Science.gov

Sample records for moderator flow measurements

  1. Electrified film flows at moderate Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craster, Richard; Wray, Alex; Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    We examine the flow of a thin, inclined film sandwiched between two parallel electrodes. We follow the Weighted Residual Integral Boundary Layer method, which has been shown via comparison with both direct numerical simulations and experiments to give good results in both the drag-gravity and drag-inertia regimes. We extend existing models to give an accurate model of electrostatic effects via a similar separation of variables approach. A disparity in material properties between the liquid and gas regions induces a Maxwell stress at the interface, which affords a significant degree of control over the behaviour of the film. In one dimension, linear stability comparisons are made with a full Orr-Sommerfeld calculation, and nonlinear comparisons are made with direct numerical simulations, both showing excellent agreement in large parts of parameter space. The model is also extended to fully two-dimensional simulations. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1, EPSRC DTG Studentship (AWW).

  2. Whistle Gauge Measures Flow And Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Kwack, Eug Y.

    1989-01-01

    Simple, rugged gauge used to measure speed of flow and temperature of steam or other gas flowing through pipes of arbitrary diameter, from 1 to 28 in. or larger. Specially designed, instrumented whistle - has no moving parts, small, nonobstruction, operates at high temperature and pressure, and cleans itself. Does not operate at zero flow, but at moderate flows (tens of meters per second) generates intense sound for use in measurements. Consists of slanted ring groove of depth D and pressure taps in wall of pipe carrying flow to be measured. Resonant wavelength of sound generated by ring groove depends primarily on size and shape of groove and approximately equal to 4D.

  3. MODFLOW 2. 0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  4. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  5. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  6. Heat Flow Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Heat gauges are used to measure heat flow in industrial activities. They must periodically be certified by instruments designed to provide a heat flux measurement standard. CSTAR, a NASA CCDS, and REMTECH have developed a portable heat flux checker/calibrator. The Q-CHEC can be carried to the heat gauge for certification, reducing out of service time for the gauge and eliminating the need for a replacement gauge during certification. It can provide an "end-to-end" check of the instrumentation measurement system or be used as a standalone calibrator. Because Q-CHEC offers on-site capability to detect and eliminate measurement errors, measurements do not have to be repeated, and money is saved.

  7. Stressful Life Events: Measurement, Moderators, and Adaptation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-10

    tolerance for stimulation, sensation seeking as a personality attribute may well serve as an important moderator of life stress. High sensation seekers...experiencing stressful life events and psychological well -being. A helping spouse seems to be particularly valuable in contributing to self- confidence...7. Crnic, K. A., Greenberg, M. T., Ragozin, A. S., & Robinson, N. M. The effects of life stress and social support on the life satisfaction and

  8. Representativeness of Lidar Wind Measurements over Moderately Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichugina, Y. L.; Brewer, A.; Choukulkar, A.; Banta, R. M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Clack, C.; Carroll, B.; Delgado, R.; Lee, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent Doppler lidars can provide accurate horizontal and vertical information on profiles of wind flow variables such as wind speed, direction, and turbulence at high spatial resolutions. Such measurements are well suited to understanding physical processes within the boundary layer and validating wind forecast models. However, interpreting the differences between measurements and model outputs is challenging without a proper understanding of the spatial representativeness of the measurements. This paper presents analysis of measurements from several lidars obtained during the Lidar Uncertainty Measurement Experiment (LUMEX) at Boulder Atmospheric Observatory site from June 23—July 14, 2014.Data collected by two scanning Doppler lidars and 2 wind profiling lidars over moderately complex in Northern Colorado (about 25 km East of the Rocky Mountains) near the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory are used to determine the representativeness of wind profile measurements as a function of spatial footprint (defined by retrieval technique used) and spatial separation. In addition to the analysis of the representativeness of measured wind profiles, the paper discusses the sensitivity and accuracy of a commercial lidar (Leosphere 200S) data comparing to the NOAA High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL). Examples of wind profiles will be presented along with a discussion of the methodology(s) used to evaluate the accuracy and representativeness of the measured winds.

  9. Three-dimensional modeling of flow and deformation in idealized mild and moderate arterial vessels.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xi; Yeoh, Guan Heng; Timchenko, Victoria

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional numerical calculations of mild and moderate stenosed blood vessels have been performed. Large eddy simulation through a dynamic subgrid scale Smagorinsky model is applied to model the transitional and turbulent pulsatile flow. For the compliant stenosed model, fluid-structure interaction is realized through a two-way coupling between the fluid flow and the deforming vessel through the change in the external diameter due to the increment of circumferential pressure via a novel moving boundary approach. Model predictions compare very well against measured and numerical data for the centerline velocities, thickness of the flow separation zones and radial wall displacements.

  10. Flow quality measurements in compressible subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. Calvin; Johnson, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to re-examine the heat transfer from a hot-wire probe in the compressible subsonic flow regime; describe the three-wire hot-wire probe calibration and data reduction techniques used to measure the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation; and present flow quality results obtained in the Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel and in flight with the NASA JetStar from the same three-wire hot-wire probe.

  11. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  12. Invariant Measures for Cherry Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghin, Radu; Vargas, Edson

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the invariant probability measures for Cherry flows, i.e. flows on the two-torus which have a saddle, a source, and no other fixed points, closed orbits or homoclinic orbits. In the case when the saddle is dissipative or conservative we show that the only invariant probability measures are the Dirac measures at the two fixed points, and the Dirac measure at the saddle is the physical measure. In the other case we prove that there exists also an invariant probability measure supported on the quasi-minimal set, we discuss some situations when this other invariant measure is the physical measure, and conjecture that this is always the case. The main techniques used are the study of the integrability of the return time with respect to the invariant measure of the return map to a closed transversal to the flow, and the study of the close returns near the saddle.

  13. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jack E.; Thomas, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  14. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... collected in the meter may make your peak flow measurements inaccurate. If you have a cold or other respiratory infection, germs or mucus may also collect in the meter. Proper cleaning with mild detergent in hot water will keep your peak flow meter working accurately and may keep you healthier. ...

  15. Measuring sap flow in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sap flow measurements provide a powerful tool for quantifying plant water use and monitoring qualitative physiological responses of plants to environmental conditions. As such, sap flow methods are widely employed to invesitgate the agronomic, ecological and hydrological outcomes of plant growth. T...

  16. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  17. Experiments on the flow and acoustic properties of a moderate-Reynolds-number supersonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troutt, T. R.; Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    Flow and acoustic properties of a jet at Reynolds number of 70,000 were studied at Mach 2.1. Measurements in a free jet test facility were made with pitot tubes and hot-wire anemometry. Center-line Mach number distributions for natural and excited jets were obtained. A slow initial growth rate was in the potential core region of the jet, indicating a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in moderate Reynolds number jets. The transition occurred within the first 2-3 diameters. Spectral components were calculated for the fluctuating flowfield, and sound pressure levels were measured for the overall near-field noise. The centroid of noise was located about 8 nozzle diameters downstream. The growth rates of instabilities were determined to be in agreement with linear stability theory predictions over a broad frequency range.

  18. Natural Laminar Flow Design for Wings with Moderate Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Lynde, Michelle N.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the aerodynamic design of wings with natural laminar flow is under development at the NASA Langley Research Center. The approach involves the addition of new flow constraints to an existing knowledge-based design module for use with advanced flow solvers. The uniqueness of the new approach lies in the tailoring of target pressure distributions to achieve laminar flow on transonic wings with leading-edge sweeps and Reynolds numbers typical of current transports. The method is demonstrated on the Common Research Model configuration at critical N-factor levels representative of both flight and high-Reynolds number wind tunnel turbulence levels. The design results for the flight conditions matched the target extent of laminar flow very well. The design at wind tunnel conditions raised some design issues that prompted further improvements in the method, but overall has given promising results.

  19. DNS and LES of Separated Flows at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieux, F.; Domaradzki, J. A.; Sayadi, T.; Bose, S.; Duchaine, F.

    2012-11-01

    Flows in rotating machinery, for unmanned and micro aerial vehicles, wind turbines, and propellers consist of different flow regimes. First, a laminar boundary layer is followed by a laminar separation bubble with a shear layer on top of it that experiences transition to turbulence. Subsequently, the separated turbulent flow reattaches and evolves downstream from a nonequilibrium turbulent boundary layer to an equilibrium one. Typical RANS and LES turbulence modeling methods experience difficulties when simulating such flows because they were developed for fully developed turbulent flows. This currently leaves DNS as the only reliable but computationally expensive alternative. Our work assesses the capability of LES to reduce the resolution requirements for such flows. Flow over a flat plate with suitable velocity boundary conditions away from the plate to produce a separation bubble is considered. Benchmark DNS data for this configuration was generated with the resolution of 50 ×106 mesh points; also used was a different DNS database with 15 ×106 points reported by Spalart and Strelets in JFM 403 (2000). Employing two codes, one using structured and another unstructured mesh, we concluded that accurate LES are possible using O(1%) of the DNS resolution. Work performed during Stanford-CTR Summer Program 2012.

  20. Wireless sap flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C.; Davis, T. W.; Tseng, C.; Cheng, C.; Liang, X.; Yu, P.

    2010-12-01

    This study exhibits a measurement system for wireless sensor networks to measure sap flow in multiple locations simultaneously. Transpiration is a major component of the land-surface system because it is indicative of the water movement between the soil and the air. Sap flow can be used to approximate transpiration. In forests, transpiration cannot be represented by the sap flow from a single tree. Multi-location sap flow measurements are required to show the heterogeneity caused by different trees or soil conditions. Traditional multi-location measurements require manpower and capital for data collection and instrument maintenance. Fortunately, multi-location measurements can be achieved by using the new technology of wireless sensor networks. With multi-hop communication protocol, data can be forwarded to the base station via multiple sensor nodes. This communication protocol can provide reliable data collection with the least power consumption. This study encountered two major problems. The first problem was signal amplification. The Crossbow IRIS mote was selected as the sensor node that receives the temperature data of the sap flow probe (thermocouple) through a MDA300 data acquisition board. However, the wireless sensor node could not directly receive any data from the thermocouples since the least significant bit value of the MDA300, 0.6 mV, is much higher than the voltage signal generated. Thus, the signal from the thermocouple must be amplified to exceed this threshold. The second problem is power management. A specific heat differential is required for the thermal dissipation method of measuring sap flow. Thus, an adjustable DC power supply is necessary for calibrating the heater's temperature settings. A circuit was designed to combine the signal amplifier and power regulator. The regulator has been designed to also provide power to the IRIS mote to extend battery life. This design enables wireless sap flow measurements in the forest. With the

  1. Surface flow measurements from drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Drones are transforming the way we sense and interact with the environment. However, despite their increased capabilities, the use of drones in geophysical sciences usually focuses on image acquisition for generating high-resolution maps. Motivated by the increasing demand for innovative and high performance geophysical observational methodologies, we posit the integration of drone technology and optical sensing toward a quantitative characterization of surface flow phenomena. We demonstrate that a recreational drone can be used to yield accurate surface flow maps of sub-meter water bodies. Specifically, drone's vibrations do not hinder surface flow observations, and velocity measurements are in agreement with traditional techniques. This first instance of quantitative water flow sensing from a flying drone paves the way to novel observations of the environment.

  2. Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register flows

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, I.S.; Wray, C.P.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

    2001-09-01

    Flow measurement at residential registers using flow hoods is becoming more common. These measurements are used to determine if the HVAC system is providing adequate comfort, appropriate flow over heat exchangers and in estimates of system energy losses. These HVAC system performance metrics are determined by using register measurements to find out if individual rooms are getting the correct airflow, and in estimates of total air handler flow and duct air leakage. The work discussed in this paper shows that commercially available flow hoods are poor at measuring flows in residential systems. There is also evidence in this and other studies that flow hoods can have significant errors even when used on the non-residential systems they were originally developed for. The measurement uncertainties arise from poor calibrations and the sensitivity of exiting flow hoods to non-uniformity of flows entering the device. The errors are usually large--on the order of 20% of measured flow, which is unacceptably high for most applications. Active flow hoods that have flow measurement devices that are insensitive to the entering airflow pattern were found to be clearly superior to commercially available flow hoods. In addition, it is clear that current calibration procedures for flow hoods may not take into account any field application problems and a new flow hood measurement standard should be developed to address this issue.

  3. Measurement in multiphase reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey is presented of diagnostic techniques and measurements made in multiphase reacting flows. The special problems encountered by the presence of liquid droplets, soot and solid particles in high temperature chemically reacting turbulent environments are outlined. The principal measurement techniques that have been tested in spray flames are spark photography, laser anemometry, thermocouples and suction probes. Spark photography provides measurement of drop size, drop size distribution, drop velocity, and angle of flight. Photographs are analysed automatically by image analysers. Photographic techniques are reliable, inexpensive and proved. Laser anemometers have been developed for simultaneous measurement of velocity and size of individual particles in sprays under conditions of vaporization and combustion. Particle/gas velocity differentials, particle Reynolds numbers, local drag coefficients and direct measurement of vaporization rates can be made by laser anemometry. Gas temperature in sprays is determined by direct in situ measurement of time constants immediately prior to measurement with compensation and signal analysis by micro-processors. Gas concentration is measured by suction probes and gas phase chromatography. Measurements of particle size, particle velocity, gas temperature, and gas concentration made in airblast and pressure atomised liquid spray flames are presented.

  4. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  5. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2. 1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  6. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2.1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  7. MODFLOW 2.0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Paik, I.K.

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  8. PIV measurements of isothermal plane turbulent impinging jets at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayrullina, A.; van Hooff, T.; Blocken, B.; van Heijst, G. J. F.

    2017-04-01

    This paper contains a detailed experimental analysis of an isothermal plane turbulent impinging jet (PTIJ) for two jet widths at moderate Reynolds numbers (7200-13,500) issued on a horizontal plane at fixed relative distances equal to 22.5 and 45 jet widths. The available literature on such flows is scarce. Previous studies on plane turbulent jets mainly focused on free jets, while most studies on impinging jets focused on the heat transfer between the jet and an impingement plane, disregarding jet development. The present study focuses on isothermal PTIJs at moderate Reynolds numbers characteristic of air curtains. Flow visualisations with fluorescent dye and 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements have been performed. A comparison is made with previous studies of isothermal free turbulent jets at moderate Reynolds numbers. Mean and instantaneous velocity and vorticity, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds shear stress are analysed. The jet issued from the nozzle with higher aspect ratio shows more intensive entrainment and a faster decay of the centreline velocity compared to the jet of lower aspect ratio for the same value of jet Reynolds number. The profiles of centreline and cross-jet velocity and turbulence intensity show that the PTIJs behave as a free plane turbulent jet until 70-75% of the total jet height. Alongside the information obtained on the jet dynamics, the data will be useful for the validation of numerical simulations.

  9. Retinal Blood Flow and Retinal Blood Oxygen Saturation in Mild to Moderate Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tayyari, Faryan; Khuu, Lee-Anne; Flanagan, John G; Singer, Shaun; Brent, Michael H; Hudson, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between retinal blood flow (RBF) and retinal blood oxygen saturation (SO2) in mild to moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and in age-matched controls. One eye of each of 15 healthy subjects (68 ± 6 years) and 13 subjects with mild to moderate NPDR (67 ± 10 years) was dilated. None of the patients with NPDR had received treatment for their retinopathic changes or had any evidence of sight-threatening characteristics. Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography blood flow was measured using the prototype RTVue system; six separate measurements each comprising an upper and a lower nasal pupil scan were acquired. Six hyperspectral retinal measurements were acquired using a noninvasive hyperspectral retinal camera (prototype H-8.5 HR Camera). Total RBF was significantly lower in NPDR when compared to controls (42.7 ± 7.5 vs. 33.0 ± 9.2 μL/min; P = 0.004). Mean retinal arterial and venular SO2 were higher in NPDR than in controls (94.7 ± 2.4% vs. 92.9 ± 1.6%, P = 0.02; 62.5 ± 5.7% vs. 56.3 ± 4.7%, P = 0.003). This study showed a correlation between RBF and arteriolar SO2 in both controls (r = 0.58, P = 0.02) and NPDR (r = 0.54, P = 0.05), but no correlation between venular RBF and venular SO2 in controls (r = 0.24, P = 0.83) or in NPDR (r = 0.23, P = 0.45). The arteriovenous difference (AV difference) was lower in the NPDR group when compared to controls (30.6 ± 6 vs. 36.7 ± 5.3, P = 0.008). This study found a lower total RBF and a lower AV difference in the NPDR group, suggesting a reduced oxygen uptake from the retina in people with relatively early diabetic retinopathy.

  10. Flood moderation: Declining peak flows along some Rocky Mountain rivers and the underlying mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, Stewart B.; Foster, Stephen G.; Hillman, Evan J.; Luek, Andreas; Zanewich, Karen P.

    2016-05-01

    It has been proposed that global warming will amplify the water cycle and intensify river floods. We tested this hypothesis by investigating historic trends in magnitudes, durations and timing of the annual peak flows of rivers that drain the Rocky Mountains around the North American hydrographic apex, the source for rivers flowing to the Pacific, Arctic (including Hudson Bay) and Atlantic Oceans. We sought century-long records and to reduce influences from land-use we assessed drainages from parks and protected areas. Of 30 rivers and reaches that were free-flowing or slightly regulated, seven displayed declining peak flows (7 p < 0.1, 4 p < 0.05), and one showed increase (p < 0.05); three of five moderately regulated rivers displayed decline (p < 0.05). Substantial floods, exceeding the 1-in-5 year recurrence (Q5), were more common in the early versus latter halves of the records for some Arctic drainages and were more common during the Pacific Decadal Oscillation negative phase for all regions. The timing of peak flows was relatively unchanged and Q5 flood durations declined for a few rivers. These results indicate flood moderation rather than flood intensification, particularly for Arctic Ocean drainages. This could reflect regional hydrological consequences from climate change including: (1) declining overall annual river flows; (2) winter warming that would increase the rain versus snow proportion, thus reducing snow accumulation and melt; and (3) spring warming that advances snow melt, lengthening the melt interval before peak flows. These changes would shift the seasonality of river flows and reduce annual peaks. We might expect continuing moderation of peak flows but there will probably still be occasional major floods from exceptional rain events such as occurred in northern Montana in 1964 and in southern Alberta in 2013.

  11. "Influence Method" applied to measure a moderated neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The ;Influence Method; is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector, in the count rate of another detector when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency. The method and its detailed mathematical description were recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1]). In this article we apply it to the measurement of the moderated neutron flux produced by an 241AmBe neutron source surrounded by a light water sphere, employing a pair of 3He detectors. For this purpose, the method is extended for its application where particles arriving at the detector obey a Poisson distribution and also, for the case when efficiency is not constant over the energy spectrum of interest. Experimental distributions and derived parameters are compared with theoretical predictions of the method and implications concerning the potential application to the absolute calibration of neutron sources are considered.

  12. Convective heat flow in space cryogenics plugs - Critical and moderate He II heat flux densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1990-01-01

    Plug flow rates of entropy, heat and normal fluid in phase separators and in zero net mass flow systems are, to some extent, quite similar. A simplified analysis of critical conditions is presented in agreement with data trends. A critical temperature gradient arises on the basis of the He II two-fluid model at the stability limit constraining the thermohydrodynamics of the system. Thus, the question of critical thermodynamic fluctuations associated with nucleation versus the possibility of critical gradients in externally imposed parameters is answered in favor of the latter route toward turbulence. Furthermore, a similarity equation is presented which incorporates size dependent rates for moderate heat flow densities observed in experiments.

  13. Convective heat flow in space cryogenics plugs - Critical and moderate He II heat flux densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1990-01-01

    Plug flow rates of entropy, heat and normal fluid in phase separators and in zero net mass flow systems are, to some extent, quite similar. A simplified analysis of critical conditions is presented in agreement with data trends. A critical temperature gradient arises on the basis of the He II two-fluid model at the stability limit constraining the thermohydrodynamics of the system. Thus, the question of critical thermodynamic fluctuations associated with nucleation versus the possibility of critical gradients in externally imposed parameters is answered in favor of the latter route toward turbulence. Furthermore, a similarity equation is presented which incorporates size dependent rates for moderate heat flow densities observed in experiments.

  14. Linearized numerical solution method for rotating coaxial disk flows at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Delgado, A.; Rath, H. J.

    A linearized solution method for rotating coaxial disk flows at moderate Reynolds numbers is discussed below. The analytical or numerical linearized similarity solutions agree with the nonlinear ones for infinite disk flows of the Stewartson-type as well as of the Batchelor-type with a small difference between angular velocities of both the disks. Over the inner portion of shrouded flows the computed results of the linearized partial differential equations have, overall, a good agreement with the solutions of the nonlinear von Karman similarity one and also with the complete Navier-Stokes solution.

  15. Underestimation of access flow by ultrasound dilution flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Clemens; Smits, Johannes H. M.; Zijlstra, Jan J.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Bakker, Chris J. G.; Viergever, Max A.

    2002-02-01

    For hemodialysis access surveillance, flow measurements are increasingly considered important because they identify accesses at risk of thrombosis. Usually these flow measurements are performed with the ultrasound dilution technique. In a previous patient study it was observed that the resulting flow values were systematically low as compared to magnetic resonance flow measurements, but a satisfactory explanation was lacking. In the present study, we will demonstrate by hemodynamic calculations and in vitro experiments that this discrepancy can be explained by a temporary reduction of the access flow rate, caused by the reversed needle configuration during ultrasound dilution flow measurements. In this configuration, blood is injected retrogressively at one needle and flow between the needles is increased, causing an increased dissipation of energy. The proposed explanation is subsequently confirmed in a patient with a loop graft, by measuring the blood velocity by Doppler ultrasound as a function of reversed dialyzer flow rate. Apart from the ultrasound dilution technique, these findings are applicable to other recently proposed methods for measuring access flow that employ the reversed needle configuration.

  16. Method and device for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Atherton, Richard; Marinkovich, Phillip S.; Spadaro, Peter R.; Stout, J. Wilson

    1976-11-23

    This invention is a fluid flow measuring device for determining the coolant flow at the entrance to a specific nuclear reactor fuel region. The device comprises a plurality of venturis having the upstream inlet and throat pressure of each respectively manifolded together to provide one static pressure signal for each region monitored. The device provides accurate flow measurement with low pressure losses and uniform entrance and discharge flow distribution.

  17. Turbulent bands in plane-Poiseuille flow at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiangming; Tao, Jianjun; Chen, Shiyi; Brandt, Luca

    2015-04-01

    In this letter, we show via numerical simulations that the typical flow structures appearing in transitional channel flows at moderate Reynolds numbers are not spots but isolated turbulent bands, which have much longer lifetimes than the spots. Localized perturbations can evolve into isolated turbulent bands by continuously growing obliquely when the Reynolds number is larger than 660. However, interactions with other bands and local perturbations cause band breaking and decay. The competition between the band extension and breaking does not lead to a sustained turbulence until Re becomes larger than about 1000. Above this critical value, the bands split, providing an effective mechanism for turbulence spreading.

  18. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-03-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P < 0.05) in DB compared with Con. Leg oxygen extraction (arteriovenous O(2) difference) was higher (P < 0.05) in DB than in Con (5 s: 127 +/- 3 vs. 56 +/- 4 ml/l), and leg oxygen uptake was not different between Con and DB during exercise. The difference between leg oxygen delivery and leg oxygen uptake was smaller (P < 0.05) during exercise in DB than in Con (5 s: 59 +/- 12 vs. 262 +/- 39 ml/min). The present data demonstrate that muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery can be markedly reduced without affecting muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting that blood flow does not limit muscle oxygen uptake at the onset of exercise. Additionally, prostanoids and/or nitric oxide appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise.

  19. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing.

  20. Improved Ultrasonic Transducer For Measuring Cryogenic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis

    1991-01-01

    Improved ultrasonic transducer used to measure flow of cryogenic fluid. Includes wedge made nonintrusive by machining it out of bulk material of duct carrying fluid. Skewed surfaces of wedge suppress standing waves, thus reducing ringing and increasing signal-to-noise ratio. Increases accuracy of measurements of times of arrival of ultrasonic pulses, from which times flow inferred.

  1. Instrument continuously measures density of flowing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, R. B.; Macinko, J.; Miller, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Electromechanical densitometer continuously measures the densities of either single-phase or two-phase flowing cryogenic fluids. Measurement is made on actual flow. The instrument operates on the principle that the mass of any vibrating system is a primary factor in determining the dynamic characteristics of the system.

  2. Models for Turbulent Plane Couette Flow Using the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition: Moderate Aspect Ratio Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehlis, Jeff; Smith, Troy; Holmes, Philip; Faisst, Holger

    2002-11-01

    We model turbulent plane Couette flow for a moderate aspect ratio domain by expanding the velocity field as a sum of optimal modes calculated via the proper orthogonal decomposition from numerical data. Ordinary differential equations are obtained by Galerkin projection of the Navier-Stokes equations onto these modes. For a minimal truncation including only the most energetic modes having no streamwise variation, we show under quite general conditions the existence of linearly stable nontrivial fixed points, corresponding to a state in which the mean flow is coupled to streamwise vortices and their associated streaks. When the two next most energetic modes, still lacking streamwise variations, are included, chaos and heteroclinic cycles associated with the fixed points are found. The attractors involve repeated visits near unstable fixed points and periodic orbits corresponding to steady and periodically varying vortices, and account for a self-sustaining process in which vortices interact with the mean flow.

  3. Doppler Measurements of the Suns Meridional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Doppler velocity data obtained with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) instruments in Tucson from 1992 August through 1995 April were analyzed to determine the structure and evolution of the Sun's meridional flow. Individual measurements of the flow were derived from line-of-sight velocity images averaged over 17 minutes to remove the p-mode oscillation signal. Typical flow velocities are poleward at approximately 20 m/s, but the results suggest that episodes may occur with much stronger flows. Such variations may help to explain some of the many disparate reports on the strength and structure of the Sun's meridional flow.

  4. Ultrasonic Blood Flow Measurement in Haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, D.; Papadimitriou, M.; Kulatilake, A. E.

    1970-01-01

    A 5-megacycle Doppler flow meter, calibrated in-vitro, was found to give a linear response to blood flow in the ranges commonly encountered in haemodialysis. With this, blood flow through artificial kidneys could be measured simply and with a clinically acceptable error. The method is safe, as blood lines do not have to be punctured or disconnected and hence there is no risk of introducing infection. Besides its value as a research tool the flow meter is useful in evaluating new artificial kidneys. Suitably modified it could form the basis of an arterial flow alarm system. PMID:5416812

  5. COTS MEMS Flow-Measurement Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip; Smith, Floyd A.; Blank, Greg; Cruzan, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional tubing instrumentation for measuring airflow, designers and technicians at Glenn Research Center have been fabricating packaging components and assembling a set of unique probes that contain commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor chips. MEMS sensor chips offer some compelling advantages over standard macroscopic measurement devices. MEMS sensor technology has matured through mass production and use in the automotive and aircraft industries. At present, MEMS are the devices of choice for sensors in such applications as tire-pressure monitors, altimeters, pneumatic controls, cable leak detectors, and consumer appliances. Compactness, minimality of power demand, rugged construction, and moderate cost all contribute to making MEMS sensors attractive for instrumentation for future research. Conventional macroscopic flow-measurement instrumentation includes tubes buried beneath the aerodynamic surfaces of wind-tunnel models or in wind-tunnel walls. Pressure is introduced at the opening of each such tube. The pressure must then travel along the tube before reaching a transducer that generates an electronic signal. The lengths of such tubes typically range from 20 ft (approx.= 6 m) to hundreds of feet (of the order of 100 m). The propagation of pressure signals in the tubes damps the signals considerably and makes it necessary to delay measurements until after test rigs have reached steady-state operation. In contrast, a MEMS pressure sensor that generates electronic output can take readings continuously under dynamic conditions in nearly real time. In order to use stainless-steel tubing for pressure measurements, it is necessary to clean many tubes, cut them to length, carefully install them, delicately deburr them, and splice them. A cluster of a few hundred 1/16-in.- (approx.=1.6-mm-) diameter tubes (such clusters are common in research testing facilities) can be several inches (of the order of 10

  6. Entrainment measurements in annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Assad, A.; Jan, C.; Bertodano, M. de; Beus, S.G.

    1997-07-01

    Air/water and vapor/freon were utilized to scale and simulate annular two-phase flow for high pressure steam/water conditions. A unique vapor/liquid Freon loop was built to obtain the high pressure data. The results were compared with two correlations available in the open literature. The Ishii and Mishima dimensionless group was able to scale the data remarkably well even for vapor/liquid Freon. However, the correlation needs to be adjusted for high Weber numbers of the gas phase.

  7. Achromatic Emission Velocity Measurements in Luminous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, S. J.; Fulghum, S. F.; Rostler, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    A new velocity measurement instrument for luminous flows was developed by Science Research Laboratory for NASA. The SIEVE (Segmented Image Emission VElocimeter) instrument uses broadband light emitted by the flow for the velocity measurement. This differs from other velocimetry techniques in that it does not depend on laser illumination and/or light scattering from particles in the flow. The SIEVE is a passive, non-intrusive diagnostic. By moving and adjusting the imaging optics, the SIEVE can provide three-dimensional mapping of a flow field and determine turbulence scale size. A SIEVE instrument was demonstrated on an illuminated rotating disk to evaluate instrument response and noise and on an oxy-acetylene torch to measure flame velocities. The luminous flow in rocket combustors and plumes is an ideal subject for the SIEVE velocity measurement technique.

  8. Measurements of surface-pressure and wake-flow fluctuations in the flow field of a whitcomb supercritical airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roos, F. W.; Riddle, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of surface pressure and wake flow fluctuations were made as part of a transonic wind tunnel investigation into the nature of a supercritical airfoil flow field. Emphasis was on a range of high subsonic Mach numbers and moderate lift coefficients corresponding to the development of drag divergence and buffeting. Fluctuation data were analyzed statistically for intensity, frequency content, and spatial coherence. Variations in these parameters were correlated with changes in the mean airfoil flow field.

  9. Correlation of carotid blood flow and corrected carotid flow time with invasive cardiac output measurements.

    PubMed

    Ma, Irene W Y; Caplin, Joshua D; Azad, Aftab; Wilson, Christina; Fifer, Michael A; Bagchi, Aranya; Liteplo, Andrew S; Noble, Vicki E

    2017-12-01

    Non-invasive measures that can accurately estimate cardiac output may help identify volume-responsive patients. This study seeks to compare two non-invasive measures (corrected carotid flow time and carotid blood flow) and their correlations with invasive reference measurements of cardiac output. Consenting adult patients (n = 51) at Massachusetts General Hospital cardiac catheterization laboratory undergoing right heart catheterization between February and April 2016 were included. Carotid ultrasound images were obtained concurrently with cardiac output measurements, obtained by the thermodilution method in the absence of severe tricuspid regurgitation and by the Fick oxygen method otherwise. Corrected carotid flow time was calculated as systole time/√cycle time. Carotid blood flow was calculated as π × (carotid diameter)(2)/4 × velocity time integral × heart rate. Measurements were obtained using a single carotid waveform and an average of three carotid waveforms for both measures. Single waveform measurements of corrected flow time did not correlate with cardiac output (ρ = 0.25, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.49, p = 0.08), but an average of three waveforms correlated significantly, although weakly (ρ = 0.29, 95% CI 0.02-0.53, p = 0.046). Carotid blood flow measurements correlated moderately with cardiac output regardless of if single waveform or an average of three waveforms were used: ρ = 0.44, 95% CI 0.18-0.63, p = 0.004, and ρ = 0.41, 95% CI 0.16-0.62, p = 0.004, respectively. Carotid blood flow may be a better marker of cardiac output and less subject to measurements issues than corrected carotid flow time.

  10. Blood flow and muscle oxygenation during low, moderate, and maximal sustained isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Chris J; Allen, Matti D; Olympico, Eric; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rice, Charles L

    2015-09-01

    A reduction of blood flow to active muscle will precipitate fatigue, and sustained isometric contractions produce intramuscular and compartmental pressures that can limit flow. The present study explored how blood flow and muscle oxygenation respond to isometric contractions at low, moderate, and maximal intensities. Over two visits, 10 males (26 ± 2 yr; means ± SD) performed 1-min dorsiflexion contractions at 30, 60, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Doppler ultrasound of the anterior tibial artery was used to record arterial diameter and mean blood velocity and to calculate absolute blood flow. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of tibialis anterior was acquired with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There was a progressive increase in blood flow at 30% MVC (peak of 289 ± 139% resting value), no change from rest until an increase in the final 10 s of exercise at 60% MVC (peak of 197 ± 102% rest), and an initial decrease (59 ± 30% resting value) followed by a progressive increase at 100% MVC (peak of 355 ± 133% rest). Blood flow was greater at 30 and 100% than 60% MVC during the last 30 s of exercise. TOI was ∼63% at rest and, within 30 s of exercise, reached steady-state values of ∼42%, ∼22%, and ∼22% for 30, 60, and 100% MVC, respectively. Even maximal contraction of the dorsiflexors is unable to cause more than a transient decrease of flow in the anterior tibial artery. Unlike dynamic or intermittent isometric exercise, our results indicate blood flow is not linearly graded with intensity or directly coupled with oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions.

  11. LES of Separated Flows Over an Airfoil at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, G.; Domaradzki, J. A.; Grilli, M.; Hickel, S.

    2012-11-01

    Separation effects strongly affect flows for unmanned aerial vehicles, micro air vehicles, and rotating machinery, e.g., wind turbines, propellers, and low pressure turbines. The Reynolds number for such flows are usually moderate and they can be accurately simulated using DNS. However, the large computational cost of DNS makes this technique unsuitable for industrial applications while less expensive RANS and LES techniques encounter difficulties in simulating such flows because they consist of a mixture of laminar, separated, transitional, and turbulent regions. In this work we investigate an ability of LES to accurately predict the behavior of such flows on a benchmark case of a laminar separation bubble on a NACA-0012 airfoil at Rec = 5 ×104 at 5 deg of incidence for which accurate DNS results are available (Jones et al., JFM 602, 175 (2008)). Using a conservative immersed boundary method with the Adaptive Local Deconvolution Method (ALDM) we have performed 2D and 3D simulations of this flow with resolution reduced drastically from that in the benchmark DNS. The results to date show good predictions for the pressure coefficient Cp and the location of the separation point, but the friction coefficient Cf is not predicted accurately. Work performed during TTR40 Summer Program 2011.

  12. Multipath ultrasonic flow meters for gas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, M.P.

    1995-11-01

    This paper gives an introduction to the practical application of ultrasonic gas flow meters. A general outline of the theory and methods applied using multipath flow meters. The multi-path type meter provides state of the art gas flow measurements and its accuracy and reliability satisfy the requirements for custody transfer. A typical multi-path device can achieve accuracies better than 0.2%.

  13. Quantitative tomographic measurements of opaque multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; O'HERN,TIMOTHY J.; CECCIO,STEVEN L.

    2000-03-01

    An electrical-impedance tomography (EIT) system has been developed for quantitative measurements of radial phase distribution profiles in two-phase and three-phase vertical column flows. The EIT system is described along with the computer algorithm used for reconstructing phase volume fraction profiles. EIT measurements were validated by comparison with a gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) system. The EIT system was used to accurately measure average solid volume fractions up to 0.05 in solid-liquid flows, and radial gas volume fraction profiles in gas-liquid flows with gas volume fractions up to 0.15. In both flows, average phase volume fractions and radial volume fraction profiles from GDT and EIT were in good agreement. A minor modification to the formula used to relate conductivity data to phase volume fractions was found to improve agreement between the methods. GDT and EIT were then applied together to simultaneously measure the solid, liquid, and gas radial distributions within several vertical three-phase flows. For average solid volume fractions up to 0.30, the gas distribution for each gas flow rate was approximately independent of the amount of solids in the column. Measurements made with this EIT system demonstrate that EIT may be used successfully for noninvasive, quantitative measurements of dispersed multiphase flows.

  14. Laser Doppler velocity measurements of swirling flows with upstream influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rloff, K. L.; Bossel, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Swirling flow in a rotating tube is studied by flow visualization at a moderate Reynolds number, and its velocity field is measured by laser-Doppler anemometry. The tube has constant diameter, and approximately uniform initial rigid rotation of the flow is assured by passing the flow through a rotating plug of porous metal before it enters the test section. At moderate swirl values, an object mounted on the tube centerline causes a closed bubble to form upstream of the obstacle, with a clearly defined stagnation point on the axis, and recirculating flow inside the bubble. The bubble length grows upstream as the swirl is increased, until it breaks up into a Taylor column reaching all the way upstream and downstream at swirl values above a certain critical value. A vortex jump (in the sense of Benjamin) occurs downstream of the obstacle except when the Taylor column is present. Using a laser-Doppler anemometer, axial and swirl velocity profiles are obtained at several stations upstream and downstream of the bubble, and in and around the bubble.

  15. Flow Disturbance Characterization Measurements in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Rudolph A.; Andino, Marlyn Y.; Melton, Latunia; Eppink, Jenna; Kegerise, Michael A.; Tsoi, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Recent flow measurements have been acquired in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) to assess the unsteady flow environment in the test section. The primary purpose of the test is to determine the feasibility of the NTF to conduct laminar-flow-control testing and boundary-layer transition sensitive testing. The NTF can operate in two modes, warm (air) and cold/cryogenic (nitrogen) test conditions for testing full and semispan scaled models. The warm-air mode enables low to moderately high Reynolds numbers through the use of high tunnel pressure, and the nitrogen mode enables high Reynolds numbers up to flight conditions, depending on aircraft type and size, utilizing high tunnel pressure and cryogenic temperatures. NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project is interested in demonstrating different laminar-flow technologies at flight-relevant operating conditions throughout the transonic Mach number range and the NTF is well suited for the initial ground-based demonstrations. Roll polar data at selected test conditions were obtained to look at the uniformity of the flow disturbance field in the test section. Data acquired from the rake probes included mean total temperatures, mean and fluctuating static/total pressures, and mean and fluctuating hot-wire measurements. . Based on the current measurements and previous data, an assessment was made that the NTF is a suitable facility for ground-based demonstrations of laminar-flow technologies at flight-relevant conditions in the cryogenic mode.

  16. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: generation of flow and measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a \\Pi -shaped dusty plasma experimental device with micron size kaolin/melamine formaldehyde particles embedded in a background of argon plasma created by a direct current glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super particle identification code, particle image velocimetry analysis and the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral drag force responsible for the generation as well as the attenuation of the dust fluid flow is made. These techniques can be usefully employed in laboratory devices to investigate linear and non-linear collective excitations in a flowing dusty plasma.

  17. Thermographic heat transfer measurements in separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, V.; Wittig, S.; Bittlinger, G.; Pfeiffer, A.

    1993-12-01

    A measurement technique to determine the surface heat transfer distribution in complex turbulent flows is described. For this purpose, a constant wall heat flux test surface has been designed. To measure the surface temperature of the test plate, an infrared camera was used. The instrumentation allows the determination of the heat transfer with high accuracy and detailed spatial resolution. In examining combustor-type separated flow, the capabilities of the technique are demonstrated and its accuracy is verified by appropriate conventional techniques.

  18. Doppler-Shifted Raman Spectroscopy Measures Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, Reginald J.; Hillard, Mervin E., Jr.; Lempert, Walter R.; Covell, Peter F.; Miller, David S.

    1990-01-01

    Technique for measuring velocity, static pressure, and translational temperature of flowing molecules by use of stimulated Raman spectroscopy demonstrated in supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. Nonintrusive, accurate wind-tunnel measurements obtained without seeding flows. Optical equipment for vibration-free Raman doppler velocimetry in wind tunnel includes specially designed retrometer that reduces sensitivity of system to vibrations. This capability very valuable in aerodynamic testing and proves useful in wide variety of laboratory, industrial, and engineering applications.

  19. Perspectives of anisotropic flow measurements at NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkikh, V. L.; Lokhtin, I. P.; Malinina, L. V.; Petrushanko, S. V.; Snigirev, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    High-accuracy and high-luminosity measurements of anisotropic flow for various hadron types over full NICA energy range will provide important constraints on the early dynamics of heavy-ion reactions under the conditions where a first-order quark-hadron phase transition may occur. The statistical reach for elliptic flow measurements at NICA is estimated with HYDJET++ heavy-ion event generator.

  20. Measurement of kinematically unstationary separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poensgen, C. A.; Gallus, H. E.

    The development of flow separation between the hub wall and the blade suction side in an axial compressor annular cascade is examined with several measurement techniques. The flow was first assumed to be stationary; separation could be estimated with flow visualization and pneumatic pressure measurements on lateral walls and blade surfaces were carried out for evaluating flow losses in the cascade. Measurements at airfoil surfaces with hot wire probes and hot film sensors gave information about the development of the blade boundary layer. The influence of the unstationary flow on the development of airfoil boundary layers and the separation at the hub with dependence of the aerodynamic loading is studied. Cylindrical bars were used instead of a real blading in order to obtain typical wakes without potential interactions between rotor and stator. Experimental examinations similar to the one described for the steady flow were carried out. It is found that flow losses increase in the airfoil boundary layer while they drop to the hub separation. By and large, the total losses are found to be lower with unsteady flow.

  1. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dannert, D.A.; Horne, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    On of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow, regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low, flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether gas/ oil, gas/water or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. This goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter. It has many advantages besides the ones previously mentioned and is in full in that chapter.

  2. The dynamics of idealized katabatic flow over a moderate slope and ice shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renfrew, A. Ian

    2004-04-01

    A non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model has been employed to simulate idealized katabatic flows over a moderate slope and adjoining ice shelf. The topography of Coats Land and the adjoining Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica, has been used; this is typical of much of the Antarctic coastline. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System Version 4.3 has been adapted for simulations over compacted snow, most notably through changes to the multi-layer soil model. The simulations are initialized using clear-sky conditions and at rest. On the slope, a shallow katabatic flow develops, the winds becoming approximately steady on the slope by ~ 12 h. The peak downslope winds are about 7 m s-1 at 30 m above the snow surface. The katabatic flow depth ranges from 50 to 100 m down the slope. Over the ice shelf the katabatic flow peters out, while a pool of cold air develops, primarily through sensible-heat loss into the surface and partially balancing the net radiative-heat loss to space. Near-surface and sounding data from the model simulations compare well with archetypal and typical katabatic flow observations, especially after some tuning of the model's turbulence parametrization. An analysis of the downslope flow dynamics shows the buoyancy force is generally balanced by the inertial force, except towards the foot of the slope where it is balanced by upslope forces related to gradients in the potential-temperature deficit and katabatic-layer height, caused by the pool of cold air over the ice shelf. Over time, the cooling of the ice shelf boundary layer leads to an apparent retreat of the katabatic flow from the ice shelf and some way up the slope. The dynamical analysis explains the surface climatology observed, such that the persistent katabatic winds of Coats Land rarely reach the Brunt Ice Shelf. The simulated katabatic flow moves from 'shooting' to 'tranquil' towards the foot of the slope. This transition acts to trigger a train of internal gravity waves which

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of Flows over an NACA-0012 Airfoil at Low and Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flow over an NACA-0012 airfoil are performed at a low and a moderate Reynolds numbers of Re(sub c)=50 times10(exp 3) and 1times 10(exp 6). The angles of attack are 5 and 15 degrees at the low and the moderate Reynolds number cases respectively. The three-dimensional unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using higher order compact schemes. The flow field in the low Reynolds number case consists of a long separation bubble near the leading-edge region and an attached boundary layer on the aft part of the airfoil. The shear layer that formed in the separated region persisted up to the end of the airfoil. The roles of the turbulent diffusion, advection, and dissipation terms in the turbulent kinetic-energy balance equation change as the boundary layer evolves over the airfoil. In the higher Reynolds number case, the leading-edge separation bubble is very small in length and in height. A fully developed turbulent boundary layer is observed in a short distance downstream of the reattachment point. The boundary layer velocity near the wall gradually decreases along the airfoil. Eventually, the boundary layer separates near the trailing edge. The Reynolds stresses peak in the outer part of the boundary layer and the maximum amplitude also gradually increases along the chord.

  4. Measurements of gravity driven granular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facto, Kevin

    This dissertation presents experiments that studied two gravity driven granular channel flows. The first experiment used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the density and displacement distributions of poppy seeds flowing in a rough walled channel. Time-averaged measurements of normalized velocity and density showed little flow speed dependence. Instantaneous measurements, however, showed marked velocity dependence in the displacement distributions. There was evidence of aperiodic starting and stopping at lower flow speeds and the onset of density waves on a continuous flow at higher speeds. The second experiment measured forces in all three spatial directions at the boundary of a flow of steel balls. The relationship between the normal and the tangential forces were examined statistically and compared to the Coulomb friction model. For both large and small forces, the tangential and normal forces are unrelated, as there appears to be a strong tendency for the tangential force to maintain a value that will bear the weight the weight of the particles in flow.

  5. Probe Without Moving Parts Measures Flow Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Vachon, M. Jake

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of local flow angle is critical in many fluid-dynamic applications, including the aerodynamic flight testing of new aircraft and flight systems. Flight researchers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center have recently developed, flight-tested, and patented the force-based flow-angle probe (FLAP), a novel, force-based instrument for the measurement of local flow direction. Containing no moving parts, the FLAP may provide greater simplicity, improved accuracy, and increased measurement access, relative to conventional moving vane-type flow-angle probes. Forces in the FLAP can be measured by various techniques, including those that involve conventional strain gauges (based on electrical resistance) and those that involve more advanced strain gauges (based on optical fibers). A correlation is used to convert force-measurement data to the local flow angle. The use of fiber optics will enable the construction of a miniature FLAP, leading to the possibility of flow measurement in very small or confined regions. This may also enable the tufting of a surface with miniature FLAPs, capable of quantitative flow-angle measurements, similar to attaching yarn tufts for qualitative measurements. The prototype FLAP was a small, aerodynamically shaped, low-aspect-ratio fin about 2 in. (approximately equal to 5 cm) long, 1 in. (approximately equal to 2.5 cm) wide, and 0.125 in. (approximately equal to 0.3 cm) thick (see Figure 1). The prototype FLAP included simple electrical-resistance strain gauges for measuring forces. Four strain gauges were mounted on the FLAP; two on the upper surface and two on the lower surface. The gauges were connected to form a full Wheatstone bridge, configured as a bending bridge. In preparation for a flight test, the prototype FLAP was mounted on the airdata boom of a flight-test fixture (FTF) on the NASA Dryden F-15B flight research airplane.

  6. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future.

  7. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  8. NMRI Measurements of Flow of Granular Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Masami; Waggoner, R. Allen; Fukushima, Eiichi

    1996-01-01

    We investigate complex 3D behavior of granular mixtures in shaking and shearing devices. NMRI can non-invasively measure concentration, velocity, and velocity fluctuations of flows of suitable particles. We investigate origins of wall-shear induced convection flow of single component particles by measuring the flow and fluctuating motion of particles near rough boundaries. We also investigate if a mixture of different size particles segregate into their own species under the influence of external shaking and shearing disturbances. These non-invasive measurements will reveal true nature of convecting flow properties and wall disturbance. For experiments in a reduced gravity environment, we will design a light weight NMR imager. The proof of principle development will prepare for the construction of a complete spaceborne system to perform experiments in space.

  9. Electromagnetic probe technique for fluid flow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The probes described herein, in various configurations, permit the measurement of the volume fraction of two or more fluids flowing through a pipe. Each probe measures the instantaneous relative dielectric constant of the fluid in immediate proximity. As long as separation of the relative dielectric constant of the fluid is possible, several or even many fluids can be measured in the same flow stream. By using multiple probes, the velocity of each fluid can generally be determined as well as the distribution of each constituent in the pipe. The values are determined by statistical computation. There are many potential applications for probes of this type in industry and government. Possible NASA applications include measurements of helium/hydrazine flow during rocket tests at White Sands, liquid/gas flow in hydrogen or oxygen lines in Orbiter engines, and liquid/gaseous Freon flow in zero gravity tests with the KS135 aircraft at JSC. Much interest has been shown recently by the oil industry. In this a good method is needed to measure the fractions of oil, water, and natural gas flowing in a pipeline and the velocity of each. This particular problem involves an extension of what has been developed to date and our plans to solve this problem will be discussed herein.

  10. Electromagnetic probe technique for fluid flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.

    1994-02-01

    The probes described herein, in various configurations, permit the measurement of the volume fraction of two or more fluids flowing through a pipe. Each probe measures the instantaneous relative dielectric constant of the fluid in immediate proximity. As long as separation of the relative dielectric constant of the fluid is possible, several or even many fluids can be measured in the same flow stream. By using multiple probes, the velocity of each fluid can generally be determined as well as the distribution of each constituent in the pipe. The values are determined by statistical computation. There are many potential applications for probes of this type in industry and government. Possible NASA applications include measurements of helium/hydrazine flow during rocket tests at White Sands, liquid/gas flow in hydrogen or oxygen lines in Orbiter engines, and liquid/gaseous Freon flow in zero gravity tests with the KS135 aircraft at JSC. Much interest has been shown recently by the oil industry. In this a good method is needed to measure the fractions of oil, water, and natural gas flowing in a pipeline and the velocity of each. This particular problem involves an extension of what has been developed to date and our plans to solve this problem will be discussed herein.

  11. Unsteady measurement techniques for turbomachinery flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffa, Nicholas Andrew

    Accurate unsteady measurements are required for studying the flows in high speed turbomachines, which rely on the interaction between rotating and stationary components. Using statistics of phase locked ensembles simplifies the problem, but accurate frequency response in the 10-100 kHz range significantly limits the applicable techniques. This research advances the state of the art for phase resolved measurement techniques using for high speed turbomachinery flows focusing on the following areas: development, validation, and uncertainty quantification. Four methods were developed and implemented: an unsteady total pressure probe, the multiple overheat hot-wire method, the slanted hot-wire method, and the phase peak yaw hot-wire method. These methods allow for the entire phase locked average flow field to be measured (temperature, pressure, and velocity components, swirl angle, etc.). No trusted reference measurement or representative canonical flow exists for comparison of the phase resolved quantities, making validation challenging. Five different validation exercises were performed to increase the confidence and explore the range of applicability. These exercises relied on checking for consistency with expected flow features, comparing independent measurements, and cross validation with CFD. The combined uncertainties for the measurements were quantified using uncertainty estimates from investigations into the elemental error sources. The frequency response uncertainty of constant temperature hot-wire system was investigated using a novel method of illuminating the wire with a laser pulse. The uncertainty analysis provided estimates for the uncertainty in the measurements as well as showing the sensitivity to various sources of error.

  12. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  13. The Leicestershire Intellectual Disability Tool: A Simple Measure to Identify Moderate to Profound Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrer, Freya; McGrother, Catherine W.; Thorp, Catherine F.; Taub, Nicholas A.; Bhaumik, Sabyasachi; Cicchetti, Domenic V.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It is often useful to ascertain whether adults have moderate to profound intellectual disability (approximate IQ less than 50; developmental age less than 108 months) when deciding whether to refer to specialist or mainstream services. The aim of the present study was to develop a simple measure to estimate moderate to profound…

  14. Influence of moderate Joule heating on electroosmotic flow velocity, retention, and efficiency in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guofang; Tallarek, Ulrich; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Zhang, Yukui

    2004-07-30

    The influence of Joule heating on electroosmotic flow velocity, the retention factor of neutral analytes, and separation efficiency in capillary electrochromatography was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A plot of electrical current against the applied electrical field strength was used to evaluate the Joule heating effect. When the mobile phase concentration of Tris buffer exceeded 5.0 mM in the studied capillary electrochromatography systems using particulate and monolithic columns (with an accompanying power level of heat dissipation higher than 0.35 W/m), the Joule heating effect became clearly noticeable. Theoretical models for describing the variation of electroosmotic flow velocity with increasing applied field strength and the change of retention factors for neutral analytes with electrical field strength at higher Tris buffer concentrations were analyzed to explain consequences of Joule heating in capillary electrochromatography. Qualitative agreement between experimental data and implications of the theoretical model analysis was observed. The decrease of separation efficiency in capillary electrochromatography with macroporous octadecylsilica particles at high buffer concentration can be also attributed to Joule heating mainly via the increased axial diffusion of the analyte molecules and dispersion of solute bands by a nonuniform electroosmotic flow profile over the column cross-section. However, within a moderate temperature range, the contribution of the macroscopic velocity profile in the column arising from radial temperature gradients is insignificant.

  15. PERFORMING QUALITY FLOW MEASUREMENTS AT MINE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate flow measurement data is vital to research, monitoring, and remediation efforts at mining sites. This guidebook has been prepared to provide a summary of information relating to the performance of low measurements, and how this information can be applied at mining sites....

  16. Wastewater Sampling Methodologies and Flow Measurement Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Daniel J.; Keffer, William J.

    This document provides a ready source of information about water/wastewater sampling activities using various commercial sampling and flow measurement devices. The report consolidates the findings and summarizes the activities, experiences, sampling methods, and field measurement techniques conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),…

  17. PERFORMING QUALITY FLOW MEASUREMENTS AT MINE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate flow measurement data is vital to research, monitoring, and remediation efforts at mining sites. This guidebook has been prepared to provide a summary of information relating to the performance of low measurements, and how this information can be applied at mining sites....

  18. Depth selective acousto-optic flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Tsalach, Adi; Schiffer, Zeev; Ratner, Eliahu; Breskin, Ilan; Zeitak, Reuven; Shechter, Revital; Balberg, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Optical based methods for non-invasive measurement of regional blood flow tend to incorrectly assess cerebral blood flow, due to contribution of extra-cerebral tissues to the obtained signal. We demonstrate that spectral analysis of phase-coded light signals, tagged by specific ultrasound patterns, enables differentiation of flow patterns at different depths. Validation of the model is conducted by Monte Carlo simulation. In-vitro experiments demonstrate good agreement with the simulations' results and provide a solid validation to depth discrimination ability. These results suggest that signal contamination originating from extra-cerebral tissue may be eliminated using spectral analysis of ultrasonically tagged light. PMID:26713201

  19. Coherent Raman spectroscopy for supersonic flow measurments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1986-01-01

    In collaboration with NASA/Langley Research Center, a truly nonintrusive and nonseeding method for measuring supersonic molecular flow parameters was proposed and developed at Colorado State University. The feasibility of this Raman Doppler Velocimetry (RDV), currently operated in a scanning mode, was demonstrated not only in a laboratory environment at Colorado State University, but also in a major wind tunnel at NASA/Langley Research Center. The research progress of the RDV development is summarized. In addition, methods of coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin spectroscopy and single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy are investigated, respectively, for measurements of high-pressure and turbulent flows.

  20. Collective flow measurements at RHIC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esumi, Shinichi

    2017-04-01

    Recent experimental results on collective flow measurements from relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC) are presented and discussed to study high-temperature and high-density quark-nuclear matter, Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) especially focusing on bulk properties, such as freeze-out parameters, temperature, chemical potential, collective expansion, azimuthal event anisotropy measurements. Their relations to the various correlation and fluctuation studies are also discussed, including initial geometrical and E- and B-field conditions as well as possible collective flow evolution that could even be developed in small systems. Current results and understandings from the beam energy scan program (BES) and future plans are discussed and reviewed.

  1. Slip length measurement of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas.

  2. Fluid Flow Technology that Measures Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    From 1994 to 1996, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a Center Director's Discretionary Fund research effort to apply artificial intelligence technologies to the health management of plant equipment and space propulsion systems. Through this effort, NASA established a business relationship with Quality Monitoring and Control (QMC), of Kingwood, Texas, to provide hardware modeling and artificial intelligence tools. Very detailed and accurate Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) analysis and algorithms were jointly created, which identified several missing, critical instrumentation needs for adequately evaluating the engine health status. One of the missing instruments was a liquid oxygen (LOX) flow measurement. This instrument was missing since the original SSME included a LOX turbine flow meter that failed during a ground test, resulting in considerable damage for NASA. New balanced flow meter technology addresses this need with robust, safe, and accurate flow metering hardware.

  3. Improved visualization of flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1991-01-01

    A capability was developed that makes it possible to apply to measured flow field data the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamic problems. The measurement monitor surface (MMS) procedure was applied to the analysis of flow field measurements within a low aspect ratio transonic axial flow fan rotor obtained with 2-D laser anemometry. The procedure generates input for the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamics problems. The relative Mach number contour plots obtained by this method resemble the conventional contour plots obtained by more traditional methods. The results show that the MMS procedure can be used to generate input for the multidimensional processing and analysis tools developed for data from numerical flow field simulations. They show that an experimenter can apply the MMS procedure to his data and then use an interactive graphics program to display scalar quantities like the Mach number by profiles, carpet plots, contour lines, and surfaces using various colors. Also, flow directionality can be shown by display of vector fields and particle traces.

  4. Thermoelectric Magnetohydrodynamic Flow During Crystal Growth with a Moderate or Weak Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khine, Y. Y.; Walker, John S.; Szofran, Frank R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper treats a steady, axisymmetric melt motion in a cylindrical ampoule with a uniform, axial magnetic field and with an electric current due to a radial temperature variation along the crystal-melt interface, where the values of the absolute thermoelectric power for the crystal and melt are different. The radial component of the thermoelectric current in the melt produces an azimuthal body force, and the axial variation of the centrifugal force due to the azimuthal motion drives a meridional circulation with radial and axial velocities. For moderate magnetic field strengths, the azimuthal velocity and magnetic field produce a radial induced electric field which partially cancels the Seebeck electromotive force in the melt, so that the thermoelectric current and the melt motion are coupled. For weak magnetic fields, the thermoelectric current is decoupled from the melt motion, which is an ordinary hydrodynamic flow driven by a known azimuthal body force. The results show how the flow varies with the strength of the magnetic field and with the magnitude of the temperature variation along the crystal-melt interface. They also define the parameter ranges for which the simpler weak-field decoupled analysis gives accurate predictions.

  5. Energy measurement using flow computers and chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, J.

    1995-12-01

    Arkla Pipeline Group (APG), along with most transmission companies, went to electronic flow measurement (EFM) to: (1) Increase resolution and accuracy; (2) Real time correction of flow variables; (3) Increase speed in data retrieval; (4) Reduce capital expenditures; and (5) Reduce operation and maintenance expenditures Prior to EFM, mechanical seven day charts were used which yielded 800 pressure and differential pressure readings. EFM yields 1.2-million readings, a 1500 time improvement in resolution and additional flow representation. The total system accuracy of the EFM system is 0.25 % compared with 2 % for the chart system which gives APG improved accuracy. A typical APG electronic measurement system includes a microprocessor-based flow computer, a telemetry communications package, and a gas chromatograph. Live relative density (specific gravity), BTU, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} are updated from the chromatograph to the flow computer every six minutes which provides accurate MMBTU computations. Because the gas contract length has changed from years to monthly and from a majority of direct sales to transports both Arkla and its customers wanted access to actual volumes on a much more timely basis than is allowed with charts. The new electronic system allows volumes and other system data to be retrieved continuously, if EFM is on Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) or daily if on dial up telephone. Previously because of chart integration, information was not available for four to six weeks. EFM costs much less than the combined costs of telemetry transmitters, pressure and differential pressure chart recorders, and temperature chart recorder which it replaces. APG will install this equipment on smaller volume stations at a customers expense. APG requires backup measurement on metering facilities this size. It could be another APG flow computer or chart recorder, or the other companies flow computer or chart recorder.

  6. Ultrasonic meters measure gas pipeline flow

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    New ultrasonic meters from Stork Ultrasonic Technologies, Houston are improving pipeline gas flow measurements, custody transfers, process gas flow measurements, and flare gas applications. The meters are easy to install, extremely accurate, and all feature realtime measurements. This meter (Gassonic 400) is designed for use in 8-in. to 64-in. gas pipelines and features a dual transducer device which uses the absolute digital travel time method of pulse transmission. Wide band piezoceramic transducers are used in this bi-directional, single bounce system which includes pulse verification and high-speed electronic processing by a central processing unit. Measuring values of this meter are obtained by direct digital measurement of travel time of each individual ultrasonic pulse which covers a pre-determined distance between two transducers inserted in the pipe wall. These transducers cause negligible flow restriction and absolute digital reference and excellent repeatability is possible without adjustment or re-calibration. Dozens of measurements can be processed so that average output values are updated every second during use. It is a field-programmable meter for variations in site parameters, presentation of service diagnostics, user selected velocity or quantity outputs, and has standard analog and digital interfaces. Also, it is suitable for swirl measurement or compensation. Since it relies on a reflection method, the ultrasonic meter allows easy, one-sided insertion and it is suitable for hot-tapping. This instrument is especially useful in gas blending stations, compressor control, leak detection, salt dome storage applications, pipeline balancing, and additive injection systems.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of moderate-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations with an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method are used to investigate the effects of particle rotation on flows past random arrays of mono-disperse spheres at moderate particle Reynolds numbers. This study is an extension of a previous study of the authors [Q. Zhou and L.-S. Fan, "Direct numerical simulation of low-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres," J. Fluid Mech. 765, 396-423 (2015)] that explored the effects of particle rotation at low particle Reynolds numbers. The results of this study indicate that as the particle Reynolds number increases, the normalized Magnus lift force decreases rapidly when the particle Reynolds number is in the range lower than 50. For the particle Reynolds number greater than 50, the normalized Magnus lift force approaches a constant value that is invariant with solid volume fractions. The proportional dependence of the Magnus lift force on the rotational Reynolds number (based on the angular velocity and the diameter of the spheres) observed at low particle Reynolds numbers does not change in the present study, making the Magnus lift force another possible factor that can significantly affect the overall dynamics of fluid-particle flows other than the drag force. Moreover, it is found that both the normalized drag force and the normalized torque increase with the increase of the particle Reynolds number and the solid volume fraction. Finally, correlations for the drag force, the Magnus lift force, and the torque in random arrays of rotating spheres at arbitrary solids volume fractions, rotational Reynolds numbers, and particle Reynolds numbers are formulated.

  8. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  9. Healthy term and moderately preterm infants have similar cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral blood flow volumes during early post-natal transition.

    PubMed

    Demel, A; Feilke, K; Schöning, M; Wolf, M; Poets, C F; Franz, A R

    2015-08-01

    This pilot study evaluated changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral blood flow volume during the transitional period in healthy term and moderately preterm infants. The cohort comprised 16 preterm infants and seven full-term infants with mean gestational ages of 34 and 39 weeks, respectively. Longitudinal measurements were conducted during the first three days after birth. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation was determined bilaterally by frequency domain near-infrared spectroscopy. Flow volumes were determined in internal carotid and vertebral arteries by multiplying the time-averaged velocity by the cross-sectional area: cerebral blood flow volume was calculated as the sum of flow volumes and adjusted for brain weight. Brain weight-adjusted cerebral blood flow volumes and regional cerebral oxygen saturation were similar in preterm and term infants. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation did not correlate with brain weight-adjusted cerebral blood flow volume. Right and left brain weight-adjusted internal carotid flow volumes did not correlate with right and left regional cerebral oxygen saturation. Our findings suggest that during the first three days after birth there was adequate cardiorespiratory adaptation, cerebral perfusion and adequate compensation through the arterial circle of Willis in both healthy term and moderately preterm infants. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  11. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing. Fuel flow is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow...

  12. Hyperbolic contraction measuring systems for extensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, M.; Tamaddon Jahromi, H. R.; Stading, M.; Webster, M. F.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper an experimental method for extensional measurements on medium viscosity fluids in contraction flow is evaluated through numerical simulations and experimental measurements. This measuring technique measures the pressure drop over a hyperbolic contraction, caused by fluid extension and fluid shear, where the extensional component is assumed to dominate. The present evaluative work advances our previous studies on this experimental method by introducing several contraction ratios and addressing different constitutive models of varying shear and extensional response. The constitutive models included are those of the constant viscosity Oldroyd-B and FENE-CR models, and the shear-thinning LPTT model. Examining the results, the impact of shear and first normal stress difference on the measured pressure drop are studied through numerical pressure drop predictions. In addition, stream function patterns are investigated to detect vortex development and influence of contraction ratio. The numerical predictions are further related to experimental measurements for the flow through a 15:1 contraction ratio with three different test fluids. The measured pressure drops are observed to exhibit the same trends as predicted in the numerical simulations, offering close correlation and tight predictive windows for experimental data capture. This result has demonstrated that the hyperbolic contraction flow is well able to detect such elastic fluid properties and that this is matched by numerical predictions in evaluation of their flow response. The hyperbolical contraction flow technique is commended for its distinct benefits: it is straightforward and simple to perform, the Hencky strain can be set by changing contraction ratio, non-homogeneous fluids can be tested, and one can directly determine the degree of elastic fluid behaviour. Based on matching of viscometric extensional viscosity response for FENE-CR and LPTT models, a decline is predicted in pressure drop for

  13. Hyperbolic contraction measuring systems for extensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, M.; Tamaddon Jahromi, H. R.; Stading, M.; Webster, M. F.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper an experimental method for extensional measurements on medium viscosity fluids in contraction flow is evaluated through numerical simulations and experimental measurements. This measuring technique measures the pressure drop over a hyperbolic contraction, caused by fluid extension and fluid shear, where the extensional component is assumed to dominate. The present evaluative work advances our previous studies on this experimental method by introducing several contraction ratios and addressing different constitutive models of varying shear and extensional response. The constitutive models included are those of the constant viscosity Oldroyd-B and FENE-CR models, and the shear-thinning LPTT model. Examining the results, the impact of shear and first normal stress difference on the measured pressure drop are studied through numerical pressure drop predictions. In addition, stream function patterns are investigated to detect vortex development and influence of contraction ratio. The numerical predictions are further related to experimental measurements for the flow through a 15:1 contraction ratio with three different test fluids. The measured pressure drops are observed to exhibit the same trends as predicted in the numerical simulations, offering close correlation and tight predictive windows for experimental data capture. This result has demonstrated that the hyperbolic contraction flow is well able to detect such elastic fluid properties and that this is matched by numerical predictions in evaluation of their flow response. The hyperbolical contraction flow technique is commended for its distinct benefits: it is straightforward and simple to perform, the Hencky strain can be set by changing contraction ratio, non-homogeneous fluids can be tested, and one can directly determine the degree of elastic fluid behaviour. Based on matching of viscometric extensional viscosity response for FENE-CR and LPTT models, a decline is predicted in pressure drop for

  14. A warm footbath improves coronary flow reserve in patients with mild-to-moderate coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Se-Jung; Park, Jong-Kwan; Oh, Seungjin; Jeon, Dong Woon; Yang, Joo Young; Hong, Suk-Min; Kwak, Min-Sub; Choi, Yoon-Suk; Rim, Se-Joong; Youn, Ho-Joong

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that thermal therapy by means of warm waterbaths and sauna has beneficial effects in chronic heart failure. However, a comprehensive investigation of the hemodynamic effects of thermal vasodilation on coronary arteries has not been previously undertaken. In this study, we studied the effect of a warm footbath (WFB) on coronary arteries in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), as well as any adverse effect. We studied 21 patients (33.3% men, mean age 60.8 ± 13.5 years) with CAD. Coronary flow Doppler examination of the left anterior descending coronary artery and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were performed and measured using adenosine before and after a WFB. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate did not change with the WFB. Mean velocity of diastolic coronary flow significantly increased (diastolic mean flow velocity: 18.3 ± 7.1 cm/sec initial, 21.5 ± 8.0 cm/sec follow-up, P = 0.002) and CFR significantly improved (1.6 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 0.5, P < 0.001) after WFB. The WFB was well accepted and no relevant adverse effects were observed. The change of CFR after WFB correlated well with diastolic function (E', r = 0.51, P = 0.031; E/E', r =-0.675, P = 0.002). A WFB significantly improved CFR without any adverse effects in patients with mild-to-moderate CAD and can be applied with little risk of a coronary artery event if appropriately performed. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Helium-flow measurement using ultrasonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    While designing cryogenic instrumentation for the Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) helium-distribution system it became clear that accurate measurement of mass flow of helium which varied in temperature from room to sub-cooled conditions would be difficult. Conventional venturi flow meters full scale differential pressure signal would decrease by more than an order of magnitude during cooldown causing unacceptable error at operating temperature. At sub-cooled temperatures, helium would be pumped around cooling loops by an efficient, low head pressure circulating compressor. Additional pressure drop meant more pump work was necessary to compress the fluid resulting in a higher outlet temperature. The ideal mass flowmeter for this application was one which did not add pressure drop to the system, functioned over the entire temperature range, has high resolution and delivers accurate mass flow measurement data. Ultrasonic flow measurement techniques used successfully by the process industry, seemed to meet all the necessary requirements. An extensive search for a supplier of such a device found that none of the commercial stock flowmeters were adaptable to cryogenic service so the development of the instrument was undertaken by the CBA Cryogenic Control and Instrumentation Engineering Group at BNL.

  16. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  17. 40 CFR 92.107 - Fuel flow measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... measurement. (a) Fuel flow measurement for locomotive and engine testing. The rate of fuel consumption by the... performed for at least 10 flow rates evenly distributed over the entire range of fuel flow rates used...

  18. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  19. Unified Model Deformation and Flow Transition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Liu, Tianshu; Garg, Sanjay; Bell, James H.; Morgan, Daniel G.

    1999-01-01

    The number of optical techniques that may potentially be used during a given wind tunnel test is continually growing. These include parameter sensitive paints that are sensitive to temperature or pressure, several different types of off-body and on-body flow visualization techniques, optical angle-of-attack (AoA), optical measurement of model deformation, optical techniques for determining density or velocity, and spectroscopic techniques for determining various flow field parameters. Often in the past the various optical techniques were developed independently of each other, with little or no consideration for other techniques that might also be used during a given test. Recently two optical techniques have been increasingly requested for production measurements in NASA wind tunnels. These are the video photogrammetric (or videogrammetric) technique for measuring model deformation known as the video model deformation (VMD) technique, and the parameter sensitive paints for making global pressure and temperature measurements. Considerations for, and initial attempts at, simultaneous measurements with the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) and the videogrammetric techniques have been implemented. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) has been found to be useful for boundary-layer transition detection since turbulent boundary layers convect heat at higher rates than laminar boundary layers of comparable thickness. Transition is marked by a characteristic surface temperature change wherever there is a difference between model and flow temperatures. Recently, additional capabilities have been implemented in the target-tracking videogrammetric measurement system. These capabilities have permitted practical simultaneous measurements using parameter sensitive paint and video model deformation measurements that led to the first successful unified test with TSP for transition detection in a large production wind tunnel.

  20. Production of microbubbles from axisymmetric flow focusing in the jetting regime for moderate Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Vega, E J; Acero, A J; Montanero, J M; Herrada, M A; Gañán-Calvo, A M

    2014-06-01

    We analyze both experimentally and numerically the formation of microbubbles in the jetting regime reached when a moderately viscous liquid stream focuses a gaseous meniscus inside a converging micronozzle. If the total (stagnation) pressure of the injected gas current is fixed upstream, then there are certain conditions on which a quasisteady gas meniscus forms. The meniscus tip is sharpened by the liquid stream down to the gas molecular scale. On the other side, monodisperse collections of microbubbles can be steadily produced in the jetting regime if the feeding capillary is appropriately located inside the nozzle. In this case, the microbubble size depends on the feeding capillary position. The numerical simulations for an imposed gas flow rate show that a recirculation cell appears in the gaseous meniscus for low enough values of that parameter. The experiments allow one to conclude that the bubble pinch-off comprises two phases: (i) a stretching motion of the precursor jet where the neck radius versus the time before the pinch essentially follows a potential law, and (ii) a final stage where a very thin and slender gaseous thread forms and eventually breaks apart into a number of micron-sized bubbles. Because of the difference between the free surface and core velocities, the gaseous jet breakage differs substantially from that of liquid capillary jets and gives rise to bubbles with diameters much larger than those expected from the Rayleigh-type capillary instability. The dependency of the bubble diameter upon the flow-rate ratio agrees with the scaling law derived by A. M. Gañán-Calvo [Phys. Rev. E 69, 027301 (2004)], although a slight influence of the Reynolds number can be observed in our experiments.

  1. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing but is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  2. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement... measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of one percent of full-scale flow rate for...

  3. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  4. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications....314-79 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of ±1 percent of full-scale flow rate for each measurement range used. An exception...

  5. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications....314-79 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of ±1 percent of full-scale flow rate for each measurement range used. An exception...

  6. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing but is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  7. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  8. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing but is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  9. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Fuel flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing but is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  10. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  11. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  12. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing but is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a...

  13. Mean-flow measurements of the flow field diffusing bend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, O. J.

    1982-01-01

    Time-average measurements of the low-speed turbulent flow in a diffusing bend are presented. The experimental geometry consists of parallel top and bottom walls and curved diverging side walls. The turning of the center line of this channel is 40 deg, the area ratio is 1.5 and the ratios of height and center-line length to throat width are 1.5 and 3, respectively. The diffusing bend is preceded and followed by straight constant area sections. The inlet boundary layers on the parallel walls are artificially thickened and occupy about 30% of the channel height; those on the side walls develop naturally and are about half as thick. The free-stream speed at the inlet was approximately 30 m/sec for all the measurements. Inlet boundary layer mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles are presented, as are data for wall static pressures, and at six cross sections, surveys of the velocity-vector and static-pressure fields. The dominant feature of the flow field is a pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices formed by the cross-stream pressure gradient in the bend on which an overall deceleration is superimposed.

  14. Attitude importance as a moderator of the relationship between implicit and explicit attitude measures.

    PubMed

    Karpinski, Andrew; Steinman, Ross B; Hilton, James L

    2005-07-01

    The authors examined attitude importance as a moderator of the relationship between the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and explicit attitude measures. In Study 1 (N = 194), as ratings of attitude importance regarding the 2000 presidential election increased, the strength of the relationship between a Bush-Gore IAT and explicit attitude measures also increased. Study 2 provided a conceptual replication of these results using attitudes toward Coke and Pepsi (N = 112). In addition, across both studies, explicit attitude measures were better predictors of deliberative behaviors than IAT scores. In Study 3 (N = 77), the authors examined the role of elaboration as a mechanism by which attitude importance may moderate IAT-explicit attitude correlations. As predicted, increased elaboration resulted in stronger IAT-explicit attitude correlations. Other possible mechanisms by which attitude importance may moderate the IAT-explicit attitude relationship also are discussed.

  15. EDITORIAL: Measurement techniques for multiphase flows Measurement techniques for multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-11-01

    Research on multiphase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing and so on. Multiphase flows originally have nonlinear features because of multiphase systems. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The nonlinear interaction causes the multiphase flows to be very complicated. Therefore techniques for measuring multiphase flows are very useful in helping to understand the nonlinear phenomena. The state-of-the-art measurement techniques were presented and discussed at the sixth International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows (ISMTMF2008) held in Okinawa, Japan, on 15-17 December 2008. This special feature of Measurement Science and Technology includes selected papers from ISMTMF2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China, Japan and many western Pacific countries have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for over 1000 years. Much technical and scientific information was exchanged at the symposium in Okinawa. The proceedings of ISMTMF2008 apart from these special featured papers were published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series vol. 147 (2009). We would like to express special thanks to all the contributors to the symposium and this special feature. This special feature will be a milestone in measurement techniques for multiphase flows.

  16. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  17. Investigation of flow structure on a stationary and pitching delta wing of moderate sweep angle using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goruney, Tunc

    Near-surface flow patterns along a basic delta wing of moderate sweep angle, representative of key features of Unmanned Combat Air Vehicles (UCAVs) and Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs), are visualized by a technique of high-image-density digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV), which provides quantitative representations of the whole-field flow patterns. Due to the highly three-dimensional nature of the flow patterns, they are also visualized by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV). Qualitative dye visualization is employed to complement the DPIV technique. The flow structure is represented by patterns of dye, velocity vectors, streamwise, transverse and out-of-plane velocity components, streamline topology and vorticity. The surface topology, i.e., surface streamlines, and patterns of surface velocity and vorticity oriented normal to the surface of the wing, are investigated by making use of topological rules and critical point theory. For the case of DPIV measurements, the focus is on the time evolution of the surface topology during relaxation of the flow after termination of a pitching maneuver, for a wide range of pitch rates. It is demonstrated that there exists a critical universal state, which marks an abrupt transformation between two distinctly different states of the near-surface pattern of critical points. Moreover, an approach that predicts the occurrence of three-dimensional separation from the surface of the wing, for a wide range of pitch rate, is introduced. For the case of SPIV measurements, the relationship between the three-dimensional flow structure above the surface of the wing and the near-surface topology along the wing has been established, at successive instants following termination of the maneuver. Features of the leading-edge vortex and its breakdown location were quantitatively determined at the termination of the pitching maneuver. For the relaxed state of the flow structure, there is a reference elevation above the wing surface

  18. Infrared Measurements of Multiphase Flow Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kommer, Eric; Dessiatoun, Serguei

    2011-11-01

    Understanding of phase change heat transfer mechanisms remains elusive due its sensitivity to many variables, but also due to the lack of reliable local information that can enable models to be tested. Although point measurements of variables such as local film thickness and heat transfer have been made, techniques whereby these quantities can be measured over the large areas have been lacking. IR thermometry is an established technology that can be used where optical access to the surface is available in the wavelength of interest. The use of IR measurements is demonstrated in this work to measure the inner and outer wall temperatures of an electrically heated silicon tube during flow boiling of FC-72. The electrical conductivity of silicon can be varied over a broad range by controlling the dopant concentration. Since silicon is largely transparent to IR radiation, the temperature of the inner and outer walls can be measured by coating selected areas with IR opaque thin films. FC-72 is also partially transparent to IR radiation over a broad range of wavelengths, allowing the flow to be visualized. Details of the proposed technique, test apparatus, data reduction, and model development are presented. This work was sponsored by NASA HQ Grant NNX09AK39A.

  19. Measurement of Liver Blood Flow: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stansby, G. P.; Hobbs, K. E. F.; Hawkes, D. J.; Colchester, A. C. F.

    1991-01-01

    The study of hepatic haemodynamics is of importance in understanding both hepatic physiology and disease processes as well as assessing the effects of portosystemic shunting and liver transplantation. The liver has the most complicated circulation of any organ and many physiological and pathological processes can affect it1,2. This review surveys the methods available for assessing liver blood flow, examines the different parameters being measured and outlines problems of applicability and interpretation for each technique. The classification of these techniques is to some extent arbitrary and several so called “different” methods may share certain common principles. The methods reviewed have been classified into two groups (Table 1): those primarily reflecting flow through discrete vessels or to the whole organ and those used to assess local microcirculatory blood flow. All techniques have their advantages and disadvantages and in some situations a combination may provide the most information. In addition, because of the many factors affecting liver blood flow and sinusoidal perfusion, readings in a single subject may vary depending on positioning, recent food intake, anxiety, anaesthesia and drug therapy. This must be borne in mind if different studies are to be meaningfully compared. PMID:1931785

  20. Microparticle tracking velocimetry as a tool for microfluidic flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salipante, Paul; Hudson, Steven D.; Schmidt, James W.; Wright, John D.

    2017-07-01

    The accurate measurement of flows in microfluidic channels is important for commercial and research applications. We compare the accuracy of flow measurement techniques over a wide range flows. Flow measurements made using holographic microparticle tracking velocimetry (µPTV) and a gravimetric flow standard over the range of 0.5-100 nL/s agree within 0.25%, well within the uncertainty of the two flow systems. Two commercial thermal flow sensors were used as the intermediaries (transfer standards) between the two flow measurement systems. The gravimetric flow standard was used to calibrate the thermal flow sensors by measuring the rate of change of the mass of liquid in a beaker on a micro-balance as it fills. The holographic µPTV flow measurements were made in a rectangular channel and the flow was seeded with 1 µm diameter polystyrene spheres. The volumetric flow was calculated using the Hagen-Pouiseille solution for a rectangular channel. The uncertainty of both flow measurement systems is given. For the gravimetric standard, relative uncertainty increased for decreasing flows due to surface tension forces between the pipette carrying the flow and the free surface of the liquid in the beaker. The uncertainty of the holographic µPTV measurements did not vary significantly over the measured flow range, and thus comparatively are especially useful at low flow velocities.

  1. Mesoscale meteorological measurements characterizing complex flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbe, J.M.; Allwine, K.J.

    1993-09-01

    Meteorological measurements are an integral and essential component of any emergency response system for addressing accidental releases from nuclear facilities. An important element of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program is the refinement and use of state-of-the-art meteorological instrumentation. ASCOT is currently making use of ground-based remote wind sensing instruments such as doppler acoustic sounders (sodars). These instruments are capable of continuously and reliably measuring winds up to several hundred meters above the ground, unattended. Two sodars are currently measuring the winds, as part of ASCOT`s Front Range Study, in the vicinity of DOE`s Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) near Boulder, Colorado. A brief description of ASCOT`s ongoing Front Range Study is given followed by a case study analysis that demonstrates the utility of the meteorological measurement equipment and the complexity of flow phenomena that are experienced near RFP. These complex flow phenomena can significantly influence the transport of the released material and consequently need to be identified for accurate assessments of the consequences of a release.

  2. Holocinematographic velocimetry - Resolution limitation for flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liburdy, James A.

    1987-10-01

    The goal of developing a holocinematographic velocimeter (HCV) is to provide a technique to study the evolution of instantaneous three-dimensional velocity profiles in turbulent flow fields. The method tracks individual seed particles that have been introduced into the flow. An imaging system using far-field holography is used to provide a full field of view tracking. Velocity information is determined from measured particle displacements of sequential hologram reconstruction. This study examines the resolution limits of far-field holography as applied to the HCV. The results aid in the determination of required seeding concentrations, establish the ability to resolve particle centers, and illustrate the use of a dual TV camera system to aid resolution. A straightforward enhancement technique provides a means to eliminate noise and reduce out of image plane ambiguity.

  3. Unsteady Dynamics of free falling of multi flexible fibers in moderate Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dewei

    2007-11-01

    The direct simulations of sedimentation of single and multi flexible fibers are conducted in moderate Reynolds number flows by using a newly developed method. In the method, for fluid domain, the lattice Boltzmann equations are used to solve the Navier Stokes equations. For solid domain, a fiber is discretized as a chain of rigid segments. The segments are connected through ball and socket joints and can be bent and twisted. Constraint forces are introduced at each joint. Translation and rotation matrix of fiber are linearized with respect to the constraint forces up to a second order of time step. Thus, motion of the fiber under the constraint and hydrodynamic forces could be solved by using a modified leap-frog algorithm. Effects of many body interaction on fiber fluttering are studied. It is found that in the same conditions initial fluttering may be damped by fluid viscosity for a single flexible fiber while irregular and persistent fluttering, rocking and oscillation may occur for a multi- fiber system. It is evident that clusters, such as doublets and triplets, are spontaneously formed and have a profound impact on unsteady dynamics of fibers. Two mechanisms contribute to an increase in unsteadiness. First the clusters have larger local settling velocity than a single fiber. Second, closely packed fibers become more ``fat'' or ``thick'' body and have a lower effective aspect ratio. The flows behind the 'fat' clusters tend to be more unsteady and induce vortex shedding that causes fibers persistently fluttering, rocking or oscillating. It is found that a fiber chain with a long vertical dimension is not stable. They will break down and become more flat structure. This property is directly related to that the fiber is preferentially oriented in horizontal direction due to inertia. In addition, the effects of flexibility on unsteady dynamics of sedimentation of flexible fiber are studied in a given range of Re. We find that when stiffness is very large, the

  4. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... percent of the measuring weight. (3) If the mass of fuel consumed is measured electronically (load cell... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications....314-79 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a...

  5. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate measurement... parameters are the elapsed time measurement of the event and the weight or volume measurement. ...

  6. Accelerating moderately stiff chemical kinetics in reactive-flow simulations using GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Kyle E.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The chemical kinetics ODEs arising from operator-split reactive-flow simulations were solved on GPUs using explicit integration algorithms. Nonstiff chemical kinetics of a hydrogen oxidation mechanism (9 species and 38 irreversible reactions) were computed using the explicit fifth-order Runge-Kutta-Cash-Karp method, and the GPU-accelerated version performed faster than single- and six-core CPU versions by factors of 126 and 25, respectively, for 524,288 ODEs. Moderately stiff kinetics, represented with mechanisms for hydrogen/carbon-monoxide (13 species and 54 irreversible reactions) and methane (53 species and 634 irreversible reactions) oxidation, were computed using the stabilized explicit second-order Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (RKC) algorithm. The GPU-based RKC implementation demonstrated an increase in performance of nearly 59 and 10 times, for problem sizes consisting of 262,144 ODEs and larger, than the single- and six-core CPU-based RKC algorithms using the hydrogen/carbon-monoxide mechanism. With the methane mechanism, RKC-GPU performed more than 65 and 11 times faster, for problem sizes consisting of 131,072 ODEs and larger, than the single- and six-core RKC-CPU versions, and up to 57 times faster than the six-core CPU-based implicit VODE algorithm on 65,536 ODEs. In the presence of more severe stiffness, such as ethylene oxidation (111 species and 1566 irreversible reactions), RKC-GPU performed more than 17 times faster than RKC-CPU on six cores for 32,768 ODEs and larger, and at best 4.5 times faster than VODE on six CPU cores for 65,536 ODEs. With a larger time step size, RKC-GPU performed at best 2.5 times slower than six-core VODE for 8192 ODEs and larger. Therefore, the need for developing new strategies for integrating stiff chemistry on GPUs was discussed.

  7. Moderate Physical Activity and Its Relationship to Select Measures of a Healthy Diet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakely, Frank; Dunnagan, Tim; Haynes, George; Moore, Sylvia; Pelican, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    In rural communities, physical activity may influence and predict nutritional behaviors. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if an individual's stage of participation in moderate physical activity was related to select measures of a healthy diet. Data were collected using a mail-in survey from a random sample conducted in the…

  8. Moderate Physical Activity and Its Relationship to Select Measures of a Healthy Diet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakely, Frank; Dunnagan, Tim; Haynes, George; Moore, Sylvia; Pelican, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    In rural communities, physical activity may influence and predict nutritional behaviors. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if an individual's stage of participation in moderate physical activity was related to select measures of a healthy diet. Data were collected using a mail-in survey from a random sample conducted in the…

  9. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D/sub 2/O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%.

  10. Flow Measurement by Means of Light Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobel, Th.

    1949-01-01

    There has been under development for the high-speed wind tunnel of the LFA an optical measuring arrangement for the qualitative and quantitative investigation of flow. By the use of interference measurements, the determination of density at the surface of the bodies being tested in the air stream and in the vicinity of these bodies can be undertaken. The results obtained so far in the simple preliminary investigations show that it is possible, even at a low Reynolds number, to obtain the density field in the neighborhood of a test body by optical means. Simple analytical expressions give the relation between density, pressure, velocity, and temperature. In addition to this, the interference measurement furnishes valuable data on the state of the boundary layer, that is, the sort of boundary layer (whether laminar or turbulent), as well as the temperature and velocity distribution.

  11. Measurement of Flow-Mediated Vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Saisu, Tomoko; Yamashina, Akira

    2017-04-06

    The FMDJ study, a multicenter prospective observational study conducted in Japan, demonstrated the acceptable reliability of measurement of flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) using a semi-automatic device in individual institutions. However, in about 10% of Japanese subjects, adequate scans to determine the brachial arterial diameter failed to be obtained. The prevalence of inadequate scans was higher in women than in men, while obesity had no influence on the inadequate scan rate. The FMDJ study also proposed that attending periodic refresher courses on the measurement of FMD is needed for maintaining competency. Finally, the FMDJ study proposed reference values for FMD. Thus, FMD measurement may be categorized as a clinically applicable tool on the basis of class IIb (exploratory cohort study with good reference standards) evidence.

  12. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  13. Optical fiber sensors for flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Sallehuddin; Green, Robert G.; Dutton, Ken

    2000-08-01

    The overall aim of this project is to investigate the use of optical fiber sensors for on-line monitoring of particles and droplets having low concentration being conveyed by a fluid. In this project, the system employs lensed optical fiber sensors developed using a low cost approach. A general mathematical model for the lens constructed at each end of the fiber optic was derived which takes into consideration that a large divergent beam is undesirable because it reduces the energy centered in the beam and can cause overlapping of adjacent transmitted beams at the receivers. Initially, the optical fibers are polished. Then, the lenses are formed using a specially-made heating platform. The receiver fiber is coupled to a photodiode, enabling the received light level to be measured. Optical fiber sensors are suitable for monitoring flowing materials where the conveyed component ratio is less than 10% vol./vol. The use of optical fibers provides an opportunity to design sensors with a very wide bandwidth, thus enabling the measurement of high speed flowing particles or droplets. The light extinction method used in this project is suitable for measurement of particles or droplets equal and greater than 100 micrometers .

  14. Turbulence measurements in high-speed flows by resonant fluoresence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Both mean flow and turbulence measurements were investigated using the resonant Doppler velocimeter in a Mach 3.2 nitrogen flow. Data are presented showing velocity, temperature and pressure measured point by point across the flow field. This data is compared with conventional pitot and temperature surveys. Turbulence was induced by a small metal tab in the flow and observed by both hot wire and RDV techniques. Photographs of the flow field demonstrate the utility of the RDV for quantitative flow field visualization.

  15. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  16. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  17. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  18. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  19. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications....314-79 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a... period of the clock. (2) For Diesel engines only, if the mass of fuel consumed is measured by discrete...

  20. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids related to their complex permeability are disclosed. A microwave probe is provided for exposure to the fluids. The probe can be non-intrusive or can also be positioned at the location where measurements are to be made. The impedance of the probe is determined. in part. by the complex dielectric constant of the fluids at the probe. A radio frequency signal is transmitted to the probe and the reflected signal is phase and amplitude detected at a rapid rate for the purpose of identifying the fluids. Multiple probes may be selectively positioned to monitor the behavior of the fluids including their flow rate. Fluids may be identified as between two or more different fluids as well as multiple phases of the same fluid based on differences between their complex permittivities.

  1. Meteorological insights from planetary heat flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    Planetary heat flow measurements are made with a series of high-precision temperature sensors deployed in a column of regolith to determine the geothermal gradient. Such sensors may, however, be susceptible to other influences, especially on worlds with atmospheres. First, pressure fluctuations at the surface may pump air in and out of pore space leading to observable, and otherwise unexpected, temperature fluctuations at depth. Such pumping is important in subsurface radon and methane transport on Earth: evidence of such pumping may inform understanding of methane or water vapor transport on Mars. Second, the subsurface profile contains a muted record of surface temperature history, and such measurements on other worlds may help constrain the extent to which Earth's Little Ice Age was directly solar-forced, versus volcanic-driven and/or amplified by climate feedbacks.

  2. Transcutaneous measurement of volume blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, R. E.; Mcleod, F. D.; Miller, C. W.; Histand, M. B.; Wells, M. K.

    1974-01-01

    Blood flow velocity measurements, using Doppler velocimeter, are described. The ability to measure blood velocity using ultrasound is derived from the Doppler effect; the change in frequency which occurs when sound is reflected or transmitted from a moving target. When ultrasound of the appropriate frequency is transmitted through a moving blood stream, the blood cells act as point scatterers of ultrasonic energy. If this scattered ultrasonic energy is detected, it is found to be shifted in frequency according to the velocity of the blood cells, nu, the frequency of the incident sound, f sub o, the speed of sound in the medium, c, and the angle between the sound beam and the velocity vector, o. The relation describing this effect is known as the Doppler equation. Delta f = 2 f sub o x nu x cos alpha/c. The theoretical and experimental methods are evaluated.

  3. Flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, George C.

    1987-01-01

    A method of measuring the result of a binding assay that does not require separation of fluorescent smaller particles is disclosed. In a competitive binding assay the smaller fluorescent particles coated with antigen compete with antigen in the sample being analyzed for available binding sites on larger particles. In a sandwich assay, the smaller, fluorescent spheres coated with antibody attach themselves to molecules containing antigen that are attached to larger spheres coated with the same antibody. The separation of unattached, fluorescent smaller particles is made unnecessary by only counting the fluorescent events triggered by the laser of a flow cytometer when the event is caused by a particle with a light scatter measurement within a certain range corresponding to the presence of larger particles.

  4. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1984-05-30

    The invention relates to a method of measuring binding assays carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also a known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The binding reactant is the same as the binding reactant present in the sample. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number and strength of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating. (LEW)

  5. Three dimensional flow measurements in a turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabakoff, W.; Vittal, B. V. R.; Wood, B.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine experimentally the flow behavior in combined scroll nozzle assembly of a radial inflow turbine. Hot film anemometry technique was used to measure the three dimensional flow velocity in the scroll. The through flow and secondary flow velocity components are measured at various points in three scroll sections.

  6. Flowmeter measures flow rates of high temperature fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1966-01-01

    Flowmeter in which flow rate is determined by measuring the position and thus the displacement of an internal float acted upon by the flowing fluid determines the flow rates of various liquid metals at elevated temperatures. Viscous forces cause the float to move from its mounted position, affording several means for measuring this motion and the flow rate.

  7. [Aortic flow measurement by transesophageal Doppler effect].

    PubMed

    Cathignol, D; Lavandier, B; Muchada, R

    1985-01-01

    Continuous measurement of cardiac output by thermodilution is invasive, impractical and unpleasant for the patient. We propose to measure descending aortic blood flow with a specially designed intra-oesophageal Doppler echo probe. The apparatus is composed of two main parts. First an A scan system makes possible the measurement of the diameter of the vessel, second a continuous wave velocimeter is used to measure the spatial mean velocity of the blood. An output calculator determines the descending aortic blood flow. The oesophageal catheter contains three ultrasonic transducers at its tip mounted on an epoxy resin bracket produced by moulding. They are connected to a flexible hose placed inside a flexible polyvinyl sheath whose outer diameter is 6.8 mm and length is 50 cm. A cylindrical latex balloon is mounted on this sheath which is water inflated to minimum pressure, ensuring a good ultrasonic coupling between the transducers and the oesophageal wall. Connection between the probe and the apparatus is made by three coaxial cables. Three isolator-transformers are built into the connector cable to ensure a safe electrical circuit. After having bled the probe of any air, the balloon is deflated. The probe is gently introduced into the oesophagus by nasal or oral route until the transducers are situated between the 5th and 6th vertebra. The balloon is then inflated to minimum pressure with 10 ml of distilled water contained in a syringe. To find the aorta, the velocimeter is first used like a Doppler stethoscope. The probe is rotated into a position corresponding to the maximum level of Doppler signal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Corrections on LIFPA velocity measurements in microchannel with moderate velocity fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Khan, Jamil; Reifsnider, Ken; Wang, Guiren

    2015-02-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer (LIFPA) has been developed in order to measure velocity fluctuations of the unsteady micro electrokinetic turbulent flows in microfluidics. The statistical errors of LIFPA measurement, because of 3-D flows and Taylor's hypothesis (compared with local Taylor's hypothesis Pinton and Labbé in J Phys II 4:1461-1468, 1994), are theoretically estimated and compared to hot-wire anemometer (HWA) measurement that is used for conventional turbulence measurement. The correction factor in the direction parallel to the laser beam is estimated, and the influence of directional correction factors of LIFPA is also investigated. It is found that in our investigation, the error due to Taylor's hypothesis is negligible. The influence of 3-D flows on the first derivative variance of velocity fluctuations in LIFPA is smaller than that in HWA measurement.

  9. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Than X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for monitoring the presence, concentration, and the movement of fluids. It is based on utilizing electromagnetic measurements of the complex permittivity of the fluids for detecting and monitoring the fluid. More particularly the apparatus uses one or more microwave probes which are placed at the locations where the measurements are to be made. A radio frequency signal is transmitted to the probe and the reflected signal is phase and amplitude detected at a rapid rate for the purpose of identifying the fluids, based on their dielectric constant at the probe. The apparatus can be used for multiple purposes including measures of flow rates, turbulence, dispersion, fluid identification, and changes in flow conditions of multiple fluids or multiple states of a single fluid in a flowline or a holding container. The apparatus includes a probe consisting of two electrical conductors separated by an insulator. A radio frequency signal is communicated to the probe and is reflected back from the portion of the probe exposed to the fluid. The radio frequency signal also provides a reference signal. An oscillator generates a second signal which combined with each of the reference signal and the reflected signal to produce signals of lower frequencies to facilitate filtering and amplifying those signals. The two signals are then mixed in a detector to produce an output signal that is representative of the phase and amplitude change caused by the reflection of the signal at the probe exposed to the fluid. The detector may be a dual phase detector that provides two such output signals that are in phase quadrature. A phase shifter may be provided for selectively changing the phase of the reference signal to improve the sensitivity of at least one of the output signals for more accurate readings and/or for calibration purposes. The two outputs that are in quadrature with respect to each other may be simultaneously monitored to account for

  10. Assessing stability in mild and moderate Parkinson's disease: Can clinical measures provide insight?

    PubMed

    Hubble, Ryan P; Silburn, Peter A; Naughton, Geraldine A; Cole, Michael H

    2016-09-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the relationship between accelerometer-derived measures of movement rhythmicity and clinical measures of mobility, balance confidence and gait difficulty in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty-nine independently-living PD patients (Hoehn & Yahr Stages 1-3) with no history of significant injury or orthopaedic/deep brain stimulation surgery were recruited from a database of patients who had expressed an interest to participate in research. Participants completed clinical assessments of mobility, postural stability, balance confidence and symptom severity, while head and trunk rhythmicity was evaluated during gait using accelerometers. Following data collection, patients were stratified based on disease stage into either a Mild (Hoehn & Yahr Stage 1) or Moderate (Hoehn & Yahr Stages 2-3) PD group. The results highlighted that the Moderate PD group had poorer quality of life, reduced balance confidence and increased gait and falls difficulty. Furthermore, for these patients, gait disability and the number of previous falls were both negatively correlated with multiple components of head and trunk rhythmicity. For the Mild PD group, six-meter walk time was positively correlated with ML head rhythmicity and linear regression highlighted a significant predictive relationship between these outcomes. For the Mild and Moderate PD groups, balance confidence respectively predicted anterior-posterior trunk rhythmicity and vertical head rhythmicity. While these findings demonstrate that falls history and the Gait and Falls questionnaire provide moderate insight into head and trunk rhythmicity in Moderate PD patients, objective and clinically-feasible measures of postural instability would assist with the management of these symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  12. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  13. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    SciTech Connect

    Raptis, A.C.

    1981-07-17

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow is disclosed. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  14. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of one percent of full-scale flow rate for each... ±five percent of full-scale flow rate for the measurement range used. The controlling parameters are the...

  15. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of one percent of full-scale flow rate for each... ±five percent of full-scale flow rate for the measurement range used. The controlling parameters are the...

  16. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of one percent of full-scale flow rate for each... ±five percent of full-scale flow rate for the measurement range used. The controlling parameters are the...

  17. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate measurement...

  18. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate measurement...

  19. A screening test for unstimulated salivary flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Margherita; Zunt, Susan; Eckert, George J; Zero, Domenick

    2005-01-01

    It is well established that saliva is an important factor for the health of both soft and hard tissues in the oral cavity. This study determined: 1) the correlation between unstimulated salivary flow assessed using the Modified Schirmer tear strip Test (MST), with gravimetric and volumetric measurements and 2) the MST value that would allow the most reliable identification of patients with severe (<0.1 ml/minute) and moderate (<0.2 ml/minute) hyposalivation. A retrospective clinical study was conducted using data from 90 patients seen at the Indiana University School of Dentistry. All patients had a sample of unstimulated whole saliva collected by drooling for five minutes for volumetric/gravimetric assessment, followed by placement of the Schirmer strip in the floor of the mouth for three minutes (MST). Results showed a non-linear association between the MST and volumetric/gravimetric methods, with moderate Spearman correlation coefficients (0.67-0.71). Analysis of ROC-curves suggests that a cutoff screening value of 25 mm/three minutes provides high sensitivity (77%) and positive predictive value (71%) without significantly affecting specificity (80%). In conclusion, this study supports use of the MST test as a screening tool for hyposalivation.

  20. Measuring vortical flows in the solar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfellner, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This thesis focuses on observations of the effects of rotation on solar convection at the length scales of supergranulation and larger (>30 Mm). Rotation drives vortical flows through the Coriolis force and causes anisotropic velocity correlations that are believed to influence the large-scale solar dynamics. We obtain horizontal flows using photospheric Doppler velocity and continuum intensity images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft via the techniques of time-distance helioseismology (TD) and local correlation tracking (LCT) of granules. In time-distance helioseismology, the local vertical vorticity can be measured by taking the difference between wave travel times measured in the anti-clockwise and clockwise directions along a closed contour. The agreement between the TD and LCT methods is excellent up to ±60° latitude, provided that a center-to-limb correction is applied. Averaging over longitude, one finds that there is a small but significant correlation between the horizontal divergence and the vertical vorticity component of supergranular flows away from the solar equator. By comparison to a noise model, we find that the TD technique can be used to probe the vertical vorticity of flows on spatial scales larger than about 15 Mm, thus including supergranules and also giant cells. We also find that the vertical vorticity signal is much easier to measure using SDO/HMI observations than previous observations. The impact of the Sun's rotation on supergranulation is studied in detail by making spatial maps of the vertical vorticity of the flows associated with the average supergranule. The average supergranule is constructed by co-aligning thousands of individual supergranules in a given latitude band. For the first time, we are able to spatially resolve vorticity associated with inflows and outflow regions. In the northern hemisphere, outflows are on average associated with a clockwise

  1. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-10-12

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible. 3 figures.

  2. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible.

  3. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible.

  4. Pulmonary O2 uptake and leg blood flow kinetics during moderate exercise are slowed by hyperventilation-induced hypocapnic alkalosis

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Lisa M. K.; Heigenhauser, George J. F.; Paterson, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hyperventilation-induced hypocapnic alkalosis (Hypo) on the adjustment of pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2p) and leg femoral conduit artery (“bulk”) blood flow (LBF) during moderate-intensity exercise (Mod) was examined in eight young male adults. Subjects completed four to six repetitions of alternate-leg knee-extension exercise during normal breathing [Con; end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PetCO2) ∼40 mmHg] and sustained hyperventilation (Hypo; PetCO2 ∼20 mmHg). Increases in work rate were made instantaneously from baseline (3 W) to Mod (80% estimated lactate threshold). V̇o2p was measured breath by breath by mass spectrometry and volume turbine, and LBF (calculated from mean femoral artery blood velocity and femoral artery diameter) was measured simultaneously by Doppler ultrasound. Concentration changes of deoxy (Δ[HHb])-, oxy (Δ[O2Hb])-, and total hemoglobin-myoglobin (Δ[HbTot]) of the vastus lateralis muscle were measured continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The kinetics of V̇o2p, LBF, and Δ[HHb] were modeled using a monoexponential equation by nonlinear regression. The time constants for the phase 2 V̇o2p (Hypo, 49 ± 26 s; Con, 28 ± 8 s) and LBF (Hypo, 46 ± 16 s; Con, 23 ± 6 s) were greater (P < 0.05) in Hypo compared with Con. However, the mean response time for the overall Δ[HHb] response was not different between conditions (Hypo, 23 ± 5 s; Con, 24 ± 3 s), whereas the Δ[HHb] amplitude was greater (P < 0.05) in Hypo (8.05 ± 7.47 a.u.) compared with Con (6.69 ± 6.31 a.u.). Combined, these results suggest that hyperventilation-induced hypocapnic alkalosis is associated with slower convective (i.e., slowed femoral artery and microvascular blood flow) and diffusive (i.e., greater fractional O2 extraction for a given ΔV̇o2p) O2 delivery, which may contribute to the hyperventilation-induced slowing of V̇o2p (and muscle O2 utilization) kinetics. PMID:20339012

  5. 40 CFR 92.107 - Fuel flow measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement. 92.107 Section...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.107 Fuel flow measurement. (a) Fuel flow measurement for locomotive and engine testing. The rate of fuel consumption by...

  6. 40 CFR 92.107 - Fuel flow measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Fuel flow measurement. 92.107 Section...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.107 Fuel flow measurement. (a) Fuel flow measurement for locomotive and engine testing. The rate of fuel consumption by...

  7. 40 CFR 92.107 - Fuel flow measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement. 92.107 Section...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.107 Fuel flow measurement. (a) Fuel flow measurement for locomotive and engine testing. The rate of fuel consumption by...

  8. 40 CFR 92.107 - Fuel flow measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement. 92.107 Section...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.107 Fuel flow measurement. (a) Fuel flow measurement for locomotive and engine testing. The rate of fuel consumption by...

  9. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method...

  10. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  11. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  12. Bodies in flowing plasmas - Spacecraft measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samir, U.

    1981-01-01

    Results are reviewed from in-situ measurements relevant to the interaction of bodies in flowing plasmas. A brief discussion is given of the interaction in the general context of space plasma physics, including possible applications to solar-system plasmas. Attention is given to the mode of experimentation in the Shuttle/Spacelab era. It is noted that the majority of in-situ investigations during the past decade were limited to the very near surface of ionospheric satellites. It is expected that experiments to be carried out on board the Spacelab/Orbiter will make possible well-planned controlled experiments in the area of body-plasma interactions in its widest sense.

  13. Measuring sickle cell morphology during blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kviatkovsky, Inna; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Shabad, Eveline L; Dann, Eldad J; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-03-01

    During a sickle cell crisis in sickle cell anemia patients, deoxygenated red blood cells may change their mechanical properties and block small blood vessels, causing pain, local tissue damage, and possibly organ failure. Measuring the structural and morphological changes in sickle cells is important for understanding the factors contributing to vessel blockage and for developing an effective treatment. In this work, we image blood cells from sickle cell anemia patients using spectrally encoded flow cytometry, and analyze the interference patterns between reflections from the cell membranes. Using a numerical simulation for calculating the interference pattern obtained from a model of a red blood cell, we propose an analytical expression for the three-dimensional shape of characteristic sickle cells and compare our results to a previously suggested model. Our imaging approach offers new means for analyzing the morphology of sickle cells, and could be useful for studying their unique physiological and biomechanical properties.

  14. Novel laser Doppler flowmeter for pulpal blood flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, De Yu; Millerd, James E.; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.

    1996-04-01

    We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated a new configuration of laser Doppler flowmetry for dental pulpal blood flow measurements. To date, the vitality of a tooth can be determined only by subjective thermal or electric tests, which are of questionable reliability and may induced pain in patient. Non-invasive techniques for determining pulpal vascular reactions to injury, treatment, and medication are in great demand. The laser Doppler flowmetry technique is non-invasive; however, clinical studies have shown that when used to measure pulpal blood flow the conventional back-scattering Doppler method suffers from low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and unreliable flux readings rendering it impossible to calibrate. A simplified theoretical model indicates that by using a forward scattered geometry the detected signal has a much higher SNR and can be calibrated. The forward scattered signal is readily detectable due to the fact that teeth are relatively thin organs with moderate optical loss. A preliminary experiment comparing forward scattered detection with conventional back- scattered detection was carried out using an extracted human molar. The results validated the findings of the simple theoretical model and clearly showed the utility of the forward scattering geometry. The back-scattering method had readings that fluctuated by as much as 187% in response to small changes in sensor position relative to the tooth. The forward scattered method had consistent readings (within 10%) that were independent of the sensor position, a signal-to-noise ratio that was at least 5.6 times higher than the back-scattering method, and a linear response to flow rate.

  15. Evaluation of the Boron Dilution Method for Moderator Temperature Coefficient Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demaziere, Christophe; Pazsit, Imre; Por, Gabor

    2002-11-15

    A measurement of the at-power moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) at the pressurized water reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. The measurement was performed when the boron concentration decreased under 300 ppm in the reactor coolant system, by using the boron dilution method. Detailed calculations were made to estimate all reactivity effects taking place during such a measurement. These effects can only be accounted for through static core calculations that allow calculating contributions to the reactivity change induced by the moderator temperature change. All the calculations were performed with the Studsvik Scandpower SIMULATE-3 code. Analysis of the measurement showed that the contribution of the Doppler effect (in the fuel) was almost negligible, whereas the reactivity effects due to other than the Doppler fuel coefficient and the boron change were surprisingly significant. It was concluded that due to the experimental inaccuracies, the uncertainty associated with the boron dilution method could be much larger than previously expected. The MTC might then be close to -72 pcm/degC, whereas the main goal of the measurement is to verify that the MTC is larger (less negative) than this threshold. The usefulness of the boron dilution method for MTC measurements can therefore be questioned.

  16. In Situ Measurement of Ground-Surface Flow Resistivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    New instrument allows in situ measurement of flow resistivity on Earth's ground surface. Nonintrusive instrument includes specimen holder inserted into ground. Flow resistivity measured by monitoring compressed air passing through flow-meters; pressure gages record pressure at ground surface. Specimen holder with knife-edged inner and outer cylinders easily driven into ground. Air-stream used in measuring flow resistivity of ground enters through quick-connect fitting and exits through screen and venthole.

  17. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Fuel flow measurement specifications. 89.415 Section 89.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate...

  18. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications. 89.415 Section 89.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate...

  19. Kinetic measurements of hand motor impairments after mild to moderate stroke using grip control tasks.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu; Ma, Le; Yan, Tiebin; Liu, Huihua; Wei, Xijun; Song, Rong

    2014-05-11

    The aim of this study is to investigate quantitative outcome measurements of hand motor performance for subjects after mild to moderate stroke using grip control tasks and characterize abnormal flexion synergy of upper extremities after stroke. A customized dynamometer with force sensors was used to measure grip force and calculate rotation torque during the sub-maximal grip control tasks. The paretic and nonpartic sides of eleven subjects after stroke and the dominant sides of ten healthy persons were tested. Their maximal voluntary grip force was measured and used to set sub-maximal grip control tasks at three different target force levels. Force control ability was characterized by the maximal grip force, mean force percentage, coefficient of variation (CV), target deviation ratio (TDR), and rotation torque ratio (RTR). The motor impairments of subjects after stroke were also evaluated using the Fugl-Meyer assessment for upper extremity (FMA-UE) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Maximal grip force of the paretic side was significantly reduced as compared to the nonparetic side and the healthy group, while the difference of maximal grip force between the nonparetic side and the healthy group was not significant. TDR and RTR increased for all three groups with increasing target force level. There were significant differences of CV, TDR and RTR between the paretic side and the healthy group at all the force levels. CV, TDR and RTR showed significant negative correlations with FMA-UE and WMFT at 50% of maximum grip force. This study designed a customized dynamometer together with an innovative measurement, RTR, to investigate the hand motor performance of subjects after mild to moderate stroke during force control tasks. And stroke-induced abnormal flexion synergy of wrist and finger muscles could be characterized by RTR. This study also identified a set of kinetic parameters which can be applied to quantitatively assess the hand motor function of subjects after

  20. Flow in a differentially rotated cylindrical drop at moderate Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriott, G. M.; Brown, R. A.

    1984-07-01

    Galerkin finite-element approximations are combined with computer-implemented perturbation methods for tracking families of solutions to calculate the steady axisymmetric flows in a differentially rotated cylindrical drop as a function of Reynolds number Re, drop aspect ratio and the rotation ratio between the two end disks. The flows for Reynolds numbers below 100 are primarily viscous and reasonably described by an asymptotic analysis. When the disks are exactly counter-rotated, multiple steady flows are calculated that bifurcate to higher values of Re from the expected solution with two identical secondary cells stacked symmetrically about the axial midplane. The new flows have two cells of different size and are stable beyond the critical value Re sub c. The slope of the locus of Re sub c for drops with aspect ratio up to 3 disagrees with the result for two disks of infinite radius computed assuming the similarity form of the velocity field. Changing the rotation ratio for exact counter-rotation ruptures the junction of the multiple flow fields into two separated flow families.

  1. An experimental investigation of moderate reynolds number flow in a T-Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Susan; Ameel, Timothy A.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental investigation of water flow in a T-shaped channel with rectangular cross section (20 × 20 mm inlet ID and 20 × 40 mm outlet ID) has been conducted for a Reynolds number Re range of 56-422, based on inlet diameter. Dynamical conditions and the T-channel geometry of the current study are applicable to the microscale. 2-D planar particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were used in multiple locations of the T-channel to investigate local dynamical behaviors. Steady symmetric and asymmetric flow regimes predicted in the literature, which is largely numerical, are experimentally verified. Unsteady flow regimes, which are numerically predicted to occur at higher Re but have not yet been experimentally characterized, are also examined, and real-time LIF results illuminate the evolution of unsteady structure. Experimental data of the present resolution and scope are not presently available for unsteady flow regimes. Time scales are presented for unsteady flow regimes, which are found to exhibit periodic behavior and to occur for Re ≥ 195. An unsteady symmetrical regime is identified for Re ≥ 350 that is detrimental to mixing. Momentum fields and dynamical behaviors of all flow regimes are characterized in detail, such that published mixing trends may be better understood. Results of all experimental trials were used to construct a regime map. A symmetric topology is found to be dominant for Re from 56 to 116, when flow is steady, and 350 to 422, when flow is characterized by unsteady stagnation-point oscillation in the T-channel junction. Asymmetric flow, which is positively indicated for mixing, is dominant for Re between 142 and 298, and the fluid interface exhibits both steady (two standing vortices) and unsteady (shear-layer type roll-up) behaviors. This result is based on multiple experiments and suggests a practical operating range of 142 ≤ Re ≤ 298 where asymmetric flow is highly likely to experimentally occur

  2. Laboratory evaluation of microwave Doppler velocimeter for solid flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Wang, H. G.; Isa, M.; Liu, C. G.

    2014-04-01

    Pneumatic-conveyed solid flows are common in many industrial processes. The flow speed may be high and varying. The density of solids may also change with time. The mass flow rate is usually difficult to quantify for such multphase flows. On the other hand, microwave Doppler radar has been used as a device for velocity measurement or motion detection. It would be feasible to use such a device for solid flow measurements. In this paper, the principle of using microwave Doppler radar for such an application is investigated. Experimental results obtained using a microwave Doppler velocimeter for different types of solid flows in a laboratory environment are presented.

  3. Asymptotic theory of two-phase gas-solid flow through a vertical tube at moderate pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Y. A.; Zhurov, A. I.

    1997-02-01

    Based on the equations, constitutive relations and boundary conditions of the kinetic theory of colliding particles in a gas-solid suspension, the approximate theory of the steady, developed vertical flow of a gas-particulate mixture is developed for the case of moderate gas pressure gradient in a vertical tube. The basic equations and boundary conditions show a singular behaviour of the solution of the problem at the wall. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is applied to develop a boundary layer-type theory for the flow parameters of the particulate phase. The basic equations in the bulk flow are reduced to a system of two ordinary integrodifferential equations for the particle-phase concentration and mean kinetic energy of particle velocity fluctuations (particle-phase pseudotemperature). The distributions of the particle concentration and velocity are found in both the bulk and the boundary layer. The solutions shows the bifurcation of flow parameters, and an explicit criterion is derived to identify a range of the given macroscopic parameters corresponding to upward or downward particulate flow. The integrated parameters (total fluxes of the gas and particle phase) are calculated.

  4. Method and apparatus for coal analysis and flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rollwitz, W.L.; King, J.D.

    1985-07-23

    A flow meter apparatus and method for measuring the flow, composition and heat content of coal is set forth. In the preferred and illustrated embodiment, the free or unpaired electron population of flowing coal is measured by electron magnetic resonance (EMR); the hydrogen nucleii population is measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). By calibration utilizing a standard specimen for a given type of coal, a profile for various types of coal can be obtained wherein measurement data is converted into an indication of the heat content typically measured in BTU per pound. This enables provision of a volumetric flow meter, a flow meter indicating flow in calorie content. This device enables integration to provide total heat content flow. Other variables describing the coal can be obtained.

  5. Moderately converging ion and electron flows in two-dimensional diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavenago, M.

    2012-11-01

    Flow of particles in diodes is solved selfconsistently assuming an approximated system of flow lines, that can be easily represented by an analytic transformation in a complex plane, with assumed uniformity in the third spatial direction. Beam current compression is tunable by an angle parameter α0; transformed coordinate lines are circular arcs, exactly matching to the curved cathode usually considered by rectilinear converging flows. The curvature of flow lines allows to partly balance the transverse effect of space charge. A self-contained discussion of the whole theory is reported, ranging from analytical solution for selfconsistent potential to electrode drawing to precise numerical simulation, which serves as a verification and as an illustration of typical electrode shapes. Motion and Poisson equation are written in a curved flow line system and their approximate consistency is shown to imply an ordinary differential equation for the beam edge potential. Transformations of this equation and their series solutions are given and discussed, showing that beam edge potential has a maximum, so supporting both diode (with α0 ≅ π/3) and triode design. Numerical simulations confirm the consistency of these solution. Geometrical details of diode design are discussed: the condition of a zero divergence beam, with the necessary anode lens effect included, is written and solved, as a function of beam compression; accurate relations for diode parameters and perveance are given. Weakly relativistic effects including self-magnetic field are finally discussed as a refinement.

  6. Numerical Dissipation and Subgrid Scale Modeling for Separated Flows at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieux, Francois; Domaradzki, Julian Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    Flows in rotating machinery, for unmanned and micro aerial vehicles, wind turbines, and propellers consist of different flow regimes. First, a laminar boundary layer is followed by a laminar separation bubble with a shear layer on top of it that experiences transition to turbulence. The separated turbulent flow then reattaches and evolves downstream from a nonequilibrium turbulent boundary layer to an equilibrium one. In previous work, the capability of LES to reduce the resolution requirements down to 1 % of DNS resolution for such flows was demonstrated (Cadieux et al., JFE 136-6). However, under-resolved DNS agreed better with the benchmark DNS than simulations with explicit SGS modeling because numerical dissipation and filtering alone acted as a surrogate SGS dissipation. In the present work numerical viscosity is quantified using a new method proposed recently by Schranner et al. and its effects are analyzed and compared to turbulent eddy viscosities of explicit SGS models. The effect of different SGS models on a simulation of the same flow using a non-dissipative code is also explored. Supported by NSF.

  7. Moderately converging ion and electron flows in two-dimensional diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.

    2012-11-15

    Flow of particles in diodes is solved selfconsistently assuming an approximated system of flow lines, that can be easily represented by an analytic transformation in a complex plane, with assumed uniformity in the third spatial direction. Beam current compression is tunable by an angle parameter {alpha}{sub 0}; transformed coordinate lines are circular arcs, exactly matching to the curved cathode usually considered by rectilinear converging flows. The curvature of flow lines allows to partly balance the transverse effect of space charge. A self-contained discussion of the whole theory is reported, ranging from analytical solution for selfconsistent potential to electrode drawing to precise numerical simulation, which serves as a verification and as an illustration of typical electrode shapes. Motion and Poisson equation are written in a curved flow line system and their approximate consistency is shown to imply an ordinary differential equation for the beam edge potential. Transformations of this equation and their series solutions are given and discussed, showing that beam edge potential has a maximum, so supporting both diode (with {alpha}{sub 0}{approx_equal}{pi}/3) and triode design. Numerical simulations confirm the consistency of these solution. Geometrical details of diode design are discussed: the condition of a zero divergence beam, with the necessary anode lens effect included, is written and solved, as a function of beam compression; accurate relations for diode parameters and perveance are given. Weakly relativistic effects including self-magnetic field are finally discussed as a refinement.

  8. Evaluation of a watershed model for estimating daily flow using limited flow measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was evaluated for estimation of continuous daily flow based on limited flow measurements in the Upper Oyster Creek (UOC) watershed. SWAT was calibrated against limited measured flow data and then validated. The Nash-Sutcliffe model Efficiency (NSE) and...

  9. Effects of mild (33 degrees C) and moderate (29 degrees C) hypothermia on cerebral blood flow and metabolism, lactate, and extracellular glutamate in experimental head injury.

    PubMed

    Mori, K; Maeda, M; Miyazaki, M; Iwase, H

    1998-12-01

    The effects of mild (33 degrees C) and moderate (29 degrees C) hypothermia were investigated to determine which temperature was more effective against compression-induced cerebral ischemia. Eighteen cats were anesthetized. The animals were divided into three groups according to deep-brain temperature (control, 37 degrees C; mild hypothermia, 33 degrees C; and moderate hypothermia, 29 degrees C). Intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were monitored, the latter by hydrogen clearance. Arteriovenous oxygen difference (AVDO2) and cerebral venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) were measured in blood samples from the superior sagittal sinus. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and the cerebral metabolic rate of lactate (CMR lactate) were calculated. Extracellular glutamate was measured by microdialysis. ICP was increased by inflation of an epidural balloon until CBF became zero, and this ischemia was maintained for 5 min, after which the balloon was quickly deflated. All parameters were recorded over 6 h. Evans blue was injected to examine vascular permeability changes. CBF was decreased by 56% by mild hypothermia and by 77% by moderate hypothermia. Mild hypothermia had a coupled metabolic suppression whereas moderate hypothermia significantly increased AVDO2 and decreased ScvO2, producing a low CBF/CMRO2 (relative ischemia). After balloon deflation, all three groups showed reactive hyperemia, which was significantly reduced by mild and moderate hypothermia. CBF then decreased to 50% of pre-inflation values and ScvO2 decreased (post-ischemic hypoperfusion). CBF/CMRO2, ScvO2, and AVDO2 did not differ significantly between the three groups. After balloon deflation, all three groups showed increased CMR lactate, which was significantly reduced by mild and moderate hypothermia. Extracellular glutamate increased in control animals (3.8 +/- 1.72 microM), an effect most effectively suppressed in the mild hypothermia group (1.0 +/- 0.46 microM). Damaged

  10. System for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method and system for measuring a multi-phase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multi-phase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The system for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes taking into account a pressure drop experienced by the gas phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase.

  11. Ocular blood flow measurements in healthy human myopic eyes.

    PubMed

    Benavente-Pérez, Alexandra; Hosking, Sarah L; Logan, Nicola S; Broadway, David C

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the haemodynamic features of young healthy myopes and emmetropes, in order to ascertain the perfusion profile of human myopia and its relationship with axial length prior to reaching a degenerative state. The retrobulbar, microretinal and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) of one eye of each of twenty-two high myopes (N = 22, mean spherical equivalent (MSE) ≤-5.00D), low myopes (N = 22, MSE-1.00 to-4.50D) and emmetropes (N = 22, MSE ± 0.50D) was analyzed using color Doppler Imaging, Heidelberg retinal flowmetry and ocular blood flow analyser (OBF) respectively. Intraocular pressure, axial length (AL), systemic blood pressure, and body mass index were measured. When compared to the emmetropes and low myopes, the AL was greater in high myopia (p < 0.0001). High myopes showed higher central retinal artery resistance index (CRA RI) (p = 0.004), higher peak systolic to end diastolic velocities ratio (CRA ratio) and lower end diastolic velocity (CRA EDv) compared to low myopes (p = 0.014, p = 0.037). Compared to emmetropes, high myopes showed lower OBFamplitude (OBFa) (p = 0.016). The POBF correlated significantly with the systolic and diastolic blood velocities of the CRA (p = 0.016, p = 0.036). MSE and AL correlated negatively with OBFa (p = 0.03, p = 0.003), OBF volume (p = 0.02, p < 0.001), POBF (p = 0.01, p < 0.001) and positively with CRA RI (p = 0.007, p = 0.05). High myopes exhibited significantly reduced pulse amplitude and CRA blood velocity, the first of which may be due to an OBF measurement artefact or real decreased ocular blood flow pulsatility. Axial length and refractive error correlated moderately with the ocular pulse and with the resistance index of the CRA, which in turn correlated amongst themselves. It is hypothesized that the compromised pulsatile and CRA haemodynamics observed in young healthy myopes is an early feature of the decrease in ocular blood flow

  12. Multiphase Flow Measurements by Full Stream Batch Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Liang, Fa-Chun; Zhang, Xiu-Gang; Lin, Zong-Hu

    2007-06-01

    A new method of multiphase flow measurements that based on the "extracting and separating method" was proposed in this paper. An extraction flow (or sample) is diverted in a manner of time sharing or full stream batch sampling, then the sample is separated into single phase flows and metered with conventional flow meters, the total flow rates of each phase are determined according to the metered values and the extraction ratios. Because the full stream is conducted to the extraction loop during sampling, no matter what the flow regime of multiphase flow is, the extracted stream (or sample) is always the representative of the total stream and the extraction ratio can keep stable. Experiments were conducted in an air-water-oil flow test loop, the inside pipe diameter of the test loop was 50 mm, and the superficial gas velocity varied from 4.5 m/s ˜22m/s, the liquid superficial velocity was in the range of 0.02˜0.3m/s, the oil concentration was in the range of 0.0%˜60% by volume. The flow pattern occurring during the experiments included stratified flow, wave flow and annular flow. The experimental results shown that the full stream batch sample method is feasible to measure the multiphase flow rate, and the average error of flow rates measurements for each phase was less than 3.82%.

  13. Continuous flow measurements using fixed ultrasonic meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltmann, Rick

    1993-01-01

    USGS has or soon will be installing four continuous flow-monitoring stations in the delta that will use ultrasonic velocity meters (DVM). Funding for the stations has been provided by USGS, DWR, USBR, and Contra Costa Water District.

  14. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... during the test. Overall measurement accuracy must be ± 2 percent of the maximum engine value for all...

  15. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... during the test. Overall measurement accuracy must be ± 2 percent of the maximum engine value for all...

  16. [Improve, but measure in moderation; quality management in specialty residency training].

    PubMed

    Ter Braak, E W M T

    2017-01-01

    Intuitively, we believe we gain knowledge through taking measurements, and our appetite for quality measurement in general has grown spectacularly. However, this approach has to be qualified. Many aspects of quality are difficult to measure, yet are very important, and choosing what to measure may be heavily influenced by the availability bias of instruments. Moreover, a lot can be known without actually measuring. Quantitative results tend to offer false reassurance simply by their abundance, and results presented by means of Likert scales may obscure the crucial critique of a minority of respondents. Narrative comments in surveys are often much more meaningful as they can foster an open dialogue between residents and their clinical teachers, preferably led by a neutral chairperson. Contrary to what is often claimed, it is even possible to engage in improvement without prior measurement. I propose measuring only in moderation and instead devoting time and money to patient care and educating residents, and on the design and execution of improvement plans.

  17. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 6: Flow measurement instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    A summary is provided of information available on liquid and gaseous oxygen flowmetering including an evaluation of commercial meters. The instrument types, physical principles of measurement, and performance characteristics are described. Problems concerning flow measurements of less than plus or minus two percent uncertainty are reviewed. Recommendations concerning work on flow reference systems, the use of surrogate fluids, and standard tests for oxygen flow measurements are also presented.

  18. On the Scaling of Small, Heat Simulated Jet Noise Measurements to Moderate Size Exhaust Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlin, Dennis K.; Bridges, James; Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable geometry nozzles to provide optimum thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, the acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometry of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at The Pennsylvania State University and the NASA Glenn Research Center- in partnership with GE Aviation is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles. An equally important objective is to validate methodology for using data obtained from small and moderate scale experiments to reliably predict the most important components of full scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small scale and moderate scale jet acoustic data, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones. Unresolved issues however are identified that are currently receiving our attention, in particular the effect of the small bypass ratio airflow. Future activities will identify and test promising noise reduction techniques in an effort to predict how well such concepts will work with full scale engines in flight conditions.

  19. Effects of moderate and severe malnutrition in rats on splenic T lymphocyte subsets and activation assessed by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Barberena, E; González-Márquez, H; Gómez-Olivares, J L; Ortiz-Muñiz, R

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition is distributed widely throughout the world and is a particular problem in developing countries. Laboratory animals have been very useful in studying the effects of varying levels of malnutrition because non-nutritional factors that affect humans may be controlled. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of moderate and severe malnutrition on lymphocyte proportions and activation markers of T cells in experimentally malnourished rats during lactation by flow cytometry. Lower absolute (total) and relative (%) numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ lymphocyte subpopulations were observed in moderately (second degree) and severely (third degree) malnourished rats compared with well-nourished rats (P < 0·05). Both groups of malnourished rats showed a significant decrease in the percentage of CD71+ cells at 24 h post-activation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). After 24 h activation of spleen cells with PHA, a lower percentage of CD25+ cells was observed in malnourished than well-nourished rats (P < 0·05). In conclusion, the results of this study indicated an altered expression of CD71 and CD25 during activation of T lymphocytes in malnourished rats and may partially explain increased susceptibility to infection associated with malnutrition. Moreover, these results demonstrated that moderate malnutrition affects the response of T lymphocytes as much as severe malnutrition. PMID:18373698

  20. Effects of moderate and severe malnutrition in rats on splenic T lymphocyte subsets and activation assessed by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Barberena, E; González-Márquez, H; Gómez-Olivares, J L; Ortiz-Muñiz, R

    2008-06-01

    Malnutrition is distributed widely throughout the world and is a particular problem in developing countries. Laboratory animals have been very useful in studying the effects of varying levels of malnutrition because non-nutritional factors that affect humans may be controlled. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of moderate and severe malnutrition on lymphocyte proportions and activation markers of T cells in experimentally malnourished rats during lactation by flow cytometry. Lower absolute (total) and relative (%) numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ lymphocyte subpopulations were observed in moderately (second degree) and severely (third degree) malnourished rats compared with well-nourished rats (P < 0.05). Both groups of malnourished rats showed a significant decrease in the percentage of CD71+ cells at 24 h post-activation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). After 24 h activation of spleen cells with PHA, a lower percentage of CD25+ cells was observed in malnourished than well-nourished rats (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the results of this study indicated an altered expression of CD71 and CD25 during activation of T lymphocytes in malnourished rats and may partially explain increased susceptibility to infection associated with malnutrition. Moreover, these results demonstrated that moderate malnutrition affects the response of T lymphocytes as much as severe malnutrition.

  1. Laser Doppler anemometer signal processing for blood flow velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdova, M A; Fedosov, I V; Tuchin, V V

    2015-03-31

    A new method for analysing the signal in a laser Doppler anemometer based on the differential scheme is proposed, which provides the flow velocity measurement in strongly scattering liquids, particularly, blood. A laser Doppler anemometer intended for measuring the absolute blood flow velocity in animal and human near-surface arterioles and venules is developed. The laser Doppler anemometer signal structure is experimentally studied for measuring the flow velocity in optically inhomogeneous media, such as blood and suspensions of scattering particles. The results of measuring the whole and diluted blood flow velocity in channels with a rectangular cross section are presented. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Flow Measurement. Training Module 3.315.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the principles of liquid flow and the methods of measuring open channel and fuel pipe flow rates. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts, and transparency masters. The module addresses the basic flow formula, and…

  3. Field methods for measuring concentrated flow erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; Pérez, R.; James, M. R.; Quinton, J. N.; Taguas, E. V.; Gómez, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    techniques (3D) for measuring erosion from concentrated flow (pole, laser profilemeter, photo-reconstruction and terrestrial LiDAR) The comparison between two- and three-dimensional methods has showed the superiority of the 3D techniques for obtaining accurate cross sectional data. The results from commonly-used 2D methods can be subject to systematic errors in areal cross section that exceed magnitudes of 10 % on average. In particular, the pole simplified method has showed a clear tendency to understimate areas. Laser profilemeter results show that further research on calibrating optical devices for a variety of soil conditions must be carried out to improve its performance. For volume estimations, photo-reconstruction results provided an excellent approximation to terrestrial laser data and demonstrate that this new remote sensing technique has a promising application field in soil erosion studies. 2D approaches involved important errors even over short measurement distances. However, as well as accuracy, the cost and time requirements of a technique must be considered.

  4. Personal Computer System for Automatic Coronary Venous Flow Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Dew, Robert B.

    1985-01-01

    We developed an automated system based on an IBM PC/XT Personal computer to measure coronary venous blood flow during cardiac catheterization. Flow is determined by a thermodilution technique in which a cold saline solution is infused through a catheter into the coronary venous system. Regional temperature fluctuations sensed by the catheter are used to determine great cardiac vein and coronary sinus blood flow. The computer system replaces manual methods of acquiring and analyzing temperature data related to flow measurement, thereby increasing the speed and accuracy with which repetitive flow determinations can be made.

  5. Measurement and control systems for an imaging electromagnetic flow metre.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y Y; Lucas, G; Leeungculsatien, T

    2014-03-01

    Electromagnetic flow metres based on the principles of Faraday's laws of induction have been used successfully in many industries. The conventional electromagnetic flow metre can measure the mean liquid velocity in axisymmetric single phase flows. However, in order to achieve velocity profile measurements in single phase flows with non-uniform velocity profiles, a novel imaging electromagnetic flow metre (IEF) has been developed which is described in this paper. The novel electromagnetic flow metre which is based on the 'weight value' theory to reconstruct velocity profiles is interfaced with a 'Microrobotics VM1' microcontroller as a stand-alone unit. The work undertaken in the paper demonstrates that an imaging electromagnetic flow metre for liquid velocity profile measurement is an instrument that is highly suited for control via a microcontroller.

  6. Wind-flow measurement over the Subaru Telescope.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Hirofumi; Baba, Naoshi; Ohtsubo, Masashi; Norimoto, Yuji; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Miura, Noriaki

    2004-05-20

    Wind flows over the 8.2-m Subaru Telescope at Mauna Kea in Hawaii were analyzed with a correlation method. Three or four wind flows were detected from our measurements. Spatial and temporal resolution of the wind-flow analysis across the 8.2 m pupil were investigated experimentally. A three-dimensional spatiotemporal-frequency analysis was also applied to the wind-flow data.

  7. Energy flow measurements in acoustic waves in a duct.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi

    2006-12-22

    Where, how much and how efficiently the energy conversion takes place in a regenerator of a thermoacoustic engine are expressed using the axial distribution of acoustic work flow and heat flow. As a first step in determining the energy flows inside the regenerator, measuring methods of the work flow are briefly described and the experimental results in an acoustic resonator are shown. Applicability of these methods to the regenerator is discussed.

  8. The effect of stretch-and-flow voice therapy on measures of vocal function and handicap.

    PubMed

    Watts, Christopher R; Diviney, Shelby S; Hamilton, Amy; Toles, Laura; Childs, Lesley; Mau, Ted

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the efficacy of stretch-and-flow voice therapy as a primary physiological treatment for patients with hyperfunctional voice disorders. Prospective case series. Participants with a diagnosis of primary muscle tension dysphonia or phonotraumatic lesions due to hyperfunctional vocal behaviors were included. Participants received stretch-and-flow voice therapy structured once weekly for 6 weeks. Outcome variables consisted of two physiologic measures (s/z ratio and maximum phonation time), an acoustic measure (cepstral peak prominence [CPP]), and a measure of vocal handicap (voice handicap index [VHI]). All measures were obtained at baseline before treatment and within 2 weeks posttreatment. The s/z ratio, maximum phonation time, sentence CPP, and VHI showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) improvement through therapy. Effect sizes reflecting the magnitude of change were large for s/z ratio and VHI (d = 1.25 and 1.96 respectively), and moderate for maximum phonation time and sentence CPP (d = 0.79 and 0.74, respectively). This study provides supporting evidence for preliminary efficacy of stretch-and-flow voice therapy in a small sample of patients. The treatment effect was large or moderate for multiple outcome measures. The data provide justification for larger, controlled clinical trials on the application of stretch-and-flow voice therapy in the treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Drop-box Weir for Measuring Flow Rates Under Extreme Flow Conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sediment and large rocks often are transported in runoff during extreme events. The sediment can deposit in a runoff-measuring structure and give erroneous readings. The drop-box weir (DBW) is one of only a few flow-measuring devices capable of measuring sediment-laden flows. Recent studies have ...

  10. Turbulent Channel Flow Measurements Using Matched Hot-Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estejab, Baraheh; Bailey, Sean

    2011-11-01

    We present an experimental study conducted in a turbulent channel flow facility using hot-wire probes with both constant and varying viscous-scaled wire length. The objectives of the study were threefold: first, to validate the flow produced by the channel flow facility; second, to investigate the validity of recently proposed spatial filtering corrections for Reynolds stress profiles; and third, to extend the investigation of the near-wall peak Reynolds number dependence in turbulent pipe flow conducted by Hultmark, Bailey and Smits (see J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 649, pp. 103-113). We found that in channel flow, unlike in the pipe flow experiments, the near-wall peak exhibited the same Reynolds number dependence observed in turbulent boundary layer studies and channel flow DNS. Since the same measurement techniques and procedures were used in the current study as used in the pipe flow study, this demonstrated that the near-wall Reynolds number independence observed in the pipe study was not due to error introduced by measurement methodology. Furthermore, comparison of results from wires of different length verified that spatial filtering corrections work in channel flow as well as pipe and boundary layer flows. Corrected results were in good agreement with channel flow DNS, thus verifying that the flow in the facility approximates one-dimensional turbulent Poiseuille flow.

  11. Inertial effects at moderate Reynolds number in thin-film rimming flows driven by surface shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, E. D.; Hibberd, S.; Power, H.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we study two-dimensional thin-film flow inside a stationary circular cylinder driven by an imposed surface shear stress. Modelling is motivated by a need to understand the cooling and film dynamics provided by oil films in an aero-engine bearing chamber characterised by conditions of very high surface shear and additional film mass flux from oil droplets entering the film through the surface. In typical high-speed operation, film inertial effects can provide a significant leading-order mechanism neglected in existing lubrication theory models. Inertia at leading-order is included within a depth-averaged formulation where wall friction is evaluated similar to hydraulic models. This allows key nonlinear inertial effects to be included while retaining the ability to analyse the problem in a mathematically tractable formulation and compare with other approaches. In constructing this model, a set of simplified mass and momentum equations are integrated through the depth of the film yielding a spatially one-dimensional depth-averaged formulation of the problem. An a priori assumed form of velocity profile is needed to complete the system. In a local Stokes flow analysis, a quadratic profile is the exact solution for the velocity field though it must be modified when inertial effects become important. Extension of the velocity profile to a cubic profile is selected enabling specification of a wall friction model to include the roughness of the cylinder wall. A modelling advantage of including the inertia term, relevant to the applications considered, is that a smooth progression in solution can be obtained between cases of low Reynolds number corresponding to lubrication theory, and high Reynolds number corresponding to uniform rimming-flow. Importantly, we also investigate the effect of inertia on some typical solutions from other studies and present a greater insight to existing and new film solutions which arise from including inertia effects.

  12. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, T.; Fujita, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1.

  13. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Fujita, K; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1.

  14. Efficiencies of intracoronary sodium nitroprusside on fractional flow reserve measurement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaosheng; Deng, Jie; Wang, Xiaozeng; Zhao, Xin; Han, Yaling

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractional flow reserve (FFR) has certain advantages of assessing functional severity of coronary stenosis. Adenosine(AD) is the most widely used agents in FFR measurement but has the disadvantages of higher rate of complications. Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) represents a valuable alternative. Methods and results: In 75 patients with 86 moderate coronary stenosis, FFR values, heart rate and blood pressure were measured at baseline, after 0.6 μg boluses of intracoronary (IC) SNP, and after 140 μg/kg /min of continuous intravenous (IV) AD. FFR values decreased significantly after administering IV AD and IC SNP compared with the baseline Pd/Pa values (P < 0.001). Mean FFR induced by IV AD was not significantly different from that by IC SNP (t = 0.577, P = 0.566). The mean kappa value in the evaluation of two methods was 0.973 for FFR. There was a significant correlation between the FFR values of IV AD and IC SNP (R = 0.911, P < 0.001). Significant decreases in the blood pressures were found after agents were given compared to the baseline. No significant difference was found between AD and SNP. In addition, immediate complications occurred in 60.5% patients of IV AD in contrast to no adverse events after IC SNP. Conclusion: SNP is a safe and effective agent and easy to use for the FFR measurement. Maximal hyperemia by IC SNP is equivalent to that by IV AD. IC SNP could be considered a potential alternative in patients with contraindications to AD administration. PMID:25932219

  15. Water holdup measurement in kerosene water two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.-F.; Zhang, X.-G.; Wang, D.; Lin, Z.-H.

    2007-12-01

    This paper proposes an intrusive method for measurement of water holdup based on water layer thickness in horizontal pipes. Water layer thickness is measured by a capacitance probe, which is made of a metal wire with an insulating film. The capacitance is linearly proportional to the water layer thickness and is independent of water salinity and its distribution. Seven thicknesses over the cross section of the pipe are measured simultaneously to compute water holdup. A curve of water layer thickness as a function of time is compared with a flow structure photo and the measured time-averaged water holdup is compared with that of a quick-closing valve (QCV) system. The experiments were carried out in kerosene-oil two-phase flows with high water fraction in horizontal pipes of 29 mm diameter. Four flow patterns with continuous water are reported, namely wavy stratified flow (WS), three-layer flow (3 L), water and dispersed oil in water flow (W&DO/W) and dispersed oil in water flow (DO/W). The results show that the layer thickness curves are in reasonable agreement with the flow structures to different extents under different flow patterns and that the accuracies of the measured water holdup mainly depend on flow patterns. The relative error limits of water holdup are -15.2% for WS, 12.9% and -14.5% (positive and negative) for 3 L, 34.9% for W&DO/W and 15.8% for DO/W.

  16. Photoacoustic Doppler flow measurement in optically scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-12-01

    We recently observed the photoacoustic Doppler effect from flowing small light-absorbing particles. Here, we apply the effect to measure blood-mimicking fluid flow in an optically scattering medium. The light scattering in the medium decreases the amplitude of the photoacoustic Doppler signal but does not affect either the magnitude or the directional discrimination of the photoacoustic Doppler shift. This technology may hold promise for a new Doppler method for measuring blood flow in microcirculation with high sensitivity.

  17. Some exact solutions to the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards-Payne traffic flow equations: II. Moderate congestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infeld, E.; Rowlands, G.; Skorupski, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    We find a further class of exact solutions to the Lighthill-Whitham- Richards-Payne (LWRP) traffic flow equations. As before, using two consecutive Lagrangian transformations, a linearization is achieved. Next, depending on the initial density, we either obtain exact formulae for the dependence of the car density and velocity on x,t, or else, failing that, the same result in a parametric representation. The calculation always involves two possible factorizations of a consistency condition. Both must be considered. In physical terms, the lineup usually separates into two offshoots at different velocities. Each velocity soon becomes uniform. This outcome in many ways resembles not only that of Rowlands et al (2013 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46 365202 (part I)) but also the two-soliton solution to the Korteweg-de Vries equation. This paper can be read independently of part I. This explains unavoidable repetitions. Possible uses of both papers in checking numerical codes are indicated. Since LWRP, numerous more elaborate models, including multiple lanes, traffic jams, tollgates, etc, abound in the literature. However, we present an exact solution. These are few and far between, other than found by inverse scattering. The literature for various models, including ours, is given. The methods used here and in part I may be useful in solving other problems, such as shallow water flow.

  18. High-order numerical simulations of the flow around wings at moderately high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Negi, Prabal; Hosseini, Seyed M.; Hanifi, Ardeshir; Henningson, Dan S.; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-11-01

    The results of a DNS of the flow around a wing section represented by a NACA4412 profile, with Rec = 400 , 000 and 5° angle of attack, are presented in this study. The high-order spectral-element code Nek5000 was used for the computations. The Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β ranges from = 0 to 85 on the suction side, and the maximum Reθ and Reτ values are around 2 , 800 and 373, respectively. The adversre pressure gradient (APG) on the suction side of the wing leads to a progressively increasing value of the inner peak in the tangential velocity fluctuations, as well as the development of an outer peak, which is also observed in the other components of the Reynolds-stress tensor. Close to the trailing edge, i.e., at x / c = 0 . 9 , the outer peak in the inner-scaled tangential velocity profile is larger than the inner peak. These effects are connected to the fact that the large-scale motions of the flow become energized due to the APG, as apparent from spanwise-premultiplied power spectral density plots. Preliminary comparisons between DNS and well-resolved LES data, based on a relaxation-term filtering approach, are also presented with the aim of further extending the Reynolds number to Rec = 1 , 000 , 000 . Funded by the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  19. Laser anemometer measurements in a transonic axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.; Powell, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A laser anemometer system employing an efficient data acquisition technique was used to make measurements upstream, within, and downstream of the compressor rotor. A fluorescent dye technique allowed measurements within endwall boundary layers. Adjustable laser beam orientation minimized shadowed regions and enabled radial velocity measurements outside of the blade row. The flow phenomena investigated include flow variations from passage to passage, the rotor shock system, three-dimensional flows in the blade wake, and the development of the outer endwall boundary layer. Laser anemometer measurements are compared to a numerical solution of the streamfunction equations and to measurements made with conventional instrumentation.

  20. Laser anemometer measurements in a transonic axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.; Powell, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    A laser anomometer system employing an efficient data acquisition technique has been used to make measurements upstream, within, and downstream of the compressor rotor. A fluorescent dye technique allowed measurements within endwall boundary layers. Adjustable laser beam orientation minimized shadowed regions and enabled radial velocity measurements outside of the blade row. The flow phenomena investigated include flow variations from passage to passage, the rotor shock system, three-dimensional flows in the blade wake, and the development of the outer endwall boundary layer. Laser anemometer measurements are compared to a numerical solution of the streamfunction equations and to measurements made with conventional instrumentation.

  1. On acoustic intensity measurements in the presence of mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical analysis demonstrates that the technique of measuring acoustic intensity by means of cross correlation between nearby microphones cannot, in general, be extended to situations in which there is mean flow. However, it may be possible to use this technique to measure intensities in ducts with mean flow at frequencies below their cutoff frequencies.

  2. Prognostic value of coronary flow reserve in asymptomatic moderate or severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction and nonobstructed coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Banovic, Marko; Bosiljka, Vujisic-Tesic; Voin, Brkovic; Milan, Petrovic; Ivana, Nedeljkovic; Dejana, Popovic; Danijela, Trifunovic; Serjan, Nikolic

    2014-04-01

    Patients with moderate and severe aortic stenosis (AS) and without obstructive epicardial coronary disease have been shown to have an impairment of coronary flow reserve (CFR). We investigated the prognostic significance of CFR in predicting death during mid-to-long-term follow-up in asymptomatic patients with moderate/severe AS, preserved ejection fraction (EF), and with nonobstructed coronary arteries. A total of 127 patients with moderate or severe AS (effective orifice area of 1.5 cm(2) or less), mean age 66 ± 11 were enrolled in this prospective study. The median follow-up was 32 ± 7 months. All patients had standard Doppler echo study, coronary angiography, and adenosine-stress transthoracic Doppler echo for CFR measurement. Univariate analysis showed that diabetes mellitus, CFR, aortic valve area (AVA), maximal velocity (Vmax ), mean pressure gradient (Pmean ), energy loss index (ELI), aortic valve resistance (AVR), NT-proBNP, E/E', valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva ), and stroke work loss (SWL) were associated (P < 0.05) with death. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that only Zva and CFR were independent predictors of death, with the CFR being the single strongest predictor (Table 2). Using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, the CFR value of 1.85 had the highest accuracy in predicting the death during mid-to-long-term follow-up (area under the curve; AUC 0.890, P = 0.009, sensitivity 96.3%, specificity 75%; 95% CI 0.287-0.946; Fig. 1). The Zva value of 5.52 Hg/mL per m had a sensitivity 70.0% and specificity 72.0% (AUC 0.766, 95% CI 0.587-0.946; P = 0.005). This study demonstrates that CFR has a prognostic value in patients with asymptomatic moderate or severe AS with preserved EF and nonobstructed coronary arteries. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A tool for obtaining oriented samples of weakly to moderately indurated sedimentary rocks for paleomagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerbekmo, J. F.

    1990-03-01

    The tool is designed to take 1 inch (2.5 cm) diameter cores up to 2 inches (5 cm) in length in sedimentary rocks of moderate induration that cannot normally be sampled by traditional methods. A stainless steel core-barrel with internal scriber is hammered vertically into the rock and twisted out. The core-barrel is attached to an extruder which also holds a plastic bottle. The core is screwed out of the core-barrel directly into the bottle of the same internal diameter. The vial is later cut to an acceptable length for the magnetometer and sealed with a plastic cap. Inasmuch as the sample is never removed from the plastic bottle, fractured and bentonitic rocks which cannot be sampled by means of hand-blocks or by diamond-drilling, can be magnetically measured.

  4. Turbulence measurements in shock induced flow using hot wire anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, Lin C.; Duffy, Robert E.; Trolier, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements over various geometric shapes have been made by immersing models in shock-induced flows. The heat transfer to a body is strongly dependent on the turbulence level of the stream. The interpretation of such heat transfer measurements requires a knowledge of the turbulence intensity. Turbulence intensity measurements, using hot-wire anemometry, have been successfully carried out in shock-induced flows. The experimental procedures for making such measurements and the techniques required are discussed.

  5. Quantitative analysis of the angular dynamics of a single spheroid in simple shear flow at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, Tomas; Nordmark, Arne; Aidun, Cyrus K.; Do-Quang, Minh; Lundell, Fredrik

    2016-08-01

    A spheroidal particle in simple shear flow shows surprisingly complicated angular dynamics; caused by effects of fluid inertia (characterized by the particle Reynolds number Rep) and particle inertia (characterized by the Stokes number St). Understanding this behavior can provide important fundamental knowledge of suspension flows with spheroidal particles. Up to now only qualitative analysis has been available at moderate Rep. Rigorous analytical methods apply only to very small Rep and numerical results lack accuracy due to the difficulty in treating the moving boundary of the particle. Here we show that the dynamics of the rotational motion of a prolate spheroidal particle in a linear shear flow can be quantitatively analyzed through the eigenvalues of the log-rolling particle (particle aligned with vorticity). This analysis provides an accurate description of stable rotational states in terms of Rep,St, and particle aspect ratio (rp). Furthermore we find that the effect on the orientational dynamics from fluid inertia can be modeled with a Duffing-Van der Pol oscillator. This opens up the possibility of developing a reduced-order model that takes into account effects from both fluid and particle inertia.

  6. Flow measurement in mechanical ventilation: a review.

    PubMed

    Schena, Emiliano; Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Cecchini, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Accurate monitoring of flow rate and volume exchanges is essential to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury. Mechanical ventilators employ flowmeters to estimate the amount of gases delivered to patients and use the flow signal as a feedback to adjust the desired amount of gas to be delivered. Since flowmeters play a crucial role in this field, they are required to fulfill strict criteria in terms of dynamic and static characteristics. Therefore, mechanical ventilators are equipped with only the following kinds of flowmeters: linear pneumotachographs, fixed and variable orifice meters, hot wire anemometers, and ultrasonic flowmeters. This paper provides an overview of these sensors. Their working principles are described together with their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, the most promising emerging approaches for flowmeters design (i.e., fiber optic technology and three dimensional micro-fabrication) are briefly reviewed showing their potential for this application.

  7. Experimental measurements of surface turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexey L.; Rostov, Andrey P.; Shefer, Nadezhda A.

    2014-11-01

    Results of processing data obtained with the help of multi-parameter meter of turbulent micropulsation of wind speed components, temperature, humidity, pressure, and concentration of aerosol particles are discussed. The results of statistical processing of experimental time series of the aerosol scattering coefficient (nephelometer), wind speed components and temperature (ultrasonic anemometer-thermometer), are presented. Registration of the relative and absolute humidity, incoming and outgoing radiation was carried out in parallel. On the basis of the pulsation method of observations from the obtained data, dispersion of fluctuations of optical and meteorological parameters; auto-spectra fluctuations of wind speed, temperature, humidity and scattering coefficient; turbulent flows of momentum, heat and aerosol particles; the spectra of turbulent flows were calculated.

  8. Capacitance Probe for Fluid Flow and Volume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a micro-gravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  9. Capacitance probe for fluid flow and volume measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a microgravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  10. Measuring the Flow Through the Kerama Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Jae-Hun Park Graduate School of Oceanography University of Rhode Island Narragansett, RI 02882-1197 Phone: 401-874-6515 & 401-874-6610 Fax...The principal flows in and out of the East China Sea (ECS) are through channels penetrating the Ryukyu Ridge (Figure 1). Since ~20 Sv of Kuroshio...Figure 1. The Ryukyu ridgeline, from Taiwan (on the left) to Kyushu, Japan (on the right). The Kerama Gap at Distance = 600 km from

  11. WEEE flow and mitigating measures in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianxin; Lu, Bin; Xu, Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The research presented in this paper shows that Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) issues associated with home appliances, such as TV sets, refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and personal computers, are linked in the WEEE flow and recycling systems and are important to matters of public policy and regulation. In this paper, the sources and generation of WEEE in China are identified, and WEEE volumes are calculated. The results show that recycling capacity must increase if the rising quantity of domestic WEEE is to be handled properly. Simultaneously, suitable WEEE treatment will generate large volumes of secondary resources. Environmental problems caused by the existing recycling processes have been investigated in a case study. Problems mainly stem from open burning of plastic-metal parts and from precious metals leaching techniques that utilize acids. The existing WEEE flow at the national level was investigated and described. It became obvious that a considerable amount of obsolete items are stored in homes and offices and have not yet entered the recycling system. The reuse of used appliances has become a high priority for WEEE collectors and dealers because reuse generates higher economic profits than simple material recovery. The results of a cost analysis of WEEE flow shows that management and collection costs significantly influence current WEEE management. Heated discussions are ongoing in political and administrative bodies as to whether extended producer responsibilities policies are promoting WEEE recycling and management. This paper also discusses future challenges and strategies for WEEE management in China.

  12. WEEE flow and mitigating measures in China

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jianxin Lu Bin; Xu Cheng

    2008-07-01

    The research presented in this paper shows that Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) issues associated with home appliances, such as TV sets, refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and personal computers, are linked in the WEEE flow and recycling systems and are important to matters of public policy and regulation. In this paper, the sources and generation of WEEE in China are identified, and WEEE volumes are calculated. The results show that recycling capacity must increase if the rising quantity of domestic WEEE is to be handled properly. Simultaneously, suitable WEEE treatment will generate large volumes of secondary resources. Environmental problems caused by the existing recycling processes have been investigated in a case study. Problems mainly stem from open burning of plastic-metal parts and from precious metals leaching techniques that utilize acids. The existing WEEE flow at the national level was investigated and described. It became obvious that a considerable amount of obsolete items are stored in homes and offices and have not yet entered the recycling system. The reuse of used appliances has become a high priority for WEEE collectors and dealers because reuse generates higher economic profits than simple material recovery. The results of a cost analysis of WEEE flow shows that management and collection costs significantly influence current WEEE management. Heated discussions are ongoing in political and administrative bodies as to whether extended producer responsibilities policies are promoting WEEE recycling and management. This paper also discusses future challenges and strategies for WEEE management in China.

  13. The steady flow due to a rotating sphere at low and moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, S. C. R.; Singh, S. N.; Ingham, D. B.

    1980-11-01

    The paper examines the problem of determining the steady axisymmetric motion induced by a sphere rotating with constant angular velocity about a diameter in a viscous incompressible fluid which is at rest at large distances from the diameter. The equations of motion are reduced to three sets of nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equations in the radial variable by expanding the flow variables as series of orthogonal Gegenbauer functions with argument mu = cos theta. Numerical solutions of the finite set of equations obtained by truncating the series after a given number of terms are obtained. Calculations are performed for Reynolds numbers of 1-100, and results are compared with various other theoretical results and with experimental data.

  14. Calibration measurements using the ORNL fissile mass flow monitor

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, J.; Uckan, T.; Sumner, J.; Mattingly, J.; Mihalczo, J.

    1998-11-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of fissile-mass-flow measurements using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This Flow Monitor is part of a Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) that will be installed in at least two Russian Federation (R.F.) blending facilities. The key objectives of the demonstration of the ORNL Flow Monitor are two: (a) demonstrate that the ORNL Flow Monitor equipment is capable of reliably monitoring the mass flow rate of {sup 235}UF{sub 6} gas, and (b) provide a demonstration of ORNL Flow Monitor system in operation with UF{sub 6} flow for a visiting R.F. delegation. These two objectives have been met by the PGDP demonstration, as presented in this paper.

  15. Constraining Jupiter's internal flows using Juno magnetic and gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, E.; Cao, H.; Kaspi, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Deciphering the flow below the cloud-level of Jupiter remains a critical milestone in understanding Jupiter's internal structure and dynamics. The expected high-precision Juno measurements of both the gravity field and the magnetic field might help to reach this goal. Here we propose a method that combines both fields to constrain the depth-dependent flow field inside Jupiter. This method is based on a mean-field electrodynamic balance that relates the flow field to the anomalous magnetic field, and geostrophic balance that relates the flow field to the anomalous gravity field. We find that the flow field has two distinct regions of influence: an upper region in which the flow affects mostly the gravity field and a lower region in which the flow affects mostly the magnetic field. An optimization procedure allows to reach a unified flow structure that is consistent with both the gravity and the magnetic fields.

  16. Evaluation of flow capture techniques for measuring HVAC grilleairflows

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Wray, Craig P.

    2002-11-01

    This paper discusses the accuracy of commercially available flow hoods for residential applications. Results of laboratory and field tests indicate these hoods can be inadequate to measure airflows in residential systems, and there can be large measurement discrepancies between different flow hoods. The errors are due to poor calibrations, sensitivity of the hoods to grille airflow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. It is possible to obtain reasonable results using some flow hoods if the field tests are carefully done, the grilles are appropriate, and grille location does not restrict flow hood placement. We also evaluated several simple flow capture techniques for measuring grille airflows that could be adopted by the HVAC industry and homeowners as simple diagnostics. These simple techniques can be as accurate as commercially available devices. Our test results also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, agencies such as ASHRAE or ASTM need to develop a new standard for flow hood calibration, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow capture techniques.

  17. MRI Based Diagnostics for Temperature Measurements in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Lauren Sascha; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, John K.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate modeling of the thermal diffusion in the complex turbulent flows related to cooling high temperature gas turbine blades is critical to optimize the performance and predict the lifetime of the blades. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques for temperature measurement in simple but related flows are being developed in an effort to obtain full field thermal measurements to better understand diffusion processes and support the development of more accurate computational models in these flows. Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) utilizes the temperature dependence of the hydrogen proton resonant frequency (PRF) in water. MRT is now routinely used to measure tissue temperatures during medical procedures, and a few previous studies have made velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent pipe flows. In this study, MRT is applied to the flow of a heated single hole film cooling jet (Reynolds number 3000) inclined at 30 degrees injected into a cold developing turbulent channel flow (Reynolds number 25,000 based on bulk velocity and channel height.) The jet fluid temperature is 30 degrees Celsius above the temperature in the channel. The temperature measurements compare well to previously published results for measured passive scalar concentration in the same flow although the temperature measurements show higher uncertainties of 5--10 % of the temperature difference. Techniques for reducing this uncertainty will be presented as well as procedures for applying MRT to quantify the turbulent heat transfer coefficient in turbulent internal flows.

  18. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique.

  19. Measurement of two-component flow using ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, J. C.; Eghbali, D. A.; Flitton, V. E.; Anderson, D. G.

    Calibration of transit-time and Doppler ultrasonic flowmeters under two-component flow conditions has been conducted on 400 mm (16-in.) pipe. Testing covered total flows of 0.19 to 1.89 m(exp 3)/s (3000 to 30,000 gpm) and void fractions up to 40 percent. Both flowmeter types accurately measured total volumetric flow over a portion of their ranges. Pipe average void fraction, based on a three-beam gamma densitometer, was used to determine water component flow under stratified flow conditions, with similar results.

  20. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  1. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  2. Simulation of Five-Frequency Quasiperiodic and Related States For Convecting Flows In Moderate-Aspect-Ratio Box Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Lai, Ming-Chih; Cross, M. C.; Greenside, Henry

    2000-11-01

    We have developed a finite-difference code to integrate the three-dimensional Boussinesq equations for Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a box geometry with insulating or conducting side walls and no-slip boundary conditions. Motivated by the experimental observations of Walden et al [Phys. Rev. Lett., 53, 242 (1984)], we used this code to study the dynamics of moderate-aspect-ratio convecting flows as a function of Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, and aspect ratio. Our simulations were able to reproduce the occurrence of quasiperiodic states with up to five incommensurate frequencies, although the values of the frequencies differ quantitatively. We find that the five-frequency state is sensitive to small perturbations to the system, breaking down to mode-locking, intermittent, and chaotic states on small changes in the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers and aspect ratio. In particular, small changes in the aspect ratio lead to a surprisingly large multiplicity of distinct planforms yielding vastly different dynamics.

  3. Comparison of different techniques to measure body composition in moderately active adolescents.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, A; Bertini, I; Candeloro, N; Iacopino, L; Andreoli, A; Van Loan, M D

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the differences in the estimate of body fat percentage (%FM) and the amount (kg) of fat free mass (FFM) by different methods in 26 moderately active adolescents very similar in age, body fatness, and training status. Mean (SD) age was 16.7 (0.9) years, height was 177.0 (5.1) cm, and weight 68.0 (5.2) kg. %FM was assessed using dual-energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and two skinfold prediction equations: that of Slaughter et al (%FM Sla) and that of Deurenberg et al (%FM Deu). In the same way, FFM was measured using DXA and different impedance equations: those of Suprasongsin et al (FFM Sup), Schaefer et al (FFM Sch), Houtkooper et al (FFM Hou), and Deurenberg et al (FFM Deu). To determine the interchangeability of the different methods of measuring %FM and FFM, one way analysis of variance, standard error (SE), and coefficient of variation (CV%) ((SD/mean) x 100) were used. On average, no significant statistical differences were observed between the values determined for %FM: DXA value, 11.7 (5.4%); %FM Sla, 10.9 (4.0)%; %FM Deu, 11.5 (2.3)%. On the other hand, SE and CV% between each pair of the three methods used showed very large variability. With regard to the measurement or prediction of FFM, the mean value measured by DXA was significantly higher than that predicted by the equation of Sch (+7.2 kg, p < 0.001), Deu (+3.2 kg, p < 0.001), and Hou (+2.6 kg, p < 0.001), whereas it was lower than that predicted by the equation of Sup (-1.6 kg, p < 0.05). The Hou and Deu values were the only two that, on average, did not differ in a statistically significant way, although they showed the highest CV%. In our sample of moderately active adolescents the estimated values for %FM and FFM appear to be highly dependent on method.

  4. Comparison of different techniques to measure body composition in moderately active adolescents

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, A.; Bertini, I.; Candeloro, N.; Iacopino, L.; Andreoli, A.; Van Loan, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the differences in the estimate of body fat percentage (%FM) and the amount (kg) of fat free mass (FFM) by different methods in 26 moderately active adolescents very similar in age, body fatness, and training status. METHODS: Mean (SD) age was 16.7 (0.9) years, height was 177.0 (5.1) cm, and weight 68.0 (5.2) kg. %FM was assessed using dual-energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and two skinfold prediction equations: that of Slaughter et al (%FM Sla) and that of Deurenberg et al (%FM Deu). In the same way, FFM was measured using DXA and different impedance equations: those of Suprasongsin et al (FFM Sup), Schaefer et al (FFM Sch), Houtkooper et al (FFM Hou), and Deurenberg et al (FFM Deu). To determine the interchangeability of the different methods of measuring %FM and FFM, one way analysis of variance, standard error (SE), and coefficient of variation (CV%) ((SD/mean) x 100) were used. RESULTS: On average, no significant statistical differences were observed between the values determined for %FM: DXA value, 11.7 (5.4%); %FM Sla, 10.9 (4.0)%; %FM Deu, 11.5 (2.3)%. On the other hand, SE and CV% between each pair of the three methods used showed very large variability. With regard to the measurement or prediction of FFM, the mean value measured by DXA was significantly higher than that predicted by the equation of Sch (+7.2 kg, p < 0.001), Deu (+3.2 kg, p < 0.001), and Hou (+2.6 kg, p < 0.001), whereas it was lower than that predicted by the equation of Sup (-1.6 kg, p < 0.05). The Hou and Deu values were the only two that, on average, did not differ in a statistically significant way, although they showed the highest CV%. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample of moderately active adolescents the estimated values for %FM and FFM appear to be highly dependent on method. 


 PMID:9773169

  5. Collective flow measured with the Plastic Ball

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, H.G.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kampert, K.H.; Kolb, B.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, H.R.; Siemiarczuk, T.

    1989-08-01

    The experimental results from the Plastic Ball detector have contributed vastly to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of nuclear collisions at several hundred MeV per nucleon. The discovery of the collective flow phenomena (bounce-off of spectator fragments, side-splash in the reaction plane, and squeeze-out out of the reaction plane), as they were predicted by hydrodynamical models, has led to the experimental observation of compressed nuclear matter, which is a necessary condition before one can study the equation of state in detail and search for phase transitions at higher energies. 39 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Experimental and Computational Study of the Flow past a Simplified Geometry of an Engine/Pylon/Wing Installation at low velocity/moderate incidence flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Yannick; Lucas, Matthieu; Bonnaud, Cyril; Joly, Laurent; ISAE Team; Airbus Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically and experimentally the vortices that develop past a model geometry of a wing equipped with pylon-mounted engine at low speed/moderate incidence flight conditions. For such configuration, the presence of the powerplant installation under the wing initiates a complex, unsteady vortical flow field at the nacelle/pylon/wing junctions. Its interaction with the upper wing boundary layer causes a drop of aircraft performances. In order to decipher the underlying physics, this study is initially conducted on a simplified geometry at a Reynolds number of 200000, based on the chord wing and on the freestream velocity. Two configurations of angle of attack and side-slip angle are investigated. This work relies on unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes computations, oil flow visualizations and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements. The vortex dynamics thus produced is described in terms of vortex core position, intensity, size and turbulent intensity thanks to a vortex tracking approach. In addition, the analysis of the velocity flow fields obtained from PIV highlights the influence of the longitudinal vortex initiated at the pylon/wing junction on the separation process of the boundary layer near the upper wing leading-edge.

  7. Transitional flow in the wake of a moderate to large height cylindrical roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plogmann, B.; Würz, W.; Krämer, E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of an isolated, cylindrical roughness on the stability of an airfoil boundary layer has been studied based on particle image velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry. The investigated roughness elements range from a sub-critical to a super-critical behavior with regard to the critical roughness Reynolds number. For the sub-critical case, the nonlinear disturbance growth in the near wake is governed by oblique Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type modes. Further downstream, these disturbance modes are, however, damped with the mean flow stabilization and no dominant modes persist in the far wake. By contrast, in the transitional configuration the disturbance growth is increased, but still associated with a TS-type instability in the near-wake centerline region of the low-aspect (height-to-diameter) ratio element. That is, the disturbances in the centerline region show a similar behavior as known for 2D elements, whereas in the outer spanwise domain a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) type, shear-layer instability is found, as previously reported for larger aspect ratio isolated elements. With increasing height and, thereby, aspect ratio of the roughness, the KH-type instability domain extends toward the centerline and, accordingly, the TS-type instability domain decreases. For high super-critical cases, transition is already triggered in the wall-normal and spanwise shear layers upstream and around the roughness. In the immediate wake, periodic shear-layer disturbances roll up into a—for isolated elements characteristic—shedding of vortices, which was not present at the lower roughness Reynolds number cases due to the decreased aspect ratio and, thereby, different instability mechanism.

  8. Three-dimensional flow measurements in a tesla turbine rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thomas; Schosser, Constantin; Hain, Rainer; Kaehler, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Tesla turbines are fluid mechanical devices converting flow energy into rotation energy by two physical effects: friction and adhesion. The advantages of the tesla turbine are its simple and robust design, as well as its scalability, which makes it suitable for custom power supply solutions, and renewable energy applications. To this day, there is a lack of experimental data to validate theoretical studies, and CFD simulations of these turbines. This work presents a comprehensive analysis of the flow through a tesla turbine rotor gap, with a gap height of only 0.5 mm, by means of three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (3D-PTV). For laminar flows, the experimental results match the theory very well, since the measured flow profiles show the predicted second order parabolic shape in radial direction and a fourth order behavior in circumferential direction. In addition to these laminar measurements, turbulent flows at higher mass flow rates were investigated.

  9. Rationale for Measuring Duct Leakage Flows in Large Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Diamond, Richard C.; Sherman, Max H.

    2005-07-01

    Industry-wide methods of assessing duct leakage are based on duct pressurization tests, and focus on ''high pressure'' ducts. Even though ''low pressure'' ducts can be a large fraction of the system and tend to be leaky, few guidelines or construction specifications require testing these ducts. We report here on the measured leakage flows from ten large commercial duct systems at operating conditions: three had low leakage (less than 5% of duct inlet flow), and seven had substantial leakage (9 to 26%). By comparing these flows with leakage flows estimated using the industry method, we show that the latter method by itself is not a reliable indicator of whole-system leakage flow, and that leakage flows need to be measured.

  10. Pulsating-flow measurement with an orifice flange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossart, L. M.

    1981-05-01

    A measurement problem encountered during instrumentation of a geothermal air drilling operation on the Baca Ranch in the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico was how to measure the flow of ammonia water solution injected into the air line. The pump that develops the pressure in the ammonia line is not a positive displacement pump, therefore, counting pump strokes does not determine the number of gal/min of ammonia flow. The flow was measured using an orifice flange differential pressure technique but, the range of flow measured, exceeded the 4:1 range ability of an orifice. A computer smoothing of the differential pressure and the line pressure together with a scaling factor, determined by the shape of the raw differential pressure, provided a smoothing of the flow data which was checked against the actual flow over a long time period to determine the volume of solution injected into the system per hour. An instantaneous reading of ammonia flow was thereby determined. It showed small variations in corrosion rate measured in the standpipe that may have been caused by a momentary variation in the flow of ammonia solution.

  11. Calibration of dimensional change in finite element models using AGR moderator brick measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, K.; Hall, G.; Tan, E.; Marsden, B. J.; Warren, N.

    2014-08-01

    Physically based models, resolved using the finite element (FE) method, are often used to model changes in geometry and the associated stress fields of graphite moderator bricks within a reactor. These models require inputs that describe the loading conditions (field variables), and coded relationships describing the behaviour of material properties. Historically, behaviour on material properties have been obtained from Materials Test Reactor (MTR) experiments, however data relating to samples trepanned from operating reactors are increasingly being used to improve models. Geometry measurements from operating reactors offer the potential for improving the coded relationship for dimensional change in FE models. A non-linear mixed-effect model is presented for calibrating the parameters of FE models that are sensitive to mid-brick diameter, using channel geometry measurements obtained from inspection campaigns. The work makes use of a novel technique: the development of a Bayesian emulator, which is a surrogate for the FE model. The use of an emulator allows the influence of the inputs to the finite element model to be evaluated, and delivers a substantial reduction in the computational burden of calibration.

  12. 232Th, 233Pa, and 234U capture cross-section measurements in moderated neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringer, O.; Isnard, H.; AlMahamid, I.; Chartier, F.; Letourneau, A.

    2008-07-01

    The Th-U cycle was studied through the evolution of a 100 μg 232Th sample irradiated in a moderated neutron flux of 8.010 14 n/cm 2/s, intensity close to that of a thermal molten salt reactor. After 43 days of irradiation and 6 months of cooling, a precise mass spectrometric analysis, using both TIMS and MC-ICP-MS techniques, was performed, according to a rigorous methodology. The measured thorium and uranium isotopic ratios in the final irradiated sample were then compared with integral simulations based on evaluated data; an overall good agreement was seen. Four important thermal neutron-capture cross-sections were also extracted from the measurements, 232Th (7.34±0.21 b), 233Pa (38.34±1.78 b), 234U (106.12±3.34 b), and 235U (98.15±11.24 b). Our 232Th and 235U results confirmed existing values whereas the cross-sections of 233Pa and 234U (both key parameters) have been redefined.

  13. Measuring ice and liquid water content in moderately supercooled clouds with Cloudnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, Johannes; Seifert, Patric; Myagkov, Alexander; Albert, Ansmann

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between ice nuclei and clouds is an important topic in weather and climate research. Recent laboratory experiments and field in-situ field campaigns present more and more detailed measurements of ice nucleating particles (INP) at temperatures close to 0°C. This brings moderately supercooled mixed-phase clouds into the focus of current cloud research. One current example is the European Union BACCHUS project. A major goal of BACCHUS is the analysis of the anthropogenic impact on ice nucleation. Within this project, we use the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Remote Observations System (LACROS) and the Cloudnet framework in order to get quantitative insight into the formation of ice in mixed-phase layered clouds with cloud top temperature (CTT) from -40 to 0°C. Depolarization measurements from lidar and radar show a clear dependence between particle shape and the temperature under which the particles have been formed. The special focus of this work is on the CTT range from -10 to 0°C. An algorithm is presented to decide between ice and liquid water precipitation falling from the clouds showing that between 10% and 30% of all layered clouds show ice precipitation with CTT between -5 and 0°C. For these slightly supercooled clouds an average ice-water-content between 10e-7 and 10e-8 [kg per cubic meter] is found.

  14. Measurement and control of pressure driven flows in microfluidic devices using an optofluidic flow sensor.

    PubMed

    Cheri, Mohammad Sadegh; Shahraki, Hamidreza; Sadeghi, Jalal; Moghaddam, Mohammadreza Salehi; Latifi, Hamid

    2014-09-01

    Measurement and control of pressure-driven flow (PDF) has a great potential to enhance the performance of chemical and biological experiments in Lab on a Chip technology. In this paper, we present an optofluidic flow sensor for real-time measurement and control of PDF. The optofluidic flow sensor consists of an on-chip micro Venturi and two optical Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometers. Flow rate was measured from the fringe shift of FP interferometers resulted from movement fluid in the on-chip micro Venturi. The experimental results show that the optofluidic flow sensor has a minimum detectable flow change of 5 nl/min that is suitable for real time monitoring and control of fluids in many chemical and biological experiments. A Finite Element Method is used to solve the three dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes and continuity equations to validate the experimental results.

  15. Measurement and control of pressure driven flows in microfluidic devices using an optofluidic flow sensor

    PubMed Central

    Cheri, Mohammad Sadegh; Shahraki, Hamidreza; Sadeghi, Jalal; Moghaddam, Mohammadreza Salehi; Latifi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Measurement and control of pressure-driven flow (PDF) has a great potential to enhance the performance of chemical and biological experiments in Lab on a Chip technology. In this paper, we present an optofluidic flow sensor for real-time measurement and control of PDF. The optofluidic flow sensor consists of an on-chip micro Venturi and two optical Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometers. Flow rate was measured from the fringe shift of FP interferometers resulted from movement fluid in the on-chip micro Venturi. The experimental results show that the optofluidic flow sensor has a minimum detectable flow change of 5 nl/min that is suitable for real time monitoring and control of fluids in many chemical and biological experiments. A Finite Element Method is used to solve the three dimensional (3D) Navier–Stokes and continuity equations to validate the experimental results. PMID:25584118

  16. Measurement of waves in flows across a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing wave flow across a surface wherein at least two pressure levels are sensed and combined to provide a representation of waves within the flow. In the preferred embodiment holes bored through the aircraft surface at an interval of one-half the wavelength of the flow being measured introduce pressure perturbations into a cavity so they may acoustically interfere. The interfering waveform is sensed by at least one microphone disposed in the cavity.

  17. Microwave/Sonic Apparatus Measures Flow and Density in Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Ngo, Phong; Carl, J. R.; Byerly, Kent A.

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the rate of flow and the mass density of a liquid or slurry includes a special section of pipe instrumented with microwave and sonic sensors, and a computer that processes digitized readings taken by the sensors. The apparatus was conceived specifically for monitoring a flow of oil-well-drilling mud, but the basic principles of its design and operation are also applicable to monitoring flows of other liquids and slurries.

  18. Gradient Driven Flow: Lattice Gas, Diffusion Equation and Measurement Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    03-200 1 Journal Article (refereed) 2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Gradient Driven Flow : Lattice Gas, Diffusion Equation and...time regime, the collective motion exhibits an onset of oscillation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Diffusion; Fick’s Law; Gradient Driven Flow ; Lattice Gas 16...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 20010907 062 Gradient driven flow : lattice gas, diffusion equation and measurement scales R.B

  19. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of 0.0000031 watts/sqcm was measured and at the Apollo 17 site a value of 0.0000022 watts/sqcm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20% and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  20. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. B.; Keihm, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of .0000031 W/sq cm was measured, and at the Apollo 17 site a value of .0000022 W/sq cm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20 percent and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  1. Measuring molecular flows with high-resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; Exton, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is proposed to use high-resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy to directly measure high-speed molecular flow velocities in wind tunnels and in combustive chambers. A feasibility study indicates that flow speeds from Mach 0.04 up may be measured with the proposed method using available laser systems. It is pointed out that the success of the proposed technique will make it possible to measure all interesting flow parameters, i.e., species concentration, temperature, and velocity, in a time of less than 1 microsecond at a repetition rate of 10,000/s using a single experimental arrangement.

  2. Measurement uncertainty budget of an interferometric flow velocity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermuske, Mike; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Flow rate measurements are a common topic for process monitoring in chemical engineering and food industry. To achieve the requested low uncertainties of 0:1% for flow rate measurements, a precise measurement of the shear layers of such flows is necessary. The Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) is an established method for measuring local flow velocities. For exact estimation of the flow rate, the flow profile in the shear layer is of importance. For standard LDV the axial resolution and therefore the number of measurement points in the shear layer is defined by the length of the measurement volume. A decrease of this length is accompanied by a larger fringe distance variation along the measurement axis which results in a rise of the measurement uncertainty for the flow velocity (uncertainty relation between spatial resolution and velocity uncertainty). As a unique advantage, the laser Doppler profile sensor (LDV-PS) overcomes this problem by using two fan-like fringe systems to obtain the position of the measured particles along the measurement axis and therefore achieve a high spatial resolution while it still offers a low velocity uncertainty. With this technique, the flow rate can be estimated with one order of magnitude lower uncertainty, down to 0:05% statistical uncertainty.1 And flow profiles especially in film flows can be measured more accurately. The problem for this technique is, in contrast to laboratory setups where the system is quite stable, that for industrial applications the sensor needs a reliable and robust traceability to the SI units, meter and second. Small deviations in the calibration can, because of the highly position depending calibration function, cause large systematic errors in the measurement result. Therefore, a simple, stable and accurate tool is needed, that can easily be used in industrial surroundings to check or recalibrate the sensor. In this work, different calibration methods are presented and their influences to the

  3. Flow cytometry: A powerful technology for measuring biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    A broad definition of a biomarker is that it is a measurable characteristic of a biological system that changes upon exposure to a physical or chemical insult. While the definition can be further refined, it is sufficient for the purposes of demonstrating the advantages of flow cytometry for making quantitative measurements of biomarkers. Flow cytometry and cell sorting technologies have emerged during the past 25 years to take their place alongside other essential tools used in biology such as optical and electron microscopy. This paper describes the basics of flow cytometry technology, provides illustrative examples of applications of the technology in the field of biomarkers, describes recent developments in flow cytometry that have not yet been applied to biomarker measurements, and projects future developments of the technology. The examples of uses of flow cytometry for biomarker quantification cited in this paper are meant to be illustrative and not exhaustive in the sense of providing a review of the field.

  4. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENTS FROM MARIOTTE RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, Jim; Murphy, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The mariotte reservoir supplies water at a constant hydraulic pressure by self-regulation of its internal gas pressure. Automated outflow measurements from mariotte reservoirs are generally difficult because of the reservoir's self-regulation mechanism. This paper describes an automated flow meter specifically designed for use with mariotte reservoirs. The flow meter monitors changes in the mariotte reservoir's gas pressure during outflow to determine changes in the reservoir's water level. The flow measurement is performed by attaching a pressure transducer to the top of a mariotte reservoir and monitoring gas pressure changes during outflow with a programmable data logger. The advantages of the new automated flow measurement techniques include: (i) the ability to rapidly record a large range of fluxes without restricting outflow, and (ii) the ability to accurately average the pulsing flow, which commonly occurs during outflow from the mariotte reservoir.

  5. Volumetric liquid flow measurement through thermography to simulate blood flow in an artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaseñor-Mora, Carlos; Rabell-Montiel, Adela; González-Vega, Arturo; Gutierrez-Juarez, Gerardo

    2015-09-01

    Encouraged to improve the procedure to measure the blood flow in cases with peripheral artery disease using thermography, that allows to evaluate several arteries simultaneously, it was developed an alternative to measure the volumetric flow through a conduit, it was studied the variation of the thermal energy computed from thermal images due to changes in flow at different temperatures, and it was observed that the measurement is not strongly influenced by the emissivity of the conduit, the ambient temperature and humidity, but that is necessary to establish an adequate calibration of the camera to can use it as measurement instrument.

  6. New method to measure coronary velocity and coronary flow reserve.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-D; Svendsen, M; Choy, J S; Sinha, A K; Huo, Y; Yoshida, K; Molloi, S; Kassab, G S

    2011-07-01

    Coronary flow reserve (CFR) is an important index of coronary microcirculatory function. The objective of this study was to validate the reproducibility and accuracy of intravascular conductance catheter-based method for measurements of baseline and hyperemic coronary flow velocity (and hence CFR). The absolute coronary blood velocity was determined by measuring the time of transit of a saline injection between two pairs of electrodes (known distance) on a conductance catheter during a routine saline injection without the need for reference flow. In vitro validation was made in the velocity range of 5 to 70 cm/s in reference to the volume collection method. In 10 swine, velocity measurements were compared with those from a flow probe in coronary arteries at different CFR attained by microsphere embolization. In vitro, the mean difference between the proposed method and volume collection was 0.7 ± 1.34 cm/s for steady flow and -0.77 ± 2.22 cm/s for pulsatile flow. The mean difference between duplicate measurements was 0 ± 1.4 cm/s. In in vivo experiments, the flow (product of velocity and lumen cross-sectional area that is also measured by the conductance catheter) was determined in both normal and stenotic vessels and the mean difference between the proposed method and flow probe was -1 ± 12 ml/min (flow ranged from 10 to 130 ml/min). For CFR, the mean difference between the two methods was 0.06 ± 0.28 (range of 1 to 3). Our results demonstrate the reproducibility and accuracy of velocity and CFR measurements with a conductance catheter by use of a standard saline injection. The ability of the combined measurement of coronary lumen area (as previously validated) and current velocity and CFR measurements provides an integrative diagnostic tool for interventional cardiology.

  7. One dimensional wavefront sensor development for tomographic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.; Pierson, R.; Chen, E.

    1995-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because they generally have high inherent bandwidth, and are non-intrusive. However, since optical probe measurements inherently integrate all information along the optical path, it is often difficult to isolate out-of-plane components in 3-dimensional flow events. It is also hard to make independent measurements of internal flow structure. Using an arrangement of one-dimensional wavefront sensors, we have developed a system that uses tomographic reconstruction to make two-dimensional measurements in an arbitrary flow. These measurements provide complete information in a plane normal to the flow. We have applied this system to the subsonic free jet because of the wide range of flow scales available. These measurements rely on the development of a series of one-dimensional wavefront sensors that are used to measure line-integral density variations in the flow of interest. These sensors have been constructed using linear CCD cameras and binary optics lenslet arrays. In designing these arrays, we have considered the coherent coupling between adjacent lenses and have made comparisons between theory and experimental noise measurements. The paper will present examples of the wavefront sensor development, line-integral measurements as a function of various experimental parameters, and sample tomographic reconstructions.

  8. Project Themis: PIV Measurement of Elbow Flow through a Flow Conditioner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Project Themis: PIV Measurement of Elbow Flow through a Flow...Project Themis: PIV Measurement of Elbow Flow through a Flow Conditioner Benjamin Miller AFRL/RZSE (Jackson and Tull) Air Force Research...Max power = 20mJ @ 1kHz • Phantom V210 • 2,000 frames per second 45 CFM hose 90 ̊ long curve elbow VORTAB L/D = 30 • VORTAB placed one

  9. Quantitative flow and velocity measurements of pulsatile blood flow with 4D-DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaughnessy, Gabe; Hoffman, Carson; Schafer, Sebastian; Mistretta, Charles A.; Strother, Charles M.

    2017-03-01

    Time resolved 3D angiographic data from 4D DSA provides a unique environment to explore physical properties of blood flow. Utilizing the pulsatility of the contrast waveform, the Fourier components can be used to track the waveform motion through vessels. Areas of strong pulsatility are determined through the FFT power spectrum. Using this method, we find an accuracy from 4D-DSA flow measurements within 7.6% and 6.8% RMSE of ICA PCVIPR and phantom flow probe validation measurements, respectively. The availability of velocity and flow information with fast acquisition could provide a more quantitative approach to treatment planning and evaluation in interventional radiology.

  10. Flow among Musicians: Measuring Peak Experiences of Student Performers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnamon, Sarah; Moran, Aidan; O'Connell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    "Flow" is a highly coveted yet elusive state of mind that is characterized by complete absorption in the task at hand as well as by enhanced skilled performance. Unfortunately, because most measures of this construct have been developed in physical activity and sport settings, little is known about the applicability of flow scales to the…

  11. Flow among Musicians: Measuring Peak Experiences of Student Performers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnamon, Sarah; Moran, Aidan; O'Connell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    "Flow" is a highly coveted yet elusive state of mind that is characterized by complete absorption in the task at hand as well as by enhanced skilled performance. Unfortunately, because most measures of this construct have been developed in physical activity and sport settings, little is known about the applicability of flow scales to the…

  12. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  13. PIV measurements of flow in a centrifugal blood pump: steady flow.

    PubMed

    Day, Steven W; McDaniel, James C

    2005-04-01

    Magnetically suspended left ventricular assist devices have only one moving part, the impeller. The impeller has absolutely no contact with any of the fixed parts, thus greatly reducing the regions of stagnant or high shear stress that surround a mechanical or fluid bearing. Measurements of the mean flow patterns as well as viscous and turbulent stresses were made in a shaft-driven prototype of a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump at several constant flow rates (3-9 L/min) using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The chosen range of flow rates is representative of the range over which the pump may operate while implanted. Measurements on a three-dimensional measurement grid within several regions of the pump, including the inlet, blade passage, exit volute, and diffuser are reported. The measurements are used to identify regions of potential blood damage due to high shear stress and/or stagnation of the blood, both of which have been associated with blood damage within artificial heart valves and diaphragm-type pumps. Levels of turbulence intensity and Reynolds stresses that are comparable to those in artificial heart valves are reported. At the design flow rate (6 L/min), the flow is generally well behaved (no recirculation or stagnant flow) and stress levels are below levels that would be expected to contribute to hemolysis or thrombosis. The flow at both high (9 L/min) and low (3 L/min) flow rates introduces anomalies into the flow, such as recirculation, stagnation, and high stress regions. Levels of viscous and Reynolds shear stresses everywhere within the pump are below reported threshold values for damage to red cells over the entire range of flow rates investigated; however, at both high and low flow rate conditions, the flow field may promote activation of the clotting cascade due to regions of elevated shear stress adjacent to separated or stagnant flow.

  14. PIV measurements of flow in a centrifugal blood pump: time-varying flow.

    PubMed

    Day, Steven W; McDaniel, James C

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of the time-varying flow in a centrifugal blood pump operating as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are presented. This includes changes in both the pump flow rate as a function of the left ventricle contraction and the interaction of the rotating impeller and fixed exit volute. When operating with a pulsing ventricle, the flow rate through the LVAD varies from 0-11 L/min during each cycle of the heartbeat. Phase-averaged measurements of mean velocity and some turbulence statistics within several regions of the pump, including the inlet, blade passage, exit volute, and diffuser, are reported at 20 phases of the cardiac cycle. The transient flow fields are compared to the constant flow rate condition that was reported previously in order to investigate the transient effects within the pump. It is shown that the quasi-steady assumption is a fair treatment of the time varying flow field in all regions of this representative pump, which greatly simplifies the comprehension and modeling of this flow field. The measurements are further interpreted to identify the effects that the transient nature of the flow field will have on blood damage. Although regions of recirculation and stagnant flow exist at some phases of the cardiac cycle, there is no location where flow is stagnant during the entire heartbeat.

  15. Adaptive flow-field measurements using digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarske, Jürgen W.; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Fregin, Bob; König, Jörg; Büttner, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Variations of the optical detection path-length in image correlation based flow-field measurements result in strong errors in position allocation and thus lead to a strong enhancement of the measurement uncertainty of the velocity. In this contribution we use digital holography to measure the wavefront distortion induced by fluctuating phase boundary, employing spatially extended guide stars. The measured phase information is used to correct the influence of the phase boundary in the detection path employing a spatial light modulator. We analyze the potential of guide stars that are reflected by the phase boundary, i.e. the Fresnel reflex, and transmitted. Our results show, that the usage of wavefront shaping enables to strongly reduce the measurement uncertainty and to strongly improve the quality of image correlation based flow-field measurements. The approaches presented here are not limited to application in flow measurement, but could be useful for a variety of applications.

  16. Flow Field Measurements Using Hotwire Anemometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    programs were written to coordinate hotwire system calibration with hotwire experimentation. An experiment, Wake Velocity Profile Ll Analyisis and Drag...experimentation. An experiment, Wake Velocity Profile Analyisis and Drag Coefficient Measurement of an Airfoil, was used as a vehicle to test the system. The

  17. A novel acoustic method for gas flow measurement using correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuuttila, Matti Tapani

    The study demonstrates a new kind of acoustic method for gas flow measurement. The method uses upstream and downstream propagating low frequency plane wave and correlation techniques for volume flow rate determination. The theory of propagating low frequency plane waves in the pipe is introduced and is proved empirically to be applicable for flow measurement. The flow profile dependence of the method is verified and found to be negligible at least in the region of moderate perturbations. The physical principles of the method were applied in practice in the form of a flowmeter with new design concepts. The developed prototype meters were verified against the reference standard of NMI (Nederlands Meetinstituut), which showed that a wide dynamic range of 1:80 is achievable with total expanded uncertainty below 0.3%. Also the requirements used for turbine meters of linearity, weighted mean error and stability were shown to be well fulfilled. A brief comparison with other flowmeter types shows the new flowmeter to be competitive. The advantages it offers are a small pressure drop over the meter, no blockage of flow in possible malfunction, no pulsation to flow, essentially no moving parts, and the possibility for bidirectional measurements. The introduced flowmeter is also capable of using the introduced flowmeter is also capable of using the telephone network or a radio-modem to read the consumption of gas and report its operation to the user.

  18. Temperature and pressure measurements at cold exit of counter-flow vortex tube with flow visualization of reversed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Mohd Hazwan bin; Katanoda, Hiroshi; Morita, Hiromitsu

    2015-02-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the cold flow discharged from the counter-flow vortex tube (VT), the temperature and pressure of the cold flow were measured, and the existence and behavior of the reversed flow at the cold exit was studied using a simple flow visualization technique consisting of a 0.75mm-diameter needle, and an oil paint droplet. It is observed through this experiment that the Pitot pressure at the cold exit center can either be lower or higher than atmospheric pressure, depending on the inlet pressure and the cold fraction, and that a reversed flow is observed when the Pitot pressure at the cold exit center is lower than atmospheric pressure. In addition, it is observed that when reducing the cold fraction from unity at any arbitrary inlet pressure, the region of reversed and colder flow in the central part of cold exit extends in the downstream direction.

  19. Measurements of granular flow dynamics with high speed digital images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.

    1994-12-31

    The flow of granular materials is common to many industrial processes. This dissertation suggests and validates image processing algorithms applied to high speed digital images to measure the dynamics (velocity, temperature and volume fraction) of dry granular solids flowing down an inclined chute under the action of gravity. Glass and acrylic particles have been used as granular solids in the experiment. One technique utilizes block matching for spatially averaged velocity measurements of the glass particles. This technique is compared with the velocity measurement using an optic probe which is a conventional granular flow velocity measurement device. The other technique for measuring the velocities of individual acrylic particles is developed with correspondence using a Hopfield network. This technique first locates the positions of particles with pattern recognition techniques, followed by a clustering technique, which produces point patterns. Also, several techniques are compared for particle recognition: synthetic discriminant function (SDF), minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filter, modified minimum average correlation energy (MMACE) filter and variance normalized correlation. The author proposes an MMACE filter which improves generalization of the MACE filter by adjusting the amount of averaged spectrum of training images in the spectrum whitening stages of the MACE filter. Variance normalized correlation is applied to measure the velocity and temperature of flowing glass particles down the inclined chute. The measurements are taken for the steady and wavy flow and qualitatively compared with a theoretical model of granular flow.

  20. Exploratory flexural power flow measurements on a bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderwal, H. M. M.

    1990-05-01

    Exploratory experiments in a bar with an absorptive termination were performed. The bar was excited in a transversal direction. The flexural power flow in the bar was measured at various positions, applying the two transducer technique (2TT) and the four transducer technique (4TT). The separation distance between the accelerometers was varied. The power flow at the excitation point was determined from a force and an acceleration measurement (Fv). When comparing the 2TT power flow with the 4TT or Fv power flow, the discretization error (i.e. the error due to a finite accelerometer separation) is an important parameter, particularly for separations larger than one sixth of a wavelength. In order to quantify the effect of this error, a prediction of the measured power flows on the basis of an analytical solution of the bending wave equation for the far field is performed. For most cases a good agreement is found between the predicted and the measured power flow ratios (i.e. 4TT/2TT and 2TT/Fv). However, for accelerometer separations smaller than about one sixth of a wavelength, a larger scatter is observed in the power flow data, measured with the 4TT, due to loss of significant digits. This effect may result in limitations for multiple transducer techniques in two or three dimensional structures.

  1. Measurement of directed blood flow by laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Evan R.; Thompson, Oliver B.; Andrews, Michael K.

    2011-03-01

    Recent success in reconciling laser Doppler and speckle measurements of dermal perfusion by the use of multi-exposure speckle has prompted an investigation of speckle effects arising from directed blood flow which might be expected in the small blood vessels of the eye. Unlike dermal scatter, the blood in retinal vessels is surrounded by few small and stationary scatterers able to assist the return of light energy by large-angle scatter. Returning light is expected to come from multiple small angle scatter from the large red blood cells which dominate the fluid. This work compares speckle measurements on highly scattering skin, with measurements on flow in a retinal phantom consisting of a glass capillary which is itself immersed in an index matching fluid to provide a flat air-phantom interface. Brownian motion dominated measurements when small easily levitated scatters were used, and flow was undetectable. With whole-blood, Brownian motion was small and directed flows in the expected region of tens of mm/s were detectable. The nominal flow speed relates to the known pump rate; within the capillary the flow will have a profile reducing toward the walls. The pulsatile effects on laser speckle contrast in the retina are discussed with preliminary multi-exposure measurements on retinal vessels using a fundus camera. Differences between the multiple exposure curves and power spectra of perfused tissue and ordered flow are discussed.

  2. Planetary heat flow from shallow subsurface measurements: Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, Marc; Hagermann, Axel

    2016-10-01

    Planetary heat flow probes measure heat flow (depth-resolved temperature and thermal conductivity) to provide insight into the internal state of a planet. The probes have been utilized extensively on Earth, twice on the Moon, and once on the Surface of comet 67P-CG. Mars is an important target for heat flow measurement as heat flow is a critical parameter in Martian thermal history models. Earlier studies indicate that Martian planetary heat flow can be accessed at 5 m below the surface in dry regolith monitored over at least one Martian year. A one Martian year monitoring period is necessary because, in the shallow subsurface, heat flow from the interior is superposed with time varying heat flow contributions, primarily due to insolation. Given that a heat flow probe may not achieve its target depth or monitoring period, this study investigates how the depth (2-5 m), duration (0-1 Martian year) and quality of measurements influence the accuracy of planetary heat flow. An inverse model is used to show that, in the preceding scenarios, the accuracy of planetary heat flow directly estimated from depth-dependent thermal conductivity with 10-20% precision errors, temperatures with 50-100 mK precision errors and modelling uncertainties up to 500 mK, can, on average, be improved by a factor of 27 with optimization to 13%. Accuracies increase with sensor penetration depth and regolith monitoring period. Heat flow optimized from instantaneous measurements or those with the shortest regolith monitoring periods have increased accuracy where the frequency and amplitude of the temperature variation are lowest. The inverse model is based on the Function Specification Inversion method. This study demonstrates that a solution subspace can be identified within a space of uncertainties modelled for the temperature measurements and planetary heat flow: the subspace is defined by a constant log-ratio of their respective standard deviations. Optimized heat flow estimates display

  3. Measurement of limb blood flow by electrical impedance plethysmography.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Swain, I. D.; Shakespeare, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Limb blood flow has been measured in 72 individuals by the noninvasive technique of electrical impedance plethysmography. Venous occlusion was not used. Blood flow was measured in 230 limbs in which 195 limbs were either in normal individuals or the clinically normal limbs of patients (normal limbs). Thirty-five limbs were clinically abnormal. Measurements on limbs with clinical abnormalities showed that blood flow values often fell within the limits of the normal range. However 3 cases of known vascular injury and 2 cases studied after hand surgery under tourniquet showed lowered blood flow values by comparison with the unaffected limb. A simultaneously recorded range of cardiac output and stroke volume measurements gave similar results to those obtained in a previous, unconnected study. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4004047

  4. Measurements of Flow Distortion within the CSAT3 Sonic Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, T. W.; Dellwik, E.; Mann, J.; Angelou, N.

    2014-12-01

    We have measured flow distortion within the CSAT3 sonic anemometer using two quite different techniques. One method compares three adjacent, differently-aligned CSAT3 sonics to each other, using a data analysis technique similar to that of Kochendorfer et al.~(2012). The two 'outside' sonics are upright references while the central, test sonic is oriented with its v-axis vertical, so that fluctuations of wind direction are surrogates for variations in the vertical wind component. The second technique compares CSAT3 measurements to independent velocity measurements with a 3-component Doppler LIDAR. The LIDAR is focused at a distance of 0.8 m in front of the sonic and is thus a flow-distortion-free reference. Here we compare the results of the two techniques to each other, as well as to a transducer-shadowing model for CSAT3 flow distortion. On the basis of these measurements, recommendations are made for correction of CSAT3 flow distortion.

  5. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  6. Stereoscopic PIV measurements of flow in the nasal cavity with high flow therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C. J. T.; Buchmann, N. A.; Jermy, M. C.; Moore, S. M.

    2011-04-01

    Knowledge of the airflow characteristics within the nasal cavity with nasal high flow (NHF) therapy and during unassisted breathing is essential to understand the treatment's efficacy. The distribution and velocity of the airflow in the nasal cavity with and without NHF cannula flow has been investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry at steady peak expiration and inspiration. In vivo breathing flows were measured and dimensionally scaled to reproduce physiological conditions in vitro. A scaled model of the complete nasal cavity was constructed in transparent silicone and airflow simulated with an aqueous glycerine solution. NHF modifies nasal cavity flow patterns significantly, altering the proportion of inspiration and expiration through each passageway and producing jets with in vivo velocities up to 17.0 ms-1 for 30 l/min cannula flow. Velocity magnitudes differed appreciably between the left and right sides of the nasal cavity. The importance of using a three-component measurement technique when investigating nasal flows has been highlighted.

  7. I can't wait: Methods for measuring and moderating individual differences in impulsive choice.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer R; Hill, Catherine C; Marshall, Andrew T; Stuebing, Sarah L; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive choice behavior occurs when individuals make choices without regard for future consequences. This behavior is often maladaptive and is a common symptom in many disorders, including drug abuse, compulsive gambling, and obesity. Several proposed mechanisms may influence impulsive choice behavior. These mechanisms provide a variety of pathways that may provide the basis for individual differences that are often evident when measuring choice behavior. This review provides an overview of these different pathways to impulsive choice, and the behavioral intervention strategies being developed to moderate impulsive choice. Because of the compelling link between impulsive choice behavior and the near-epidemic pervasiveness of obesity in the United States, we focus on the relationship between impulsive choice behavior and obesity as a test case for application of the multiple pathways approach. Choosing immediate gratification over healthier long term food choices is a contributing factor to the obesity crisis. Behavioral interventions can lead to more self controlled choices in a rat pre-clinical model, suggesting a possible gateway for translation to human populations. Designing and implementing effective impulsive choice interventions is crucial to improving the overall health and well-being of impulsive individuals.

  8. A process-oriented measure of habit strength for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Grove, J. Robert; Zillich, Irja; Medic, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Habitual action is an important aspect of health behaviour, but the relevance of various habit strength indicators continues to be debated. This study focused specifically on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and evaluated the construct validity of a framework emphasizing patterned action, stimulus-response bonding, automaticity, and negative consequences for nonperformance as indicators of habit strength for this form of exercise. Methods: Upper-level undergraduates (N = 124) provided demographic information and responded to questionnaire items assessing historical MVPA involvement, current MVPA involvement, and the four proposed habit strength dimensions. Factor analyses were used to examine the latent structure of the habit strength indicators, and the model's construct validity was evaluated via an examination of relationships with repetition history and current behaviour. Results: At a measurement level, findings indicated that the proposed four-component model possessed psychometric integrity as a coherent set of factors. Criterion-related validity was also demonstrated via significant changes in three of the four factors as a function of past involvement in MVPA and significant correlations with the frequency, duration, and intensity of current MVPA. Conclusions: These findings support the construct validity of this exercise habit strength model and suggest that it could provide a template for future research on how MVPA habits are developed and maintained. PMID:25750789

  9. I can't wait: Methods for measuring and moderating individual differences in impulsive choice

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jennifer R.; Hill, Catherine C.; Marshall, Andrew T.; Stuebing, Sarah L.; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Impulsive choice behavior occurs when individuals make choices without regard for future consequences. This behavior is often maladaptive and is a common symptom in many disorders, including drug abuse, compulsive gambling, and obesity. Several proposed mechanisms may influence impulsive choice behavior. These mechanisms provide a variety of pathways that may provide the basis for individual differences that are often evident when measuring choice behavior. This review provides an overview of these different pathways to impulsive choice, and the behavioral intervention strategies being developed to moderate impulsive choice. Because of the compelling link between impulsive choice behavior and the near-epidemic pervasiveness of obesity in the United States, we focus on the relationship between impulsive choice behavior and obesity as a test case for application of the multiple pathways approach. Choosing immediate gratification over healthier long term food choices is a contributing factor to the obesity crisis. Behavioral interventions can lead to more self controlled choices in a rat pre-clinical model, suggesting a possible gateway for translation to human populations. Designing and implementing effective impulsive choice interventions is crucial to improving the overall health and well-being of impulsive individuals. PMID:27695664

  10. In vitro flow measurements in ion sputtered hydrocephalus shunts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental procedure for accurate measurements of the pressure-drop/flow rate relationship in hydrocephalus shunts. Using a fish-hook arrangement, small flow rates in a perforated ion-sputtered Teflon microtubule were measured in vitro in a pressured system and were correlated with pressure in the system. Results indicate that appropriate drainage rates could be obtained in the physiological range for hydrocephalus shunts.

  11. Dual Stokes cars measurements in supersonic combusting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Antcliff, Richard R.; Chitsomboon, Tawit; Diskin, Glenn S.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1987-01-01

    Coherent antiStokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) was used to make simultaneous measurements of temperature, nitrogen and oxygen density in a reacting supersonic flow. A supersonic burner (SSB) was designed to provide supersonic flow in which combustion can be studied in the laboratory. Measurements made with the CARS system will be used for validation of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes. Preliminary results of the CFD calculations are presented.

  12. In vitro flow measurements in ion sputtered hydrocephalus shunts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental procedure for accurate measurements of the pressure-drop/flow rate relationship in hydrocephalus shunts. Using a fish-hook arrangement, small flow rates in a perforated ion-sputtered Teflon microtubule were measured in vitro in a pressured system and were correlated with pressure in the system. Results indicate that appropriate drainage rates could be obtained in the physiological range for hydrocephalus shunts.

  13. Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in a Buoyant Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    John William Strutt , the third Baron of Rayleigh , or more commonly known as Lord Rayleigh , was the first to offer a correct explanation of the...FILTERED RAYLEIGH SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN A BUOYANT FLOW FIELD         THESIS       Steven Michael Meents, Captain, USAF...AFIT/GAE/ENY/08-M22 FILTERED RAYLEIGH SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN A BUOYANT FLOW FIELD THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics

  14. Flow measurements in a water tunnel using a holocinematographic velocimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.; Beeler, George B.

    1987-06-01

    Dual-view holographic movies were used to examine complex flows with full three-space and time resolution. This approach, which tracks the movement of small tracer particles in water, is termed holocinematographic velocimetry (HCV). A small prototype of a new water tunnel was used to demonstrate proof-of-concept for the HCV. After utilizing a conventional flow visualization apparatus with a laser light sheet to illuminate tracer particles to evaluate flow quality of the prototype tunnel, a simplified version of the HCV was employed to demonstrate the capabilities of the approach. Results indicate that a full-scale version of the water tunnel and a high performance version of the HCV should be able to check theoretical and numerical modeling of complex flows and examine the mechanisms operative in turbulent and vortex flow control concepts, providing an entirely unique instrument capable, for the first time, of simultaneous three-space and time measurements in turbulent flow.

  15. Flow measurements in a water tunnel using a holocinematographic velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.; Beeler, George B.

    1987-01-01

    Dual-view holographic movies were used to examine complex flows with full three-space and time resolution. This approach, which tracks the movement of small tracer particles in water, is termed holocinematographic velocimetry (HCV). A small prototype of a new water tunnel was used to demonstrate proof-of-concept for the HCV. After utilizing a conventional flow visualization apparatus with a laser light sheet to illuminate tracer particles to evaluate flow quality of the prototype tunnel, a simplified version of the HCV was employed to demonstrate the capabilities of the approach. Results indicate that a full-scale version of the water tunnel and a high performance version of the HCV should be able to check theoretical and numerical modeling of complex flows and examine the mechanisms operative in turbulent and vortex flow control concepts, providing an entirely unique instrument capable, for the first time, of simultaneous three-space and time measurements in turbulent flow.

  16. Self-Rated Pubertal Development, Depressive Symptoms and Delinquency: Measurement Issues and Moderation by Gender and Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Negriff, Sonya; Fung, Michelle T.; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships between pubertal development, depressive symptoms and delinquency in a sample of 241 males and 213 females aged 9–13 years. Four objectives were set forth for this study: 1) to examine relationships between pubertal stage or timing and depressive symptoms and delinquency; 2) to compare continuous and categorical measures of pubertal timing; 3) to examine gender as a moderator of these relationships, and 4) to examine maltreatment as a moderator of these relationships. Results indicated that mature pubertal stage and early (continuous) pubertal timing were both related to higher delinquency whereas only early pubertal timing was related to depressive symptoms. Categorical timing was not related to depressive symptoms or delinquency. Neither gender nor maltreatment were found to be moderators. These findings provide evidence against equating pubertal stage, continuous timing, and categorical timing, and highlight the need to identify possible moderators in research on pubertal development. PMID:25152546

  17. PIV measurements of hydrodynamic interactions between biofilms and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Kenneth T.; Kazemifar, Farzan; Aybar, Marcelo; Perez-Calleja, Patricia; Nerenberg, Robert; Sinha, Sumit; Hardy, Richard J.; Best, Jim L.; Sambrook Smith, Greg H.

    2015-11-01

    Biofilms constitute an important form of bacterial life in aquatic environments and are present at the interface of fluids and solid such as riverbeds or bridge columns. They are also utilized in bioreactors for bioremediation and water treatment purposes. They are permeable, heterogeneous, and deformable structures that can influence the flow and mass/momentum transport, yet their interaction with flow is not fully understood in part due to technical obstacles impeding quantitative experimental investigations. We have attempted to address these challenges using the PIV technique and fluorescence imaging to investigate the flow field around cylinders covered with biofilms at different growth stages. These measurements are meant to uncover the coupled dynamics of turbulence and the biofilm development. Preliminary results of PIV measurements of flow-biofilm interactions in channel flow will be presented.

  18. Measurement system design of an imaging electromagnetic flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Lucas, G.; Leeungculsatien, T.; Zhang, T.

    2012-03-01

    Electromagnetic flow meters based on the principles of Faraday's laws of induction have been used successfully in many industries. In order to achieve velocity profile measurements in single phase and multiphase flows with non-uniform velocity profiles, a novel Imaging Electromagnetic Flow meter (IEF) has been developed which is described in this paper. The novel electromagnetic flow meter uses a microcontroller as the processing core to achieve the function of driving the uniform magnetic field, acquiring voltage signals with electronic system, matrix inversion calculation and result display. The work undertaken in the paper demonstrates that an imaging electromagnetic flow meter for liquid velocity profile measurement is an instrument that is highly suited for control via a microcontroller.

  19. Flap survey test of a combined surface blowing model: Flow measurements at static flow conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, T.

    1978-01-01

    The Combined Surface Blowing (CSB) V/STOL lift/propulsion system consists of a blown flap system which deflects the exhaust from a turbojet engine over a system of flaps deployed at the trailing edge of the wing. Flow measurements consisting of velocity measurements using split film probes and total measure surveys using a miniature Kiel probe were made at control stations along the flap systems at two spanwise stations, the centerline of the nozzle and 60 percent of the nozzle span outboard of the centerline. Surface pressure measurements were made in the wing cove and the upper surface of the first flap element. The test showed a significant flow separation in the wing cove. The extent of the separation is so large that the flow into the first flap takes place only at the leading edge of the flap. The velocity profile measurements indicate that large spanwise (3 dimensional) flow may exist.

  20. Continuous regional blood flow measurement during environmental heating in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kregel, K.C.; Wall, P.T.; Gisolfi, C.V.

    1986-03-05

    With prolonged exposure to high ambient temperatures, shifting regional blood flows reflect the dominance of cardiovascular over thermoregulatory requirements. Hypotension and decreased cardiac output contribute to the circulatory failure noted in heat stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in regional blood flows during prolonged exposure (50-70 min) to 45/sup 0/C heat. Sprague-Dawley rats (250-450 g) were implanted with pulsed Doppler flow probes on the superior mesenteric, caudal, and left iliac arteries. Measurements included blood flows in kHz Doppler shift, colonic (T/sub c/) and tail-skin temperatures, and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP). As T/sub c/ rose from 37/sup 0/ to 42/sup 0/C, iliac flow remained relatively constant, caudal flow rose to peak values of 257-600%, and mesenteric flow declined 60-88% relative to baseline. The rise in caudal blood flow occurred within the first 5 min of exposure whereas the decline in mesenteric flow was progressive; MABP rose to peak levels of 180 mm Hg. Heart rate rose to 500-630 bpm. At T/sub c/ above 42/sup 0/C, mesenteric flow increased in several animals (36-75%) and MABP began to fall. The authors hypothesize that the hypotension observed with prolonged heat exposure in the rat is in part attributed to the inability of the animal to sustain splanchnic vasoconstriction.

  1. Cyclic Concentration Measurements for Characterizing Pulsating Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.

    2013-07-07

    Slurry mixed in vessels via pulse jet mixers has a periodic, rather than steady, concentration profile. Measurements of local concentration taken at the center of the tank at a range of elevations within the mixed region were analyzed to obtain a greater understanding of how the periodic pulse jet mixing cycle affects the local concentration. Data were obtained at the critical suspension velocity, when all solids are suspended at the end of the pulse. The data at a range of solids loadings are analyzed to observe the effect of solids concentration during the suspension and settling portions of the mixing cycle.

  2. Can theory of mind deficits be measured reliably in people with mild and moderate Alzheimer's dementia?

    PubMed

    Choong, Caroline Sm; Doody, Gillian A

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from Alzheimer's dementia develop difficulties in social functioning. This has led to an interest in the study of "theory of mind" in this population. However, difficulty has arisen because the associated cognitive demands of traditional short story theory of mind assessments result in failure per se in this population, making it challenging to test pure theory of mind ability. Simplified, traditional 1st and 2nd order theory of mind short story tasks and a battery of alternative theory of mind cartoon jokes and control slapstick cartoon jokes, without memory components, were administered to 16 participants with mild-moderate Alzheimer's dementia, and 11 age-matched healthy controls. No significant differences were detected between participants with Alzheimer's dementia and controls on the 1st or 2nd order traditional short story theory of mind tasks (p = 0.155 and p = 0.154 respectively). However, in the cartoon joke tasks there were significant differences in performance between the Alzheimer participants and the control group, this was evident for both theory of mind cartoons and the control 'slapstick' jokes. It remains very difficult to assess theory of mind as an isolated phenomenon in populations with global cognitive impairment, such as Alzheimer's dementia, as the tasks used to assess this cognition invariably depend on other cognitive functions. Although a limitation of this study is the small sample size, the results suggest that there is no measurable specific theory of mind deficit in people with Alzheimer's dementia, and that the use of theory of mind representational models to measure social cognitive ability may not be appropriate in this population.

  3. From steady solutions to chaotic flows in a Rayleigh-Bénard problem at moderate Rayleigh numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puigjaner, D.; Herrero, J.; Simó, C.; Giralt, F.

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection problem in a cubical cavity at moderate values of the Rayleigh number ( Ra≤105) and a Prandtl number of Pr=0.71 (with extensions to Pr=0.75 and 0.80) was investigated. The cubical cavity was heated from below and had perfectly conducting sidewalls and uniform temperature distributions on the two horizontal walls. A system of ordinary differential equations with a dimension of typically N≈11 000 was obtained when the conservation equations were discretized by means of a Galerkin method. Previous knowledge of the bifurcation diagram of steady solutions, reported in the literature, was used to identify the origin of several branches of periodic orbits that were continued with Ra. Half a dozen of such periodic orbits were found to be stable within narrow ranges of Ra (at most, some 5000 units wide). An attracting two-torus, restricted to a very narrow region of Ra, was also identified. It was found that the instabilization of periodic orbits quite often resulted into the development of complex dynamics such as the creation of homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits. Instances of both types of global bifurcations were analyzed in some detail. One particular instance of chaotic dynamics (a strange attractor) was also identified. Chaotic dynamics has been found at Pr=0.71 in a flow invariant subspace, which can be interpreted as a fixed-point subspace in terms of equivariant theory; this subspace is not attracting. However, some regions of attracting chaotic dynamics for moderate Rayleigh numbers ( 9×104≤Ra≤105) were found at values of Pr slightly above 0.71. The role of a particular homoclinic solution found at Pr=0.71 in the generation of these chaotic regions was analyzed.

  4. Measuring Photospheric Rotational and Meridional Flows Using Magnetic Feature Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Derek

    2016-05-01

    Long-lived rotational and meridional flows are important ingredients of the solar cycle. Using magnetic field images to measure these flows on the solar surface has typically been performed by cross-correlating thin longitudinal strips or square patches across sufficiently long time gaps. Here, I use one month of SDO/HMI line-of-sight magnetic field observations, combined with the SWAMIS magnetic feature tracking algorithm to measure the motion of individual features in these magnetograms. By controlling for perturbations due to short-lived flows and due to false motions from feature interactions, I effectively isolate the long-lived flows traced by the magnetic features. This allows me to produce high-fidelity differential rotation measurements with well-characterized variances and covariances of the fit parameters. I also produce medium-fidelity measurements of the much weaker meridional flow that is broadly consistent with previous results, showing a peak flow of 16.7 m/s at 45 degrees latitude. This work shows that measuring the motions of individual features in photospheric magnetograms can produce high precision results in relatively short time spans, which suggests that high resolution non-longitudinally averaged photospheric velocity residual measurements could be produced to compare with coronal results, and to provide other diagnostics of the solar dynamo. This work has been partially supported by NASA Grants NNX11AP03G and NNX14AJ67G.

  5. Process tomography applied to multi-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakowski, T.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the state of the art in measuring multi-phase flows by using tomographic techniques. The results presented show a wide range of industrial applications of process tomography from the nuclear and chemical to the food industry. This is illustrated by examples of the application of various tomographic sensors to the measurement of geometric or kinematic parameters of multi-phase flows. An application of process tomography for the validation of computational fluid dynamic models and the possibility of constructing a flowmeter for multi-phase flow are addressed.

  6. Rarefield gas flows through meshes and implications for atmospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbel, J.

    2001-05-01

    Meshes are commonly used as part of instruments for in situ atmospheric measurements. This study analyses the aerodynamic effect of meshes by means of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. Based on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method, a simple mesh parameterisation is described and applied to a number of representative flow conditions. For open meshes freely exposed to the flow, substantial compression effects are found both upstream and downstream of the mesh. Meshes attached to close instrument structures, on the other hand, cause only minor flow disturbances. In an accompanying paper, the approach developed here is applied to the quantitative analysis of rocket-borne density measurements in the middle atmosphere.

  7. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    Energy systems and water resources are inextricably linked, especially in the case of bioenergy, which can require up to three orders of magnitude more water than other energy carriers. Water scarcity already affects about 1 in 5 people globally, and stands to be exacerbated in many locales by current biofuel expansion plans. This dissertation engages with several of the analytical and governance challenges raised by this connection between bioenergy expansion and global water resources. My examination begins with an overview of important concepts in water resource analysis, followed by a review of current literature on the water impacts of most major energy pathways. I then report on a case study of ethanol fuel in California. This work employed a coupled agro-climatic and life cycle assessment (LCA) model to estimate the water resource impacts of several bioenergy expansion scenarios at a county-level resolution. It shows that ethanol production in California regularly consumes more than 1000 gallons of water per gallon of fuel produced, and that 99% of life-cycle water consumption occurs in the feedstock cultivation phase. This analysis then delves into the complexity of life cycle impact assessment for water resources. Despite improvements in water accounting methods, impact assessment must contend with the fact that different water sources are not necessarily commensurable, and that impacts depend on the state of the resource base that is drawn upon. I adapt water footprinting and LCA techniques to the bioenergy context, describing comprehensive inventory approaches and developing a process for characterizing (weighting) consumption values to enable comparison across resource bases. This process draws on metrics of water stress, accounting for environmental flow requirements, climatic variability, and non-linearity of water stress effects. My assessment framework was developed in hopes that it would be useful in managing the risks and impacts it describes. The

  8. Guide to Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Jason D.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Snyder, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In electric propulsion (EP) systems, accurate measurement of the propellant mass flow rate of gas or liquid to the thruster and external cathode is a key input in the calculation of thruster efficiency and specific impulse. Although such measurements are often achieved with commercial mass flow controllers and meters integrated into propellant feed systems, the variability in potential propellant options and flow requirements amongst the spectrum of EP power regimes and devices complicates meter selection, integration, and operation. At the direction of the Committee on Standards for Electric Propulsion Testing, a guide was jointly developed by members of the electric propulsion community to establish a unified document that contains the working principles, methods of implementation and analysis, and calibration techniques and recommendations on the use of mass flow meters in laboratory and spacecraft electric propulsion systems. The guide is applicable to EP devices of all types and power levels ranging from microthrusters to high-power ion engines and Hall effect thrusters. The establishment of a community standard on mass flow metering will help ensure the selection of the proper meter for each application. It will also improve the quality of system performance estimates by providing comprehensive information on the physical phenomena and systematic errors that must be accounted for during the analysis of flow measurement data. This paper will outline the standard methods and recommended practices described in the guide titled "Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems."

  9. Guide to Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Jason D.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Snyder, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In electric propulsion (EP) systems, accurate measurement of the propellant mass flow rate of gas or liquid to the thruster and external cathode is a key input in the calculation of thruster efficiency and specific impulse. Although such measurements are often achieved with commercial mass flow controllers and meters integrated into propellant feed systems, the variability in potential propellant options and flow requirements amongst the spectrum of EP power regimes and devices complicates meter selection, integration, and operation. At the direction of the Committee on Standards for Electric Propulsion Testing, a guide was jointly developed by members of the electric propulsion community to establish a unified document that contains the working principles, methods of implementation and analysis, and calibration techniques and recommendations on the use of mass flow meters in laboratory and spacecraft electric propulsion systems. The guide is applicable to EP devices of all types and power levels ranging from microthrusters to high-power ion engines and Hall effect thrusters. The establishment of a community standard on mass flow metering will help ensure the selection of the proper meter for each application. It will also improve the quality of system performance estimates by providing comprehensive information on the physical phenomena and systematic errors that must be accounted for during the analysis of flow measurement data. This paper will outline the standard methods and recommended practices described in the guide titled "Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems."

  10. Measurable inhomogeneities in stock trading volume flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortines, A. A. G.; Riera, R.; Anteneodo, C.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the statistics of volumes of shares traded in stock markets. We show that the stochastic process of trading volumes can be understood on the basis of a mixed Poisson process at the microscopic time level. The beta distribution of the second kind (also known as q-gamma distribution), that has been proposed to describe empirical volume histograms, naturally results from our analysis. In particular, the shape of the distribution at small volumes is governed by the degree of granularity in the trading process, while the exponent controlling the tail is a measure of the inhomogeneities in market activity. Furthermore, the present case furnishes empirical evidence of how power law probability distributions can arise as a consequence of a fluctuating intrinsic parameter.

  11. Heat transfer measurements of the 1983 kilauea lava flow.

    PubMed

    Hardee, H C

    1983-10-07

    Convective heat flow measurements of a basaltic lava flow were made during the 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. Eight field measurements of induced natural convection were made, giving heat flux values that ranged from 1.78 to 8.09 kilowatts per square meter at lava temperatures of 1088 and 1128 degrees Celsius, respectively. These field measurements of convective heat flux at subliquidus temperatures agree with previous laboratory measurements in furnace-melted samples of molten lava, and are useful for predicting heat transfer in magma bodies and for estimating heat extraction rates for magma energy.

  12. Heat-transfer measurements of the 1983 Kilauea lava flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1983-10-07

    Convective heat flow measurements of a basaltic lava flow were made during the 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. Eight field measurements of induced natural convection were made, giving heat flux values that ranged from 1.78 to 8.09 kilowatts per square meter at lava temperatures of 1088 and 1128 degrees Celsius, respectively. These field measurements of convective heat flux at subliquidus temperatures agree with previous laboratory measurements in furnace-melted samples of molten lava, and are useful for predicting heat transfer in magma bodies and for estimating heat extraction rates for magma energy.

  13. Induced airflow in flying insects II. Measurement of induced flow.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P; Jacobson, Nathaniel P

    2006-01-01

    The flapping wings of insects and birds induce a strong flow over their body during flight. Although this flow influences the sensory biology and physiology of a flying animal, there are very little data on the characteristics of this self-generated flow field or its biological consequences. A model proposed in the companion paper estimated the induced flow over flying insects. In this study, we used a pair of hot wire anemometers to measure this flow at two locations near the body of a tethered flapping hawk moth, Manduca sexta. The axial inflow anemometer measured the airflow prior to its entry into the stroke plane, whereas the radial outflow anemometer measured the airflow after it crossed the stroke plane. The high temporal resolution of the hot wire anemometers allowed us to measure not only the mean induced flow but also subtle higher frequency disturbances occurring at 1-4 times the wing beat frequency. These data provide evidence for the predictions of a mathematical model proposed in the companion paper. Specifically, the absolute value of the measured induced flow matches the estimate of the model. Also, as predicted by the model, the induced flow varies linearly with wing beat frequency. Our experiments also show that wing flexion contributes significantly to the observed higher frequency disturbances. Thus, the hot wire anemometry technique provides a useful means to quantify the aerodynamic signature of wing flexion. The phasic and tonic components of induced flow influence several physiological processes such as convective heat loss and gas exchange in endothermic insects, as well as alter the nature of mechanosensory and olfactory stimuli to the sensory organs of a flying insect.

  14. Time-Resolved Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2008-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultipler tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. Mean and rms velocity and temperature fluctuation measurements in both an electrically-heated jet facility with a 10-mm diameter nozzle and also in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented.

  15. Thomson scattering measurements from asymmetric interpenetrating plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J. S. Moody, J. D.; Fiuza, F.; Ryutov, D.; Divol, L.; Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.

    2014-11-15

    Imaging Thomson scattering measurements of collective ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion temperature and density from laser produced counter-streaming asymmetric flows. Two foils are heated with 8 laser beams each, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 60 J 2ω probe laser with a 200 ps pulse length. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the multi-ion species, asymmetric flows theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperatures, ion densities, and flow velocities for each plasma flow are determined.

  16. Effects of nonuniform acceptance in anisotropic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Voloshin, Sergei

    2008-03-15

    The applicability of anisotropic flow measurement techniques and their extension for detectors with nonuniform azimuthal acceptance are discussed. Considering anisotropic flow measurements with two and three (mixed harmonic) azimuthal correlations we introduce a set of observables based on the x and y components of the event flow vector. These observables provide independent measures of anisotropic flow and can be used to test the self-consistency of the analysis. Based on these observables we propose a technique that explicitly takes into account the effects of nonuniform detector acceptance. Within this approach the acceptance corrections, as well as parameters that define the method applicability, can be determined directly from experimental data. For practical purposes a brief summary of the method is provided at the end.

  17. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  18. Clean seeding for flow visualization and velocimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, Mark F.; Crafton, Jim W.; Estevadeordal, Jordi; Delapp, Joseph; McNiel, Charles; Peltier, Don; Reynolds, Tina

    2010-05-01

    Flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) are among the most useful tools available for experimental aerodynamics studies. Implementation of these techniques, however, requires that seed material be introduced into the flow. The undesirable qualities of the seeding material often prevent the use of flow visualization and velocimetry techniques in many test environments. This is particularly true for large-scale, closed-circuit tunnels where facility operators must weigh the risks of facility contamination, sensor damage, and safety concerns that might result from the introduction of seed particles. Identification of a practical clean seeding material that minimizes or eliminates these concerns would enable flow visualization and velocimetry techniques to be deployed in these facilities. Here, we demonstrate two seeding systems that have the potential to provide such a solution. The first system is a new concept which uses liquid carbon dioxide that can be made to form discrete particles as it expands from a high-pressure tank. PIV measurements are demonstrated in several flows, including supersonic and subsonic tunnels, using these residue-free seed particles. The second system utilizes a combination of steam and liquid nitrogen to produce an aerosol or fog that serves as flow seeding. Water- or steam-based seeding has been previously demonstrated for flow visualization in subsonic tunnels; here however, we utilize this seed material for PIV and LDV measurements as well as for flow visualization in a large supersonic tunnel.

  19. Experimental measurements of the cavitating flow after horizontal water entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tat Nguyen, Thang; Hai, Duong Ngoc; Quang Thai, Nguyen; Phuong, Truong Thi

    2017-10-01

    Water-entry cavitating flow is of considerable importance in underwater high-speed applications. That is because of the drag-reduction effect that concerns the presence of a cavity around moving objects. Though the study of the flow has long been carried out, little data are documented in literature so far. Besides, currently, in the case of unsteady flow, experimental measurements of some flow parameters such as the cavity pressure still encounter difficulties. Hence continuing research efforts are of important significance. The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally the unsteady cavitating flow after the horizontal water entry of projectiles. An experimental apparatus has been developed. Qualitative and quantitative optical visualizations of the flow have been carried out by using high-speed videography. Digital image processing has been applied to analyzing the recorded flow images. Based on the known correlations between the ellipsoidal super-cavity’s size and the corresponding cavitation number, the cavity pressure has been measured by utilizing the data of image processing. A comparison between the partial- and super-cavitating flow regimes is reported. The received results can be useful for the design of high-speed underwater projectiles.

  20. Flow Field Measurement of Mixing Driven by Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batur, C.; Zhong, H.

    2003-01-01

    Mixing driven by buoyancy-induced flows inside a cavity consists of stretching and folding of an interface. Measurement of the flow field using particle imaging velocimetry shows that during stretching the flow field has a single elliptic point, thus dominated by a single vortex. However, global bifurcation that results in folding introduces a hyperbolic point whereby the flow field degenerates to multiple vortex interactions. The short-lived coherent structure observed during mixing which results in the Rayleigh- Taylor morphology is attributed to vortex interactions. The mixing characteristics of non-homogeneous fluids driven by buoyancy are important towards understanding transport phenomenon in a microgravity environment. Mixing consists of stretching and folding of an interface due to a flow field whose intensity depends on the body force. For miscible liquids, the characteristic of the flow field determines whether mass transport is governed by diffusion or bulk stirring which induces mixing. For technologically important processes, transport of mass is governed by the coupling of the body force to scalar gradients such as concentration and or temperature' 2 3 . In order to lend insight into these classes of problems we consider a model experimental system to study mixing driven by buoyancy-induced flows. The characteristics of mixing is addressed from detail measurements of the flow field using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), and its corresponding interface dynamics using image processing techniques.

  1. Measuring Vortex Breakdown Flows Within Open Cylindrical Bioreactors Using Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusting, Jonathan; Sheridan, John; Hourigan, Kerry

    2004-11-01

    A low-shear model bioreactor has been developed to allow a more accurate definition of the external hydrodynamic conditions experienced by cells during large-scale aggregation. The particular flow being studied within the bioreactor is the vortex breakdown instability known to occur in open cylindrical vessels driven by a rotating lid. Flow conditions at an aspect ratio of 1.5 and a Reynolds number range of 500 to 3000 are characterized experimentally using Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry. Flow measurements relevant to cell culture applications, such as local velocities and shear stresses, are confirmed to be highly dependent on Reynolds number and the spatial distribution of cells. Moderate time-dependency of local conditions is also observed, particularly in the breakdown bubble region. In addition, vortex breakdown is found to occur even with adherent-cell culture scaffolds submerged at various positions on the central axis of the bioreactor, although the shape and steadiness of the bubble is affected.

  2. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  3. The in situ permeable flow sensor: A device for measuring groundwater flow velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, S.; Barker, G.T.; Nichols, R.L.

    1994-03-01

    A new technology called the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. These sensors use a thermal perturbation technique to directly measure the direction and magnitude of the full three dimensional groundwater flow velocity vector in unconsolidated, saturated, porous media. The velocity measured is an average value characteristic of an approximately 1 cubic meter volume of the subsurface. During a test at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, two flow sensors were deployed in a confined aquifer in close proximity to a well which was screened over the entire vertical extent of the aquifer and the well was pumped at four different pumping rates. In this situation horizontal flow which is radially directed toward the pumping well is expected. The flow sensors measured horizontal flow which was directed toward the pumping well, within the uncertainty in the measurements. The observed magnitude of the horizontal component of the flow velocity increased linearly with pumping rate, as predicted by theoretical considerations. The measured horizontal component of the flow velocity differed from the predicted flow velocity, which was calculated with the assumptions that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer were radially homogeneous and isotropic, by less than a factor of two. Drawdown data obtained from other wells near the pumping well during the pump test indicate that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer are probably not radially homogeneous but the effect of the inhomogeneity on the flow velocity field around the pumping well was not modeled because the degree and distribution of the inhomogeneity are unknown. Grain size analysis of core samples from wells in the area were used to estimate the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity.

  4. On-Orbit Lunar Modulation Transfer Function Measurements for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Taeyong; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wang, Zhipeng

    2013-01-01

    Spatial quality of an imaging sensor can be estimated by evaluating its modulation transfer function (MTF) from many different sources such as a sharp edge, a pulse target, or bar patterns with different spatial frequencies. These well-defined targets are frequently used for prelaunch laboratory tests, providing very reliable and accurate MTF measurements. A laboratory-quality edge input source was included in the spatial-mode operation of the Spectroradiometric Calibration Assembly (SRCA), which is one of the onboard calibrators of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Since not all imaging satellites have such an instrument, SRCA MTF estimations can be used as a reference for an on-orbit lunar MTF algorithm and results. In this paper, the prelaunch spatial quality characterization process from the Integrated Alignment Collimator and SRCA is briefly discussed. Based on prelaunch MTF calibration using the SRCA, a lunar MTF algorithm is developed and applied to the lifetime on-orbit Terra and Aqua MODIS lunar collections. In each lunar collection, multiple scan-directionMoon-to-background transition profiles are aligned by the subpixel edge locations from a parametric Fermi function fit. Corresponding accumulated edge profiles are filtered and interpolated to obtain the edge spread function (ESF). The MTF is calculated by applying a Fourier transformation on the line spread function through a simple differentiation of the ESF. The lifetime lunar MTF results are analyzed and filtered by a relationship with the Sun-Earth-MODIS angle. Finally, the filtered lunarMTF values are compared to the SRCA MTF results. This comparison provides the level of accuracy for on-orbit MTF estimations validated through prelaunch SRCA measurements. The lunar MTF values had larger uncertainty than the SRCA MTF results; however, the ratio mean of lunarMTF fit and SRCA MTF values is within 2% in the 250- and 500-m bands. Based on the MTF measurement uncertainty range

  5. A thermal stack structure for measurement of fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hao; Mitchell, S. J. N.; Campbell, D. H.; Gamble, Harold S.

    2003-03-01

    A stacked thermal structure for fluid flow sensing has been designed, fabricated, and tested. A double-layer polysilicon process was employed in the fabrication. Flow measurement is based on the transfer of heat from a temperature sensor element to the moving fluid. The undoped or lightly doped polysilicon temperature sensor is located on top of a heavily doped polysilicon heater element. A dielectric layer between the heater and the sensor elements provides both thermal coupling and electrical isolation. In comparison to a hot-wire flow sensor, the heating and sensing functions are separated, allowing the electrical characteristics of each to be optimized. Undoped polysilicon has a large temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) up to 7 %/K and is thus a preferred material for the sensor. However, heavily doped polysilicon is preferred for the heater due to its lower resistance. The stacked flow sensor structure offers a high thermal sensitivity making it especially suitable for medical applications where the working temperatures are restricted. Flow rates of various fluids can be measured over a wide range. The fabricated flow sensors were used to measure the flow rate of water in the range μl - ml/min and gas (Helium) in the range 10 - 100ml/min.

  6. Volumetric Flow Measurement Using an Implantable CMUT Array.

    PubMed

    Mengli Wang; Jingkuang Chen

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes volumetric-flow velocity measurement using an implantable capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array. The array is comprised of multiple-concentric CMUT rings for ultrasound transmission and an outmost annular CMUT array for ultrasound reception. Microelectromechanical-system (MEMS) fabrication technology allows reception CMUT on this flowmeter to be implemented with a different membrane thickness and gap height than that of transmission CMUTs, optimizing the performance of these two different kinds of devices. The silicon substrate of this 2-mm-diameter CMUT ring array was bulk micromachined to approximately 80 to 100 μm thick, minimizing tissue disruption. The blood-flow velocity was detected using pulse ultrasound Doppler by comparing the demodulated echo ultrasound with the incident ultrasound. The demodulated ultrasound signal was sampled by a pulse delayed in time domain from the transmitted burst, which corresponds to detecting the signal at a specific distance. The flow tube/vessel diameter was detected through the time-flight delay difference from near and far wall reflections, which was measured from the ultrasound pulse echo. The angle between the ultrasound beam and the flow was found by using the cross-correlation from consecutive ultrasound echoes. Artificial blood flowing through three different polymer tubes was experimented with, while keeping the same volumetric flow rate. The discrepancy in flow measurement results between this CMUT meter and a calibrated laser Doppler flowmeter is less than 5%.

  7. Precision electron flow measurements in a disk transmission line.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Waylon T.; Pelock, Michael D.; Martin, Jeremy Paul; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.; Pointon, Timothy David

    2008-01-01

    An analytic model for electron flow in a system driving a fixed inductive load is described and evaluated with particle in cell simulations. The simple model allows determining the impedance profile for a magnetically insulated transmission line given the minimum gap desired, and the lumped inductance inside the transition to the minimum gap. The model allows specifying the relative electron flow along the power flow direction, including cases where the fractional electron flow decreases in the power flow direction. The electrons are able to return to the cathode because they gain energy from the temporally rising magnetic field. The simulations were done with small cell size to reduce numerical heating. An experiment to compare electron flow to the simulations was done. The measured electron flow is {approx}33% of the value from the simulations. The discrepancy is assumed to be due to a reversed electric field at the cathode because of the inductive load and falling electron drift velocity in the power flow direction. The simulations constrain the cathode electric field to zero, which gives the highest possible electron flow.

  8. Phase-locked measurements of gas-liquid horizontal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2014-11-01

    A flow of gas and liquid in a horizontal pipe can be described in terms of various flow regimes, e.g. wavy stratified, annular or slug flow. These flow regimes appear at characteristic gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and feature unique wave phenomena. Wavy stratified flow is populated by low amplitude waves whereas annular flow contains high amplitude and long lived waves, so called disturbance waves, that play a key role in a liquid entrainment into the gas phase (droplets). In a slug flow regime, liquid-continuous regions travel at high speeds through a pipe separated by regions of stratified flow. We use a refractive index matched dynamic shadowgraphy technique using a high-speed camera mounted on a moving robotic linear rail to track the formation and development of features characteristic for the aforementioned flow regimes. We show that the wave dynamics become progressively more complex with increasing liquid and gas Reynolds numbers. Based on the shadowgraphy measurements we present, over a range of conditions: (i) phenomenological observations of the formation, and (ii) statistical data on the downstream velocity distribution of different classes of waves. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  9. Two parametric flow measurement in gas-liquid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Chen, C.; Xu, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    The importance and current development of two parametric measurement during two-phase flow are briefly reviewed in this paper. Gas-liquid two-phase two parametric metering experiments were conducted by using an oval gear meter and a sharp edged orifice mounted in series in a horizontal pipe. Compressed air and water were used as gas and liquid phases respectively. The correlations, which can be used to predict the total flow rate and volumetric quality of two-phase flow or volumetric flow rate of each phase, have also been proposed in this paper. Comparison of the calculated values of flow rate of each phase from the correlations with the test data showed that the root mean square fractional deviation for gas flow rate is 2.9 percent and for liquid flow rate 4.4 percent. The method proposed in this paper can be used to measure the gas and liquid flow rate in two-phase flow region without having to separate the phases.

  10. A New Differential Pressure Flow Meter for Measurement of Human Breath Flow: Simulation and Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Devon; Tsow, Francis; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica

    2016-03-01

    The development and performance characterization of a new differential pressure-based flow meter for human breath measurements is presented in this article. The device, called a "Confined Pitot Tube," is comprised of a pipe with an elliptically shaped expansion cavity located in the pipe center, and an elliptical disk inside the expansion cavity. The elliptical disk, named Pitot Tube, is exchangeable, and has different diameters, which are smaller than the diameter of the elliptical cavity. The gap between the disk and the cavity allows the flow of human breath to pass through. The disk causes an obstruction in the flow inside the pipe, but the elliptical cavity provides an expansion for the flow to circulate around the disk, decreasing the overall flow resistance. We characterize the new sensor flow experimentally and theoretically, using Comsol Multiphysics(®) software with laminar and turbulent models. We also validate the sensor, using inhalation and exhalation tests and a reference method.

  11. Polymer-based micro flow sensor for dynamical flow measurements in hydraulic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, R.; Festa, M.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we present a micro flow sensor from a polymer for dynamical flow measurements in hydraulic systems. The flow sensor is based on the thermal anemometric principle and consists of two micro-structured housing shells from polysulfone (PSU) which form a small fluidic channel with a cross-section of 580 µm × 400 µm. In between there is a thin polyimide membrane supporting three gold track structures forming an electrical heater and two resistive thermometers which allows the detection of the flow direction, too. The complete sensor is inserted into the hydraulic system, but only a small bypass flow is directed through the fluidic channel by means of a special splitting system. Due to its small heat capacity, the sensor is suitable to detect flow pulsations up to about 1200 Hz which allows the sensor to be used for the condition monitoring or preventive maintenance of hydraulic systems.

  12. Auroral signatures associated with flow bursts measured by ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Xing, X.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Bonnell, J. W.; Larson, D. E.; Auster, U.

    2012-12-01

    The poleward portion of the auroral oval frequently shows intense, transient auroral disturbances, including poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs) forming along the poleward boundary of the oval and auroral streamers extending equatorward from PBIs. Such auroral activity is suggested to correspond to plasma sheet flow bursts, which play an important role in plasma transport in the magnetotail. Our recent analysis using THEMIS all-sky imager (ASI) data showed that substorm auroral onset results from such high-latitude aurora activity, when it occurs near the end of the substorm growth phase. The precursor streamer sequence was also supported by in-situ spacecraft and radar measurements, suggesting that enhanced transient plasma flows toward the near-Earth plasma sheet are crucial to lead to substorm onset. However, the auroral sequence leads to important questions, which are the magnetotail source region of pre-onset PBIs and pre-onset plasma sheet flow that initiate the precursor auroral sequence, and its dependence on magnetic activity levels. The present study uses the ARTEMIS spacecraft coordinated with the high-resolution THEMIS ASI array to identify flow bursts in the distant magnetotail (>50 RE) and correlate them with the different auroral activity. We found that the distant tail flow direction and related auroral intensifications has a strong dependence on substorm phase. Tailward flows were commonly seen during the expansion phase of substorms, and flow bursts were frequently correlated with multiple intensifications along poleward expanding arcs. The poleward expansion ceased when the tailward flow magnitude dropped to the background level, indicating that the flows and auroral intensifications are physically related. In contrast, flow bursts during the recovery phase and steady magnetospheric convections (SMCs) were directed earthward, and these flows were associated with a series of PBIs lasting for tens of minutes without large poleward expansion

  13. Flow measurement using speckle in optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Stromski, Steven

    2005-04-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is a valuable tool for depth-resolved flow measurements in tissue. However, DOCT suffers from two disadvantages: it is insensitive to flow in the direction normal to the imaging beam, and it requires knowledge of the phase of the demodulated signal. We present an alternative method of extracting flow information, using speckle of conventional amplitude optical coherence tomography images. The two techniques can be shown to be essentially equivalent, with the distinction that speckle methods are sensitive to flow in all directions but do not provide information on the direction of flow. It is well known in other imaging modalities that moving scatterers cause a time-varying speckle pattern. Due to the pixel-by-pixel acquisition scheme of conventional OCT, time-varying speckle is manifested as a change of OCT image spatial speckle frequencies. We tested the ability of speckle to provide quantitative flow information using a flow phantom (a tube filled with Intralipid flowing at a constant volumetric flow rate). Initially, m-scans were taken at over the center of the tube. Images were averaged to reduce noise and the region corresponding to the center one-quarter of the tube lumen was selected. Sequential a-scans were concatenated, the Fourier transform performed, and a ratio of high to low spatial frequencies computed. We found that, over a range of velocities, this ratio bore a linear relation to flow velocity. For two-dimensional imaging, the program was modified to use a sliding window. Parabolic flow profile was visualized inside the tube. This study shows the feasibility of extracting quantitative flow data in all directions without phase information.

  14. Contributions of moderately low flows and large floods to geomorphic change in the Rio Puerco Arroyo, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Eleanor R.; Friedman, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract—From the mid-1800s to around 1930, monsoonal floods incised an arroyo roughly 100 m wide and 10 m deep along the lower Rio Puerco, NM, from the confluence with the Rio San Jose downstream to the mouth at the Rio Grande, causing sedimentation and flooding downstream. Since the 1930s, the channel has greatly narrowed, a densely vegetated floodplain has developed, the arroyo has partly filled, and downstream sedimentation has greatly decreased. Application of herbicide to a 12-km reach of the arroyo in 2003 to control non-native saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) prompted ongoing studies of channel change in the presence and absence of dense, riparian, woody vegetation. We used digital terrain models and satellite imagery to quantify changes in channel width and location in the sprayed reach and in an unsprayed reach downstream during a moderately low-flow interval (November 2006 to March 2010) and during an interval with a large flood (March 2010 to January/February 2014). Channel width increased in magnitude and variability in the sprayed reach but not in the unsprayed reach over both intervals, continuing a pattern first observed in an earlier study of the period 2003 to 2006. Since the herbicide application in 2003, there have been a total of five meander cutoffs in the sprayed reach and none in the unsprayed reach. In kilometer-long sections of the sprayed reach, channel width is now approaching that at the beginning of the period of channel narrowing in 1935.

  15. Measurements of the tip-gap turbulent flow structure in a low-speed compressor cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Genglin

    This dissertation presents results from a thorough study of the tip-gap turbulent flow structure in a low-speed linear compressor cascade wind tunnel at Virginia Tech that includes a moving belt system to simulate the relative motion between the tip and the casing. The endwall pressure measurements and the surface oil flow visualizations were made on a stationary endwall to obtain the flow features and to determine the measurement profiles of interest. A custom-made miniature 3-orthogonal-velocity-component fiber-optic laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure all three components of velocity within a 50 mum spherical measurement volume within the gap between the endwall and the blade tip, mainly for the stationary wall with 1.65% and 3.30% tip gaps as well as some initial experiments for the moving wall. Since all of the vorticity in a flow originates from the surfaces under the action of strong pressure gradient, it was very important to measure the nearest-wall flow on the endwall and around the blade tip. The surface skin friction velocity was measured by using viscous sublayer velocity profiles, which verified the presence of an intense lateral shear layer that was observed from surface oil flow visualizations. All second- and third-order turbulence quantities were measured to provide detailed data for any parallel CFD efforts. The most complete data sets were acquired for 1.65% and 3.30% tip gap/chord ratios in a low-speed linear compressor cascade. This study found that tip gap flows are complex pressure-driven, unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows. The crossflow velocity normal to the blade chord is nearly uniform in the and tip-gap and changes substantially from the pressure to suction side. The crossflow velocity relies on the local tip pressure loading that is different from the mid-span pressure loading because of tip leakage vortex influence. The tip gap flow is highly skewed three-dimensional flow throughout the full gap

  16. Measuring Surface Tension of a Flowing Soap Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sane, Aakash; Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that surface tension is sensitive to the presence of surfactants and many conventional methods exist to measure it. These techniques measure surface tension either by intruding into the system or by changing its geometry. Use of conventional methods in the case of a flowing soap film is not feasible because intruding the soap film changes surface tension due to Marangoni effect. We present a technique in which we measure the surface tension in situ of a flowing soap film without intruding into the film. A flowing soap film is created by letting soap solution drip between two wires. The interaction of the soap film with the wires causes the wires to deflect which can be measured. Surface tension is calculated using a relation between curvature of the wires and the surface tension. Our measurements indicate that the surface tension of the flowing soap film for our setup is around 0.05 N/m. The nature of this technique makes it favorable for measuring surface tension of flowing soap films whose properties change on intrusion.

  17. Constraints on Lava Flow Emplacement Derived From Precision Topographic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Bjonnes, E. E.

    2005-12-01

    Precision topography obtained with a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) was used to derive constraints on the physical properties of two lava flows on the Big Island of Hawaii. We used a Trimble 4800 DGPS to collect positional information across the lava flows with < 2 cm horizontal and < 4 cm vertical precision (but field tests show that points are usually repeatable to < 1 cm both horizontally and vertically). The DGPS data were overlaid on georeferenced aerial and satellite imaging data, allowing us to correlate the measured topographic points to field notes and photographs, as well as to the local setting evident in the vertical images. We combined field and imaging data for the eastern lobe of the 1907 basalt flow from the southwestern rift zone of Mauna Loa volcano, east of the Ocean View Estates subdivision, and for portions of a grass-covered Pleistocene benmoreite flow near Mana on the western flank of Mauna Kea volcano. Measured physical dimensions of the Hawaiian lava flows obtained from the DGPS data were then used to calculate the yield strength, average effusion rate, and effective viscosity of the lavas using published relationships derived from diverse theories of fluid flow. Yield strengths obtained from three different expressions ranged from 5800 to 56000 Pa for the Mauna Loa basalt flow and from 13000 to 28000 Pa for the Mauna Kea benmoreite flow. Total flow length could not be determined for the Mauna Kea flow, but the entire surface portion of the 1907 flow is well exposed; this allowed us to calculate an average effusion rate of 29 m/s and effective viscosities ranging from 17000 to 280000 Pa-s for this flow, broadly consistent with values published for the 1984 basalt flow from the eastern rift zone of Mauna Loa. These results improve our confidence in being able to derive similar constraints on the likely emplacement conditions of lava flows on other planets, such as the enormous lava flows commonly found on the martian, venusian

  18. A flux monitoring method for easy and accurate flow rate measurement in pressure-driven flows.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-03-07

    We propose a low-cost and versatile method to measure flow rate in microfluidic channels under pressure-driven flows, thereby providing a simple characterization of the hydrodynamic permeability of the system. The technique is inspired by the current monitoring method usually employed to characterize electro-osmotic flows, and makes use of the measurement of the time-dependent electric resistance inside the channel associated with a moving salt front. We have successfully tested the method in a micrometer-size channel, as well as in a complex microfluidic channel with a varying cross-section, demonstrating its ability in detecting internal shape variations.

  19. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  20. Measurements and simulation of the flow around a poppet valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilek, Z.; Nadarajah, S.; Peric, M.; Tindal, M. J.; Yianneskis, M.

    The flow through an axisymmetric inlet port was investigated experimentally and numerically. Laser-Doppler anemometry was used to measure the three ensemble-averaged mean and rms velocity components for two valve lifts, 6 and 10 mm. Numerical calculations of the flows were carried out using a finite volume multigrid method and a standard k-epsilon turbulence model. Comparison of the predictions with the experimental results shows good agreement for the mean velocities for the 10 mm lift case. However, for the 6 mm liftcase the predicted flow differs substantially from the experimental results. This indicates the extreme sensitivity of the flow to the valve lift and the need for more sophisticated turbulence modeling when predicting such flows.

  1. Simultaneous measurements and flow visualization in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherikar, S. V.; Chevray, R.

    Wind tunnel experiments performed to determine the flow characteristics of a plane mixing layer are described. Two parallel streams of air moving at different velocities were separated by a splitter plate prior to their mixing in the test section. Gaseous NH3 and gaseous HCI were introduced near the splitter plate to produce an ammonium chloride aerosol which made flow visualization possible. Flow visualization records (movies) and velocity measurements, using laser-doppler-velocimeters tracking silicone oil particles in the flow, were made simultaneously and synchronized using a chopped beam of a He-Ne laser which left a signature on the move film and provided a signal for flow rate data acquisition. Analysis of these synchronized data verified the existence of large, essentially two-dimensional coherent structures in the plane mixing layer.

  2. An Innovative Flow-Measuring Device: Thermocouple Boundary Layer Rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative flow-measuring device, a thermocouple boundary layer rake, was developed. The sensor detects the flow by using a thin-film thermocouple (TC) array to measure the temperature difference across a heater strip. The heater and TC arrays are microfabricated on a constant-thickness quartz strut with low heat conductivity. The device can measure the velocity profile well into the boundary layer, about 65 gm from the surface, which is almost four times closer to the surface than has been possible with the previously used total pressure tube.

  3. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  4. Laser velocimeter measurements of solids in multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadambi, J. R.

    Preliminary tests were conducted using water as the fluid in the refractive index matched multiphase flow loop. A Laser Doppler Velocimeter was used for measuring the fluid velocity along a horizontal diameter located 17 feet downstream of the pump. The tests were conducted in the Reynolds number range of 1000 to 3000. In addition to LDV velocity measurements, pressure drops as well as flow rates were also measured. Representative velocity profiles and pressure drop data are presented. The test loop was then filled with the refractive index matched fluid, 55 percent (by weight) sodium iodide solution in water. The velocity profile for a representative data point and pressure drop data is shown.

  5. A Structured-Grid Quality Measure for Simulated Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    A structured-grid quality measure is proposed, combining three traditional measurements: intersection angles, stretching, and curvature. Quality assesses whether the grid generated provides the best possible tradeoffs in grid stretching and skewness that enable accurate flow predictions, whereas the grid density is assumed to be a constraint imposed by the available computational resources and the desired resolution of the flow field. The usefulness of this quality measure is assessed by comparing heat transfer predictions from grid convergence studies for grids of varying quality in the range of [0.6-0.8] on an 8'half-angle sphere-cone, at laminar, perfect gas, Mach 10 wind tunnel conditions.

  6. A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles is described. This technique utilizes an arc-discharge-electron-beam system to produce a luminous disturbance in the flow. The time of flight of this disturbance was measured. Experimental tests were conducted in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. The measured velocities were of the order of 6000 m/sec over a free-stream density range from 0.000196 to 0.00186 kg/cu m. The fractional error in the velocity measurements was less than 5 percent. Long arc discharge columns (0.356 m) were generated under hypersonic flow conditions in the expansion-tube modified to operate as an expansion tunnel.

  7. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  8. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  9. Bubbly flow velocity measurements near a heated cylindrical conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.; Hassan, Y.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply recent advances and improvements in the digital pulsed laser velocimetry (DPLV) technique to the analysis of two-phase bubbly flow about a cylindrical conductor emitting a constant heat flux within a transparent rectangular enclosure. Pulsed laser velocimetry is a rapidly advancing fluid flow visualization technique that determines full-field instantaneous velocity vectors of a quantitative nature such that the flow field remains undisturbed by the measurement. The DPLV method offers several significant advantages over more traditional fluid velocity measurement techniques such as hot wire/film anemometry and laser Doppler anemometry because reliable instantaneous velocity data may be acquired over substantial flow areas in a single experiment.

  10. Improved technique for blood flow velocity measurement using Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadares Oliveira, Eduardo J.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.; Maia, Joaquim M.; Costa, Eduardo T.

    2002-04-01

    The Doppler velocimeter developed allows to determine the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the velocity vector of the flow, and to calculate the precise blood flow in a vessel. Four piezoelectric transducers constitute the Doppler velocimeter. Three of these transducers are positioned to form an equilateral triangle (base of a pyramid). When these transducers move simultaneously, backward or forward from the initial position, the emitted ultrasonic beams focalize on a position (peak of the pyramid) closer or farther from the transducers faces, according to the depth of the vessel where we intend to measure de flow. The angle between the transducers allows adjusting the height of this pyramid and the position of the focus (where the three beams meet). A forth transducer is used to determine the diameter of the vessel and monitor the position of the Doppler velocimeter relative to the vessel. Simulation results showed that with this technique is possible to accomplish precise measurement of blood flow.

  11. Direct measurement of the flow field around swimming microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Michel, Nicolas; Tuval, Idan

    2010-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms create flows that influence their mutual interactions and modify the rheology of their suspensions. While extensively studied theoretically, these flows have not been measured in detail around any freely-swimming microorganism. We report such measurements for the microphytes Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The minute (˜0.3%) density excess of V. carteri over water leads to a strongly dominant Stokeslet contribution, with the widely-assumed stresslet flow only a correction to the subleading source dipole term. This implies that suspensions of V. carteri have features similar to suspensions of sedimenting particles. The flow in the region around C. reinhardtii where significant hydrodynamic interaction is likely to occur differs qualitatively from a "puller" stresslet, and can be described by a simple three-Stokeslet model.

  12. Direct Measurement of the Flow Field around Swimming Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Michel, Nicolas; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2010-10-01

    Swimming microorganisms create flows that influence their mutual interactions and modify the rheology of their suspensions. While extensively studied theoretically, these flows have not been measured in detail around any freely-swimming microorganism. We report such measurements for the microphytes Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The minute (˜0.3%) density excess of V. carteri over water leads to a strongly dominant Stokeslet contribution, with the widely-assumed stresslet flow only a correction to the subleading source dipole term. This implies that suspensions of V. carteri have features similar to suspensions of sedimenting particles. The flow in the region around C. reinhardtii where significant hydrodynamic interaction is likely to occur differs qualitatively from a puller stresslet, and can be described by a simple three-Stokeslet model.

  13. Device for Measuring Low Flow Speed in a Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Frank; Magee, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-throat venturi system has been invented for measuring laminar flow of air or other gas at low speed (1 to 30 cm/s) in a duct while preserving the laminar nature of the flow and keeping the velocity profile across the duct as nearly flat as possible. While means for measuring flows at higher speeds are well established, heretofore, there have been no reliable means for making consistent, accurate measurements in this speed range. In the original application for which this system was invented, the duct leads into the test section of a low-speed wind tunnel wherein uniform, low-speed, laminar flow is required for scientific experiments. The system could also be used to monitor a slow flow of gas in an industrial process like chemical vapor deposition. In the original application, the multiple- throat venturi system is mounted at the inlet end of the duct having a rectangular cross section of 19 by 14 cm, just upstream of an assembly of inlet screens and flow straighteners that help to suppress undesired flow fluctuations (see Figure 1). The basic venturi measurement principle is well established: One measures the difference in pressure between (1) a point just outside the inlet, where the pressure is highest and the kinetic energy lowest; and (2) the narrowest part (the throat) of the venturi passage, where the kinetic energy is highest and the pressure is lowest. Then by use of Bernoulli s equation for the relationship between pressure and kinetic energy, the volumetric flow speed in the duct can be calculated from the pressure difference and the inlet and throat widths. The design of this system represents a compromise among length, pressure recovery, uniformity of flow, and complexity of assembly. Traditionally, venturis are used to measure faster flows in narrower cross sections, with longer upstream and downstream passages to maintain accuracy. The dimensions of the passages of the present venturi system are sized to provide a readily measurable

  14. Intraoperative flow measurement in composite Y arterial grafts.

    PubMed

    Speziale, G; Ruvolo, G; Coppola, R; Marino, B

    2000-05-01

    Total arterial myocardial revascularization may be achieved by using the 'Y-graft' techniques with different free arterial conduits anastomosed off the side of an in situ internal thoracic artery to reach distal coronary segments. This study was assessed to measure intraoperative graft flow, resistance and clinical outcomes. Seventy-six patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting during a time period of 27 months were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients received sequential grafting by using both internal thoracic arteries, inferior epigastric and right gastroepiploic artery joined as a composite Y graft. Intraoperative graft flow, resistance and derived variables were measured. All patients except one showed good flow (ml/min and waveform) in either branch of composite graft. In one case, a low-flow situation through the graft was registered requiring surgical correction. Temporary occlusion of either branch did not significantly affect flow in the other side of the arterial Y. Mid-term follow-up (3 and 15 months) and angiographic studies showed a high graft patency rate. Composite arterial grafts provide excellent early and mid-term clinical results. Flow reserve of the left internal thoracic artery did not affect blood flow and resistance on either branch of the Y graft when temporary occlusion on the other side of the arterial Y was performed.

  15. Advanced material distribution measurement in multiphase flows: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    George, D.L.; Ceccio, S.L.; O`Hern, T.J.; Shollenberger, K.A.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1998-08-01

    A variety of tomographic techniques that have been applied to multiphase flows are described. The methods discussed include electrical impedance tomography (EIT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT), radiative particle tracking (RDT), X-ray imaging, and acoustic tomography. Also presented is a case study in which measurements were made with EIT and GDT in two-phase flows. Both solid-liquid and gas-liquid flows were examined. EIT and GDT were applied independently to predict mean and spatially resolved phase volume fractions. The results from the two systems compared well.

  16. Prediction of flow profiles in arteries from local measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Atabek, H. B.

    1971-01-01

    This paper develops an approximate numerical method for calculating flow profiles in arteries. The theory takes into account the nonlinear terms of the Navier-Stokes equations as well as the large deformations of the arterial wall. The method, assuming axially symmetric flow, determines velocity distribution and wall shear at a given location from the locally measured values of the pressure, pressure gradient, and pressure-radius relation. The computed results agree well with the corresponding experimental data.

  17. Remote Synoptic Surface Flow Measurements in Small Bodies of Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    data in vertical photos of the wave tank, to surface flow values measured directly by floats. The production of homogeneous flow in a section of...The following property of the Fourier transform is used here: the Fourier transform of a product of two functions equals the convolution of the...function g. In rows A and B of Fig. 13 are presented the one-dimensional sine wave and rect functions and their transforms. Row C has the product of a

  18. Flow measurement on an oscillating pipe flow near the entrance using the UVP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, G.; Kikura, H.; Takeda, Y.; Aritomi, M.

    The authors have carried out a study to investigate and clarify the characteristics of purely oscillating pipe flows over the developing region. The main objective of this study is to establish the method of time-dependent velocity profiles obtained by the ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) measurement method. First, the relationship between the test fluids and the microparticles, as reflectors of ultrasonic pulses, was investigated. In addition, the relationship between the sound speeds of the test fluids and the wall materials was studied. Second, the UVP was used to obtain the instantaneous velocity profiles in oscillating pipe flows, and the developing characteristics of the flows were analyzed. Finally, the ``entrance length'' (by analogy with a unidirectional pipe flow) required for oscillating pipe flows was analyzed by examining the amplitude of the harmonic spectral components of the oscillating frequency. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) is proposed as the applicable method to estimate the ``entrance length''. From the Fourier transform of the velocity on the centerline, nonlinear oscillation of fluid occurs in the ``entrance length'' of the oscillating flows, and the viscous dissipation of the higher-order velocity harmoncis determines the entrance region. The ``entrance length'' can be obtained from the dissipation length of the third-order harmonic. These results prove that the UVP method is highly applicable to carry out the flow measurement in the ``entrance length'' of oscillating pipe flow.

  19. Flow measurement on oscillating pipe flow near the entrance using the UVP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, G.; Kikura, H.; Takeda, Y.; Aritomi, M.

    2003-02-01

    The authors have carried out a study to investigate and clarify the characteristics of purely oscillating pipe flows over the developing region. The main objective of this study is to establish the method of time-dependent velocity profiles obtained by the ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) measurement method. First, the relationship between the test fluids and the micro-particles, as reflectors of ultrasonic pulses, was investigated, and also the relationship between the sound speeds of the test fluids and wall materials was studied. Second, the UVP was used to obtain the instantaneous velocity profiles in oscillating pipe flows, and the developing characteristics of the flows were analyzed. Finally, the "entrance length" (analogy with a unidirectional pipe flow) required for oscillating pipe flows were analyzed examining the amplitude of the harmonic spectral components of the oscillating frequency. The fast Fourier transform (FFT) is proposed as the applicable method to estimate the "entrance length". From the Fourier transform of the velocity on the centerline, nonlinear oscillation of fluid occurs in the "entrance length" of the oscillating flows, and the viscous dissipation of the higher order velocity harmonics determines the entrance region. The "entrance length" can be obtained from the dissipation length of the third order harmonic. These results prove that the UVP method is highly applicable for carrying out flow measurements in the "entrance length" of the oscillating pipe flow.

  20. Aqueous Flow Measured by Fluorophotometry in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Toris, Carol B; Fan, Shan; Johnson, Thomas V; Camras, Lucinda J; Hays, Cassandra L; Liu, Hong; Ishimoto, Bruce M

    2016-07-01

    A fluorophotometer designed to measure aqueous flow in murine eyes was tested with artificial fluorescein chambers and in live mice with different anesthesia regimens, aqueous flow suppressants, and an anterior chamber cannulation method. Two hours following topical fluorescein application, one group of CD-1 mice was anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine, 2,2,2-tribromoethanol, or ketamine alone. Cornea and anterior chamber fluorescein concentrations were measured periodically for 60 to 90 minutes by fluorophotometric scans to calculate aqueous flow. Later, a subgroup of mice underwent aqueous flow measurement by anterior chamber cannulation. A third group was treated with timolol, dorzolamide, and vehicle in a crossover manner 1 hour prior to fluorophotometric scans. Aqueous flow with ketamine/xylazine anesthesia (0.09 ± 0.05 μL/min, mean ± SD, n = 24) was slower than with tribromoethanol or ketamine alone (P < 0.001). Timolol reduced aqueous flow from 0.20 ± 0.07 μL/min to 0.07 ± 0.03 μL/min (P = 0.001) under tribromoethanol anesthesia and from 0.14 ± 0.03 μL/min to 0.10 ± 0.02 μL/min (P = 0.004) under ketamine anesthesia but not under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Dorzolamide reduced aqueous flow from 0.09 ± 0.03 to 0.06 ± 0.03 μL/min (P = 0.04) under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Aqueous flow by anterior chamber cannulation (0.20 ± 0.13 μL/min) was greater (P = 0.05) than by fluorophotometry (0.09 ± 0.07 μL/min). A new noninvasive fluorophotometric method detected effects of general anesthesia and known aqueous suppressants on aqueous flow in mice. Aqueous flow measured by fluorophotometry was slower than by cannulation, and was technically easier with less variability. The mouse fluorophotometer is useful for repeated measurements of aqueous flow in the murine eye making crossover and longitudinal studies possible.

  1. Aqueous Flow Measured by Fluorophotometry in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Toris, Carol B.; Fan, Shan; Johnson, Thomas V.; Camras, Lucinda J.; Hays, Cassandra L.; Liu, Hong; Ishimoto, Bruce M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A fluorophotometer designed to measure aqueous flow in murine eyes was tested with artificial fluorescein chambers and in live mice with different anesthesia regimens, aqueous flow suppressants, and an anterior chamber cannulation method. Methods Two hours following topical fluorescein application, one group of CD-1 mice was anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine, 2,2,2-tribromoethanol, or ketamine alone. Cornea and anterior chamber fluorescein concentrations were measured periodically for 60 to 90 minutes by fluorophotometric scans to calculate aqueous flow. Later, a subgroup of mice underwent aqueous flow measurement by anterior chamber cannulation. A third group was treated with timolol, dorzolamide, and vehicle in a crossover manner 1 hour prior to fluorophotometric scans. Results Aqueous flow with ketamine/xylazine anesthesia (0.09 ± 0.05 μL/min, mean ± SD, n = 24) was slower than with tribromoethanol or ketamine alone (P < 0.001). Timolol reduced aqueous flow from 0.20 ± 0.07 μL/min to 0.07 ± 0.03 μL/min (P = 0.001) under tribromoethanol anesthesia and from 0.14 ± 0.03 μL/min to 0.10 ± 0.02 μL/min (P = 0.004) under ketamine anesthesia but not under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Dorzolamide reduced aqueous flow from 0.09 ± 0.03 to 0.06 ± 0.03 μL/min (P = 0.04) under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Aqueous flow by anterior chamber cannulation (0.20 ± 0.13 μL/min) was greater (P = 0.05) than by fluorophotometry (0.09 ± 0.07 μL/min). Conclusions A new noninvasive fluorophotometric method detected effects of general anesthesia and known aqueous suppressants on aqueous flow in mice. Aqueous flow measured by fluorophotometry was slower than by cannulation, and was technically easier with less variability. The mouse fluorophotometer is useful for repeated measurements of aqueous flow in the murine eye making crossover and longitudinal studies possible. PMID:27447085

  2. Characterization of fracture permeability with high-resolution vertical flow measurements during borehole pumping.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hess, A.E.; Cheng, C.H.; Hardin, E.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of fracture permeability in granitic rocks was investigated by measuring the distribution of vertical flow in boreholes during periods of steady pumping. Pumping tests were conducted at two sites chosen to provide examples of moderately fractured rocks near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire and intensely fractured rocks near Oracle, Arizona. A sensitive heat-pulse flowmeter was used for accurate measurements of vertical flow as low as 0.2 liter per minute. Results indicate zones of fracture permeability in crystalline rocks are composed of irregular conduits that cannot be approximated by planar fractures of uniform aperture, and that the orientation of permeability zones may be unrelated to the orientation of individual fractures within those zones.-Authors

  3. Measurements of flow-induced birefringence in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen-li; Huang, Hung-Yen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the use of a microscopic circular polariscope to measure the flow-induced birefringence in a microfluidic device that represents the kinematics of fluid motion optically. Unlike the commercial birefringence microscope employed in the previous studies, our approach is able to provide direct measurement of retardance, which quantifies the difference in refractive index of the fluid experienced by the ordinary and extraordinary rays, from one single image frame. This capability facilitates unsteady full-field quantitation of flow-induced birefringence in microfluidics that has never been achieved before. At low flow rates, we find that the value of the retardance is independent of the microfluidic design and proportional to the nominal strain rates. This linearity bridges the measurement of birefringence and the deformation rate in the microflow environment, which yields the stress information of the fluid flow. In addition, the μPIV results confirm that both extensional and shear strain rates contribute to the flow-induced birefringence so that the retardance distribution can be used to represent the field of the principal strain rate in a microfluidic device. The outcome of this study proves that our approach provides a non-invasive method that enables an intuitive full-field representation of stress in the instantaneous flow field in a microfluidic device. PMID:26858809

  4. Measurement and Modelling of a Heaving Airfoil Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, Victor; Seifert, Avraham

    2016-11-01

    An outline of a low order modelling procedure of a heaving airfoil in still fluid using experimental measurements is provided. Due to its relative simplicity, the proposed procedure is applicable for the analysis of flow fields within complex and unsteady geometries and it is ideal for analysing the data obtained by experimentation. Currently, this procedure is used to model and predict the flow field evolution using small number of low profile load sensors and flow field measurements. The time delay neural networks are used in order to estimate the flow field. The neural networks estimate the amplitudes of the most energetic modes using four sensory inputs. The modes are calculated using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the flow field data obtained experimentally by time-resolved, phase-locked particle imaging velocimetry. In order to permit the use of proper orthogonal decomposition, the measured flow field is mapped onto a stationary domain using volume preserving transformation. The analysis performed by the model showed good estimation quality within the parameter range used in the training procedure. However, the performance deteriorates for cases out of this range. This state indicates that, in order to improve the robustness of the model, both the decomposition and the training data sets must be diverse.

  5. Vascular dialysis access flow measurement: early intervention through early detection.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Susana San; Chow, Josephine

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the project is to determine the effectiveness of using online access flow measurement, thermodilution method (Fresenius BTM), in detecting and predicting thrombosis or stenosis of the haemodialysis fistula, so that early intervention could be instituted. All haemodialysis patients with permanent vascular dialysis access, either arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or arteriovenous fistula graft (AVG), in a large tertiary referral Dialysis Service in Australia were included in this prospective observational quality project, conducted over 12 months. Out of 165 patients studied, 36 patients were found to have poor dialysis access flow, defined as AVF--flow of <200 ml/min or a decrease of 25% from last measurement or AVG--flow of <600 ml/min or a decrease of 25% from last measurement. Doppler ultrasounds were performed, and confirmed findings of significant stenosis, either on the arterial or venous sites, as indicated by poor dialysis access flow results. Thermodilution technique is a reliable and effective method of detecting poor dialysis access flow for patients with permanent vascular access, comparable with other techniques.

  6. Measurement of VOC reactivities using a photochemical flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.

    1998-07-01

    A commercial ambient air monitoring instrument, the Airtrak 2000, has been modified for use as a photochemical flow reactor and used to measure the absolute and incremental reactivity of 18 single test VOCs and the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent VOC mixtures. A flow technique is a useful supplement to traditional static chamber experiments. The static chamber technique involves periodic sampling of an irradiated mixture in a photochemical chamber. Under these conditions, the irradiated mixture is always in transition. Using a flow system, a steady-state condition is established within the flow reactor that is representative, in this case, of the early stages of the smog forming process in the atmosphere. The measurement technique also allows changes in the background chamber reactivity to be monitored and taken into account. The incremental reactivity of 13 of the 18 test compounds measured is compared with previously reported results from a static chamber experiment, and the two data sets are generally in good agreement. The additivity of reactivity was tested by measuring the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent mixtures, the components being compounds measured individually in this study. The measured reactivity of a mixture was compared to that calculated from the sum of the measured reactivity of the mixture`s individual components. The results show that reactivity is additive for the concentration range studied.

  7. System and method measuring fluid flow in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Kidd, T.G.

    1999-05-18

    A system is described for measuring fluid mass flow in a conduit in which there exists a pressure differential in the fluid between at least two spaced-apart locations in the conduit. The system includes a first pressure transducer disposed in the side of the conduit at a first location for measuring pressure of fluid at that location, a second or more pressure transducers disposed in the side of the conduit at a second location, for making multiple measurements of pressure of fluid in the conduit at that location, and a computer for computing the average pressure of the multiple measurements at the second location and for computing flow rate of fluid in the conduit from the pressure measurement by the first pressure transducer and from the average pressure calculation of the multiple measurements. 3 figs.

  8. System and method measuring fluid flow in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German; Kidd, Terrel G.

    1999-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid mass flow in a conduit in which there exists a pressure differential in the fluid between at least two spaced-apart locations in the conduit. The system includes a first pressure transducer disposed in the side of the conduit at a first location for measuring pressure of fluid at that location, a second or more pressure transducers disposed in the side of the conduit at a second location, for making multiple measurements of pressure of fluid in the conduit at that location, and a computer for computing the average pressure of the multiple measurements at the second location and for computing flow rate of fluid in the conduit from the pressure measurement by the first pressure transducer and from the average pressure calculation of the multiple measurements.

  9. Large, Moderate or Small? The Challenge of Measuring Mass Eruption Rates in Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, M. T.; Dürig, T.; Hognadottir, T.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Bjornsson, H.; Barsotti, S.; Petersen, G. N.; Thordarson, T.; Pedersen, G. B.; Riishuus, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The potential impact of a volcanic eruption is highly dependent on its eruption rate. In explosive eruptions ash may pose an aviation hazard that can extend several thousand kilometers away from the volcano. Models of ash dispersion depend on estimates of the volcanic source, but such estimates are prone to high error margins. Recent explosive eruptions, including the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland, have provided a wealth of data that can help in narrowing these error margins. Within the EU-funded FUTUREVOLC project, a multi-parameter system is currently under development, based on an array of ground and satellite-based sensors and models to estimate mass eruption rates in explosive eruptions in near-real time. Effusive eruptions are usually considered less of a hazard as lava flows travel slower than eruption clouds and affect smaller areas. However, major effusive eruptions can release large amounts of SO2 into the atmosphere, causing regional pollution. In very large effusive eruptions, hemispheric cooling and continent-scale pollution can occur, as happened in the Laki eruption in 1783 AD. The Bárdarbunga-Holuhraun eruption in 2014-15 was the largest effusive event in Iceland since Laki and at times caused high concentrations of SO2. As a result civil protection authorities had to issue warnings to the public. Harmful gas concentrations repeatedly persisted for many hours at a time in towns and villages at distances out to 100-150 km from the vents. As gas fluxes scale with lava fluxes, monitoring of eruption rates is therefore of major importance to constrain not only lava but also volcanic gas emissions. This requires repeated measurements of lava area and thickness. However, most mapping methods are problematic once lava flows become very large. Satellite data on thermal emissions from eruptions have been used with success to estimate eruption rate. SAR satellite data holds potential in delivering lava volume and eruption rate estimates

  10. Initial simulated FFR investigation using flow measurements in patient-specific 3D printed coronary phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Lauren; Sommer, Kelsey; Izzo, Richard; Podgorsak, Alexander; Wilson, Michael; Said, Zaid; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Rudin, Stephen; Angel, Erin; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Accurate patient-specific phantoms for device testing or endovascular treatment planning can be 3D printed. We expand the applicability of this approach for cardiovascular disease, in particular, for CT-geometry derived benchtop measurements of Fractional Flow Reserve, the reference standard for determination of significant individual coronary artery atherosclerotic lesions. Materials and Methods: Coronary CT Angiography (CTA) images during a single heartbeat were acquired with a 320x0.5mm detector row scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE). These coronary CTA images were used to create 4 patientspecific cardiovascular models with various grades of stenosis: severe, <75% (n=1); moderate, 50-70% (n=1); and mild, <50% (n=2). DICOM volumetric images were segmented using a 3D workstation (Vitrea, Vital Images); the output was used to generate STL files (using AutoDesk Meshmixer), and further processed to create 3D printable geometries for flow experiments. Multi-material printed models (Stratasys Connex3) were connected to a programmable pulsatile pump, and the pressure was measured proximal and distal to the stenosis using pressure transducers. Compliance chambers were used before and after the model to modulate the pressure wave. A flow sensor was used to ensure flow rates within physiological reported values. Results: 3D model based FFR measurements correlated well with stenosis severity. FFR measurements for each stenosis grade were: 0.8 severe, 0.7 moderate and 0.88 mild. Conclusions: 3D printed models of patient-specific coronary arteries allows for accurate benchtop diagnosis of FFR. This approach can be used as a future diagnostic tool or for testing CT image-based FFR methods.

  11. Superelevation measurements of debris flows in a curved flume construction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidl, Christian; Rickenmann, Dieter; McArdell, Brian W.

    2013-04-01

    A possible approach to estimate maximum flow velocities is based on the vortex equation by using superelevation marks. Superelevation can be observed in bending channels, where the flow-height of the inner-curvature is lower than the flow-height of the outer-curvature, caused by the centrifugal acceleration of the flow. The objective of this work is to analyze the influence of channel geometry (bend radius and slope) and material properties on the vortex equation when applying to debris flows. In particular, the project aims to compare observed flow velocities from physical modeling in flume experiments with observations from debris-flow field sites. In a first step experimental investigations are done at the laboratory of the Swiss Federal Institute WSL, Birmensdorf. The flume consists of a flexible plastic half-pipe and is mounted on a wooden plane construction. Two different bend radii (1.0 m and 3.0 m) with a bend angle of 60° are implemented. The total length of the flume, of about 8 m, is further covered with 40 grit silicon carbide sandpaper reflecting a constant basal friction layer. To apply for the complexity of a debris-flow process, four different material mixtures based on four different grain size distributions, were defined. Superelevation is measured by laser devices mounted at two cross sections differing in their bend radii. The maximum flow velocity is measured by high-speed cameras. Additionally, a balance is placed to measure weight over time at the outflow. 80 experiments have been conducted, based on the maximum channel slope of 36 %. Another 38 experiments were performed with a channel slope of 27 %. In total, we accomplished 61 experiments for the 3.0 m bend radius and 57 experiments for the 1.0 m bend radius. Front velocities of the debris-flow experiments range between 0.4 m/s and 2.4 m/s. First analyses show plausible results when comparing observed and back calculated flow velocities. Beside the experiments, a second step of this

  12. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow Characteristics Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, E. G.; Lin, C. S.; Edwards, L. G.; Knapp, J.; Harrison, M. E.; Xhang, X.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the technical approach and initial results of a test program for studying two-phase annular flow under the simulated microgravity conditions of KC-135 aircraft flights. A helical coil flow channel orientation was utilized in order to circumvent the restrictions normally associated with drop tower or aircraft flight tests with respect to two-phase flow, namely spatial restrictions preventing channel lengths of sufficient size to accurately measure pressure drops. Additionally, the helical coil geometry is of interest in itself, considering that operating in a microgravity environment vastly simplifies the two-phase flows occurring in coiled flow channels under 1-g conditions for virtually any orientation. Pressure drop measurements were made across four stainless steel coil test sections, having a range of inside tube diameters (0.95 to 1.9 cm), coil diameters (25 - 50 cm), and length-to-diameter ratios (380 - 720). High-speed video photographic flow observations were made in the transparent straight sections immediately preceding and following the coil test sections. A transparent coil of tygon tubing of 1.9 cm inside diameter was also used to obtain flow visualization information within the coil itself. Initial test data has been obtained from one set of KC-135 flight tests, along with benchmark ground tests. Preliminary results appear to indicate that accurate pressure drop data is obtainable using a helical coil geometry that may be related to straight channel flow behavior. Also, video photographic results appear to indicate that the observed slug-annular flow regime transitions agree quite reasonably with the Dukler microgravity map.

  13. Measurement Of Multiphase Flow Water Fraction And Water-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Cheng-gang

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes a microwave transmission multiphase flow water-cut meter that measures the amplitude attenuation and phase shift across a pipe diameter at multiple frequencies using cavity-backed antennas. The multiphase flow mixture permittivity and conductivity are derived from a unified microwave transmission model for both water- and oil-continuous flows over a wide water-conductivity range; this is far beyond the capability of microwave-resonance-based sensors currently on the market. The water fraction and water cut are derived from a three-component gas-oil-water mixing model using the mixture permittivity or the mixture conductivity and an independently measured mixture density. Water salinity variations caused, for example, by changing formation water or formation/injection water breakthrough can be detected and corrected using an online water-conductivity tracking technique based on the interpretation of the mixture permittivity and conductivity, simultaneously measured by a single-modality microwave sensor.

  14. Measurements in a large angle oblique jet impingement flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Velocity and surface pressure measurements, in the flow field of an obliquely impinging jet, and their interpretation as regards the governing mechanics and the aerodynamic noise generation characteristics of such a flow are reported. A computer controlled probe positioning mechanism allowed the measurement of the velocity magnitude and direction in the plane parallel to the plate. The mean velocity and Reynolds stress components were recorded. Measures of the terms in the momentum equation reveal the character of the pressure gradients in the neighborhood of the stagnation point. The effects of the stagnation streamline location on the vorticity field and the vortex sound considerations are discussed in relationship to the aerodynamic noise generation effects of this flow.

  15. Measurements of Turbulent Flow Field in Separate Flow Nozzles with Enhanced Mixing Devices - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a series of experiments was conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on the effect of mixing enhancement devices on the aeroacoustic performance of separate flow nozzles. Initial acoustic evaluations of the devices showed that they reduced jet noise significantly, while creating very little thrust loss. The explanation for the improvement required that turbulence measurements, namely single point mean and RMS statistics and two-point spatial correlations, be made to determine the change in the turbulence caused by the mixing enhancement devices that lead to the noise reduction. These measurements were made in the summer of 2000 in a test program called Separate Nozzle Flow Test 2000 (SFNT2K) supported by the Aeropropulsion Research Program at NASA Glenn Research Center. Given the hot high-speed flows representative of a contemporary bypass ratio 5 turbofan engine, unsteady flow field measurements required the use of an optical measurement method. To achieve the spatial correlations, the Particle Image Velocimetry technique was employed, acquiring high-density velocity maps of the flows from which the required statistics could be derived. This was the first successful use of this technique for such flows, and shows the utility of this technique for future experimental programs. The extensive statistics obtained were likewise unique and give great insight into the turbulence which produces noise and how the turbulence can be modified to reduce jet noise.

  16. Digital image processing based mass flow rate measurement of gas/solid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ding; Peng, Lihui; Lu, Geng; Yang, Shiyuan; Yan, Yong

    2009-02-01

    With the rapid growth of the process industry, pneumatic conveying as a tool for the transportation of a wide variety of pulverized and granular materials has become widespread. In order to improve plant control and operational efficiency, it is essential to know the parameters of the particle flow. This paper presents a digital imaging based method which is capable of measuring multiple flow parameters, including volumetric concentration, velocity and mass flow rate of particles in the gas/solid two phase flow. The measurement system consists of a solid state laser for illumination, a low-cost CCD camera for particle image acquisition and a microcomputer with bespoke software for particle image processing. The measurements of particle velocity and volumetric concentration share the same sensing hardware but use different exposure time and different image processing methods. By controlling the exposure time of the camera a clear image and a motion blurred image are obtained respectively. The clear image is thresholded by OTSU method to identify the particles from the dark background so that the volumetric concentration is determined by calculating the ratio between the particle area and the total area. Particle velocity is derived from the motion blur length, which is estimated from the motion blurred images by using the travelling wave equation method. The mass flow rate of particles is calculated by combining the particle velocity and volumetric concentration. Simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is promising for the measurement of multiple parameters of gas/solid two-phase flow.

  17. Flow Disturbance Measurements in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Rudolph A.; Andino, Marlyn Y.; Melton, Latunia; Eppink, Jenna; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent flow measurements have been acquired in the National Transonic Facility to assess the test-section unsteady flow environment. The primary purpose of the test is to determine the feasibility of the facility to conduct laminar-flow-control testing and boundary-layer transition-sensitive testing at flight-relevant operating conditions throughout the transonic Mach number range. The facility can operate in two modes, warm and cryogenic test conditions for testing full and semispan-scaled models. Data were acquired for Mach and unit Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.2 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 0.95 and 3.3 × 10(exp 6) less than Re/m less than 220×10(exp 6) collectively at air and cryogenic conditions. Measurements were made in the test section using a survey rake that was populated with 19 probes. Roll polar data at selected conditions were obtained to look at the uniformity of the flow disturbance field in the test section. Data acquired included mean total temperatures, mean and fluctuating static/total pressures, and mean and fluctuating hot-wire measurements. This paper focuses primarily on the unsteady pressure and hot-wire results. Based on the current measurements and previous data, an assessment was made that the facility may be a suitable facility for ground-based demonstrations of laminar-flow technologies at flight-relevant conditions in the cryogenic mode.

  18. Sensors for Using Times of Flight to Measure Flow Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gutave; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny; Turso, James

    2006-01-01

    Thin-film sensors for measuring flow velocities in terms of times of flight are undergoing development. These sensors are very small and can be mounted flush with surfaces of airfoils, ducts, and other objects along which one might need to measure flows. Alternatively or in addition, these sensors can be mounted on small struts protruding from such surfaces for acquiring velocity measurements at various distances from the surfaces for the purpose of obtaining boundary-layer flow-velocity profiles. These sensors are related to, but not the same as, hot-wire anemometers. Each sensor includes a thin-film, electrically conductive loop, along which an electric current is made to flow to heat the loop to a temperature above that of the surrounding fluid. Instantaneous voltage fluctuations in segments of the loop are measured by means of electrical taps placed at intervals along the loop. These voltage fluctuations are caused by local fluctuations in electrical resistance that are, in turn, caused by local temperature fluctuations that are, in turn, caused by fluctuations in flow-induced cooling and, hence, in flow velocity. The differential voltage as a function of time, measured at each pair of taps, is subjected to cross-correlation processing with the corresponding quantities measured at other pairs of taps at different locations on the loop. The cross-correlations yield the times taken by elements of fluid to travel between the pairs of taps. Then the component of velocity along the line between any two pairs of taps is calculated simply as the distance between the pairs of taps divided by the travel time. Unlike in the case of hot-wire anemometers, there is no need to obtain calibration data on voltage fluctuations versus velocity fluctuations because, at least in principle, the correlation times are independent of the calibration data.

  19. Doppler Global Velocimetry Measurements for Supersonic Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    2005-01-01

    The application of Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) to high-speed flows has its origins in the original development of the technology by Komine et al (1991). Komine used a small shop-air driven nozzle to generate a 200 m/s flow. This flow velocity was chosen since it produced a fairly large Doppler shift in the scattered light, resulting in a significant transmission loss as the light passed through the Iodine vapor. This proof-of-concept investigation showed that the technology was capable of measuring flow velocity within a measurement plane defined by a single-frequency laser light sheet. The effort also proved that velocity measurements could be made without resolving individual seed particles as required by other techniques such as Fringe- Type Laser Velocimetry and Particle Image Velocimetry. The promise of making planar velocity measurements with the possibility of using 0.1-micron condensation particles for seeding, Dibble et al (1989), resulted in the investigation of supersonic jet flow fields, Elliott et al (1993) and Smith and Northam (1995) - Mach 2.0 and 1.9 respectively. Meyers (1993) conducted a wind tunnel investigation above an inclined flat plate at Mach 2.5 and above a delta wing at Mach 2.8 and 4.6. Although these measurements were crude from an accuracy viewpoint, they did prove that the technology could be used to study supersonic flows using condensation as the scattering medium. Since then several research groups have studied the technology and developed solutions and methodologies to overcome most of the measurement accuracy limitations:

  20. A new approach to highly resolved measurements of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, J.; Hölling, A.; Peinke, J.; Bhiladvala, R.; Hölling, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present the design and principle of a new anemometer, namely the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA), which has been developed for highly resolved flow speed measurements of two components (2d) under laboratory conditions. We will explain the working principle and demonstrate the sensor’s performance by means of comparison measurements of wake turbulence with a commercial X-wire. In the past we have shown that the 2d-LCA is capable of being applied in liquid and particle-laden domains, but we also believe that other challenging areas of operation such as near-wall flows can become accessible.

  1. Comparison of different hydrological similarity measures to estimate flow quantiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, M.; Ridolfi, E.; Napolitano, F.

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the influence of hydrological similarity measures on the definition of homogeneous regions. To this end, several attribute sets have been analyzed in the context of the Region of Influence (ROI) procedure. Several combinations of geomorphological, climatological, and geographical characteristics are also used to cluster potentially homogeneous regions. To verify the goodness of the resulting pooled sites, homogeneity tests arecarried out. Through a Monte Carlo simulation and a jack-knife procedure, flow quantiles areestimated for the regions effectively resulting as homogeneous. The analysis areperformed in both the so-called gauged and ungauged scenarios to analyze the effect of hydrological measures on flow quantiles estimation.

  2. Measurement of anterior and posterior circulation flow contributions to cerebral blood flow. An ultrasound-derived volumetric flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Boyajian, R A; Schwend, R B; Wolfe, M M; Bickerton, R E; Otis, S M

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasound-derived volumetric flow analysis may be useful in answering questions of basic physiological interest in the cerebrovascular circulation. Using this technique, the authors have sought to describe quantitatively the complete concurrent flow relations among all four arteries supplying the brain. The aim of this study of normal subjects was to determine the relative flow contributions of the anterior (internal carotid arteries) and posterior (vertebral arteries) cerebral circulation. Comparisons between the observed and theoretically expected anterior and posterior flow distribution would provide an opportunity to assess traditional rheological conceptions in vivo. Pulsed color Doppler ultrasonography was used to measure mean flow rates in the internal carotid and vertebral arteries in 21 normal adults. The anterior circulation (internal carotid arteries bilaterally) carried 82% of the brain's blood supply and comprised 67% of the total vascular cross-sectional area. These values demonstrate precise concordance between observations in vivo and the theoretically derived (Hagen-Poiseuille) expected flow distribution. These cerebrovascular findings support the traditional conception of macroscopic blood flow. Further studies using ultrasound-derived volumetric analysis of the brain's arterial flow relations may illuminate the vascular pathophysiology underlying aging, cerebral ischemia, and dementias.

  3. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

  4. Laboratory Measurements of Dust Charging in Flowing Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, L. H.; Han, J.; Ulibarri, Z.; Wang, X.; Munsat, T.; Horanyi, M.

    2016-12-01

    The coupling of macroscopic charge carriers (dust) in plasmas to electric and magnetic fields plays a critical role in shaping the size and spatial distribution of these particles. Planetary rings, noctilucent clouds, and comets are all examples where dusty plasma effects have been suggested to explain a number of observations. In all of these environments, the charging of the dust particles plays a crucial role. Charging of dust particles in thermal plasmas has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Here we describe a new experimental setup for the investigation of dust charging in both non-flowing and flowing plasmas, and present preliminary results. Dust particles with diameters of 100-120 μm are released via a dust dropper and exposed to plasma before being collected in a Faraday cup, where the charges of individual grains are measured. A new design in the non-flowing plasma experiment is applied to minimize sheath effects on the charge measurements at the chamber wall. Charging of dust particles in flowing plasma is carried out at the Colorado Solar Wind Experiment (CSWE) facility, which creates simulated solar wind flow with ion energies up to 1 keV. The effect of dust size, plasma composition, and flow speed will be discussed.

  5. PIV Measurements of Flows in Artificial Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, Radoslav; Kallweit, Stephan; Rossi, Massimiliano; Morbiducci, Umberto; Scalise, Lorenzo; Verdonck, Pascal; Tomasini, Enrico Primo

    Through several decades many different models of prosthetic artificial heart valves (PHV) have been designed and optimized in order to enhance hemodynamic properties. These properties are not only material dependent but the major influence results from the mechanical assembly of the particular PHV. For the experimental assessment of the flow through such PHVs particle image velocimetry (PIV) is already an accepted method [1] due to its noninvasive optical approach and accuracy. Here, we present various modifications of PIV in order to explain, compare and realize which method is the most suitable for the quantification of such flows. The choice of the experimental procedure for testing the PHVs is strongly dependent on the optical access of the designed in-vitro testing loops simulating the human heart and vascular system. The hardware demand and its configuration for, e.g., stereoscopic PIV is much more complex than standard 2D PIV, therefore the conditions and design of the testing loop have to be realized to allow the desired flow measurement. The flow in heart valves as an unsteady periodically generated flow, can be obtained by averaged phaselocked or measurements with high temporal. The properties, advantages and drawbacks of specific PIV techniques to visualize the flow behind a PHV will be discussed.

  6. PIV measurements and flow characteristics downstream of mangrove root models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Amirkhosro; Curet, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    Mangrove forests attracted attentions as a solution to protect coastal areas exposed to sea-level rising, frequent storms, and tsunamis. Mangrove forests found in tide-dominated flow regions are characterized by their massive and complex root systems, which play a prominent role in the structure of tidal flow currents. To understand the role of mangrove roots in flow structure, we modeled mangrove roots with rigid and flexible arrays of cylinders with different spacing between them as well as different configurations. In this work, we investigate the fluid dynamics downstream of the models using a 2-D time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) and flow visualization. We carried out experiments for four different Reynolds number based on cylinder diameters ranges from 2200 to 12000. We present time-averaged and time-resolved flow parameters including velocity distribution, vorticity, streamline, Reynolds shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy. The results show that the flow structure has different vortex shedding downstream of the cylinders due to interactions of shear layers separating from cylinders surface. The spectral analysis of the measured velocity data is also performed to obtain Strouhal number of the unsteady flow in the cylinder wake.

  7. Fluidic Control of Nozzle Flow: Some Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federspiel, John; Bangert, Linda; Wing, David; Hawkes, Tim

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental program that investigated the use of a secondary air stream to control the amount of flow through a convergent-divergent nozzle. These static tests utilized high pressure, ambient temperature air that was injected at the throat of the nozzle through an annular slot. Multiple injection slot sizes and injection angles were tested. The introduction of secondary flow was made in an opposing direction to the primary flow and the resulting flow field caused the primary stream to react as though the physical throat size had been reduced. The percentage reduction in primary flow rate was generally about twice the injected flow rate. The most effective throttling was achieved by injecting through the smallest slot in an orientation most nearly opposed to the approaching primary flow. Thrust edliciency, as measured by changes in nozzle thrust coefficient, was highest at high nozzle pressure ratios, NPR. The static test results agreed with predictions obtained prior from PABSD, a fully viscous computational fluid dynamics program. Since use of such an injection system on gas turbine engine exhaust nozzles would be primarily at high NPRs, it was concluded that fluidic control holds promise for reducing nozzle weight and complexity on future systems.

  8. Flow cytometric measurement of total DNA and incorporated halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, Frank A.; Gray, Joe W.

    1986-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous flow cytometric measurement of the total DNA content and the level of DNA synthesis in normal and malignant cells is disclosed. The sensitivity of the method allows a study of cell cycle traverse rates for large scale cell populations as well as single cell measurements. A DNA stain such as propidium iodide is used as the probe for the measurement of total DNA content and a monoclonal antibody reactive with a DNA precursor such as bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) is used as a probe for the measurement of BrdU uptake by the cells as a measure of DNA synthesis.

  9. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit.

    PubMed

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-10-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  10. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  11. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  12. Flow measurements in a model ramjet secondary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chittilapilly, L.T.; Venkateswaran, S.; Paul, P.J.; Mukunda, H.S. Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore )

    1990-12-01

    Experimental studies were conducted on a typical secondary combustion chamber of a ramjet to understand the influence of various inlet parameters such as primary nozzle configuration, secondary air injection angle, and flow Reynolds numbers on the secondary combustion chamber (SCC) performance. Cold flow studies were made with air as the flow medium for both primary and secondary jets followed by similar studies with hot primary jets. The general flow structure in the SCC obtained from surface oil film technique showed recirculation zones near the head end. The combustor length required for jet mixing was found to be unrelated to recirculation zone length confirmed by selective temperature and total pressure profile measurements. The calculated frictional loss from the momentum balance consideration was found to be small. That significant improvement in mixing can be achieved by a choice of multiple-hole primary nozzle configuration has been demonstrated. 11 refs.

  13. Heat flow measurements on the southeast coast of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyndman, R.D.; Jaeger, J.C.; Sass, J.H.

    1969-01-01

    Three boreholes have been drilled for the Australian National University near the southeast coast of New South Wales, Australia. The heat flows found are 1.1, 1.0, and 1.3 ??cal/cm2sec. The errors resulting from the proximity of the sea and a lake, surface temperature change, conductivity structure and water flow have been examined. The radioactive heat production in some of the intrusive rocks of the area have also been measured. The heat flows are much lower than the values of about 2.0 found elsewhere in south eastern Australia. The lower values appear to be part of a distinct heat flow province in eastern Australia. ?? 1969.

  14. Enhancement of flow measurements using fluid-dynamic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, H.; Seitz, T.; Tropea, C.

    2017-09-01

    Novel experimental modalities acquire spatially resolved velocity measurements for steady state and transient flows which are of interest for engineering and biological applications. One of the drawbacks of such high resolution velocity data is their susceptibility to measurement errors. In this paper, we propose a novel filtering strategy that allows enhancement of the noisy measurements to obtain reconstruction of smooth divergence free velocity and corresponding pressure fields which together approximately comply to a prescribed flow model. The main step in our approach consists of the appropriate use of the velocity measurements in the design of a linearized flow model which can be shown to be well-posed and consistent with the true velocity and pressure fields up to measurement and modeling errors. The reconstruction procedure is then formulated as an optimal control problem for this linearized flow model. The resulting filter has analyzable smoothing and approximation properties. We briefly discuss the discretization of the approach by finite element methods and comment on the efficient solution by iterative methods. The capability of the proposed filter to significantly reduce data noise is demonstrated by numerical tests including the application to experimental data. In addition, we compare with other methods like smoothing and solenoidal filtering.

  15. Arterial Blood Flow Measurement Using Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, David K.; Myerowitz, P. David; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Peppler, Walter W.; Fields, Barry L.; Watson, Kim M.; O'Connor, Julia

    1984-08-01

    Standard angiography demonstrates the anatomy of arterial occlusive disease but not its physiological signficance. Using intravenous digital subtraction angiography (DSA), we investigated transit-time videodensitometric techniques in measuring femoral arterial flows in dogs. These methods have been successfully applied to intraarterial DSA but not to intravenous DSA. Eight 20 kg dogs were instrumented with an electromagnetic flow probe and a balloon occluder above an imaged segment of femoral artery. 20 cc of Renografin 76 was power injected at 15 cc/sec into the right atrium. Flow in the femoral artery was varied by partial balloon occlusion or peripheral dilatation following induced ischemia resulting in 51 flow measurements varying from 15 to 270 cc/min. Three different transit-time techniques were studied: crosscorrelation, mean square error, and two leading edge methods. Correlation between videodensitometry and flowmeter measurements using these different techniques ranged from 0.78 to 0.88 with a mean square error of 29 to 37 cc/min. Blood flow information using several different transit-time techniques can be obtained with intravenous DSA.

  16. Velocity measurement of flow over random soft porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkirk, Isreal; Mirbod, Parisa

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to experimentally examine the flow over random soft porous media in a three-dimensional channel. Various combination of fibrous material and the morphology of the fibers were chosen to achieve void volume fraction (ɛ) ranging from 0.4 to 0.7. Care has been taken to keep the Reynolds number low so that the flow was laminar. The channel height was constant, however the thickness of the fibrous media was varied to achieve different filling fraction. Before starting the tests in the duct with fiber arrays, a series of tests in an empty duct (i.e., without fibers) conducted to validate the experimental measurements. We also discussed the error and uncertainty sources in the experiments and described the techniques to improve their impact. We studied detailed velocity measurements of the flow over fibrous material inside a rectangular duct using a planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Using these measurements, we determined the values of the slip velocity at the interface between the fibrous media and the flow. It was found that values of the slip velocity normalized by the maximum velocity in the flow depend on solid volume fraction, pore spaces, and fraction of channel filled by the fiber layers.

  17. Emittance Measurements for a Thin Liquid Sheet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englehart, Amy N.; McConley, Marc W.; Chubb, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    The Liquid Sheet Radiator (LSR) is an external flow radiator that uses a triangular-shaped flowing liquid sheet as the radiating surface. It has potentially much lower mass than solid wall radiators such as pumped loop and heat pipe radiators, along with being nearly immune to micrometeoroid penetration. The LSR has an added advantage of simplicity. Surface tension causes a thin (100-300 microns) liquid sheet to coalesce to a point, causing the sheet flow to have a triangular shape. Such a triangular sheet is desirable since it allows for simple collection of the flow at a single point. A major problem for all external flow radiators is the requirement that the working fluid be of very low (approx. 10(sup -8) torr) vapor pressure to keep evaporative losses low. As a result, working fluids are limited to certain oils (such as used in diffusion pumps) for low temperatures (300-400 K) and liquid metals for higher temperatures. Previous research on the LSR has been directed at understanding the fluid mechanics of thin sheet flows and assessing the stability of such flows, especially with regard to the formation of holes in the sheet. Taylor studied extensively the stability of thin liquid sheets both theoretically and experimentally. He showed that thin sheets in a vacuum are stable. The latest research has been directed at determining the emittance of thin sheet flows. The emittance was calculated from spectral transmittance data for the Dow Corning 705 silicone oil. By experimentally setting up a sheet flow, the emittance was also determined as a function of measurable quantities, most importantly, the temperature drop between the top of the sheet and the temperature at the coalescence point of the sheet. Temperature fluctuations upstream of the liquid sheet were a potential problem in the analysis and were investigated.

  18. Flow measurements with digital subtraction densitometry in a steady flow experimental model.

    PubMed

    Mygind, M; Engell, L; Mygind, T

    1995-07-01

    Computerized densitometry was applied on digital subtraction series for measuring flow rates, 600 to 2,000 ml/min, in model experiments, using contrast medium as indicator substance. A total of 962 measurements were performed, employing the Stewart-Hamilton dilution technique, as well as direct measurements of velocity of the indicator bolus between 2 measuring sites. Results with the dilution technique were closely correlated with true values, but slightly lower (mean 8%), presumably because of sedimentation of contrast medium. Measurements based on bolus velocity were most accurate when the bolus passage was defined by points near the gravity line of the area under the concentration curve. Use of more easily identified curve points, e.g. the time of curve maximum, tended to yield too high values due to flow laminarity with a high-velocity leading edge of the indicator. Variation in repeated measurements on any single image series was attributed to the low sampling rate.

  19. Regional measurements of blood flow in experimental RG-2 rat gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Groothuis, D.R.; Pasternak, J.F.; Fischer, J.M.; Blasberg, R.G.; Bigner, D.D.; Vick, N.A.

    1983-07-01

    Regional measurements of blood flow (F) were performed in transplanted intracerebral RG-2 rat gliomas using (14C)iodoantipyrine, Kety-Schmidt blood flow equations, and quantitative autoradiography. Twenty-nine intracranial tumors in ten rats were analyzed by location; 18 intraparenchymal, seven meningeal, two third-ventricular, and two fourth-ventricular tumors were studied. For all tumors, averaged mean F was 91 +/- 33 (S.D.) ml/hg/min. In all but one tumor, mean F was intermediate between normal cortex and corpus callosum values. There was moderate regional variation: averaged mean F was lower in tumor center (78 +/- 47 ml/hg/min) than in tumor periphery (93 +/- 30 ml/hg/min). Within individual tumors, F showed moderate variation which correlated to some extent with histological features; a regional F of less than 10 ml/hg/min was observed in only one tumor within an area of necrosis. F in regions of brain immediately surrounding the tumor was higher than in tumor periphery. Blood flow to RG-2 tumors seems unlikely to limit drug delivery any more than to normal brain, and the consistent levels from tumor to tumor and within individual tumors make the RG-2 model an excellent one with which to study drug delivery in experimental brain tumors.

  20. Low Reynolds number Couette flow facility for drag measurements.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tyler J; Lang, Amy W; Wheelus, Jennifer N; Westcott, Matthew

    2010-09-01

    For this study a new low Reynolds number Couette facility was constructed to investigate surface drag. In this facility, mineral oil was used as the working fluid to increase the shear stress across the surface of the experimental models. A mounted conveyor inside a tank creates a flow above which an experimental model of a flat plate was suspended. The experimental plate was attached to linear bearings on a slide system that connects to a force gauge used to measure the drag. Within the gap between the model and moving belt a Couette flow with a linear velocity profile was created. Digital particle image velocimetry was used to confirm the velocity profile. The drag measurements agreed within 5% of the theoretically predicted Couette flow value.

  1. Flow Measurements in a Suction Sump by UVP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Jiro; Neya, Masashi; Hattori, Masakatsu; Tanigawa, Hirochika; Hirata, Katsuya

    In the present study, to reveal the air entrainment mechanism into a suction pipe in a suction sump, the authors conduct flow-velocity measurements by UDM (Ultrasonic Doppler Method). Here, we consider the simplest geometry as a suction sump, that is, a straight channel with rectangle-cross section and a simple suction pipe near the end of the channel. Ultrasonic transducers are fixed outside the side, bottom and back walls with right/near-right angles and, we get three-dimensional time-mean velocity distributions and equi-vorticity contours. At first, measurement accuracy is checked by comparing velocity profiles by UDM with hydrogen bubble method. As a result, the authors show typical flow fields in the sump, and show the relation between flow pattern and air entrainment. Especially, we compare two cases where the air entrainment is often observed.

  2. Low Reynolds number Couette flow facility for drag measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Tyler J.; Lang, Amy W.; Wheelus, Jennifer N.; Westcott, Matthew

    2010-09-01

    For this study a new low Reynolds number Couette facility was constructed to investigate surface drag. In this facility, mineral oil was used as the working fluid to increase the shear stress across the surface of the experimental models. A mounted conveyor inside a tank creates a flow above which an experimental model of a flat plate was suspended. The experimental plate was attached to linear bearings on a slide system that connects to a force gauge used to measure the drag. Within the gap between the model and moving belt a Couette flow with a linear velocity profile was created. Digital particle image velocimetry was used to confirm the velocity profile. The drag measurements agreed within 5% of the theoretically predicted Couette flow value.

  3. [Measurement of cerebral blood flow by thermal diffusion using a flow probe with a Peltier stack].

    PubMed

    Yamagata, S; Kikuchi, H; Hashimoto, K; Minamikawa, J; Watanabe, Y

    1987-05-01

    In order to evaluate the blood flow by means of thermal diffusion, relationship between blood flow and parameters induced by thermal diffusion was investigated. Flow probe employed for measurement by thermal diffusion incorporated a Peltier stack which contained a small semiconductor and two L-shaped gold plates. These two plates were attached to both sides of the semiconductor by one side of each gold plate and the other side was surfaced with a tissue to be measured. Temperature gradient is created with current applied to the Peltier stack between two plates, one cooled and the other heated, and it is affected only by tissue blood flow. Two kinds of parameters of thermal diffusion were subjected to compare to blood flow. One was temperature gradient when the constant current was applied to the Peltier stack. The other was a current required to maintain a definite temperature gradient which was determined before hand. From the theoretical principle in thermodynamics, the correlations between blood flow and each of thermal diffusion parameters were defined by the following equations: (Formula: see text) where F is blood flow, delta V is voltage converted from temperature gradient, and Ci and Cv are constants. Each of phi v and phi i indicates the characteristics of each probe. Experimental study was carried out to confirm the above relationship using cortex of experimental animals. Under the general anesthesia, a cat was placed in prone position. After the craniotomy, dura mater was opened and a small flow probe, 10 mm in diameter, 5 mm in height and 5 g in weight, was placed on the cortex and blood flow was continuously evaluated by two parameters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Flow measurements in sewers based on image analysis: automatic flow velocity algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jeanbourquin, D; Sage, D; Nguyen, L; Schaeli, B; Kayal, S; Barry, D A; Rossi, L

    2011-01-01

    Discharges of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and stormwater are recognized as an important source of environmental contamination. However, the harsh sewer environment and particular hydraulic conditions during rain events reduce the reliability of traditional flow measurement probes. An in situ system for sewer water flow monitoring based on video images was evaluated. Algorithms to determine water velocities were developed based on image-processing techniques. The image-based water velocity algorithm identifies surface features and measures their positions with respect to real world coordinates. A web-based user interface and a three-tier system architecture enable remote configuration of the cameras and the image-processing algorithms in order to calculate automatically flow velocity on-line. Results of investigations conducted in a CSO are presented. The system was found to measure reliably water velocities, thereby providing the means to understand particular hydraulic behaviors.

  5. Pulsed photoacoustic Doppler flow measurements in blood-mimicking phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2011-03-01

    The feasibility of making spatially resolved measurements of blood flow using pulsed photoacoustic Doppler techniques has been explored. Doppler time shifts were quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated within a blood-simulating phantom using pairs of laser light pulses. The photoacoustic waves were detected using a focussed or planar PZT ultrasound transducer. For each flow measurement, a series of 100 waveform pairs was collected. Previous data processing methods involved rejection of poorly correlated waveform pairs; the modal velocity value and standard deviation were then extracted from the selected distribution of velocity measurements. However, the data selection criteria used in this approach is to some extent arbitrary. A new data analysis protocol, which involves averaging the 100 cross-correlation functions and thus uses all of the measured data, has been designed in order to prevent exclusion of outliers. This more rigorous approach has proved effective for quantifying the linear motion of micron-scale absorbers imprinted on an acetate sheet moving with velocities in the range 0.14 to 1.25 ms-1. Experimental parameters, such as the time separation between the laser pulses and the transducer frequency response, were evaluated in terms of their effect on the accuracy, resolution and range of measurable velocities. The technique was subsequently applied to fluid phantoms flowing at rates less than 5 mms-1 along an optically transparent tube. Preliminary results are described for three different suspensions of phenolic resin microspheres, and also for whole blood. Velocity information was obtained even under non-optimal conditions using a low frequency transducer and a low pulse repetition frequency. The distinguishing advantage of pulsed rather than continuous-wave excitation is that spatially resolved velocity measurements can be made. This offers the prospect of mapping flow within the microcirculation and thus

  6. In vitro hematocrit measurement using spectrally encoded flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Adel; Golan, Lior; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-01-01

    Measuring key physiological parameters of small blood samples extracted from patients could be useful for real-time clinical diagnosis at the point of care. An important parameter required from all blood tests is the blood hematocrit, a measure of the fractional volume occupied by the red cells within the blood. In this work, we present a method for in vitro evaluation of hematocrit based on the data acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry. Analysis of the reflectance confocal images of blood within a flow chamber resulted in an error as low as 1.7% in the measured hematocrit. The technique could be used as part of an in vitro diagnostic system that measures important blood parameters at the point of care. PMID:27867734

  7. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  8. 4D-flow cardiac magnetic resonance-derived vorticity is sensitive marker of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Michal; Humphries, Stephen; Stenmark, Kurt R; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Buckner, J Kern; Hunter, Kendall S; Fenster, Brett E

    2017-04-27

    To investigate the possibility that vorticity assessed by four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance (4D-Flow CMR) in the left ventricle of patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a potential marker of early LV diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) and more sensitive than standard echocardiography, and whether changes in vorticity are associated with quantitative computed tomography (CT) and clinical markers of COPD, and right ventricular (RV) echocardiographic markers indicative of ventricular interdependency. Sixteen COPD patients with presumptive LVDD and 10 controls underwent same-day 4D-Flow CMR and Doppler echocardiography to quantify early and late diastolic vorticity as well as standard evaluation for LVDD. Furthermore, all patients underwent detailed CT analysis for COPD markers including percent emphysema and air trapping. The 4D-Flow CMR derived diastolic vorticity measures were correlated with CT measures, standard clinical and CMR markers, and echocardiographic diastolic RV metrics. Early diastolic vorticity was significantly reduced in COPD patients (P < 0.0001) with normal left ventricular (LV) mass, geometry, systolic function, and no or mild signs of Doppler LVDD when compared with controls. Vorticity significantly differentiated COPD patients without echocardiographic signs of LVDD (n = 11) from controls (P < 0.0001), and from COPD patients with stage I LVDD (n = 5) (P < 0.0180). Vorticity markers significantly correlated with CT computed measures, CMR-derived RV ejection fraction, echocardiographic RV diastolic metrics, and 6-minute walk test. 4D-Flow CMR derived diastolic vorticity is reduced in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD and no or mild signs of LVDD, implying early perturbations in the LV flow domain preceding more obvious mechanical changes (i.e. stiffening and dilation). Furthermore, reduced LV vorticity appears to be driven by COPD induced changes in lung tissue and parallel RV

  9. Calibration of nozzle for air mass flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Jan; Kanta, Lukáš

    2017-09-01

    The effort to make calibration measurement of mass flow through a nozzle was not satisfying. Traversing across the pipe radius with Pitot probe was done. The presence of overshoot behind the bend in the pipe was found. The overshoot led to an asymmetric velocity profile.

  10. Measurements of flow past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2013-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve has been inserted in an axisymmetric model of the aorta within a mock circulation apparatus with physiological pressure and flow variations. The velocity field behind the valve has been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The results closely match those reported by similar studies. A triple jet emanated from the valve's orifices and regions of reverse flow formed in the sinus region. Velocity fluctuations were greatest in the shear layers of the jets. The average r.m.s. streamwise velocity fluctuation over the turbulent period was 0.22 m/s; its maximum value was 0.53 m/s and occurred at the onset of deceleration. Measurements with the valve inserted in an anatomical model of the aorta are planned for the near future. The present and future measurements will be compared to determine the effects of the aorta anatomy on the characteristics of flow through bileaflet valves. In particular, measurements of the viscous and turbulent shear stresses will be analyzed to identify possible locations of blood element damage, and regions of recirculation and stagnation will be identified as locations favourable to thrombus growth. The effects of flows in branching arteries and valve orientation will also be investigated. Supported by NSERC.

  11. Nonintrusive Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Hypersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of nitric oxide vibrational temperature, rotational temperature and velocity have been measured in the hypersonic freestream at the exit of a conical nozzle, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. Particular attention has been devoted to reducing the major sources of systematic error that can affect fluorescence tempera- ture measurements, including beam attenuation, transition saturation effects, laser mode fluctuations and transition choice. Visualization experiments have been performed to improve the uniformity of the nozzle flow. Comparisons of measured quantities with a simple one-dimensional computation are made, showing good agreement between measurements and theory given the uncertainty of the nozzle reservoir conditions and the vibrational relaxation rate.

  12. STORM-SEWER FLOW MEASUREMENT AND RECORDING SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, Frederick A.; Kaehrle, William R.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive study and development of instruments and techniques for measuring all components of flow in a storm-sewer drainage system were undertaken by the U. S. Geological Survey under the sponsorship of FHWA. The study involved laboratory and field calibration and testing of measuring flumes, pipe insert meters, weirs, and electromagnetic velocity meters as well as the development and calibration of pneumatic bubbler and pressure transducer head-measuring systems. Tracer dilution and acoustic-flowmeter measurements were used in field verification tests. A single micrologger was used to record data from all the instruments and also to activate on command the electromagnetic velocity meter and tracer dilution systems.

  13. Continuous heatable Langmuir probe for flowing afterglow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubé, Sylvain; Mostefaoui, Toufik; Rowe, Bertrand

    2000-02-01

    A heatable Langmuir probe consisting of a continuous dc-heating-current loop of tungsten wire is presented. This technique is efficient to keep the probe surface clean for flowing afterglow measurements. In our experimental conditions, the perturbations on the electron density determination can be considered as very small. The measurement of the well-known rate for the dissociative recombination of O2+ shows that the gas surrounding the probe is not heated for estimated probe temperature up to 700 K.

  14. Measurements in Film Cooling Flows with Periodic Wakes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold- wire ) anemometry . Hot - wire anemometry was used for velocity measurements. The local film cooling...and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity, respectively. Boundary layer probes with 1.27 m...jet velocity and temperature were documented by Coulthard et al. 26 by traversing the constant current and hot - wire probes over the hole exit plane

  15. Abel Inversion of Deflectometric Measurements in Dynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Albers, Burt W.; Griffin, DeVon W.

    1999-01-01

    We present an Abel-inversion algorithm to reconstruct mean and rms refractive-index profiles from spatially resolved statistical measurements of the beam-deflection angle in time-dependent, axisymmetric flows. An oscillating gas-jet diffusion flame was investigated as a test case for applying the algorithm. Experimental data were obtained across the whole field by a rainbow schlieren apparatus. Results show that simultaneous multipoint measurements are necessary to reconstruct the rms refractive index accurately.

  16. Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

  17. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Bernard P.; Martin, Paul F.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  18. Observations and Measurements on Unsteady Cloud Cavitation Flow Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, L. X.; Yan, G. J.; Huang, B.

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are to investigate the unsteady structures and hydrodynamics of cavitating flows. Experimental results are presented for a Clark-Y hydrofoil, which is fixed at α=0°, 5° and 8°. The high-speed video camera and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are applied to investigate the transient flow structures. The dynamic measurement system is used to record the dynamic characteristics. The cloud cavitation exhibits noticeable unsteady characteristics. For the case of α=0°, there exit strong interactions between the attached cavity and the re-entrant flow. While for the case of α=8°, the re-entrant flow is relatively thin and the interaction between the cavity and re-entrant flow is limited. The results also present that the periodic collapse and shedding of the large-scale cloud cavitation, which leads to substantial increase of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the cavity region. Experimental evidence indicates that the hydrodynamics are clearly affected by the cavitating flow structures, the amplitude of load fluctuation are much higher for the cloud cavitating cases.

  19. Plasma dragged microparticles as a method to measure plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, Catalin M.; Wang Zhehui; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2006-10-15

    The physics of microparticle motion in flowing plasmas is studied in detail for plasmas with electron and ion densities n{sub e,i}{approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, electron and ion temperatures of no more than 15 eV, and plasma flows on the order of the ion thermal speed, v{sub f}{approx}v{sub ti}. The equations of motion due to Coulomb interactions and direct impact with ions and electrons, of charge variation, as well as of heat exchange with the plasma, are solved numerically for isolated particles (or dust grains) of micron sizes. It is predicted that microparticles can survive in plasma long enough, and can be dragged in the direction of the local ion flow. Based on the theoretical analysis, we describe a new plasma flow measurement technique called microparticle tracer velocimetry (mPTV), which tracks microparticle motion in a plasma with a high-speed camera. The mPTV can reveal the directions of the plasma flow vectors at multiple locations simultaneously and at submillimeter scales, which is hard to achieve by most other techniques. Thus, mPTV can be used to study plasma flows produced in the laboratory.

  20. Measurements of turbulent flow overlying impermeable and permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehoon; Blois, Gianluca; Best, James; Christensen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    There exist an array of natural and industrial flow systems wherein the flow is bounded by a surface that is both permeable and rough (e.g. river beds, bed reactors). In such scenarios, the wall boundary condition is complex as it involves both slip and penetration which together significantly modify the statistical and structural modifications the overlying flow owing to momentum exchange across the wall. The current investigation explores the individual roles of topography and permeability in such flows by systematically decoupling one from the other with a number of wall models having the same porous structure (i.e. cubically arranged spheres; two and five layers, respectively, to highlight the effect of turbulence penetration depth) but with different surface topography (smooth versus cubically arranged hemispheres). High resolution particle-image velocimetry measurements were conducted in the streamwise-wall-normal (x - y) plane and refractive-index matching was employed to optically access the flow within the permeable wall. First- and second-order velocity statistics are used to assess the flow modifications associated with the different wall models and thus ascertain the individual impacts of permeability and topography. NSF.

  1. A smart flow measurement system for flow evaluation with multiple signals in different operation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltsas, G.; Katsikogiannis, P.; Asimakopoulos, P.; Nassiopoulou, A. G.

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of a smart flow measurement system based on an integrated thermal flow sensor that implements a heater and two pairs of thermopiles, symmetrically situated on both sides of the heater. A specially designed interface circuit monitors and controls sensor operation, allowing three different operational modes: constant voltage (CV), constant power (CP) and constant temperature (CT). It also simultaneously monitors the heater resistance and the thermopile signal. Communication with a PC is implemented through a USB connection, and a developed Java program controls the system and data representation and storage. Transfer rates in the order of 20 000 sps are achieved, which allow detailed flow monitoring. For system evaluation, flow measurements were performed in both the calorimetric and hot-wire principles with the three different modes of operation and the corresponding results are presented comparatively. Flow velocity was determined by different sensor signals (heater resistance and power, thermopile signal) and the related sensitivities were extracted. Furthermore, it was verified that the system could detect the flow direction as well as the transition point from laminar to turbulent region.

  2. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Flow Measurements Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff; Wernet, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Modern aircraft design often puts the engine exhaust in close proximity to the airframe surfaces. Aircraft noise prediction tools must continue to develop in order to meet the challenges these aircraft present. The Jet-Surface Interaction Tests have been conducted to provide a comprehensive quality set of experimental data suitable for development and validation of these exhaust noise prediction methods. Flow measurements have been acquired using streamwise and cross-stream particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating surface pressure data acquired using flush mounted pressure transducers near the surface trailing edge. These data combined with previously reported far-field and phased array noise measurements represent the first step toward the experimental data base. These flow data are particularly applicable to development of noise prediction methods which rely on computational fluid dynamics to uncover the flow physics. A representative sample of the large flow data set acquired is presented here to show how a surface near a jet affects the turbulent kinetic energy in the plume, the spatial relationship between the jet plume and surface needed to generate surface trailing-edge noise, and differences between heated and unheated jet flows with respect to surfaces.

  3. Accurate Blood Flow Measurements: Are Artificial Tracers Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Poelma, Christian; Kloosterman, Astrid; Hierck, Beerend P.; Westerweel, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Imaging-based blood flow measurement techniques, such as particle image velocimetry, have become an important tool in cardiovascular research. They provide quantitative information about blood flow, which benefits applications ranging from developmental biology to tumor perfusion studies. Studies using these methods can be classified based on whether they use artificial tracers or red blood cells to visualize the fluid motion. We here present the first direct comparison in vivo of both methods. For high magnification cases, the experiments using red blood cells strongly underestimate the flow (up to 50% in the present case), as compared to the tracer results. For medium magnification cases, the results from both methods are indistinguishable as they give the same underestimation of the real velocities (approximately 33%, based on in vitro reference measurements). These results suggest that flow characteristics reported in literature cannot be compared without a careful evaluation of the imaging characteristics. A method to predict the expected flow averaging behavior for a particular facility is presented. PMID:23028878

  4. Turbulence measurements in the bubbly flow region of hydraulic jumps

    SciTech Connect

    Kucukali, Serhat; Chanson, Hubert

    2008-10-15

    A hydraulic jump is characterized by a highly turbulent flow with macro-scale vortices, some kinetic energy dissipation and a bubbly two-phase flow structure. New air-water flow measurements were performed in a large-size facility using two types of phase-detection intrusive probes: i.e. single-tip and double-tip conductivity probes. These were complemented by some measurements of free-surface fluctuations using ultrasonic displacement meters. The void fraction measurements showed the presence of an advective diffusion shear layer in which the void fractions profiles matched closely an analytical solution of the advective diffusion equation for air bubbles. The free-surface fluctuations measurements showed large turbulent fluctuations that reflected the dynamic, unsteady structure of the hydraulic jumps. The measurements of interfacial velocity and turbulence level distributions provided new information on the turbulent velocity field in the highly-aerated shear region. The velocity profiles tended to follow a wall jet flow pattern. The air-water turbulent integral time and length scales were deduced from some auto- and cross-correlation analyses based upon the method of Chanson [H. Chanson, Bubbly flow structure in hydraulic jump, Eur. J. Mech. B/Fluids 26 (3) (2007) 367-384], providing the turbulent scales of the eddy structures advecting the air bubbles in the developing shear layer. The length scale L{sub xz} is an integral air-water turbulence length scale which characterized the transverse size of the large vortical structures advecting the air bubbles. The experimental data showed that the dimensionless integral turbulent length scale L{sub xz}/d{sub 1} was closely related to the inflow depth: i.e. L{sub xz}/d{sub 1} = 0.2-0.8, with L{sub xz} increasing towards the free-surface. (author)

  5. The Moderated Relationship of Appearance Valence on Appearance Self Consciousness: Development and Testing of New Measures of Appearance Schema Components

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Timothy P.; Rosser, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the creation and psychometric properties of two independent measures of aspects of appearance schematicity – appearance salience and valence, assessed by the CARSAL and CARVAL, and their relation to appearance self-consciousness. Five hundred and ninety two participants provided data in a web based task. The results demonstrate the sound psychometric properties of both scales. This was demonstrated by good item total characteristics, good internal reliability of each scale, and the independence of the two scales shown through principal components analysis. Furthermore, the scales show independent and moderated relationships with valid measures of appearance related psychosocial distress. Negatively valenced appearance information was associated with increased appearance self-consciousness. More crucially, the impact of negative valence on appearance self-consciousness was exacerbated by the moderating effect increased salience of appearance. PMID:23226326

  6. The moderated relationship of appearance valence on appearance self consciousness: development and testing of new measures of appearance schema components.

    PubMed

    Moss, Timothy P; Rosser, Benjamin A

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the creation and psychometric properties of two independent measures of aspects of appearance schematicity--appearance salience and valence, assessed by the CARSAL and CARVAL, and their relation to appearance self-consciousness. Five hundred and ninety two participants provided data in a web based task. The results demonstrate the sound psychometric properties of both scales. This was demonstrated by good item total characteristics, good internal reliability of each scale, and the independence of the two scales shown through principal components analysis. Furthermore, the scales show independent and moderated relationships with valid measures of appearance related psychosocial distress. Negatively valenced appearance information was associated with increased appearance self-consciousness. More crucially, the impact of negative valence on appearance self-consciousness was exacerbated by the moderating effect increased salience of appearance.

  7. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into

  8. Measurement of flow through porous media by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oezdemirel, B.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative imaging of flow through porous media is possible utilizing pulsed gradient phase encoding techniques in MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). The random directional motion of the fluid in a porous medium causes signal attenuation due to the dispersion of the phase information when velocity phase encoding gradient pulses are applied. Isolation of the effect of molecular diffusion process which is random not only in space but also in time in achieved by acquiring images with velocity compensated gradient pulses for measurement of the diffusion constant. PFOB (perfluorooctyl bromide) was used as an intravascular contrast agent in the experiments on the rabbit kidney models for extraction of all available information about the parameters governing the microvascular flow process in one MRI setup. A pulse sequence program was developed on a 1.5 T whole body MRI system to incorporate the multislice data collection, chemical-shift artifact correction, and cardiac gating algorithms. The complete imaging setup also included several radio frequency coils for F-19 imaging and an image reconstruction program with a motion artifact suppression algorithm required for collection of flow sensitive images in in-vivo studies. The results obtained from the experiments on the rabbit kidneys verified the proposed formulation for the quantitative analysis of microvascular flow. These studies on the animal models indicated that the measurement of microvascular flow on an absolute scale can be realized using the phase sensitive pulsed gradient velocity encoding methods. Utilization of the measurement and analysis techniques can be possible in the controlled experiments such as monitoring tumor responses to a certain kind of therapy through the evaluation of the microvascular flow.

  9. Simultaneous 3D Strain and Flow Fields Measurement of a Model Artery under Unsteady Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, Mostafa; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    Fluid-Structure Interaction imposes challenges in both aero-elasticity and biomedical studies. A simultaneous solid deformation and fluid flow measurement technique based on digital in-line holographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) has been developed. It allows us to measure concurrently 3D strain field of a deforming structure and the unsteady flow near it. To facilitate the measurement, both wall and flow are seeded with tracer particles distinguished by size. The motion of these tracers provides the 3D deformation of the wall and the 3D velocity distribution of the flow separately. A fully index matched facility including transparent artery and NaI solution is constructed to enable observations near the wall or through the complex geometry. An arterial model with the inner diameter of 9.5 mm and the thickness of 0.9 mm is manufactured from the cross-linked transparent PDMS at the mixing ratio of 1:10 and doped with mono-dispersed 19 μm polystyrene particles. A cinematic holographic PTV system is used to trace the 3D particle motion in the model and flow simultaneously. Preliminary study is performed within a sample volume of 15 × 15 × 75 mm with the spatial resolution of 7.4 μm in lateral and 10 μm in depth. Uncertainty and accuracy analysis will be reported. NSF Grant No: CBET-0844647.

  10. Multiphase Flow Measurement by Dual Gamma Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yingxiang; Cui, Bin; Li, Donghui; Schlaberg, H. Inaki; Zheng, Zhichu; Zhong, Xingfu

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes some of our research in three phase flow-rate measurement of oil/gas/water by processing tomography of dual gamma ray, including the instrumental designs on the technique of photons pulse counter, signals of sensor, preamplifier, filter and shaping amplifier, DC base shift correcting circuit, narrow windows of energy spectroscopy, programmable pulse count acquisition system; the FPGA (Field programmable gate array) based data acquisition and processing system for gamma ray tomography; and the oil-water-gas three phase volumetric fraction distributions from experiments on a test flow loop.

  11. Two-phase flow measurements with advanced instrumented spool pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, K.C.

    1980-09-01

    A series of two-phase, air-water and steam-water tests performed with instrumented piping spool pieces is described. The behavior of the three-beam densitometer, turbine meter, and drag flowmeter is discussed in terms of two-phase models. Results from application of some two-phase mass flow models to the recorded spool piece data are shown. Results of the study are used to make recommendations regarding spool piece design, instrument selection, and data reduction methods to obtain more accurate measurements of two-phase flow parameters. 13 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a VHTR Lower Plenum Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2007-06-01

    Mean velocity and turbulence data that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor are presented as a follow-up to summaries presented at the 2006 Annual Meeting and the 2006 Winter Meeting. The experiments were designed to develop benchmark databases to support the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum to validate the heat transfer and fluid flow software that will be used to study the behavior of the VHTR system.

  13. Rotating permanent magnet excitation for blood flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sarath S; Vinodkumar, V; Sreedevi, V; Nagesh, D S

    2015-11-01

    A compact, portable and improved blood flow measurement system for an extracorporeal circuit having a rotating permanent magnetic excitation scheme is described in this paper. The system consists of a set of permanent magnets rotating near blood or any conductive fluid to create high-intensity alternating magnetic field in it and inducing a sinusoidal varying voltage across the column of fluid. The induced voltage signal is acquired, conditioned and processed to determine its flow rate. Performance analysis shows that a sensitivity of more than 250 mV/lpm can be obtained, which is more than five times higher than conventional flow measurement systems. Choice of rotating permanent magnet instead of an electromagnetic core generates alternate magnetic field of smooth sinusoidal nature which in turn reduces switching and interference noises. These results in reduction in complex electronic circuitry required for processing the signal to a great extent and enable the flow measuring device to be much less costlier, portable and light weight. The signal remains steady even with changes in environmental conditions and has an accuracy of greater than 95%. This paper also describes the construction details of the prototype, the factors affecting sensitivity and detailed performance analysis at various operating conditions.

  14. [Measurement of cerebral blood flow using phase-contrast MRI].

    PubMed

    Obata, T; Shishido, F; Koga, M; Ikehira, H; Kimura, F; Yoshida, K

    1997-07-01

    The development of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging(P-C MRI) provides a noninvasive method for measurement of volumetric blood flow(VFR). The VFR of the left and right internal carotid arteries and basilar artery were measured using P-C MRI, and total cerebral blood flow(tCBF) was calculated by summing up the VFR values in three vessels. We investigated the changes in these blood flows as influenced from age, head size, height, weight, body surface area and handedness. Moreover, regional CBF(rCBF) was measured by combining with the single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) of 123I. The blood flows were 142 +/- 58 mL/ min(mean +/- SD) in the basilar artery, 229 +/- 86 mL/min in the left, 223 +/- 58 mL/min in the right internal carotid artery, and tCBF was 617 +/- 128 mL/min(Ref. Magn Resn Imaging 14:P. 1143, 1996). Significant increases were observed in head-size-related change of VFR in the basilar artery and height-related change of tCBF. The value of rCBF was easily acquired in combination with SPECT. Phase-contrast MRI is useful for a noninvasive and rapid analysis of cerebral VFR and has potential for clinical use.

  15. Holocene Flows of the Cima Volcanic Field, Mojave Desert, Part 2: Flow Rheology from Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, T.; Whittington, A. G.; Soldati, A.; Sehlke, A.; Beem, J. R.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology is often utilized as an indicator of rheological behavior during flow emplacement. Rheological behavior can be characterized by the viscosity and yield strength of lava, which in turn are dependent on physical and chemical properties including crystallinity, vesicularity, and bulk composition. We are studying the rheology of a basaltic lava flow from a monogenetic Holocene cinder cone in the Cima lava field (Mojave Desert, California). The flow is roughly 2.5 km long and up to 700m wide, with a well-developed central channel along much of its length. Samples were collected along seven different traverses across the flow, along with real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS profiles to allow levee heights and slopes to be measured. Surface textures change from pahoehoe ropes near the vent to predominantly jagged `a`a blocks over the majority of the flow, including all levees and the toe. Chemically the lava shows little variation, plotting on the trachybasalt-basanite boundary on the total alkali-silica diagram. Mineralogically the lava is dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine phenocrysts, with abundant flow-aligned plagioclase microcrystals. The total crystal fraction is ~50% near the vent, with higher percentages in the distal portion of the flow. Vesicularity varies between ~10 and more than ~60%. Levees are ~10-15m high with slopes typically ~25-35˚, suggesting a yield strength at final emplacement of ~150,000 Pa. The effective emplacement temperature and yield strength of lava samples will be determined using the parallel-plate technique. We will test the hypothesis that these physical and rheological properties of the lava during final emplacement correlate with spatial patterns in flow morphology, such as average slope and levee width, which have been determined using remote sensing observations (Beem et al. 2014).

  16. Earth's field NMR flow meter: preliminary quantitative measurements.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of Earth's field NMR (EF NMR) combined with a pre-polarising permanent magnet for measuring fast fluid velocities. This time of flight measurement protocol has a considerable history in the literature; here we demonstrate that it is quantitative when employing the Earth's magnetic field for signal detection. NMR signal intensities are measured as a function of flow rate (0-1m/s) and separation distance between the permanent magnet and the EF NMR signal detection. These data are quantitatively described by a flow model, ultimately featuring no free parameters, that accounts for NMR signal modulation due to residence time inside the pre-polarising magnet, between the pre-polarising magnet and the detection RF coil and inside the detection coil respectively. The methodology is subsequently demonstrated with a metallic pipe in the pre-polarising region.

  17. Torque Transient of Magnetically Drive Flow for Viscosity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Su, Ching-Hua; Lin, Bochuan; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2004-01-01

    Viscosity is a good indicator of structural changes for complex liquids, such as semiconductor melts with chain or ring structures. This paper discusses the theoretical and experimental results of the transient torque technique for non-intrusive viscosity measurement. Such a technique is essential for the high temperature viscosity measurement of high pressure and toxic semiconductor melts. In this paper, our previous work on oscillating cup technique was expanded to the transient process of a magnetically driven melt flow in a damped oscillation system. Based on the analytical solution for the fluid flow and cup oscillation, a semi-empirical model was established to extract the fluid viscosity. The analytical and experimental results indicated that such a technique has the advantage of short measurement time and straight forward data analysis procedures

  18. Endoscopic measurements of gastric mucosal blood flow in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ashley, S W; Yan, Z Y; Soybel, D I; Cheung, L Y

    1985-05-01

    The feasibility and validity of endoscopic measurements of gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) using 3% H2 gas clearance were investigated in the intact stomach of anesthetized dogs. Platinum electrodes were lengthened and modified to permit passage through the instrument channel of a standard gastroscope. In five anesthetized dogs, antral mucosal blood flow (103.2 +/- 5.3 ml/min/100 g tissue) was significantly higher (P less than 0.05) than that in the corpus (66.9 +/- 7.1 ml/min/100 g tissue). Histamine stimulation selectively increased flow in the corpus to 134.5 +/- 7.5 ml/min/100 g tissue. Comparison of endoscopic GMBF measurements in these five dogs on 2 different days revealed a close correlation (r = 0.87, P less than 0.001). Endoscopic H2 clearance measurements obtained in five awake dogs were not significantly different from those obtained during pentobarbitol anesthesia. In 12 dogs, GMBF determined by endoscopic H2 gas clearance showed a good agreement (r = 0.91, P less than 0.001) with that measured by radioactive microspheres. These two methods also demonstrated comparable changes in GMBF induced by intravenous infusion of histamine and vasopressin. It was concluded that 3% H2 gas clearance can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure GMBF through the endoscope, a unique advantage of this method for potential clinical use.

  19. Characterizing pulmonary blood flow distribution measured using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Henderson, A Cortney; Prisk, G Kim; Levin, David L; Hopkins, Susan R; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-12-01

    The arterial spin labeling (ASL) method provides images in which, ideally, the signal intensity of each image voxel is proportional to the local perfusion. For studies of pulmonary perfusion, the relative dispersion (RD, standard deviation/mean) of the ASL signal across a lung section is used as a reliable measure of flow heterogeneity. However, the RD of the ASL signals within the lung may systematically differ from the true RD of perfusion because the ASL image also includes signals from larger vessels, which can reflect the blood volume rather than blood flow if the vessels are filled with tagged blood during the imaging time. Theoretical studies suggest that the pulmonary vasculature exhibits a lognormal distribution for blood flow and thus an appropriate measure of heterogeneity is the geometric standard deviation (GSD). To test whether the ASL signal exhibits a lognormal distribution for pulmonary blood flow, determine whether larger vessels play an important role in the distribution, and extract physiologically relevant measures of heterogeneity from the ASL signal, we quantified the ASL signal before and after an intervention (head-down tilt) in six subjects. The distribution of ASL signal was better characterized by a lognormal distribution than a normal distribution, reducing the mean squared error by 72% (p < 0.005). Head-down tilt significantly reduced the lognormal scale parameter (p = 0.01) but not the shape parameter or GSD. The RD increased post-tilt and remained significantly elevated (by 17%, p < 0.05). Test case results and mathematical simulations suggest that RD is more sensitive than the GSD to ASL signal from tagged blood in larger vessels, a probable explanation of the change in RD without a statistically significant change in GSD. This suggests that the GSD is a useful measure of pulmonary blood flow heterogeneity with the advantage of being less affected by the ASL signal from tagged blood in larger vessels.

  20. Non-intrusive flow measurements on a reentry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. B.; Satavicca, D. A.; Zimmermann, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluates the utility of various non-intrusive techniques for the measurement of the flow field on the windward side of the Space Shuttle or a similar re-entry vehicle. Included are linear (Rayleigh, Raman, Mie, Laser Doppler Velocimetry, Resonant Doppler Velocimetry) and nonlinear (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman, Laser Induced Fluorescence) light scattering, electron beam fluorescence, thermal emission and mass spectroscopy. Flow field properties are taken from a nonequilibrium flow model by Shinn, Moss and Simmonds at NASA Langley. Conclusions are, when possible, based on quantitative scaling of known laboratory results to the conditions projected. Detailed discussion with researchers in the field contributed further to these conclusions and provided valuable insights regarding the experimental feasibility of each of the techniques.

  1. Flow measurement around a model ship with propeller and rudder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van, S. H.; Kim, W. J.; Yoon, H. S.; Lee, Y. Y.; Park, I. R.

    2006-04-01

    For the design of hull forms with better resistance and propulsive performance, it is essential to understand flow characteristics, such as wave and wake development, around a ship. Experimental data detailing the local flow characteristics are invaluable for the validation of the physical and numerical modeling of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, which are recently gaining attention as efficient tools for hull form evaluation. This paper describes velocity and wave profiles measured in the towing tank for the KRISO 138,000 m3 LNG carrier model with propeller and rudder. The effects of propeller and rudder on the wake and wave profiles in the stern region are clearly identified. The results contained in this paper can provide an opportunity to explore integrated flow phenomena around a model ship in the self-propelled condition, and can be added to the International Towing Tank Conference benchmark data for CFD validation as the previous KCS and KVLCC cases.

  2. Mass flow measurement of liquid cryogens using the triboelectric effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechene, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    A cross correlator technique using triboelectric technology has been shown to be a feasible method to measure liquid flow rate for liquid nitrogen and JP4 jet fuel. This technology, invented and pioneered by Auburn International, Inc., is also expected to be suitable for use with all other insulating liquids and cryogens. The technology described is particularly well suited for cryogenic use, since the sensor is non-contacting and non-intrusive, and therefore, causes no additional pressure drop within the flow stream. Further development of the in-line sensor is required to produce a prototypical version for the test purposes under SSME fuel flow conditions. However, with the knowledge gained from this feasibility study, it is very likely that an acceptable sensor design for a full test bed evaluation could be produced.

  3. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  4. SAPFLUXNET: towards a global database of sap flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Poyatos, Rafael; Granda, Víctor; Molowny-Horas, Roberto; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Steppe, Kathy; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi

    2016-12-01

    Plant transpiration is the main evaporative flux from terrestrial ecosystems; it controls land surface energy balance, determines catchment hydrological responses and influences regional and global climate. Transpiration regulation by plants is a key (and still not completely understood) process that underlies vegetation drought responses and land evaporative fluxes under global change scenarios. Thermometric methods of sap flow measurement have now been widely used to quantify whole-plant and stand transpiration in forests, shrublands and orchards around the world. A large body of research has applied sap flow methods to analyse seasonal and diurnal patterns of transpiration and to quantify their responses to hydroclimatic variability, but syntheses of sap flow data at regional to global scales are extremely rare. Here we present the SAPFLUXNET initiative, aimed at building the first global database of plant-level sap flow measurements. A preliminary metadata survey launched in December 2015 showed an encouraging response by the sap flow community, with sap flow data sets from field studies representing >160 species and >120 globally distributed sites. The main goal of SAPFLUXNET is to analyse the ecological factors driving plant- and stand-level transpiration. SAPFLUXNET will open promising research avenues at an unprecedented global scope, namely: (i) exploring the spatio-temporal variability of plant transpiration and its relationship with plant and stand attributes, (ii) summarizing physiological regulation of transpiration by means of few water-use traits, usable for land surface models, (iii) improving our understanding of the coordination between gas exchange and plant-level traits (e.g., hydraulics) and (iv) analysing the ecological factors controlling stand transpiration and evapotranspiration partitioning. Finally, SAPFLUXNET can provide a benchmark to test models of physiological controls of transpiration, contributing to improve the accuracy of

  5. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  6. Measurement Requirements for Improved Modeling of Arcjet Facility Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.

    2000-01-01

    Current efforts to develop new reusable launch vehicles and to pursue low-cost robotic planetary missions have led to a renewed interest in understanding arc-jet flows. Part of this renewed interest is concerned with improving the understanding of arc-jet test results and the potential use of available computational-fluid- dynamic (CFD) codes to aid in this effort. These CFD codes have been extensively developed and tested for application to nonequilibrium, hypersonic flow modeling. It is envisioned, perhaps naively, that the application of these CFD codes to the simulation of arc-jet flows would serve two purposes: first. the codes would help to characterize the nonequilibrium nature of the arc-jet flows; and second. arc-jet experiments could potentially be used to validate the flow models. These two objectives are, to some extent, mutually exclusive. However, the purpose of the present discussion is to address what role CFD codes can play in the current arc-jet flow characterization effort, and whether or not the simulation of arc-jet facility tests can be used to eva1uate some of the modeling that is used to formu1ate these codes. This presentation is organized into several sections. In the introductory section, the development of large-scale, constricted-arc test facilities within NASA is reviewed, and the current state of flow diagnostics using conventional instrumentation is summarized. The motivation for using CFD to simulate arc-jet flows is addressed in the next section, and the basic requirements for CFD models that would be used for these simulations are briefly discussed. This section is followed by a more detailed description of experimental measurements that are needed to initiate credible simulations and to evaluate their fidelity in the different flow regions of an arc-jet facility. Observations from a recent combined computational and experiment.al investigation of shock-layer flows in a large-scale arc-jet facility are then used to illustrate the

  7. Measurements of the flow and thermal characteristics of turbulet jets in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, S. A.

    An experimental investigation of the flow, turbulence, and thermal characteristics of heated, cooled, and isothermal turbulent jets in cross flow is reported. The experiments were carried out in a water channel facility of the recirculation type. Hot or cold water was injected verically upward from a circular pipe located near the channel bottom to the cross-flowing stream in the channel. Hot and cold-film anemometers along with appropriate linearizers, bridges, filters, and probes were used. A new signal analysis method was developed for resolving the complex three-dimensional structure of the mean turbulent flow field resulting from the interaction between the free stream and the jet. A rotatable probe technique was used to measure the size components for the Reynolds stress tensor in isothermal flows of any turbulence intensity. New experssions that correct for the temperature contamination of the velocity signals in nonisothermal flows were developed for both the linearized and unlinearized anemometer responses. Mean velocity and turbulence intensity data were obtained for the isothermal jet at jet-to-free stream velocity ratios of 2, 4, and 6 both in and outside the jet plane of symmetry.

  8. A New Differential Pressure Flow Meter for Measurement of Human Breath Flow: Simulation and Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Bridgeman, Devon; Tsow, Francis; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The development and performance characterization of a new differential pressure-based flow meter for human breath measurements is presented in this article. The device, called a “Confined Pitot Tube,” is comprised of a pipe with an elliptically shaped expansion cavity located in the pipe center, and an elliptical disk inside the expansion cavity. The elliptical disk, named Pitot Tube, is exchangeable, and has different diameters, which are smaller than the diameter of the elliptical cavity. The gap between the disk and the cavity allows the flow of human breath to pass through. The disk causes an obstruction in the flow inside the pipe, but the elliptical cavity provides an expansion for the flow to circulate around the disk, decreasing the overall flow resistance. We characterize the new sensor flow experimentally and theoretically, using Comsol Multiphysics® software with laminar and turbulent models. We also validate the sensor, using inhalation and exhalation tests and a reference method. PMID:27818521

  9. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  10. Rayleigh Light Scattering for Concentration Measurements in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, William M.

    1996-01-01

    Despite intensive research over a number of years, an understanding of scalar mixing in turbulent flows remains elusive. An understanding is required because turbulent mixing has a pivotal role in a wide variety of natural and technologically important processes. As an example, the mixing and transport of pollutants in the atmosphere and in bodies of water are often dependent on turbulent mixing processes. Turbulent mixing is also central to turbulent combustion which underlies most hydrocarbon energy use in modern societies as well as in unwanted fire behavior. Development of models for combusting flows is therefore crucial, however, an understanding of scalar mixing is required before useful models of turbulent mixing and, ultimately, turbulent combustion can be developed. An important subset of turbulent flows is axisymmetric turbulent jets and plumes because they are relatively simple to generate, and because the provide an appropriate test bed for the development of general theories of turbulent mixing which can be applied to more complex geometries and flows. This paper focuses on a number of experimental techniques which have been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Development for measuring concentration in binary axisymmetric turbulent jets. In order to demonstrate the value of these diagnostics, some of the more important results from earlier and on-going investigations are summarized. Topics addressed include the similarity behavior of variable density axisymmetric jets, the behavior of absolutely unstable axisymmetric helium jets, and the role of large scale structures and scalar dissipation in these flows.

  11. Measuring Material Microstructure Under Flow Using 1-2 Plane Flow-Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Gurnon, A. Kate; Godfrin, P. Douglas; Wagner, Norman J.; Eberle, Aaron P. R.; Butler, Paul; Porcar, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    A new small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) sample environment optimized for studying the microstructure of complex fluids under simple shear flow is presented. The SANS shear cell consists of a concentric cylinder Couette geometry that is sealed and rotating about a horizontal axis so that the vorticity direction of the flow field is aligned with the neutron beam enabling scattering from the 1-2 plane of shear (velocity-velocity gradient, respectively). This approach is an advance over previous shear cell sample environments as there is a strong coupling between the bulk rheology and microstructural features in the 1-2 plane of shear. Flow-instabilities, such as shear banding, can also be studied by spatially resolved measurements. This is accomplished in this sample environment by using a narrow aperture for the neutron beam and scanning along the velocity gradient direction. Time resolved experiments, such as flow start-ups and large amplitude oscillatory shear flow are also possible by synchronization of the shear motion and time-resolved detection of scattered neutrons. Representative results using the methods outlined here demonstrate the useful nature of spatial resolution for measuring the microstructure of a wormlike micelle solution that exhibits shear banding, a phenomenon that can only be investigated by resolving the structure along the velocity gradient direction. Finally, potential improvements to the current design are discussed along with suggestions for supplementary experiments as motivation for future experiments on a broad range of complex fluids in a variety of shear motions. PMID:24561395

  12. Measuring material microstructure under flow using 1-2 plane flow-small angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Gurnon, A Kate; Godfrin, P Douglas; Wagner, Norman J; Eberle, Aaron P R; Butler, Paul; Porcar, Lionel

    2014-02-06

    A new small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) sample environment optimized for studying the microstructure of complex fluids under simple shear flow is presented. The SANS shear cell consists of a concentric cylinder Couette geometry that is sealed and rotating about a horizontal axis so that the vorticity direction of the flow field is aligned with the neutron beam enabling scattering from the 1-2 plane of shear (velocity-velocity gradient, respectively). This approach is an advance over previous shear cell sample environments as there is a strong coupling between the bulk rheology and microstructural features in the 1-2 plane of shear. Flow-instabilities, such as shear banding, can also be studied by spatially resolved measurements. This is accomplished in this sample environment by using a narrow aperture for the neutron beam and scanning along the velocity gradient direction. Time resolved experiments, such as flow start-ups and large amplitude oscillatory shear flow are also possible by synchronization of the shear motion and time-resolved detection of scattered neutrons. Representative results using the methods outlined here demonstrate the useful nature of spatial resolution for measuring the microstructure of a wormlike micelle solution that exhibits shear banding, a phenomenon that can only be investigated by resolving the structure along the velocity gradient direction. Finally, potential improvements to the current design are discussed along with suggestions for supplementary experiments as motivation for future experiments on a broad range of complex fluids in a variety of shear motions.

  13. Noninvasive fluid flow measurements in microfluidic channels with backscatter interferometry.

    PubMed

    Markov, Dmitry A; Dotson, Stephen; Wood, Scott; Bornhop, Darryl J

    2004-11-01

    The ability to measure fluid velocity within picoliter volumes or on-chip noninvasively, is important toward fully realizing the potential of microfluidics and micrototal analysis systems, particularly in applications such as micro-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or in metering mixing where the flow rate must be quantified. Additionally, these measurements need to be performed directly on moving fluids in a noninvasive fashion. We presented here the proof of principle experiments showing nonintrusive fluid flow measurements can be accomplished on-chip using a pump and probe configuration with backscattering interferometry. The on-chip interferometric backscatter detector (OCIBD) is based on a fiber-coupled HeNe laser that illuminates a portion of an isotropically etched 40 microm radius channel and a position sensitive transducer to measure fringe pattern shifts. An infrared laser with a mechanical shutter is used to heat a section of a flowing volume and the resulting refractive index (RI) change is detected with the OCIBD downstream as a time-dependent RI perturbation. Fluid velocity is quantified as changes in the phase difference between the shutter signal and the OCIBD detected signal in the Fourier domain. The experiments are performed in the range of 3-6 microL/h with 3sigma detection limits determined to be 0.127 nL/s. Additionally, the RI response of the system is calibrated using temperature changes as well as glycerol solutions.

  14. Accurate measurement of streamwise vortices in low speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Rye M.; Kudo, Jun; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2010-11-01

    Low Reynolds number experiments with flapping animals (such as bats and small birds) are of current interest in understanding biological flight mechanics, and due to their application to Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) which operate in a similar parameter space. Previous PIV wake measurements have described the structures left by bats and birds, and provided insight to the time history of their aerodynamic force generation; however, these studies have faced difficulty drawing quantitative conclusions due to significant experimental challenges associated with the highly three-dimensional and unsteady nature of the flows, and the low wake velocities associated with lifting bodies that only weigh a few grams. This requires the high-speed resolution of small flow features in a large field of view using limited laser energy and finite camera resolution. Cross-stream measurements are further complicated by the high out-of-plane flow which requires thick laser sheets and short interframe times. To quantify and address these challenges we present data from a model study on the wake behind a fixed wing at conditions comparable to those found in biological flight. We present a detailed analysis of the PIV wake measurements, discuss the criteria necessary for accurate measurements, and present a new dual-plane PIV configuration to resolve these issues.

  15. Multipoint Measurements of the Electron Jet of Symmetric Magnetic Reconnection with a Moderate Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Eriksson, S.; Phan, T. D.; Burch, J. L.; Ahmadi, N.; Goodrich, K. A.; Newman, D. L.; Trattner, K. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu-V.

    2017-06-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of the electron jet in a symmetric magnetic reconnection event with moderate guide field. All four spacecraft sampled the ion diffusion region and observed the electron exhaust. The observations suggest that the presence of the guide field leads to an asymmetric Hall field, which results in an electron jet skewed towards the separatrix with a nonzero component along the magnetic field. The jet appears in conjunction with a spatially and temporally persistent parallel electric field ranging from -3 to -5 mV /m , which led to dissipation on the order of 8 nW /m3 . The parallel electric field heats electrons that drift through it, and is associated with a streaming instability and electron phase space holes.

  16. Multipoint Measurements of the Electron Jet of Symmetric Magnetic Reconnection with a Moderate Guide Field.

    PubMed

    Wilder, F D; Ergun, R E; Eriksson, S; Phan, T D; Burch, J L; Ahmadi, N; Goodrich, K A; Newman, D L; Trattner, K J; Torbert, R B; Giles, B L; Strangeway, R J; Magnes, W; Lindqvist, P-A; Khotyaintsev, Yu-V

    2017-06-30

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of the electron jet in a symmetric magnetic reconnection event with moderate guide field. All four spacecraft sampled the ion diffusion region and observed the electron exhaust. The observations suggest that the presence of the guide field leads to an asymmetric Hall field, which results in an electron jet skewed towards the separatrix with a nonzero component along the magnetic field. The jet appears in conjunction with a spatially and temporally persistent parallel electric field ranging from -3 to -5  mV/m, which led to dissipation on the order of 8  nW/m^{3}. The parallel electric field heats electrons that drift through it, and is associated with a streaming instability and electron phase space holes.

  17. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  18. Optically Measured Microvascular Blood Flow Contrast of Malignant Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Regine; Putt, Mary E.; Carlile, Peter M.; Durduran, Turgut; Giammarco, Joseph M.; Busch, David R.; Jung, Ki Won; Czerniecki, Brian J.; Tchou, Julia; Feldman, Michael D.; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark A.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; DeMichele, Angela; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval) tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92–2.63); tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94–2.66), and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90–2.70). Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography. PMID:24967878

  19. Basic data for some recent Australian heat-flow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munroe, Robert J.; Sass, J.H.; Milburn, G.T.; Jaeger, J.C.; Tammemagi, H.Y.

    1975-01-01

    This report has been compiled to provide background information and detailed temperature and thermal conductivity data for the heat-flow values reported in Sass, Jaeger, and Munroe (in press). The data were collected as part of a joint heat-flow study by the Australian National University (ANU) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under the direction of J. C. Jaeger (ANU) and J. H. Sass (USGS). The format is similar to that used for basic data from United States heat-flow determinations (Sass and Munroe, 1974). Each section contains a state map showing the geographic distribution of heat-flow data followed by tables which list individual temperatures, thermal conductivities, and radiogenic heat production values. A companion volume (Bunker and others, 1975) gives details of the heat-production measurements together with individual radioelement concentrations. Localities are arranged in alphabetical order within each state. The methods and techniques of measurements have been described by Sass and others (1971a, b). Unusual methods or procedures which differ markedly from these techniques are noted and described in the comments sections of the tables.

  20. Blood flow Doppler velocimetry measured during active labor.

    PubMed

    Baron, Joel; Shwarzman, Polina; Sheiner, Eyal; Weintraub, Adi Y; Spiegel, Efrat; Sciaky, Yael; Dukler, Doron; Hershkovitz, Reli

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate blood flow Doppler velocimetry during the first and second stages of active labor. A prospective observational study was performed. Patients at term (37-42 weeks gestation), with normal fetal heart rate tracing patterns (categorized as category I) were examined during the first and second stages of labor. The sonographic parameters that were measured included the blood flow resistance of the maternal uterine artery (UtA) and umbilical artery (UA). Wilcoxon-matched pair test was used for the comparison of flows between the first and the second stages of labor. UtA and UA Doppler velocimetry measurements were obtained from 31 parturients. The left (LT) and right (RT) UtA pulsatility index (PI) was lower in the second stage of labor as compared with the first stage. However, only the LT side reached a statistically significant difference (0.88 ± 0.32 and 0.73 ± 0.18; P = 0.005). Compared with the first stage of labor, UA PI was significantly higher during the second stage of labor (0.72 ± 0.17 vs. 0.84 ± 0.33; respectively, P = 0.05). Significant blood flow resistance changes in maternal as well as in fetal blood vessels occur during the second stage as compared with the first stage of active labor.

  1. Microvascular flow modeling using in vivo hemodynamic measurements in reconstructed 3D capillary networks.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graham M; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G

    2012-08-01

    We describe a systematic approach to modeling blood flow using reconstructed capillary networks and in vivo hemodynamic measurements. Our goal was to produce flow solutions that represent convective O(2) delivery in vivo. Two capillary networks, I and II (84 × 168 × 342 and 70 × 157 × 268 μm(3)), were mapped using custom software. Total network red blood cell supply rate (SR) was calculated from in vivo data and used as a target metric for the flow model. To obtain inlet hematocrits, mass balances were applied recursively from downstream vessels. Pressure differences across the networks were adjusted to achieve target SR. Baseline flow solutions were used as inputs to existing O(2) transport models. To test the impact of flow redistribution, asymmetric flow solutions (Asym) were generated by applying a ± 20% pressure change to network outlets. Asym solutions produced a mean absolute difference in SR per capillary of 27.6 ± 33.3% in network I and 33.2 ± 40.1% in network II vs. baseline. The O(2) transport model calculated mean tissue PO(2) of 28.2 ± 4.8 and 28.1 ± 3.5 mmHg for baseline and 27.6 ± 5.2 and 27.7 ± 3.7 mmHg for Asym. This outcome illustrates that moderate changes in flow distribution within a capillary network have little impact on tissue PO(2) provided that total SR remains unchanged. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Study of flow rate induced measurement error in flow-through nano-hole plasmonic sensor

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Long; Huang, Liang; Wang, Tianyi; Wang, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Flow-through gold film perforated with periodically arrayed sub-wavelength nano-holes can cause extraordinary optical transmission (EOT), which has recently emerged as a label-free surface plasmon resonance sensor in biochemical detection by measuring the transmission spectral shift. This paper describes a systematic study of the effect of microfluidic field on the spectrum of EOT associated with the porous gold film. To detect biochemical molecules, the sub-micron-thick film is free-standing in a microfluidic field and thus subject to hydrodynamic deformation. The film deformation alone may cause spectral shift as measurement error, which is coupled with the spectral shift as real signal associated with the molecules. However, this microfluid-induced measurement error has long been overlooked in the field and needs to be identified in order to improve the measurement accuracy. Therefore, we have conducted simulation and analytic analysis to investigate how the microfluidic flow rate affects the EOT spectrum and verified the effect through experiment with a sandwiched device combining Au/Cr/Si3N4 nano-hole film and polydimethylsiloxane microchannels. We found significant spectral blue shift associated with even small flow rates, for example, 12.60 nm for 4.2 μl/min. This measurement error corresponds to 90 times the optical resolution of the current state-of-the-art commercially available spectrometer or 8400 times the limit of detection. This really severe measurement error suggests that we should pay attention to the microfluidic parameter setting for EOT-based flow-through nano-hole sensors and adopt right scheme to improve the measurement accuracy. PMID:26649131

  3. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  4. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  5. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  6. Stochastic Measurement Models for Quantifying Lymphocyte Responses Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Andrey; Pavlyshyn, Damian; Markham, John F.; Dowling, Mark R.; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses are complex dynamic processes whereby B and T cells undergo division and differentiation triggered by pathogenic stimuli. Deregulation of the response can lead to severe consequences for the host organism ranging from immune deficiencies to autoimmunity. Tracking cell division and differentiation by flow cytometry using fluorescent probes is a major method for measuring progression of lymphocyte responses, both in vitro and in vivo. In turn, mathematical modeling of cell numbers derived from such measurements has led to significant biological discoveries, and plays an increasingly important role in lymphocyte research. Fitting an appropriate parameterized model to such data is the goal of these studies but significant challenges are presented by the variability in measurements. This variation results from the sum of experimental noise and intrinsic probabilistic differences in cells and is difficult to characterize analytically. Current model fitting methods adopt different simplifying assumptions to describe the distribution of such measurements and these assumptions have not been tested directly. To help inform the choice and application of appropriate methods of model fitting to such data we studied the errors associated with flow cytometry measurements from a wide variety of experiments. We found that the mean and variance of the noise were related by a power law with an exponent between 1.3 and 1.8 for different datasets. This violated the assumptions inherent to commonly used least squares, linear variance scaling and log-transformation based methods. As a result of these findings we propose a new measurement model that we justify both theoretically, from the maximum entropy standpoint, and empirically using collected data. Our evaluation suggests that the new model can be reliably used for model fitting across a variety of conditions. Our work provides a foundation for modeling measurements in flow cytometry experiments thus

  7. Temperature measurement in laminar free convective flow using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Mosarraf; Shakher, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    A method for measurement of temperature in laminar free convection flow of water is presented using digital holographic interferometry. The method is relatively simple and fast because the method uses lensless Fourier transform digital holography, for which the reconstruction algorithm is simple and fast, and also the method does not require use of any extra experimental efforts as in phase shifting. The quantitative unwrapped phase difference is calculated experimentally from two digital holograms recorded in two different states of water--one in the quiescent state, the other in the laminar free convection. Unknown temperature in laminar free convection is measured quantitatively using a known value of temperature in the quiescent state from the unwrapped phase difference, where the equation by Tilton and Taylor describing the variation of refractive index of water with temperature is used to connect the phase with temperature. Experiments are also performed to visualize the turbulent free convection flow.

  8. The laser measurement technology of combustion flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingdong; Wang, Guangyu; Qu, Dongsheng

    2014-07-01

    The parameters of combustion flow field such as temperature, velocity, pressure and mole-fraction are of significant value in engineering application. The laser spectroscopy technology which has the non-contact and non- interference properties has become the most important method and it has more advantages than conventionally contacting measurement. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF/LIF) is provided with high sensibility and resolution. Filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) is a good measurement method for complex flow field .Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is prosperity on development and application. This article introduced the theoretical foundation, technical principle, system structure, merits and shortages. It is helpful for researchers to know about the latest development tendency and do the related research.

  9. Flow Measurement of Liquid Metal Flow in Spallation Target Model of ADS by using Ultrasound.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Hironari; Kikuchi, Kenji

    2007-11-01

    Measurement of Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) flow by Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) technique was successfully realized in the mockup loop of shield annular tube type spallation target, JLBL-2 (JAEA Lead-Bismuth Loop-2), for Accelerator Driven System (ADS) target test facility in J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex). UVP is a powerful tool to measure an instantaneous space-time velocity profile especially on a velocity measurement of an opaque liquid flow, such as liquid metal. However, it has not yet been done well because both of its poor wetting property with stainless steel and of the difficulty in manufacturing probe at high temperature. At lower temperature, wetting of LBE to stainless steel that is a material of target loop is too poor. Therefore, the surface of the test section was treated by polishing, flatting and finally coating with nickel and solder. And we performed velocity measurement along the centerline of the loop and confirmed basic performance of the loop. It was found that there were periodical releases of eddy from the re-circulation region formed near the wall surface of the inner cylinder. We made then a measurement for non-parallel directions with the centerline and observed 3-dimensional structure of LBE flow configuration.

  10. Flow cytometric measurement of total DNA and incorporated halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, Frank A.; Gray, Joe W.

    1988-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous flow cytometric measurement of the total DNA content and the level of DNA synthesis in normal and malignant cells is disclosed. The sensitivity of the method allows a study of cell cycle traverse rates for large scale cell populations as well as single cell measurements. A DNA stain such as propidium iodide or Hoechst 33258 is used as the probe for the measurement of total DNA content and a monoclonal antibody reactive with a DNA precursor such as halodeoxy-uridine (HdU), more specifically bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) is used as a probe for the measurement of HdU or BrdU uptake by the cells as a measure of DNA synthesis.

  11. Flow cytometric measurement of total DNA and incorporated halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.

    1983-10-18

    A method for the simultaneous flow cylometric measurement of total cellular DNA content and of the uptake of DNA precursors as a measure of DNA synthesis during various phases of the cell cycle in normal and malignant cells in vitro and in vivo is described. The method comprises reacting cells with labelled halodeoxyuridine (HdU), partially denaturing cellular DNA, adding to the reaction medium monoclonal antibodies (mabs) reactive with HdU, reacting the bound mabs with a second labelled antibody, incubating the mixture with a DNA stain, and measuring simultaneously the intensity of the DNA stain as a measure of the total cellular DNA and the HdU incorporated as a measure of DNA synthesis. (ACR)

  12. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, W. R.; Meindl, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive evaluation of the practical and theoretical limitations encountered in the use of totally implantable CW Doppler flowmeters is provided. Theoretical analyses, computer models, in-vitro and in-vivo calibration studies describe the sources and magnitudes of potential errors in the measurement of blood flow through the renal artery, as well as larger vessels in the circulatory system. The evaluation of new flowmeter/transducer systems and their use in physiological investigations is reported.

  13. Whole Field Measurements of Vorticity in Turbulent and Unsteady Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-11

    shown in Fig. 2. It was fabricated by component of velocity in flows with predominately one individually fixing Aluminum coated mirrors (with the...3. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS Two experiments were performed to demonstrate the technique. Both used deodorized kerosene with 10 ppm of the photochromtic...the blaze angle, and the grating step width and spacing. It was fabricated by individually fixing 2.1. Review of the measurement technique aluminum

  14. Laser Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Velocimetry Measurements of Oscillating Airfoil Dynamic Stall Flow Field By M.S.Chandrasekharal Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics and Fluid Mechanics ...tunnel of the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory(FML) angle information. The other could be used for the at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). It is one of...were on throat is always kept choked so that no disturbances a different traverse mechanism , but this was driven as can propagate upstream into the

  15. Flow Cytometric Measurement of Cellular Ionized Calcium Concentration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    membrane transport system for organic anions. J. man monocyles. J. cell. Physiol. 134: 131-136 Immun. 140: 915-920 (1988). (1988). 19 Finket, T.H...discuss the measurement of [Ca Ji using can function to transmit information from flow cytometry to analyze cells loaded with the l membrane to...Kim plasma membrane and across intracellular for technical assistance. calcium storage sites such as calctosomes, ability CodesAva and/ r- Dis t

  16. Modeling and Measurement of Turbulent Swirling Flows Through Abrupt Expansions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Measurements, B22. Touloukian , Y.S. (editor), 1967, Tbermophysical Properties of High Temperature Solid Mfaterials, Vol. 3: Ferrous Alloys ...Stanford University, 1978. School of Mechanical Engrg, Purdue University, 30. J. K. Eaton and J. P. Johnston, Turbulent Flow West Lafayette. IN, July 1983...from 12 R, where a linear curve fit of the temperature dependent resistivity of the stainless steel "e ( Touloukian , 1967) test section was used. Heat

  17. Velocity Measurements of Thermoelectric Driven Flowing Liquid Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szott, Matthew; Xu, Wenyu; Fiflis, Peter; Haehnlein, Ian; Kapat, Aveek; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid lithium has garnered additional attention as a PFC due to its several advantages over solid PFCs, including reduced erosion and thermal fatigue, increased heat transfer, higher device lifetime, and enhanced plasma performance due to the establishment of low recycling regimes at the wall. The Lithium Metal Infused Trenches concept (LiMIT) has demonstrated thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic flow of liquid lithium through horizontal open-faced metal trenches with measured velocities varying from 3.7+/-0.5 cm/s in the 1.76 T field of HT-7 to 22+/-3 cm/s in the SLiDE facility at UIUC at 0.059 T. To demonstrate the versatility of the concept, a new LiMIT design using narrower trenches shows steady state, thermoelectric-driven flow at an arbitrary angle from horizontal. Velocity characteristics are measured and discussed. Based on this LiMIT concept, a new limiter design has been developed to be tested on the mid-plane of the EAST plasma. Preliminary modelling suggests lithium flow of 6 cm/s in this device. Additionally, recent testing at the Magnum-PSI facility has given encouraging results, and velocity measurements in relation to magnetic field strength and plasma flux are also presented.

  18. Measuring and Optimizing flows in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. Z.; Clark, M.; Forest, C. B.; Kaplan, E. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rasmus, A. M.; Rahbarnia, K.

    2012-10-01

    In the Madison Dynamo Experiment, two counter-rotating impellers drive a turbulent flow of liquid sodium in a one meter-diameter sphere. One of the goals of the experiment is to observe a magnetic field grow at the expense of kinetic energy in the flow. The enormous Reynolds number of the experiment and its two vortex geometry leads to a large turbulent EMF. This poster presents results from the MDE after several upgrades were made. First, an equatorial baffle was installed to stabilize the position of the shear layer between the two counterrotating hemispheres. This reduced the scale of the largest eddies in the experiment, lowering the effective resistivity due to turbulence. Next, a probe was used to measure both the fluctuating velocity and magnetic fields, enabling a direct measurement of the turbulent EMF. This EMF is anti-parallel to the mean current, consistent with an enhanced resistivity predicted by mean field theory. Finally, vanes with adjustable orientation were installed on the vessel wall, allowing the pitch of the helical flow to be altered. Computational fluid dynamics simulations and inversion of the measured induced magnetic field are used to determine the optimum angle of these vanes to minimize the critical velocity at which the dynamo onset occurs.

  19. Flow Visualization of Low Prandtl Number Fluids using Electrochemical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crunkleton, D.; Anderson, T.; Narayanan, R.; Labrosse, G.

    2003-01-01

    It is well established that residual flows exist in contained liquid metal processes. In 1-g processing, buoyancy forces often drive these flows and their magnitudes can be substantial. It is also known that residual flows can exist during microgravity processing, and although greatly reduced in magnitude, they can influence the properties of the processed materials. Unfortunately, there are very few techniques to visualize flows in opaque, high temperature liquid metals, and those available are not easily adapted to flight investigation. In this study, a novel technique is developed that uses liquid tin as the model fluid and solid-state electrochemical cells constructed from Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) to establish and measure dissolved oxygen boundary conditions. The melt serves as a common electrode for each of the electrochemical cells in this design, while independent reference electrodes are maintained at the outside surfaces of the electrolyte. By constructing isolated electrochemical cells at various locations along the container walls, oxygen is introduced or extracted by imposing a known electrical potential or passing a given current between the melt and the reference electrode. This programmed titration then establishes a known oxygen concentration boundary condition at the selected electrolyte-melt interface. Using the other cells, the concentration of oxygen at the electrolyte-melt interface is also monitored by measuring the open-circuit potentials developed between the melt and reference electrodes. Thus the electrochemical cells serve to both establish boundary conditions for the passive tracer and sense its path. Rayleigh-Benard convection was used to validate the electrochemical approach to flow visualization. Thus, a numerical characterization of the second critical Rayleigh numbers in liquid tin was conducted for a variety of Cartesian aspect ratios. The extremely low Prandtl number of tin represents the lowest value studied numerically

  20. Flow Visualization of Low Prandtl Number Fluids using Electrochemical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crunkleton, D.; Anderson, T.; Narayanan, R.; Labrosse, G.

    2003-01-01

    It is well established that residual flows exist in contained liquid metal processes. In 1-g processing, buoyancy forces often drive these flows and their magnitudes can be substantial. It is also known that residual flows can exist during microgravity processing, and although greatly reduced in magnitude, they can influence the properties of the processed materials. Unfortunately, there are very few techniques to visualize flows in opaque, high temperature liquid metals, and those available are not easily adapted to flight investigation. In this study, a novel technique is developed that uses liquid tin as the model fluid and solid-state electrochemical cells constructed from Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) to establish and measure dissolved oxygen boundary conditions. The melt serves as a common electrode for each of the electrochemical cells in this design, while independent reference electrodes are maintained at the outside surfaces of the electrolyte. By constructing isolated electrochemical cells at various locations along the container walls, oxygen is introduced or extracted by imposing a known electrical potential or passing a given current between the melt and the reference electrode. This programmed titration then establishes a known oxygen concentration boundary condition at the selected electrolyte-melt interface. Using the other cells, the concentration of oxygen at the electrolyte-melt interface is also monitored by measuring the open-circuit potentials developed between the melt and reference electrodes. Thus the electrochemical cells serve to both establish boundary conditions for the passive tracer and sense its path. Rayleigh-Benard convection was used to validate the electrochemical approach to flow visualization. Thus, a numerical characterization of the second critical Rayleigh numbers in liquid tin was conducted for a variety of Cartesian aspect ratios. The extremely low Prandtl number of tin represents the lowest value studied numerically

  1. Pressure-derived measurement of coronary flow reserve.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Philip; Berger, Alexandre; Manoharan, Ganesh; Bartunek, Jozef; Barbato, Emanuele; Wijns, William; Heyndrickx, Guy R; Pijls, Nico H J; De Bruyne, Bernard

    2005-01-18

    We aimed to validate the technique of measuring the coronary flow reserve (CFR) with coronary pressure measurements against an established thermodilution technique. The CFR has traditionally required measurement of coronary blood flow velocity with the Doppler wire and, more recently, using a thermodilution technique with the coronary pressure wire. However, recent work has suggested that the CFR may be derived from pressure measurements alone (the ratio of the square root of the pressure drop across an epicardial stenosis during hyperemia to that value at rest). This depends on the assumption that friction losses across a coronary stenosis are negligible. We compared pressure-derived CFR values with those obtained by the thermodilution technique using the intracoronary pressure wire in 38 stenoses in 34 patients with significant coronary stenoses undergoing percutaneous intervention. We also compared these two techniques of measuring CFR in 25 stenoses (6 vessels) artificially created by inflating small balloons within a stented coronary artery after percutaneous intervention. There is a close linear relationship between pressure-derived and thermodilution CFR in native (r(2) = 0.52; p < 0.001) and artificial stenoses (r(2) = 0.54; p < 0.05), although the pressure-derived technique appears to systematically underestimate CFR values in both situations. This applies to native and artificial stenoses. Coronary flow reserve cannot be measured merely with pressure alone, and it cannot be safely assumed that friction losses are negligible across a native coronary stenosis. These data suggest that friction loss is an important determinant of the pressure gradient along an atherosclerotic coronary artery.

  2. Experimental measurement of structural power flow on an aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental technique is used to measure the structural power flow through an aircraft fuselage with the excitation near the wing attachment location. Because of the large number of measurements required to analyze the whole of an aircraft fuselage, it is necessary that a balance be achieved between the number of measurement transducers, the mounting of these transducers, and the accuracy of the measurements. Using four transducers mounted on a bakelite platform, the structural intensity vectors at locations distributed throughout the fuselage are measured. To minimize the errors associated with using a four transducers technique the measurement positions are selected away from bulkheads and stiffeners. Because four separate transducers are used, with each transducer having its own drive and conditioning amplifiers, phase errors are introduced in the measurements that can be much greater than the phase differences associated with the measurements. To minimize these phase errors two sets of measurements are taken for each position with the orientation of the transducers rotated by 180 deg and an average taken between the two sets of measurements. Results are presented and discussed.

  3. A robust thermal microstructure for mass flow rate measurement in steady and unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viard, R.; Talbi, A.; Merlen, A.; Pernod, P.; Frankiewicz, C.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Preobrazhensky, V.

    2013-06-01

    A silicon micro-machined thermal gas flow sensor operating in anemometric mode has been designed, fabricated and investigated for continuous and pulsatile flows. The sensor is specifically designed to achieve high sensitivity, fast response time and high robustness. It is composed of four metallic resistors interconnected to form a Wheatstone bridge. Two of them act simultaneously as the heating and sensing elements and the two others are used as a temperature reference. The heating element consists of a metallic wire of platinum Pt (2 µm width, 2 mm length) maintained on each lateral side by periodic silicon oxide SiO2 micro-bridges. Finite element simulations show that this structure achieves a fast thermal response time of 200 µs in constant current operating mode and a coefficient of temperature rise close to 25 °C/120 µW based on bulk electrical resistivity and when the Pt wire and SiO2 thicknesses are close to 100 nm and 500 nm, respectively. This design allows the fabrication of a robust thermal flow sensor with heating elements as long as possible, which enables accurate measurements with high signal to noise ratio. The sensor is then characterised experimentally; its electrical and thermal properties are obtained in the absence of fluid flow. These results confirm the effectiveness of the thermal insulation as predicted by the simulations. In a second step, the fluidic characterizations are reported and discussed for both continuous and pulsatile flows. In continuous mode, the sensor response was studied for gas flow rate ranging from 0 L min-1 to 10 L min-1. In pulsatile mode, the sensor is integrated inside a channel of a micro-valve actuated at 200 Hz. The measurements are compared with those obtained by a classical commercial hot wire.

  4. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  5. Measurement of electroosmotic flow in capillary and microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Fang; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2007-11-02

    Microfluidics is the science and technology of systems that process or manipulate small amounts of fluids, using channels with dimensions of tens of micrometers. Electroosmotic flow (EOF) is an important characteristic of fluids in microchannels. In this paper, EOF generation, effects on separation and definition of EOF are introduced. And EOF measurement methods on capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microchip CE are systematically reviewed based on detection principle, hallmarks of EOF measurement methods are presented, the devices and signals are also schematically described. This paper offers researchers a guidance to obtain an estimate of EOF mobility in capillary and microchip electrophoresis.

  6. A Moderated Nonlinear Factor Model for the Development of Commensurate Measures in Integrative Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Patrick J.; McGinley, James S.; Bauer, Daniel J.; Hussong, Andrea M.; Burns, Alison; Chassin, Laurie; Sher, Kenneth; Zucker, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Integrative data analysis (IDA) is a methodological framework that allows for the fitting of models to data that have been pooled across two or more independent sources. IDA offers many potential advantages including increased statistical power, greater subject heterogeneity, higher observed frequencies of low base-rate behaviors, and longer developmental periods of study. However, a core challenge is the estimation of valid and reliable psychometric scores that are based on potentially different items with different response options drawn from different studies. In Bauer and Hussong (2009) we proposed a method for obtaining scores within an IDA called moderated nonlinear factor analysis (MNLFA). Here we move significantly beyond this work in the development of a general framework for estimating MNLFA models and obtaining scale scores across a variety of settings. We propose a five step procedure and demonstrate this approach using data drawn from n=1972 individuals ranging in age from 11 to 34 years pooled across three independent studies to examine the factor structure of 17 binary items assessing depressive symptomatology. We offer substantive conclusions about the factor structure of depression, use this structure to compute individual-specific scale scores, and make recommendations for the use of these methods in practice. PMID:25960575

  7. Wear Testing of Moderate Activities of Daily Living Using In Vivo Measured Knee Joint Loading

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Vot, Leo; Gibney, Christian; Nowack, Moritz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Resumption of daily living activities is a basic expectation for patients provided with total knee replacements. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the impact of different activities on the wear performance. In this study the wear performance under application of different daily activities has been analyzed. In vivo load data for walking, walking downstairs/upstairs, sitting down/standing up, and cycling (50 W & 120 W) has been standardized for wear testing. Wear testing of each activity was carried out on a knee wear simulator. Additionally, ISO walking was tested for reasons of comparison. Wear was assessed gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. In vivo walking produced the highest overall wear rates, which were determined to be three times higher than ISO walking. Moderate wear rates were determined for walking upstairs and downstairs. Low wear rates were determined for standing up/sitting down and cycling at power levels of 50 W and 120 W. The largest wear particles were observed for cycling. Walking based on in vivo data has been shown to be the most wear-relevant activity. Highly demanding activities (stair climbing) produced considerably less wear. Taking into account the expected number of loads, low-impact activities like cycling may have a greater impact on articular wear than highly demanding activities. PMID:25811996

  8. Measuring life space in older adults with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease using mobile phone GPS.

    PubMed

    Tung, James Yungjen; Rose, Rhiannon Victoria; Gammada, Emnet; Lam, Isabel; Roy, Eric Alexander; Black, Sandra E; Poupart, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    As an indicator of physical and cognitive functioning in community-dwelling older adults, there is increasing interest in measuring life space, defined as the geographical area a person covers in daily life. Typically measured through questionnaires, life space can be challenging to assess in amnestic dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). While global positioning system (GPS) technology has been suggested as a potential solution, there remains a lack of data validating GPS-based methods to measure life space in cognitively impaired populations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the construct validity of a GPS system to provide quantitative measurements of global movement for individuals with mild-to-moderate AD. Nineteen community-dwelling older adults with mild-to-moderate AD (Mini-Mental State Examination score 14-28, age 70.7 ± 2.2 years) and 33 controls (CTL; age 74.0 ± 1.2 years) wore a GPS-enabled mobile phone during the day for 3 days. Measures of geographical territory (area, perimeter, mean distance from home, and time away from home) were calculated from the GPS log. Following a log-transformation to produce symmetrical distributions, group differences were tested using two-sample t tests. Construct validity of the GPS measures was tested by examining the correlation between the GPS measures and indicators of physical function [steps/day, gait velocity, and Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD)] and affective state (Apathy Evaluation Scale and Geriatric Depression Scale). Multivariate regression was performed to evaluate the relative strength of significantly correlated factors. GPS-derived area (p < 0.01), perimeter (p < 0.01), and mean distance from home (p < 0.05) were smaller in the AD group compared to CTL. The correlation analysis found significant associations of the GPS measures area and perimeter with all measures of physical function (steps/day, DAD, and gait velocity; p < 0.01), symptoms of apathy (p < 0.01), and

  9. Laser velocimeter measurements of multiphase flow of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadambi, J. R.; Chen, R. C.; Bhunia, S.

    A unique refractive index matched facility for studying solid-liquid multiphase flow has been developed. The refractive index matching of the solid and the liquid allows the use of non-intrusive Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) to measure the solid and the liquid velocities. These measurements will be useful in developing a better understanding of solid-liquid flows, especially solid-liquid and solid-solid interactions. Silica gel and 50 percent sodium iodide solution in water (refractive index approx. 1.443) are used as the refractive index matched solid and liquid respectively. A two color back scatter mode LDV is used for making velocity measurements. Tests were conducted in solid-liquid slurries with volumetric solid concentration levels of 5 percent and 15 percent in the Reynolds number (Re) range of 400 to 9200. Silica gel particles of mean diameter 40 microns were used. Measurements included mapping of the solid and liquid velocities and obtaining the pressure drop data. Signal processing technique utilizing histogram of velocity measurements made at a point and signal amplitude discrimination was successfully used for differentiating between solid and liquid velocities.

  10. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  11. Laser velocimeter measurements of multiphase flow of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Chen, R.C.; Bhunia, S.

    1989-01-01

    A unique refractive index matched facility for studying solid-liquid multiphase flow has been developed. The refractive index matching of the solid and the liquid allows the use of non-intrusive Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) to measure the solid and the liquid velocities. These measurements will be useful in developing a better understanding of solid-liquid flows, especially solid-liquid and solid-solid interactions. Silica gel and 50% sodium iodide solution in water (refractive index {approx}1.443) are used as the refractive index matched solid and liquid respectively. A two color back scatter mode LDV is used for making velocity measurements. Tests were conducted in solid-liquid slurries with volumetric solid concentration levels of 5% and 15% in the Reynolds number (Re) range of 400 to 9200. Silica gel particles of mean diameter 40 microns were used. Measurements included mapping of the solid and liquid velocities and obtaining the pressure drop data. Signal processing technique utilizing histogram of velocity measurements made at a point and signal amplitude discrimination was successfully used for differentiating between solid and liquid velocities. 34 refs., 61 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Spatial and Numerical Predictors of Measurement Performance: The Moderating Effects of Community Income and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Beth M.; Dearing, Eric; Vasilyeva, Marina; Ganley, Colleen M.; Tine, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Spatial reasoning and numerical predictors of measurement performance were investigated in 4th graders from low-income and affluent communities. Predictors of 2 subtypes of measurement performance (spatial-conceptual and formula based) were assessed while controlling for verbal and spatial working memory. Consistent with prior findings, students…

  13. Implicit and explicit measures of spider fear and avoidance behavior: Examination of the moderating role of working memory capacity.

    PubMed

    Effting, Marieke; Salemink, Elske; Verschuere, Bruno; Beckers, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Avoidance behavior is central to several anxiety disorders. The current study tested whether avoidance behavior for spiders depends on a dynamic interplay between implicit and explicit processes, moderated by the availability to exert control through working memory capacity (WMC). A total of 63 participants completed an approach-avoidance task, an implicit association test, a spider fear questionnaire and a behavioral avoidance test that included an assessment of approach distance as well as approach speed. WMC was measured by a complex operation span task. It was hypothesized that in individuals with low WMC, implicit avoidance tendencies and implicit negative associations predict avoidance behavior for a spider better than the explicit measure, whereas in high WMC individuals, the explicit measure should better predict avoidance behavior than the implicit measures. Results revealed that WMC moderated the influence of implicit negative associations, but not implicit avoidance tendencies, on spider approach distance but not the speed of approaching. Although explicit spider fear directly influenced avoidance behavior, its impact was not modulated by WMC. Participants in our study were from a non-clinical sample, which limits the generalizability of our findings. These findings suggest that implicit processes might become more pertinent for fear behavior as the ability to control such processes wanes, which may be particularly relevant for anxiety disorders given their association with lowered executive control functioning. As such, training procedures that specifically target implicit processes or control abilities might improve treatment outcomes for anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluid flow measurements by means of vibration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagna, Mauro M.; Dinardo, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Laura; Vacca, Gaetano

    2015-11-01

    The achievement of accurate fluid flow measurements is fundamental whenever the control and the monitoring of certain physical quantities governing an industrial process are required. In that case, non-intrusive devices are preferable, but these are often more sophisticated and expensive than those which are more common (such as nozzles, diaphrams, Coriolis flowmeters and so on). In this paper, a novel, non-intrusive, simple and inexpensive methodology is presented to measure the fluid flow rate (in a turbulent regime) whose physical principle is based on the acquisition of transversal vibrational signals induced by the fluid itself onto the pipe walls it is flowing through. Such a principle of operation would permit the use of micro-accelerometers capable of acquiring and transmitting the signals, even by means of wireless technology, to a control room for the monitoring of the process under control. A possible application (whose feasibility will be investigated by the authors in a further study) of this introduced technology is related to the employment of a net of micro-accelerometers to be installed on pipeline networks of aqueducts. This apparatus could lead to the faster and easier detection and location of possible leaks of fluid affecting the pipeline network with more affordable costs. The authors, who have previously proven the linear dependency of the acceleration harmonics amplitude on the flow rate, here discuss an experimental analysis of this functional relation with the variation in the physical properties of the pipe in terms of its diameter and constituent material, to find the eventual limits to the practical application of the measurement methodology.

  15. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    PubMed Central

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M.; Techet, Alexandra H.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Whitcomb, Louis L.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-01-01

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well’s two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well’s oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m3 s-1 at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s-1 (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d-1), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s-1 (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d-1) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s-1 (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d-1). PMID:21903931

  16. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M; Techet, Alexandra H; Yoerger, Dana R; Whitcomb, Louis L; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Sylva, Sean P; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-12-11

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well's two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well's oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m(3) s(-1) at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s(-1) (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d(-1)), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s(-1) (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d(-1)) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s(-1) (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d(-1)).

  17. Mass flow and its pulsation measurements in supersonic wing wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmakov, A. S.; Shevchenko, A. M.; Yatskikh, A. A.; Yermolaev, Yu. G.

    2016-10-01

    The results of experimental study of the flow in the wing wake are presented. Experiments were carried out in supersonic wind tunnel T-325 of ITAM SB RAS. Rectangle half-wing with sharp edges with a chord length of 30 mm and semispan of 95 mm was used to generate vortex wake. Experimental data were obtained in the cross section located 6 chord length downstream of the trailing edge at Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4 and at wing angles of attack of 4 and 10 degrees. Constant temperature hot-wire anemometer was used to measure disturbances in supersonic flow. Hot-wire was made of a tungsten wire with a diameter of 10 μm and length of 1.5 mm. Shlieren flow visualization were performed. As a result, the position and size of the vortex core in the wake of a rectangular wing were determined. For the first time experimental data on the mass flow distribution and its pulsations in the supersonic longitudinal vortex were obtained.

  18. Contactless impedance sensors and their application to flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Opekar, František; Tůma, Petr; Stulík, Karel

    2013-02-27

    The paper provides a critical discussion of the present state of the theory of high-frequency impedance sensors (now mostly called contactless impedance or conductivity sensors), the principal approaches employed in designing impedance flow-through cells and their operational parameters. In addition to characterization of traditional types of impedance sensors, the article is concerned with the use of less common sensors, such as cells with wire electrodes or planar cells. There is a detailed discussion of the effect of the individual operational parameters (width and shape of the electrodes, detection gap, frequency and amplitude of the input signal) on the response of the detector. The most important problems to be resolved in coupling these devices with flow-through measurements in the liquid phase are also discussed. Examples are given of cell designs for continuous flow and flow-injection analyses and of detection systems for miniaturized liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. New directions for the use of these sensors in molecular biology and chemical reactors and some directions for future development are outlined.

  19. Contactless Impedance Sensors and Their Application to Flow Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Opekar, František; Tůma, Petr; Štulík, Karel

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a critical discussion of the present state of the theory of high-frequency impedance sensors (now mostly called contactless impedance or conductivity sensors), the principal approaches employed in designing impedance flow-through cells and their operational parameters. In addition to characterization of traditional types of impedance sensors, the article is concerned with the use of less common sensors, such as cells with wire electrodes or planar cells. There is a detailed discussion of the effect of the individual operational parameters (width and shape of the electrodes, detection gap, frequency and amplitude of the input signal) on the response of the detector. The most important problems to be resolved in coupling these devices with flow-through measurements in the liquid phase are also discussed. Examples are given of cell designs for continuous flow and flow-injection analyses and of detection systems for miniaturized liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. New directions for the use of these sensors in molecular biology and chemical reactors and some directions for future development are outlined. PMID:23447011

  20. Nephron blood flow dynamics measured by laser speckle contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Sosnovtseva, Olga V.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Cupples, William A.; Sorensen, Charlotte Mehlin

    2011-01-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) has an important role in autoregulation of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Because of the characteristics of signal transmission in the feedback loop, the TGF undergoes self-sustained oscillations in single-nephron blood flow, GFR, and tubular pressure and flow. Nephrons interact by exchanging electrical signals conducted electrotonically through cells of the vascular wall, leading to synchronization of the TGF-mediated oscillations. Experimental studies of these interactions have been limited to observations on two or at most three nephrons simultaneously. The interacting nephron fields are likely to be more extensive. We have turned to laser speckle contrast imaging to measure the blood flow dynamics of 50–100 nephrons simultaneously on the renal surface of anesthetized rats. We report the application of this method and describe analytic techniques for extracting the desired data and for examining them for evidence of nephron synchronization. Synchronized TGF oscillations were detected in pairs or triplets of nephrons. The amplitude and the frequency of the oscillations changed with time, as did the patterns of synchronization. Synchronization may take place among nephrons not immediately adjacent on the surface of the kidney. PMID:21048025