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Sample records for modified bcs theory

  1. The BCS Bose crossover theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S. K.; de Llano, M.; Sevilla, F. J.; Solís, M. A.; Valencia, J. J.

    2007-03-01

    We contrast four distinct versions of the BCS-Bose statistical crossover theory according to the form assumed for the electron-number equation that accompanies the BCS gap equation. The four versions correspond to explicitly accounting for two-hole-(2h) as well as two-electron-(2e) Cooper pairs (CPs), or both in equal proportions, or only either kind. This follows from a recent generalization of the Bose-Einstein condensation (GBEC) statistical theory that includes not boson-boson interactions but rather 2e- and also (without loss of generality) 2h-CPs interacting with unpaired electrons and holes in a single-band model that is easily converted into a two-band model. The GBEC theory is essentially an extension of the Friedberg-Lee 1989 BEC theory of superconductors that excludes 2h-CPs. It can thus recover, when the numbers of 2h- and 2e-CPs in both BE-condensed and non-condensed states are separately equal, the BCS gap equation for all temperatures and couplings as well as the zero-temperature BCS (rigorous-upper-bound) condensation energy for all couplings. But ignoring either 2h- or 2e-CPs it can do neither. In particular, only half the BCS condensation energy is obtained in the two crossover versions ignoring either kind of CPs. We show how critical temperatures Tc from the original BCS-Bose crossover theory in 2D require unphysically large couplings for the Cooper/BCS model interaction to differ significantly from the Tcs of ordinary BCS theory (where the number equation is substituted by the assumption that the chemical potential equals the Fermi energy).

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and the BCS Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slichter, Charles P.

    The author describes the inspiration for the experiment by Hebel and Slichter to measure the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time in super-conductors, the design considerations for the experiment, the surprising experimental results, their theoretical treatment using the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, and how comparing the nuclear relaxation results with those for ultrasound absorption confirmed the central idea of the BCS theory, the BCS pair wave function.

  3. BCS theory with the external pair potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorishin, Konstantin V.

    2017-09-01

    We consider a hypothetical substance, where interaction between (within) structural elements of condensed matter (molecules, nanoparticles, clusters, layers, wires etc.) depends on state of Cooper pairs: an additional work must be made against this interaction to break a pair. Such a system can be described by BCS Hamiltonian with the external pair potential term. In this model the potential essentially renormalizes the order parameter: if the pairing lowers energy of the structure the energy gap is slightly enlarged at zero temperature and asymptotically tends to zero as temperature rises. Thus the critical temperature of such a superconductor is equal to infinity formally. For this case the effective Ginzburg-Landau theory is formulated, where the coherence length decreases as temperature rises, the GL parameter and the second critical field are increasing functions of temperature unlike the standard theory. If the pairing enlarges energy of the structure then suppression of superconductivity and the first order phase transition occur.

  4. The role of the chemical potential in the BCS theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Dragoş-Victor; Nemnes, George Alexandru

    2016-12-01

    We study the effect of the chemical potential on the results of the BCS theory of superconductivity. We assume that the pairing interaction is manifested between electrons of single-particle energies in an interval [ μ - ħωc , μ + ħωc ] , where μ and ωc are parameters of the model- μ need not be equal to the chemical potential of the system, denoted here by μR. The BCS results are recovered if μ =μR. If μ ≠μR the physical properties change significantly: the energy gap Δ is smaller than the BCS gap, a population imbalance appears, and the superconductor-normal metal phase transition is of the first order. The quasiparticle imbalance is an equilibrium property that appears due to the asymmetry with respect to μR of the single-particle energy interval in which the pairing potential is manifested. For μR - μ taking values in some ranges, the equation for Δ may have more than one solution at the same temperature, forming branches of solutions when Δ is plotted vs. μR - μ at fixed T. The solution with the highest energy gap, which corresponds to the BCS solution when μ =μR, ceases to exist if | μ -μR | ≥ 2Δ0 (Δ0 is the BCS gap at zero temperature). Therefore the superconductivity is conditioned by the existence of the pairing interaction and also by the value of μR - μ.

  5. Supersymmetric BCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Alejandro; Russo, Jorge G.

    2012-06-01

    We implement relativistic BCS superconductivity in {N} = 1 supersymmetric field theories with a U(1) R symmetry. The simplest model contains two chiral superfields with a Kähler potential modified by quartic terms. We study the phase diagram of the gap as a function of the temperature and the specific heat. The superconducting phase transition turns out to be first order, due to the scalar contribution to the one-loop potential. By virtue of supersymmetry, the critical curves depend logarithmically with the UV cutoff, rather than quadratically as in standard BCS theory. We comment on the difficulties in having fermion condensates when the chemical potential is instead coupled to a baryonic U(1) B current. We also discuss supersymmetric models of BCS with canonical Kähler potential constructed by "integrating-in" chiral superfields.

  6. Bcs-Bec Crossover Without Appeal to Scattering Length Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, G. P.

    2014-01-01

    BCS-BEC (an acronym formed from Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer and Bose-Einstein condensation) crossover physics has customarily been addressed in the framework of the scattering length theory (SLT), which requires regularization/renormalization of equations involving infinities. This paper gives a frame by frame picture, as it were, of the crossover scenario without appealing to SLT. While we believe that the intuitive approach followed here will make the subject accessible to a wider readership, we also show that it sheds light on a feature that has not been under the purview of the customary approach: the role of the hole-hole scatterings vis-à-vis the electron-electron scatterings as one goes from the BCS to the BEC end. More importantly, we show that there are critical values of the concentration (n)and the interaction parameter (λ) at which the condensation of Cooper pairs takes place; this is a finding in contrast with the view that such pairs are automatically condensed.

  7. Two-color spectroscopy of fermions in mean-field BCS-BEC crossover theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koštrun, Marijan; Côté, Robin

    2006-04-01

    We calculate two-photon Raman spectra for fermionic atoms with interactions described by a single-mode mean-field BCS-BEC crossover theory. We compare calculated spectra of interacting and noninteracting systems and find that interactions lead to the appearance of correlated atomic pair signal due to Cooper pairs; splitting of peaks in the spectroscopic signal due to the gap in fermionic dispersion; and attenuation of signal due to the partial conversion of fermions into the corresponding single-mode dimer. By exploring the behavior of these effects, one can obtain quantitative estimates of the BCS parameters from the spectra.

  8. Response Functions for the Two-Dimensional Ultracold Fermi Gas: Dynamical BCS Theory and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitali, Ettore; Shi, Hao; Qin, Mingpu; Zhang, Shiwei

    2017-08-01

    Response functions are central objects in physics. They provide crucial information about the behavior of physical systems, and they can be directly compared with scattering experiments involving particles such as neutrons or photons. Calculations of such functions starting from the many-body Hamiltonian of a physical system are challenging and extremely valuable. In this paper, we focus on the two-dimensional (2D) ultracold Fermi atomic gas which has been realized experimentally. We present an application of the dynamical BCS theory to obtain response functions for different regimes of interaction strengths in the 2D gas with zero-range attractive interaction. We also discuss auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) methods for the calculation of imaginary time correlations in these dilute Fermi gas systems. Illustrative results are given and comparisons are made between AFQMC and dynamical BCS theory results to assess the accuracy of the latter.

  9. Dynamical description of the fission process using the TD-BCS theory

    SciTech Connect

    Scamps, Guillaume; Simenel, Cédric; Lacroix, Denis

    2015-10-15

    The description of fission remains a challenge for nuclear microscopic theories. The time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with BCS pairing is applied to study the last stage of the fission process. A good agreement is found for the one-body observables: the total kinetic energy and the average mass asymmetry. The non-physical dependence of two-body observables with the initial shape is discussed.

  10. Second-order perturbation theory for the single-impurity Anderson model of a BCS superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alastalo, Ari T.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a conserving approximation for a single magnetic impurity embedded in a BCS superconductor according to the Anderson model. The calculation generalizes the second-order selfenergy theory of a normal metal host into a superconducting medium. Within the second-order theory, both spin and pairing fluctuations contribute to the selfenergy. The second-order theory removes the unphysical spontaneous symmetry breaking of the Hartree-Fock approximation but results in a doubling of the bound-state spectrum within the energy gap. The HF bound states may be recovered in the small-U limit as the average of the two separate bound states. For increasing U, the novel pronounced low-energy bound states tend towards the center of the gap while the other bound states approach the gap edge and their spectral weights vanish.

  11. Ginzburg-Landau theory of a trapped Fermi gas with a BEC-BCS crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Kun; Yu Zengqiang; Yin Lan

    2009-05-15

    The Ginzburg-Landau theory of a trapped Fermi gas with a BEC-BCS crossover is derived by the path-integral method. In addition to the standard Ginzburg-Landau equation, a second equation describing the total atom density is obtained. These two coupled equations are necessary to describe both homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems. The Ginzburg-Landau theory is valid near the transition temperature T{sub c} on both sides of the crossover. In the weakly interacting BEC region, it is also accurate at zero temperature where the Ginzburg-Landau equation can be mapped onto the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation. The applicability of GP equation at finite temperature is discussed. On the BEC side, the fluctuation of the order parameter is studied and the renormalization to the molecule coupling constant is obtained.

  12. Self consistent theories of superfluid density and collective modes in BCS-BEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyack, Rufus; Anderson, Brandon; Wu, Chien-Te; Levin, Kathryn

    Establishing fully self consistent and sum rule compatible response functions in strongly correlated Fermi superfluids has been a historically challenging subject. In this talk, we present recent progress pertaining to response functions in many-body Fermi systems. We note that even in strict BCS theory, the textbook derivation of density and current response functions in the gradient expansion breaks certain conservation laws such as the compressibility sum rule. To include additional contributions that preserve all expected conservation laws, we show how to exploit Ward identities within two different t-matrix schemes. In this way we address the density-density response (including collective modes) and the superfluid density. Finally, we characterize approximations made in the literature where some consistency requirements have been dropped.

  13. Self-consistent theory for molecular instabilities in a normal degenerate Fermi gas in the BEC-BCS crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Combescot, R.; Leyronas, X.; Kagan, M. Yu.

    2006-02-15

    We investigate within a self-consistent theory the molecular instabilities arising in the normal state of a homogeneous degenerate Fermi gas, covering the whole Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) to BCS crossover. These are the standard instability for molecular formation, the BCS instability which corresponds to the formation of Cooper pairs, and the related Bose-Einstein instability. These instabilities manifest themselves in the properties of the particle-particle vertex, which we calculate in a ladder approximation. To find the critical temperatures corresponding to these various instabilities, we handle the properties of the interacting Fermi gas on the same footing as the instabilities by making use of the same vertex. This approximate treatment is shown to be quite satisfactory in a number of limiting situations where it agrees with known exact results. The results for the BCS critical temperature and for the BE condensation are found to be in fair agreement with earlier results. The threshold for formation of molecules at rest undergoes a sizable shift toward the BEC side, due to quantum effects arising from the presence of the degenerate Fermi gas. This should make its experimental observation fairly easy. This shift remains important at least up to temperatures comparable to the Fermi energy of the gas.

  14. Effective theory for the Goldstone field in the BCS-BEC crossover at T=0

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, Juan L. Valle, Manuel A.

    2009-05-15

    We perform a detailed study of the effective Lagrangian for the Goldstone mode of a superfluid Fermi gas at zero temperature in the whole BCS-BEC crossover. By using a derivative expansion of the response functions, we derive the most general form of this Lagrangian at the next to leading order in the momentum expansion in terms of four coefficient functions. This involves the elimination of all the higher order time derivatives by careful use of the leading order field equations. In the infinite scattering length limit where conformal invariance is realized, we show that the effective Lagrangian must contain an unnoticed invariant combination of higher spatial gradients of the Goldstone mode, while explicit couplings to spatial gradients of the trapping potential are absent. Across the whole crossover, we determine all the coefficient functions at the one-loop level, taking into account the dependence of the gap parameter on the chemical potential in the mean-field approximation. These results are analytically expressed in terms of elliptic integrals of the first and second kind. We discuss the form of these coefficients in the extreme BCS and BEC regimes and around the unitary limit, and compare with recent work by other authors.

  15. Snake instability of dark solitons across the BEC-BCS crossover: An effective-field-theory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, G.; Van Alphen, W.; Klimin, S. N.; Tempere, J.

    2017-09-01

    In the present article the snake instability mechanism for dark solitons in superfluid Fermi gases is studied in the context of a recently developed effective field theory [S. N. Klimin et al., Eur. Phys. J. B 88, 122 (2015), 10.1140/epjb/e2015-60213-4]. This theoretical treatment has proven to be suitable to study stable dark solitons in quasi-one-dimensional setups across the BEC-BCS crossover. In this paper the nodal plane of the stable soliton solution is perturbed by adding a transverse modulation. The numerical solution of the system of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the amplitude of the perturbation leads to an estimate of the growth rate and characteristic length scale of the instability, which are calculated for a wide range of interaction regimes and compared to other theoretical predictions. The behavior of the maximum transverse size that the atomic cloud can have in order to preserve the stability is described across the BEC-BCS crossover. The analysis of the effects of spin imbalance on this critical length reveals a stabilization of the soliton with increasing imbalance and therefore provides the experimental community with a method to achieve the realization of stable solitons in real three-dimensional configurations, without reducing the system dimensionality.

  16. BCS Theory of Time-Reversal-Symmetric Hofstadter-Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umucalılar, R. O.; Iskin, M.

    2017-08-01

    The competition between the length scales associated with the periodicity of a lattice potential and the cyclotron radius of a uniform magnetic field is known to have dramatic effects on the single-particle properties of a quantum particle, e.g., the fractal spectrum is known as the Hofstadter butterfly. Having this intricate competition in mind, we consider a two-component Fermi gas on a square optical lattice with opposite synthetic magnetic fields for the components, and study its effects on the many-body BCS-pairing phenomenon. By a careful addressing of the distinct superfluid transitions from the semimetal, quantum spin-Hall insulator, or normal phases, we explore the low-temperature phase diagrams of the model, displaying lobe structures that are reminiscent of the well-known Mott-insulator transitions of the Bose-Hubbard model.

  17. Optimized perturbation theory applied to the study of the thermodynamics and BEC-BCS crossover in the three-color Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Dyana C.; Farias, R. L. S.; Manso, Pedro H. A.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2017-09-01

    The Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with two flavors, three colors, and diquark interactions is analyzed in the context of optimized perturbation theory (OPT). Corrections to the thermodynamical potential that go beyond the large-Nc (LN) approximation are taken into account, and the region of the phase diagram corresponding to intermediate chemical potentials and very low temperatures is explored. The simultaneous presence of both the quark-antiquark and diquark condensates can cause the system to behave as a fluid composed of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) or a color superconductor one, in the form of a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluid. The BEC-BCS crossover is then studied in the nonperturbative OPT scheme. The results obtained in the context of the OPT method are then contrasted with those obtained in the LN approximation. We show that there are values for the coupling constants related to quark-quark and quark-antiquark interactions where the corrections beyond LN brought by the OPT method can influence the behavior of the diquark condensate and the effective quark mass as a function of the baryon chemical potential. These changes in the behavior of the phase structure of the model modify the location of the critical point related to the phase structure as a whole of the model. Also, when we impose the color neutrality condition, our results show that the nature of the phase transition can change as well, shifting the ratio of the quark-antiquark and quark-quark interactions to higher values in the OPT case as compared to the LN approximation.

  18. Conventional BCS, unconventional BCS, and non-BCS hidden dineutron phases in neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodel, V. A.; Clark, J. W.; Shaginyan, V. R.; Zverev, M. V.

    2014-09-01

    The nature of pairing correlations in neutron matter is re-examined. Working within the conventional approximation in which the nn pairing interaction is provided by a realistic bare nn potential fitted to scattering data, it is demonstrated that the standard BCS theory fails in regions of neutron number density, where the pairing constant λ, depending crucially on density, has a non-BCS negative sign. We are led to propose a non-BCS scenario for pairing phenomena in neutron matter that involves the formation of a hidden dineutron state. In low-density neutron matter, where the pairing constant has the standard BCS sign, two phases organized by pairing correlations are possible and compete energetically: a conventional BCS phase and a dineutron phase. In dense neutron matter, where λ changes sign, only the dineutron phase survives and exists until the critical density for termination of pairing correlations is reached at approximately twice the neutron density in heavy atomic nuclei.

  19. Giant Anharmonicity and Theory of Surprising BCS Superconductivity in MgB2 at 40 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Taner

    2002-03-01

    The recent surprise discovery of superconductivity in MgB2 at 40 K has stimulated a great deal of research on this intercalated grahite-like system. Sparked by this discovery, we set out to unlock the structural secrets and, in particular, to reveal the origin of the high Tc in MgB_2; an electron-phonon or other exotic mechanism? To answer this fundamental question, we calculated T_c, its pressure dependence for uni- and biaxial compressions, and the isotope effect from the electronic band structure and lattice dynamics of MgB2 using density functional theory[1-2]. The calculated phonon density of states (DOS) are in excellent agreement with the inelastic neutron scattering measurements. We find that the in-plane boron phonons near the zone-center are very anharmonic and strongly coupled to the planar B sigma bands near the Fermi level. The boron mass and pressure dependence of this mode is found to be the key to quantitatively explaining the observed high T_c, the total isotope effect, and the pressure dependence of T_c. We propose that a stringent test on the hole and phonon based theories of the superconductivity in MgB2 would be a measurement of the biaxial ab-compression dependence of T_c. In collobration with Oguz Gulseren, NIST and UPENN [1] T. Yildirim et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 037001 (2001). [2] For details, see http://www.ncnr.nist.gov/staff/taner/mgb2

  20. The application of the fractional exclusion statistics to the BCS theory-A redefinition of the quasiparticle energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Dragoş-Victor; Nemnes, George Alexandru

    2016-09-01

    The effective energy of a superconductor Eeff(T) at temperature T is defined as the difference between the total energy at temperature T and the total energy at 0 K. We call the energy of the condensate, Ec, the difference between Eeff and the sum of the quasiparticle energies Eqp. Ec, Eqp, as well as the BCS quasiparticle energy ɛ are positive and depend on the gap energy Δ, which, in turn, depends on the populations of the quasiparticle states (equivalently, they depend on T). So, from the energetic point of view, the superconductor is a Fermi liquid of interacting quasiparticles. We show that the choice of quasiparticles is not unique, but there is an infinite range of possibilities. Some of these possibilities have been explored in the context of the fractional exclusion statistics (FES), which is a general method of describing interacting particle systems as ideal gases. We apply FES here and transform the Fermi liquid of BCS excitations into an ideal gas by redefining the quasiparticle energies. The new FES quasiparticles exhibit the same energy gap as the BCS quasiparticles, but a different DOS, which is finite at any quasiparticle energy. We also discuss the effect of the remnant electron-electron interaction (electron-electron interaction beyond the BCS pairing model) and show that this can stabilize the BCS condensate, increasing the critical temperature.

  1. Dynamic density and spin responses of a superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Path integral formulation and pair fluctuation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lianyi

    2016-10-01

    We present a standard field theoretical derivation of the dynamic density and spin linear response functions of a dilute superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover in both three and two dimensions. The derivation of the response functions is based on the elegant functional path integral approach which allows us to calculate the density-density and spin-spin correlation functions by introducing the external sources for the density and the spin density. Since the generating functional cannot be evaluated exactly, we consider two gapless approximations which ensure a gapless collective mode (Goldstone mode) in the superfluid state: the BCS-Leggett mean-field theory and the Gaussian-pair-fluctuation (GPF) theory. In the mean-field theory, our results of the response functions agree with the known results from the random phase approximation. We further consider the pair fluctuation effects and establish a theoretical framework for the dynamic responses within the GPF theory. We show that the GPF response theory naturally recovers three kinds of famous diagrammatic contributions: the Self-Energy contribution, the Aslamazov-Lakin contribution, and the Maki-Thompson contribution. We also show that unlike the equilibrium state, in evaluating the response functions, the linear (first-order) terms in the external sources as well as the induced order parameter perturbations should be treated carefully. In the superfluid state, there is an additional order parameter contribution which ensures that in the static and long wavelength limit, the density response function recovers the result of the compressibility (compressibility sum rule). We expect that the f-sum rule is manifested by the full number equation which includes the contribution from the Gaussian pair fluctuations. The dynamic density and spin response functions in the normal phase (above the superfluid critical temperature) are also derived within the Nozières-Schmitt-Rink (NSR) theory.

  2. BCS wave-function approach to the BEC-BCS crossover of exciton-polariton condensates.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Tim; Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Ishida, Natsuko; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2010-10-29

    The crossover between low and high density regimes of exciton-polariton condensates is examined using a BCS wave-function approach. Our approach is an extension of the BEC-BCS crossover theory for excitons, but includes a cavity photon field. The approach can describe both the low density limit, where the system can be described as a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of exciton-polaritons, and the high density limit, where the system enters a photon-dominated regime. In contrast to the exciton BEC-BCS crossover where the system approaches an electron-hole plasma, the polariton high density limit has strongly correlated electron-hole pairs. At intermediate densities, there is a regime with BCS-like properties, with a peak at nonzero momentum of the singlet pair function. We calculate the expected photoluminescence and give several experimental signatures of the crossover.

  3. BCS quantum critical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Theoretically, we recently showed that the scaling relation between the transition temperature T c and the superfluid density at zero temperature n s (0) might exhibit a parabolic pattern: Tc\\propto \\sqrt {ns(0)} (Tao Y., Sci. Rep., 6 (2016) 23863). It is significantly different from the linear scaling described by Homes' law, which is well known as a mean-field result. More recently, Božović et al. have observed such a parabolic scaling in the overdoped copper oxides with a sufficiently low transition temperature T c (Božović I. et al., Nature, 536 (2016) 309). They further point out that this experimental finding is incompatible with the standard Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) description. Here we report that if T c is sufficiently low, applying the renormalization group approach into the BCS action at zero temperature will naturally lead to the parabolic scaling. Our result indicates that when T c sufficiently approaches zero, quantum fluctuations will be overwhelmingly amplified so that the mean-field approximation may break down at zero temperature.

  4. Quantum field theory based on birefringent modified Maxwell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M.

    2014-04-01

    In the current paper the properties of a birefringent Lorentz-violating extension of quantum electrodynamics is considered. The theory results from coupling modified Maxwell theory, which is a CPT-even Lorentz-violating extension of the photon sector, to a Dirac theory of standard spin-1/2 particles. It is then restricted to a special birefringent case with one nonzero Lorentz-violating coefficient. The modified dispersion laws of electromagnetic waves are obtained plus their phase and group velocities are considered. After deriving the photon propagator and the polarization vectors for a special momentum configuration we prove both unitarity at tree level and microcausality for the quantum field theory based on this Lorentz-violating modification. These analytical proofs are done for a spatial momentum with two vanishing components and the proof of unitarity is supported by numerical investigations in case all components are nonvanishing. The upshot is that the theory is well behaved within the framework of our assumptions where there is a possible issue for negative Lorentz-violating coefficients. The paper shall provide a basis for the future analysis of alternative birefringent quantum field theories.

  5. Modified Iterative Extended Hueckel. 1: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.

    1980-01-01

    Iterative Extended Huekel is modified by inclusion of explicit effective internuclear and electronic interactions. The one electron energies are shown to obey a variational principle because of the form of the effective electronic interactions. The modifications permit mimicking of aspects of valence bond theory with the additional feature that the energies associated with valence bond type structures are explicitly calculated. In turn, a hybrid molecular, orbital valence, bond scheme is introduced which incorporates variant total molecular electronic density distributions similar to the way that Iterative Extended Hueckel incorporates atoms.

  6. The integrated bispectrum in modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Dipak

    2017-01-01

    Gravity-induced non-Gaussianity can provide important clues to Modified Gravity (MG) Theories. Several recent studies have suggested using the Integrated Bispectrum (IB) as a probe for squeezed configuration of bispectrum. Extending previous studies on the IB, we include redshift-space distortions to study a class of (parametrised) MG theories that include the string-inspired Dvali, Gabadadze & Porrati (DGP) model. Various contributions from redshift-space distortions are derived in a transparent manner, and squeezed contributions from these terms are derived separately. Results are obtained using the Zel'dovich Approximation (ZA). Results are also presented for projected surveys (2D). We use the Press-Schechter (PS) and Sheth-Tormen (ST) mass functions to compute the IB for collapsed objects that can readily be extended to peak-theory based approaches. The cumulant correlators (CCs) generalise the ordinary cumulants and are known to probe collapsed configurations of higher order correlation functions. We generalise the concept of CCs to halos of different masses. We also introduce a generating function based approach to analyse more general non-local biasing models. The Fourier representations of the CCs, the skew-spectrum, or the kurt-spctra are discussed in this context. The results are relevant for the study of the Minkowski Functionals (MF) of collapsed tracers in redshift-space.

  7. The BCS-BEC Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Meera M.

    2015-09-01

    This chapter presents the crossover from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) state of weakly correlated pairs of fermions to the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of diatomic molecules in the atomic Fermi gas. Our aim is to provide a pedagogical review of the BCS-BEC crossover, with an emphasis on the basic concepts, particularly those that are not generally known or are difficult to find in the literature. We shall not attempt to give an exhaustive survey of current research in the limited space here; where possible, we will direct the reader to more extensive reviews.

  8. Modified Interior Distance Functions (Theory and Methods)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polyak, Roman A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we introduced and developed the theory of Modified Interior Distance Functions (MIDF's). The MIDF is a Classical Lagrangian (CL) for a constrained optimization problem which is equivalent to the initial one and can be obtained from the latter by monotone transformation both the objective function and constraints. In contrast to the Interior Distance Functions (IDF's), which played a fundamental role in Interior Point Methods (IPM's), the MIDF's are defined on an extended feasible set and along with center, have two extra tools, which control the computational process: the barrier parameter and the vector of Lagrange multipliers. The extra tools allow to attach to the MEDF's very important properties of Augmented Lagrangeans. One can consider the MIDFs as Interior Augmented Lagrangeans. It makes MIDF's similar in spirit to Modified Barrier Functions (MBF's), although there is a fundamental difference between them both in theory and methods. Based on MIDF's theory, Modified Center Methods (MCM's) have been developed and analyzed. The MCM's find an unconstrained minimizer in primal space and update the Lagrange multipliers, while both the center and the barrier parameter can be fixed or updated at each step. The MCM's convergence was investigated, and their rate of convergence was estimated. The extension of the feasible set and the special role of the Lagrange multipliers allow to develop MCM's, which produce, in case of nondegenerate constrained optimization, a primal and dual sequences that converge to the primal-dual solutions with linear rate, even when both the center and the barrier parameter are fixed. Moreover, every Lagrange multipliers update shrinks the distance to the primal dual solution by a factor 0 less than gamma less than 1 which can be made as small as one wants by choosing a fixed interior point as a 'center' and a fixed but large enough barrier parameter. The numericai realization of MCM leads to the Newton MCM (NMCM). The

  9. Flow equations for the BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.; Gies, H.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Wetterich, C.

    2007-08-15

    The functional renormalization group is used for the BCS-BEC crossover in gases of ultracold fermionic atoms. In a simple truncation, we see how universality and an effective theory with composite bosonic diatom states emerge. We obtain a unified picture of the whole phase diagram. The flow reflects different effective physics at different scales. In the BEC limit as well as near the critical temperature, it describes an interacting bosonic theory.

  10. Modified PRISM theory for confined polymers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengjin; Zhang, Chen; Du, Zhongjie; Mi, Jianguo

    2012-11-14

    We propose a modified polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) to describe the interfacial density profiles of polymers in contact with planar and curved solid surfaces. In the theoretical approach, a bridge function derived from density functional method is included. In description of hard-sphere polymer at planar and curved surfaces with an arbitrary external field, the effect of modification has been validated by the available simulation data, except for low density system. When extended to confined real systems, the modified theoretical model also shows an encouraging prospect in description of the interfacial structure and properties.

  11. Black hole solutions of modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardoux, Yannis

    2012-10-01

    The main interest of the work exposed in this thesis is to explore hairy black holes in a more general framework than General Relativity by taking into account the presence of a cosmological constant, of higher dimensions, of exotic matter fields or of higher curvature terms. These extensions to General Relativity can be derived in the context of String Theory. It is also by studying natural extensions to General Relativity that we can more deeply understand the theory of Einstein. Firstly, we will display the theory of General Relativity with its building blocks in particular and we will give the mathematical tools that we need afterwards. Then, a first extension will be detailed with the introduction of higher dimensions and p-form fields which constitute the natural generalization of the electromagnetic interaction. We will build in this framework new static black hole solutions where p-form fields allow to shape the geometry of the horizon. Secondly, we will present the general extension of Einstein theory in any dimension which produces second order field equations: Lovelock theory. We will determine in this context a large class of solutions in dimension 6 for which the theory is reduced to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory with the presence of p-form fields. Thirdly, we will study a generalization of General Relativity in dimension 4 whose modification is induced by a conformally coupled scalar field. We will namely exhibit a new black hole solution with a flat horizon in the presence of axionic fields. To conclude this thesis, thermodynamical aspects of these gravitational theories will be studied. In this way, we will be able to determine the mass and the charges of these new solutions and we will examine phase transition phenomena in the presence of a conformally scalar field.

  12. Modified contour-improved perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Loewe, Marcelo; Martinez, Cristian; Valenzuela, Cristian

    2010-11-01

    The semihadronic tau decay width allows a clean extraction of the strong coupling constant at low energies. We present a modification of the standard ''contour-improved'' method based on a derivative expansion of the Adler function. The new approach has some advantages compared to contour-improved perturbation theory. The renormalization scale dependence is weaker by more than a factor of 2 and the last term of the expansion is reduced by about 10%, while the renormalization scheme dependence remains approximately equal. The extracted QCD coupling at the tau mass scale is by 2% lower than the contour-improved value. We find {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1211{+-}0.0010.

  13. Density perturbations in general modified gravitational theories

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2010-07-15

    We derive the equations of linear cosmological perturbations for the general Lagrangian density f(R,{phi},X)/2+L{sub c}, where R is a Ricci scalar, {phi} is a scalar field, and X=-{partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}/}2 is a field kinetic energy. We take into account a nonlinear self-interaction term L{sub c}={xi}({phi}) {open_square}{phi}({partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}}) recently studied in the context of ''Galileon'' cosmology, which keeps the field equations at second order. Taking into account a scalar-field mass explicitly, the equations of matter density perturbations and gravitational potentials are obtained under a quasistatic approximation on subhorizon scales. We also derive conditions for the avoidance of ghosts and Laplacian instabilities associated with propagation speeds. Our analysis includes most of modified gravity models of dark energy proposed in literature; and thus it is convenient to test the viability of such models from both theoretical and observational points of view.

  14. Constraining modified gravitational theories by weak lensing with Euclid

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, Matteo; Calabrese, Erminia; De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Scaramella, Roberto

    2011-01-15

    Future proposed satellite missions such as Euclid can offer the opportunity to test general relativity on cosmic scales through mapping of the galaxy weak-lensing signal. In this paper we forecast the ability of these experiments to constrain modified gravity scenarios such as those predicted by scalar-tensor and f(R) theories. We find that Euclid will improve constraints expected from the Planck satellite on these modified theories of gravity by 2 orders of magnitude. We discuss parameter degeneracies and the possible biases introduced by modifications to gravity.

  15. BCS as Foundation and Inspiration: the Transmutation of Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    The BCS theory injected two powerful ideas into the collective consciousness of theoretical physics: pairing and spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the 50 years since the seminal work of Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer, those ideas have found important use in areas quite remote from the stem application to metallic superconductivity. This is a brief and eclectic sketch of some highlights, emphasizing relatively recent developments in QCD and in the theory of quantum statistics, and including a few thoughts about future directions. A common theme is the importance of symmetry transmutation, as opposed to the simple breaking of electromagnetic U(1) symmetry in classic metallic superconductors.

  16. BCS as Foundation and Inspiration:. the Transmutation of Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    The BCS theory injected two powerful ideas into the collective consciousness of theoretical physics: pairing and spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the 50 years since the seminal work of Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer, those ideas have found important use in areas quite remote from the stem application to metallic superconductivity. This is a brief and eclectic sketch of some highlights, emphasizing relatively recent developments in QCD and in the theory of quantum statistics, and including a few thoughts about future directions. A common theme is the importance of symmetry transmutation, as opposed to the simple breaking of electromagnetic U(1) symmetry in classic metallic superconductors.

  17. Extra force in f(R) modified theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Boehmer, Christian G.; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2007-05-15

    The equation of motion for massive particles in f(R) modified theories of gravity is derived. By considering an explicit coupling between an arbitrary function of the scalar curvature, R, and the Lagrangian density of matter, it is shown that an extra force arises. This extra force is orthogonal to the four-velocity and the corresponding acceleration law is obtained in the weak-field limit. Connections with MOND and with the Pioneer anomaly are further discussed.

  18. Fast route to nonlinear clustering statistics in modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winther, Hans A.; Ferreira, Pedro G.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a simple and computationally fast method for performing N -body simulations for a large class of modified gravity theories with a screening mechanism such as chameleons, symmetrons, and Galileons. By combining the linear Klein-Gordon equation with a screening factor, calculated from analytical solutions of spherical symmetric configurations, we obtain a modified field equation of which the solution is exact in the linear regime while at the same time taking screening into account on nonlinear scales. The resulting modified field equation remains linear and can be solved just as quickly as the Poisson equation without any of the convergence problems that can arise when solving the full equation. We test our method with N -body simulations and find that it compares remarkably well with full simulations well into the nonlinear regime.

  19. Comparison of different pairing fluctuation approaches to BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Kathryn Chen Qijin Chien, C.-C. He Yan

    2010-02-15

    The subject of BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover is particularly exciting because of its realization in ultracold atomic Fermi gases and its possible relevance to high temperature superconductors. In this paper we review the body of theoretical work on this subject, which represents a natural extension of the seminal papers by Leggett and by Nozieres and Schmitt-Rink (NSR). The former addressed only the ground state, now known as the 'BCS-Leggett' wave-function, and the key contributions of the latter pertain to calculations of the superfluid transition temperature T{sub c}. These two papers have given rise to two main and, importantly, distinct, theoretical schools in the BCS-BEC crossover literature. The first of these extends the BCS-Leggett ground state to finite temperature and the second extends the NSR scheme away from T{sub c} both in the superfluid and normal phases. It is now rather widely accepted that these extensions of NSR produce a different ground state than that first introduced by Leggett. This observation provides a central motivation for the present paper which seeks to clarify the distinctions in the two approaches. Our analysis shows how the NSR-based approach views the bosonic contributions more completely but treats the fermions as 'quasi-free'. By contrast, the BCS-Leggett based approach treats the fermionic contributions more completely but treats the bosons as 'quasi-free'. In a related fashion, the NSR-based schemes approach the crossover between BCS and BEC by starting from the BEC limit and the BCS-Leggett based scheme approaches this crossover by starting from the BCS limit. Ultimately, one would like to combine these two schemes. There are, however, many difficult problems to surmount in any attempt to bridge the gap in the two theory classes. In this paper we review the strengths and weaknesses of both approaches. The flexibility of the BCS-Leggett based approach and its ease of handling make it widely used in T=0

  20. Classifying linearly shielded modified gravity models in effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Lombriser, Lucas; Taylor, Andy

    2015-01-23

    We study the model space generated by the time-dependent operator coefficients in the effective field theory of the cosmological background evolution and perturbations of modified gravity and dark energy models. We identify three classes of modified gravity models that reduce to Newtonian gravity on the small scales of linear theory. These general classes contain enough freedom to simultaneously admit a matching of the concordance model background expansion history. In particular, there exists a large model space that mimics the concordance model on all linear quasistatic subhorizon scales as well as in the background evolution. Such models also exist when restricting the theory space to operators introduced in Horndeski scalar-tensor gravity. We emphasize that whereas the partially shielded scenarios might be of interest to study in connection with tensions between large and small scale data, with conventional cosmological probes, the ability to distinguish the fully shielded scenarios from the concordance model on near-horizon scales will remain limited by cosmic variance. Novel tests of the large-scale structure remedying this deficiency and accounting for the full covariant nature of the alternative gravitational theories, however, might yield further insights on gravity in this regime.

  1. Modified Rate-Theory Predictions in Comparison to Microstructural Data

    SciTech Connect

    Surh, M P; Okita, T; Wolfer, W G

    2003-11-03

    Standard rate theory methods have recently been combined with experimental microstructures to successfully reproduce measured swelling behavior in ternary steels around 400 C. Fit parameters have reasonable values except possibly for the recombination radius, R{sub c}, which can be larger than expected. Numerical simulations of void nucleation and growth reveal the importance additional recombination processes at unstable clusters. Such extra recombination may reduce the range of possible values for R{sub c}. A modified rate theory is presented here that includes the effect of these undetectably small defect clusters. The fit values for R{sub c} are not appreciably altered, as the modification has little effect on the model behavior in the late steady state. It slightly improves the predictions for early transient times, when the sink strength of stable voids and dislocations is relatively small. Standard rate theory successfully explains steady swelling behavior in high purity stainless steel.

  2. Quantum fluctuations in the BCS-BEC crossover of two-dimensional Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lianyi; Lü, Haifeng; Cao, Gaoqing; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia-Ji

    2015-08-01

    We present a theoretical study of the ground state of the BCS-BEC crossover in dilute two-dimensional Fermi gases. While the mean-field theory provides a simple and analytical equation of state, the pressure is equal to that of a noninteracting Fermi gas in the entire BCS-BEC crossover, which is not consistent with the features of a weakly interacting Bose condensate in the BEC limit and a weakly interacting Fermi liquid in the BCS limit. The inadequacy of the two-dimensional mean-field theory indicates that the quantum fluctuations are much more pronounced than those in three dimensions. In this work, we show that the inclusion of the Gaussian quantum fluctuations naturally recovers the above features in both the BEC and the BCS limits. In the BEC limit, the missing logarithmic dependence on the boson chemical potential is recovered by the quantum fluctuations. Near the quantum phase transition from the vacuum to the BEC phase, we compare our equation of state with the known grand canonical equation of state of two-dimensional Bose gases and determine the ratio of the composite boson scattering length aB to the fermion scattering length a2 D. We find aB≃0.56 a2 D , in good agreement with the exact four-body calculation. We compare our equation of state in the BCS-BEC crossover with recent results from the quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the experimental measurements and find good agreements.

  3. Wormhole geometries in f(R) modified theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Oliveira, Miguel A.

    2009-11-01

    In this work, we construct traversable wormhole geometries in the context of f(R) modified theories of gravity. We impose that the matter threading the wormhole satisfies the energy conditions, so that it is the effective stress-energy tensor containing higher order curvature derivatives that is responsible for the null energy condition violation. Thus, the higher order curvature terms, interpreted as a gravitational fluid, sustain these nonstandard wormhole geometries, fundamentally different from their counterparts in general relativity. In particular, by considering specific shape functions and several equations of state, exact solutions for f(R) are found.

  4. Wormhole geometries in f(R) modified theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Oliveira, Miguel A.

    2009-11-15

    In this work, we construct traversable wormhole geometries in the context of f(R) modified theories of gravity. We impose that the matter threading the wormhole satisfies the energy conditions, so that it is the effective stress-energy tensor containing higher order curvature derivatives that is responsible for the null energy condition violation. Thus, the higher order curvature terms, interpreted as a gravitational fluid, sustain these nonstandard wormhole geometries, fundamentally different from their counterparts in general relativity. In particular, by considering specific shape functions and several equations of state, exact solutions for f(R) are found.

  5. Relativistic gravitation theory for the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.

    2004-10-15

    The modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) paradigm of Milgrom can boast of a number of successful predictions regarding galactic dynamics; these are made without the assumption that dark matter plays a significant role. MOND requires gravitation to depart from Newtonian theory in the extragalactic regime where dynamical accelerations are small. So far relativistic gravitation theories proposed to underpin MOND have either clashed with the post-Newtonian tests of general relativity, or failed to provide significant gravitational lensing, or violated hallowed principles by exhibiting superluminal scalar waves or an a priori vector field. We develop a relativistic MOND inspired theory which resolves these problems. In it gravitation is mediated by metric, a scalar, and a 4-vector field, all three dynamical. For a simple choice of its free function, the theory has a Newtonian limit for nonrelativistic dynamics with significant acceleration, but a MOND limit when accelerations are small. We calculate the {beta} and {gamma} parameterized post-Newtonian coefficients showing them to agree with solar system measurements. The gravitational light deflection by nonrelativistic systems is governed by the same potential responsible for dynamics of particles. To the extent that MOND successfully describes dynamics of a system, the new theory's predictions for lensing by that system's visible matter will agree as well with observations as general relativity's predictions made with a dynamically successful dark halo model. Cosmological models based on the theory are quite similar to those based on general relativity; they predict slow evolution of the scalar field. For a range of initial conditions, this last result makes it easy to rule out superluminal propagation of metric, scalar, and vector waves.

  6. Dark energy or modified gravity? An effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, Jolyon; Flanagan, Éanna É.; Park, Minjoon; Watson, Scott E-mail: eef3@cornell.edu E-mail: gswatson@syr.edu

    2013-08-01

    We take an Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach to unifying existing proposals for the origin of cosmic acceleration and its connection to cosmological observations. Building on earlier work where EFT methods were used with observations to constrain the background evolution, we extend this program to the level of the EFT of the cosmological perturbations — following the example from the EFT of Inflation. Within this framework, we construct the general theory around an assumed background which will typically be chosen to mimic ΛCDM, and identify the parameters of interest for constraining dark energy and modified gravity models with observations. We discuss the similarities to the EFT of Inflation, but we also identify a number of subtleties including the relationship between the scalar perturbations and the Goldstone boson of the spontaneously broken time translations. We present formulae that relate the parameters of the fundamental Lagrangian to the speed of sound, anisotropic shear stress, effective Newtonian constant, and Caldwell's varpi parameter, emphasizing the connection to observations. It is anticipated that this framework will be of use in constraining individual models, as well as for placing model-independent constraints on dark energy and modified gravity model building.

  7. Nonlinear growth in modified gravity theories of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Laszlo, Istvan; Bean, Rachel

    2008-01-15

    Theoretical differences in the growth of structure offer the possibility that we might distinguish between modified gravity theories of dark energy and {lambda}CDM. A significant impediment to applying current and prospective large scale galaxy and weak lensing surveys to this problem is that, while the mildly nonlinear regime is important, there is a lack of numerical simulations of nonlinear growth in modified gravity theories. A major question exists as to whether existing analytical fits, created using simulations of standard gravity, can be confidently applied. In this paper we address this, presenting results of N-body simulations of a variety of models where gravity is altered including the Dvali, Gabadadze, and Porrati model. We consider modifications that alter the Poisson equation and also consider the presence of anisotropic shear stress that alters how particles respond to the gravitational potential gradient. We establish how well analytical fits of the matter power spectrum by Peacock and Dodds and Smith et al. are able to predict the nonlinear growth found in the simulations from z=50 up to today, and also consider implications for the weak lensing convergence power spectrum. We find that the analytical fits provide good agreement with the simulations, being within 1{sigma} of the simulation results for cases with and without anisotropic stress and for scale-dependent and independent modifications of the Poisson equation. No strong preference for either analytical fit is found.

  8. 3D weak lensing: Modified theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratten, Geraint; Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick; Brax, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Weak lensing (WL) promises to be a particularly sensitive probe of both the growth of large-scale structure as well as the fundamental relation between matter density perturbations and metric perturbations, thus providing a powerful tool with which we may constrain modified theories of gravity (MG) on cosmological scales. Future deep, wide-field WL surveys will provide an unprecedented opportunity to constrain deviations from General Relativity. Employing a 3D analysis based on the spherical Fourier-Bessel expansion, we investigate the extent to which MG theories will be constrained by a typical 3D WL survey configuration including noise from the intrinsic ellipticity distribution σɛ of source galaxies. Here, we focus on two classes of screened theories of gravity: (i) f (R ) chameleon models and (ii) environmentally dependent dilaton models. We use one-loop perturbation theory combined with halo models in order to accurately model the evolution of the matter power spectrum with redshift in these theories. Using a χ2 analysis, we show that for an all-sky spectroscopic survey, the parameter fR0 can be constrained in the range fR0<5 ×10-6(9 ×10-6) for n =1 (2 ) with a 3 σ confidence level. This can be achieved by using relatively low-order angular harmonics ℓ<100 . Higher-order harmonics ℓ>100 could provide tighter constraints but are subject to nonlinear effects, such as baryonic feedback, that must be accounted for. We also employ a Principal Component Analysis in order to study the parameter degeneracies in the MG parameters. The confusion from intrinsic ellipticity correlation and modification of the matter power spectrum at a small scale due to feedback mechanisms is briefly discussed.

  9. Dense QCD: Overhauser or BCS pairing?

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byung-Yoon; Rho, Mannque; Wirzba, Andreas; Zahed, Ismail

    2000-08-01

    We discuss the Overhauser effect (particle-hole pairing) versus the BCS effect (particle-particle or hole-hole pairing) in QCD at large quark density. In weak coupling and to leading logarithm accuracy, the pairing energies can be estimated exactly. For a small number of colors, the BCS effect overtakes the Overhauser effect, while for a large number of colors the opposite takes place, in agreement with a recent renormalization group argument. In strong coupling with large pairing energies, the Overhauser effect may be dominant for any number of colors, suggesting that QCD may crystallize into an insulator at a few times nuclear matter density, a situation reminiscent of dense Skyrmions. The Overhauser effect is dominant in QCD in 1+1 dimensions, although susceptible to quantum effects. It is sensitive to temperature in all dimensions. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  10. Gravitational Cherenkov losses in theories based on modified Newtonian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2011-03-18

    Survival of high-energy cosmic rays (HECRs) against gravitational Cherenkov losses is shown not to cast strong constraints on modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theories that are compatible with general relativity (GR): theories that coincide with GR for accelerations ≫a(0) (a(0) is the MOND constant). The energy-loss rate, E, is many orders smaller than those derived in the literature for theories with no extra scale. Modification to GR, which underlies E, enters only beyond the MOND radius of the particle: r(M)=(Gp/ca(0))(1/2). The spectral cutoff, entering E quadratically, is thus r(M)(-1), not k(dB)=p/ℏ. Thus, E is smaller than published rates, which use k(dB), by a factor ∼(r(M)k(dB))(2)≈10(39)(cp/3×10(11)  Gev)(3). Losses are important only beyond D(loss)≈qℓ(M), where q is a dimensionless factor, and ℓ(M)=c(2)/a(0) is the MOND length, which is ≈2π times the Hubble distance.

  11. A lower bound for the BCS functional with boundary conditions at infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuchert, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    We consider a many-body system of fermionic atoms interacting via a local pair potential and subject to an external potential within the framework of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory. We measure the free energy of the whole sample with respect to the free energy of a reference state which allows us to define a BCS functional with boundary conditions at infinity. Our main result is a lower bound for this energy functional in terms of expressions that typically appear in Ginzburg-Landau functionals.

  12. Resonant electronic Raman scattering: A BCS-like system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Leonarde N.; Arantes, A.; Schüller, C.; Bell, M. J. V.; Anjos, V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the resonant intersubband Raman scattering of two-dimensional electron systems in GaAs-AlGaAs single quantum wells. Self-consistent calculations of the polarized and depolarized Raman cross sections show that the appearance of excitations at the unrenormalized single-particle energy are related to three factors: the extreme resonance regime, the existence of degeneracy in intersubband excitations of the electron gas, and, finally, degeneracy in the interactions between pairs of excitations. It is demonstrated that the physics that governs the problem is similar to the one that gives rise to the formation of the superconducting state in the BCS theory of normal metals. Comparison between experiment and theory shows an excellent agreement.

  13. Strong-coupling BCS models of Josephson qubits.

    PubMed

    Alicki, R; Miklaszewski, W

    2013-01-23

    The strong-coupling version of the BCS theory for superconductors is used to derive microscopic models for all types of small Josephson junctions--charge qubit, flux qubit and phase qubit. Applied to Josephson qubits it yields a more complicated structure of the lowest-lying energy levels than that obtained from phenomenological models based on quantization of the Kirchhoff equations. In particular, highly degenerate levels emerge, which act as probability sinks for the qubit. The alternative formulae concerning spectra of superconducting qubits are presented and compared with the experimental data. In contrast to the existing theories those formulae contain microscopic parameters of the model. In particular, for the first time, the density of Cooper pairs at zero temperature is estimated for an Al-based flux qubit. Finally, the question whether small Josephson junctions can be treated as macroscopic quantum systems is briefly discussed.

  14. Nuclear pairing correlations within and beyond HFB-BCS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Lacroix, Denis

    2015-02-01

    Pairing correlations in nuclear systems play a crucial role in several aspects, i.e. binding energies and odd-even effects, superfluid phenomena and pair transfer mechanisms, just to quote few of them. On the theoretical side, the standard description of these features is done by using BCS or HFB models which allow to describe in a simple way pairing effects. However, due to the explicit breaking of the particle number, these theories present some limitations which can be cured by using particle number projection techniques. In this paper, we will show the merits of these techniques and their accuracy in treating pairing correlations. First, a beyond BCS-HFB method is introduced where the effect of four quasi-particle states is included perturbatively and subsequently the particle number is restored. We will then show the need of restoring the good particle number also for excited states that are essential in the pair transfer process between superfluid systems. Applications to the Richardson model are shown and discussed.

  15. Gravitational Microlensing in Modified Gravity Theories - Inverse-Square Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.

    2011-02-01

    Microlensing studies are usually based on the lens equation that is valid only to the first order in the gravitational constant G and lens mass M. We consider corrections to the conventional lens equation in terms of differentiable functions, so that they can express not only the second-order effects of GM in general relativity but also modified gravity theories. As a generalization of Ebina et al. (Prog. Theor. Phys. 104 (2000), 1317), we show that, provided that the spacetime is static, spherically symmetric and asymptotically flat, the total amplification by microlensing remains unchanged at the linear order of the correction to the deflection angle, if and only if the correction takes a particular form as the inverse square of the impact parameter, whereas the magnification factor for each image is corrected. It is concluded that the light curve shape by microlensing is inevitably changed and will thus allow us to probe modified gravity, unless a modificati on to the deflection angle takes the particular form. No systematic deviation in microlensing observations has been reported. For instance, therefore, the Yukawa-type correction is constrained as the characteristic length > 10^{14} m.

  16. Expansion of a Fermi cloud in the BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, G.; Manini, N.; Salasnich, L.

    2006-06-01

    We study the free expansion of a dilute two-component Fermi gas with attractive interspecies interaction in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-Bose-Einstein condensate (BCS-BEC) crossover. We apply a time-dependent parameter-free density-functional theory by using two choices of the equation of state: an analytic formula based on Monte Carlo data and the mean-field equation of state resulting from the extended BCS equations. The calculated axial and transverse radii and the aspect ratio of the expanding cloud are compared to experimental data on vapors of Li6 atoms. Remarkably, the mean-field theory shows a better agreement with the experiments than the theory based on the Monte Carlo equation of state. Both theories predict a measurable dependence of the aspect ratio on expansion time and on scattering length.

  17. Modified f( R, T) gravity theory and scalar field cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay; Singh, C. P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the behaviors of scalar field in modified f( R, T) gravity theory within the framework of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model. The universe is assumed to be filled with two non-interacting matter sources, scalar field (normal or phantom) with scalar potential and matter contribution due to f( R, T) action. We first explore a model where the potential is a constant, and the universe evolves as a de Sitter type. This model is compatible with phantom scalar field only which gives fine tuning with the recent observations. The model exhibits a wide variety of early time physical phenomena that eventually behaves like a cosmological constant at late times. The model shows transition from decelerated to accelerated expansion of the universe. We also explore a model where the scalar field potential and the scale factor evolve exponentially as a scalar field. This model is compatible with normal scalar field only and describes transition from inflationary to the decelerated phase at early times and quintessence to phantom phase at late times. We constraint our results with the recent observational data and find that some values of parameters are consistent with SNe Ia and H( z)+SNe Ia data to describe accelerated expansion only whereas some one give decelerated and accelerated expansions with H( z), WMAP7 and WMAP7+BAO+ H( z) observational data.

  18. A modified Lorentz theory as a test theory of special relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D. G.; Gagnon, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Attention has been given recently to a modified Lorentz theory (MLT) that is based on the generalized Galilean transformation. Some explicit formulas within the framework of MLT, dealing with the one-way velocity of light, slow-clock transport, and the Doppler effect are derived. A number of typical experiments are analyzed on this basis. Results indicate that the empirical equivalence between MLT and special relativity is still maintained to second order terms. The results of previous works that predict that the MLT might be distinguished from special relativity at the third order by Doppler centrifuge tests capable of a fractional frequency detection threshold of 10 to the -15th are confirmed.

  19. A modified Lorentz theory as a test theory of special relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T.; Torr, D. G.; Gagnon, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Attention has been given recently to a modified Lorentz theory (MLT) that is based on the generalized Galilean transformation. Some explicit formulas within the framework of MLT, dealing with the one-way velocity of light, slow-clock transport, and the Doppler effect are derived. A number of typical experiments are analyzed on this basis. Results indicate that the empirical equivalence between MLT and special relativity is still maintained to second order terms. The results of previous works that predict that the MLT might be distinguished from special relativity at the third order by Doppler centrifuge tests capable of a fractional frequency detection threshold of 10 to the -15th are confirmed.

  20. Quantum fluctuations in the BCS-BEC crossover of two-dimensional Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lianyi; Lu, Haifeng; Cao, Gaoqing; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia -Ji

    2015-08-14

    We present a theoretical study of the ground state of the BCS-BEC crossover in dilute two-dimensional Fermi gases. While the mean-field theory provides a simple and analytical equation of state, the pressure is equal to that of a noninteracting Fermi gas in the entire BCS-BEC crossover, which is not consistent with the features of a weakly interacting Bose condensate in the BEC limit and a weakly interacting Fermi liquid in the BCS limit. The inadequacy of the two-dimensional mean-field theory indicates that the quantum fluctuations are much more pronounced than those in three dimensions. In this work, we show that the inclusion of the Gaussian quantum fluctuations naturally recovers the above features in both the BEC and the BCS limits. In the BEC limit, the missing logarithmic dependence on the boson chemical potential is recovered by the quantum fluctuations. Near the quantum phase transition from the vacuum to the BEC phase, we compare our equation of state with the known grand canonical equation of state of two-dimensional Bose gases and determine the ratio of the composite boson scattering length aB to the fermion scattering length a2D. We find aB ≃ 0.56a2D, in good agreement with the exact four-body calculation. As a result, we compare our equation of state in the BCS-BEC crossover with recent results from the quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the experimental measurements and find good agreements.

  1. Quantum fluctuations in the BCS-BEC crossover of two-dimensional Fermi gases

    DOE PAGES

    He, Lianyi; Lu, Haifeng; Cao, Gaoqing; ...

    2015-08-14

    We present a theoretical study of the ground state of the BCS-BEC crossover in dilute two-dimensional Fermi gases. While the mean-field theory provides a simple and analytical equation of state, the pressure is equal to that of a noninteracting Fermi gas in the entire BCS-BEC crossover, which is not consistent with the features of a weakly interacting Bose condensate in the BEC limit and a weakly interacting Fermi liquid in the BCS limit. The inadequacy of the two-dimensional mean-field theory indicates that the quantum fluctuations are much more pronounced than those in three dimensions. In this work, we show thatmore » the inclusion of the Gaussian quantum fluctuations naturally recovers the above features in both the BEC and the BCS limits. In the BEC limit, the missing logarithmic dependence on the boson chemical potential is recovered by the quantum fluctuations. Near the quantum phase transition from the vacuum to the BEC phase, we compare our equation of state with the known grand canonical equation of state of two-dimensional Bose gases and determine the ratio of the composite boson scattering length aB to the fermion scattering length a2D. We find aB ≃ 0.56a2D, in good agreement with the exact four-body calculation. As a result, we compare our equation of state in the BCS-BEC crossover with recent results from the quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the experimental measurements and find good agreements.« less

  2. Gravitationally bound BCS state as dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Stephon; Cormack, Sam

    2017-04-01

    We explore the possibility that fermionic dark matter undergoes a BCS transition to form a superfluid. This requires an attractive interaction between fermions and we describe a possible source of this interaction induced by torsion. We describe the gravitating fermion system with the Bogoliubov-de Gennes formalism in the local density approximation. We solve the Poisson equation along with the equations for the density and gap energy of the fermions to find a self-gravitating, superfluid solution for dark matter halos. In order to produce halos the size of dwarf galaxies, we require a particle mass of ~ 200 eV. We find a maximum attractive coupling strength before the halo becomes unstable. If dark matter halos do have a superfluid component, this raises the possibility that they contain vortex lines.

  3. Modified gravity theories on a nutshell: Inflation, bounce and late-time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, S.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2017-06-01

    We systematically review some standard issues and also the latest developments of modified gravity in cosmology, emphasizing on inflation, bouncing cosmology and late-time acceleration era. Particularly, we present the formalism of standard modified gravity theory representatives, like F(R) , F(G) and F(T) gravity theories, but also several alternative theoretical proposals which appeared in the literature during the last decade. We emphasize on the formalism developed for these theories and we explain how these theories can be considered as viable descriptions for our Universe. Using these theories, we present how a viable inflationary era can be produced in the context of these theories, with the viability being justified if compatibility with the latest observational data is achieved. Also we demonstrate how bouncing cosmologies can actually be described by these theories. Moreover, we systematically discuss several qualitative features of the dark energy era by using the modified gravity formalism, and also we critically discuss how a unified description of inflation with dark energy era can be described by solely using the modified gravity framework. Finally, we also discuss some astrophysical solutions in the context of modified gravity, and several qualitative features of these solutions. The aim of this review is to gather the different modified gravity techniques and form a virtual modified gravity ;toolbox;, which will contain all the necessary information on inflation, dark energy and bouncing cosmologies in the context of the various forms of modified gravity.

  4. Modified coupling procedure for the Poincare gauge theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmierczak, Marcin

    2009-06-15

    The minimal coupling procedure, which is employed in standard Yang-Mills theories, appears to be ambiguous in the case of gravity. We propose a slight modification of this procedure, which removes the ambiguity. Our modification justifies some earlier results concerning the consequences of the Poincare gauge theory of gravity. In particular, the predictions of the Einstein-Cartan theory with fermionic matter are rendered unique.

  5. Generalized second law of thermodynamic in modified teleparallel theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, M.; Bahamonde, Sebastian; Jamil, Mubasher

    2017-07-01

    This study is conducted to examine the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSLT) in flat FRW for modified teleparallel gravity involving coupling between a scalar field with the torsion scalar T and the boundary term B=2\

  6. Proposal for a modified Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cabo, Alejandro; Claro, Francisco; Menendez-Proupin, Eduardo; Cruz-Hernandez, Norge; Fernandez-Sanz, Javier

    2006-01-15

    A modified version of the Moeller-Plesset approach for obtaining the correlation energy associated with a Hartree-Fock ground state is proposed. The method is tested in a model of interacting fermions that allows for an exact solution. Using up to third order terms improved results are obtained, even in the limit of loosely bound particles. Tested in molecules as well, the modified method appears to give improved results in symmetric systems.

  7. Can Malin's gravitational-field equations be modified to obtain a viable theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.; Prestage, J.

    1976-01-01

    Malin's (1975) gravitational theory, which was recently shown by Lindblom and Nester (1975) to be incorrect, is modified by means of a recently proposed method for obtaining viable gravitational theories. The resulting self-consistent theory, which is in effect a Rastall-type modification of the Einstein theory, exhibits nonconservation of momentum, yet agrees with all experimental limits known to date within the post-Newtonian approximation framework.

  8. Modified Enskog kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas.

    PubMed

    Baalrud, Scott D; Daligault, Jérôme

    2015-06-01

    Concepts underlying the Enskog kinetic theory of hard-spheres are applied to include short-range correlation effects in a model for transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas. The approach is based on an extension of the effective potential transport theory [S. D. Baalrud and J. Daligault, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 235001 (2013)] to include an exclusion radius surrounding individual charged particles that is associated with Coulomb repulsion. This is obtained by analogy with the finite size of hard spheres in Enskog's theory. Predictions for the self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients of the one-component plasma are tested against molecular dynamics simulations. The theory is found to accurately capture the kinetic contributions to the transport coefficients, but not the potential contributions that arise at very strong coupling (Γ≳30). Considerations related to a first-principles generalization of Enskog's kinetic equation to continuous potentials are also discussed.

  9. Obtaining Bounds from Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays in Isotropic Modified Maxwell Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the methods used to obtain a two-sided bound on isotropic modified Maxwell theory from experimental data of ultra high-energy cosmic rays in 2008. The bound is updated with results from the HEGRA experiment.

  10. The impacts of vicarious illness experience on response to gain- versus loss-framed breast cancer screening (BCS) messages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jung

    2014-01-01

    Although vicarious experience with certain illnesses has been found to be influential on people's illness perceptions and related behaviors, the concept of vicarious experience has been understudied in health communication research. This study aims to ground possible effects of vicarious illness experience (VIE) into theory, specifically concerning the developments in gain versus loss framing literature. An experiment using 154 African American participants (mean age = 46 years) found that participants who had close women affected by breast cancer and those who had no close women affected by breast cancer responded to gain- versus loss-framed breast cancer screening (BCS) messages differently. Compared to the loss frame, the gain frame was more effective for participants with VIE in increasing their favorable attitudes toward BCS, BCS recommendation intentions, and memory of the BCS message. In contrast, when compared to the gain frame, the loss frame was more effective for those without VIE in increasing their cognitive elaboration of the BCS message. The findings suggest the strategic potential of VIE in developing health interventions, and they also provide practical implications for health communication practitioners into how to strategically use gain versus loss framing in accordance with their target publics.

  11. A New First-Principles Calculation of Field-Dependent RF Surface Impedance of BCS Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping; Reece, Charles E.

    2014-02-01

    There is a need to understand the intrinsic limit of radiofrequency (RF) surface impedance that determines the performance of superconducting RF cavities in particle accelerators. Here we present a field-dependent derivation of Mattis-Bardeen theory of the RF surface impedance of BCS superconductors based on the shifted density of states resulting from coherently moving Cooper pairs. Our theoretical prediction of the effective BCS RF surface resistance (Rs) of niobium as a function of peak surface magnetic field amplitude agrees well with recently reported record low loss resonant cavity measurements from JLab and FNAL with carefully, yet differently, prepared niobium material. The surprising reduction in resistance with increasing field is explained to be an intrinsic effect.

  12. Impurity effects on BCS-BEC crossover in ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Yanming; Zhang, Leifeng; Wang, Jibiao; Chen, Qijin

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the effects of "nonmagnetic" impurities on the s -wave BCS-BEC crossover in atomic Fermi gases within a pairing fluctuation theory. Both pairing and impurity scattering T matrices are treated self-consistently at the same time. While the system is less sensitive to impurity scattering in the Born limit, for strong impurity scatterers, both the frequency and the gap function are highly renormalized, leading to significant suppression of the superfluid Tc, the order parameter, and the superfluid density. We also find the formation of impurity bands and smearing of coherence peak in the fermion density of states, leading to a spectrum weight transfer and finite lifetime of Bogoliubov quasiparticles. In the BCS regime, the superfluidity may be readily destroyed by the impurity of high density, leading to a superfluid-insulator quantum phase transition at zero temperature. In comparison, the superfluidity in unitary and BEC regimes is relatively more robust.

  13. Magnetic tuning of the relativistic BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-Cheng; de La Incera, Vivian; Ferrer, Efrain J.; Wang, Qun

    2011-09-01

    The effect of an applied magnetic field in the crossover from Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) pairing regimes is investigated. We use a model of relativistic fermions and bosons inspired by those previously used in the context of cold fermionic atoms and in the magnetic-color-flavor-locking phase of color superconductivity. It turns out that, as with cold atom systems, an applied magnetic field can also tune the BCS-BEC crossover in the relativistic case. We find that no matter what the initial state is at B=0, for large enough magnetic fields the system always settles into a pure BCS regime. In contrast to the atomic case, the magnetic field tuning of the crossover in the relativistic system is not connected to a Feshbach resonance, but to the relative numbers of Landau levels with either BEC or BCS type of dispersion relations that are occupied at each magnetic field strength.

  14. A modified Lax-Phillips scattering theory for quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The Lax-Phillips scattering theory is an appealing abstract framework for the analysis of scattering resonances. Quantum mechanical adaptations of the theory have been proposed. However, since these quantum adaptations essentially retain the original structure of the theory, assuming the existence of incoming and outgoing subspaces for the evolution and requiring the spectrum of the generator of evolution to be unbounded from below, their range of applications is rather limited. In this paper, it is shown that if we replace the assumption regarding the existence of incoming and outgoing subspaces by the assumption of the existence of Lyapunov operators for the quantum evolution (the existence of which has been proved for certain classes of quantum mechanical scattering problems), then it is possible to construct a structure analogous to the Lax-Phillips structure for scattering problems for which the spectrum of the generator of evolution is bounded from below.

  15. A modified Lax-Phillips scattering theory for quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Y.

    2015-07-15

    The Lax-Phillips scattering theory is an appealing abstract framework for the analysis of scattering resonances. Quantum mechanical adaptations of the theory have been proposed. However, since these quantum adaptations essentially retain the original structure of the theory, assuming the existence of incoming and outgoing subspaces for the evolution and requiring the spectrum of the generator of evolution to be unbounded from below, their range of applications is rather limited. In this paper, it is shown that if we replace the assumption regarding the existence of incoming and outgoing subspaces by the assumption of the existence of Lyapunov operators for the quantum evolution (the existence of which has been proved for certain classes of quantum mechanical scattering problems), then it is possible to construct a structure analogous to the Lax-Phillips structure for scattering problems for which the spectrum of the generator of evolution is bounded from below.

  16. Comparison of the Modified Biot-Gassmann Theory and the Kuster-Toksoz Theory in Predicting Elastic Velocities of Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities of water-saturated sandstones depend primarily on porosity, effective pressure, and the degree of consolidation. If the dry-frame moduli are known, from either measurements or theoretical calculations, the effect of pore water on velocities can be modeled using the Gassmann theory. Kuster and Toksoz developed a theory based on wave-scattering theory for a variety of inclusion shapes, which provides a means for calculating dry- or wet-frame moduli. In the Kuster-Toksoz theory, elastic wave velocities through different sediments can be predicted by using different aspect ratios of the sediment's pore space. Elastic velocities increase as the pore aspect ratio increases (larger pore aspect ratio describes a more spherical pore). On the basis of the velocity ratio, which is assumed to be a function of (1-0)n, and the Biot-Gassmann theory, Lee developed a semi-empirical equation for predicting elastic velocities, which is referred to as the modified Biot-Gassmann theory of Lee. In this formulation, the exponent n, which depends on the effective pressure and the degree of consolidation, controls elastic velocities; as n increases, elastic velocities decrease. Computationally, the role of exponent n in the modified Biot-Gassmann theory by Lee is similar to the role of pore aspect ratios in the Kuster-Toksoz theory. For consolidated sediments, either theory predicts accurate velocities. However, for unconsolidated sediments, the modified Biot-Gassmann theory by Lee performs better than the Kuster-Toksoz theory, particularly in predicting S-wave velocities.

  17. Research on a Modified Framework of Implicit Personality Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Albert; Stoeger, Heidrun

    2010-01-01

    There is ample evidence that labeled gifted students exhibit maladaptive behavior patterns. According to Carol Dweck those students who subscribe to a fixed view of their abilities are particularly at risk. In this contribution we extended Dweck's framework and distinguished two aspects of the implicit theory of one's own abilities. We…

  18. Theory of room temperature ferromagnetism in Cr modified DNA nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruğ Duru, Izzet; Değer, Caner; Eldem, Vahap; Kalayci, Taner; Aktaş, Şahin

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the magnetic properties of Cr3+ (J  <  0) ion-modified DNA (M-DNA) nanowire (1000 base) at room temperature under a uniform magnetic field (˜100 Oe) for different doping concentrations. A Monte Carlo simulation method-based Metropolis algorithm is used to figure out the thermodynamic quantities of nanowire formed by Cr M-DNA followed by analysing the dependency of the ferromagnetic behaviour of the M-DNA to dopant concentration. It is understood that ion density/base and ion density/helical of Cr3+ ions can be a tuning parameter, herewith the dopant ratio has an actual importance on the magnetic characterization of M-DNA nanowire (3%-20%). We propose the source of magnetism as an exchange interaction between Cr and DNA helical atoms indicated in the Heisenberg Hamiltonian.

  19. Ginzburg-Landau expansion in BCS-BEC crossover region of disordered attractive Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchinskii, E. Z.; Kuleeva, N. A.; Sadovskii, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied disorder effects on the coefficients of Ginzburg-Landau expansion for attractive Hubbard model within the generalized DMFT+Σ approximation for the wide region of the values of attractive potential U—from the weak-coupling limit, where superconductivity is described by BCS model, towards the strong coupling, where superconducting transition is related to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of compact Cooper pairs. For the case of semi-elliptic initial density of states disorder influence on the coefficients A and B before the square and the fourth power of the order parameter is universal for at all values of electronic correlations and is related only to the widening of the initial conduction band (density of states) by disorder. Similar universal behavior is valid for superconducting critical temperature Tc (the generalized Anderson theorem) and specific heat discontinuity at the transition. This universality is absent for the coefficient C before the gradient term, which in accordance with the standard theory of "dirty" superconductors is strongly suppressed by disorder in the weak-coupling region, but can slightly grow in BCS-BEC crossover region, becoming almost independent of disorder in the strong coupling region. This leads to rather weak disorder dependence of the penetration depth and coherence length, as well as the slope of the upper critical magnetic field at Tc, in BCS-BEC crossover and strong coupling regions.

  20. Detecting the BCS pairing amplitude via a sudden lattice ramp in a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiesinga, Eite; Nuske, Marlon; Mathey, Ludwig

    2016-05-01

    We determine the exact time evolution of an initial Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) state of ultra-cold atoms in a hexagonal optical lattice. The dynamical evolution is triggered by ramping the lattice potential up, such that the interaction strength Uf is much larger than the hopping amplitude Jf. The quench initiates collective oscillations with frequency | Uf | /(2 π) in the momentum occupation numbers and imprints an oscillating phase with the same frequency on the order parameter Δ. The latter is not reproduced by treating the time evolution in mean-field theory. The momentum density-density or noise correlation functions oscillate at frequency | Uf | /(2 π) as well as its second harmonic. For a very deep lattice, with negligible tunneling energy, the oscillations of momentum occupation numbers are undamped. Non-zero tunneling after the quench leads to dephasing of the different momentum modes and a subsequent damping of the oscillations. This occurs even for a finite-temperature initial BCS state, but not for a non-interacting Fermi gas. We therefore propose to use this dephasing to detect a BCS state. Finally, we predict that the noise correlation functions in a honeycomb lattice will develop strong anti-correlations near the Dirac point. We acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation.

  1. Non-linear structure in modified action theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Marcos V.

    We study the effects and carry out a suite of cosmological simulations of modified action f(R) models where cosmic acceleration arises from an alteration of gravity instead of dark energy. These models introduce an extra scalar degree of freedom which enhances the force of gravity below the Compton scale of the scalar. The simulations exhibit the so-called chameleon mechanism, necessary for satisfying local constraints on gravity, where this scale depends on environment, in particular the depth of the local gravitational potential. We find that the chameleon mechanism can substantially suppress the enhancement of power spectrum in the non-linear regime if the background field value is comparable to or smaller than the depth of the gravitational potentials of typical structures. Nonetheless power spectrum enhancements at intermediate scales remain at a measurable level even when the expansion history is indistinguishable from a cosmological constant, cold dark matter model. We also investigate the effects of the modified dynamics on halo properties such as their abundance and clustering. We find that the f(R) effects on the halo mass- function and bias depend mostly on the linear power spectrum modifications, but that the chameleon mechanism suppresses the modifications at high-mass halos with deep potential wells. The f(R) modifications also affect the threshold density for collapse, or similarly the overdensity for virialization and therefore can change halo definitions from those of ACDM. As a result, simple scaling relations that take the linear matter power spectrum into a non-linear spectrum fail to capture the modifications of f(R) due to the change in collapsed structures, the chameleon mechanism, and the time evolution of the modifications. A quantification of these effects, including modifications on halo profiles, is necessary to accurately describe halo properties and potentially construct a halo model of the non-linear power spectrum.

  2. Large scale structure in Bekenstein's theory of relativistic modified Newtonian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Skordis, C; Mota, D F; Ferreira, P G; Boehm, C

    2006-01-13

    A relativistic theory of modified gravity has been recently proposed by Bekenstein. The tensor field in Einstein's theory of gravity is replaced by a scalar, a vector, and a tensor field which interact in such a way to give modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) in the weak-field nonrelativistic limit. We study the evolution of the Universe in such a theory, identifying its key properties and comparing it with the standard cosmology obtained in Einstein gravity. The evolution of the scalar field is akin to that of tracker quintessence fields. We expand the theory to linear order to find the evolution of perturbations on large scales. The impact on galaxy distributions and the cosmic microwave background is calculated in detail. We show that it may be possible to reproduce observations of the cosmic microwave background and galaxy distributions with Bekenstein's theory of MOND.

  3. Modified interfacial statistical associating fluid theory: a perturbation density functional theory for inhomogeneous complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shekhar; Dominik, Aleksandra; Chapman, Walter G

    2007-12-28

    A density functional theory based on Wertheim's first order perturbation theory is developed for inhomogeneous complex fluids. The theory is derived along similar lines as interfacial statistical associating fluid theory [S. Tripathi and W. G. Chapman, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094506 (2005)]. However, the derivation is more general and applies broadly to a range of systems, retaining the simplicity of a segment density based theory. Furthermore, the theory gives the exact density profile for ideal chains in an external field. The general avail of the theory has been demonstrated by applying the theory to lipids near surfaces, lipid bilayers, and copolymer thin films. The theoretical results show excellent agreement with the results from molecular simulations.

  4. Modified interfacial statistical associating fluid theory: A perturbation density functional theory for inhomogeneous complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shekhar; Dominik, Aleksandra; Chapman, Walter G.

    2007-12-01

    A density functional theory based on Wertheim's first order perturbation theory is developed for inhomogeneous complex fluids. The theory is derived along similar lines as interfacial statistical associating fluid theory [S. Tripathi and W. G. Chapman, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094506 (2005)]. However, the derivation is more general and applies broadly to a range of systems, retaining the simplicity of a segment density based theory. Furthermore, the theory gives the exact density profile for ideal chains in an external field. The general avail of the theory has been demonstrated by applying the theory to lipids near surfaces, lipid bilayers, and copolymer thin films. The theoretical results show excellent agreement with the results from molecular simulations.

  5. BcsKC is an essential protein for the type VI secretion system activity in Burkholderia cenocepacia that forms an outer membrane complex with BcsLB.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Daniel; MacDonald, Douglas K; Valvano, Miguel A

    2010-11-12

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) contributes to the virulence of Burkholderia cenocepacia, an opportunistic pathogen causing serious chronic infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. BcsK(C) is a highly conserved protein among the T6SSs in Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we show that BcsK(C) is required for Hcp secretion and cytoskeletal redistribution in macrophages upon bacterial infection. These two phenotypes are associated with a functional T6SS in B. cenocepacia. Experiments employing a bacterial two-hybrid system and pulldown assays demonstrated that BcsK(C) interacts with BcsL(B), another conserved T6SS component. Internal deletions within BcsK(C) revealed that its N-terminal domain is necessary and sufficient for interaction with BcsL(B). Fractionation experiments showed that BcsK(C) can be in the cytosol or tightly associated with the outer membrane and that BcsK(C) and BcsL(B) form a high molecular weight complex anchored to the outer membrane that requires BcsF(H) (a ClpV homolog) to be assembled. Together, our data show that BcsK(C)/BcsL(B) interaction is essential for the T6SS activity in B. cenocepacia.

  6. Automated assay for fondaparinux (Arixtra) on the Dade Behring BCS XP.

    PubMed

    Sanfelippo, Michael J; Tillema, Veronica B

    2009-10-01

    An assay for fondaparinux (Arixtra) is described based on a modified commercial assay for heparin. The assay is automated on a Dade Behring BCS XP (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Deerfield, IL) and uses the inhibition of activated factor X to quantitate the drug. The assay was unaffected by platelet contamination or the presence of warfarin. The assay was affected by the antithrombin level, and the value obtained in the assay decreased significantly when the antithrombin level was less than 60%. The assay is, however, not specific for fondaparinux. Specimens containing unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin will yield results by this assay that will not be an accurate estimation of concentration.

  7. Modified teleparallel theories of gravity: Gauss-Bonnet and trace extensions.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, Sebastian; Böhmer, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate modified theories of gravity in the context of teleparallel geometries with possible Gauss-Bonnet contributions. The possible coupling of gravity with the trace of the energy-momentum tensor is also taken into account. This is motivated by the various different theories formulated in the teleparallel approach and the metric approach without discussing the exact relationship between them. Our formulation clarifies the connections between different well-known theories. For instance, we are able to formulate the correct teleparallel equivalent of Gauss-Bonnet modified general relativity, amongst other results. Finally, we are able to identify modified gravity models which have not been studied in the past. These appear naturally within our setup and would make a interesting starting point for further studies.

  8. Modified Coulomb-Dipole Theory for 2e Photoionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In the light of recent experiment on 2e photoionization of Li near threshold, we have considered a modification of the Coulomb-dipole theory, retaining the basic assumption that the threshold is dominated by asymmetric events in phase space [implies r(sub 1), k(sub 1)) greater than or equal to 2(r(sub 2), k(sub )]. In this region [in a collinear model, 2/r(sub 12) approached + 2/(r(sub 1)+r(sub 2)] the interaction reduces to V(rIsub 1) is greater than or equal to 2r(sub 2) is identically equal to [(-Z/r(sub 2)-(A-1)/r(sub 1)] + [(-2r(sub 2)/r(sub 1 exp 2)] is identically equal to V(sub c)+[V(sub d)]. For two electron emission Z = 2, thus both electrons see a Coulomb potential (V(sub c)) asymptotically, albeit each seeing a different charge. The residual potential (V(sub d)) is dipole in character. Writing the total psi = psi (sub c) + psi(sub d) = delta psi, and noting that. (T+V(sub c)-E)psy(sub c) = 0 and (T+V(sub c))psi(sub d) = 0 can be solved exactly, we find, substituting psi into the complete Schrod. Eq., that delta psi = -(H-E)(exp -1)(V(sub d) psi(sub 0)+V(sub c psi (sub 1). Using the fact that the absolute value of V(sub c) is much more than the absolute value of V(sub d) in almost all of configuration space, we can replace H by H(sub 0) in 9H-E)(exp -1) to obtain an improved approximation psi (improved) = psi(sub c) + psi(sub d) -(H(sub 0)-E)(exp -1) (V(sub c) psi (sub 0) + V(sub c) psi(sub 1). Here's the Green's function (H(sub 0)-E)(exp -1), can be exhibited explicitly, but the last term in psi (improved) is small, compared to the first two terms. Inserting them into the transition matrix element, which one handles in the usual way, we obtain in the limit E approaches 0, the threshold law: Q(E) alpha E + M(E)E(exp 5/4) + higher order (Eq. 1a). The modulation function, M(E), is a well-defined (but very non-trivial integral, but it is expected to be well approximated by a sinusoidal function containing a dipole phase term (M(E) = c sin[alpha log (E

  9. Modified Brans-Dicke gravitational theory with nonzero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation is modified by assuming that the divergence of the energy-momentum tensor is proportional to the covariant derivative of the scalar curvature. No ad hoc additions to the usual Brans-Dicke field equations are required as in Rastall's modification of the Einstein theory or as in the steady-state theories, of which this is a natural possibility. Three parameters emerge from the theory - namely, the unnormalized gravitational constant, the usual Brans-Dicke parameter, and the proportionality constant. In the post-Newtonian approximation, these parameters can be fixed by experiment. However, there exists a certain choice of the parameters for which the theory reduces to an Einstein theory with constant scalar curvature.

  10. Scale Invariance in 2D BCS-BEC Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensarma, Rajdeep; Taylor, Edward; Randeria, Mohit

    2013-03-01

    In 2D BCS-BEC crossover, the frequency of the breathing mode in a harmonic trap, as well as the lower edge of the radio frequency spectroscopy response, show remarkable scale-invariance throughout the crossover regime, i.e. they are independent of the coupling constant. Using functional integral methods, we study the behaviour of these quantities in the 2D BCS-BEC crossover and comment on the possible reasons for this scale independence. RS was supported by DAE, Govt. of India. MR was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1006532. ET was supported by NSERC and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

  11. Superconductivity in an electron band just above the Fermi level: possible route to BCS-BEC superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, K; Ito, Y; Ota, Y; Kotani, Y; Shimojima, T; Kiss, T; Watanabe, S; Chen, C-T; Niitaka, S; Hanaguri, T; Takagi, H; Chainani, A; Shin, S

    2014-02-28

    Conventional superconductivity follows Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer(BCS) theory of electrons-pairing in momentum-space, while superfluidity is the Bose-Einstein condensation(BEC) of atoms paired in real-space. These properties of solid metals and ultra-cold gases, respectively, are connected by the BCS-BEC crossover. Here we investigate the band dispersions in FeTe(0.6)Se(0.4)(Tc = 14.5 K ~ 1.2 meV) in an accessible range below and above the Fermi level(EF) using ultra-high resolution laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We uncover an electron band lying just 0.7 meV (~8 K) above EF at the Γ-point, which shows a sharp superconducting coherence peak with gap formation below Tc. The estimated superconducting gap Δ and Fermi energy [Symbol: see text]F indicate composite superconductivity in an iron-based superconductor, consisting of strong-coupling BEC in the electron band and weak-coupling BCS-like superconductivity in the hole band. The study identifies the possible route to BCS-BEC superconductivity.

  12. Microstructure-dependent piezoelectric beam based on modified strain gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. S.; Feng, W. J.

    2014-09-01

    A microstructure-dependent piezoelectric beam model was developed using a variational formulation, which is based on the modified strain gradient theory and the Timoshenko beam theory. The new model contains three material length scale parameters and can capture the size effect, unlike the classical beam theory. To illustrate the new piezoelectric beam model, the static bending and the free vibration problems of a simply supported beam are numerically solved. These results may be useful in the analysis and design of smart structures that are constructed from piezoelectric materials.

  13. f(R) and f(T) theories of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    We briefly review f(R) theories, both in the metric and Palatini formulations, their scalar-tensor representations and the chameleon mechanism that could explain the absence of perceptible consequences in the Solar System. We also review f(T) theories, a different approach to modified gravity consisting in a deformation of the teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity. We show some applications to cosmology and cosmic strings. As f(R)'s, f(T) theories are not exempted from additional degrees of freedom; we also discuss this still open issue.

  14. Exploring the Role of Diagnosis in the Modified Labeling Theory of Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroska, Amy; Harkness, Sarah K.

    2008-01-01

    According to the modified labeling theory of mental illness, when an individual is diagnosed with a mental illness, cultural ideas associated with the mentally ill become personally relevant and foster negative self-feelings. We explore the way that psychiatric diagnosis shapes this process. Specifically, we examine if and how psychiatric…

  15. BCS-BEC crossover at finite temperature in the broken-symmetry phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, P.; Pisani, L.; Strinati, G. C.

    2004-09-01

    The BCS-BEC crossover is studied in a systematic way in the broken-symmetry phase between zero temperature and the critical temperature. This study bridges two regimes where quantum and thermal fluctuations are, respectively, important. The theory is implemented on physical grounds, by adopting a fermionic self-energy in the broken-symmetry phase that represents fermions coupled to superconducting fluctuations in weak coupling and to bosons described by the Bogoliubov theory in strong coupling. This extension of the theory beyond mean field proves important at finite temperature, to connect with the results in the normal phase. The order parameter, the chemical potential, and the single-particle spectral function are calculated numerically for a wide range of coupling and temperature. This enables us to assess the quantitative importance of superconducting fluctuations in the broken-symmetry phase over the whole BCS-BEC crossover. Our results are relevant to the possible realizations of this crossover with high-temperature cuprate superconductors and with ultracold fermionic atoms in a trap.

  16. Relativistic corrections to the Cooperon mass: BCS versus BEC picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipavský, P.

    2017-02-01

    Relativistic corrections to the Cooperon mass are discussed for preformed Cooper pairs that become superconductive via the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and for Cooperons in the Bardeen-Copper-Schrieffer (BCS) condensate. The distinction explains experimental results of Tate et al. (1989).

  17. The future of the universe in modified gravitational theories: approaching a finite-time future singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2008-10-15

    We investigate the future evolution of the dark energy universe in modified gravities, including F(R) gravity, and string-inspired scalar Gauss-Bonnet and modified Gauss-Bonnet ones, and ideal fluid with an inhomogeneous equation of state (EoS). The modified Friedmann-Robertson-Walker dynamics for all of these theories may be presented in a universal form by using the effective ideal fluid with an inhomogeneous EoS without specifying its explicit form. We construct several examples of a modified gravity which produces accelerating cosmologies ending at the finite-time future singularities of all four known types by applying a reconstruction program. Some scenarios for resolving a finite-time future singularity are presented. Among these scenarios, the most natural one is related to additional modification of the gravitational action in the early universe. In addition, late-time cosmology in the non-minimal Maxwell-Einstein theory is considered. We investigate the forms of non-minimal gravitational coupling which generate finite-time future singularities and the general conditions for this coupling such that the finite-time future singularities cannot emerge. Furthermore, it is shown that the non-minimal gravitational coupling can remove the finite-time future singularities or make the singularity stronger (or weaker) in modified gravity.

  18. On the stability conditions for theories of modified gravity in the presence of matter fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Frusciante, Noemi; Papadomanolakis, Georgios

    2017-03-01

    We present a thorough stability analysis of modified gravity theories in the presence of matter fields. We use the Effective Field Theory framework for Dark Energy and Modified Gravity to retain a general approach for the gravity sector and a Sorkin-Schutz action for the matter one. Then, we work out the proper viability conditions to guarantee in the scalar sector the absence of ghosts, gradient and tachyonic instabilities. The absence of ghosts can be achieved by demanding a positive kinetic matrix, while the lack of a gradient instability is ensured by imposing a positive speed of propagation for all the scalar modes. In case of tachyonic instability, the mass eigenvalues have been studied and we work out the appropriate expressions. For the latter, an instability occurs only when the negative mass eigenvalue is much larger, in absolute value, than the Hubble parameter. We discuss the results for the minimally coupled quintessence model showing for a particular set of parameters two typical behaviours which in turn lead to a stable and an unstable configuration. Moreover, we find that the speeds of propagation of the scalar modes strongly depend on matter densities, for the beyond Horndeski theories. Our findings can be directly employed when testing modified gravity theories as they allow to identify the correct viability space.

  19. BCS-BEC crossover physics in FeSe bulk superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibauchi, Takasada

    The physics of the crossover between weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and strong-coupling Bose-Einstein-condensate (BEC) limits gives a unified framework of quantum bound (superfluid) states of interacting fermions. This crossover has been studied in the ultracold atomic systems, but is extremely difficult to be realized for electrons in solids. Through the superfluid response, transport, thermoelectric response, and quantum oscillations, we demonstrate that the Fermi energy of the bulk superconductor FeSe is extremely small, with the ratio of the gap to Fermi energy is of the order of unity, which qualifies FeSe to be deep inside the BCS-BEC crossover regime. Thus FeSe appears to be a key material to solve the longstanding issue in the crossover physics; the presence of preformed Cooper pairs giving rise to a pseudogap above the superconducting transition temperature Tc. We report experimental signatures of preformed Cooper pairing well above Tc = 8 . 5 K in clean single crystals of FeSe. Our torque magnetometry reveals distinct diamagnetic signal below T* ~ 20 K indicating that the superconducting fluctuations above the transition temperature are strongly enhanced from the standard Gaussian theory. The transport and thermoelectric coefficients also exhibit distinct anomalies at ~T* , signaling a possible pseudogap formation. The multiband nature with the electron-hole compensation in FeSe may highlight a fundamentally new aspect of the BCS-BEC crossover physics In collaboration with S. Kasahara, T. Yamashita, Y. Matsuda (Kyoto), Y. Mizukami (Tokyo), T. Wolf, F. Hardy, C. Meingast, H. v. Löhneysen (KIT), M. D. Watson, A. I. Coldea (Oxford), T. Terashima (NIMS), W. Knafo (Toulouse), T. Hanaguri (Riken).

  20. BCS class IV drugs: Highly notorious candidates for formulation development.

    PubMed

    Ghadi, Rohan; Dand, Neha

    2017-02-28

    BCS class IV drugs (e.g., amphotericin B, furosemide, acetazolamide, ritonavir, paclitaxel) exhibit many characteristics that are problematic for effective oral and per oral delivery. Some of the problems associated include low aqueous solubility, poor permeability, erratic and poor absorption, inter and intra subject variability and significant positive food effect which leads to low and variable bioavailability. Also, most of the class IV drugs are substrate for P-glycoprotein (low permeability) and substrate for CYP3A4 (extensive pre systemic metabolism) which further potentiates the problem of poor therapeutic potential of these drugs. A decade back, extreme examples of class IV compounds were an exception rather than the rule, yet today many drug candidates under development pipeline fall into this category. Formulation and development of an efficacious delivery system for BCS class IV drugs are herculean tasks for any formulator. The inherent hurdles posed by these drugs hamper their translation to actual market. The importance of the formulation composition and design to successful drug development is especially illustrated by the BCS class IV case. To be clinically effective these drugs require the development of a proper delivery system for both oral and per oral delivery. Ideal oral dosage forms should produce both a reasonably high bioavailability and low inter and intra subject variability in absorption. Also, ideal systems for BCS class IV should produce a therapeutic concentration of the drug at reasonable dose volumes for intravenous administration. This article highlights the various techniques and upcoming strategies which can be employed for the development of highly notorious BCS class IV drugs. Some of the techniques employed are lipid based delivery systems, polymer based nanocarriers, crystal engineering (nanocrystals and co-crystals), liquisolid technology, self-emulsifying solid dispersions and miscellaneous techniques addressing the P

  1. Uniform diffracted fields from a perfectly conducting cylindrical reflector with modified theory of physical optics.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Uğur; Sarnık, Mücahit

    2013-01-01

    The uniform diffracted fields are calculated on PEC cylindrical reflector by Modified Theory of Physical Optics (MTPO). It is aimed to convert the noncontinuous solution to a continuous solution by finding a uniform equation which does not contain any expression converging to 0 in the denominator part. Three axioms of MTPO theory are used to construct the integral equations for the perfectly electrically conducting surface application. The "edge-point" technique is used to find the diffracted field, and uniform solution is to be found via "detour parameter(s)." Finally, the obtained results are to be compared with the nonuniform ones, numerically.

  2. Axisymmetric Distributions of Thick Circular Plate in a Modified Couple Stress Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Marin, Marin; Abbas, Ibrahim A.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the two-dimensional axisymmetric distributions of thick circular plate in modified couple stress theory with heat and mass diffusive sources is investigated. The problem is considered in the context of the theories of thermodiffusion elastic solid with one and two relaxation time developed by Sherief et al. [Int. J. Eng. Sci. 42, 591 (2004)] and Kumar and Kansal [Int. J. Solid Struct. 45, 5890 (2008)] by using Laplace and Hankel transforms technique. The displacements, stress components, temperature change and chemical potential are obtained in transformed domain. Particular cases of interest are also deduced.

  3. Diffraction analysis of blazed transmission gratings with a modified extended scalar theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaijun; Kuang, Dengfeng; Fang, Zhiliang

    2008-06-01

    An alternative interpretation of the diffraction of blazed transmission gratings with moderate structure period is proposed according to a modified extended scalar theory (MEST). The diffraction field on the bottom facet of the grating is considered to be the interference of four subfields investigated in the problem of diffraction of a plane wave by an infinite half-plane. It is observed that MEST gives the total field that agrees with rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), and the result is more reliable than that of extended scalar theory (EST). The MEST is still a ray-optical-based approximation approach, and the region of validity is compared with EST and RCWA.

  4. Uniform Diffracted Fields from a Perfectly Conducting Cylindrical Reflector with Modified Theory of Physical Optics

    PubMed Central

    Yalçın, Uğur; Sarnık, Mücahit

    2013-01-01

    The uniform diffracted fields are calculated on PEC cylindrical reflector by Modified Theory of Physical Optics (MTPO). It is aimed to convert the noncontinuous solution to a continuous solution by finding a uniform equation which does not contain any expression converging to 0 in the denominator part. Three axioms of MTPO theory are used to construct the integral equations for the perfectly electrically conducting surface application. The “edge-point” technique is used to find the diffracted field, and uniform solution is to be found via “detour parameter(s).” Finally, the obtained results are to be compared with the nonuniform ones, numerically. PMID:23766679

  5. Constraining Modified Theories of Gravity with Gravitational-Wave Stochastic Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Maselli, Andrea; Marassi, Stefania; Ferrari, Valeria; Kokkotas, Kostas; Schneider, Raffaella

    2016-08-26

    The direct discovery of gravitational waves has finally opened a new observational window on our Universe, suggesting that the population of coalescing binary black holes is larger than previously expected. These sources produce an unresolved background of gravitational waves, potentially observable by ground-based interferometers. In this Letter we investigate how modified theories of gravity, modeled using the parametrized post-Einsteinian formalism, affect the expected signal, and analyze the detectability of the resulting stochastic background by current and future ground-based interferometers. We find the constraints that Advanced LIGO would be able to set on modified theories, showing that they may significantly improve the current bounds obtained from astrophysical observations of binary pulsars.

  6. Constraints on modified Newtonian dynamics theories from radio tracking data of the Cassini spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, A.; Folkner, W. M.; Jacobson, R. A.; Park, R. S.

    2014-05-01

    The modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) is an attempt to modify the gravitation theory to solve the dark matter problem. This phenomenology is very successful at the galactic level. The main effect produced by MOND in the Solar System is called the external field effect parametrized by the parameter Q2. We have used nine years of Cassini range and Doppler measurements to constrain Q2. Our estimate of this parameter based on Cassini data is given by Q2=(3±3)×10-27 s-2, which shows no deviation from General Relativity and excludes a large part of the relativistic MOND theories. This limit can also be interpreted as a limit on an external tidal potential acting on the Solar System coming from the internal mass of our Galaxy (including dark matter) or from a new hypothetical body.

  7. Edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode covalently modified with 2-anthraquinonyl groups: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kozub, Barbara R; Henstridge, Martin C; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Compton, Richard G

    2011-10-24

    An edge plane pyrolitic graphite (EPPG) electrode was modified by electrochemical reduction of anthraquinone-2-diazonium tetrafluoroborate (AQ2-N(2)(+)BF(4)(-)), giving an EPPG-AQ2-modified electrode of a surface coverage below a monolayer. Cyclic voltammograms simulated using Marcus-Hush theory for 2e(-) process assuming a uniform surface gave unrealistically low values of reorganisation energies, λ, for both electron transfer steps. Subsequently, two models of surface inhomogeneity based on Marcus-Hush theory were investigated: a distribution of formal potentials, E', and a distribution of electron tunneling distances, r(0). The simulation of cyclic voltammograms involving the distribution of formal potentials showed a better fit than the simulation with the distribution of tunneling distances. Importantly the reorganization energies used for the simulation of E' distribution were similar to the literature values for adsorbed species.

  8. Prediction of positive food effect: Bioavailability enhancement of BCS class II drugs.

    PubMed

    Raman, Siddarth; Polli, James E

    2016-06-15

    High-throughput screening methods have increased the number of poorly water-soluble, highly permeable drug candidates. Many of these candidates have increased bioavailability when administered with food (i.e., exhibit a positive food effect). Food is known to impact drug bioavailability through a variety of mechanisms, including drug solubilization and prolonged gastric residence time. In vitro dissolution media that aim to mimic in vivo gastrointestinal (GI) conditions have been developed to lessen the need for fed human bioequivalence studies. The objective of this work was to develop an in vitro lipolysis model to predict positive food effect of three BCS Class II drugs (i.e., danazol, amiodarone and ivermectin) in previously developed lipolysis media. This in vitro lipolysis model was comparatively benchmarked against FeSSIF and FaSSIF media that were modified for an in vitro lipolysis approach, as FeSSIF and FaSSIF are widely used in in vitro dissolution studies. The in vitro lipolysis model accurately predicted the in vivo positive food effect for three model BCS class II drugs. The in vitro lipolysis model has potential use as a screening test of drug candidates in early development to assess positive food effect.

  9. A density functional theory study of arsenic immobilization by the Al(III)-modified zeolite clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Awuah, Joel B; Dzade, Nelson Y; Tia, Richard; Adei, Evans; Kwakye-Awuah, Bright; Richard A Catlow, C; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2016-04-28

    We present density functional theory calculations of the adsorption of arsenic acid (AsO(OH)3) and arsenous acid (As(OH)3) on the Al(III)-modified natural zeolite clinoptilolite under anhydrous and hydrated conditions. From our calculated adsorption energies, we show that adsorption of both arsenic species is favorable (associative and exothermic) under anhydrous conditions. When the zeolite is hydrated, adsorption is less favourable, with the water molecules causing dissociation of the arsenic complexes, although exothermic adsorption is still observed for some sites. The strength of interaction of the arsenic complexes is shown to depend sensitively on the Si/Al ratio in the Al(III)-modified clinoptilolite, which decreases as the Si/Al ratio increases. The calculated large adsorption energies indicate the potential of Al(iii)-modified clinoptilolite for arsenic immobilization.

  10. Isospin Dependent Pairing Interactions and BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Sagawa, H.; Margueron, J.; Hagino, K.

    2008-11-11

    We propose new types of density dependent contact pairing interaction which reproduce the pairing gaps in symmetric and neutron matters obtained by a microscopic treatment based on the realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction. The BCS-BEC crossover of neutrons pairs in symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matters is studied by using these contact interactions. It is shown that the bare and screened pairing interactions lead to different features of the BCS-BEC crossover in symmetric nuclear matter. We perform Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations for semi-magic Calcium, Nickel, Tin and Lead isotopes and N = 20, 28, 50 and 82 isotones using these density-dependent pairing interactions. Our calculations well account for the experimental data for the neutron number dependence of binding energy, two neutrons separation energy, and odd-even mass staggering of these isotopes. Especially the interaction IS+IV Bare without the medium polarization effect gives satisfactory results for all the isotopes.

  11. Description of C isotopes within RMF+BCS approach

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, G.; Singh, D.; Kaushik, M.

    2013-06-03

    In the present investigations we have employed relativistic mean-field plus BCS (RMF + BCS) approach to carry out a systematic study for the ground state properties of even-even C Isotopes. One of the prime reason of this study has been to look into the role of low lying states in neutron rich reason near neutron drip line. It is found that irrespective of whether any resonant state exists or not, the occupancy of weakly bound neutron single particle states having low orbital angular momentum, (l = 0 or 1), with a well spread wave function due to the absence or very small strength of centrifugal barrier, helps to cause the occurrence of nuclei with widely extended neutron density. Such nuclei are found to have characteristically very small two-neutron separation energy and large neutron rms radius akin to that observed in weakly bound systems.

  12. Modified free volume theory of self-diffusion and molecular theory of shear viscosity of liquid carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Nasrabad, Afshin Eskandari; Laghaei, Rozita; Eu, Byung Chan

    2005-04-28

    In previous work on the density fluctuation theory of transport coefficients of liquids, it was necessary to use empirical self-diffusion coefficients to calculate the transport coefficients (e.g., shear viscosity of carbon dioxide). In this work, the necessity of empirical input of the self-diffusion coefficients in the calculation of shear viscosity is removed, and the theory is thus made a self-contained molecular theory of transport coefficients of liquids, albeit it contains an empirical parameter in the subcritical regime. The required self-diffusion coefficients of liquid carbon dioxide are calculated by using the modified free volume theory for which the generic van der Waals equation of state and Monte Carlo simulations are combined to accurately compute the mean free volume by means of statistical mechanics. They have been computed as a function of density along four different isotherms and isobars. A Lennard-Jones site-site interaction potential was used to model the molecular carbon dioxide interaction. The density and temperature dependence of the theoretical self-diffusion coefficients are shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental data when the minimum critical free volume is identified with the molecular volume. The self-diffusion coefficients thus computed are then used to compute the density and temperature dependence of the shear viscosity of liquid carbon dioxide by employing the density fluctuation theory formula for shear viscosity as reported in an earlier paper (J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 7118). The theoretical shear viscosity is shown to be robust and yields excellent density and temperature dependence for carbon dioxide. The pair correlation function appearing in the theory has been computed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. A revision of the quality of life-breast cancer survivors (QOL-BCS) instrument.

    PubMed

    Azuero, Andres; Su, Xiaogang; McNees, Patrick; Meneses, Karen

    2013-08-01

    The importance of quality of life (QOL) measurement among breast cancer survivors (BCS) is well-recognized by researchers and clinicians. With data from 427 rural BCS, the authors used a combination of clinical expertise and statistical analysis to revise a 48-item measure of QOL specific to BCS. The revised 15-item measure showed adequate psychometric properties and provides the basis for a brief yet comprehensive multidimensional measure of QOL applicable to most BCS. Future work includes fine-tuning the measurement model and examining its generalizability among non-rural BCS.

  14. Projected BCS-Tamm-Dancoff approximation with blocking effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, H.; Krmpotić, F.

    1982-05-01

    The blocking effect is introduced through a canonical transformation in the projected BCS-Tamm-Dancoff approximation. It is suggested that the blocking effect may play an important role in the description of the low-lying states in odd-mass nuclei. Present address: Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata, Argentina. Member of Carrera de Investigador Científico, CONICET, Argentina. Sponsored by Financiadora de Estudos e Projetos (FINEP), Brasil.

  15. Effect of the particle-hole channel on BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation crossover in atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qijin

    2016-05-01

    BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover is effected by increasing pairing strength between fermions from weak to strong in the particle-particle channel, and has attracted a lot of attention since the experimental realization of quantum degenerate atomic Fermi gases. Here we study the effect of the (often dropped) particle-hole channel on the zero T gap Δ(0), superfluid transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap at Tc, and the mean-field ratio 2Δ(0)/, from BCS through BEC regimes, using a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the contributions of finite-momentum pairs and features a pseudogap in single particle excitation spectrum. Summing over the infinite particle-hole ladder diagrams, we find a complex dynamical structure for the particle-hole susceptibility χph, and conclude that neglecting the self-energy feedback causes a serious over-estimate of χph. While our result in the BCS limit agrees with Gor’kov et al., the particle-hole channel effect becomes more complex and pronounced in the crossover regime, where χph is reduced by both a smaller Fermi surface and a big (pseudo)gap. Deep in the BEC regime, the particle-hole channel contributions drop to zero. We predict a density dependence of the magnetic field at the Feshbach resonance, which can be used to quantify χph and test different theories.

  16. Nonlinear light-Higgs coupling in superconductors beyond BCS: Effects of the retarded phonon-mediated interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Murakami, Yuta; Aoki, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    We study the contribution of the Higgs amplitude mode on the nonlinear optical response of superconductors beyond the BCS approximation by taking into account the retardation effect in the phonon-mediated attractive interaction. To evaluate the vertex correction in nonlinear optical susceptibilities that contains the effect of collective modes, we propose an efficient scheme which we call the "dotted DMFT" based on the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory (nonequilibrium DMFT), to get around the difficulty of solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation and analytical continuation. The vertex correction is represented by the derivative of the self-energy with respect to the external driving field, which is self-consistently determined by the differentiated ("dotted") DMFT equations. We apply the method to the Holstein model, a prototypical electron-phonon-coupled system, to calculate the susceptibility for the third-harmonic generation including the vertex correction. The results show that, in sharp contrast to the BCS theory, the Higgs mode can contribute to the third-harmonic generation for general polarization of the laser field with an order of magnitude comparable to the contribution from the pair breaking or charge density fluctuations. The physical origin is traced back to the nonlinear resonant light-Higgs coupling, which has been absent in the BCS approximation.

  17. Effect of the particle-hole channel on BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation crossover in atomic Fermi gases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qijin

    2016-05-17

    BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover is effected by increasing pairing strength between fermions from weak to strong in the particle-particle channel, and has attracted a lot of attention since the experimental realization of quantum degenerate atomic Fermi gases. Here we study the effect of the (often dropped) particle-hole channel on the zero T gap Δ(0), superfluid transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap at Tc, and the mean-field ratio 2Δ(0)/, from BCS through BEC regimes, using a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the contributions of finite-momentum pairs and features a pseudogap in single particle excitation spectrum. Summing over the infinite particle-hole ladder diagrams, we find a complex dynamical structure for the particle-hole susceptibility χph, and conclude that neglecting the self-energy feedback causes a serious over-estimate of χph. While our result in the BCS limit agrees with Gor'kov et al., the particle-hole channel effect becomes more complex and pronounced in the crossover regime, where χph is reduced by both a smaller Fermi surface and a big (pseudo)gap. Deep in the BEC regime, the particle-hole channel contributions drop to zero. We predict a density dependence of the magnetic field at the Feshbach resonance, which can be used to quantify χph and test different theories.

  18. Late-time cosmic acceleration: ABCD of dark energy and modified theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, M.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2016-10-01

    We briefly review the problems and prospects of the standard lore of dark energy. We have shown that scalar fields, in principle, cannot address the cosmological constant problem. Indeed, a fundamental scalar field is faced with a similar problem dubbed naturalness. In order to keep the discussion pedagogical, aimed at a wider audience, we have avoided technical complications in several places and resorted to heuristic arguments based on physical perceptions. We presented underlying ideas of modified theories based upon chameleon mechanism and Vainshtein screening. We have given a lucid illustration of recently investigated ghost-free nonlinear massive gravity. Again, we have sacrificed rigor and confined to the basic ideas that led to the formulation of the theory. The review ends with a brief discussion on the difficulties of the theory applied to cosmology.

  19. LRS Bianchi type-II string cosmological models in a modified theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakavalli, T.; Ananda Rao, G.; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of spatially homogeneous anisotropic LRS Bianchi type-II cosmological models with string source in a modified theory of gravitation formulated by Harko et al. (Phys. Rev. D 84:024020, 2011) which is universally known as f( R, T) gravity. Here R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy momentum tensor. By solving the field equation we have presented massive string and Takabyasi or p-string models in this theory. However it is interesting to note that geometric string in this space-time does not exist in this theory. Physical and geometrical properties of the strings obtained are also discussed.

  20. Quantum fluctuations in the superfluid state of the BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, Roberto B.; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Randeria, Mohit

    2008-02-15

    We determine the effects of quantum fluctuations about the T=0 mean-field solution of the BCS-BEC crossover in a dilute Fermi gas using the functional integral method. These fluctuations are described in terms of the zero-point motion of collective modes and the virtual scattering of gapped quasiparticles. We calculate their effects on various measurable properties, including chemical potential, ground-state energy, the gap, the speed of sound and the Landau critical velocity. At unitarity, we find excellent agreement with quantum Monte Carlo and experimental results. In the BCS limit, we show analytically that we obtain Fermi liquid interaction corrections to thermodynamics including the Hartree shift. In the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) limit, we show that the theory leads to an approximate description of the reduction of the scattering length for bosonic molecules and also obtain quantum depletion of the Lee-Yang form. At the end of the paper, we describe a method to include feedback of quantum fluctuations into the gap equation, and discuss the problems of self-consistent calculations in satisfying Goldstone's theorem and obtaining ultraviolet finite results at unitarity.

  1. Quantum and thermal fluctuations in the BCS-BEC crossover with unequal mass fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Roberto; Zhou, Qi; Randeria, Mohit

    2008-03-01

    A lot of progress has been done in the study of the BCS-BEC crossover for equal-mass fermions in recent years by both theory and experimental groups. An extension of this problem which is starting to receive more attention is the study of mixtures of fermions with different masses, such as a mixture of ^40K and ^6Li. Using our functional integral method, which we have previously used to study the equal-mass case and which includes the effect of collective excitations (see R. B. Diener et al, cond-mat/0709.2653), we have studied the properties of a fermionic gas with unequal masses across the BCS-BEC crossover. We will present results for different thermodynamical quantities as a function of mass ratio and interaction strength: e.g. the beta parameter at unitarity, the ground state energy as a function of 1/(kFas), as well as the dimer scattering in the BEC limit as a function of mass ratio which agrees to within 20% with the exact four-body calculation of D. Petrov et al., J. Phys. B At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 38, S645 (2005).

  2. Contact Intensity and Extended Hydrodynamics in the BCS-BEC Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasnich, Luca

    In the first part of this chapter we analyze the contact intensity C, which has been introduced by Tan (Ann Phys 323:2952 (2008)) and appears in several physical observables of the strongly correlated two-component Fermi gas. We calculate the contact C in the full BCS-BEC crossover for a uniform superfluid Fermi gas by using an efficient parametetrization of the ground-state energy. In the case of harmonic confinement, within the Thomas-Fermi approximation, we derive analytical formulas of C in the three relevant limits of the crossover. In the second part of this chapter we discuss the extended superfluid hydrodynamics we have recently proposed to describe static and dynamical collective properties of the Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover. In particular we show the relation with the effective theory for the Goldstone field derived by Son and Wingate (Ann Phys 321, 197 (2006)) on the basis of conformal invariance. By using our equations of extended hydrodynamics we determine nonlinear sound waves, static response function and structure factor of a generic superfluid at zero temperature.

  3. BCS instability and finite temperature corrections to tachyon mass in intersecting D1-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Sudipto Paul; Sarkar, Swarnendu; Sathiapalan, B.

    2014-09-01

    A holographic description of BCS superconductivity is given in [1]. This model was constructed by insertion of a pair of D8-branes on a D4-background. The spectrum of intersecting D8-branes has tachyonic modes indicating an instability which is identified with the BCS instability in superconductors. Our aim is to study the stability of the intersecting branes under finite temperature effects. Many of the technical aspects of this problem are captured by a simpler problem of two intersecting D1-branes on flat background. In the simplified set-up we compute the one-loop finite temperature corrections to the tree-level tachyon mass-squared-squared using the frame-work of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory in (1 + 1)-dimensions. We show that the one-loop two-point functions are ultraviolet finite due to cancellation of ultraviolet divergence between the amplitudes containing bosons and fermions in the loop. The amplitudes are found to be infrared divergent due to the presence of massless fields in the loops. We compute the finite temperature mass-squared correction to all the massless fields and use these temperature dependent masses-squared to compute the tachyonic mass-squared correction. We show numerically the existence of a transition temperature at which the effective mass-squared of the tree-level tachyons becomes zero, thereby stabilizing the brane configuration.

  4. Applying theory-driven approaches to understanding and modifying clinicians' behavior: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Perkins, Matthew B; Jensen, Peter S; Jaccard, James; Gollwitzer, Peter; Oettingen, Gabriele; Pappadopulos, Elizabeth; Hoagwood, Kimberly E

    2007-03-01

    Despite major recent research advances, large gaps exist between accepted mental health knowledge and clinicians' real-world practices. Although hundreds of studies have successfully utilized basic behavioral science theories to understand, predict, and change patients' health behaviors, the extent to which these theories-most notably the theory of reasoned action (TRA) and its extension, the theory of planned behavior (TPB)-have been applied to understand and change clinician behavior is unclear. This article reviews the application of theory-driven approaches to understanding and changing clinician behaviors. MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched, along with bibliographies, textbooks on health behavior or public health, and references from experts, to find article titles that describe theory-driven approaches (TRA or TPB) to understanding and modifying health professionals' behavior. A total of 19 articles that detailed 20 studies described the use of TRA or TPB and clinicians' behavior. Eight articles describe the use of TRA or TPB with physicians, four relate to nurses, three relate to pharmacists, and two relate to health workers. Only two articles applied TRA or TPB to mental health clinicians. The body of work shows that different constructs of TRA or TPB predict intentions and behavior among different groups of clinicians and for different behaviors and guidelines. The number of studies on this topic is extremely limited, but they offer a rationale and a direction for future research as well as a theoretical basis for increasing the specificity and efficiency of clinician-targeted interventions.

  5. Agitation Rate and Time for Complete Dissolution in BCS Biowaivers Based on Investigation of a BCS Biowaiver for Dexketoprofen Tablets.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Gordon, John; Gwaza, Luther; Mangas-Sanjuan, V; Álvarez, Covadonga; Torrado, Juan J

    2015-09-08

    The objective of the present work is to investigate the validity of the existing requirements for BCS biowaivers of immediate release products containing a class I drug in relation to the agitation rate (50 or 75 rpm in the paddle apparatus) and the time limit for complete dissolution (30 min) in the current biowaivers in vitro dissolution tests. Further, the possibility of extensions will be examined since it has been proposed that the time limit for complete dissolution should be revised to 60 min, and also, if cone formation occurs with apparatus 2 at 50 rpm, then a higher agitation rate is acceptable to eliminate it. The development of four generic dexketoprofen immediate release tablets is described. Dexketoprofen is the eutomer of ketoprofen. According to the BCS, dexketoprofen is a class I drug. Three out of the four products failed to show bioequivalence for Cmax in the initial bioequivalence study conducted with the product despite similar but nonrapid dissolution profiles at 50 rpm in the paddle apparatus, or similar and very rapid dissolution profiles at 75 rpm. In conclusion, these data indicate that BCS biowaivers for class I drugs should be granted only when dissolution with the paddle apparatus is complete in 30 min at 50 rpm. The time limit for complete dissolution should not be extended to 60 min. Furthermore, the agitation rate should not be increased to 75 rpm, even in the case of a coning effect.

  6. Rainbows without unicorns: metric structures in theories with modified dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Iarley P.; Loret, Niccoló; Nettel, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    Rainbow metrics are a widely used approach to the metric formalism for theories with modified dispersion relations. They have had a huge success in the quantum gravity phenomenology literature, since they allow one to introduce momentum-dependent space-time metrics into the description of systems with a modified dispersion relation. In this paper, we introduce the reader to some realizations of this general idea: the original rainbow metrics proposal, the momentum-space-inspired metric and a Finsler geometry approach. As the main result of this work we also present an alternative definition of a four-velocity dependent metric which allows one to handle the massless limit. This paper aims to highlight some of their properties and how to properly describe their relativistic realizations.

  7. Evolution of the vortex state in the BCS-BEC crossover of a quasi two-dimensional superfluid Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xuebing; Zhou, Kezhao; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-11-01

    We use the path-integral formalism to investigate the vortex properties of a quasi-two dimensional (2D) Fermi superfluid system trapped in an optical lattice potential. Within the framework of mean-field theory, the cooper pair density, the atom number density, and the vortex core size are calculated from weakly interacting BCS regime to strongly coupled while weakly interacting BEC regime. Numerical results show that the atoms gradually penetrate into the vortex core as the system evolves from BEC to BCS regime. Meanwhile, the presence of the optical lattice allows us to analyze the vortex properties in the crossover from three-dimensional (3D) to 2D case. Furthermore, using a simple re-normalization procedure, we find that the two-body bound state exists only when the interaction is stronger than a critical one denoted by G c which is obtained as a function of the lattice potential’s parameter. Finally, we investigate the vortex core size and find that it grows with increasing interaction strength. In particular, by analyzing the behavior of the vortex core size in both BCS and BEC regimes, we find that the vortex core size behaves quite differently for positive and negative chemical potentials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51331006, 51590883, and 11204321) and the Project of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-M05-3).

  8. De Sitter and scaling solutions in a higher-order modified teleparallel theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos

    2017-08-01

    The existence and the stability conditions for some exact relativistic solutions of special interest are studied in a higher-order modified teleparallel gravitational theory. The theory with the use of a Lagrange multiplier is equivalent with that of General Relativity with a minimally coupled noncanonical field. The conditions for the existence of de Sitter solutions and ideal gas solutions in the case of vacuum are studied as also the stability criteria. Furthermore, in the presence of matter the behaviour of scaling solutions is given. Finally, we discuss the degrees of freedom of the field equations and we reduce the field equations in an algebraic equation, where in order to demonstrate our result we show how this noncanonical scalar field can reproduce the Hubble function of Λ-cosmology.

  9. A mixed element based on Lagrange multiplier method for modified couple stress theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young-Rok; Lee, Byung-Chai

    2016-11-01

    A 2D mixed element is proposed for the modified couple stress theory. The C1 continuity for the displacement field is required because of the second derivatives of displacement in the energy form of the theory. The C1 continuity is satisfied in a weak sense with the Lagrange multiplier method. A supplementary rotation is introduced as an independent variable and the kinematic relation between the physical rotation and the supplementary rotation is constrained with Lagrange multipliers. Convergence criteria and a stability condition are derived, and the number and the positions of nodes for each independent variable are determined. Internal degrees of freedom are condensed out, so the element has only 21 degrees of freedom. The proposed element passes the C^{0-1} patch test. Numerical results show that the principle of limitation is applied to the element and the element is robust to mesh distortion. Furthermore, the size effects are captured well with the element.

  10. Modified Uncertainty Theory and Parents’ Perspectives about Equivocal Diagnostic Results for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tluczek, Audrey; McKechnie, Anne Chevalier; Lynam, Patrice A.

    2010-01-01

    A grounded, dimensional analysis described the experiences of five couples whose infants had equivocal diagnostic test results following positive genetic newborn screens for cystic fibrosis. We analyzed interview data collected at two times during each infant’s first year. Uncertainty emerged as the central thematic dimension. Results showed that parents passed through a series of stages similar to the process described by Mishel’s Uncertainty in Illness Theory (UIT), thus extending the application of the theory to circumstances in which the very presence of an illness is uncertain. Findings informed a modified version of the UIT comprised of five domains: stimuli frame, degree of uncertainty, opportunity-danger continuum, affective responses, and coping. This model incorporated Morse’s conception of suffering. Three contextual domains influenced parents’ experiences at various junctures along the uncertainty trajectory: individual characteristics, structure providers, and time. We discussed implications of the model for future research and clinical practice relative to genetic testing. PMID:20065305

  11. A mixed element based on Lagrange multiplier method for modified couple stress theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young-Rok; Lee, Byung-Chai

    2017-01-01

    A 2D mixed element is proposed for the modified couple stress theory. The C1 continuity for the displacement field is required because of the second derivatives of displacement in the energy form of the theory. The C1 continuity is satisfied in a weak sense with the Lagrange multiplier method. A supplementary rotation is introduced as an independent variable and the kinematic relation between the physical rotation and the supplementary rotation is constrained with Lagrange multipliers. Convergence criteria and a stability condition are derived, and the number and the positions of nodes for each independent variable are determined. Internal degrees of freedom are condensed out, so the element has only 21 degrees of freedom. The proposed element passes the C^{0-1} patch test. Numerical results show that the principle of limitation is applied to the element and the element is robust to mesh distortion. Furthermore, the size effects are captured well with the element.

  12. Cosmological BCS mechanism and the big bang singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Stephon; Biswas, Tirthabir

    2009-07-15

    We provide a novel mechanism that resolves the big bang singularity present in Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-times without the need for ghost fields. Building on the fact that a four-fermion interaction arises in general relativity when fermions are covariantly coupled, we show that at early times the decrease in scale factor enhances the correlation between pairs of fermions. This enhancement leads to a BCS-like condensation of the fermions and opens a gap dynamically driving the Hubble parameter H to zero and results in a nonsingular bounce, at least in some special cases.

  13. BCS-BEC crossover of spin imbalanced Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chang-Yan; He, Yan

    2015-12-01

    We study the BCS-Bose Einstein Condensation (BEC) crossover of a three-dimensional spin polarized Fermi gas with Rashba spin-orbital coupling (SOC). At finite temperature, the effects of non-condensed pairs due to the thermal excitation are considered based on the G0 G pair fluctuation theory. These fluctuations generate a pseudogap even persistent above Tc. Within this framework, the Sarma state or the spin polarized superfluid state and polarized pseudogap state are explored in detail. The resulting Tc curves show that the enhancement of pairing due to the SOC roughly cancels out the suppression of pairing due to the population imbalance. Thus we observed that in a large portion of the parameter space, the polarized superfluid state are stabilized by the SOC.

  14. Strong-coupling superconductivity beyond BCS and the key pairing interaction in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A. S.

    2011-03-01

    It has been now over 20 years since the discovery of the first high temperature superconductor by Georg Bednorz and Alex Müller in 1986 and yet, despite intensive effort, no universally accepted theory exists about the origin of high-temperature superconductivity. A controversial issue on whether the electron-phonon interaction (EPI) is crucial for high-temperature superconductivity or weak and inessential has been one of the most challenging problems of contemporary condensed matter physics. I briefly review our recent theoretical results, which in conjunction with a great number of experimental observations including isotope effects, angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), pump-probe and tunnelling spectroscopies, normal state diamagnetism and magnetic quantum oscillations provide the definite answer to this fundamental question. The true origin of high-temperature superconductivity is found in a significant finite-range Fröhlich EPI of nonadiabatic polaronic carriers which is beyond the conventional BCS-Migdal-Eliashberg approximation.

  15. Causality and superluminal behavior in classical field theories: Applications to k-essence theories and modified-Newtonian-dynamics-like theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneton, Jean-Philippe

    2007-04-15

    Field theories with Lorentz (or diffeomorphism invariant) action can exhibit superluminal behavior through the breaking of local Lorentz invariance. Quantum induced superluminal velocities are well-known examples of this effect. The issue of the causal behavior of such propagation is somewhat controversial in the literature and we intend to clarify it. We provide a careful analysis of the meaning of causality in classical relativistic field theories and stress the role played by the Cauchy problem and the notion of chronology. We show that, in general, superluminal behavior threatens causality only if one assumes that a prior chronology in spacetime exists. In the case where superluminal propagation occurs, however, there are at least two nonconformally related metrics in spacetime and thus two available notions of chronology. These two chronologies are on equal footing, and it would thus be misleading to choose ab initio one of them to define causality. Rather, we provide a formulation of causality in which no prior chronology is assumed. We argue that this is the only way to deal with the issue of causality in the case where some degrees of freedom propagate faster than others. In that framework, then, it is shown that superluminal propagation is not necessarily noncausal, the final answer depending on the existence of an initial data formulation. This also depends on global properties of spacetime that we discuss in detail. As an illustration of these conceptual issues, we consider two field theories, namely, k-essence scalar fields and bimetric theories of gravity, and we derive the conditions imposed by causality. We discuss various applications such as the dark energy problem, modified-Newtonian-dynamics-like theories of gravity, and varying speed of light theories.

  16. Causality and superluminal behavior in classical field theories: Applications to k-essence theories and modified-Newtonian-dynamics-like theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneton, Jean-Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Field theories with Lorentz (or diffeomorphism invariant) action can exhibit superluminal behavior through the breaking of local Lorentz invariance. Quantum induced superluminal velocities are well-known examples of this effect. The issue of the causal behavior of such propagation is somewhat controversial in the literature and we intend to clarify it. We provide a careful analysis of the meaning of causality in classical relativistic field theories and stress the role played by the Cauchy problem and the notion of chronology. We show that, in general, superluminal behavior threatens causality only if one assumes that a prior chronology in spacetime exists. In the case where superluminal propagation occurs, however, there are at least two nonconformally related metrics in spacetime and thus two available notions of chronology. These two chronologies are on equal footing, and it would thus be misleading to choose ab initio one of them to define causality. Rather, we provide a formulation of causality in which no prior chronology is assumed. We argue that this is the only way to deal with the issue of causality in the case where some degrees of freedom propagate faster than others. In that framework, then, it is shown that superluminal propagation is not necessarily noncausal, the final answer depending on the existence of an initial data formulation. This also depends on global properties of spacetime that we discuss in detail. As an illustration of these conceptual issues, we consider two field theories, namely, k-essence scalar fields and bimetric theories of gravity, and we derive the conditions imposed by causality. We discuss various applications such as the dark energy problem, modified-Newtonian-dynamics-like theories of gravity, and varying speed of light theories.

  17. Particle-hole duality, integrability, and Russian doll BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, L. V.; Pogosov, W. V.

    2015-08-01

    We address a generalized Richardson model (Russian doll BCS model), which is characterized by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. This model is known to be exactly solvable and integrable. We point out that the Russian doll BCS model, on the level of Hamiltonian, is also particle-hole symmetric. This implies that the same state can be expressed both in the particle and hole representations with two different sets of Bethe roots. We then derive exact relations between Bethe roots in the two representations, which can hardly be obtained staying on the level of Bethe equations. In a quasi-classical limit, similar identities for usual Richardson model, known from literature, are recovered from our results. We also show that these relations for Richardson roots take a remarkably simple form at half-filling and for a symmetric with respect to the middle of the interaction band distribution of one-body energy levels, since, in this special case, the rapidities in the particle and hole representations up to the translation satisfy the same system of equations.

  18. Caco-2 cells, biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) and biowaiver.

    PubMed

    Smetanová, Libuse; Stĕtinová, Vĕra; Svoboda, Zbynek; Kvetina, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Almost all orally administered drugs are absorbed across the intestinal mucosa. The Caco-2 monolayers are used as an in vitro model to predict drug absorption in humans and to explore mechanism of drug absorption. The Caco-2 cells are derived from a human colon adenocarcinoma and spontaneously differentiate to form confluent monolayer of polarized cells structurally and functionally resembling the small intestinal epithelium. For studying drug permeability, Caco-2 cells are seeded onto the Transwell inserts with semipermeable membrane and grown to late confluence (21 days). After determination of cell viability, the integrity of monolayer is checked by phenol red permeability and by 14C-mannitol permeability. The transport from apical to basolateral (AP-BL) and basolateral to apical (BL-AP) is studied by adding the diluted drug on the apical or basolateral side and withdrawing the samples from the opposite compartment, respectively, for HPLC analysis or liquid scintillation spectrometry. Ca2+ -free transport medium is used to determine paracellular component of the drug transport. On the basis of permeability and solubility, drugs can be categorized into four classes of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). For certain drugs, the BCS-based biowaiver approach can be used which enables to reduce in vivo bioequivalence studies.

  19. BcsA and BcsB form the catalytically active core of bacterial cellulose synthase sufficient for in vitro cellulose synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Omadjela, Okako; Narahari, Adishesh; Strumillo, Joanna; Mélida, Hugo; Mazur, Olga; Bulone, Vincent; Zimmer, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose is a linear extracellular polysaccharide. It is synthesized by membrane-embedded glycosyltransferases that processively polymerize UDP-activated glucose. Polymer synthesis is coupled to membrane translocation through a channel formed by the cellulose synthase. Although eukaryotic cellulose synthases function in macromolecular complexes containing several different enzyme isoforms, prokaryotic synthases associate with additional subunits to bridge the periplasm and the outer membrane. In bacteria, cellulose synthesis and translocation is catalyzed by the inner membrane-associated bacterial cellulose synthase (Bcs)A and BcsB subunits. Similar to alginate and poly-β-1,6 N-acetylglucosamine, bacterial cellulose is implicated in the formation of sessile bacterial communities, termed biofilms, and its synthesis is likewise stimulated by cyclic-di-GMP. Biochemical studies of exopolysaccharide synthesis are hampered by difficulties in purifying and reconstituting functional enzymes. We demonstrate robust in vitro cellulose synthesis reconstituted from purified BcsA and BcsB proteins from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Although BcsA is the catalytically active subunit, the membrane-anchored BcsB subunit is essential for catalysis. The purified BcsA-B complex produces cellulose chains of a degree of polymerization in the range 200–300. Catalytic activity critically depends on the presence of the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, but is independent of lipid-linked reactants. Our data reveal feedback inhibition of cellulose synthase by UDP but not by the accumulating cellulose polymer and highlight the strict substrate specificity of cellulose synthase for UDP-glucose. A truncation analysis of BcsB localizes the region required for activity of BcsA within its C-terminal membrane-associated domain. The reconstituted reaction provides a foundation for the synthesis of biofilm exopolysaccharides, as well as its activation by cyclic-di-GMP. PMID:24127606

  20. Integrated analysis on static/dynamic aeroelasticity of curved panels based on a modified local piston theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhichun; Zhou, Jian; Gu, Yingsong

    2014-10-01

    A flow field modified local piston theory, which is applied to the integrated analysis on static/dynamic aeroelastic behaviors of curved panels, is proposed in this paper. The local flow field parameters used in the modification are obtained by CFD technique which has the advantage to simulate the steady flow field accurately. This flow field modified local piston theory for aerodynamic loading is applied to the analysis of static aeroelastic deformation and flutter stabilities of curved panels in hypersonic flow. In addition, comparisons are made between results obtained by using the present method and curvature modified method. It shows that when the curvature of the curved panel is relatively small, the static aeroelastic deformations and flutter stability boundaries obtained by these two methods have little difference, while for curved panels with larger curvatures, the static aeroelastic deformation obtained by the present method is larger and the flutter stability boundary is smaller compared with those obtained by the curvature modified method, and the discrepancy increases with the increasing of curvature of panels. Therefore, the existing curvature modified method is non-conservative compared to the proposed flow field modified method based on the consideration of hypersonic flight vehicle safety, and the proposed flow field modified local piston theory for curved panels enlarges the application range of piston theory.

  1. The biowaiver extension for BCS class III drugs: the effect of dissolution rate on the bioequivalence of BCS class III immediate-release drugs predicted by computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-08-02

    The Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) guidance issued by the FDA allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release (IR) solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I drugs. However, a number of drugs within BCS class III have been proposed to be eligible for biowaivers. The World Health Organization (WHO) has shortened the requisite dissolution time of BCS class III drugs on their Essential Medicine List (EML) from 30 to 15 min for extended biowaivers; however, the impact of the shorter dissolution time on AUC(0-inf) and C(max) is unknown. The objectives of this investigation were to assess the ability of gastrointestinal simulation software to predict the oral absorption of the BCS class I drugs propranolol and metoprolol and the BCS class III drugs cimetidine, atenolol, and amoxicillin, and to perform in silico bioequivalence studies to assess the feasibility of extending biowaivers to BCS class III drugs. The drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted using physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of test drugs provided by GastroPlus (version 6.0). Virtual trials with a 200 mL dose volume at different drug release rates (T(85%) = 15 to 180 min) were performed to predict the oral absorption (C(max) and AUC(0-inf)) of the above drugs. Both BCS class I drugs satisfied bioequivalence with regard to the release rates up to 120 min. The results with BCS class III drugs demonstrated bioequivalence using the prolonged release rate, T(85%) = 45 or 60 min, indicating that the dissolution standard for bioequivalence is dependent on the intestinal membrane permeability and permeability profile throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The results of GastroPlus simulations indicate that the dissolution rate of BCS class III drugs could be prolonged to the point where dissolution, rather than permeability, would control the overall absorption. For BCS class III drugs with intestinal absorption patterns

  2. Modified Spin-Wave Theory on Low-Dimensional Heisenberg Ferrimagnets: A New Robust Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriki, Yusaku; Yamamoto, Shoji

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new scheme for modifying conventional spin waves so as to precisely describe low-dimensional Heisenberg ferrimagnets at finite temperatures. What is called the modified spin-wave theory was initiated by Takahashi, who intended to calculate the low-temperature thermodynamics of low-dimensional Heisenberg ferromagnets, where Holstein-Primakoff bosons are constrained to keep the total uniform magnetization zero in a straightforward manner. If the concept of an ideal Bose gas with a fixed density is applied to antiferromagnets and ferrimagnets, the formulation is no longer trivial, having rich variety in the way how the conventional spin waves, especially those in ferrimagnets, are constrained and brought into interaction. Which magnetization should be kept zero, uniform, staggered, or both? One or more chemical potentials can be introduced so as to satisfy the relevant constraint condition either in diagonalizing the Hamiltonian or in minimizing the free energy, making the Bogoliubov transformation dependent on temperature or leaving it free from temperature dependence. We can bring the thus-modified spin waves into interaction on the basis of the Hartree-Fock approximation or through the use of Wick's theorem in an attempt to refine their descriptions. Comparing various modification schemes both numerically and analytically in one and two dimensions, we eventually find an excellent bosonic language capable of describing heterogeneous quantum magnets on a variety of lattices over the whole temperature range — Wick's-theorem-based interacting spin waves modified so as to keep every sublattice magnetization zero via the temperature-dependent Bogoliubov transformation.

  3. Relationship between tissue distributions of modified Wuzi Yanzong prescription () in rats and meridian tropism theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Li, Wei-Wei; Wu, Cai-Sheng; Zhang, Jin-Lan; Song, Yi-Xiang; Song, Fang-Jiao; Fu, Hong; Liu, Geng-Xin; Wang, Xue-Mei

    2016-12-20

    To investigate the relationship between tissue distributions of modified Wuzi Yanzong prescription (, MWP) in rats and meridian tropism theory. A high-performance liquid chromatography with Fourier transform-mass spectrometry (HPLC-FT) method was used to identify the metabolites of MWP in different tissues of rats after continued oral administration of MWP for 7 days. The relationship between MWP and meridian tropism theory was studied according to the tissue distributions of the metabolites of MWP in rats and the relevant literature. Nineteen metabolites, mainly flavanoid compounds, were detected in the different rat tissues and classified to each herb in MWP. Further, it was able to establish that the tissue distributions of the metabolites of MWP were consistent with the descriptions of meridian tropism of MWP available in literature, this result might be useful in clarifying the mechanism of MWP on meridian tropism. In the long run, these data might provide scientific evidence of the meridian tropism theory to further promote the reasonable, effective utilization, and modernization of Chinese medicine. The tissue distributions of MWP in vivo were consistent with the descriptions of meridian tropism of MWP.

  4. Ultrafast energy transfer with competing channels: Non-equilibrium Förster and Modified Redfield theories.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Joachim; Mančal, Tomáš

    2017-05-07

    We derive equations of motion for the reduced density matrix of a molecular system which undergoes energy transfer dynamics competing with fast internal conversion channels. Environmental degrees of freedom of such a system have no time to relax to quasi-equilibrium in the electronic excited state of the donor molecule, and thus the conditions of validity of Förster and Modified Redfield theories in their standard formulations do not apply. We derive non-equilibrium versions of the two well-known rate theories and apply them to the case of carotenoid-chlorophyll energy transfer. Although our reduced density matrix approach does not account for the formation of vibronic excitons, it still confirms the important role of the donor ground-state vibrational states in establishing the resonance energy transfer conditions. We show that it is essential to work with a theory valid in a strong system-bath interaction regime to obtain correct dependence of the rates on donor-acceptor energy gap.

  5. Overview of High-Temperature Superconductivity: Theory, Surfaces, Interfaces and Bulk Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    superconductivity. The RVB theory has been amplified or modified in several ways [5,6,7], the details of which we won’t go into here. Rice and Wang [8] have...similar to those of RVB theory, but different from BCS theory. Rice and Wang , however, favor a phonon interaction which mediates the attraction between...36, 857. 7. Kotliar, G. Phys. Rev. B,1988, IZ, 3664. 8. Rice, M. J.; Wang , Y. R. Phys. Rev.-B, 1988, 37, 5893. 9. Coffey, L.; Cox, D. L. Phys. Rev

  6. More is Different:. 50 Years of Nuclear BCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broglia, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    At the basis of BCS theory, and associated symmetry breaking phenomena in gauge space, one finds Cooper pair binding. A major question in the nuclear case concerning this issue, regards the relative role played by the bare nucleon-nucleon force and by the interaction induced by the exchange of vibrations between members of Cooper pairs. The exotic nucleus 113Li8 in which two neutrons forming an extended halo, bind weakly to the 9Li core, provides an excellent testing ground to try to shed light on this issue. Theory finds that, in this case, the exchange of collective vibrations associated with the core and with the halo fields, provides an important fraction of the glue binding the pair. Inverse kinematics and active detector based experiments, combined with a quantitative description (based on absolute differential cross sections) of single Cooper pair tunneling, the specific probe of pairing in nuclei, which forces the virtual phonon into a real final state, have tested these predictions with positive results. The extension of structure and reaction studies to open shell (superfluid) nuclei (Sn-isotopes), displaying a strong alignment of quasispin in gauge space, and associated domain wall, as testified by pairing rotational bands excited in terms of single Cooper pair tunneling, provides an overall description of the data within experimental errors. This is also true in connection with pairing vibrations as observed in closed shell nuclei. Many of the concepts which are at the basis of the development associated with a quantitative treatment of the variety of phenomena associated with the spontaneous breaking of gauge symmetry in nuclei have been instrumental in connection with novel studies of soft matter, namely of protein evolution and protein folding. Although the route to these subjects and associated development does not necessarily imply the nuclear physics connection, such a connection has proven qualitatively and quantitatively inspiring. In particular

  7. Putative Androgen Exposure and Sexual Orientation: Cross-Cultural Evidence Suggesting a Modified Neurohormonal Theory.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Lee; Lykins, Amy; Hoskin, Anthony; Ratnasingam, Malini

    2015-12-01

    According to neurohormonal theory, prenatal androgens are key determinants of sexual orientation. As a reputed marker for prenatal androgens, the 2D:4D finger length ratio has been used in more than a dozen studies to test the hypothesis that prenatal androgens influence sexual orientation. Findings have been very inconsistent. The present study sought to retest the hypothesis that 2D:4D and sexual orientation are related is a manner consistent with neurohormonal theory. A 2D:4D measure (of the right hand) along with four additional somatic markers of androgen exposure (height, physical strength, muscularity, and athletic ability) with samples of college students in Malaysia (N = 2,058) and the United States (N = 2,511). The five androgen measures were factor analyzed, resulting in a two-factor solution: Factor 1 consisted of strength, muscularity, and athletic ability (the muscular coordination factor), and Factor 2 was comprised of the r2D:4D and adult height (the bone growth factor). Sexual orientation was measured by asking each respondent the extent to which they were sexually attracted to males and the extent to which they were sexually attracted to females, both on 11-point scales. When the countries and sexes were analyzed separately, neither the r2D:4D measure nor Factor 2 correlated with sexual orientation to significant degrees. Instead, it was the muscular coordination factor that correlated the best. Support was found for the hypothesis that prenatal androgens influence sexual orientation, but the nature of these influences was more complex than neurohormonal theory predicted. A modified theory is needed and presented to accommodate the results from this study. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  8. A Rapid Distortion Theory modified turbulence spectra for semi-analytical airfoil noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Leandro D.; Christophe, Julien; Schram, Christophe; Desmet, Wim

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes an implementation of the Rapid Distortion Theory, for the prediction of the noise resulting from the interaction of an airfoil with incoming turbulence. In the framework of the semi-analytical modeling strategy known as Amiet's theory, this interaction mechanism is treated in a linearized form where the airfoil thickness, camber and angle of attack are assumed negligible, leading to a frozen turbulence description of the incident gust. Important semi-analytical developments have been proposed in the literature to improve the modeling of the gust-airfoil interaction accounting for parallel and skewed gusts, non-rectangular linearized airfoil shapes or blade tip effects. This work is rather focused on the investigation of the distortion of turbulence that occurs in the vicinity of the airfoil leading edge, compared with Rapid Distortion Theory, where main results are briefly reminded in this paper. The main contribution of this work is a detailed experimental investigation of the evolution of turbulent quantities relevant to noise production, performed in the close vicinity of the airfoil leading edge subjected to grid turbulence, by means of stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements. The results indicate that the distortion effects are concentrated in a narrow region close to the stagnation point of the leading edge, with dimension of the order of its radius of curvature. Additionally, it is shown that the turbulence intensity grows significantly as the flow approaches the airfoil leading-edge. Based on those results, a modified turbulence spectrum is proposed to describe the incoming turbulence in Amiet's theory. The sound predictions show a significantly better match with acoustic measurements than using the original turbulence model.

  9. Thermal effect on dynamics of thin and thick composite laminated microbeams by modified couple stress theory for different boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Zajkani, Asghar; Akbarizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-12-01

    In this article, thermal effect on free vibration behavior of composite laminated microbeams based on the modified couple stress theory is presented. The proposed anisotropic model is developed by using a variational formulation. The governing equations and boundary conditions are obtained based on a modified couple stress theory and using the principle of minimum potential energy and considering different beam theories, i.e., Euler-Bernoulli, Timoshenko and Reddy beam theories. Unlike the classical beam theories, this model contains a material length scale parameter and can capture the size effect. Free vibration of a simply supported beam is solved by utilizing Fourier series. In addition, the fundamental frequency is achieved by using the generalized differential quadrature method for four types of cross-ply laminations with clamped-clamped, clamped-hinged and hinged-hinged boundary conditions for different beam theories. For investigating different parameters including temperature changes, material length scale parameter, beam thickness, some numerical results on different cross-ply laminated beams are presented. The fundamental frequency of different thin and thick beam theories is investigated by increasing slenderness ratio and thermal loads. The results prove that the modified couple stress theory increases the natural frequency under the thermal effects for free vibration of composite laminated microbeams.

  10. A Distortion-Modified Free Volume Theory for Nonlinear Viscoelastic Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelar, C. F.; Liechti, K. M.

    2003-06-01

    Many polymeric materials, including structural adhesives, exhibit anonlinear viscoelastic response. The nonlinear theory of Knauss and Emri(Polym. Engrg. Sci. 27, 1987, 87 100) is based on the Doolittle conceptthat the ‘free volume’ controls the mobility of polymer molecules and,thus, the inherent time scale of the material. It then follows thatfactors such as temperature and moisture, which change the free volume,will influence the time scale. Furthermore, stress-induced dilatationwill also affect the free volume and, hence, the time scale. However,during this investigation, dilatational effects alone were found to beinsufficient for describing the response of near pure shear tests of abisphenol A epoxy with amido amine hardener. Thus, the free volumeapproach presented here has been modified to include distortionaleffects in the inherent time scale of the material. The same was foundto be true for a urethane adhesive.

  11. Doomsdays in a modified theory of gravity: A classical and a quantum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarran, Imanol; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Chen, Che-Yu; Chen, Pisin

    2017-09-01

    By far cosmology is one of the most exciting subject to study, even more so with the current bulk of observations we have at hand. These observations might indicate different kinds of doomsdays, if dark energy follows certain patterns. Two of these doomsdays are the Little Rip (LR) and Little Sibling of the Big Rip (LSBR). In this work, aside from proving the unavoidability of the LR and LSBR in the Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) scenario, we carry out a quantum analysis of the EiBI theory with a matter field, which, from a classical point of view would inevitably lead to a universe that ends with either LR or LSBR. Based on a modified Wheeler-DeWitt equation, we demonstrate that such fatal endings seems to be avoidable.

  12. Applicability of modified effective-range theory to positron-atom and positron-molecule scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Karwasz, Grzegorz

    2006-06-15

    We analyze low-energy scattering of positrons on Ar atoms and N{sub 2} molecules using the modified effective-range theory (MERT) developed by O'Malley, et al. [J. Math. Phys. 2, 491 (1961)]. We use the formulation of MERT based on exact solutions of the Schroedinger equation with polarization potential rather than low-energy expansions of phase shifts into momentum series. We show that MERT describes the experimental data well, provided that effective-range expansion is performed both for s- and p-wave scattering, which dominate in the considered regime of positron energies (0.4-2 eV). We estimate the values of the s-wave scattering length and the effective range for e{sup +}-Ar and e{sup +}-N{sub 2} collisions.

  13. Theory for self-consistent interplay between light and nanomaterials strongly modified by metallic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Akira; Osono, Katsuya; Nobuhiro, Atsushi; Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Ishihara, Hajime

    2013-03-28

    The design of the interplay between light and nanomaterials by the effect of localized-surface-plasmon resonance in metallic nanostructures is a fascinating subject, and recently, a lot of research has been carried out from both fundamental and applicational points of view. In this paper, we demonstrate the theories for describing the self-consistent interplay between the electronic states in the nanomaterials, the localized surface plasmons in the metallic nanostructures, and the light field, which provides insight into how the photoexcitation processes are modified through microscopic energy exchanges. As examples of such demonstrations, we show two cases, i.e., the interaction between a single metallic nanosphere and a quantum dot, and that between metallic nanostructures forming a nanogap and dimer molecules, where a peculiar dependence of photoexcitation processes on the distance between the metallic nanostructure and the absorbers arises depending on the respective characteristics of their interplay.

  14. Zero-loss image formation and modified contrast transfer theory in EFTEM.

    PubMed

    Angert, I; Majorovits, E; Schröder, R R

    2000-04-01

    For a weak phase/weak amplitude object the information transfer in the imaging process of TEM is described by the common formalism of the contrast transfer function (CTF). So far the effects of inelastic scattering were not accounted for in this formalism. In conventional imaging they were simply neglected. In energy filtering TEM (EFTEM), where removal of inelastic electrons leads to higher specimen contrast, they were modelled by a global increase of the elastic amplitude contrast. Thus, the description of inelastic and elastic scattering was mixed. Here a new ansatz is proposed which treats elastic and inelastic contrast transfer separately by adding an inelastic contribution to the scattering potentials. In EFTEM this has the effect of adding a filter contrast which depends on the characteristics of the inelastic scattering. For samples with dominant plasmon loss the additional filter contrast is restricted to low resolution. Because of its strong dependence on the nature of the inelastic scattering process, the filter contrast cannot in general be unified with the conventional elastic amplitude contrast. The modified CTF theory for EFTEM was tested experimentally on a variety of samples. Images of amorphous layers of copper, aluminium, and carbon films, as well as zero-loss images of proteins embedded in amorphous ice were evaluated. The values of the parameters of the additional filter contrast were determined for carbon film and proteins embedded in vitrified ice. Comparison of different CTF models used to reconstruct 3D volumes from zero-loss images confirmed that best agreement with the atomic model is attained with the new, modified CTF theory.

  15. An empirical analysis of online gamers' perceptions of game items: modified theory of consumption values approach.

    PubMed

    Park, Bong-Won; Lee, Kun Chang

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this article are (1) to propose a modified theory of consumption values (MTCV) for investigation of online gamer perceptions of the value of purchasable game items and (2) to apply the developed MTCV to multiple game genres and player age groups. To address these aims, 327 valid questionnaires were obtained and analyzed. The original theory of consumption values (TCV) was modified to apply to the specific characteristics of online games. The original TCV specifies five types of consumption values: functional value, social value, emotional value, conditional value, and epistemic value. After revising the TCV to apply to the examination of online games, we proposed that the MTCV be composed of character competency value, enjoyment value, visual authority value, and monetary value. The validity of the MTCV was proven by statistically analyzing the responses provided by the 327 valid questionnaires. To examine the second aim, experiments were conducted to examine the MTCV in three online game genres-massive multiplayer online role-playing games, first-person shooters games, and casual games. The second aim was also studied via questionnaires that examined the ages of online gamers. It was determined that massive multiplayer online role-playing games players regard visual authority value and monetary value as more important than do casual gamers. It was also determined that younger gamers tend to be more interested in visual authority, whereas older gamers tend to be more interested in character competency. This research provides a foundation for future studies to extend the MTCV to consider other user factors, such as cultural effects.

  16. Modeling gravity-driven fingering in rough-walled fractures using modified percolation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Pore scale invasion percolation theory is modified for imbibition of.wetting fluids into fractures. The effects of gravity, local aperture field geometry, and local in-plane air/water interfacial curvatureare included in the calculation of aperture filling potential which controls wetted structure growth within the fracture. The inclusion of gravity yields fingers oriented in the direction of the gravitational gradient. These fingers widen and tend to meander and branch more as the gravitational gradient decreases. In-plane interfacial curvature also greatly affects the wetted structure in both horizontal and nonhorizontal fractures causing the formation of macroscopic wetting fronts. The modified percolation model is used to simulate imbibition into an analogue rough-walled fracture where both fingering and horizontal imbibition experiments were previously conducted. Comparison of numerical and experimental results showed reasonably good agreement. This process oriented physical and numerical modeling is-a necessary step toward including gravity-driven fingering in models of flow and transport through unsaturated, fractured rock.

  17. Prediction of solubility and permeability class membership: provisional BCS classification of the world's top oral drugs.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Arik; Miller, Jonathan M; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-12-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) categorizes drugs into one of four biopharmaceutical classes according to their water solubility and membrane permeability characteristics and broadly allows the prediction of the rate-limiting step in the intestinal absorption process following oral administration. Since its introduction in 1995, the BCS has generated remarkable impact on the global pharmaceutical sciences arena, in drug discovery, development, and regulation, and extensive validation/discussion/extension of the BCS is continuously published in the literature. The BCS has been effectively implanted by drug regulatory agencies around the world in setting bioavailability/bioequivalence standards for immediate-release (IR) oral drug product approval. In this review, we describe the BCS scientific framework and impact on regulatory practice of oral drug products and review the provisional BCS classification of the top drugs on the global market. The Biopharmaceutical Drug Disposition Classification System and its association with the BCS are discussed as well. One notable finding of the provisional BCS classification is that the clinical performance of the majority of approved IR oral drug products essential for human health can be assured with an in vitro dissolution test, rather than empirical in vivo human studies.

  18. Models for low-energy Lorentz violation in the photon sector: Addendum to 'Consistency of isotropic modified Maxwell theory'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.; Schreck, M.

    2012-03-01

    In a previous article, Klinkhamer and Schreck (2011) [1], we established the consistency of isotropic modified Maxwell theory for a finite range of the Lorentz-violating parameter κ, which includes both positive and negative values of κ. As an aside, we mentioned the existence of a physical model which, for low-energy photons, gives rise to isotropic modified Maxwell theory with a positive parameter κ (corresponding to a "slow" photon). Here, we present a related model which gives rise to isotropic modified Maxwell theory with a negative parameter κ (corresponding to a "fast" photon). Both models have an identical particle content, photon and Dirac particles, but differ in the type of spacetime manifold considered.

  19. Testing the flexibility of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: evidence from an unspaced orthography (Thai).

    PubMed

    Winskel, Heather; Perea, Manuel; Peart, Emma

    2014-07-01

    In the current study, we tested the generality of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Thai native speakers (Experiment 2). Thai has a distinctive alphabetic orthography with visually complex letters (ฝ ฟ or ผ พ) and nonlinear characteristics and lacks interword spaces. We used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Thai letters, or symbols. For the English speakers, we found a similar pattern of results as in previous studies (i.e., a dissociation between letters and symbols). In contrast, for the Thai participants, we found that the pattern for Thai letters, Roman letters and symbols displayed a remarkably similar linear trend. Thus, while we observed qualified support for the MRF theory, in that we found an advantage for initial position, this effect also applied to symbols (i.e., our data revealed a language-specific effect). We propose that this pattern for letters and symbols in Thai has developed as a specialized adaptive mechanism for reading in this visually complex and crowded nonlinear script without interword spaces.

  20. Renormalization group scale-setting from the action—a road to modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domazet, Silvije; Štefančić, Hrvoje

    2012-12-01

    The renormalization group (RG) corrected gravitational action in Einstein-Hilbert and other truncations is considered. The running scale of the RG is treated as a scalar field at the level of the action and determined in a scale-setting procedure recently introduced by Koch and Ramirez for the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. The scale-setting procedure is elaborated for other truncations of the gravitational action and applied to several phenomenologically interesting cases. It is shown how the logarithmic dependence of the Newton's coupling on the RG scale leads to exponentially suppressed effective cosmological constant and how the scale-setting in particular RG-corrected gravitational theories yields the effective f(R) modified gravity theories with negative powers of the Ricci scalar R. The scale-setting at the level of the action at the non-Gaussian fixed point in Einstein-Hilbert and more general truncations is shown to lead to universal effective action quadratic in the Ricci tensor.

  1. BCS MPI: N new approach i the system software design for large-scale parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, J. C.; Petrini, F.; Frachtenberg, E.

    2003-01-01

    Buffered Co-Scheduled (BCS) MPI proposes a new approach to design the communication libraries for large-scale parallel machines. The emphasis of BCS MPI is on the global coordination of a large number of processes rather than in the traditional optimization of the local performance of a pair of communicating processes. BCS MPI delays the interprocessor communication in order to schedule globally the communication pattern and it is designed on top of a minimal set of collective communication primitives. In this paper we describe a prototype implementation of BCS MDI and its Communication protocols. The experimental results, executed on a set of scientific applications representative of the ASCI workload, show that BCS MPI is only marginally slower than the production-level MPI, but much simpler to implement, debug and analyze.

  2. BCS MPI: a new approach in the software design for large-scale parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Peinador, J. F.; Petrini, F.

    2003-01-01

    BCS MPI proposes a new approach to design the communication libraries for large scale parallel machines. The emphasis of BCS MPI is on the global coordination of the potentially large number of processes and in the reduction of the non determinism rather than in the traditional optimization of the local performance of a pair of communicating processes. BCS MPI delays the interprocessor communication in order to schedule globally the communication pattern and it is designed on top of a minimal set of collective communication primitives. In this paper we describe a prototype implementation of BCS MPI and its communication protocols. The experimental results, executed on a set of scientific applications representative of the ASCI workload, show that BCS MPI is only marginally slower than the production-level MPI, but much simpler to implement, debug and analyze.

  3. Modified kinetic theory applied to the shear flows of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yifei; Feng, Zhi-Gang; Michaelides, Efstathios E.; Mao, Shaolin

    2017-04-01

    Granular materials are characterized by large collections of discrete particles, where the particle-particle interactions are significantly more important than the particle-fluid interactions. The current kinetic theory captures fairly accurately the granular flow behavior in the dilute case, when only binary interactions are significant, but is not accurate at all in the dense flow regime, where multi-particle interactions and contacts must be modeled. To improve the kinetic theory results for granular flows in the dense flow regime, we propose a Modified Kinetic Theory (MKT) model that utilizes the contact duration or cutoff time to account for the complex particle-particle interactions in the dense regime. The contact duration model, also called TC model, was originally proposed by Luding and McNamara ["How to handle the inelastic collapse of a dissipative hard-sphere gas with the TC model," Granular Matter 1, 113 (1998)] to solve the inelastic collapse issue existing in the inelastic hard sphere model. This model defines a cutoff time tc such that dissipation is not counted if the time between two consecutive contacts is less than tc. As shown in their study, the use of a cutoff time tc can also reduce the dissipation during multi-particle contacts. In this paper we relate the TC model with the Discrete Element Method (DEM) by choosing the cutoff time tc to be the duration of contact calculated from the linear-spring-dashpot soft-sphere model of the DEM. We examine two types of granular flows, simple shear flow and the plane shear flow, and compare the results of the classical kinetic theory model, the present MKT model, and the DEM model. We show that the MKT model entails a significant improvement over the kinetic theory model for simple shear flows at inertial regimes. With the MKT model the calculations are close to the DEM results at solid fractions as high as 0.57. Even for the plane shear flows, where shear rate and solid fraction are inhomogeneous, the

  4. Overland flow connectivity on planar patchy hillslopes - modified percolation theory approaches and combinatorial model of urns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezlobin, David; Pariente, Sarah; Lavee, Hanoch; Sachs, Eyal

    2017-04-01

    Source-sink systems are very common in hydrology; in particular, some land cover types often generate runoff (e.g. embedded rocks, bare soil) , while other obstruct it (e.g. vegetation, cracked soil). Surface runoff coefficients of patchy slopes/plots covered by runoff generating and obstructing covers (e.g., bare soil and vegetation) depend critically on the percentage cover (i.e. sources/sinks abundance) and decrease strongly with observation scale. The classic mathematical percolation theory provides a powerful apparatus for describing the runoff connectivity on patchy hillslopes, but it ignores strong effect of the overland flow directionality. To overcome this and other difficulties, modified percolation theory approaches can be considered, such as straight percolation (for the planar slopes), quasi-straight percolation and models with limited obstruction. These approaches may explain both the observed critical dependence of runoff coefficients on percentage cover and their scale decrease in systems with strong flow directionality (e.g. planar slopes). The contributing area increases sharply when the runoff generating percentage cover approaches the straight percolation threshold. This explains the strong increase of the surface runoff and erosion for relatively low values (normally less than 35%) of the obstructing cover (e.g., vegetation). Combinatorial models of urns with restricted occupancy can be applied for the analytic evaluation of meaningful straight percolation quantities, such as NOGA's (Non-Obstructed Generating Area) expected value and straight percolation probability. It is shown that the nature of the cover-related runoff scale decrease is combinatorial - the probability for the generated runoff to avoid obstruction in unit area decreases with scale for the non-trivial percentage cover values. The magnitude of the scale effect is found to be a skewed non-monotonous function of the percentage cover. It is shown that the cover-related scale

  5. Performance assessment of several equations of state and second virial coefficients in modified Enskog theory: Results for transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, M.; Alavianmehr, M. M.; Otoofat, M.; Mohsenipour, A. A.; Ghatee, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we identify a simple method for predicting transport properties of fluids over wide ranges of temperatures and pressure. In this respect, the capability of several equations of state (EOS) and second virial coefficient correlations to predict transport properties of fluids including carbon dioxide, methane and argon using modified Enskog theory (MET) is investigated. The transport properties in question are viscosity and thermal conductivity. The results indicate that the SRK EOS employed in the modified Enskog theory outperforms other equations of state. The average absolute deviation was found to be 12.2 and 18.5% for, respectively, the calculated thermal conductivity and viscosity using the MET.

  6. BCS Biowaivers: Similarities and Differences Among EMA, FDA, and WHO Requirements.

    PubMed

    Davit, Barbara M; Kanfer, Isadore; Tsang, Yu Chung; Cardot, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), based on aqueous solubility and intestinal permeability, has enjoyed wide use since 1995 as a mechanism for waiving in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies. In 2000, the US-FDA was the first regulatory agency to publish guidance for industry describing how to meet criteria for requesting a waiver of in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for highly soluble, highly permeable (BCS Class I) drugs. Subsequently, the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) published guidelines recommending how to obtain BCS biowaivers for BCS Class III drugs (high solubility, low permeability), in addition to Class I drugs. In 2015, the US-FDA became better harmonized with the EMA and WHO following publication of two guidances for industry outlining criteria for obtaining BCS biowaivers for both Class I and Class III drugs. A detailed review and comparison of the BCS Class I and Class III criteria currently recommended by the US-FDA, EMA, and WHO revealed good convergence of the three agencies with respect to BCS biowaiver criteria. The comparison also suggested that, by applying the most conservative of the three jurisdictional approaches, it should be possible for a sponsor to design the same set of BCS biowaiver studies in preparing a submission for worldwide filing to satisfy US, European, and emerging market regulators. It is hoped that the availability of BCS Class I and Class III biowaivers in multiple jurisdictions will encourage more sponsors to request waivers of in vivo bioavailability/bioequivalence testing using the BCS approach.

  7. Modified kinetic theory applied to the shear flows of granular materials

    DOE PAGES

    Duan, Yifei; Feng, Zhi -Gang; Michaelides, Efstathios E.; ...

    2017-04-11

    Here, granular materials are characterized by large collections of discrete particles, where the particle-particle interactions are significantly more important than the particle-fluid interactions. The current kinetic theory captures fairly accurately the granular flow behavior in the dilute case, when only binary interactions are significant, but is not accurate at all in the dense flow regime, where multi-particle interactions and contacts must be modeled. To improve the kinetic theory results for granular flows in the dense flow regime, we propose a Modified Kinetic Theory (MKT) model that utilizes the contact duration or cut-off time to account for the complex particle-particle interactionsmore » in the dense regime. The contact duration model, also called TC model, is originally proposed by Luding and McNamara to solve the inelastic collapse issue existing in the Inelastic Hard Sphere (IHS) model. This model defines a cut-off time tc such that dissipation is not counted if the time between two consecutive contacts is less than tc. As shown in their study, the use of a cut-off time tc can also reduce the dissipation during multi-particle contacts. In this paper we relate the TC model with the Discrete Element Method (DEM) by choosing the cut-off time tc to be the duration of contact calculated from the linear-spring-dashpot soft-sphere model of the DEM. We examine two types of granular flows: simple shear flow and the plane shear flow, and compare the results of the classical Kinetic Theory (KT) model, the present MKT model, and the DEM model. Here, we show that the MKT model entails a significant improvement over the KT model for simple shear flows at inertial regimes. With the MKT model the calculations are close to the DEM results at solid fractions as high as 0.57. Even for the plane shear flows, where shear rate and solid fraction are inhomogeneous, the results of the MKT model agree very well with the DEM results.« less

  8. Transition and Damping of Collective Modes in a Trapped Fermi Gas between BCS and Unitary Limits near the Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hang; Zhang, Wenyuan; Zhou, Li; Ma, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the transition and damping of low-energy collective modes in a trapped unitary Fermi gas by solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation in a scaled form, which is combined with both the T-matrix fluctuation theory in normal phase and the mean-field theory in order phase. In order to connect the microscopic and kinetic descriptions of many-body Feshbach scattering, we adopt a phenomenological two-fluid physical approach, and derive the coupling constants in the order phase. By solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov steady-state equation in a variational form, we calculate two viscous relaxation rates with the collision probabilities of fermion’s scattering including fermions in the normal fluid and fermion pairs in the superfluid. Additionally, by considering the pairing and depairing of fermions, we get results of the frequency and damping of collective modes versus temperature and s-wave scattering length. Our theoretical results are in a remarkable agreement with the experimental data, particularly for the sharp transition between collisionless and hydrodynamic behaviour and strong damping between BCS and unitary limits near the phase transition. The sharp transition originates from the maximum of viscous relaxation rate caused by fermion-fermion pair collision at the phase transition point when the fermion depair, while the strong damping due to the fast varying of the frequency of collective modes from BCS limit to unitary limit. PMID:26522094

  9. Estimation of thermodynamic properties of Cu-La binary alloy with modified Miedema's theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-hong; Zhang, Shi-hong; Chen, Yan; Cheng, Ming; Song, Hong-wu; Liu, Jin-song

    2016-01-01

    According to modified Miedema's theory, mixing enthalpies (Δ H), excess entropies ( S E), excess Gibbs free energy ( G E), and component activities ( a) of Cu-La binary alloy were estimated using the basic thermodynamic principles and some simple physical parameters of Cu and La, such as electronegativity, atomic volume and electron density. Based on the Cu-La binary alloy phase diagram, the Gibbs free energy of the phase precipitation reactions of Cu6La and Cu5La was deduced. The results showed that the values of Δ H, S E, and G E of Cu-La binary alloy were all negative. Compared to the ideal solution, the activities of the components presented a large negative deviation from Raoult's law, which indicated that there was a strong interaction between Cu and La. The calculated data are well consistent with the experimental data. The Gibbs free energies of the phase precipitation reactions of Cu6La are lower than those for Cu5La, which means that Cu6La is thermodynamically more stable than Cu5La. Furthermore, the experimental results show that rareearth rich Cu6La phase particles in copper matrix are formed after La microalloying.

  10. Assessing the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: Evidence from Sinhalese-English bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Ravini; Winskel, Heather

    2016-11-01

    The current study aimed to test the applicability of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Sinhalese native speakers (Experiment 2), who were skilled readers of both Sinhala and Roman scripts. A two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Sinhala letters or symbols was conducted. For Roman script, the English and Sinhalese speakers displayed analogous results as in previous studies for Roman letters and symbols (i.e., an initial letter advantage and W-shaped function for Roman letters and a Λ-shaped function for symbols). In contrast for Sinhala script, the Sinhalese speakers displayed a strong linear function with accuracy for letter positions 1, 2 and 3 similarly advantaged. We propose that this characteristic pattern for Sinhala script has developed as a specialised adaptive mechanism to optimise the processing of letters when reading in this distinctive script.

  11. The efficacy of a modified Theory of Reasoned Action to explain gambling behavior in college students.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Robert G; Andrew, Damon P S; Mahony, Daniel F

    2011-09-01

    Recently, Thrasher et al. (College Student Affairs Journal 27(1): 57-75, 2007) explored the efficacy of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA; Ajzen and Fishbein, Attitudes, personality, and behavior, 1980) in explaining gambling behavior of college students. However, their study found the TRA only predicted small amounts of variance in gambling intentions. Heeding their call to enhance the efficacy of the TRA through the addition of explanatory variables to the model, the present study incorporated gambling motivations and locus of control as moderating variables within the TRA to test the potential of a modified TRA in explaining gambling behavior of college students. A total of 345 students at a major metropolitan research university in the Midwest volunteered to participate in the study. A series of hierarchical linear regressions indicated intrinsic motivation to accomplish (p = .002) significantly moderated the relationship between gambling attitudes and gambling intentions. Further, internal locus of control (p < .001), chance locus of control (p < .001), and powerful others locus of control (p < .001) also significantly moderated the relationship between gambling attitudes and gambling intentions. The significant impact of the moderating variables on the relationship between gambling attitudes and intentions suggests intrinsic motivation and locus of control can alter the impact of the relationship between gambling attitudes and gambling intentions.

  12. Cosmological tests of modified gravity: Constraints on F (R ) theories from the galaxy clustering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, Julien; Brax, Philippe; Marinoni, Christian; Valageas, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    The clustering ratio η , a large-scale structure observable originally designed to constrain the shape of the power spectrum of matter density fluctuations, is shown to provide a sensitive probe of the nature of gravity in the cosmological regime. We apply this analysis to F (R ) theories of gravity using the luminous red galaxy sample extracted from the spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 7 and 10 catalogs. We find that general relativity (GR), complemented with a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with parameters fixed by the Planck satellite, describes extremely well the clustering of galaxies up to z ˜0.6 . On large cosmic scales, the absolute amplitude of deviations from GR, |fR 0|, is constrained to be smaller than 4.6 ×1 0-5 at the 95% confidence level. This bound makes cosmological probes of gravity almost competitive with the sensitivity of Solar System tests, although still one 1 order of magnitude less effective than astrophysical tests. We also extrapolate our results to future large surveys like Euclid and show that the astrophysical bound will certainly remain out of reach for such a class of modified-gravity models that only differ from Λ CDM at low redshifts.

  13. BCS-BEC crossover with unequal-mass fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, Roberto B.; Randeria, Mohit

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the crossover from BCS pairing to molecular Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in an atomic gas with two fermion species with masses m{sub {up_arrow}{ne}m{down_arrow}}tuned through a Feshbach resonance. We present results for the T=0 equation of state as a function of the scattering length including the effects of Gaussian fluctuations about the mean field ground state. We compute the ground state energy as a function of m{sub {up_arrow}/}m{sub {down_arrow}}at unitarity and find excellent agreement with the quantum Monte Carlo result for m{sub {up_arrow}/}m{sub {down_arrow}=}6.67 for a {sup 40}K-{sup 6}Li mixture. We show that the dimer scattering length in the BEC limit as a function of m{sub {up_arrow}/}m{sub {down_arrow}}compares well with the exact four-body results of Petrov et al. [J. Phys. B 38, S645 (2005)]. We also derive the condition for trapping frequencies to obtain an unpolarized gas in a harmonic trap.

  14. BCS versus Overhauser pairing in dense (2+1)-dimensional QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Zahed, Ismail

    2001-07-01

    We compare the BCS and Overhauser effect as competing mechanisms for the destabilization of the quark Fermi surface at an asymptotically large chemical potential, for the special case of 2 space and 1 time dimensions. We use the framework of perturbative one-gluon exchange, which dominates the pairing at {mu}/g{sup 2}{much_gt}1. With screening in matter, we show that in the weak coupling limit the Overhauser effect can compete with the BCS effect only for a sufficiently large number of colors. Both the BCS and the Overhauser gaps are of order g{sup 4}/{mu} in the Landau gauge.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers immersed in liquids based on the modified couple stress theory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haw-Long; Chang, Win-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The modified couple stress theory is adopted to study the sensitivity of a rectangular atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever immersed in acetone, water, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and 1-butanol. The theory contains a material length scale parameter and considers the size effect in the analysis. However, this parameter is difficult to obtain via experimental measurements. In this study, a conjugate gradient method for the parameter estimation of the frequency equation is presented. The optimal method provides a quantitative approach for estimating the material length scale parameter based on the modified couple stress theory. The results show that the material length scale parameter of the AFM cantilever immersed in acetone, CCl4, water, and 1-butanol is 0, 25, 116.3, and 471 nm, respectively. In addition, the vibration sensitivities of the AFM cantilever immersed in these liquids are investigated. The results are useful for the design of AFM cantilevers immersed in liquids.

  16. Generic van der Waals equation of state, modified free volume theory of diffusion, and viscosity of simple liquids.

    PubMed

    Laghaei, Rozita; Nasrabad, Afshin Eskandari; Eu, Byung Chan

    2005-03-31

    The shear viscosity formula derived by the density fluctuation theory in previous papers is computed for argon, krypton, and methane by using the self-diffusion coefficients derived in the modified free volume theory with the help of the generic van der Waals equation of state. In the temperature regime near or above the critical temperature, the density dependence of the shear viscosity can be accounted for by ab initio calculations with the self-diffusion coefficients provided by the modified free volume theory if the minimum (critical) free volume is set equal to the molecular volume and the volume overlap parameter (alpha) is taken about unity in the expression for the self-diffusion coefficient. In the subcritical temperature regime, if the density fluctuation range parameter is chosen appropriately at a temperature, then the resulting expression for the shear viscosity can well account for its density and temperature dependence over the ranges of density and temperature experimentally studied. In the sense that once the density fluctuation range is fixed at a temperature, the theory can account for the experimental data at other subcritical temperatures on the basis of the intermolecular force only; the theory is predictive even in the subcritical regime of temperature. Theory is successfully tested in comparison with experimental data for self-diffusion coefficients and shear viscosity for argon, krypton, and methane.

  17. The FDA should eliminate the ambiguities in the current BCS biowaiver guidance and make public the drugs for which BCS biowaivers have been granted.

    PubMed

    Benet, L Z; Larregieu, C A

    2010-09-01

    Although US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class 1 drugs are designated as high-permeability drugs, in fact, the criterion utilized is high extent of absorption. This ambiguity should be eliminated, and the FDA criterion should explicitly be stated as > or =90% absorption based on absolute bioavailability or mass balance. Maintaining confidentiality regarding the drugs for which the FDA has approved BCS waivers of in vivo bioequivalence studies is not good public policy and should be reversed.

  18. Vector-tensor nature of Bekenstein's relativistic theory of modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Zlosnik, T. G.; Ferreira, P. G.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2006-08-15

    Bekenstein's theory of relativistic gravity is conventionally written as a bimetric theory. The two metrics are related by a disformal transformation defined by a dynamical vector field and a scalar field. In this paper we show that the theory can be rewritten as vector-tensor theory akin to Einstein-Aether theories with noncanonical kinetic terms. We discuss some of the implications of this equivalence.

  19. A Preliminary ZEUS Lightning Location Error Analysis Using a Modified Retrieval Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elander, Valjean; Koshak, William; Phanord, Dieudonne

    2004-01-01

    The ZEUS long-range VLF arrival time difference lightning detection network now covers both Europe and Africa, and there are plans for further expansion into the western hemisphere. In order to fully optimize and assess ZEUS lightning location retrieval errors and to determine the best placement of future receivers expected to be added to the network, a software package is being developed jointly between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV). The software package, called the ZEUS Error Analysis for Lightning (ZEAL), will be used to obtain global scale lightning location retrieval error maps using both a Monte Carlo approach and chi-squared curvature matrix theory. At the core of ZEAL will be an implementation of an Iterative Oblate (IO) lightning location retrieval method recently developed at MSFC. The IO method will be appropriately modified to account for variable wave propagation speed, and the new retrieval results will be compared with the current ZEUS retrieval algorithm to assess potential improvements. In this preliminary ZEAL work effort, we defined 5000 source locations evenly distributed across the Earth. We then used the existing (as well as potential future ZEUS sites) to simulate arrival time data between source and ZEUS site. A total of 100 sources were considered at each of the 5000 locations, and timing errors were selected from a normal distribution having a mean of 0 seconds and a standard deviation of 20 microseconds. This simulated "noisy" dataset was analyzed using the IO algorithm to estimate source locations. The exact locations were compared with the retrieved locations, and the results are summarized via several color-coded "error maps."

  20. A Preliminary ZEUS Lightning Location Error Analysis Using a Modified Retrieval Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elander, Valjean; Koshak, William; Phanord, Dieudonne

    2004-01-01

    The ZEUS long-range VLF arrival time difference lightning detection network now covers both Europe and Africa, and there are plans for further expansion into the western hemisphere. In order to fully optimize and assess ZEUS lightning location retrieval errors and to determine the best placement of future receivers expected to be added to the network, a software package is being developed jointly between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV). The software package, called the ZEUS Error Analysis for Lightning (ZEAL), will be used to obtain global scale lightning location retrieval error maps using both a Monte Carlo approach and chi-squared curvature matrix theory. At the core of ZEAL will be an implementation of an Iterative Oblate (IO) lightning location retrieval method recently developed at MSFC. The IO method will be appropriately modified to account for variable wave propagation speed, and the new retrieval results will be compared with the current ZEUS retrieval algorithm to assess potential improvements. In this preliminary ZEAL work effort, we defined 5000 source locations evenly distributed across the Earth. We then used the existing (as well as potential future ZEUS sites) to simulate arrival time data between source and ZEUS site. A total of 100 sources were considered at each of the 5000 locations, and timing errors were selected from a normal distribution having a mean of 0 seconds and a standard deviation of 20 microseconds. This simulated "noisy" dataset was analyzed using the IO algorithm to estimate source locations. The exact locations were compared with the retrieved locations, and the results are summarized via several color-coded "error maps."

  1. A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF BCS RF SURFACE IMPEDANCE WITH MAGNETIC FIELD USING THE XIAO CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, Charles E.; Xiao, Binping

    2013-09-01

    A recent new analysis of field-dependent BCS rf surface impedance based on moving Cooper pairs has been presented.[1] Using this analysis coded in Mathematica TM, survey calculations have been completed which examine the sensitivities of this surface impedance to variation of the BCS material parameters and temperature. The results present a refined description of the "best theoretical" performance available to potential applications with corresponding materials.

  2. Solar flare hard and soft x ray relationship determined from SMM HXRBS and BCS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toot, G. David

    1989-01-01

    The exact nature of the solar flare process is still somewhat a mystery. A key element to understanding flares if the relationship between the hard x rays emitted by the most energetic portions of the flare and the soft x rays from other areas and times. This relationship was studied by comparing hard x ray light curved from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) with the soft x ray light curve and its derivation from the Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) which is part of the X-Ray Polychrometer (XRP), these instruments being on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft (SMM). Data sample was taken from flares observed with the above instruments during 1980, the peak of the previous maximum of solar activity. Flares were chosen based on complete coverage of the event by several instruments. The HXRBS data covers the x ray spectrum from about 25 keV to about 440 keV in 15 spectral channels, while the BCS data used covers a region of the Spectrum around 3 angstroms including emission from the Ca XIX ion. Both sets of data were summed over their spectral ranges and plotted against time at a maximum time resolution of around 3 seconds. The most popular theory of flares holds that a beam of electrons produces the hard x rays by bremsstrahlung while the soft x rays are the thermal response to this energy deposition. The question is whether the rate of change of soft x ray emission might reflect the variability of the electron beam and hence the variability of the hard x rays. To address this, we took the time derivative of the soft x ray light curve and compared it to the hard flares, 12 of them showed very closed agreement between the soft x ray derivative and the hard x ray light curve. The other five did not show this behavior but were similar to each other in general soft x ray behavior. Efforts to determine basic differences between the two kinds of flares continue. In addition the behavior of soft x ray temperature of flares was examined.

  3. Solar flare hard and soft x ray relationship determined from SMM HXRBS and BCS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toot, G. David

    1989-01-01

    The exact nature of the solar flare process is still somewhat a mystery. A key element to understanding flares if the relationship between the hard x rays emitted by the most energetic portions of the flare and the soft x rays from other areas and times. This relationship was studied by comparing hard x ray light curved from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) with the soft x ray light curve and its derivation from the Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) which is part of the X-Ray Polychrometer (XRP), these instruments being on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft (SMM). Data sample was taken from flares observed with the above instruments during 1980, the peak of the previous maximum of solar activity. Flares were chosen based on complete coverage of the event by several instruments. The HXRBS data covers the x ray spectrum from about 25 keV to about 440 keV in 15 spectral channels, while the BCS data used covers a region of the Spectrum around 3 angstroms including emission from the Ca XIX ion. Both sets of data were summed over their spectral ranges and plotted against time at a maximum time resolution of around 3 seconds. The most popular theory of flares holds that a beam of electrons produces the hard x rays by bremsstrahlung while the soft x rays are the thermal response to this energy deposition. The question is whether the rate of change of soft x ray emission might reflect the variability of the electron beam and hence the variability of the hard x rays. To address this, we took the time derivative of the soft x ray light curve and compared it to the hard flares, 12 of them showed very closed agreement between the soft x ray derivative and the hard x ray light curve. The other five did not show this behavior but were similar to each other in general soft x ray behavior. Efforts to determine basic differences between the two kinds of flares continue. In addition the behavior of soft x ray temperature of flares was examined.

  4. Inhomogeneous BCS-BEC crossover for trapped cold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaricci, A.; Privitera, A.; Capone, M.

    2014-05-01

    The BCS-BEC (Bose-Einstein condensation) crossover in a lattice is a powerful paradigm that describes how a superconductor deviates from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer physics as the attractive interaction increases. Optical lattices loaded with binary mixtures of cold atoms allow one to access this phenomenon experimentally in a clean and controlled way. We show that, however, the possibility to study this phenomenon in actual cold-atoms experiments is limited by the effect of the trapping potential. Real-space dynamical mean-field theory calculations show indeed that interactions and the confining potential conspire to pack the fermions in the center of the trap, which approaches a band insulator when the attraction becomes sizeable. Interestingly, the energy gap is spatially more homogeneous than the superfluid condensate order parameter. We show how this physics reflects in several observables, and we propose an alternative strategy to disentangle the effect of the harmonic potential and measure the intrinsic properties resulting from the interaction strength.

  5. Spin noise and magnetic screening of impurities in a BCS superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Dall, Matthias; da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias; de Sousa, Rogério

    The coupling of a localized impurity to a BCS superconductor (SC) leads to the formation of impurity Cooper-pairs via the proximity effect, generating two bound states within the SC energy gap, the so-called Yu-Rusinov-Shiba (YSR) states. They are similar to the Andreev Bound States that originate from Andreev reflection, e.g. when the impurity is hosted in a Josephson junction, and are known to produce sharp sub-gap resonances in charge noise [de Sousa et al., PRB 2009], providing a natural explanation for the observation of microresonators in superconducting devices [Simmonds et al., PRL 2004]. Here we present a theory for the spin noise generated by magnetic impurities in a SC, and discuss the impact of the Shiba states on models of flux noise in superconducting qubits. We use a combination of analytical methods and the numerical renormalization group technique to calculate the spin noise of an Anderson impurity in a SC, unveiling the competition between the proximity effect and Kondo correlations. Both mechanisms produce magnetic screening and a corresponding reduction in spin noise, giving rise to new insights on the kinds of impurities that are responsible for the observed 1 /fα flux noise in superconducting circuits. This research is supported by NSERC CRD/478366-2015.

  6. Experimental verification of the modified spring-mass theory of fiber Bragg grating accelerometers using transverse forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuo; Chan, Tommy H T; Yau, Man Hong; Thambiratnam, David P; Tam, Hwa Yaw

    2014-02-20

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) accelerometer using transverse forces is more sensitive than one using axial forces with the same mass of the inertial object, because a barely stretched FBG fixed at its two ends is much more sensitive to transverse forces than axial ones. The spring-mass theory, with the assumption that the axial force changes little during the vibration, cannot accurately predict its sensitivity and resonant frequency in the gravitational direction because the assumption does not hold due to the fact that the FBG is barely prestretched. It was modified but still required experimental verification due to the limitations in the original experiments, such as the (1) friction between the inertial object and shell; (2) errors involved in estimating the time-domain records; (3) limited data; and (4) large interval ~5  Hz between the tested frequencies in the frequency-response experiments. The experiments presented here have verified the modified theory by overcoming those limitations. On the frequency responses, it is observed that the optimal condition for simultaneously achieving high sensitivity and resonant frequency is at the infinitesimal prestretch. On the sensitivity at the same frequency, the experimental sensitivities of the FBG accelerometer with a 5.71 gram inertial object at 6 Hz (1.29, 1.19, 0.88, 0.64, and 0.31  nm/g at the 0.03, 0.69, 1.41, 1.93, and 3.16 nm prestretches, respectively) agree with the static sensitivities predicted (1.25, 1.14, 0.83, 0.61, and 0.29  nm/g, correspondingly). On the resonant frequency, (1) its assumption that the resonant frequencies in the forced and free vibrations are similar is experimentally verified; (2) its dependence on the distance between the FBG's fixed ends is examined, showing it to be independent; (3) the predictions of the spring-mass theory and modified theory are compared with the experimental results, showing that the modified theory predicts more accurately. The modified theory

  7. Considerations for a Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS): application to five drugs.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Shivani V; Rodriguez, William; Khan, Mansoor; Polli, James E

    2014-06-01

    It has been advocated that biopharmaceutic risk assessment should be conducted early in pediatric product development and synchronized with the adult product development program. However, we are unaware of efforts to classify drugs into a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) framework for pediatric patients. The objective was to classify five drugs into a potential BCS. These five drugs were selected since both oral and intravenous pharmacokinetic data were available for each drug, and covered the four BCS classes in adults. Literature searches for each drug were conducted using Medline and applied to classify drugs with respect to solubility and permeability in pediatric subpopulations. Four pediatric subpopulations were considered: neonates, infants, children, and adolescents. Regarding solubility, dose numbers were calculated using a volume for each subpopulation based on body surface area (BSA) relative to 250 ml for a 1.73 m(2) adult. Dose numbers spanned a range of values, depending upon the pediatric dose formula and subpopulation. Regarding permeability, pharmacokinetic literature data required assumptions and decisions about data collection. Using a devised pediatric BCS framework, there was agreement in adult and pediatric BCS class for two drugs, azithromycin (class 3) and ciprofloxacin (class 4). There was discordance for the three drugs that have high adult permeability since all pediatric permeabilities were low: dolasetron (class 3 in pediatric), ketoprofen (class 4 in pediatric), and voriconazole (class 4 in pediatric). A main contribution of this work is the identification of critical factors required for a pediatric BCS.

  8. Apo- and Cellopentaose-bound Structures of the Bacterial Cellulose Synthase Subunit BcsZ

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Olga; Zimmer, Jochen

    2012-10-25

    Cellulose, a very abundant extracellular polysaccharide, is synthesized in a finely tuned process that involves the activity of glycosyl-transferases and hydrolases. The cellulose microfibril consists of bundles of linear {beta}-1,4-glucan chains that are synthesized inside the cell; however, the mechanism by which these polymers traverse the cell membrane is currently unknown. In Gram-negative bacteria, the cellulose synthase complex forms a trans-envelope complex consisting of at least four subunits. Although three of these subunits account for the synthesis and translocation of the polysaccharide, the fourth subunit, BcsZ, is a periplasmic protein with endo-{beta}-1,4-glucanase activity. BcsZ belongs to family eight of glycosyl-hydrolases, and its activity is required for optimal synthesis and membrane translocation of cellulose. In this study we report two crystal structures of BcsZ from Escherichia coli. One structure shows the wild-type enzyme in its apo form, and the second structure is for a catalytically inactive mutant of BcsZ in complex with the substrate cellopentaose. The structures demonstrate that BcsZ adopts an ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 6}-barrel fold and that it binds four glucan moieties of cellopentaose via highly conserved residues exclusively on the nonreducing side of its catalytic center. Thus, the BcsZ-cellopentaose structure most likely represents a posthydrolysis state in which the newly formed nonreducing end has already left the substrate binding pocket while the enzyme remains attached to the truncated polysaccharide chain. We further show that BcsZ efficiently degrades {beta}-1,4-glucans in in vitro cellulase assays with carboxymethyl-cellulose as substrate.

  9. Modified Brans-Dicke theory with space-time anisotropic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Taeyoon; Oh, Phillial E-mail: ploh@skku.edu

    2014-03-01

    We consider the ADM formalism of the Brans-Dicke theory and propose a space-time anisotropic extension of the theory by introducing five free parameters. We find that the resulting theory reveals many interesting aspects which are not present in the original BD theory. We first discuss the ghost instability and strong coupling problems which are present in the gravity theory without the full diffeomorphism symmetry and show that they can be avoided in a region of the parameter space. We also perform the post-Newtonian approximation and show that the constraint of the Brans-Dicke parameter ω{sub BD} being large to be consistent with the solar system observations could be evaded in the extended theory. We also discuss that accelerating Universe can be achieved without the need of the potential for the Brans-Dicke scalar.

  10. A Modified Hansen's Theory as Applied to the Motion of Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, Peter

    1960-01-01

    This report presents a theory of oblateness perturbations of the orbits of artificial satellites based on Hansen's theory, with modification for adaptation to fast machine computation. The theory permits the easy inclusion of any gravitational terms and is suitable for the deduction of geo-physical and geodetic data from orbit observations on artificial satellites. The computations can be carried out to any desired order compatible with the accuracy of the geodetic parameters.

  11. Novel symmetries in the modified version of two dimensional Proca theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanja, T.; Shukla, D.; Malik, R. P.

    2013-08-01

    By exploiting Stueckelberg's approach, we obtain a gauge theory for the two-dimensional, that is, (1+1)-dimensional (2D) Proca theory and demonstrate that this theory is endowed with, in addition to the usual Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) and anti-BRST symmetries, the on-shell nilpotent (anti-)co-BRST symmetries, under which the total gauge-fixing term remains invariant. The anticommutator of the BRST and co-BRST (as well as anti-BRST and anti-co-BRST) symmetries define a unique bosonic symmetry in the theory, under which the ghost part of the Lagrangian density remains invariant. To establish connections of the above symmetries with the Hodge theory, we invoke a pseudo-scalar field in the theory. Ultimately, we demonstrate that the full theory provides a field theoretic example for the Hodge theory where the continuous symmetry transformations provide a physical realization of the de Rham cohomological operators and discrete symmetries of the theory lead to the physical realization of the Hodge duality operation of differential geometry. We also mention the physical implications and utility of our present investigation.

  12. The Modified Delphi Method to Analyze the Application of Instructional Design Theory to Online Graduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeedick, Danielle Marie

    2010-01-01

    During the past several decades, the field of instructional design theory has experienced changes in what is mostly applied to traditional, on-ground education. While instructional design theory has been (and still is being) discussed, constructed, and deconstructed, there has been no agreement among prominent instructional design theory…

  13. Ethical Decision Making in Academic Dishonesty with Application of Modified Theory of Planned Behavior: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Chan Ling; Othman, Jamilah; D'Silva, Jeffrey Lawrence; Omar, Zoharah

    2014-01-01

    This conceptual paper studies the application of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TBP) in academic dishonesty with the mediating variable of ethical ideologies. The study reviews literature on the Theory of Planned Behavior and past studies pertaining to academic dishonesty. The paper analyses the relationship of the variables of TPB on academic…

  14. Statistics on BCS classification of generic drug products approved between 2000 and 2011 in the USA.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anil K; Anand, Om; Chun, Nam; Conner, Dale P; Mehta, Mehul U; Nhu, Duong T; Polli, James E; Yu, Lawrence X; Davit, Barbara M

    2012-12-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification system (BCS) classifies drug substances based on aqueous solubility and intestinal permeability. The objective of this study was to use the World Health Organization Model List of Essential Medicines to determine the distribution of BCS Class 1, 2, 3, and 4 drugs in Abbreviated New drug Applications (ANDA) submissions. To categorize solubility and intestinal permeability properties of generic drugs under development, we used a list of 61 drugs which were classified as BCS 1, 2, 3, and 4 drugs with certainty in the World Health Organization Model List of Essential Medicines. Applying this list to evaluation of 263 ANDA approvals of BCS drugs during the period of 2000 to 2011 indicated 110 approvals (41.8%) for Class 1 drugs (based on both biowaiver and in vivo bioequivalence studies), 55 (20.9%) approvals for Class 2 drugs, 98 (37.3%) approvals for Class 3 drugs, and no (0%) approvals for Class 4 drugs. The present data indicated a trend of more ANDA approvals of BCS Class 1 drugs than Class 3 or Class 2 drugs. Antiallergic drugs in Class 1, drugs for pain relief in Class 2 and antidiabetic drugs in Class 3 have received the largest number of approvals during this period.

  15. Free vibration of three-dimensional anisotropic layered composite nanoplates based on modified couple-stress theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junhong; Chen, Jiangyi; Pan, Ernian

    2017-03-01

    Based on the modified couple-stress theory, three-dimensional analytical solutions of free vibration of a simply supported, multilayered and anisotropic composite nanoplate are derived by solving an eigenvalue system and using the propagator matrix method. By expanding the solutions of the extended displacements in terms of two-dimensional Fourier series, the final governing equations of motion with modified couple-stress effect are reduced to an eigenvalue system of ordinary differential equations. Analytical expressions for the natural frequencies and mode shapes of multilayered anisotropic composite plates with modified couple-stress effect are then derived via the propagator matrix method. Numerical examples are carried out for homogeneous thick-plates and sandwich composite plates to show the effect of the non-local parameter in different layers and stacking sequence on the mode shapes. The present solutions can serve as benchmarks to various thick-plate theories and numerical methods, and could be further useful for designing layered composite structures involving small scale.

  16. Free vibration analysis of embedded magneto-electro-thermo-elastic cylindrical nanoshell based on the modified couple stress theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Safarpour, Hamed

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, size-dependent effect of an embedded magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) nanoshell subjected to thermo-electro-magnetic loadings on free vibration behavior is investigated. Also, the surrounding elastic medium has been considered as the model of Winkler characterized by the spring. The size-dependent MEE nanoshell is investigated on the basis of the modified couple stress theory. Taking attention to the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT), the modeled nanoshell and its equations of motion are derived using principle of minimum potential energy. The accuracy of the presented model is validated with some cases in the literature. Finally, using the Navier-type method, an analytical solution of governing equations for vibration behavior of simply supported MEE cylindrical nanoshell under combined loadings is presented and the effects of material length scale parameter, temperature changes, external electric potential, external magnetic potential, circumferential wave numbers, constant of spring, shear correction factor and length-to-radius ratio of the nanoshell on natural frequency are identified. Since there has been no research about size-dependent analysis MEE cylindrical nanoshell under combined loadings based on FSDT, numerical results are presented to be served as benchmarks for future analysis of MEE nanoshells using the modified couple stress theory.

  17. Ion-Conserving Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Theory Considering a Steric Effect in an Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-12-01

    The modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck (MPNP) and modified Poisson-Boltzmann (MPB) equations are well known as fundamental equations that consider a steric effect, which prevents unphysical ion concentrations. However, it is unclear whether they are equivalent or not. To clarify this problem, we propose an improved free energy formulation that considers a steric limit with an ion-conserving condition and successfully derive the ion-conserving modified Poisson-Boltzmann (IC-MPB) equations that are equivalent to the MPNP equations. Furthermore, we numerically examine the equivalence by comparing between the IC-MPB solutions obtained by the Newton method and the steady MPNP solutions obtained by the finite-element finite-volume method. A surprising aspect of our finding is that the MPB solutions are much different from the MPNP (IC-MPB) solutions in a confined space. We consider that our findings will significantly contribute to understanding the surface science between solids and liquids.

  18. Constraints on modified gravity from Planck 2015: when the health of your theory makes the difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatelli, Valentina; Piazza, Federico; Marinoni, Christian

    2016-09-01

    We use the effective field theory of dark energy (EFT of DE) formalism to constrain dark energy models belonging to the Horndeski class with the recent Planck 2015 CMB data. The space of theories is spanned by a certain number of parameters determining the linear cosmological perturbations, while the expansion history is set to that of a standard ΛCDM model. We always demand that the theories be free of fatal instabilities. Additionally, we consider two optional conditions, namely that scalar and tensor perturbations propagate with subliminal speed. Such criteria severely restrict the allowed parameter space and are thus very effective in shaping the posteriors. As a result, we confirm that no theory performs better than ΛCDM when CMB data alone are analysed. Indeed, the healthy dark energy models considered here are not able to reproduce those phenomenological behaviours of the effective Newton constant and gravitational slip parameters that, according to previous studies, best fit the data.

  19. BCS-BEC crossover induced by a shallow band: Pushing standard superconductivity types apart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Vagov, A.; Shanenko, A. A.; Axt, V. M.; Perali, A.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2017-03-01

    The appearance of a shallow band(s) drives a superconductor towards the BCS-BEC crossover, conventionally associated with notable changes in single-particle properties and an elevated critical temperature. Here we demonstrate that the proximity to the crossover induced by a shallow band has also a dramatic effect on the phase diagram of the superconducting magnetic properties. When the system passes from the BCS to BEC regime, the intertype domain between superconductivity types I and II enlarges systematically, being inversely proportional to the square of the Cooper-pair radius, the main parameter that controls the BCS-BEC superconductivity. We also show that despite the presence of a shallow band, the condensate fluctuations are suppressed when it coexists in one material with standard deep bands, as in recent iron chalcogenides FeSe xTe1 -x and FeSe .

  20. Modifying Health Behavior for Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Prevention with the Health Belief Model and Social Support Theory.

    PubMed

    Padchasuwan, Natnapa; Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Rujirakul, Ratana; Wakkuwattapong, Parichart; Norkaew, Jun; Kujapun, Jirawoot; Ponphimai, Sukanya; Chavenkun, Wasugree; Kompor, Pontip; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is a serious health problem in Thailand. Infection is associated with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), endemic among human populations in northeast and north Thailand where raw fish containing fluke metacercariae are frequently consumed. Recently, Thailand public health authorities have been organized to reduce morbidity and mortality particularly in the northeast through O. viverrini and CCA screening projects. Health modfication is one of activities included in this campaign, but systemic guidelines of modifying and developing health behavior for liver flukes and CCA prevention in communities towards health belief and social support theory are still various and unclear. Here we review the guidelines for modifying and developing health behavior among populations in rural communities to strengthen understanding regarding perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers to liver fluke and CCA prevention. This model may be useful for public health of cancers and related organizations to further health behavior change in endemic areas.

  1. Applying Rasch Model and Generalizability Theory to Study Modified-Angoff Cut Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce, Alvaro J.; Wang, Ze

    2012-01-01

    The traditional approach to scale modified-Angoff cut scores transfers the raw cuts to an existing raw-to-scale score conversion table. Under the traditional approach, cut scores and conversion table raw scores are not only seen as interchangeable but also as originating from a common scaling process. In this article, we propose an alternative…

  2. Examination of the Korean Modified Checklist of Autism in Toddlers: Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seung, HyeKyeung; Ji, Juye; Kim, Soo-Jin; Sung, Inkyung; Youn, Young-Ah; Hong, Gyunghun; Lee, Hyeonjin; Lee, Young Hwan; Lee, Hyunsuk; Youm, Hyun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the clinical utility and psychometric properties of the Korean Modified Checklist of Autism in Toddlers (K-M-CHAT)-2. A sample of 2300 parents of 16- to 36-month-old children was recruited across South Korea. A phone interview was utilized to follow up with participants who initially screened positive for autism spectrum…

  3. Examination of the Korean Modified Checklist of Autism in Toddlers: Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seung, HyeKyeung; Ji, Juye; Kim, Soo-Jin; Sung, Inkyung; Youn, Young-Ah; Hong, Gyunghun; Lee, Hyeonjin; Lee, Young Hwan; Lee, Hyunsuk; Youm, Hyun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the clinical utility and psychometric properties of the Korean Modified Checklist of Autism in Toddlers (K-M-CHAT)-2. A sample of 2300 parents of 16- to 36-month-old children was recruited across South Korea. A phone interview was utilized to follow up with participants who initially screened positive for autism spectrum…

  4. Gene cuisine or Frankenfood? The theory of reasoned action as an audience segmentation strategy for messages about genetically modified foods.

    PubMed

    Silk, Kami J; Weiner, Judith; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2005-12-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are currently a controversial topic about which the lay public in the United States knows little. Formative research has demonstrated that the lay public is uncertain and concerned about GM foods. This study (N = 858) extends focus group research by using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) to examine attitudes and subjective norms related to GM foods as a theoretical strategy for audience segmentation. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four unique audiences based on their attitude and subjective norm toward GM foods (ambivalent-biotech, antibiotech, biotech-normer, and biotech individual). Results are discussed in terms of the theoretical and practical significance for audience segmentation.

  5. BcsZ inhibits biofilm phenotypes and promotes virulence by blocking cellulose production in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Irfan; Rouf, Syed Fazle; Sun, Lei; Cimdins, Annika; Shafeeq, Sulman; Le Guyon, Soazig; Schottkowski, Marco; Rhen, Mikael; Römling, Ute

    2016-10-19

    Cellulose, a 1,4 beta-glucan polysaccharide, is produced by a variety of organisms including bacteria. Although the production of cellulose has a high biological, ecological and economical impact, regulatory mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis are mostly unknown. Family eight cellulases are regularly associated with cellulose biosynthesis operons in bacteria; however, their function is poorly characterized. In this study, we analysed the role of the cellulase BcsZ encoded by the bcsABZC cellulose biosynthesis operon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in biofilm related behavior. We also investigated the involvement of BcsZ in pathogenesis of S. Typhimurium including a murine typhoid fever infection model. In S. Typhimurium, cellulase BcsZ with a putative periplasmic location negatively regulates cellulose biosynthesis. Moreover, as assessed with a non-polar mutant, BcsZ affects cellulose-associated phenotypes such as the rdar biofilm morphotype, cell clumping, biofilm formation, pellicle formation and flagella-dependent motility. Strikingly, although upregulation of cellulose biosynthesis was not observed on agar plate medium at 37 °C, BcsZ is required for efficient pathogen-host interaction. Key virulence phenotypes of S. Typhimurium such as invasion of epithelial cells and proliferation in macrophages were positively regulated by BcsZ. Further on, a bcsZ mutant was outcompeted by the wild type in organ colonization in the murine typhoid fever infection model. Selected phenotypes were relieved upon deletion of the cellulose synthase BcsA and/or the central biofilm activator CsgD. Although the protein scaffold has an additional physiological role, our findings indicate that the catalytic activity of BcsZ effectively downregulates CsgD activated cellulose biosynthesis. Repression of cellulose production by BcsZ subsequently enables Salmonella to efficiently colonize the host.

  6. Initial conditions for cosmological N-body simulations of the scalar sector of theories of Newtonian, Relativistic and Modified Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Valkenburg, Wessel; Hu, Bin E-mail: hu@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl

    2015-09-01

    We present a description for setting initial particle displacements and field values for simulations of arbitrary metric theories of gravity, for perfect and imperfect fluids with arbitrary characteristics. We extend the Zel'dovich Approximation to nontrivial theories of gravity, and show how scale dependence implies curved particle paths, even in the entirely linear regime of perturbations. For a viable choice of Effective Field Theory of Modified Gravity, initial conditions set at high redshifts are affected at the level of up to 5% at Mpc scales, which exemplifies the importance of going beyond Λ-Cold Dark Matter initial conditions for modifications of gravity outside of the quasi-static approximation. In addition, we show initial conditions for a simulation where a scalar modification of gravity is modelled in a Lagrangian particle-like description. Our description paves the way for simulations and mock galaxy catalogs under theories of gravity beyond the standard model, crucial for progress towards precision tests of gravity and cosmology.

  7. Off-Grid Perfect BCs for the FDTD Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-23

    Numerical Analysis of Several Locally Conformal FDTD Schemes,” IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory and Techniques, Vol. 47, P. 56-66, 1999. [4] S. Dey and R... Mittra , “A Locally Conformal Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) Algorithm for Modeling Three-Dimensional Perfectly Conducting Objects ,” IEEE

  8. Experimental studies of sputtering on zirconium analyzed using modified Roosandaal Sanders theory. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schomber, P.R.

    1995-03-01

    An ion optics system utilizing a wein filter velocity selector has been modeled and characterized for use as an ion source for an instrument to measure high resolution angular distributions of sputtered neutral atoms. Laser induced fluorescence detection techniques are used to measure ground state and first excited state sputtering angular distributions on a polycrystalline zirconium foil using argon and nitrogen sputter gases. The incident ion beam impact angle has been varied from 15 deg to 75 deg as measured from surface normal and the wein filter velocity selector has been used to select N2+ and N+ ion beams from the nitrogen ion beam. The experimental data gathered are compared to Roosandaal Sanders analytical sputtering theory along with data on xenon and neon. Roosandaal Sanders theory reproduces the near surface normal sputtering behavior but rapidly breaks down as the incident ion beam impact angle moves toward the surface. Modifications to the Roosandaal Sanders equation to introduce adjustable fitting parameters and non-linear least squares fitting of the experimental data to these parameters has been accomplished. The results are discussed relating the fitting parameters to physical constants based in Roosandaal Sanders Theory. Discrepancies in the theory are addressed with extensive discussion on ion surface interaction.

  9. Modifying Heathcare System Alcohol Interventions for the High-Risk Drinking Environment: Theory in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croff, Julie M.; Clapp, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) is a model program in the medical context, but it may be missing a large portion of the population with low access to healthcare services. Young adults have the lowest rates of insurance, low healthcare service utilization, and high rates of substance use. Theory driven Screening and…

  10. Modifying Heathcare System Alcohol Interventions for the High-Risk Drinking Environment: Theory in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croff, Julie M.; Clapp, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) is a model program in the medical context, but it may be missing a large portion of the population with low access to healthcare services. Young adults have the lowest rates of insurance, low healthcare service utilization, and high rates of substance use. Theory driven Screening and…

  11. Development and application of an analysis of axisymmetric body effects on helicopter rotor aerodynamics using modified slender body theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, G.; Johnson, W.

    1984-01-01

    A computationally efficient body analysis designed to couple with a comprehensive helicopter analysis is developed in order to calculate the body-induced aerodynamic effects on rotor performance and loads. A modified slender body theory is used as the body model. With the objective of demonstrating the accuracy, efficiency, and application of the method, the analysis at this stage is restricted to axisymmetric bodies at zero angle of attack. By comparing with results from an exact analysis for simple body shapes, it is found that the modified slender body theory provides an accurate potential flow solution for moderately thick bodies, with only a 10%-20% increase in computational effort over that of an isolated rotor analysis. The computational ease of this method provides a means for routine assessment of body-induced effects on a rotor. Results are given for several configurations that typify those being used in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and in the rotor-body aerodynamic interference tests being conducted at Ames. A rotor-hybrid airship configuration is also analyzed.

  12. The combination of GIS and biphasic to better predict in vivo dissolution of BCS class IIb drugs, ketoconazole and raloxifene.

    PubMed

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Igawa, Naoto; Drelich, Adam J; Amidon, Gregory E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2017-09-14

    The formulation developments and the in vivo assessment of Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class II drugs are challenging due to their low solubility and high permeability in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Since the GI environment influences the drug dissolution of BCS class II drugs, the human GI characteristics should be incorporated into the in vitro dissolution system to predict bioperformance of BCS class II drugs. An absorptive compartment may be important in dissolution apparatus for BCS class II drugs, especially for bases (BCS IIb) because of high permeability, precipitation and supersaturation. Thus, the in vitro dissolution system with an absorptive compartment may help predicting the in vivo phenomena of BCS class II drugs better than compendial dissolution apparatuses. In this study, an absorptive compartment (a biphasic device) was introduced to a gastrointestinal simulator (GIS). This addition was evaluated if this in vitro system could improve the prediction of in vivo dissolution for BCS class IIb drugs, ketoconazole and raloxifene, and subsequent absorption. The GIS is a practical in vivo predictive tool and exhibited an improved in vivo prediction utilizing the biphasic format and thus a better tool for evaluating the bioperformance of BCS class IIb drugs than compendial apparatuses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Insight into thiophene hydrodesulfurization on clean and S-modified MoP(010): a periodic density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Li, Guixia; Zhao, Lianming; Zhu, Houyu; Liu, Xiuping; Ma, Huifang; Yu, Yanchen; Guo, Wenyue

    2017-07-05

    The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of thiophene on clean and S-modified MoP(010) is investigated to understand the HDS mechanism as well as the surface sulfur (S) atom effect using periodic density functional theory (DFT). The results show that thiophene prefers strongly flat adsorption on both the clean and S-modified surfaces, in either the molecular state or the dissociative state breaking simultaneously one C-S bond, and the adsorption of thiophene can be slightly weakened by the surface S atom. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis indicates that the HDS of thiophene in both the molecular and dissociative adsorption states prefers to take place along the direct desulfurization (DDS) pathway rather than hydrogenation on both the clean and S-modified MoP(010) surfaces. Surface S shows a promotion effect on the HDS catalytic activity of MoP(010), because the energy barrier/rate constant of the rate-determining step on the DDS pathway is decreased/enlarged under the S modification. Compared with the situation of MoP(001), MoP(010) should have relatively low HDS activity, since a higher energy barrier as well as weaker exothermicity is involved in the reaction on the latter surface.

  14. Collective mode of homogeneous superfluid Fermi gases in the BEC-BCS crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Combescot, R.; Kagan, M. Yu.; Stringari, S.

    2006-10-15

    We perform a detailed study of the collective mode across the whole crossover from the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)-to the BCS regime in fermionic gases at zero temperature, covering the whole range of energy beyond the linear regime. This is done on the basis of the dynamical BCS model. We recover first the results of the linear regime in a simple form. Then specific attention is paid to the nonlinear part of the dispersion relation and its interplay with the continuum of single-fermionic excitations. In particular we consider in detail the merging of the collective mode into the continuum of single-fermionic excitations. This occurs not only on the BCS side of the crossover, but also slightly beyond unitarity on the BEC side. Another remarkable feature is the very linear behavior of the dispersion relation in the vicinity of unitarity almost up to merging with the continuum. Finally, while on the BEC side the mode is quite analogous to the Bogoliubov mode, a difference appears at high wave vectors. On the basis of our results we determine the Landau critical velocity in the BEC-BCS crossover which is found to be largest close to unitarity. Our investigation has revealed interesting qualitative features which deserve experimental exploration as well as further theoretical studies by more sophisticated means.

  15. NQRS Data for C24H20BCs (Subst. No. 1575)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H20BCs (Subst. No. 1575)

  16. Development and Validation of the Calling and Vocation Questionnaire (CVQ) and Brief Calling Scale (BCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dik, Bryan J.; Eldridge, Brandy M.; Steger, Michael F.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2012-01-01

    Research on work as a calling is limited by measurement concerns. In response, the authors introduce the multidimensional Calling and Vocation Questionnaire (CVQ) and the Brief Calling scale (BCS), instruments assessing presence of, and search for, a calling. Study 1 describes CVQ development using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis…

  17. Solitons and Rabi Oscillations in a Time-Dependent BCS Pairing Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barankov, Roman; Levitov, Leonid; Spivak, Boris

    2004-03-01

    Motivated by recent efforts [1] to achieve fermion pairing in cold alkali atomic gases near a Feshbach resonance, we consider fast, nonadiabatic formation of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) state after the coupling constant is turned on. In the nonadiabatic regime [2], the system oscillates between the normal and BCS states until BCS state settles down on time scales controlled by the quasiparticle energy relaxation. We study the collective oscillation of the BCS-Bogoliubov amplitudes u_p, v_p, along with the pairing function Δ. We demonstrate that it is an integrable dynamical problem, and obtain a family of exact solutions in the form of single solitons and soliton trains, describing periodic oscillations. We interpret the collective oscillations as Bloch precession of Anderson pseudospins [3], where each soliton causes a pseudospin a full 2π Rabi rotation. Numerical simulations of the Bloch dynamics indicate the ubiquity of the solitons, and demonstrate their robustness with respect to noise and damping. [1] B. DeMarco, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4208 (1999); A. G. Truscott et al., Science 291, 2570 (2001) [2] R. A. Barankov, L. S. Levitov, B. Z. Spivak, arXiv:cond-mat/0312053 [3] P. W. Anderson, Phys. Rev. 112, 1900 (1958)

  18. Modified Biot-Gassmann theory for calculating elastic velocities for unconsolidated and consolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2002-01-01

    The classical Biot-Gassmann theory (BGT) generally overestimates shear-wave velocities of water-saturated sediments. To overcome this problem, a new theory is developed based on BGT and on the velocity ratio as a function of G(1 - ??)n, where ?? is porosity and n and G are constants. Based on laboratory data measured at ultrasonic frequencies, parameters for the new formulation are derived. This new theory is extended to include the effect of differential pressure and consolidation on the velocity ratio by making n a function of differential pressure and the rate of porosity reduction with respect to differential pressure. A scale G is introduced to compensate for discrepancies between measured and predicted velocities, mainly caused by the presence of clay in the matrix. As differential pressure increases and the rate of porosity reduction with respect to differential pressure decreases, the exponent n decreases and elastic velocities increase. Because velocity dispersion is not considered, this new formula is optimum for analyzing velocities measured at ultrasonic frequencies or for sediments having low dispersion characteristics such as clean sandstone with high permeability and lack of grain-scale local flow. The new formula is applied to predict velocities from porosity or from porosity and P-wave velocity and is in good agreement with laboratory and well log data. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

  19. Rotational analysis of birefringent crystal particles based on modified theory in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong; Zhu, Yanying; Yao, Wenying; Pei, Huan

    2015-04-01

    In order to achieve high-precision, controllable rotation of uniaxial birefringent crystal particles, we study the principle of optical rotation due to the transfer of spin angular momentum from light to birefringent crystal particles. The interaction process between the beam and particles is affected by various factors existed actually, for instance: the reflection of beam on the crystal surface, laser power, the set of angle between the crystal optical axis and surface, radius, phase difference between the ordinary ray and extraordinary ray. According to the analysis of these factors, the theoretical model of optical rotation is reconstructed. The theoretical curves of calcium carbonate and silicon particles chosen as experimental material between the rotational frequency and the radius are simulated and calculated. The result shows that the rotation frequency is inversely proportional to the cube of radius, and compared the performance of modified model with traditional model. The birefringent particles are rotated by optical tweezers in the experiment, and rotation frequency is measured with the same laser power. According to the experimental results of optical rotation, the modified Friese theoretical model is proved to be the reasonably and excellence, in addition, the result shows the maximum frequency of calcium carbonate is 19.1Hz, and the maximum frequency of silicon particles is 11.5Hz. The rationality of our experiment is testified by compared with theoretical analysis. Our study has great directive significance to the design of optical driven micro-mechanical motor and the material selection of rotor.

  20. A modified Mach-Zehnder experiment to test the applicability of quantum theory to single-particle experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, K.; Lippert, Th.; Richter, M.; Barbara, B.; Miyashita, S.; De Raedt, H.

    2011-09-01

    We propose a modified single-particle Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiment in which the path length of one arm may change (randomly or systematically) according to the value of an external two-valued variable x, for each passage of a particle through the interferometer. Quantum theory predicts an interference pattern that is independent of the sequence of the values of x. On the other hand, corpuscular models that reproduce the results of quantum optics experiments carried out up to this date show a reduced visibility and a shift of the interference pattern depending on the details of the sequence of the values of x. The key question to be answered in a real laboratory experiment is: Which interference pattern is observed? Despite the general believe that quantum theory might be used to describe all single particle experiments, this is an interesting question to be answered since in the proposed experiment the experimental conditions not only continuously change but they might also have causal effects on the passage of the photons through the interferometer. The proposed experiment can be used to determine to what extent quantum theory provides a description of observed events beyond the usual statistical level.

  1. Simulation for F.C.C. deformation texture by modified pencil glide theory[Face Centered Cubic

    SciTech Connect

    Masui, H.

    1999-11-26

    Inspired by the pencil glide theory for b.c.c. metal, modified pencil glide theory for f.c.c. metal was proposed, dividing the 12 glide systems of f.c.c. metal into three groups individually composed of eight {l{underscore}brace}111{r{underscore}brace}{l{underscore}angle}110{r{underscore}angle} glide systems around the principal axes X[100], Y[010] and Z[001]. These assumptions yielded two mathematical solutions {Omega}(3) and {Omega}(1). In {Omega}(3), from the three groups with four complete conjugated glide systems composed of, respectively, two glide systems of common {l{underscore}angle}110{r{underscore}angle} direction, only one group with the maximum plastic work may operate if the requirements are satisfied, otherwise glide systems in {Omega}(1) where one of the four conjugated glide systems is zero are activated. The model considering the 12 glide systems of f.c.c. as a whole explained many experimentally stable orientations in axisymmetric and rolling deformation. The differences between the two pencil glide theories for b.c.c. and f.c.c. are also discussed with data.

  2. Twisting Anderson pseudospins with light: Quench dynamics in terahertz-pumped BCS superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yang-Zhi; Liao, Yunxiang; Foster, Matthew S.

    2017-03-01

    We study the preparation (pump) and the detection (probe) of far-from-equilibrium BCS superconductor dynamics in THz pump-probe experiments. In a recent experiment [R. Matsunaga, Y. I. Hamada, K. Makise, Y. Uzawa, H. Terai, Z. Wang, and R. Shimano, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 057002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.057002], an intense monocycle THz pulse with center frequency ω ≃Δ was injected into a superconductor with BCS gap Δ ; the subsequent postpump evolution was detected via the optical conductivity. It was argued that nonlinear coupling of the pump to the Anderson pseudospins of the superconductor induces coherent dynamics of the Higgs (amplitude) mode Δ (t ) . We validate this picture in a two-dimensional BCS model with a combination of exact numerics and the Lax reduction method, and we compute the nonequilibrium phase diagram as a function of the pump intensity. The main effect of the pump is to scramble the orientations of Anderson pseudospins along the Fermi surface by twisting them in the x y plane. We show that more intense pump pulses can induce a far-from-equilibrium phase of gapless superconductivity ("phase I"), originally predicted in the context of interaction quenches in ultracold atoms. We show that the THz pump method can reach phase I at much lower energy densities than an interaction quench, and we demonstrate that Lax reduction (tied to the integrability of the BCS Hamiltonian) provides a general quantitative tool for computing coherent BCS dynamics. We also calculate the Mattis-Bardeen optical conductivity for the nonequilibrium states discussed here.

  3. Einstein equivalence principle and theories of gravitation: A gravitationally modified standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E.; Logiudice, E.A.; Riveros, C.; Vucetich, H.

    1988-09-15

    A formalism for the standard model of fundamental interactions in the presence of a static and spherically symmetric gravitational field is developed, extending earlier works that involve classical electromagnetic systems. This provides a tool to analyze a wide class of metric and nonmetric theories of gravitation, concerning the validity of Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP). Identification of potentially violating EEP terms of the model is achieved in a full quantum way using renormalization-group techniques. A brief discussion of some formal properties and implications for Schiff's conjecture is also given.

  4. Nonlinear theory of intense laser-plasma interactions modified by vacuum polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wenbo; Bu, Zhigang; Li, Hehe; Luo, Yuee; Ji, Peiyong

    2013-07-15

    The classical nonlinear theory of laser-plasma interactions is corrected by taking account of the vacuum polarization effects. A set of wave equations are obtained by using the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian density and the derivative correction with the first-order quantum electrodynamic effects. A model more suitable to formulate the interactions of ultra-strong lasers and high-energy-density plasmas is developed. In the result, some environments in which the effects of vacuum polarization will be enhanced are discussed.

  5. Modifying gradient theory to predict the surface properties of halogenated hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestova, T. D.; Lozovsky, T. L.; Zhelezny, V. P.

    2014-05-01

    A new method is proposed for predicting the surface tension, density profile, and thickness of the surface layer of a liquid near an interface using gradient theory. The objects of study are halogenated hydrocarbons. The algorithm for calculating surface properties includes a new modification of the Peng-Robinson cubic equation of state (EoS) that does not require information on the critical parameters, and a new procedure for calculating the influence parameter. Validation of the procedure for predicting the surface properties of liquids shows that the agreement between the calculated surface tension of halogenated hydrocarbons and the existing literature data is sufficient for practical use.

  6. Method to modify random matrix theory using short-time behavior in chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, A Matthew; Kaplan, Lev

    2009-09-01

    We discuss a modification to random matrix theory (RMT) eigenstate statistics that systematically takes into account the nonuniversal short-time behavior of chaotic systems. The method avoids diagonalization of the Hamiltonian, instead requiring only knowledge of short-time dynamics for a chaotic system or ensemble of similar systems. Standard RMT and semiclassical predictions are recovered in the limits of zero Ehrenfest time and infinite Heisenberg time, respectively. As examples, we discuss wave-function autocorrelations and cross correlations and show how the approach leads to a significant improvement in the accuracy for simple chaotic systems where comparison can be made with brute-force diagonalization.

  7. Modified Becke'05 method of nondynamic correlation in density functional theory with self-consistent implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proynov, Emil; Liu, Fenglai; Kong, Jing

    2012-02-01

    Becke's B05 method for nondynamic correlation is simplified for self-consistent implementation. An alternative form is proposed for the nondynamic correlation factors that do not require solving a complicated nonlinear algebraic equation. The four linear parameters of B05 are re-optimized together with one extra parameter in a modified expression for the second-order same-spin energy contribution. The latter is co-linear with the exact-exchange energy density and does not require higher moments of the relaxed exchange hole. Preliminary tests of this method show that it leads to a slight improvement over the resolution-of-identity B05 results reported previously for atomization energies, and to a definite improvement for reaction barriers of Hydrogen abstraction.

  8. A modified Muskingum routing approach for floodplain flows: Theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, J. J.; Ahilan, S.; Bruen, M.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryHydrological or hydraulic flood routing methods can be used to predict the floodplain influences on a flood wave as it passes along a river reach. While hydraulic routing uses both the equation of continuity and the equation of momentum to describe the dynamics of river flows, the simpler data requirements of hydrological routing makes it useful for preliminary estimates of the time and shape of a flood wave at successive points along a river. This paper presents a modified linear Muskingum hydrological routing method where the floodplain effects on flood peak attenuation and flood wave travel time are included in routing parameters. Developing the routing parameters initially involved routing hydrographs of different flood peak and duration through a 1-dimensional model of a generalised river reach in which a range of geometrical and resistance properties were varied. Comparison of upstream and simulated downstream hydrographs for each condition investigated, allowed the attenuation and travel time (storage constant, K, in standard Muskingum routing) of the flood wave to be estimated. Standard Muskingum routing was then used to develop downstream hydrographs for each K value together with assumed storage weighting factors (x) ranging from 0 to 0.5. Flood peak attenuations were again determined through comparison of the upstream and routed downstream hydrographs and with these, linear relationships between x and these attenuations were developed. Actual weighting factors, corresponding to storage constants, were subsequently determined using these relationships for all attenuations determined from the 1-dimensional model simulations. Using multi-variate regression analysis, the computed values of K and x were correlated to catchment and hydrograph properties and expressions for determining both K and x in terms of these properties were developed. The modified Muskingum routing method based on these regressed expressions for K and x was applied to a case

  9. Cosmological models in modified gravity theories with extended nonminimal derivative couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Tsoukalas, Minas

    2017-02-01

    We construct gravitational modifications that go beyond Horndeski, namely theories with extended nonminimal derivative couplings, in which the coefficient functions depend not only on the scalar field but also on its kinetic energy. Such theories prove to be ghost-free in a cosmological background. We investigate the early-time cosmology and show that a de Sitter inflationary phase can be realized as a pure result of the novel gravitational couplings. Additionally, we study the late-time evolution, where we obtain an effective dark energy sector which arises from the scalar field and its extended couplings to gravity. We extract various cosmological observables and analyze their behavior at small redshifts for three choices of potentials, namely for the exponential, the power-law, and the Higgs potentials. We show that the Universe passes from deceleration to acceleration in the recent cosmological past, while the effective dark energy equation-of-state parameter tends to the cosmological-constant value at present. Finally, the effective dark energy can be phantomlike, although the scalar field is canonical, which is an advantage of the model.

  10. Benchmark of a modified iterated perturbation theory approach on the fcc lattice at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamical mean-field theory approach to the Hubbard model requires a method to solve the problem of a quantum impurity in a bath of noninteracting electrons. Iterated perturbation theory (IPT) has proven its effectiveness as a solver in many cases of interest. Based on general principles and on comparisons with an essentially exact continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC) solver, here we show that the standard implementation of IPT fails away from half-filling when the interaction strength is much larger than the bandwidth. We propose a slight modification to the IPT algorithm that replaces one of the equations by the requirement that double occupancy calculated with IPT gives the correct value. We call this method IPT-D. We recover the Fermi liquid ground state away from half-filling. The Fermi liquid parameters, density of states, chemical potential, energy, and specific heat on the fcc lattice are calculated with both IPT-D and CTQMC as benchmark examples. We also calculated the resistivity and the optical conductivity within IPT-D. Particle-hole asymmetry persists even at coupling twice the bandwidth. A generalization to the multiorbital case is suggested. Several algorithms that speed up the calculations are described in appendixes.

  11. Astute observations in their analysis of modifying existing person--environment interaction theory in disability.

    PubMed

    Fox, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Jahiel and Scherer point out very astutely that time can be a baffling confounder in viewing disability, taxing our ability to meaningfully apply the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) model to outcomes analysis. Their approach to segmenting person and environment is constructive. But distilling factors based upon an a priori self-determination of disability as part of the model may also undercut the validity of the larger construct. While the authors are to be applauded for their efforts to extend existing models of disability to address their current shortcomings, attention must also be given to important socio- or geo-political factors that may deserve more than a contextual discussion and their own place in this developing theory.

  12. Bianchi type-I and -III modified holographic Ricci Dark energy models in Saez-Ballester theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. U. M.; Divya Prasanthi, U. Y.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we study the spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III (B-III) and locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Binachi type-I (B-I) models filled with matter and dark energy in the framework of the Saez-Ballester (1986) scalar-tensor theory of gravitation. Here, we consider the modified holographic Ricci dark energy as the viable candidate to dark energy. To obtain a deterministic solution we consider the time-varying deceleration parameter, which leads to the average scale factor a(t)=[sinh(α t)]^{1/k}. This average scale factor describes a model which generates a smooth transition of the universe from the early decelerating phase to the recent accelerating phase. The physical and kinematical aspects of the models are discussed through figures and also found to be in good agreement with recent astrophysical observations under suitable conditions.

  13. Density and spin linear response of atomic Fermi superfluids with population imbalance in the BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao; Li, Yang; He, Yan; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2014-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the density and spin (representing the two components) linear response of Fermi superfluids with tunable attractive interactions and population imbalance. In both linear response theories, we find that the fluctuations of the order parameter must be treated on equal footing with the gauge transformations associated with the symmetries of the Hamiltonian so that important constraints including various sum rules can be satisfied. Both theories can be applied to the whole BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation crossover. The spin linear responses are qualitatively different with and without population imbalance because collective-mode effects from the fluctuations of the order parameter survive in the presence of population imbalance, even though the associated symmetry is not broken by the order parameter. Since a polarized superfluid becomes unstable at low temperatures in the weak and intermediate coupling regimes, we found that the density and spin susceptibilities diverge as the system approaches the unstable regime, but the emergence of phase separation preempts the divergence.

  14. The relaxed Einstein equations in the context of a mixed UV-IR modified theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkes, Alain

    2017-03-01

    In this article we will modify the Einstein field equations by promoting Newton’s constant G to a covariant differential operator {{G} Λ }≤ft({{\\square}g}\\right) composed of two terms which operate in different energy regimes (IR and UV). The IR term inside the covariant differential operator acts like a high-pass filter with a macroscopic distance filter scale \\sqrt{ Λ } and effectively degravitates energy sources characterized by wavelengths larger than the filter scale. While this term is predominant for cosmological energy processes it is almost inessential on astrophysical scales where the UV contribution inside {{G} Λ }≤ft({{\\square}g}\\right) leads to much stronger deviations compared to GR. In the context of this particular theory of gravity we work out the effective relaxed Einstein equations, the effective 1.5 post-Newtonian near zone mass for n-body systems as well as the IR and UV modified Schwarzschild metrics. We use these results in the context of the Double Pulsar binary system and observe that we recover, in the limit of vanishing UV-IR modification parameters, the corresponding general relativistic results.

  15. Distinguishing between the Permeability Relationships with Absorption and Metabolism To Improve BCS and BDDCS Predictions in Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) and biopharmaceutics drug distribution classification system (BDDCS) are complementary classification systems that can improve, simplify, and accelerate drug discovery, development, and regulatory processes. Drug permeability has been widely accepted as a screening tool for determining intestinal absorption via the BCS during the drug development and regulatory approval processes. Currently, predicting clinically significant drug interactions during drug development is a known challenge for industry and regulatory agencies. The BDDCS, a modification of BCS that utilizes drug metabolism instead of intestinal permeability, predicts drug disposition and potential drug–drug interactions in the intestine, the liver, and most recently the brain. Although correlations between BCS and BDDCS have been observed with drug permeability rates, discrepancies have been noted in drug classifications between the two systems utilizing different permeability models, which are accepted as surrogate models for demonstrating human intestinal permeability by the FDA. Here, we recommend the most applicable permeability models for improving the prediction of BCS and BDDCS classifications. We demonstrate that the passive transcellular permeability rate, characterized by means of permeability models that are deficient in transporter expression and paracellular junctions (e.g., PAMPA and Caco-2), will most accurately predict BDDCS metabolism. These systems will inaccurately predict BCS classifications for drugs that particularly are substrates of highly expressed intestinal transporters. Moreover, in this latter case, a system more representative of complete human intestinal permeability is needed to accurately predict BCS absorption. PMID:24628254

  16. Interpretive subgroup analysis extends modified grounded theory research findings in oncologic music therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Hiscock, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Following an investigation into oncologic patients' experiences of the helpfulness of music therapy (O'Callaghan & McDermott, 2004), it was considered that examining relationships between specific patient characteristics and their responses could yield further interesting understandings. "Interpretative subgroup analysis" is introduced, which adapts principles of subgroup analysis in quantitative research to textual data analysis. Anonymous written responses from 128 oncologic patients were analyzed to compare responses from (a) those that had one music therapy session with those who had more than one session, (b) males and females, and (c) middle and older aged respondents. The number of music therapy sessions had scant effect on reported music therapy experiences, and males were much more likely to return questionnaires but much less likely to participate. Unlike some females, males always described positive affective responses when experiencing both sad and positive memories. Variations in the middle and older aged subgroups were evident in type of affective response, and emphases in descriptions of memories and music therapy's effect. Implications of these findings for music therapy practice are considered. Interpretive subgroup analysis is recommended for extending understanding of subjective within group experiences in music therapy research incorporating a grounded theory approach and large enough samples.

  17. A density functional theory study on the acetylene cyclotrimerization on Pd-modified Au(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bohua; Dong, Xiuqin; Yu, Yingzhe; Zhang, Minhua

    2017-10-01

    Calculations based on the first-principle density functional theory were carried out to study the possible acetylene cyclotrimerization reactions on Pd-Au(111) surface and to investigate the effect of Au atom alloying with Pd. The adsorption of C2H2, C4H4, C6H6 and the PDOS of 4d orbitals of surface Pd and Au atoms were studied. The comparison of d-band center of Pd and Au atom before and after C2H2 or C4H4 adsorption suggests that these molecules affect the activity of Pd-Au(111) surface to some degree due to the high binding energy of the adsorption. In our study, the second neighboring Pd ensembles on Pd-Au(111) surface can adsorb two acetylene molecules on parallel-bridge site of two Au atoms and one Pd atom, respectively. Csbnd C bonds are parallel to each other and two acetylenes are adsorbed face to face to produce four-membered ring C4H4 firstly. The geometric effect and electronic effect of Pd-Au(111) surface with the second neighboring Pd ensembles both help to reduce this activation barrier.

  18. Motion of a solitonic vortex in the BEC-BCS crossover.

    PubMed

    Ku, Mark J H; Ji, Wenjie; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Guardado-Sanchez, Elmer; Cheuk, Lawrence W; Yefsah, Tarik; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2014-08-08

    We observe a long-lived solitary wave in a superfluid Fermi gas of (6)Li atoms after phase imprinting. Tomographic imaging reveals the excitation to be a solitonic vortex, oriented transverse to the long axis of the cigar-shaped atom cloud. The precessional motion of the vortex is directly observed, and its period is measured as a function of the chemical potential in the BEC-BCS crossover. The long period and the correspondingly large ratio of the inertial to the bare mass of the vortex are in good agreement with estimates based on superfluid hydrodynamics that we derive here using the known equation of state in the BEC-BCS crossover.

  19. Correlation length and universality in the BCS-BEC crossover for energy-dependent resonance superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolino, S.; Chiofalo, M.-L.

    2017-07-01

    We consider the BCS-BEC crossover of a quantum Fermi gas at T = 0 in the presence of an energy-dependent Fano-Feshbach resonance, driving the system from broad to narrow limits. We choose a minimal microscopic potential reproducing the two-particle resonance physics in terms of the scattering length a and the effective range R∗ representing the resonance width, and solve the BCS mean-field equations varying a, R∗ and the density. We show that the condensate fraction manifests a universal behavior when the correlation length, measuring the pair size, is used as the crossover parameter. Generally, a negative effective range has the effect of stretching the crossover region between the two extreme regimes, as evidenced by the behavior of the chemical potential. These results can be useful in view of the more recent perspectives of realizing narrow resonances also by optical means and amenable as a base quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Topological superfluids and the BEC-BCS crossover in the attractive Haldane-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Xu, Zhihao; Zhang, Shizhong

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by the recent realization of the Haldane model in a shaking optical lattice, we investigate the effects of attractive interaction and the BEC-BCS crossover in this model at and away from half-filling. We show that, contrary to the usual s -wave BEC-BCS crossover in the lattice, a topological superfluid with Chern number C =2 appears in an extended region of the phase space for intermediate strength of the attractive interaction on the interaction-density plane. When inversion symmetry is broken, a gapless weak topological state is realized. We also investigate the fluctuations in these superfluid phases and show that the Anderson-Bogoliubov mode is quadratic due to time-reversal symmetry breaking and the existence of an undamped Leggett mode in the strong-coupling limit. Near the topological phase transition, the damping of the Leggett mode reaches its maximum.

  1. Crossover between BCS and performed-Boson theories with increasing interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Randeria, M.

    1993-08-01

    The author reviews recent work on Fermi systems with attractive interactions of arbitrary strength. First, he describes the results of a functional integral formulation to study the crossover from cooperative Cooper pairing to independent bound state formation and condensation. The inadequacy of a saddle point approximation with increasing coupling is pointed out, and the importance of temporal (quantum) fluctuations for normal state properties at intermediate and strong coupling is emphasized. Next, results from a quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the 2D attractive Hubbard model are described. The intermediate coupling normal state is found to deviate markedly from a canonical Fermi liquid: {open_quotes}spin-gap{close_quotes} behavior, with 1/T{sub 1}T {approximately} {chi}(T), is found in a degenerate Fermi system.

  2. BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) Primer: a Guide to Computational Methods in Superconductivity Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Ed. Superconductivity; Dekker: New York, 1969; vols. I and II. 16. Rice, M. J.; Wang , Y. R. Phys. Rev. B 1988, 37, 5893-5896. 17. Ott, H. R.; Rudigier...Pennsylvania State University Roches . ew York 14627 University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 r. G. Rubloff Dr. Roald Hoffmann IBM Department of Chemistry

  3. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G{sub 0}W{sub 0} and G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G{sub 0}W{sub 0} quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies.

  4. BEC-BCS crossover driven by the axial anomaly in the NJL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuki, Hiroaki; Baym, Gordon; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2010-12-01

    We study the QCD phase structure in the three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, incorporating the chiral-diquark interplay due to the axial anomaly. We demonstrate that for a certain range of model parameters, the low temperature critical point predicted by a Ginzburg-Landau analysis appears in the phase diagram. In addition, we show that the axial anomaly presents a new scenario for a possible BEC-BCS crossover in the color-flavor locked phase of QCD.

  5. Giant superconducting fluctuations in the compensated semimetal FeSe at the BCS-BEC crossover.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, S; Yamashita, T; Shi, A; Kobayashi, R; Shimoyama, Y; Watashige, T; Ishida, K; Terashima, T; Wolf, T; Hardy, F; Meingast, C; Löhneysen, H V; Levchenko, A; Shibauchi, T; Matsuda, Y

    2016-09-30

    The physics of the crossover between weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and strong-coupling Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) limits gives a unified framework of quantum-bound (superfluid) states of interacting fermions. This crossover has been studied in the ultracold atomic systems, but is extremely difficult to be realized for electrons in solids. Recently, the superconducting semimetal FeSe with a transition temperature Tc=8.5 K has been found to be deep inside the BCS-BEC crossover regime. Here we report experimental signatures of preformed Cooper pairing in FeSe, whose energy scale is comparable to the Fermi energies. In stark contrast to usual superconductors, large non-linear diamagnetism by far exceeding the standard Gaussian superconducting fluctuations is observed below T*∼20 K, providing thermodynamic evidence for prevailing phase fluctuations of superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance and transport data give evidence of pseudogap formation at ∼T*. The multiband superconductivity along with electron-hole compensation in FeSe may highlight a novel aspect of the BCS-BEC crossover physics.

  6. Spin-polarized neutron matter: Critical unpairing and BCS-BEC precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Martin; Sedrakian, Armen; Huang, Xu-Guang; Clark, John W.

    2016-01-01

    We obtain the critical magnetic field required for complete destruction of S -wave pairing in neutron matter, thereby setting limits on the pairing and superfluidity of neutrons in the crust and outer core of magnetars. We find that for fields B ≥1017 G the neutron fluid is nonsuperfluid—if weaker spin 1 superfluidity does not intervene—a result with profound consequences for the thermal, rotational, and oscillatory behavior of magnetars. Because the dineutron is not bound in vacuum, cold dilute neutron matter cannot exhibit a proper BCS-BEC crossover. Nevertheless, owing to the strongly resonant behavior of the n n interaction at low densities, neutron matter shows a precursor of the BEC state, as manifested in Cooper-pair correlation lengths being comparable to the interparticle distance. We make a systematic quantitative study of this type of BCS-BEC crossover in the presence of neutron fluid spin polarization induced by an ultrastrong magnetic field. We evaluate the Cooper-pair wave function, quasiparticle occupation numbers, and quasiparticle spectra for densities and temperatures spanning the BCS-BEC crossover region. The phase diagram of spin-polarized neutron matter is constructed and explored at different polarizations.

  7. Enhancement of crystallinity of cellulose produced by Escherichia coli through heterologous expression of bcsD gene from Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Elaheh; Babaipour, Valiollah; Deldar, Ali Asghar; Yakhchali, Bagher; Fatemi, Seyed Safa-Ali

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the crystallinity index of the cellulose produced by Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 after heterologous expression of the cellulose synthase subunit D (bcsD) gene of Gluconacetobacter xylinus BPR2001. The bcsD gene of G. xylinus BPR2001 was expressed in E. coli and its protein product was visualized using SDS-PAGE. FTIR analysis showed that the crystallinity index of the cellulose produced by the recombinants was 0.84, which is 17% more than that of the wild type strain. The increased crystallinity index was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The cellulose content was not changed significantly after over-expressing the bcsD. The bcsD gene can improve the crystalline structure of the bacterial cellulose but there is not any significant difference between the amounts of cellulose produced by the recombinant and wild type E. coli Nissle 1917.

  8. Polarization-resolved terahertz third-harmonic generation in a single-crystal superconductor NbN: Dominance of the Higgs mode beyond the BCS approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Ryusuke; Tsuji, Naoto; Makise, Kazumasa; Terai, Hirotaka; Aoki, Hideo; Shimano, Ryo

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in time-domain terahertz (THz) spectroscopy have unveiled that resonantly enhanced strong THz third-harmonic generation (THG) mediated by the collective Higgs amplitude mode occurs in s -wave superconductors, where charge-density fluctuations (CDFs) have been shown to also contribute to the nonlinear third-order susceptibility. It has been theoretically proposed that the nonlinear responses of Higgs and CDF exhibit essentially different polarization dependences. Here we experimentally discriminate the two contributions by polarization-resolved intense THz transmission spectroscopy for a single-crystal NbN film. The result shows that the resonant THG in the transmitted light always appears in the polarization parallel to that of the incident light with no appreciable polarization-angle dependence relative to the crystal axis. When we compare this with the theoretical calculation here with the BCS approximation and the dynamical mean-field theory for a model of NbN constructed from first principles, the experimental result strongly indicates that the Higgs mode rather than the CDF dominates the THG resonance in NbN. A possible mechanism for this is the retardation effect in the phonon-mediated pairing interaction beyond BCS.

  9. Fracture prediction using modified mohr coulomb theory for non-linear strain paths using AA3104-H19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Robert; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2016-08-01

    Experiment results from uniaxial tensile tests, bi-axial bulge tests, and disk compression tests for a beverage can AA3104-H19 material are presented. The results from the experimental tests are used to determine material coefficients for both Yld2000 and Yld2004 models. Finite element simulations are developed to study the influence of materials model on the predicted earing profile. It is shown that only the YLD2004 model is capable of accurately predicting the earing profile as the YLD2000 model only predicts 4 ears. Excellent agreement with the experimental data for earing is achieved using the AA3104-H19 material data and the Yld2004 constitutive model. Mechanical tests are also conducted on the AA3104-H19 to generate fracture data under different stress triaxiality conditions. Tensile tests are performed on specimens with a central hole and notched specimens. Torsion of a double bridge specimen is conducted to generate points near pure shear conditions. The Nakajima test is utilized to produce points in bi-axial tension. The data from the experiments is used to develop the fracture locus in the principal strain space. Mapping from principal strain space to stress triaxiality space, principal stress space, and polar effective plastic strain space is accomplished using a generalized mapping technique. Finite element modeling is used to validate the Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) fracture model in the polar space. Models of a hole expansion during cup drawing and a cup draw/reverse redraw/expand forming sequence demonstrate the robustness of the modified PEPS fracture theory for the condition with nonlinear forming paths and accurately predicts the onset of failure. The proposed methods can be widely used for predicting failure for the examples which undergo nonlinear strain path including rigid-packaging and automotive forming.

  10. Non-BCS superconducting state in yttrium hydride at a record low value of the external pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosik, Marcin W.; Szczȩśniak, Radosław; Wrona, Izabela A.; Kostrzewa, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    The ab initio calculations suggest that YH3 compound is a superconductor with the maximum value of the critical temperature (TC) for the record low external pressure equal to 17.7 GPa. Due to the high value of the electron-phonon coupling constant, the thermodynamic properties of the superconducting state in YH3 have been determined in the framework of the Eliashberg formalism. It has been shown that TC changes in the range from 45.91K to 27.29 K, for the value of the Coulomb pseudopotential μ⋆ ∈ < 0.1 , 0.3 > . The parameters of the superconducting phase differ significantly from the values predicted by the BCS theory due to the significant strong-coupling and retardation effects: kBTC /ωln ∈ < 0.138 , 0.082 > , where ωln denotes the logarithmic phonon frequency. In particular, the dimensionless ratios: RΔ = 2 Δ (0) /kBTC , RC = Δ C (TC) /CN (TC) and RH =TCCN (TC) /HC2(0) take the following values: RΔ ∈ < 4.38 , 4.20 > , RC ∈ < 2.18 , 2.02 > and RH ∈ < 0.151 , 0.168 > . The symbol Δ represents the order parameter, Δ C is the specific heat jump, CN is the specific heat of the normal state, and HC is the thermodynamic critical field.

  11. BCS, Nambu-Jona-Lasinio, and Han-Nambu: A sketch of Nambu's works in 1960-1965

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The years 1960-1965 were a remarkable period for Yoichiro Nambu. Starting with a reformulation of BCS theory with emphasis on gauge invariance, he recognized the realization of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in particle physics as evidenced by the Goldberger-Treiman relation. A concrete model of Nambu and Jona-Lasinio illustrated the essence of the Nambu-Goldstone theorem and the idea of soft pions. After the proposal of the quark model by Gell-Mann, he together with Han constructed an alternative model of integrally charged quarks with possible non-Abelian gluons. All these remarkable works were performed during the years 1960-1965. Here I briefly review those works following the original papers of Nambu chronologically, together with a brief introduction to a formulation of Noether's theorem and the Ward-Takahashi identities using path integrals. This article is mostly based on a lecture given at the Nambu Memorial Symposium held at Osaka City University in September 2015, where Nambu started his professional career.

  12. Critical behavior in one dimension: Unconventional pairing, phase separation, BEC-BCS crossover, and magnetic Lifshitz transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptok, Andrzej; Cichy, Agnieszka; Rodríguez, Karen; Kapcia, Konrad Jerzy

    2017-03-01

    We study the superconducting properties of population-imbalanced ultracold Fermi mixtures in one-dimensional optical lattices that can be effectively described by the spin-imbalanced attractive Hubbard model in the presence of a Zeeman magnetic field. We use the mean-field theory approach to obtain the ground-state phase diagrams including some unconventional superconducting phases such as the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) phase, and the η phase (an extremal case of the FFLO phase), both for the case of a fixed chemical potential and for a fixed number of particles. It allows us to determine optimal regimes for the FFLO phase as well as η -pairing stability. We also investigate the evolution from the weak coupling (BCS-like limit) to the strong coupling limit of tightly bound local pairs (BEC) with increasing attraction, at T =0 . Finally, the obtained results show that in spite of the occurrence of the Lifshitz transition induced by an external magnetic field, the superconducting state can still exist in the system, at higher magnetic field values.

  13. Applying the theory of planned behaviour to multiple sclerosis patients’ decisions on disease modifying therapy – questionnaire concept and validation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients making important medical decisions need to evaluate complex information in the light of their own beliefs, attitudes and priorities. The process can be considered in terms of the theory of planned behaviour. Decision support technologies aim at helping patients making informed treatment choices. Instruments assessing informed choices need to include risk knowledge, attitude (towards therapy) and actual uptake. However, mechanisms by which decision support achieves its goals are poorly understood. Our aim was therefore to develop and validate an instrument modeling the process of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients’ decision making about whether to undergo disease modifying (immuno-)therapies (DMT). Methods We constructed a 30-item patient administered questionnaire to access the elaboration of decisions about DMT in MS according to the theory of planned behaviour. MS-patients’ belief composites regarding immunotherapy were classified according to the domains “attitude”, “subjective social norm” and “control beliefs” and within each domain to either “expectations” or “values” yielding 6 sub-domains. A randomized controlled trial (n = 192) evaluating an evidence based educational intervention tested the instrument’s predictive power regarding intention to use immunotherapy and its sensitivity to the intervention. Results The psychometric properties of the questionnaire were satisfactory (mean item difficulty 62, mean SD 0.9, range 0–3). Responses explain up to 68% of the variability in the intention to use DMT was explained by up to 68% in the total sample. Four weeks after an educational intervention, predictive power was higher in the intervention (IG) compared to the control group (CG) (intention estimate: CG 56% / IG 69%, p = .179; three domains CG 56% / IG 74%, p = .047; six sub-domains CG 64% / IG 78%, p = .073). The IG held more critical beliefs towards immunotherapy (p = .002) and were less

  14. Predicting medical staff intention to use an online reporting system with modified unified theory of acceptance and use of technology.

    PubMed

    Chang, I-Chiu; Hsu, Hui-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to report incident events using an online information system (IS) may be different from those of a paper-based reporting system. The nationwide online Patient-Safety Reporting System (PSRS) contains a value judgment behind use of the system, similar to the Value of Perceived Consequence (VPC), which is seldom discussed in ISs applications of other disciplines. This study developed a more adequate research framework by integrating the VPC construct into the well-known Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model as a theoretical base to explore the predictors of medical staff's intention to use online PSRS. The results showed that management support was an important factor to influence medical staff's intention of using PSRS. The effects of factors such as performance expectancy, perceived positive, and perceived negative consequence on medical staff's intention of using PSRS were moderated by gender, age, experience, and occupation. The results proved that the modified UTAUT model is significant and useful in predicting medical staff's intention of using the nationwide online PSRS.

  15. Calculation of atomic excitation energies by time-dependent density functional theory within a modified linear response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunping; Sugino, Osamu; Tateyama, Yoshitaka

    2009-02-11

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become a standard tool for investigation of electronic excited states. However, for certain types of electronic excitations, TDDFT is known to give systematically inaccurate results, which has been attributed to the insufficiency of conventional exchange-correlation functionals, such as the local density approximation (LDA). To improve TDDFT performance within LDA, a modified linear response (MLR) scheme was recently proposed, in which the responses from not only the ground state, but also the intermediate excited states are taken into account. This scheme was shown to greatly improve TDDFT performance on the prediction of Rydberg and charge-transfer excitation energies of molecules. Yet, for a validation of this TDDFT-MLR scheme for excitation energies, there remain issues to be resolved regarding Rydberg transitions of single atoms before going to larger systems. In the present work, we show an adapted algorithm to construct the intermediate excited states for rare-gas atoms. With the technique, Rydberg transition energies can be well decoded from LDA, as will also be shown in the application of the TDDFT-MLR scheme to other types of atoms.

  16. Multi-objective trajectory optimization of Space Manoeuvre Vehicle using adaptive differential evolution and modified game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Runqi; Savvaris, Al; Tsourdos, Antonios; Chai, Senchun

    2017-07-01

    Highly constrained trajectory optimization for Space Manoeuvre Vehicles (SMV) is a challenging problem. In practice, this problem becomes more difficult when multiple mission requirements are taken into account. Because of the nonlinearity in the dynamic model and even the objectives, it is usually hard for designers to generate a compromised trajectory without violating strict path and box constraints. In this paper, a new multi-objective SMV optimal control model is formulated and parameterized using combined shooting-collocation technique. A modified game theory approach, coupled with an adaptive differential evolution algorithm, is designed in order to generate the pareto front of the multi-objective trajectory optimization problem. In addition, to improve the quality of obtained solutions, a control logic is embedded in the framework of the proposed approach. Several existing multi-objective evolutionary algorithms are studied and compared with the proposed method. Simulation results indicate that without driving the solution out of the feasible region, the proposed method can perform better in terms of convergence ability and convergence speed than its counterparts. Moreover, the quality of the pareto set generated using the proposed method is higher than other multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, which means the newly proposed algorithm is more attractive for solving multi-criteria SMV trajectory planning problem.

  17. [Concept extraction of graduate research by modified grounded theory approach and creating of rubric oriented to performance evaluation].

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Sone, Tomomichi; Kohno, Takeyuki; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

      A revised core curriculum model for pharmaceutical education, developed on the basis of the principles of outcome-based education, will be introduced in 2015. Inevitably, appropriate assessments of students' academic achievements will be required. Although evaluations of the cognitive domain can be carried out by paper tests, evaluation methods for the attitude domain and problem-solving abilities need to be established. From the viewpoint of quality assurance for graduates, pharmaceutical education reforms have become vital to evaluation as well as learning strategies. To evaluate student academic achievements on problem-solving abilities, authentic assessment is required. Authentic assessment is the evaluation that mimics the context tried in work and life. Specifically, direct evaluation of performances, demonstration or the learners' own work with integrated variety knowledge and skills, is required. To clarify the process of graduate research, we obtained qualitative data through focus group interviews with six teachers and analyzed the data using the modified grounded theory approach. Based on the results, we clarify the performance students should show in graduate research and create a rubric for evaluation of performance in graduate research.

  18. Vibration analysis of a rotating functionally graded tapered microbeam based on the modified couple stress theory by DQEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Shafiei, Navvab; Alireza Mousavi, S.

    2016-09-01

    Due to having difficulty in solving governing nonlinear differential equations of a non-uniform microbeam, a few numbers of authors have studied such fields. In the present study, for the first time, the size-dependent vibration behavior of a rotating functionally graded (FG) tapered microbeam based on the modified couple stress theory is investigated using differential quadrature element method (DQEM). It is assumed that physical and mechanical properties of the FG microbeam are varying along the thickness that will be defined as a power law equation. The governing equations are determined using Hamilton's principle, and DQEM is presented to obtain the results for cantilever and propped cantilever boundary conditions. The accuracy and validity of the results are shown in several numerical examples. In order to display the influence of size on the first two natural frequencies and consequently changing of some important microbeam parameters such as material length scale, rate of cross section, angular velocity and gradient index of the FG material, several diagrams and tables are represented. The results of this article can be used in designing and optimizing elastic and rotary-type micro-electro-mechanical systems like micro-motors and micro-robots including rotating parts.

  19. Vibration analysis of bonded double-FGM viscoelastic nanoplate systems based on a modified strain gradient theory incorporating surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalpoor, Ali; Kiani, Ali

    2017-03-01

    On the basis of the modified strain gradient theory, the present paper deals with the theoretical analysis of the free vibration of coupled double-FGM viscoelastic nanoplates by Kelvin-Voigt visco-Pasternak medium. To establish static equilibrium of atoms on the each nanoplate surface, the effects of the surface layers are considered. The properties of material in the thickness direction vary according to the power low distribution. Kirchhoff plate assumption and Hamilton's variational principle are employed to achieve the partial differential equations for three different cases of vibration (out-of-phase, in-phase, and one nanoplate of the system being stationary) and corresponding boundary conditions. Navier's approach which satisfies the simply supported boundary conditions applied to analytically investigate the size effect on the natural frequencies of double-FGM viscoelastic nanoplate systems. Numerical studies are carried out to illustrate the influence of viscoelastic damping structural of the nanoplates, damping coefficient of the visco-Pasternak medium, independent length scale parameter, aspect ratio, surface properties, and other factors on the frequency behavior system. Some numerical results of this research illustrate that the frequencies may increase or decrease with respect to the sign of the surface properties of FGMs.

  20. Exact Analytic Result of Contact Value for the Density in a Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Theory of an Electrical Double Layer.

    PubMed

    Lou, Ping; Lee, Jin Yong

    2009-04-14

    For a simple modified Poisson-Boltzmann (SMPB) theory, taking into account the finite ionic size, we have derived the exact analytic expression for the contact values of the difference profile of the counterion and co-ion, as well as of the sum (density) and product profiles, near a charged planar electrode that is immersed in a binary symmetric electrolyte. In the zero ionic size or dilute limit, these contact values reduce to the contact values of the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. The analytic results of the SMPB theory, for the difference, sum, and product profiles were compared with the results of the Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations [ Bhuiyan, L. B.; Outhwaite, C. W.; Henderson, D. J. Electroanal. Chem. 2007, 607, 54 ; Bhuiyan, L. B.; Henderson, D. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 128, 117101 ], as well as of the PB theory. In general, the analytic expression of the SMPB theory gives better agreement with the MC data than the PB theory does. For the difference profile, as the electrode charge increases, the result of the PB theory departs from the MC data, but the SMPB theory still reproduces the MC data quite well, which indicates the importance of including steric effects in modeling diffuse layer properties. As for the product profile, (i) it drops to zero as the electrode charge approaches infinity; (ii) the speed of the drop increases with the ionic size, and these behaviors are in contrast with the predictions of the PB theory, where the product is identically 1.

  1. Intermediate accelerated solutions as generic late-time attractors in a modified Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cid, Antonella; Leon, Genly; Leyva, Yoelsy E-mail: genly.leon@ucv.cl

    2016-02-01

    an asymptotic de Sitter-like evolution law for the scale factor. Apart from some fine-tuned examples such as the linear, and quadratic potential U(Φ) in the Jordan frame, it is true that ''intermediate accelerated'' solutions are generic late-time attractors in a modified Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory.

  2. BCS-BEC crossover in two dimensions: A quantum Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Bertaina, G.

    2012-09-26

    We investigate the crossover from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluidity to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a two-dimensional Fermi gas at T= 0 using the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo method. We calculate the equation of state and the gap parameter as a function of the interaction strength, observing large deviations compared to mean-field predictions. In the BEC regime our results show the important role of dimer-dimer and atom-dimer interaction effects that are completely neglected in the mean-field picture. We also consider the highly polarized gas and the competition between a polaronic and a molecular picture.

  3. Phase transitions in a MgB2 granular BCS superconductor in weak magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevyanko, V. V.; Sungurov, M. S.; Sukhareva, T. V.; Finkel', V. A.; Shakhov, Yu. N.

    2017-02-01

    The character of temperature dependences of the electric conductivity of MgB2 granular BCS superconductors at temperatures of 35-45 K in external magnetic fields H ext of up to 2 kOe is studied. An increase in the superconducting transition width Δ T c with an increase in Hext is found. The presence of a system of weak links in MgB2-based granular superconductors is established. On the basis of experimental data, MgB2 granular superconductor is assigned to two-level superconducting systems and the H-T phase diagram is constructed.

  4. Spectrum and Dynamics of the BCS-BEC Crossover from a Few-Body Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, Javier von; Greene, Chris H.

    2007-08-31

    The spectrum of two spin-up and two spin-down fermions in a trap is calculated using a correlated Gaussian basis throughout the range of the BCS-BEC crossover. These accurate calculations provide a few-body solution to the crossover problem. This solution is used to study the time evolution of the system as the scattering length is changed, mimicking experiments with Fermi gases near Fano-Feshbach resonances. The structure of avoiding crossings in the spectrum allow us to understand the dynamics of the system as a sequence of Landau-Zener transitions. Finally, we propose a ramping scheme to study atom-molecule coherence.

  5. Item response theory analysis of the modified Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, Thelma J; Carey, Timothy S; Edwards, Michael C

    2015-03-15

    This is a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional population-based survey. Shorten the modified 23-item Roland (mRoland) scale using item response theory (IRT) methods and describe where in the functional disability range each scale is the most precise. The Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire is recommended for a functional disability outcome measure in patients with low back pain (LBP). One commonly used version is the Roland. It is unknown where in the functional disability range the Roland measures. One candidate individual with LBP in randomly selected households was interviewed, identifying 694 adults with chronic LBP. To justify the use of a unidimensional 2-parameter logistic IRT model, we performed both exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Exploratory factor analysis revealed one dominant eigenvalue. Confirmatory factor analysis results indicate that the 1-factor model fit well. IRT analysis revealed variability in the slopes, in the range from 1.07 to 3.10. The marginal reliability, an IRT-based analog to coefficient α, was 0.88. The mRoland produces reliable scores (i.e., with a standard error <0.3) from 1.4 standard deviations below the mean to roughly 0.2 above the mean. The mRoland measures one construct. The mRoland seems to be an excellent tool for measuring just-below-average levels of functional disability. The mRoland measures high levels of functional disability with relatively poor reliability and may be more appropriate for a less-disabled population with LBP. We demonstrate that the mRoland can be shortened to 11 items with minimal loss of information. We show that there are different ways to go about selecting the set of 11 items that yield short forms with different strengths. 3.

  6. Non-equilibrium Properties of a Pumped-Decaying Bose-Condensed Electron-Hole Gas in the BCS-BEC Crossover Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanai, R.; Littlewood, P. B.; Ohashi, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate a Bose-condensed exciton gas out of equilibrium. Within the framework of the combined BCS-Leggett strong-coupling theory with the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we show how the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of excitons is suppressed to eventually disappear, when the system is in the non-equilibrium steady state. The supply of electrons and holes from the bath is shown to induce quasi-particle excitations, leading to the partial occupation of the upper branch of Bogoliubov single-particle excitation spectrum. We also discuss how this quasi-particle induction is related to the suppression of exciton BEC, as well as the stability of the steady state.

  7. Comparison of Deconvolution-Based and Absorption Modeling IVIVC for Extended Release Formulations of a BCS III Drug Development Candidate.

    PubMed

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Xia, Binfeng; Agrawal, Nancy G B

    2015-11-01

    In vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVC) are predictive mathematical models describing the relationship between dissolution and plasma concentration for a given drug compound. The traditional deconvolution/convolution-based approach is the most common methodology to establish a level A IVIVC that provides point to point relationship between the in vitro dissolution and the in vivo input rate. The increasing application of absorption physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) has provided an alternative IVIVC approach. The current work established and compared two IVIVC models, via the traditional deconvolution/convolution method and via absorption PBPK modeling, for two types of modified release (MR) formulations (matrix and multi-particulate tablets) of MK-0941, a BCS III drug development candidate. Three batches with distinct release rates were studied for each formulation technology. A two-stage linear regression model was used for the deconvolution/convolution approach while optimization of the absorption scaling factors (a model parameter that relates permeability and input rate) in Gastroplus(TM) Advanced Compartmental Absorption and Transit model was used for the absorption PBPK approach. For both types of IVIVC models established, and for either the matrix or the multiparticulate formulations, the average absolute prediction errors for AUC and C max were below 10% and 15%, respectively. Both the traditional deconvolution/convolution-based and the absorption/PBPK-based level A IVIVC model adequately described the compound pharmacokinetics to guide future formulation development. This case study highlights the potential utility of absorption PBPK model to complement the traditional IVIVC approaches for MR products.

  8. Effects of brewers` condensed solubles (BCS) on the production of ethanol from low-grade starch materials

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.H.; Chung, D.S.; Seib, P.A.

    1995-02-01

    Yeast fermentation was performed on grain and bakery byproducts with and without adding the same volume of brewers` condensed solubles (BCS). Starch material in the grain and bakery byproducts effectively was converted to fermentable sugars with conversion ratios of 93-97% by successive treatments of samples with bacterial {alpha}-amylase and fungal glucoamylase. The yeast fermentation of these enzyme-digested byproducts alone showed that ethanol concentrations of 16.4-42.7 mL/100 g dry solid in the broth were achieved with fermentation efficiencies of 87-96%. Addition of BCS to the grain byproducts increased ethanol concentration by 10-86% by increasing the potential glucose content of the broth. The rates of fermentation measured by CO{sub 2} gas production demonstrated that BCS addition to bakery byproducts reduced the fermentation time from 62-72 h to 34-35 h. In bakery byproducts that were low in amino nitrogen, exhaustion of nitrogenous compounds in substrates was found to be a limiting factor for yeast growth. Because BCS is a rich source of nitrogen, adding BCS to these substrates markedly increased the fermentation rate. 15 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Theory of the critical current in two-band superconductors with application to Mg B2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, E. J.; Carbotte, J. P.

    2005-07-01

    Using a Green’s function formulation of the superfluid current js , where a momentum qs is applied to the Cooper pair, we have calculated js as a function of qs , temperature, and impurity scattering for a two-band superconductor. We consider both renormalized BCS and full strong-coupling Eliashberg theory. There are two peaks in the current as a function of qs due to the two energy scales for the gaps, and this can give rise to nonstandard behavior for the critical current. The critical current jc , which is given as the maximum in js , can exhibit a kink as a function of temperature as the maximum is transferred from one peak to other. Other temperature variations are also possible and the universal BCS behavior is violated. The details depend on the material parameters of the system, such as the amount of coupling between the bands, the gap anisotropy, the Fermi velocities, and the density of states of each band. The Ginzburg-Landau relation between jc , the penetration depth λL , and thermodynamic critical field Hc is modified. Using Eliashberg theory with the electron-phonon spectral densities given from band structure calculations, we have applied our calculations for js and jc to the case of MgB2 and find agreement with experiment.

  10. Dipole modes of a superfluid Bose-Fermi mixture in the BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wen; Chen, Bingyan; Zhang, Xuewu

    2017-02-01

    Motivated by the first experimental realization by the Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS) group of a mixture of a Bose-Einstein condensate with a Fermi superfluid continuously changing from a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluid to a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) (Ferrier-Barbut et al 2014 Science 345 1035), we analytically study the dipole modes of the superfluid Bose-Fermi mixture in the BCS-BEC crossover. The analytical approach can explicitly reveal relationships between the frequencies of the dipole modes and the microscopic properties of the novel system. We start from coupled hydrodynamic equations, where the equation of state for the Fermi superfluid in the crossover is an analytical fitting formula based on experimental data, and by using a scaling approach we analytically study eigenfrequencies of the dipole modes for the coupled system in the ENS experimental parameters. Without the boson-fermion interaction in the equilibrium density profiles, our theoretical results can be reduced to the mean-field model and is consistent with the experimental data. However, by further taking into account the boson-fermion interaction numerically and analytically, we find that the results disagree with the experiment, especially in the parameter regime where the boson interaction is smaller than the boson-fermion interaction.

  11. Use of amino acids as counterions improves the solubility of the BCS II model drug, indomethacin.

    PubMed

    ElShaer, Amr; Khan, Sheraz; Perumal, Dhaya; Hanson, Peter; Mohammed, Afzal R

    2011-07-01

    The number of new chemical entities (NCE) is increasing every day after the introduction of combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screening to the drug discovery cycle. One third of these new compounds have aqueous solubility less than 20µg/mL [1]. Therefore, a great deal of interest has been forwarded to the salt formation technique to overcome solubility limitations. This study aims to improve the drug solubility of a Biopharmaceutical Classification System class II (BCS II) model drug (Indomethacin; IND) using basic amino acids (L-arginine, L-lysine and L-histidine) as counterions. Three new salts were prepared using freeze drying method and characterised by FT-IR spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of pH on IND solubility was also investigated using pH-solubility profile. Both arginine and lysine formed novel salts with IND, while histidine failed to dissociate the free acid and in turn no salt was formed. Arginine and lysine increased IND solubility by 10,000 and 2296 fold, respectively. An increase in dissolution rate was also observed for the novel salts. Since these new salts have improved IND solubility to that similar to BCS class I drugs, IND salts could be considered for possible waivers of bioequivalence.

  12. Impact of axillary ultrasound (AUS) on axillary dissection in breast conserving surgery (BCS).

    PubMed

    Reyna, Chantal; Kiluk, John V; Frelick, Anne; Khakpour, Nazanin; Laronga, Christine; Lee, Marie Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Preoperative axillary ultrasound (AUS) in clinically node-negative patients may increase axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in ACoSOG Z0011-eligible patients. We hypothesize that AUS identifies operative axillary disease (>3 positive nodes) in women undergoing breast conserving surgery (BCS). After IRB approval, a retrospective review of female breast cancer patients was performed; patients with clinical T1/T2 tumors undergoing BCS were included. Clinical, radiologic, and pathologic data were collected. Of 139 eligible subjects, 119/139 (86%) had nonpalpable axillary nodes. 47/119 patients (40%) had abnormal AUS and 15/47 (32%) had a positive FNA. Fourteen had ALND ;10/14 (71%) had >3 positive nodes. 6/32 (18%) with abnormal AUS but FNA negative were sentinel lymph node (SLN) positive. Of 72 normal AUS, 15 (22%) were SLN positive; 9/15 (60%) had ALND; 1 (11%) had >3 positive nodes. When evaluating for >3 positive nodes, AUS plus FNA had a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, NPV of 99%, and PPV of 71%. AUS/FNA has a high NPV for axillary metastasis and remarkable sensitivity for three or more positive axillary nodes, therefore AUS-identified metastasis should be treated as clinically node-positive disease, and is appropriate even in patients planning breast conserving surgery. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Application of the SD technique for solving a BCS-reduced Hubbard like Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Fettes, W.; Morgenstern, I.; Husslein, T.

    1997-10-01

    The authors present exact and stochastic diagonalization results for a BCS-reduced Hubbard model. The kinetic Hamiltonian is the same as in the single band Hubbard model with additional next nearest neighbor hopping. The interaction of this model is designed to inhibit superconductivity in the d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}} channel. The ground state of this model is studied by exact and stochastic diagonalization technique. The authors present a review of the technical details of the application of the stochastic diagonalization algorithm on this problem. To verify their results obtained with the stochastic diagonalization, they are compared with the exact diagonalization results. In order to show the convergence of the stochastic diagonalization the authors give a detailed analysis of the behavior of physical properties with increasing number of states. Finally they study superconductivity in this BCS-reduced Hubbard model. As an indicator of superconductivity they use the occurrence of Off Diagonal Long Range Order. The authors study the scaling behavior of this model for various attractive interactions and in addition the dependence of the superconducting correlation functions from the filling of the system.

  14. A real space auxiliary field approach to the BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarat, Sabyasachi; Majumdar, Pinaki

    2015-03-01

    The BCS to BEC crossover in attractive Fermi systems is a prototype of weak to strong coupling evolution in many body physics. While extensive numerical results are available, and several approximate methods have been developed, most of these schemes are unsuccessful in the presence of spatial inhomogeneity. Such situations call for a real space approach that can handle large spatial scales and retain the crucial thermal fluctuations. With this in mind we present comprehensive results of a real space auxiliary field approach to the BCS to BEC crossover in the attractive Hubbard model in two dimensions. The scheme reproduces the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov ground state, and leads to a T c scale that agrees with quantum Monte Carlo estimates to within a few percent. We provide results on the T c , amplitude and phase fluctuations, density of states, and the momentum resolved spectral function, over the entire interaction and temperature window. We suggest how the method generalises successfully to the presence of disorder, trapping, and population imbalance.

  15. Comparison of quality of life of Turkish breast cancer patients receiving breast conserving surgery or modified radical mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Acil, Hande; Cavdar, Ikbal

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in quality of life in patients who received breast conserving surgery (BCS) or modified radical mastectomy (MRM) for breast cancer. A total of 100 women with breast cancer who underwent either BCS or MRM between September 2011 and April 2012 at a private health center and completed their chemotherapy and radiation therapy cycles were included in the study. To assess the quality of life, we used a demographic questionnaire, the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Quality of Life assessment in Breast Cancer (EORTC QLQ-BR23). Using QLQ-C30, we found that patients who underwent BCS had better functional status and fewer symptoms than patients who underwent MRM. In QLQ-BR23, independent factors improving the functional scales were BCS, higher level of education and marital status (married); independent factors improving symptoms were BCS, higher level of education, younger age and low and normal body mass index (BMI). In QLQ-C30, independent factors affecting the functional and symptom scales were only BCS and higher level of education. We determined that patients who received BCS had better functional status and less frequent symptoms than patients who underwent MRM.

  16. Calculation of composition distribution of ultrafine ion-H2O-H2SO4 clusters using a modified binary ion nucleation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Smith, A. S.; Chan, L. Y.; Yue, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Thomson's ion nucleation theory was modified to include the effects of curvature dependence of the microscopic surface tension of field dependent, nonlinear, dielectric properties of the liquid; and of sulfuric acid hydrate formation in binary mixtures of water and sulfuric acid vapors. The modified theory leads to a broadening of the ion cluster spectrum, and shifts it towards larger numbers of H2O and H2SO4 molecules. Whether there is more shifting towards larger numbers of H2O or H2SO4 molecules depends on the relative humidity and relative acidity of the mixture. Usually, a broadening of the spectrum is accompanied by a lowering of the mean cluster intensity. For fixed values of relative humidity and relative acidity, a similar broadening pattern is observed when the temperature is lowered. These features of the modified theory illustrate that a trace of sulfuric acid can facilitate the formation of ultrafine, stable, prenucleation ion clusters as well as the growth of the prenucleation ion clusters towards the critical saddle point conditions, even with low values of relative humidity and relative acidity.

  17. Modified Statistical Dynamical Diffraction Theory: A Novel Metrological Analysis Method for Partially Relaxed and Defective Carbon-doped Silicon and Silicon Germanium Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreeman, Paul K.

    The statistical dynamical diffraction theory, which has been initially developed by late Kato remained in obscurity for many years due to intense and difficult mathematical treatment that proved to be quite challenging to implement and apply. With assistance of many authors in past (including Bushuev, Pavlov, Pungeov, and among the others), it became possible to implement this unique x-ray diffraction theory that combines the kinematical (ideally imperfect) and dynamical (the characteristically perfect diffraction) into a single system of equations controlled by two factors determined by long range order and correlation function within the structure. The first stage is completed by the publication (Shreeman and Matyi, J. Appl. Cryst., 43, 550 (2010)) demonstrating the functionality of this theory with new modifications hence called modified statistical dynamical diffraction theory (mSDDT). The foundation of the theory is also incorporated into this dissertation, and the next stage of testing the model against several ion-implanted SiGe materials has been published: (Shreeman and Matyi, physica status solidi (a)208(11), 2533-2538, 2011). The dissertation with all the previous results summarized, dives into comprehensive analysis of HRXRD analyses complete with several different types of reflections (symmetrical, asymmetrical and skewed geometry). The dynamical results (with almost no defects) are compared with well-known commercial software. The defective materials, to which commercially available modeling software falls short, is then characterized and discussed in depth. The results will exemplify the power of the novel approach in the modified statistical dynamical diffraction theory: Ability to detect and measure defective structures qualitatively and quantitatively. The analysis will be compared alongside with TEM data analysis for verification and confirmation. The application of this theory will accelerate the ability to quickly characterize the relaxed

  18. A Modified Model of College Student Persistence: Exploring the Relationship between Astin's Theory of Involvement and Tinto's Theory of Student Departure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milem, Jeffrey F.; Berger, Joseph B.

    1997-01-01

    Provides insight into first-year undergraduate persistence by using behavioral measures--based on Alexander Astin's theory of involvement--to further understanding of Tinto's theory of student departure. Findings support the use of an integrated model in which student behaviors and perceptions interact to influence the development of academic and…

  19. Modified transition state theory and negative apparent activation energies of simple metathesis reactions: application to the reaction CH3 + HBr --> CH4 + Br.

    PubMed

    Krasnoperov, Lev N; Peng, Jingping; Marshall, Paul

    2006-03-09

    A modified transition state theory (MTST) has been developed for gas-phase reactions with "negative barriers". The theory was applied to the reactions CH3 + HBr(DBr) --> CH4(CH3D) + Br (1a, 1b), which exhibit negative temperature dependences. Accurate ab initio calculations performed with coupled cluster theory extrapolated to the complete basis set limit revealed a transition state located at -2.3 kJ mol(-1) relative to the ground state of the reactants (in reaction 1a), as well as a shallow bound complex. The negative temperature dependence, the absolute values of the rate constant, and the isotope substitution effect are reproduced with good accuracy (10%), without any adjustment or fitting parameters. Analytical expressions are presented for MTST including angular momentum conservation, centrifugal barriers and tunneling. This analysis uses information about the possibly loose entrance barrier and the transition state but does not invoke a statistical intermediate complex.

  20. Modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity: Hamiltonian analysis of the general theory and accelerating FRW cosmology in a power-law F(R) model

    SciTech Connect

    Carloni, Sante; Chaichian, Masud; Tureanu, Anca; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Oksanen, Markku

    2010-09-15

    We propose the most general modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity, whose action does not contain time derivatives higher than the second order. The Hamiltonian structure of this theory is studied in all the details in the case of the spatially-flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, demonstrating many of the features of the general theory. It is shown that, with some plausible assumptions, including the projectability of the lapse function, this model is consistent. As a large class of such theories, the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity is introduced. The study of its ultraviolet properties shows that its z=3 version seems to be renormalizable in the same way as the original Horava-Lifshitz proposal. The Hamiltonian analysis of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity shows that it is in general a consistent theory. The F(R) gravity action is also studied in the fixed-gauge form, where the appearance of a scalar field is particularly illustrative. Then the spatially-flat FRW cosmology for this F(R) gravity is investigated. It is shown that a special choice of parameters for this theory leads to the same equations of motion as in the case of traditional F(R) gravity. Nevertheless, the cosmological structure of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity turns out to be much richer than for its traditional counterpart. The emergence of multiple de Sitter solutions indicates the possibility of unification of early-time inflation with late-time acceleration within the same model. Power-law F(R) theories are also investigated in detail. It is analytically shown that they have a quite rich cosmological structure: early-/late-time cosmic acceleration of quintessence, as well as of phantom types. Also it is demonstrated that all the four known types of finite-time future singularities may occur in the power-law Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity. Finally, a covariant proposal for (renormalizable) F(R) gravity within the Horava-Lifshitz spirit is presented.

  1. Purely in silico BCS classification: science based quality standards for the world's drugs.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Arik; Wolk, Omri; Kim, Young Hoon; Ramachandran, Chandrasekharan; Crippen, Gordon M; Takagi, Toshihide; Bermejo, Marival; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-11-04

    BCS classification is a vital tool in the development of both generic and innovative drug products. The purpose of this work was to provisionally classify the world's top selling oral drugs according to the BCS, using in silico methods. Three different in silico methods were examined: the well-established group contribution (CLogP) and atom contribution (ALogP) methods, and a new method based solely on the molecular formula and element contribution (KLogP). Metoprolol was used as the benchmark for the low/high permeability class boundary. Solubility was estimated in silico using a thermodynamic equation that relies on the partition coefficient and melting point. The validity of each method was affirmed by comparison to reference data and literature. We then used each method to provisionally classify the orally administered, IR drug products found in the WHO Model list of Essential Medicines, and the top-selling oral drug products in the United States (US), Great Britain (GB), Spain (ES), Israel (IL), Japan (JP), and South Korea (KR). A combined list of 363 drugs was compiled from the various lists, and 257 drugs were classified using the different in silico permeability methods and literature solubility data, as well as BDDCS classification. Lastly, we calculated the solubility values for 185 drugs from the combined set using in silico approach. Permeability classification with the different in silico methods was correct for 69-72.4% of the 29 reference drugs with known human jejunal permeability, and for 84.6-92.9% of the 14 FDA reference drugs in the set. The correlations (r(2)) between experimental log P values of 154 drugs and their CLogP, ALogP and KLogP were 0.97, 0.82 and 0.71, respectively. The different in silico permeability methods produced comparable results: 30-34% of the US, GB, ES and IL top selling drugs were class 1, 27-36.4% were class 2, 22-25.5% were class 3, and 5.46-14% were class 4 drugs, while ∼8% could not be classified. The WHO list

  2. Evolution from BCS to Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless Superfluidity in One-Dimensional Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Iskin, M.; Sa de Melo, C. A. R.

    2009-10-16

    We analyze the finite temperature phase diagram of fermion mixtures in one-dimensional optical lattices as a function of interaction strength. At low temperatures, the system evolves from an anisotropic three-dimensional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluid to an effectively two-dimensional Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) superfluid as the interaction strength increases. We calculate the critical temperature as a function of interaction strength, and identify the region where the dimensional crossover occurs for a specified optical lattice potential. Finally, we show that the dominant vortex excitations near the critical temperature evolve from multiplane elliptical vortex loops in the three-dimensional regime to planar vortex-antivortex pairs in the two-dimensional regime, and we propose a detection scheme for these excitations.

  3. Two-band superfluidity from the BCS to the BEC limit

    SciTech Connect

    Iskin, M.; Sa de Melo, C. A. R.

    2006-10-01

    We analyze the evolution of two-band superfluidity from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) limit. When the interband interaction is tuned from negative to positive values, a quantum phase transition occurs from a 0-phase to a {pi}-phase state, depending on the relative phase of the two order parameters. Furthermore, population imbalances between the two bands can be created by tuning the intraband or interband interactions. We also find two undamped low-energy collective excitations corresponding to in-phase and out-of-phase modes. Lastly, we derive the coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations, and show that they reduce to coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations for two types of bosons in the BEC limit.

  4. History of Soil Survey and Evolution of the Brazilian Soil Classification System - SiBCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha dos Anjos, Lúcia Helena; Csekö Nolasco de Carvalho, Claudia; Homem Antunes, Mauro Antonio; Muggler, Cristine Carole

    2014-05-01

    national soil classification was presented by Marcelo Camargo (Embrapa Soils) and Jacob Bennema (FAO adviser). When Soil Taxonomy was first published in 1975, a field workshop was held in Brazil, and the system was not accepted by the country scientists; one main reason was the usage of climate as a main attribute for suborders. In 1978, the first national soil field correlation meeting was held with the goal of developing the national system, giving origin to the Brazilian Soil Classification System (SiBCS). In 1980, a working group was created by Embrapa Soils and other institutes resulting in four approximations of the system. In 1999, the first edition of the SiBCS was released, followed by a second edition in 2006 and the third in 2013. The SiBCS is a hierarchic system, based on morphogenetic soil attributes, with six categorical levels: order, suborder, great group, subgroup, family, and series. It has 13 soil orders, and it is structured as a key down to subgroup level. Many soil attributes are based on concepts adopted by the Soil Taxonomy (United States) and by the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB - FAO). The development of the SiBCS is supervised by a national executive committee, and information is available at http://www.cnps.embrapa.br/sibcs (in Portuguese).

  5. BCS-BEC crossover in atomic Fermi gases with a narrow resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, L. M.; Nilsen, H. M.; Watanabe, Gentaro

    2006-10-15

    We determine the effects on the BCS-BEC crossover of the energy dependence of the effective two-body interaction, which at low energies is determined by the effective range. To describe interactions with an effective range of either sign, we consider a single-channel model with a two-body interaction having an attractive square well and a repulsive square barrier. We investigate the two-body scattering properties of the model, and then solve the Eagles-Leggett equations for the zero temperature crossover, determining the momentum dependent gap and the chemical potential self-consistently. From this we investigate the dependence of the crossover on the effective range of the interaction.

  6. BCS-BEC crossover on the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Erhai; Paramekanti, Arun

    2006-12-08

    The attractive Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice exhibits, at half filling, a quantum critical point between a semimetal with massless Dirac fermions and an s-wave superconductor (SC). We study the BCS-BEC crossover in this model away from half filling at zero temperature and show that the appropriately defined crossover line (in the interaction-density plane) passes through the quantum critical point at half filling. For a range of densities around half filling, the "underlying Fermi surface" of the SC, defined as the momentum space locus of minimum energy quasiparticle excitations, encloses an area which changes nonmonotonically with interaction. We also study fluctuations in the SC and the semimetal, and show the emergence of an undamped Leggett mode deep in the SC. Finally, we consider possible implications for ultracold atoms in optical lattices and the high temperature SCs.

  7. Drug carrier systems for solubility enhancement of BCS class II drugs: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Bhargava, Deepak; Thakkar, Arti; Arora, Saahil

    2013-01-01

    Poor aqueous solubility impedes a drug's bioavailability and challenges its pharmaceutical development. Pharmaceutical development of drugs with poor water solubility requires the establishment of a suitable formulation layout among various techniques. Various approaches have been investigated extensively to improve the aqueous solubility and poor dissolution rate of BCS class II and IV drugs. In this literature review, novel formulation options, particularly for class II drugs designed for applications such as micronization, self-emulsification, cyclodextrin complexation, co-crystallisation, super critical fluid technology, solubilisation by change in pH, salt formation, co-solvents, melt granulation, and solid dispersion, liposomal/niosomal formulations, are discussed in detail to introduce biopharmaceutical challenges and recent approaches to facilitate more efficient drug formulation and development.

  8. Nucleation of spontaneous vortices in trapped Fermi gases undergoing a BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatz, A.; Roberts, H. L. L.; Aranson, I. S.; Levin, K.

    2011-11-01

    We study the spontaneous formation of vortices during the superfluid condensation in a trapped fermionic gas subjected to a rapid thermal quench via evaporative cooling. Our work is based on the numerical solution of the time-dependent crossover Ginzburg-Landau equation coupled to the heat diffusion equation. We quantify the evolution of condensate density and vortex length as a function of a crossover phase parameter from BCS to BEC. The more interesting phenomena occur somewhat nearer to the BEC regime and should be experimentally observable; during the propagation of the cold front, the increase in condensate density leads to the formation of supercurrents toward the center of the condensate as well as possible condensate volume oscillations.

  9. Participation ratio and fidelity analyses as tools to study BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, P.; Sarkar, D.; Khan, A.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-01

    Solving Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) equations for a two dimensional Hubbard model with random on-site disorder, we compute the participation ratio and fidelity to establish conviction for a BCS-BEC crossover scenario at intermediate values of disorder proposed earlier [P. Dey, S. Basu, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 20, 485205 (2008)]. The participation ratio analysis suggests the onset of a phase with shrunk pairs extending over moderate number of lattice sites, which however preserves the superfluid character. The fidelity or the ground state overlap for two different (but closely lying) values of the disorder strength shows an abrupt drop at the immediate neighbourhood of the disorder strength where an onset of a paired (bose-like) phase occurs.

  10. Investigation of BCS gap equation of (d+id) hole doped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha

    2012-12-01

    We consider a (d + i d) cuprate superconductor and model the functional dependence of the pairing interactions V(k,k') = (Vx2-y2(k,k')+Vxy(k,k')) required for d+id ordering in the pseudo-gap(PG) phase by a function of the form Vtrial = [(Vx2-y2 (kF, kF) + Vxy(kF,kF)) F(phi,phi')], where Vx2-y2(k,k') = V1 (cos kxa-coskya) (cos k'xa-cosk'ya), Vxy(k, k') = V2sin(kxa) sin(kya) sin(k'xa) sin(k'ya), V1 and V2 (V1 > V2) are the coupling strengths, kF is the Fermi momentum, phi = arc(tan(ky/kx)), and (kx,ky) belong to the first Brillouin zone (BZ). We further assume that an attractive interaction -|U1| (cos kxa-coskya) (cos k'xa-cosk'ya), where U1 is a model parameter, is responsible for d-wave superconductivity(DSC).Within the BCS framework, for V2 ll V1, we show that the resultant zero-temperature gap Δ0(0) is an increasing function of g(kF). (~ ((D /2) (|U1| +V1)) where the quantity D is the density of energy states).; the solutions are possible if |U1|≈V1. The exercise underscores the fact that the unconventional superconductivity in the hole-doped cuprates may definitely be described within the BCS framework.

  11. Provisional in-silico biopharmaceutics classification (BCS) to guide oral drug product development.

    PubMed

    Wolk, Omri; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate in-silico predictions of physicochemical properties, in order to guide oral drug development by provisional biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS). Four in-silico methods were used to estimate LogP: group contribution (CLogP) using two different software programs, atom contribution (ALogP), and element contribution (KLogP). The correlations (r(2)) of CLogP, ALogP and KLogP versus measured LogP data were 0.97, 0.82, and 0.71, respectively. The classification of drugs with reported intestinal permeability in humans was correct for 64.3%-72.4% of the 29 drugs on the dataset, and for 81.82%-90.91% of the 22 drugs that are passively absorbed using the different in-silico algorithms. Similar permeability classification was obtained with the various in-silico methods. The in-silico calculations, along with experimental melting points, were then incorporated into a thermodynamic equation for solubility estimations that largely matched the reference solubility values. It was revealed that the effect of melting point on the solubility is minor compared to the partition coefficient, and an average melting point (162.7 °C) could replace the experimental values, with similar results. The in-silico methods classified 20.76% (± 3.07%) as Class 1, 41.51% (± 3.32%) as Class 2, 30.49% (± 4.47%) as Class 3, and 6.27% (± 4.39%) as Class 4. In conclusion, in-silico methods can be used for BCS classification of drugs in early development, from merely their molecular formula and without foreknowledge of their chemical structure, which will allow for the improved selection, engineering, and developability of candidates. These in-silico methods could enhance success rates, reduce costs, and accelerate oral drug products development.

  12. Provisional in-silico biopharmaceutics classification (BCS) to guide oral drug product development

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, Omri; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate in-silico predictions of physicochemical properties, in order to guide oral drug development by provisional biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS). Four in-silico methods were used to estimate LogP: group contribution (CLogP) using two different software programs, atom contribution (ALogP), and element contribution (KLogP). The correlations (r2) of CLogP, ALogP and KLogP versus measured LogP data were 0.97, 0.82, and 0.71, respectively. The classification of drugs with reported intestinal permeability in humans was correct for 64.3%–72.4% of the 29 drugs on the dataset, and for 81.82%–90.91% of the 22 drugs that are passively absorbed using the different in-silico algorithms. Similar permeability classification was obtained with the various in-silico methods. The in-silico calculations, along with experimental melting points, were then incorporated into a thermodynamic equation for solubility estimations that largely matched the reference solubility values. It was revealed that the effect of melting point on the solubility is minor compared to the partition coefficient, and an average melting point (162.7°C) could replace the experimental values, with similar results. The in-silico methods classified 20.76% (±3.07%) as Class 1, 41.51% (±3.32%) as Class 2, 30.49% (±4.47%) as Class 3, and 6.27% (±4.39%) as Class 4. In conclusion, in-silico methods can be used for BCS classification of drugs in early development, from merely their molecular formula and without foreknowledge of their chemical structure, which will allow for the improved selection, engineering, and developability of candidates. These in-silico methods could enhance success rates, reduce costs, and accelerate oral drug products development. PMID:25284986

  13. Quantifying the Chasm: Exploring the Impact of the BCS on Total Football Revenues for Division One Football Programs from 2002-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro, Cary A.

    2014-01-01

    The Bowl Championship Series served as a collection of bowl games that were designed to crown the national champion in Division One football. The BCS created two classifications of institutions in Division football, those that were granted automatic access (AQ) to the post-season games, and those that were not (non-AQ). The BCS also generated…

  14. Experimental Sensing and Density Functional Theory Study of H2S and SOF2 Adsorption on Au‐Modified Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Wu, Xiaoqing; Hu, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    A gas sensor is used to detect SF6 decomposed gases, which are related to insulation faults, to accurately assess the insulated status of electrical equipment. Graphene films (GrF) modified with Au nanoparticles are used as an adsorbent for the detection of H2S and SOF2, which are two characteristic products of SF6 decomposed gases. Sensing experiments are conducted at room temperature. Results demonstrate that Au‐modified GrF yields opposite responses to the tested gases and is thus considered a promising material for developing H2S‐ and SOF2‐selective sensors. The first‐principles approach is applied to simulate the interaction between the gases and Au‐modified GrF systems and to interpret experimental data. The observed opposite resistance responses can be attributed to the charge‐transfer differences related to the interfacial interaction between the gases and systems. The density of states and Mulliken population analysis results confirm the apparent charge transfer in Au‐modified GrF chemisorption, whereas the van der Waals effect dominates the pristine graphene adsorption systems. Calculation results can also explicate the significant SOF2 responses on Au‐modified GrF. This work is important in graphene modulation and device design for selective detection. PMID:27722075

  15. Systematic investigation of the effects of disorder at the lowest order throughout the BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palestini, F.; Strinati, G. C.

    2013-11-01

    A systematic investigation of the effects of disorder on the BCS-BEC crossover at the lowest order in the impurity potential is presented for the normal phase above the critical temperature Tc. Starting with the t-matrix approach for the clean system, by which pairing correlations between opposite-spin fermions evolve from the weak-coupling (BCS) to the strong-coupling (BEC) limits by increasing the strength of the attractive interparticle interaction, all possible diagrammatic processes are considered where the effects of a disordered potential are retained in the self-energy at the lowest order. An accurate numerical investigation is carried out for all these diagrammatic terms, to determine which of them are mostly important throughout the BCS-BEC crossover. Explicit calculations for the values of Tc, the chemical potential, and the Tan's contact are carried out. In addition, the effect of disorder on the single-particle spectral function is analyzed, and a correlation is found between an increase of Tc and a widening of the pseudogap energy at Tc on the BCS side of unitarity in the presence of disorder, while on the BEC side of unitarity the presence of disorder favors the collapse of the underlying Fermi surface. The present investigation is meant to orient future studies when the effects of disorder will be considered at higher orders, with the purpose of limiting the proliferation of diagrammatic terms in which interaction and disorder are considered simultaneously.

  16. Novel insights into excipient effects on the biopharmaceutics of APIs from different BCS classes: Lactose in solid oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Kubbinga, Marlies; Moghani, Laura; Langguth, Peter

    2014-09-30

    Excipients encompass a wide range of properties that are of importance for the resulting drug product. Regulatory guidelines on biowaivers for immediate release formulations require an in depth understanding of the biopharmaceutic effects of excipients in order to establish bioequivalence between two different products carrying the same API based on dissolution tests alone. This paper describes a new approach in evaluating biopharmaceutic excipient effects. Actually used quantities of a model excipient, lactose, formulated in combination with APIs from different BCS classes were evaluated. The results suggest that companies use different (relative) amounts depending on the characteristics of the API. The probability of bioinequivalence due to a difference in lactose content between test and reference products was classified as low for BCS class I APIs and medium for BCS class II and III APIs, whereas a high probability was assigned to the combination of lactose and BCS class IV APIs. If repeated for other excipients, this retrospective, top-down approach may lead to a new database and more widespread applications of the biowaiver approach.

  17. [Theories of medicine in the newly discovered medical book "Hon'po Kagen Hishu" by San'ki Tashiro: basic prescriptions and modified prescriptions].

    PubMed

    Endo, J; Nakamura, T

    2001-12-01

    While investigating the formation of the Gosei-ha school in Japan by Tashiro San'ki and Manase Dosan, we discovered "Hon'po Kagen Hishu", a heretofore unknown medical book by San'ki Tashiro. A comparison of this work with Sanki's "Wakyokushu" revealed the following points. (1) "Hon'po Kagen Hishu" is a medical book compiled by San'ki Tashiro, and is believed to have been put together after the newly-compiled "Wakyokushu" (1525). (2) The book is roughly divided into two parts: basic prescriptions and modified prescriptions. "Hon'po Kagen Hishu" reveals clearly that San'ki's medical theories form the key theories of these two parts. (3) Many of the basic prescriptions contained in "Hon'po Kagen Hishu" were existing prescriptions used by the Kyokuho-ha School which was popular in Japan at the time. The modified prescriptions conform to the bian zheng pei ji (selection of drug based on the differential diagnosis) theories of the Li-Zhu medical school. (4) Among the 15 prescriptions described in the 'Shobyou Tsuyo no Yakuho' chapter of "Hon'po Kagen Hisku" secret prescriptions from schools of thought including the Nakarai school were discovered, pointing to a connection between San'ki and the Nakarai school.

  18. Exploring the Feasibility of Biowaiver Extension of BCS Class III Drugs with Site-Specific Absorption Using Gastrointestinal Simulation Technology.

    PubMed

    Sun, Le; Sun, Jin; He, Zhonggui

    2017-06-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration, World Health Organization and European Medicines Agency have allowed biowaiver for some BCS class III drugs, but shortened the requisite dissolution time of BCS class III drugs from 30 to 15 min, considering their site-specific absorption and others risk. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of site-specific absorption, low absorbed fraction (F a) and gastric emptying rate on the biowaiver extension of BCS class III drugs. The oral absorption of BCS class III drugs nadolol, acebutolol and atenolol which were P-gp substrates, was simulated using GastroPlus software with physiological parameters reflecting site-specific and site-independent absorption. Then, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data in literature. Simulation with different dissolution rates (>85 % solubility, T 85 % = 15-180 min) was performed to predict absorption (maximum concentration, C max and area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity, AUC0-inf) of the above model/virtual drugs (F a 3.81-80.14 %). The results of this study indicated that the site-specific absorption and low F a magnified the effect of dissolution rate on C max and AUC0-inf. However, the oral absorption of model drugs was not sensitive to the change of gastric emptying rate from 0.1, 0.25, 0.5 to 1 h. Based on the results of this study, we suggest that for BCS class III drug with high F a (about >80 %), the biowaiver should extend to rapid dissolution (T 85 % = 30 min), and 30 % of F a as the boundary of intermediate permeability class (30 % < F a < 85 %).

  19. Theoretical studies of carbon nanotube superconductivity and the BEC-BCS crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingyuan

    This thesis contains two parts. The first part is about superconductivity in 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in linear, parallel pores of AFI zeolite crystals. In the second part, we study the pseudogap problem in the BEC-BCS crossover. The 4-Angstrom CNTs can be formed in the linear pores of AFI zeolite crystals. They exhibit quasi one-dimensional (1D) fluctuation superconductivity below a temperature of about 15 K. In samples with improved quality, three-dimensional (3D) superconducting behaviors were observed, which display a sharp resistance drop around the temperature 7.5 K. We build a simple model to explain this 1D-3D crossover. The system is inhomogeneous, and contains randomly situated bundles of small CNTs. We use the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) model, with weak Josephson-coupling between the bundles, to model the system. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are employed to study the superconducting behaviors of this model. Owing to the weak Josephson-coupling, there exists a phase transition at a temperature around 7.5 K, which displays the signatures of the Berezinskii- Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition. Below this critical temperature, the phase fluctuations along the c-axis of the bundles are suppressed, and the whole system gradually approaches complete coherence as the temperature is lowered. This behavior is denoted a 1D to 3D crossover superconducting transition. The weak Josephson-coupling does not significantly contribute to the free energy of the system, thus the specific heat still exhibits quasi 1D characteristics, with a rounded peak between 7.5 K and 15 K. The results of numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental observations. The BEC-BCS crossover has been studied for decades. It is still controversial about whether there exists a pseudogap state above the critical temperature around the unitary limit, where Cooper pairs exist but do not condense. In this thesis, we study the Fermi gas with contact interaction at

  20. The low/high BCS permeability class boundary: physicochemical comparison of metoprolol and labetalol.

    PubMed

    Zur, Moran; Gasparini, Marisa; Wolk, Omri; Amidon, Gordon L; Dahan, Arik

    2014-05-05

    Although recognized as overly conservative, metoprolol is currently the common low/high BCS permeability class boundary reference compound, while labetalol was suggested as a potential alternative. The purpose of this study was to identify the various characteristics that the optimal marker should exhibit, and to investigate the suitability of labetalol as the permeability class reference drug. Labetalol's BCS solubility class was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in vitro and in vivo in rats, considering the complexity of the whole of the small intestine. Labetalol was found to be unequivocally a high-solubility compound. In the pH range throughout the small intestine (6.5-7.5), labetalol exhibited pH-dependent permeability, with higher permeability at higher pH values. While in vitro octanol-buffer partitioning (Log D) values of labetalol were significantly higher than those of metoprolol, the opposite was evident in the in vitro PAMPA permeability assay. The results of the in vivo perfusion studies in rats lay between the two contradictory in vitro studies; metoprolol was shown to have moderately higher rat intestinal permeability than labetalol. Theoretical distribution of the ionic species of the drugs was in corroboration with the experimental in vitro and the in vivo data. We propose three characteristics that the optimal permeability class reference drug should exhibit: (1) fraction dose absorbed in the range of 90%; (2) the optimal marker drug should be absorbed largely via passive transcellular permeability, with no/negligible carrier-mediated active intestinal transport (influx or efflux); and (3) the optimal marker drug should preferably be nonionizable. The data presented in this paper demonstrate that neither metoprolol nor labetalol can be regarded as optimal low/high-permeability class boundary standard. While metoprolol is too conservative due to its complete absorption

  1. Free vibration and biaxial buckling analysis of magneto-electro-elastic microplate resting on visco-Pasternak substrate via modified strain gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalpoor, A.; Ahmadi-Savadkoohi, A.; Hosseini-Hashemi, Sh

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical analysis of free vibration and biaxial buckling of magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) microplate resting on Kelvin-Voigt visco-Pasternak foundation and subjected to initial external electric and magnetic potentials, using modified strain gradient theory (MSGT). Kirchhoff plate model and Hamilton’s principle are employed to extract the governing equations of motion. Governing equations were analytically solved to obtain clear closed-form expression for complex natural frequencies and buckling loads using Navier’s approach. Numerical results are presented to reveal variations of natural frequency and buckling load ratio of MEE microplate against different amounts of the length scale parameter, initial external electric and magnetic potentials, aspect ratio, damping and transverse and shear stiffness parameters of the visco-Pasternak foundation, length to thickness ratio, microplate thickness and higher modes. Numerical results of this study illustrate that by increasing thickness-to-material length scale parameter ratio, both natural frequency and buckling load ratio predicted by MSGT and modified couple stress theory are reduced because the non-dimensional length scale parameter tends to decrease the stiffness of structures and make them more flexible. In addition, results show that initial external electric and initial external magnetic potentials have no considerable influence on the buckling load ratio and frequency of MEE microplate as the microplate thickness increases.

  2. Applying Bayesian Compressed Sensing (BCS) for sensitivity analysis ofclimate model outputs that depend on a high-dimensional input space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, K.; Guo, Z.; Wang, M.; Lucas, D. D.; Debusschere, B.

    2014-12-01

    High-dimensional parametric uncertainty exists in many parts of atmospheric climatemodels. It is computationally intractable to fully understand their impact on the climatewithout a significant reduction in the number of dimensions. We employ Bayesian CompressedSensing (BCS) to perform adaptive sensitivity analysis in order to determine whichparameters affect the Quantity of Interest (QoI) the most and the least. In short, BCSfits a polynomial to the QoI via a Bayesian framework with an L1 (Laplace) prior. Thus,BCS tries to find the sparsest polynomial representation of the QoI, i.e., the fewestterms, while still trying to retain high accuracy. This procedure is adaptive in the sensethat higher order polynomial terms can be added to the polynomial model when it is likely thatparticular parameters have a significant effect on the QoI. This helps avoid overfitting and is much more computationally efficient. We apply the BCS algorithm to two sets of single column CAM (Community Atmosphere Model)simulations. In the first application, we analyze liquid cloud fraction as modeled byCLUBB (Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals), an atmospheric cloud and turbulence model.This liquid cloud fraction QoI depends on 29 different input parameters. We compare mainSobol sensitivity indices obtained with the BCS algorithm for the liquid cloud fraction in6 cases, with a previous approach to sensitivity analysis using deviance. We show BCS canprovide almost identical sensitivity analysis results. Additionally, BCS can provide animproved, lower-dimensional, higher order model for prediction. In the secondapplication, we study the time averaged ozone concentration, at varying altitudes, as afunction of 95 photochemical parameters, in order to study the sensitivity to theseparameters. To further improve model prediction, we also explore k-fold cross validationto obtain a better model for both liquid cloud fraction in CLUBB and ozone concentrationin CAM. This material is based upon work

  3. Gaussian fluctuations in the two-dimensional BCS-BEC crossover: finite temperature properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bighin, G.; Salasnich, L.

    2016-02-01

    The role of fluctuations is enhanced in lower dimensionality systems: in a two dimensions off- diagonal long-range order is destroyed by the fluctuations at any finite temperature, drastically modifying the critical properties with respect to the three-dimensional counterpart. Recently two-dimensional systems of interacting fermions have been the subject of Montecarlo studies and experimental investigations, in particular an ultracold gas of attractive fermions with a widely tunable interaction due to a Feshbach resonance has been realized and the Berezinskii- Kosterlitz-Thouless transition has been observed. The present work deals with the theoretical description of an ultracold Fermi gas: we discuss the role of Gaussian fluctuations of the order parameter in the equation of state, in particular we take into account the first sound velocity, showing that the inclusion of order parameter fluctuations is needed in order to get the correct composite-boson limit in the strong-coupling regime. The theory is also compared with experimental data. Finally we focus on the superfluid density in the weak-coupling, intermediate and strong-coupling regimes at finite temperature, through which the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless critical temperature is obtained.

  4. Excitation dynamics in Phycoerythrin 545: modeling of steady-state spectra and transient absorption with modified Redfield theory.

    PubMed

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Doust, Alexander B; Curutchet, Carles; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2010-07-21

    We model the spectra and excitation dynamics in the phycobiliprotein antenna complex PE545 isolated from the unicellular photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS24. The excitonic couplings between the eight bilins are calculated using the CIS/6-31G method. The site energies are extracted from a simultaneous fit of the absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and excitation anisotropy spectra together with the transient absorption kinetics using the modified Redfield approach. Quantitative fit of the data enables us to assign the eight exciton components of the spectra and build up the energy transfer picture including pathways and timescales of energy relaxation, thus allowing a visualization of excitation dynamics within the complex.

  5. Static structures of the BCS-like holographic superfluid in AdS4 spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Shanquan; Liu, Wenbiao; Tian, Yu

    2017-03-01

    We investigate in detail the m2=0 Abelian Higgs model in AdS4 , which is considered as the holographic dual of the most BCS-like superfluid. In homogeneous and isotropic superfluid solutions, we calculate the fourth-sound speeds, the square of which approaches 1 /2 with increasing chemical potential (lowering temperature). Then we present the single dark soliton solutions, which becomes thinner with increasing chemical potential. For the first time, we also find the interesting double and triple dark soliton solutions, which is unexpected and shows the possibility of more complicated static configurations. Finally, we investigate vortex solutions. For winding number n =1 , the vortex becomes thinner with increasing chemical potential. At a given chemical potential, with increasing winding number, first the vortex becomes bigger and the charge density depletion becomes larger, and then the charge density depletion settles down at a certain value and the growth of the vortex size is found to obey a scaling symmetry.

  6. Pairing in the BCS and LN approximations using continuum single particle level density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Id Betan, R. M.; Repetto, C. E.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the properties of drip line nuclei requires to take into account the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy of the system. This paper has the purpose to show that the continuum single particle level density is a convenient way to consider the pairing correlation in the continuum. Isospin mean-field and isospin pairing strength are used to find the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and Lipkin-Nogami (LN) approximate solutions of the pairing Hamiltonian. Several physical properties of the whole chain of the Tin isotope, as gap parameter, Fermi level, binding energy, and one- and two-neutron separation energies, were calculated and compared with other methods and with experimental data when they exist. It is shown that the use of the continuum single particle level density is an economical way to include explicitly the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy in large scale mass calculation. It is also shown that the computed properties are in good agreement with experimental data and with more sophisticated treatment of the pairing interaction.

  7. Composite bosons in the two-dimensional BCS-BEC crossover from Gaussian fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasnich, L.; Toigo, F.

    2015-01-01

    We study Gaussian fluctuations of the zero-temperature attractive Fermi gas in the two-dimensional (2D) BCS-BEC crossover showing that they are crucial to get a reliable equation of state in the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) regime of composite bosons, bound states of fermionic pairs. A low-momentum expansion up to the fourth order of the quadratic action of the fluctuating pairing field gives an ultraviolent divergent contribution of the Gaussian fluctuations to the grand potential. Performing dimensional regularization we evaluate the effective coupling constant in the beyond-mean-field grand potential. Remarkably, in the BEC regime our grand potential gives exactly the Popov's equation of state of 2D interacting bosons, and allows us to identify the scattering length aB of the interaction between composite bosons as aB=aF/(21 /2e1 /4) =0.551 ...aF , with aF is the scattering length of fermions. Remarkably, the value from our analytical relationship between the two scattering lengths is in full agreement with that obtained by recent Monte Carlo calculations.

  8. Antiferromagnetic Ising spin glass competing with BCS pairing interaction in a transverse field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, S. G.; Zimmer, F. M.; Kipper, C. J.; Calegari, E. J.

    2006-07-01

    The competition among spin glass (SG), antiferromagnetism (AF) and local pairing superconductivity (PAIR) is studied in a two-sublattice fermionic Ising spin glass model with a local BCS pairing interaction in the presence of an applied magnetic transverse field Γ. In the present approach, spins in different sublattices interact with a Gaussian random coupling with an antiferromagnetic mean J0 and standard deviation J. The problem is formulated in the path integral formalism in which spin operators are represented by bilinear combinations of Grassmann variables. The saddle-point Grand Canonical potential is obtained within the static approximation and the replica symmetric ansatz. The results are analysed in phase diagrams in which the AF and the SG phases can occur for small g (g is the strength of the local superconductor coupling written in units of J), while the PAIR phase appears as unique solution for large g. However, there is a complex line transition separating the PAIR phase from the others. It is second order at high temperature that ends in a tricritical point. The quantum fluctuations affect deeply the transition lines and the tricritical point due to the presence of Γ.

  9. Effective Hamiltonian based Monte Carlo for the BCS to BEC crossover in the attractive Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasrija, Kanika; Chakraborty, Prabuddha B.; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-10-01

    We present an effective Hamiltonian based real-space approach for studying the weak-coupling BCS to the strong-coupling Bose-Einstein condensate crossover in the two-dimensional attractive Hubbard model at finite temperatures. We introduce and justify an effective classical Hamiltonian to describe the thermal fluctuations of the relevant auxiliary fields. Our results for Tc and phase diagrams compare very well with those obtained from more sophisticated and CPU-intensive numerical methods. We demonstrate that the method works in the presence of disorder and can be a powerful tool for a real-space description of the effect of disorder on superconductivity. From a combined analysis of the superconducting order parameter, the distribution of auxiliary fields, and the quasiparticle density of states, we identify the regions of metallic, insulating, superconducting, and pseudogapped behavior. Our finding of the importance of phase fluctuations for the pseudogap behavior is consistent with the conclusions drawn from recent experiments on NbN superconductors. The method can be generalized to study superconductors with nontrivial order-parameter symmetries by identifying the relevant auxiliary variables.

  10. Trends in Energy Management Technology: BCS Integration Technologies - Open Communications Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Tom

    2002-09-18

    Our overall purpose in writing this series of articles is to provide Federal energy managers some basic informational tools to assist their decision making process relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement, and energy savings potential. Since Federal buildings rely on energy management systems more than their commercial counterparts, it is important for energy practitioners to have a high level of knowledge and understanding of these complex systems. This is the second article in a series and will focus on building control system (BCS) networking fundamentals and an assessment of current approaches to open communications protocols. This is important because networking is a complex subject and the networks form the basic infrastructure for energy management functions and for integrating a wide variety of OEM equipment into a complete EMCIS. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems. Future topics will concentrate on more practical aspects including applications software, product offerings, networking strategies, and case studies of actual installations. Please refer to the first article for a more complete overview of the purpose and background for this series.

  11. Characterization of a Thermostable d-Stereospecific Alanine Amidase from Brevibacillus borstelensis BCS-1

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Dae Heoun; Kwon, Seok-Joon; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Kwak, Mi-Sun; Lee, Mi-Hwa; Song, Jae Jun; Lee, Seung-Goo; Yoon, Ki-Hong; Sung, Moon-Hee

    2003-01-01

    A gene encoding a new thermostable d-stereospecific alanine amidase from the thermophile Brevibacillus borstelensis BCS-1 was cloned and sequenced. The molecular mass of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 199 kDa after gel filtration chromatography and about 30 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that the enzyme could be composed of a hexamer with identical subunits. The purified enzyme exhibited strong amidase activity towards d-amino acid-containing aromatic, aliphatic, and branched amino acid amides yet exhibited no enzyme activity towards l-amino acid amides, d-amino acid-containing peptides, and NH2-terminally protected amino acid amides. The optimum temperature and pH for the enzyme activity were 85°C and 9.0, respectively. The enzyme remained stable within a broad pH range from 7.0 to 10.0. The enzyme was inhibited by dithiothreitol, 2-mercaptoethanol, and EDTA yet was strongly activated by Co2+ and Mn2+. The kcat/Km for d-alaninamide was measured as 544.4 ± 5.5 mM−1 min−1 at 50°C with 1 mM Co2+. PMID:12571020

  12. Revisiting the BCS, a measurement system for characterizing the optics of solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, J. W.

    The Beam Characterization System is being employed at the Sandia's National Solar Thermal Test Facility to characterize the optical performance of heliostats, point-focus solar collectors, and their optical sub-elements as part of the on-going task to develop solar thermal technologies. With this measurement system, images of concentrated solar flux are acquired using digital imaging and processed to obtain such measures of the collector's optical performance as beam power, flux distribution, and beam diameter. Key system elements are a diffusely reflective target for imaging collector beams, meteorological instrumentation including a flux gauge to measure flux at one point in the beam, and a calibration technique to establish a pixel-intensity to flux-density conversion factor for the image. The system is employed in a variety of collector tests such as beam quality, tracking error, and wind effects. The paper describes the Beam Characterization System and its components and presents, for illustration, sample test results. An analysis of the Beam Characterization System's sources of measurement error is presented. Lastly, measurement techniques that employ the BCS to align heliostats and to measure or estimate collector surface slope errors are described.

  13. A Density Functional Theory Examination of the Local Conformational Energetics of Normal and Epigenetically Modified Duplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Olson, Wilma

    2013-03-01

    We report density functional theory calculations of various local regions of duplex DNA, including hydrogen bonded base pairs, stacked nearest-neighbor bases, and sugar-phosphate backbones. Special attention is given to the methylation of 5-cytosine, an epigenetic modification believed to play a key role in eukaryotic gene regulation. Energetically stable molecular conformations are identified and their elastic properties analyzed. Our results are compared with previous ab initio studies and high-resolution crystalline structural data.

  14. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms based on biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) literature data: verapamil hydrochloride, propranolol hydrochloride, and atenolol.

    PubMed

    Vogelpoel, H; Welink, J; Amidon, G L; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Möller, H; Olling, M; Shah, V P; Barends, D M

    2004-08-01

    Literature data related to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) are presented on verapamil hydrochloride, propranolol hydrochloride, and atenolol in the form of BCS-monographs. Data on the qualitative composition of immediate release (IR) tablets containing these active substances with a Marketing Authorization (MA) in the Netherlands (NL) are also provided; in view of these MA's the assumption was made that these tablets were bioequivalent to the innovator product. The development of a database with BCS-related data is announced by the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP).

  15. Correlation between the transition temperature and the superfluid density in BCS superconductor NbB2+x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, R.; Shengelaya, A.; Maisuradze, A.; di Castro, D.; Escamilla, R.; Keller, H.

    2008-02-01

    The results of the muon-spin rotation experiments on BCS superconductors NbB2+x ( x=0.2 and 0.34) are reported. Both samples, studied in the present work, exhibit rather broad transitions to the superconducting state, suggesting a distribution of the volume fractions with different transition temperatures (Tc's) . By taking these distributions into account, the dependence of the inverse squared zero-temperature magnetic penetration depth (λ0-2) on Tc was reconstructed for temperatures in the range 1.5K≲Tc≲8.0K . λ0-2 was found to obey the power law dependence λ0-2∝Tc3.1(1) which appears to be common for some families of BCS superconductors as, e.g., Al doped MgB2 and high-temperature cuprate superconductors as underdoped YBa2Cu3O7-δ .

  16. Evolution of the Universe within the framework of the modified Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory: The role of the cosmological scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubaryan, Edvard; Avagyan, Roland; Harutunyan, Gohar; Kotanjyan, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Early and late stages of the cosmological expansion are considered on the base of the modified Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) theory, under the assumption φ(y)=αH ^{n} (H is the Hubble constant, n is a parameter equal to four in the inflationary stage and one or two at late stages of the Universe evolution). At late stages, dynamical pattern is obtained with uniformly accelerated expansion for different values of σ (σ is the coupling constant between the gravitational and scalar fields). It is remarkable that for the limiting allowed value of α=9/(2σ) and for large σ, this variant of the theory is equivalent to the de Sitter model in the framework of the Einstein theory in the presence of a scalar field φ(y)=αH ^{2}. Therefore, the quasi exponential growth of the scale factor in the limiting case becomes purely exponential. Note that in the previously considered models the behavior of α was a power law. We also consider the inflationary regime with φ(y)=αH ^{4}. It is shown that in this case a model with slow rolling can be constructed.

  17. Mechanistic investigation of food effect on disintegration and dissolution of BCS class III compound solid formulations: the importance of viscosity.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Asma; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2012-10-01

    A negative food effect, i.e. a decrease in bioavailability upon the co-administration of compounds together with food, has been attributed particularly with high solubility/low permeability compounds (BCS class III). Different mechanisms have been proposed including intestinal dilution leading to a lower concentration gradient across the intestinal wall as well as binding of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to food components in the intestine and thereby decreasing the fraction of the dose available for absorption. These mechanisms refer primarily to the compound and not to the dosage form. An increase in viscosity of the dissolution fluid will in particular affect the absorption of BCS type III compounds with preferential absorption in the upper small intestine if the API release is delayed from the dosage form. The present study demonstrated that the increase in viscosity of the dissolution medium, following ingestion of a solid meal, may drastically reduce disintegration and dissolution. For that purpose the viscosity of the standard FDA meal was determined and simulated by solutions of HPMC in buffer. As model formulations, three commercially available tablets containing trospium chloride, a BCS class III m-cholinoreceptor antagonist was used. Trospium chloride drug products have been described to undergo a negative food effect of more than 80% following ingestion with food. The tablets showed prolonged disintegration times and reduced dissolution rates in viscous media, which could be attributed to changes in the liquid penetration rates. The effect was particularly significant for film-coated tablets relative to uncoated dosage forms. The results show the necessity of considering media viscosity when designing in vitro models of drug release for BCS type III drug formulations.

  18. Analytical comparison of magnetic and electrical properties using modified Landau theory in bismuth ferrite: Effect of milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pardeep K.; Jha, Priyanka A.; Srivastava, Geetika; Jha, A. K.; Kotnala, R. K.; Dwivedi, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, authors have synthesized bismuth ferrite using (i) solid state route and (ii) mechano-chemical activation technique. The structural studies reveal the formation of bismuth ferrite of AB5O12 type by mechanochemical activation technique and of ABO3 type by conventional solid state route. In addition to the detailed studies on magnetic and electrical properties of both the samples, a comparative analysis has been done using Landau and Berry phase theory. Through this, an effort has been made to establish a relationship between magnetism and electrical polarization vis a vis magneto-electric coupling in these samples.

  19. Zero-Temperature Properties of a Strongly Interacting Superfluid Fermi Gas in the BCS-BEC Crossover Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, H.; van Wyk, P.; Hanai, R.; Kagamihara, D.; Inotani, D.; Horikoshi, M.; Ohashi, Y.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate thermodynamic properties and effects of quantum fluctuations in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover region of a superfluid Fermi gas in the low-temperature limit. Including strong-coupling corrections within the framework of an extended T-matrix approximation, we numerically compute the isothermal compressibility χ _n . While quantum fluctuation effects on χ _n in the strong-coupling BEC regime are explained by the quantum depletion due to a repulsive interaction between tightly bound molecules, effects of self-energy shift on the Fermi chemical potential are found to enhance χ _n in the weak-coupling BCS region. We also show that the calculated χ _n agrees well with the recent experiment on a ^6 Li Fermi gas done from the weak-coupling region to the unitarity limit. Our result would be useful for the study of many-body quantum corrections in the BCS-BEC crossover region of a strongly interacting Fermi superfluid.

  20. Pure Goldstone mode in the quench dynamics of a confined ultracold Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettmann, P.; Hannibal, S.; Croitoru, M. D.; Axt, V. M.; Kuhn, T.

    2017-09-01

    We present a numerical study of the dynamic response of a confined superfluid Fermi gas to a rapid change of the scattering length (i.e., an interaction quench). Based on a fully microscopic time-dependent density-matrix approach within the full Bogoliubov-de Gennes formalism that includes a 3D harmonic confinement we simulate and identify the emergence of a Goldstone mode of the BCS gap in a cigar-shaped 6Li gas. By analyzing this Goldstone mode over a wide range of parameters, we show that its excitation spectrum is gapless and that its main frequency is not fixed by the trapping potential but that it is determined by the details of the quench. Thus we report the emergence of a pure Goldstone mode of the BCS gap that—in contrast to situations in many previous studies—maintains its gapless excitation spectrum predicted by the Goldstone theorem. Furthermore, we observe that the size-dependent superfluid resonances resulting from the atypical BCS-BEC crossover have a direct impact on this Goldstone mode. Finally, we find that the interaction quench-induced Goldstone mode leads to a low-frequency in-phase oscillation of the single-particle occupations with complete inversion of the lowest-lying single-particle states which could provide a convenient experimental access to the pure gapless Goldstone mode.

  1. Zero-Temperature Properties of a Strongly Interacting Superfluid Fermi Gas in the BCS-BEC Crossover Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, H.; van Wyk, P.; Hanai, R.; Kagamihara, D.; Inotani, D.; Horikoshi, M.; Ohashi, Y.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate thermodynamic properties and effects of quantum fluctuations in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) crossover region of a superfluid Fermi gas in the low-temperature limit. Including strong-coupling corrections within the framework of an extended T-matrix approximation, we numerically compute the isothermal compressibility χ _n. While quantum fluctuation effects on χ _n in the strong-coupling BEC regime are explained by the quantum depletion due to a repulsive interaction between tightly bound molecules, effects of self-energy shift on the Fermi chemical potential are found to enhance χ _n in the weak-coupling BCS region. We also show that the calculated χ _n agrees well with the recent experiment on a ^6Li Fermi gas done from the weak-coupling region to the unitarity limit. Our result would be useful for the study of many-body quantum corrections in the BCS-BEC crossover region of a strongly interacting Fermi superfluid.

  2. Cancellation of the N -composite-boson correlation energy under a BCS-like potential: A dimensionality-dependent effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Shiue-Yuan; Combescot, Monique; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2016-09-01

    We use Richardson-Gaudin exact equations to derive the ground-state energy of N composite bosons (cobosons) interacting via a potential which acts between fermion pairs having zero center-of-mass momentum, that is, a potential similar to the reduced BCS potential used in conventional superconductivity. Through a density expansion, we show that while for two-dimensional (2D) systems, the N -coboson correlation energy undergoes a surprising cancellation which leaves the interaction part with an N (N -1 ) dependence only, such a cancellation does not exist in 1D, 3D, or 4D systems (which correspond to 2D parabolic traps) nor when the cobosons interact via a similar short-range potential but between pairs having an arbitrary center-of-mass momentum. This shows that the previously found cancellation which exists for the Cooper-pair correlation energy results not only from the very peculiar form of the reduced BCS potential, but also from a quite mysterious dimensionality effect, the density of states for Cooper pairs feeling the BCS potential being essentially constant, as for 2D systems.

  3. Modified Iterated perturbation theory in the strong coupling regime and its application to the 3d FCC lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Sémon, Patrick; Shastry, B. Sriram; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2012-02-01

    The Dynamical Mean-Field theory(DMFT) approach to the Hubbard model requires a method to solve the problem of a quantum impurity in a bath of non-interacting electrons. Iterated Perturbation Theory(IPT)[1] has proven its effectiveness as a solver in many cases of interest. Based on general principles and on comparisons with an essentially exact Continuous-Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC)[2], here we show that the standard implementation of IPT fails when the interaction is much larger than the bandwidth. We propose a slight modification to the IPT algorithm by requiring that double occupancy calculated with IPT gives the correct value. We call this method IPT-D. We show how this approximate impurity solver compares with respect to CTQMC. We consider a face centered cubic lattice(FCC) in 3d for different physical properties. We also use IPT-D to study the thermopower using two recently proposed approximations[3]S^* and SKelvin that do not require analytical continuation and show how thermopower is essentially the entropy per particle in the incoherent regime but not in the coherent one.[1]H.Kajueter et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 131(1996)[2]P. Werner, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 076405(2006)[3]B.S. Sriram Shastry Rep. Prog. Phys. 72 016501(2009)

  4. Modal theory of modified spontaneous emission of a quantum emitter in a hybrid plasmonic photonic-crystal cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamandar Dezfouli, Mohsen; Gordon, Reuven; Hughes, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    We present an intuitive and accurate modal description of the rich optical physics involved for quantum dipole emitters coupled to hybrid plasmonic photonic-cavity structures. A significant frequency dependence for the spontaneous emission decay rate of a quantum dipole emitter coupled to these hybrid structures is found. In particular, it is shown that a Fano-type resonance reported experimentally in hybrid plasmonic systems arises from a large interference between two dominant quasinormal modes of the systems in the frequency range of interest. The presented modal theory forms an efficient basis for modeling quantum light-matter interactions in these complex hybrid systems and also enables the quantitative prediction and understanding of both radiative and nonradiative coupling for a wide range of dipole positions.

  5. Modelling and modifying young heterosexuals' HIV-preventive behaviour; a review of theories, findings and educational implications.

    PubMed

    Abraham, C; Sheeran, P

    1994-07-01

    Studies applying social cognitive frameworks such as the health belief model and the theory of reasoned action to HIV-prevention are reviewed. These models suggest that appropriate beliefs, attitudes, social norms, intentions and perceived self-efficacy are sufficient psychological conditions for safer sexual behaviour. Limitations inherent in these accounts are identified and additional factors which need to be incorporated in psychological models and health education programmes are highlighted. These include, the motivational complexity of sexual behaviour, the emotional and arousal states in which it is enacted, the difficulties of planning what is regarded as spontaneous interaction and contextual factors which can undermine HIV-preventive intentions. Health education interventions aimed at individual, group and community levels are examined in light of this theoretical review and action-focused, empowering interventions grounded in youth culture are recommended.

  6. Applying Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) Criteria to Predict Oral Absorption of Drugs in Dogs: Challenges and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Papich, Mark G; Martinez, Marilyn N

    2015-07-01

    The Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) has been a prognostic tool for assessing the potential effects of formulation on the human drug oral bioavailability. When used in conjunction with in vitro dissolution tests, the BCS can support the prediction of in vivo product performance and the development of mechanistic models that support formulation assessments through the generation of "what if" scenarios. To date, the applicability of existing human BCS criteria has not been evaluated in dogs, thereby limiting its use in canine drug development. Therefore, we examined 50 drugs for which absolute bioavailability (F) was available both in dogs and humans. The drugs were also evaluated for any potential association between solubility (calculated from the dose number, Do) or lipophilicity (LogP) and F in dogs. In humans, solubility is determined in 250 mL of fluid. However, the appropriate volume for classifying drug solubility in dogs has not been established. In this analysis, the estimated volume of a water flush administered to fasted dogs (6 mL) and a volume of 250 mL scaled to a Beagle dog (35 mL) were examined. In addition, in humans, a Do value greater than 1.0 is used to define a compound as highly soluble and a LogP value greater than 1.72 as high permeability. These same criteria were applied for defining highly soluble and highly permeable in dogs. Whether using 35 or 6 mL to determine Do, the canine solubility classification remained unchanged for all but seven compounds. There were no clear associations between a drug's F in dogs and humans or between the canine value of F and either its human BCS classification, its LogP value, or the canine Do estimate. There was a tendency for those drugs with canine values of F equal to or greater than 80% to have LogP values equal to or greater than 1.0. Exceptions to this observation tended to be those compounds known to be absorbed via mechanisms other than passive diffusion (e.g., via transporters or

  7. Modified corrections for London forces in solid-state density functional theory calculations of structure and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Korter, Timothy M

    2012-06-28

    Dispersion forces are critical for defining the crystal structures and vibrational potentials of molecular crystals. It is, therefore, important to include corrections for these forces in periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations of lattice vibrational frequencies. In this study, DFT was augmented with a correction term for London-type dispersion forces in the simulations of the structures and terahertz (THz) vibrational spectra of the dispersion-bound solids naphthalene and durene. The parameters of the correction term were modified to best reproduce the experimental crystal structures and THz spectra. It was found that the accurate reproduction of the lattice dimensions by adjusting the magnitude of the applied dispersion forces resulted in the highest-quality fit of the calculated vibrational modes with the observed THz absorptions. The method presented for the modification of the dispersion corrections provides a practical approach to accurately simulating the THz spectra of molecular crystals, accounting for inherent systematic errors imposed by computational and experimental factors.

  8. Nonperturbative quantum dynamics of the order parameter in the BCS pairing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitski, Victor

    2010-08-01

    We consider quantum dynamics of the order parameter in the discrete pairing model (Richardson model) in thermodynamic equilibrium. The integrable Richardson Hamiltonian is represented as a direct sum of Hamiltonians acting in different Hilbert spaces of single-particle and paired/empty states. This allows us to factorize the full thermodynamic partition function into a combination of simple terms associated with real spins on singly occupied states and the partition function of the quantum XY model for Anderson pseudospins associated with the paired/empty states. Using coherent-state path integral, we calculate the effects of superconducting phase fluctuations exactly. The contribution of superconducting amplitude fluctuations to the partition function in the broken-symmetry phase is shown to follow from the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations in imaginary time. These equations in turn allow several interesting mappings, e.g., they are shown to be in a one-to-one correspondence with the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation in supersymmetric quantum mechanics. However, the most practically useful approach to calculate functional determinants is found to be via an analytical continuation of the quantum order parameter to real time, Δ(τ→it) , such that the problem maps onto that of a driven two-level system. The contribution of a particular dynamic order parameter, Δ(τ) , to the partition function is shown to correspond to the sum of the Berry phase and dynamic phase accumulated by the pseudospin. We also examine a family of exact solutions for two-level-system dynamics on a class of elliptic functions and suggest a compact expression to estimate the functional determinants on such trajectories. The possibility of having quantum soliton solutions coexisting with classical BCS mean field is discussed.

  9. Fumaric acid microenvironment tablet formulation and process development for crystalline cenicriviroc mesylate, a BCS IV compound.

    PubMed

    Menning, Mark M; Dalziel, Sean M

    2013-11-04

    Cenicriviroc mesylate (CVC) is a potent dual antagonist of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) in phase 2b development as an entry inhibitor for HIV-1 infection treatment.1,2 CVC is a weak base exhibiting BCS IV characteristics with a highly pH dependent solubility profile (>100 mg/mL for pH < 2 and <0.2 μg/mL for pH > 4) and low Caco-2 cell line permeability. Previous tablet formulations of CVC, including spray-dried dispersion and a wet granulation with citric acid, had been found unacceptable for commercial use due to chemical and physical instability or unacceptably high excipient loading precluding fixed-dose combinability. A high drug loading, 26% (w/w), acidic microenvironment tablet formulation with fumaric acid solubilizer (1:1 CVC/fumaric acid) and a dry granulation process was developed iteratively through a sequence of prototypes characterized by beagle dog absorption studies, focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), and accelerated stability testing. The fumaric acid based dry granulated product demonstrated a mean bioavailability comparable to an oral solution dose in a dog model. Stability and moisture sensitivity of the formulation were improved via the dry granulation process technique and the use of fumaric acid. It is hypothesized that the observed slow dissolution kinetics of fumaric acid prolongs an acidic microenvironment around the agglomerated CVC crystals and excipients leading to increased CVC dissolution and thereby absorption. The fumaric acid formulation also demonstrated absorption resilience to gastric pH extremes in a dog model. This optimized formulation and process enables CVC to be a viable candidate for current HIV treatment paradigms of single once daily fixed-dose combination products.

  10. Solution-state polymer assemblies influence BCS class II drug dissolution and supersaturation maintenance.

    PubMed

    Dalsin, Molly C; Tale, Swapnil; Reineke, Theresa M

    2014-02-10

    Spray dried dispersions (SDDs), solid dispersions of polymer excipients and active pharmaceuticals, are important to the field of oral drug delivery for improving active stability, bioavailability, and efficacy. Herein, we examine the influence of solution-state polymer assemblies on amorphous spray-dried dispersion (SDD) performance with two BCS II model drugs, phenytoin and probucol. These drugs were spray dried with 4 model polymer excipients consisting of poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PEP), N,N,-dimethylacrylamide (DMA), or 2-methacrylamido glucopyranose (MAG): amphiphilic diblock ter- and copolymers, PEP-P(DMA-grad-MAG) and PEP-PDMA, and their respective hydrophilic analogues, P(DMA-grad-MAG) and PDMA. Selective and nonselective solvents for the hydrophilic block of the diblock ter- and copolymers were used to induce or repress solution-state assemblies prior to spray drying. Prespray dried solution-state assemblies of these four polymers were probed with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and showed differences in solution assembly size and structure (free polymer versus aggregates versus micelles). Solid-state structures of spray dried dispersions (SDDs) showed a single glass transition event implying a homogeneous mixture of drug/polymer. Crystallization temperatures and enthalpies indicated that the drugs interact mostly with the DMA-containing portions of the polymers. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine SDD particle size and morphology for the various polymer-drug pairings. In vitro dissolution tests showed excellent performance for one system, spray-dried PEP-PDMA micelles with probucol. Dissolution structures were investigated through DLS to determine drug-polymer aggregates that lead to enhanced SDD performance. Forced aggregation of the polymer into regular micelle structures was found to be a critical factor to increase the dissolution rate and supersaturation maintenance of SDDs, and may be an attractive platform to exploit in excipient

  11. In Silico Prediction of Drug Dissolution and Absorption with variation in Intestinal pH for BCS Class II Weak Acid Drugs: Ibuprofen and Ketoprofen§

    PubMed Central

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Langguth, Peter; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    The FDA Biopharmaceutical Classification System guidance allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I. Extensions of the in vivo biowaiver for a number of drugs in BCS Class III and BCS class II have been proposed, particularly, BCS class II weak acids. However, a discrepancy between the in vivo- BE results and in vitro- dissolution results for a BCS class II acids was recently observed. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral absorption of BCS class II weak acids via simulation software and to determine if the in vitro dissolution test with various dissolution media could be sufficient for in vitro bioequivalence studies of ibuprofen and ketoprofen as models of carboxylic acid drugs. The oral absorption of these BCS class II acids from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted by GastroPlus™. Ibuprofen did not satisfy the bioequivalence criteria at lower settings of intestinal pH=6.0. Further the experimental dissolution of ibuprofen tablets in the low concentration phosphate buffer at pH 6.0 (the average buffer capacity 2.2 mmol L-1/pH) was dramatically reduced compared to the dissolution in SIF (the average buffer capacity 12.6 mmol L -1/pH). Thus these predictions for oral absorption of BCS class II acids indicate that the absorption patterns largely depend on the intestinal pH and buffer strength and must be carefully considered for a bioequivalence test. Simulation software may be very useful tool to aid the selection of dissolution media that may be useful in setting an in vitro bioequivalence dissolution standard. PMID:22815122

  12. In silico prediction of drug dissolution and absorption with variation in intestinal pH for BCS class II weak acid drugs: ibuprofen and ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Langguth, Peter; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Amidon, Gordon L

    2012-10-01

    The FDA Biopharmaceutical Classification System guidance allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I. Extensions of the in vivo biowaiver for a number of drugs in BCS class III and BCS class II have been proposed, in particular, BCS class II weak acids. However, a discrepancy between the in vivo BE results and in vitro dissolution results for BCS class II acids was recently observed. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral absorption of BCS class II weak acids via simulation software and to determine if the in vitro dissolution test with various dissolution media could be sufficient for in vitro bioequivalence studies of ibuprofen and ketoprofen as models of carboxylic acid drugs. The oral absorption of these BCS class II acids from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted by GastroPlus™. Ibuprofen did not satisfy the bioequivalence criteria at lower settings of intestinal pH of 6.0. Further the experimental dissolution of ibuprofen tablets in a low concentration phosphate buffer at pH 6.0 (the average buffer capacity 2.2 mmol l (-1) /pH) was dramatically reduced compared with the dissolution in SIF (the average buffer capacity 12.6 mmol l (-1) /pH). Thus these predictions for the oral absorption of BCS class II acids indicate that the absorption patterns depend largely on the intestinal pH and buffer strength and must be considered carefully for a bioequivalence test. Simulation software may be a very useful tool to aid the selection of dissolution media that may be useful in setting an in vitro bioequivalence dissolution standard.

  13. Research in the theory of condensed matter and elementary particles. (Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The proposed research is concerned with problems occupying the common ground between quantum field theory and statistical mechanics. The topics under investigation include: superconformal field theory in two dimensions, its relationship to two dimensional critical phenomena and its applications in string theory; the covariant formulation of the superstring theory; formation of large-scale structures and spatial chaos in dynamical systems; fermion-boson mass relations in BCS type theories; and properties of quantum field theories defined over galois fields. 37 refs.

  14. Self-esteem as a mediator of the relationship between role functioning and symptoms for individuals with severe mental illness: a prospective analysis of Modified Labeling theory.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lisa; Kurzban, Seth; Brekke, John

    2012-05-01

    Despite a growing body of evidence supporting the efficacy of psychosocial rehabilitation for individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), a large proportion of these individuals remain unable to maintain basic social roles such as employee, parent, or spouse. This study investigated whether changes in role functioning over time impact symptom severity indirectly through the mechanism of changes in self-esteem as posited by Modified Labeling theory. The study sample was composed of 148 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder with psychotic features, and major depression with psychotic features who elected to participate in community-based psychosocial rehabilitation services. Measures of role functioning, self-esteem, and psychiatric symptoms were gathered at baseline and six months through a combination of structured clinical interviews and self-report surveys. SEM results at baseline provided support for a model in which self-esteem fully mediated the relationship between role functioning and psychiatric symptoms. The final model explained 20% of the variance in psychiatric symptoms. Analyses at six months post-baseline (time 2) indicate that changes in self-esteem fully mediated the relationship between changes in role functioning and changes in psychiatric symptoms. The final change model explained 23% of the variance in changes in psychiatric symptoms. Results provide empirical support for the principles underlying Modified Labeling theory. Implications include the need for interventions that focus on social participation as a means of improving self-esteem, thereby decreasing symptom exacerbation and future relapse for people with SMI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonadiabatic couplings from time-dependent density functional theory: formulation in the Casida formalism and practical scheme within modified linear response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunping; Hirai, Hirotoshi; Sugino, Osamu

    2007-08-14

    We present an efficient method to compute nonadiabatic couplings (NACs) between the electronically ground and excited states of molecules, within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in frequency domain. Based on the comparison of dynamic polarizability formulated both in the many-body wave function form and the Casida formalism, a rigorous expression is established for NACs, which is similar to the calculation of oscillator strength in the Casida formalism. The adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) gives results in reasonable accuracy as long as the conical intersection (ci) is not approached too closely, while its performance quickly degrades near the ci point. This behavior is consistent with the real-time TDDFT calculation. Through the use of modified linear response theory together with the ground-state-component separation scheme, the performance of ALDA can be greatly improved, not only in the vicinity of ci but also for Rydberg transitions and charge-transfer excitations. Several calculation examples, including the quantization of NACs from the Jahn-Teller effect in the H3 system, have been given to show that TDDFT can efficiently give NACs with an accuracy comparable to that of wave-function-based methods.

  16. Large deformation of uniaxially loaded slender microbeams on the basis of modified couple stress theory: Analytical solution and Galerkin-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2017-09-01

    Large deformation regime of micro-scale slender beam-like structures subjected to axially pointed loads is of high interest to nanotechnologists and applied mechanics community. Herein, size-dependent nonlinear governing equations are derived by employing modified couple stress theory. Under various boundary conditions, analytical relations between axially applied loads and deformations are presented. Additionally, a novel Galerkin-based assumed mode method (AMM) is established to solve the highly nonlinear equations. In some particular cases, the predicted results by the analytical approach are also checked with those of AMM and a reasonably good agreement is reported. Subsequently, the key role of the material length scale on the load-deformation of microbeams is discussed and the deficiencies of the classical elasticity theory in predicting such a crucial mechanical behavior are explained in some detail. The influences of slenderness ratio and thickness of the microbeam on the obtained results are also examined. The present work could be considered as a pivotal step in better realizing the postbuckling behavior of nano-/micro- electro-mechanical systems consist of microbeams.

  17. Study on phosphor sedimentation effect in white light-emitting diode packages by modeling multi-layer phosphors with the modified Kubelka-Munk theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Run; Wang, Yiman; Zou, Yong; Chen, Xing; Liu, Sheng; Luo, Xiaobing

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we studied the phosphor sedimentation effect in white phosphor-converted light-emitting diode packages by modeling the multi-layer phosphors with gradient concentrations. The essence of phosphor sedimentation can attribute to the variation of phosphor concentrations. By modifying the Kubelka-Munk theory, we built a multi-layer phosphor model with considering the light scattering, light absorption, and light conversion process simultaneously. With a brief review of Kubelka-Munk theory, multi-layer phosphors were modeled on the basis of single-layer phosphor model. The phosphor sedimentation effect was characterized by modeling multi-layer phosphors with gradient concentrations, whereas keeping the total amount of phosphors at the same level. It is found from the five calculation cases that phosphor sedimentation will cause the drop of light extraction efficiency (LEE) by 13.04%. Furthermore, the phosphor layer with inverse-gradient concentrations will enhance the LEE 16.56%. To figure out the reasons, the light losses were calculated, and it is proved that the light loss is enhanced when phosphor sedimentation happens.

  18. A modified blade element theory for estimation of forces generated by a beetle-mimicking flapping wing system.

    PubMed

    Truong, Q T; Nguyen, Q V; Truong, V T; Park, H C; Byun, D Y; Goo, N S

    2011-09-01

    We present an unsteady blade element theory (BET) model to estimate the aerodynamic forces produced by a freely flying beetle and a beetle-mimicking flapping wing system. Added mass and rotational forces are included to accommodate the unsteady force. In addition to the aerodynamic forces needed to accurately estimate the time history of the forces, the inertial forces of the wings are also calculated. All of the force components are considered based on the full three-dimensional (3D) motion of the wing. The result obtained by the present BET model is validated with the data which were presented in a reference paper. The difference between the averages of the estimated forces (lift and drag) and the measured forces in the reference is about 5.7%. The BET model is also used to estimate the force produced by a freely flying beetle and a beetle-mimicking flapping wing system. The wing kinematics used in the BET calculation of a real beetle and the flapping wing system are captured using high-speed cameras. The results show that the average estimated vertical force of the beetle is reasonably close to the weight of the beetle, and the average estimated thrust of the beetle-mimicking flapping wing system is in good agreement with the measured value. Our results show that the unsteady lift and drag coefficients measured by Dickinson et al are still useful for relatively higher Reynolds number cases, and the proposed BET can be a good way to estimate the force produced by a flapping wing system.

  19. Electric Interfacial Layer of Modified Cellulose Nanocrystals in Aqueous Electrolyte Solution: Predictions by the Molecular Theory of Solvation.

    PubMed

    Lyubimova, Olga; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Gusarov, Sergey; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray crystal structure-based models of Iα cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), both pristine and containing surface sulfate groups with negative charge 0-0.34 e/nm(2) produced by sulfuric acid hydrolysis of softwood pulp, feature a highly polarized "crystal-like" charge distribution. We perform sampling using molecular dynamics (MD) of the structural relaxation of neutral pristine and negatively charged sulfated CNC of various lengths in explicit water solvent and then employ the statistical mechanical 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation to evaluate the solvation structure and thermodynamics of the relaxed CNC in ambient aqueous NaCl solution at a concentration of 0.0-0.25 mol/kg. The MD sampling induces a right-hand twist in CNC and rearranges its initially ordered structure with a macrodipole of high-density charges at the opposite faces into small local spots of alternating charge at each face. This surface charge rearrangement observed for both neutral and charged CNC significantly affects the distribution of ions around CNC in aqueous electrolyte solution. The solvation free energy (SFE) of charged sulfated CNC has a minimum at a particular electrolyte concentration depending on the surface charge density, whereas the SFE of neutral CNC increases linearly with NaCl concentration. The SFE contribution from Na(+) counterions exhibits behavior similar to the NaCl concentration dependence of the whole SFE. An analysis of the 3D maps of Na(+) density distributions shows that these model CNC particles exhibit the behavior of charged nanocolloids in aqueous electrolyte solution: an increase in electrolyte concentration shrinks the electric interfacial layer and weakens the effective repulsion between charged CNC particles. The 3D-RISM-KH method readily treats solvent and electrolyte of a given nature and concentration to predict effective interactions between CNC particles in electrolyte solution. We provide CNC structural models and a modeling procedure for

  20. Caco-2 cells and Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) for prediction of transepithelial transport of xenobiotics (model drug: caffeine).

    PubMed

    Smetanova, Libuse; Stetinova, Vera; Kholova, Dagmar; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Smetana, Jan; Svoboda, Zbynek

    2009-01-01

    The Caco-2 cell monolayer model is widely used as a standard screening tool for studying the mechanisms of cellular drug transport. Caffeine was chosen as a model drug and is supposed to be class I of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Our study was conducted 1) to characterize the mechanisms of caffeine transport across the intestinal barrier, 2) to classify caffeine according to BCS, 3) to predict drugs intestinal absorption in humans. Caffeine transport (0.1, 0.3, 1 and 10 mmol/l) was studied in Caco-2 cell monolayer in apical to basolateral (AP-BL) and basolateral to apical (BL-AP) direction, under iso-pH 7.4 and pH-gradient (6/7.4) conditions. The relative contribution of the paracellular route was estimated using Ca2+- free transport medium (opening tight junctions). The caffeine transport was linear with time, transport direction and pH independent, displaying non-saturable (first-order) kinetics, with high permeability coefficient (Papp): in AP-BL direction Papp = 46.3-53.5 x 10-6 cm/s; in BL-AP direction Papp = 45.6-49.4 x 10-6 cm/s. Thus, the transport seems to be transcellular mediated by passive diffusion. Using Ca2+- free transport medium tight junctions were opened (confirmed by increased Papp of mannitol) but the caffeine Papp was not changed. Thus, the paracellular route is only a minor way of caffeine transport. High solubility and high permeability of caffeine rank it among class I of BCS and well absorbed compounds.

  1. Modified Linear Theory Aircraft Design Tools and Sonic Boom Minimization Strategy Applied to Signature Freezing via F-function Lobe Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Timothy Paul

    Commercial supersonic travel has strong business potential; however, in order for the Federal Aviation Administration to lift its ban on supersonic flight overland, designers must reduce aircraft sonic boom strength to an acceptable level. An efficient methodology and associated tools for designing aircraft for minimized sonic booms are presented. The computer-based preliminary design tool, RapidF, based on modified linear theory, enables quick assessment of an aircraft's sonic boom with run times less than 30 seconds on a desktop computer. A unique feature of RapidF is that it tracks where on the aircraft each segment of the of the sonic boom came from, enabling precise modifications, speeding the design process. Sonic booms from RapidF are compared to flight test data, showing that it is capability of predicting a sonic boom duration, overpressure, and interior shock locations. After the preliminary design is complete, scaled flight tests should be conducted to validate the low boom design. When conducting such tests, it is insufficient to just scale the length; thus, equations to scale the weight and propagation distance are derived. Using RapidF, a conceptual supersonic business jet design is presented that uses F-function lobe balancing to create a frozen sonic boom using lifting surfaces. The leading shock is reduced from 1.4 to 0.83 psf, and the trailing shock from 1.2 to 0.87 psf, 41% and 28% reductions respectfully. By changing the incidence angle of the surfaces, different sonic boom shapes can be created, and allowing the lobes to be re-balanced for new flight conditions. Computational fluid dynamics is conducted to validate the sonic boom predictions. Off-design analysis is presented that varies weight, altitude, Mach number, and propagation angle, demonstrating that lobe-balance is robust. Finally, the Perceived Level of Loudness metric is analyzed, resulting in a modified design that incorporates other boom minimization techniques to further reduce

  2. Increasing chlamydia screening tests in general practice: a modified Zelen prospective Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial evaluating a complex intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Hogan, Angela H; Ricketts, Ellie J; Wallace, Louise; Oliver, Isabel; Campbell, Rona; Kalwij, Sebastian; O'Connell, Elaine; Charlett, Andre

    2014-05-01

    To determine if a structured complex intervention increases opportunistic chlamydia screening testing of patients aged 15-24 years attending English general practitioner (GP) practices. A prospective, Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial with a modified Zelen design involving 160 practices in South West England in 2010. The intervention was based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). It comprised of practice-based education with up to two additional contacts to increase the importance of screening to GP staff and their confidence to offer tests through skill development (including videos). Practical resources (targets, posters, invitation cards, computer reminders, newsletters including feedback) aimed to actively influence social cognitions of staff, increasing their testing intention. Data from 76 intervention and 81 control practices were analysed. In intervention practices, chlamydia screening test rates were 2.43/100 15-24-year-olds registered preintervention, 4.34 during intervention and 3.46 postintervention; controls testing rates were 2.61/100 registered patients prior intervention, 3.0 during intervention and 2.82 postintervention. During the intervention period, testing in intervention practices was 1.76 times as great (CI 1.24 to 2.48) as controls; this persisted for 9 months postintervention (1.57 times as great, CI 1.27 to 2.30). Chlamydia infections detected increased in intervention practices from 2.1/1000 registered 15-24-year-olds prior intervention to 2.5 during the intervention compared with 2.0 and 2.3/1000 in controls (Estimated Rate Ratio intervention versus controls 1.4 (CI 1.01 to 1.93). This complex intervention doubled chlamydia screening tests in fully engaged practices. The modified Zelen design gave realistic measures of practice full engagement (63%) and efficacy of this educational intervention in general practice; it should be used more often. The trial was registered on the UK Clinical Research Network Study Portfolio database

  3. Cellulose production, activated by cyclic di-GMP through BcsA and BcsZ, is a virulence factor and an essential determinant of the three-dimensional architectures of biofilms formed by Erwinia amylovora Ea1189.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W

    2016-10-18

    Bacterial biofilms are multicellular aggregates encased in an extracellular matrix mainly composed of exopolysaccharides (EPSs), protein and nucleic acids, which determines the architecture of the biofilm. Erwinia amylovora Ea1189 forms a biofilm inside the xylem of its host, which results in vessel plugging and water transport impairment. The production of the EPSs amylovoran and levan is critical for the formation of a mature biofilm. In addition, cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) has been reported to positively regulate amylovoran biosynthesis and biofilm formation in E. amylovora Ea1189. In this study, we demonstrate that cellulose is synthesized by E. amylovora Ea1189 and is a major modulator of the three-dimensional characteristics of biofilms formed by this bacterium, and also contributes to virulence during systemic host invasion. In addition, we demonstrate that the activation of cellulose biosynthesis in E. amylovora is a c-di-GMP-dependent process, through allosteric binding to the cellulose catalytic subunit BcsA. We also report that the endoglucanase BcsZ is a key player in c-di-GMP activation of cellulose biosynthesis. Our results provide evidence of the complex composition of the extracellular matrix produced by E. amylovora and the implications of cellulose biosynthesis in shaping the architecture of the biofilm and in the expression of one of the main virulence phenotypes of this pathogen.

  4. A reference-modified density functional theory: An application to solvation free-energy calculations for a Lennard-Jones solution.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Tomonari; Maruyama, Yutaka; Mitsutake, Ayori; Koga, Kenichiro

    2016-06-14

    In the conventional classical density functional theory (DFT) for simple fluids, an ideal gas is usually chosen as the reference system because there is a one-to-one correspondence between the external field and the density distribution function, and the exact intrinsic free-energy functional is available for the ideal gas. In this case, the second-order density functional Taylor series expansion of the excess intrinsic free-energy functional provides the hypernetted-chain (HNC) approximation. Recently, it has been shown that the HNC approximation significantly overestimates the solvation free energy (SFE) for an infinitely dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) solution, especially when the solute particles are several times larger than the solvent particles [T. Miyata and J. Thapa, Chem. Phys. Lett. 604, 122 (2014)]. In the present study, we propose a reference-modified density functional theory as a systematic approach to improve the SFE functional as well as the pair distribution functions. The second-order density functional Taylor series expansion for the excess part of the intrinsic free-energy functional in which a hard-sphere fluid is introduced as the reference system instead of an ideal gas is applied to the LJ pure and infinitely dilute solution systems and is proved to remarkably improve the drawbacks of the HNC approximation. Furthermore, the third-order density functional expansion approximation in which a factorization approximation is applied to the triplet direct correlation function is examined for the LJ systems. We also show that the third-order contribution can yield further refinements for both the pair distribution function and the excess chemical potential for the pure LJ liquids.

  5. Non-contrast-enhanced MR angiography in the diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) compared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA): Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Li, Ceng; Zeng, Mengsu; Lu, Xin; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jiali; Sami, Muhammad Umair; Xu, Kai

    2017-02-01

    Non-CE MRA techniques (true steady-state free-precession, SSFP) have been used effectively for the selective visualization of the portal venous system and inferior vena cava. Budd-Chiari Syndrome (BCS) encompasses a number of conditions that cause the obstruction of the hepatic outflow tract from the small hepatic veins to the junction of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium. The purpose of this study was to diagnose BCS with IVC obstruction using respiratory triggered three-dimensional (3D) true SSFP with T-SLIP and compare to digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The image acquisition of 3D true SSFP scans was successfully performed in 108 patients (≧2 score). The mean and SDs of the relative SNR and CNR were 55.96±2.32 and 30.72±1.56, respectively. Intergroup agreement for the detection of the 4 types (membranous obstruction, segmental occlusion, and membranous obstruction with a hole and segmental stenosis) of BCS with IVC obstruction was excellent between the Time-SLIP and the DSA. In conclusion, Time-SLIP for the detection of IVC obstruction BCS does not require the use of contrast. This procedure can achieve a high success rate, high accuracy rate and fine image quality for the diagnosis of IVC obstruction BCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Density functional theory study on the adsorption and decomposition of H2O on clean and oxygen-modified Pd (1 0 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhao; Li, Lu; Li, Mengmeng; Li, Ruosong; Fang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Based on density functional theory together with periodic slab models, the adsorption and the corresponding dehydrogenation reaction of H2O on clean and oxygen modified Pd (1 0 0) have been investigated. The preferential sites for H2O, OH, O, and H were obtained on the surfaces. According to the optimized structural and energetic properties, it was found that H2O prefers to adsorb on the top site with weak adsorption energy (physisorption), whereas O and H atoms are prone to adsorb on the hollow site and OH occupies the bridge site. In addition, this work identified the optimum configurations for the relevant co-adsorption groups. The results confirmed that co-adsorption tends to weaken the adsorbate-substrate interaction due to the existence of oxygen atom, and that the OH group, O and H atoms are less stable on oxygen-covered Pd (1 0 0) surface than on the clean surface. Finally, the transition states and related barrier energies were ascertained to analyze the dehydrogenation mechanism of H2O. Water decomposition was found favorable on O-covered Pd (1 0 0) surface (0.49 eV), in agreement with the experimental observations. This result indicated that the joining of Oads could reduce the barrier energy and facilitate the decomposition of H2O. Besides, the distinct differences over Pd (1 1 1) and Pd (1 0 0) surface implied that water decomposition over Pd-based catalysts is a structure-sensitive reaction.

  7. Investigating the dimension of time: findings from a modified grounded theory study about clients' experiences and descriptions of temporality or time within music therapy.

    PubMed

    Daveson, Barbara; O'Callaghan, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Many references to time or temporality are located within music therapy literature, however little research has been completed regarding this phenomenon. Findings from a modified grounded theory study about clients' experiences and descriptions of time within the context of music therapy are presented here. The study was informed by the constructivist-interpretive paradigm and a grounded-descriptive statement finding resulted. A 2-staged research methodology was used, comprising a deductive-inductive content analysis of information from the public domain, followed by data-mining of information from a minimum of 160 clients and analysis of data from at least 43 of these 160 clients. Information regarding memory experiences, the duration of music therapy effects, recall and retrieval, and experiences of time are identified. Implications for practice are emphasized, in particular the following is stressed (a) the importance of time orientation and temporal connectedness in relation to identity development, (b) temporal strategies within music experience to assist integration, recall, and retrieval of information, and (c) the importance of and the elements involved in time modification. New explanations for music therapy phenomena are shared, and areas for research highlighted. Benefits of using time dynamically to aid therapeutic process are proposed, and it is concluded that temporal experience within the context of music therapy is important in relation to both practice and research.

  8. The size-dependent analysis of multilayered microbridge systems under a moving load/mass based on the modified couple stress theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshi Khaniki, H.; Hosseini-Hashemi, Sh.

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the dynamical behavior of mutlilayered microbeam systems with respect to a moving load/mass is investigated. The Winkler elastic foundation beam is used to model the coupling between layers and small-scale effects are modeled by modified couple stress theory. Equations of motion are achieved using Hamilton's principle and the solution process is proposed for a different number of layers. For double- and three-layered microbridge systems, an analytical solution is presented using Laplace transform and moreover, for higher-layered MMBS, a state space method is employed. A comprehensive parametric study is presented to clarify the effects of various parameters such as small-scale effect, coupling, the moving velocity, number of layers, etc. It is shown that material variation and scale effects changes the behavior of microbridge systems and have a significant effect on the dynamic deformation under a moving nanoparticle which could be used in understanding and designing more efficient nanostructures. Accordingly, with the brand new discussions on moving atoms, molecules, cells, nanocars, nanotrims, point loads on different nanosctructures using scanning tunneling microscopes (STM) and atomic force microscopes (AFM), this study could be a step forward in understanding, predicting and controlling such kind of behaviors.

  9. First principles phase transition, elastic properties and electronic structure calculations for cadmium telluride under induced pressure: density functional theory, LDA, GGA and modified Becke-Johnson potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabita, Kh; Maibam, Jameson; Indrajit Sharma, B.; Brojen Singh, R. K.; Thapa, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    We report first principles phase transition, elastic properties and electronic structure for cadmium telluride (CdTe) under induced pressure in the light of density functional theory using the local density approximation (LDA), generalised gradient approximation (GGA) and modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) potential. The structural phase transition of CdTe from a zinc blende (ZB) to a rock salt (RS) structure within the LDA calculation is 2.2 GPa while that within GGA is found to be at 4 GPa pressure with a volume collapse of 20.9%. The elastic constants and parameters (Zener anisotropy factor, Shear modulus, Poisson’s ratio, Young’s modulus, Kleinmann parameter and Debye’s temperature) of CdTe at different pressures of both the phases have been calculated. The band diagram of the CdTe ZB structure shows a direct band gap of 1.46 eV as predicted by mBJ calculation which gives better results in close agreement with experimental results as compared to LDA and GGA. An increase in the band gap of the CdTe ZB phase is predicted under induced pressure while the metallic nature is retained in the CdTe RS phase.

  10. Comparison of modeling a conical nanotube resting on the Winkler elastic foundation based on the modified couple stress theory and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Kianoosh; Mahinzare, Mohammad; Rajabpour, Ali; Ghadiri, Majid

    2017-03-01

    In this article, the free vibration analysis of a thin conical nanotube resting on an elastic foundation is investigated for the first time by means of the modified couple stress theory (MCST) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The proposed model in the MCST framework, its equations of motion and boundary conditions are derived by Hamilton's principle based on the thin shell model of Love. The differential quadrature method (DQM) is applied to discretize the equations of motion. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed via the AIREBO potential function, which is recommended in vibrational studies. The accuracy of the presented model is verified for previous studies with both methods. The novelty of the current study is reporting a specified length scale parameter of MCST which has a good conformity with MD results. This value is exclusively related to the proposed model of the present study. The effect of the elastic foundation stiffness is investigated with molecular dynamics for the first time as well. The results can have many applications, such as in modeling of scanning probe microscopy and biomedical microsystems.

  11. Item response theory methods can improve the measurement of physical function by combining the modified health assessment questionnaire and the SF-36 physical function scale.

    PubMed

    Martin, Marie; Kosinski, Mark; Bjorner, Jakob B; Ware, John E; Maclean, Ross; Li, Tracy

    2007-05-01

    To compare the measurement properties of the Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire [MHAQ], the SF-36((R)) Health Survey 10 item Physical Functioning scale [PF10], and scores from an item response theory (IRT) based scale combining the two measures. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (n = 339) enrolled in a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial completed the MHAQ and the SF-36 pre- and post-treatment. Psychometric analyses used confirmatory factor analysis and IRT models. Analyses of variance were used to assess sensitivity to changes in disease severity (defined by the American College of Rheumatism (ACR)) using change scores in MHAQ, PF10, and IRT scales. Analyses of covariance were used to assess treatment responsiveness. For the entire score range, the 95% confidence interval around individual patient scores was smaller for the combined (total) IRT based scale than for other measures. The MHAQ and PF10 were about 70% and 50% as efficient as the total IRT score of physical functioning in discriminating among ACR groups, respectively. The MHAQ and PF10 were also less efficient than the total IRT score in discriminating among treatment groups. Combining scales from the two short forms yields a more powerful tool with greater sensitivity to treatment response.

  12. Field-induced superconducting phase of FeSe in the BCS-BEC cross-over.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shigeru; Watashige, Tatsuya; Hanaguri, Tetsuo; Kohsaka, Yuhki; Yamashita, Takuya; Shimoyama, Yusuke; Mizukami, Yuta; Endo, Ryota; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Aoyama, Kazushi; Terashima, Taichi; Uji, Shinya; Wolf, Thomas; von Löhneysen, Hilbert; Shibauchi, Takasada; Matsuda, Yuji

    2014-11-18

    Fermi systems in the cross-over regime between weakly coupled Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and strongly coupled Bose-Einstein-condensate (BEC) limits are among the most fascinating objects to study the behavior of an assembly of strongly interacting particles. The physics of this cross-over has been of considerable interest both in the fields of condensed matter and ultracold atoms. One of the most challenging issues in this regime is the effect of large spin imbalance on a Fermi system under magnetic fields. Although several exotic physical properties have been predicted theoretically, the experimental realization of such an unusual superconducting state has not been achieved so far. Here we show that pure single crystals of superconducting FeSe offer the possibility to enter the previously unexplored realm where the three energies, Fermi energy εF, superconducting gap Δ, and Zeeman energy, become comparable. Through the superfluid response, transport, thermoelectric response, and spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we demonstrate that εF of FeSe is extremely small, with the ratio Δ/εF ~ 1(~0.3) in the electron (hole) band. Moreover, thermal-conductivity measurements give evidence of a distinct phase line below the upper critical field, where the Zeeman energy becomes comparable to εF and Δ. The observation of this field-induced phase provides insights into previously poorly understood aspects of the highly spin-polarized Fermi liquid in the BCS-BEC cross-over regime.

  13. Effects of PEGylated lipid nanoparticles on the oral absorption of one BCS II drug: a mechanistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingwang; Chen, Guijiang; Zhang, Tianpeng; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2014-01-01

    Lipid nanocarriers are becoming a versatile platform for oral delivery of lipophilic drugs. In this article, we aimed to explore the gastrointestinal behaviors of lipid nanoparticles and the effect of PEGylation on oral absorption of fenofibrate (FN), a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) II model drug. FN-loaded PEGylated lipid nanoparticles (FN-PLNs) were prepared by the solvent-diffusion method and characterized by particle size distribution, morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and drug release. Lipolytic experiments were performed to assess the resistance of lipid nanoparticles against pancreatic lipase. Pharmacokinetics was evaluated in rats after oral administration of FN preparations. The obtained FN-PLNs were 186.7 nm in size with an entrapment efficiency of >95%. Compared to conventional lipid nanoparticles, PLNs exhibited slower drug release in the lipase-containing medium, strikingly reduced mucin binding, and suppressed lipolysis in vitro. Further, oral absorption of FN was significantly enhanced using PLNs with relative bioavailability of 123.9% and 157.0% to conventional lipid nanoparticles and a commercial formulation (Lipanthyl(®)), respectively. It was demonstrated that reduced mucin trapping, suppressed lipolysis, and/or improved mucosal permeability were responsible for increased oral absorption. These results facilitated a better understanding of the in vivo fate of lipid nanoparticles, and suggested the potential of PLNs as oral carriers of BCS II drugs.

  14. Field-induced superconducting phase of FeSe in the BCS-BEC cross-over

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Shigeru; Watashige, Tatsuya; Hanaguri, Tetsuo; Kohsaka, Yuhki; Yamashita, Takuya; Shimoyama, Yusuke; Mizukami, Yuta; Endo, Ryota; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Aoyama, Kazushi; Terashima, Taichi; Uji, Shinya; Wolf, Thomas; von Löhneysen, Hilbert; Shibauchi, Takasada; Matsuda, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Fermi systems in the cross-over regime between weakly coupled Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer (BCS) and strongly coupled Bose–Einstein-condensate (BEC) limits are among the most fascinating objects to study the behavior of an assembly of strongly interacting particles. The physics of this cross-over has been of considerable interest both in the fields of condensed matter and ultracold atoms. One of the most challenging issues in this regime is the effect of large spin imbalance on a Fermi system under magnetic fields. Although several exotic physical properties have been predicted theoretically, the experimental realization of such an unusual superconducting state has not been achieved so far. Here we show that pure single crystals of superconducting FeSe offer the possibility to enter the previously unexplored realm where the three energies, Fermi energy εF, superconducting gap Δ, and Zeeman energy, become comparable. Through the superfluid response, transport, thermoelectric response, and spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy, we demonstrate that εF of FeSe is extremely small, with the ratio Δ/εF∼1(∼0.3) in the electron (hole) band. Moreover, thermal-conductivity measurements give evidence of a distinct phase line below the upper critical field, where the Zeeman energy becomes comparable to εF and Δ. The observation of this field-induced phase provides insights into previously poorly understood aspects of the highly spin-polarized Fermi liquid in the BCS-BEC cross-over regime. PMID:25378706

  15. Nanosuspension development of scutellarein as an active and rapid orally absorbed precursor of its BCS class IV glycoside scutellarin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Miao, Xiaoqing; Cao, Fangrui; Li, Shang; Ai, Nana; Chang, Qi; Lee, Simon M Y; Zheng, Ying

    2014-11-01

    This work addressed solubility and membrane permeability problems of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) Class IV glycoside scutellarin (SG) by developing a nanosuspension of its aglycone scutellarein (S) as a precursor. An S nanosuspension containing poloxamer 188 was prepared using antisolvent precipitation where hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin was utilized as a lyophilizing protectant. Particle size and polydispersity index after redispersion were 342.6 ± 18.2 and 0.32 ± 0.06 nm, respectively. The dissolution rate of the S nanosuspension was superior compared with the physical mixture. No free S, but SG and SG's isomer were detected in plasma following oral delivery of SG or S, S nanosuspension or physical mixture of S. The Cmax values of SG after dosing with the S nanosuspension were 12.0, 8.0, and 4.5-fold higher than the SG, S, or physical mixture, respectively. The Tmax and mean residence time (MRTlast ) of SG after dosing with the S nanosuspension were significantly shorter than S and SG. Treatments with SG, S, or S nanosuspensions reduced the hemorrhage rate in a zebrafish model, but the S nanosuspension exhibited the strongest rescue effect. This study highlights a new strategy to circumvent BCS Class IV flavonoid glycosides using a formulation of their aglycone as a precursor to accelerate oral absorption and improve bioactivity.

  16. Mechanistic PBPK Modeling of the Dissolution and Food Effect of a BCS IV Compound - the Venetoclax Story.

    PubMed

    Emami Riedmaier, Arian; Lindley, David J; Hall, Jeffrey A; Castleberry, Steven; Slade, Russell T; Stuart, Patricia; Carr, Robert A; Borchardt, Thomas B; Bow, Daniel A J; Nijsen, Marjoleen

    2017-10-06

    Venetoclax, a selective B-cell lymphoma-2 inhibitor, is a biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class IV compound. The aim of this study was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to mechanistically describe absorption and disposition of an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) formulation of venetoclax in humans. A mechanistic PBPK model was developed incorporating measured amorphous solubility, dissolution, metabolism and plasma protein binding. A middle-out approach was used to define permeability. Model predictions of oral venetoclax pharmacokinetics were verified against clinical studies of fed and fasted healthy volunteers, and clinical drug interaction studies with strong CYP3A inhibitor (ketoconazole) and inducer (rifampicin). Model verification demonstrated accurate prediction of the observed food effect following a low-fat diet. Ratios of predicted versus observed Cmax and AUC of venetoclax were within 0.8- to 1.25-fold of observed ratios for strong CYP3A inhibitor and inducer interactions, indicating that the venetoclax elimination pathway was correctly specified. The verified venetoclax PBPK model is one of the first examples mechanistically capturing absorption, food effect and exposure of an ASD formulated compound. This model allows evaluation of untested drug-drug interactions, especially those primarily occurring in the intestine, and paves the way for future modeling of BCS IV compounds. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Investigation of Biowaivers for Immediate Release Formulations Containing BCS III Drugs, Acyclovir, Atenolol, and Ciprofloxacin Hydrochloride, Using Dissolution Testing.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Nallagundla H S; Patnala, Srinivas; Kanfer, Isadore

    2017-02-01

    The dissolution of several products containing Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class III drugs, acyclovir, atenolol, and ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, listed in the WHO essential drug list (EDL), was tested and compared with their respective comparator pharmaceutical products (CPPs) marketed in South Africa and India. US Pharmacopeia (USP) buffers of pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8 were used as dissolution media and tested using USP apparatus 2 at 75 rpm and 900 ml. Nine acyclovir products were tested, and only three dissolved very rapidly in all media; i.e., they showed a release of >85% in 15 min. Eight atenolol products tested were all very rapidly dissolving in all three pH media. Ten ciprofloxacin hydrochloride products were tested, and the results showed that only five products met the WHO biowaiver criteria. This study indicates that not all marketed products containing the same BCS III active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in similar strength and dosage form are necessarily in vitro equivalent as per the WHO biowaiver criteria. Furthermore, selection and availability of an innovator product as CPP are important considerations that can affect the outcomes of such studies.

  18. Effects of PEGylated lipid nanoparticles on the oral absorption of one BCS II drug: a mechanistic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingwang; Chen, Guijiang; Zhang, Tianpeng; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2014-01-01

    Lipid nanocarriers are becoming a versatile platform for oral delivery of lipophilic drugs. In this article, we aimed to explore the gastrointestinal behaviors of lipid nanoparticles and the effect of PEGylation on oral absorption of fenofibrate (FN), a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) II model drug. FN-loaded PEGylated lipid nanoparticles (FN-PLNs) were prepared by the solvent-diffusion method and characterized by particle size distribution, morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and drug release. Lipolytic experiments were performed to assess the resistance of lipid nanoparticles against pancreatic lipase. Pharmacokinetics was evaluated in rats after oral administration of FN preparations. The obtained FN-PLNs were 186.7 nm in size with an entrapment efficiency of >95%. Compared to conventional lipid nanoparticles, PLNs exhibited slower drug release in the lipase-containing medium, strikingly reduced mucin binding, and suppressed lipolysis in vitro. Further, oral absorption of FN was significantly enhanced using PLNs with relative bioavailability of 123.9% and 157.0% to conventional lipid nanoparticles and a commercial formulation (Lipanthyl®), respectively. It was demonstrated that reduced mucin trapping, suppressed lipolysis, and/or improved mucosal permeability were responsible for increased oral absorption. These results facilitated a better understanding of the in vivo fate of lipid nanoparticles, and suggested the potential of PLNs as oral carriers of BCS II drugs. PMID:25473287

  19. Bioadhesive Drug Delivery System for Enhancing the Permeability of a BCS Class III Drug via Hot-Melt Extrusion Technology.

    PubMed

    Mendonsa, Nicole S; Thipsay, Priyanka; Kim, Dong Wuk; Martin, Scott T; Repka, Michael A

    2017-02-28

    As the buccal route of administration has the ability to avoid the GI tract and first-pass effect by directing the absorption toward the cheek area, the bioavailability of BCS class III drugs can be increased through this route. Only a handful of studies have been conducted using oleic acid as a permeation enhancer in any transbuccal drug delivery system. Therefore, the objectives of this novel study were to develop a buccal tablet using two concentrations of oleic acid for a model BCS class III drug via hot-melt extrusion technology and to investigate the effects of oleic acid on the physicochemical properties of the tablet. The model drug selected was ondansetron hydrochloride. Formulations consisting of polymers (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and polyethylene oxide) and two concentrations of oleic acid were prepared by hot-melt extrusion techniques. A melting point depression of the drug was obtained in the extruded granules as seen by the DSC thermograms. The ex vivo permeation studies showed a greater permeation of the drug in the formulation containing 10% oleic acid (F2) as compared to the formulation containing 20% oleic acid (F1), although not statistically significant. The in vitro bioadhesion studies, swelling studies, and surface pH measurements of the tablets were also conducted. In conclusion, permeation studies exhibited the potential of oleic acid as a buccal permeation enhancer as a significant permeation of the drug was obtained in the formulations. Hot-melt extrusion technology was successfully employed to formulate buccal tablets of ondansetron hydrochloride.

  20. Gastrointestinal Behavior of Weakly Acidic BCS Class II Drugs in Man--Case Study of Diclofenac Potassium.

    PubMed

    Van Den Abeele, Jens; Brouwers, Joachim; Mattheus, Ruben; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the gastrointestinal supersaturation and precipitation behavior of a weakly acidic Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) Class II drug in healthy volunteers. For this purpose, a tablet containing 50 mg diclofenac potassium (Cataflam(®)) was predissolved in 240 mL of water and this solution was subsequently orally administered to five healthy volunteers under fasted and fed state conditions with or without concomitant use of a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) (40 mg esomeprazole, Nexiam(®)). Subsequently, total diclofenac content and dissolved intraluminal drug concentrations as well as drug thermodynamic solubility were determined in gastrointestinal aspirates. In all volunteers, gastric supersaturation resulted in precipitation of diclofenac in the stomach. The extent of precipitation correlated well with gastric pH (r = - 0.78). pH dependency of precipitation was corroborated by the absence of precipitate in the stomach after coadministration of a meal and/or a PPI. Diclofenac was found to be fully dissolved in the duodenum in all test conditions. It can be concluded that substantial pH-dependent gastric precipitation of a weakly acidic BCS Class II drug administered as a solution occurs in humans. With regard to its implications for intestinal absorption, results suggest the instantaneous redissolution of gastric drug precipitate upon transfer to the duodenum. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Impact of modified radical mastectomy on health-related quality of life in women with early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Negin; Soltanipour, Sohail; Talei, Abdolrasol

    2012-08-01

    Systematic reviews favor a better body image and sexual activity in patients who have undergone conservative breast surgery (BCS) compared to modified radical mastectomy (MRM). In those patients with the same survival, MRM remains the surgical choice among both surgeons and patients in Iran as well as in many other countries. This cross-sectional study focuses on health-related quality of life in early stage breast cancer patients following BCS and MRM. From all post-op patients who referred to the Motahari Clinic, Shiraz, Iran, we used a convenient sampling method to select 160 MRM patients and 127 who underwent BCS. Translated copies of the EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 3) and the EORTC QLQ-BR23 questionnaires, in addition to a third questionnaire which was customized and prepared for this study, were completed by the patients under our supervision The two groups were compared by a multivariate method (Hotelling's trace test) after controlling for variables with unequal values such as disease stage, hormonal and radiotherapy treatments, and patients' role in the choice of surgery. We noted a significant difference (P < 0.001) attributed to a significantly better BI in the BCS group (average: 78.49 ± 23.14) compared to the MRM group (average: 60.71 ± 23.14). We concluded that in terms of body image, BCS has a better impact on health-related quality of life.

  2. Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the biocorrosion of copper by Gum Arabic, BCS and Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, J.G.; Geesey, G.G.; Hankins, M.R.; Wright, R.B.; Wichlacz, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thin films (3.4 nm) of copper on germanium substrates were exposed to 10% Gum Arabic aqueous solution, 1% BCS (aqueous and simulated sea water solutions) and 0.5% Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer (aqueous and simulated sea water solutions). Pre- and post-exposure characterization were done by Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ancillary graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the removal process of the copper thin film from the germanium substrate. Results indicate that the copper was oxidized by the Gum Arabic and BCS, and some was removed from the Cu/Ge interface by all three polymers and incorporated into the polymer matrix. Thus biocorrosion of copper was exhibited by the Gum Arabic, BCS and Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Power-law-like correlation between condensation energy and superconducting transition temperatures in iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconductors: Beyond the BCS understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jie; Li, Sheng; Zeng, Bin; Mu, Gang; Shen, Bing; Schneeloch, J.; Zhong, R. D.; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2014-04-01

    Superconducting condensation energy U0int has been determined by integrating the electronic entropy in various iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconducting systems. It is found that U0int∝Tcn with n =3-4, which is in sharp contrast to the simple BCS prediction U0BCS=1/2NFΔs2, with NF the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi energy and Δs the superconducting gap. A similar correlation holds if we compute the condensation energy through U0cal=3γneffΔs2/4π2kB2, with γneff the effective normal state electronic specific heat coefficient. This indicates a general relationship γneff∝Tcm with m =1-2, which is not predicted by the BCS scheme. A picture based on quantum criticality is proposed to explain this phenomenon.

  4. Power-law-like correlation between condensation energy and superconducting transition temperatures in iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconductors: Beyond the BCS understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jie; Li, Sheng; Zeng, Bin; Mu, Gang; Shen, Bing; Schneeloch, J.; Zhong, R. D.; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting condensation energy U0int has been determined by integrating the electronic entropy in various iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconducting systems. It is found that U0int ~Tcn with n = 3 to 4, which is in sharp contrast to the simple BCS prediction U0BCS = 1 / 2NFΔs2 , with NF the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi energy and Δs the superconducting gap. A similar correlation holds if we compute the condensation energy through U0cal = 3γneff Δs2 / 4π2kB2 , with γneff the effective normal state electronic specific heat coefficient. This indicates a general relationship γneff ~Tcm with m = 1 to 2, which is not predicted by the BCS scheme. A picture based on quantum criticality is proposed to explain this phenomenon.

  5. Quantitative prediction of formulation-specific food effects and their population variability from in vitro data with the physiologically-based ADAM model: a case study using the BCS/BDDCS Class II drug nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nikunjkumar; Polak, Sebastian; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Turner, David B

    2014-06-16

    Quantitative prediction of food effects (FE) upon drug pharmacokinetics, including population variability, in advance of human trials may help with trial design by optimising the number of subjects and sampling times when a clinical study is warranted or by negating the need for conduct of clinical studies. Classification and rule-based systems such as the BCS and BDDCS and statistical QSARs are widely used to anticipate the nature of FE in early drug development. However, their qualitative rather than quantitative nature makes them less appropriate for assessing the magnitude of FE. Moreover, these approaches are based upon drug properties alone and are not appropriate for estimating potential formulation-specific FE on modified or controlled release products. In contrast, physiologically-based mechanistic models can consider the scope and interplay of a range of physiological changes after food intake and, in combination with appropriate in vitro drug- and formulation-specific data, can make quantitative predictions of formulation-specific FE including the inter-individual variability of such effects. Herein the Advanced Dissolution, Absorption and Metabolism (ADAM) model is applied to the prediction of formulation-specific FE for BCS/BDDCS Class II drug and CYP3A4 substrate nifedipine using as far as possible only in vitro data. Predicted plasma concentration profiles of all three studied formulations under fasted and fed states are within 2-fold of clinically observed profiles. The % prediction error (%PE) in fed-to-fasted ratio of Cmax and AUC were less than 5% for all formulations except for the Cmax of Nifedicron (%PE=-29.6%). This successful case study should help to improve confidence in the use of mechanistic physiologically-based models coupled with in vitro data for the anticipation of FE in advance of in vivo studies. However, it is acknowledged that further studies with drugs/formulations exhibiting a wide range of properties are required to further

  6. Increasing chlamydia screening tests in general practice: a modified Zelen prospective Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial evaluating a complex intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Hogan, Angela H; Ricketts, Ellie J; Wallace, Louise; Oliver, Isabel; Campbell, Rona; Kalwij, Sebastian; O'Connell, Elaine; Charlett, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if a structured complex intervention increases opportunistic chlamydia screening testing of patients aged 15–24 years attending English general practitioner (GP) practices. Methods A prospective, Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial with a modified Zelen design involving 160 practices in South West England in 2010. The intervention was based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). It comprised of practice-based education with up to two additional contacts to increase the importance of screening to GP staff and their confidence to offer tests through skill development (including videos). Practical resources (targets, posters, invitation cards, computer reminders, newsletters including feedback) aimed to actively influence social cognitions of staff, increasing their testing intention. Results Data from 76 intervention and 81 control practices were analysed. In intervention practices, chlamydia screening test rates were 2.43/100 15–24-year-olds registered preintervention, 4.34 during intervention and 3.46 postintervention; controls testing rates were 2.61/100 registered patients prior intervention, 3.0 during intervention and 2.82 postintervention. During the intervention period, testing in intervention practices was 1.76 times as great (CI 1.24 to 2.48) as controls; this persisted for 9 months postintervention (1.57 times as great, CI 1.27 to 2.30). Chlamydia infections detected increased in intervention practices from 2.1/1000 registered 15–24-year-olds prior intervention to 2.5 during the intervention compared with 2.0 and 2.3/1000 in controls (Estimated Rate Ratio intervention versus controls 1.4 (CI 1.01 to 1.93). Conclusions This complex intervention doubled chlamydia screening tests in fully engaged practices. The modified Zelen design gave realistic measures of practice full engagement (63%) and efficacy of this educational intervention in general practice; it should be used more often. Trial registration The trial was

  7. Chemical stability and osteogenic activity of plasma-sprayed boron-modified calcium silicate-based coatings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiang; Li, Kai; Xie, Youtao; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, CaSiO3 bio-ceramic coatings have attracted great attention because of their good bioactivity. However, their high degradation rates in physiological environment restrict their practical applications. In this work, boron-modified CaSiO3 ceramic (Ca11Si4B2O22, B-CS) coating was developed on Ti substrates by plasma-spraying technique attempting to obtain enhanced chemical stability and osteogenic activity. The B-CS coating possessed significantly increased chemical stability due to the introduction of boron and consequently the modified crystal structure, while maintaining good bioactivity. Scanning electron microscope and immunofluorescence studies showed that better cellular adhesion and extinctive filopodia-like processes were observed on the B-CS coating. Compared with the pure CaSiO3 (CS) coating, the B-CS coating promoted MC3T3-E1 cells attachment and proliferation. In addition, enhanced collagen I (COL-I) secretion, alkaline phosphatase activity, and extracellular matrix mineralization levels were detected from the B-CS coating. According to RT-PCR results, notable up-regulation expressions of mineralized tissue-related genes, such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin, and bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) were observed on the B-CS coating compared with the CS coating. The above results suggested that Ca11Si4B2O22 coatings possess excellent osteogenic activity and might be a promising candidate for orthopedic applications.

  8. Octupole deformation in the nuclear chart based on the 3D Skyrme Hartree-Fock plus BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebata, Shuichiro; Nakatsukasa, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    We have performed a systematic study of the ground state for 1002 even-even nuclei in which 28 octupole-deformed nuclei are found. The interplay between the spatial deformation and the pairing correlation plays an important role in the nuclear structure. Our model is based on the Skyrme Hartree-Fock plus BCS model represented in the three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate space, which can describe any kind of nuclear shape. The quadrupole and octupole deformed nuclei appear in the mass region with characteristic neutron and proton numbers which are consistent with previous studies. In our results, there appear only pear shapes (β 30) in the octupole deformed nuclei. We investigate the potential energy surfaces as functions of the octupole deformations (β 3m ; m = 0, 1, 2, 3), which tells us that 220Rn also has local minima in the β 31 and β 32 potential energy surfaces.

  9. Induced interactions in the BCS-BEC crossover of two-dimensional Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juhee; Kim, Dong-Hee

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the Gorkov-Melik-Barkhudarov (GM) correction to superfluid transition temperature in two-dimensional Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) across the SOC-driven BCS-BEC crossover. In the calculation of the induced interaction, we find that the spin-component mixing due to SOC can induce both of the conventional screening and additional antiscreening contributions that interplay significantly in the strong SOC regime. While the GM correction generally lowers the estimate of transition temperature, it turns out that at a fixed weak interaction, the correction effect exhibits a crossover behavior where the ratio between the estimates without and with the correction first decreases with SOC and then becomes insensitive to SOC when it goes into the strong SOC regime. We demonstrate the applicability of the GM correction by comparing the zero-temperature condensate fraction with the recent quantum Monte Carlo results.

  10. Dissolution and dissolution/permeation experiments for predicting systemic exposure following oral administration of the BCS class II drug clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Kristin, Forner; René, Holm; Boontida, Morakul; Buraphacheep, Junyaprasert Varaporn; Maximilian, Ackermann; Johanna, Mazur; Peter, Langguth

    2017-04-01

    In order to save time and resources in early drug development, in vitro methods that correctly predict the formulation effect on oral drug absorption are necessary. The aim of this study was to 1) evaluate various BCS class II drug formulations with in vitro methods and in vivo in order to 2) determine which in vitro method best correlates with the in vivo results. Clarithromycin served as model compound in formulations with different particle sizes and content of excipients. The performed in vitro experiments were dissolution and dissolution/permeation experiments across two types of membrane, Caco-2 cells and excised rat intestinal sheets. The in vivo study was performed in rats. The oral absorption was enhanced by downsizing drug particles and by increasing the excipient concentration. This correlated strongly with the flux across Caco-2 cells but not with the other in vitro experiments. The insufficient correlation with the dissolution experiments can be partly explained by excipient caused problems during the filtration step. The very poor correlation of the in vivo data with the flux across excised rat intestinal sheets might be due to an artificially enlarged mucus layer ex vivo. In conclusion, downsizing BCS class II drug particles and the addition of surfactants enhanced the in vivo absorption, which was best depicted by dissolution/permeation experiments across Caco-2 cells. This setup is proposed as best model to predict the in vivo formulation effect. Also, this is the first study to evaluate the impact of the nature of the permeation membrane in dissolution/permeation experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A BCS-like gap in the superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0.15.

    PubMed

    Chen, T Y; Tesanovic, Z; Liu, R H; Chen, X H; Chien, C L

    2008-06-26

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in the high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) copper oxides two decades ago, it has been firmly established that the CuO(2) plane is essential for superconductivity and gives rise to a host of other very unusual properties. A new family of superconductors with the general composition of LaFeAsO(1-x)F(x) has recently been discovered and the conspicuous lack of the CuO(2) planes raises the tantalizing question of a different pairing mechanism in these oxypnictides. The superconducting gap (its magnitude, structure, and temperature dependence) is intimately related to pairing. Here we report the observation of a single gap in the superconductor SmFeAsO(0.85)F(0.15) with T(c) = 42 K as measured by Andreev spectroscopy. The gap value of 2Delta = 13.34 +/- 0.3 meV gives 2Delta/k(B)T(c) = 3.68 (where k(B) is the Boltzmann constant), close to the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) prediction of 3.53. The gap decreases with temperature and vanishes at T(c) in a manner consistent with the BCS prediction, but dramatically different from that of the pseudogap behaviour in the copper oxide superconductors. Our results clearly indicate a nodeless gap order parameter, which is nearly isotropic in size across different sections of the Fermi surface, and are not compatible with models involving antiferromagnetic fluctuations, strong correlations, the t-J model, and the like, originally designed for the high-T(c) copper oxides.

  12. The suitability of an in situ perfusion model for permeability determinations: utility for BCS class I biowaiver requests.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Seung; Mitchell, Stefanie; Kijek, Paul; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Hilfinger, John; Amidon, Gordon L

    2006-01-01

    The FDA has published recommendations for sponsors who wish to request a waiver of in vivo bioavailability (BA) or bioequivalence (BE) studies for immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms based on the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Biowaivers can be requested for IR formulations in which the active ingredient is shown to be a BCS class I drug: that is, a drug showing high permeability and high solubility over a pH range of 1-7.5. For permeability determinations, a variety of experimental methods can be used, such as the rat in situ single pass perfusion or Caco-2 cell culture models, once the suitability of the particular method is established. Following the recommended procedure for assessing the suitability of permeability determinations, we determined the permeability of 20 test drugs using the in situ single pass perfusion model in rats. The test compounds were coperfused through jejunal intestinal segments with an internal permeability reference standard (metoprolol) over a 90 min time period. Sample analysis was performed by HPLC, and the ratio of the effective permeability, Peff (cm/s), of test compound to that of metoprolol was determined. To address the question of test drug permeabilities that approach that of the internal standard, we propose that a statistical analysis such as the "0.8-1.25 rule" used for in vivo or in vitro bioequivalence studies provide guidance for permeability classification using the in situ single pass perfusion model. We developed a method using the 90% confidence interval of the permeability ratio of the test to internal reference standard in order to differentiate between high and low permeability compounds. This analysis allowed for the proper permeability classification of all of the test compounds and suggests a robust means for assessing drug permeability classification.

  13. Computer simulations for bioequivalence trials: selection of analyte in BCS drugs with first-pass metabolism and two metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Fontestad, Carmen; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; Fernández-Teruel, Carlos; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Bermejo, Marival; Casabó, Vicente G

    2010-12-23

    The objective of this work is to use a computer simulation approach to define the most sensitive analyte for in vivo bioequivalence studies of all types of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) drugs undergoing first-pass hepatic metabolism with two metabolic pathways. A semi-physiological model was developed in NONMEM VI to simulate bioequivalence trials. Four BCS classes (from Class I to IV) of drugs, with three possible saturation scenarios (non-saturation, saturation and saturation of only the major route of metabolism), two (high or low) dose schemes, and six types of pharmaceutical quality for the drug products were simulated. The number of investigated scenarios was 144 (4 × 3 × 2 × 6). The parent drug is the most sensitive analyte for bioequivalence trials in all the studied scenarios. Metabolite data does not show sensitivity to detect differences in pharmaceutical quality or it gives the same information as the parent compound. An interesting point to notice is the case of class I drugs administered at a high dose when the principal metabolic route is saturated and the secondary one is not saturated. In this case a substantial reduction in dissolution rate (as it could occur in the case of a prolonged release formulation developed as a line extension of an immediate release formulation) leads to a considerable increase in the AUC of the major metabolite whose formation is saturated supporting the need to require pharmacokinetic and clinical data for new prolonged release medicinal products. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biowaiver extension potential and IVIVC for BCS Class II drugs by formulation design: Case study for cyclosporine self-microemulsifying formulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Geun

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this work was to suggest the biowaiver potential of biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) Class II drugs in self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) which are known to increase the solubility, dissolution and oral absorption of water-insoluble drugs. Cyclosporine was selected as a representative BCS Class II drug. New generic candidate of cyclosporine SMEDDS (test) was applied for the study with brand SMEDDS (reference I) and cyclosporine self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS, reference II). Solubility and dissolution of cyclosporine from SMEDDS were critically enhanced, which were the similar behaviors with BCS class I drug. The test showed the identical dissolution rate and the equivalent bioavailability (0.34, 0.42 and 0.68 of p values for AUC₀(→)₂₄(h), C(max) and T(max), respectively) with the reference I. Based on the results, level A in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) was established from these two SMEDDS formulations. This study serves as a good example for speculating the biowaiver extension potential of BCS Class II drugs specifically in solubilizing formulation such as SMEDDS.

  15. ZNF469 frequently mutated in the brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is a single exon gene possibly regulating the expression of several extracellular matrix components.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, Marianne; Spencer, Helen L; Porter, Louise F; Burkitt-Wright, Emma M M; Bürer, Céline; Janecke, Andreas; Bakshi, Madhura; Sillence, David; Al-Hussain, Hailah; Baumgartner, Matthias; Steinmann, Beat; Black, Graeme C M; Manson, Forbes D C; Giunta, Cecilia

    2013-07-01

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS; MIM 229200) is an autosomal recessive generalized connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in ZNF469 and PRDM5. It is characterized by extreme thinning and fragility of the cornea that may rupture in the absence of significant trauma leading to blindness. Keratoconus or keratoglobus, high myopia, blue sclerae, hyperelasticity of the skin without excessive fragility, and hypermobility of the small joints are additional features of BCS. Transcriptional regulation of extracellular matrix components, particularly of fibrillar collagens, by PRDM5 and ZNF469 suggests that they might be part of the same pathway, the disruption of which is likely to cause the features of BCS. In the present study, we have performed molecular analysis of a cohort of 23 BCS affected patients on both ZNF469 and PRDM5, including those who were clinically reported previously [1]; the clinical description of three additional patients is reported in detail. We identified either homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in ZNF469 in 18 patients while, 4 were found to be homozygous for PRDM5 mutations. In one single patient a mutation in neither ZNF469 nor PRDM5 was identified. Furthermore, we report the 12 novel ZNF469 variants identified in our patient cohort, and show evidence that ZNF469 is a single exon rather than a two exon gene.

  16. ZNF469 frequently mutated in the brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is a single exon gene possibly regulating the expression of several extracellular matrix components

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbach, Marianne; Spencer, Helen L.; Porter, Louise F.; Burkitt-Wright, Emma M.M.; Bürer, Céline; Janecke, Andreas; Bakshi, Madhura; Sillence, David; Al-Hussain, Hailah; Baumgartner, Matthias; Steinmann, Beat; Black, Graeme C.M.; Manson, Forbes D.C.; Giunta, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS; MIM 229200) is an autosomal recessive generalized connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in ZNF469 and PRDM5. It is characterized by extreme thinning and fragility of the cornea that may rupture in the absence of significant trauma leading to blindness. Keratoconus or keratoglobus, high myopia, blue sclerae, hyperelasticity of the skin without excessive fragility, and hypermobility of the small joints are additional features of BCS. Transcriptional regulation of extracellular matrix components, particularly of fibrillar collagens, by PRDM5 and ZNF469 suggests that they might be part of the same pathway, the disruption of which is likely to cause the features of BCS. In the present study, we have performed molecular analysis of a cohort of 23 BCS affected patients on both ZNF469 and PRDM5, including those who were clinically reported previously [1]; the clinical description of three additional patients is reported in detail. We identified either homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in ZNF469 in 18 patients while, 4 were found to be homozygous for PRDM5 mutations. In one single patient a mutation in neither ZNF469 nor PRDM5 was identified. Furthermore, we report the 12 novel ZNF469 variants identified in our patient cohort, and show evidence that ZNF469 is a single exon rather than a two exon gene. PMID:23680354

  17. Control of bulk superconductivity in a BCS superconductor by surface charge doping via electrochemical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, E.; Daghero, D.; Ummarino, G. A.; Laviano, F.; Nair, J. R.; Cristiano, R.; Casaburi, A.; Portesi, C.; Sola, A.; Gonnelli, R. S.

    2017-04-01

    The electrochemical gating technique is a powerful tool to tune the surface conduction properties of various materials by means of pure charge doping, but its efficiency is thought to be hampered in materials with a good electronic screening. We show that, if applied to a metallic superconductor (NbN thin films), this approach allows the observation of reversible enhancements or suppressions of the bulk superconducting transition temperature, which vary with the thickness of the films. These results are interpreted in terms of a proximity effect, and indicate that the effective screening length depends on the induced charge density, becoming much larger than that predicted by a standard screening theory at very high electric fields.

  18. Equation of State of Ultracold Fermions in the 2D BEC-BCS Crossover Region.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, I; Bayha, L; Kedar, D; Murthy, P A; Neidig, M; Ries, M G; Wenz, A N; Zürn, G; Jochim, S; Enss, T

    2016-01-29

    We report the experimental measurement of the equation of state of a two-dimensional Fermi gas with attractive s-wave interactions throughout the crossover from a weakly coupled Fermi gas to a Bose gas of tightly bound dimers as the interaction strength is varied. We demonstrate that interactions lead to a renormalization of the density of the Fermi gas by several orders of magnitude. We compare our data near the ground state and at finite temperature with predictions for both fermions and bosons from quantum Monte Carlo simulations and Luttinger-Ward theory. Our results serve as input for investigations of close-to-equilibrium dynamics and transport in the two-dimensional system.

  19. BCS-like critical fluctuations with limited overlap of Cooper pairs in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Chen, Guanyu; Zhu, Xiyu; Xing, Jie; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2017-08-01

    In conventional superconductors, very narrow superconducting-fluctuation regions are observed above Tc, because strong overlap of Cooper pairs occurs in a coherence volume 4 π ξ3/3 with ξ being the coherence length. In the bulk form of iron-chalcogenide superconductor FeSe, it is argued that the system may be located in the crossover region from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), where strong superconducting fluctuations are expected. In this respect, we carried out magnetization, specific heat, and Nernst effect measurements on FeSe single crystals in order to investigate the superconducting fluctuation effect near Tc. The temperature range of diamagnetization induced by superconducting fluctuations seems very narrow above Tc. The temperature-dependent magnetization curves measured at different magnetic fields do not cross at a single point. This is in sharp contrast to the situation in many cuprate superconductors, where such a crossing point has been taken as a clear signature of strong critical fluctuations. The magnetization data can be scaled according to the Ginzburg-Landau fluctuation theory for a quasi-two-dimensional system. However the scaling result cannot be described by the theoretical function of the fluctuation theory due to the limited fluctuation regions. The specific heat jump near Tc is rather sharp without the trace of strong superconducting fluctuations. This is also supported by the Nernst effect measurements which indicate a very narrow region for vortex motion above Tc. Associated with a very small value of Ginzburg number and further analyses, we conclude that the superconducting fluctuations are vanishingly weak above Tc in this material. Our results are strongly against the picture of significant phase fluctuations in FeSe single crystals, although the system has a very limited overlap of Cooper pairs in the coherence volume. This dichotomy provides new insights into the superconducting mechanism when the

  20. Hydrophobin-nanofibrillated cellulose stabilized emulsions for encapsulation and release of BCS class II drugs.

    PubMed

    Paukkonen, Heli; Ukkonen, Anni; Szilvay, Geza; Yliperttula, Marjo; Laaksonen, Timo

    2017-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to construct biopolymer-based oil-in-water emulsion formulations for encapsulation and release of poorly water soluble model compounds naproxen and ibuprofen. Class II hydrophobin protein HFBII from Trichoderma reesei was used as a surfactant to stabilize the oil/water interfaces of the emulsion droplets in the continuous aqueous phase. Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) was used as a viscosity modifier to further stabilize the emulsions and encapsulate protein coated oil droplets in NFC fiber network. The potential of both native and oxidized NFC were studied for this purpose. Various emulsion formulations were prepared and the abilities of different formulations to control the drug release rate of naproxen and ibuprofen, used as model compounds, were evaluated. The optimal formulation for sustained drug release consisted of 0.01% of drug, 0.1% HFBII, 0.15% oxidized NFC, 10% soybean oil and 90% water phase. By comparison, the use of native NFC in combination with HFBII resulted in an immediate drug release for both of the compounds. The results indicate that these NFC originated biopolymers are suitable for pharmaceutical emulsion formulations. The native and oxidized NFC grades can be used as emulsion stabilizers in sustained and immediate drug release applications. Furthermore, stabilization of the emulsions was achieved with low concentrations of both HFBII and NFC, which may be an advantage when compared to surfactant concentrations of conventional excipients traditionally used in pharmaceutical emulsion formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chiral random matrix theory for two-color QCD at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Kanazawa, Takuya; Yamamoto, Naoki; Wettig, Tilo

    2010-04-15

    We identify a non-Hermitian chiral random matrix theory that corresponds to two-color QCD at high density. We show that the partition function of the random matrix theory coincides with the partition function of the finite-volume effective theory at high density, and that the Leutwyler-Smilga-type spectral sum rules of the random matrix theory are identical to those derived from the effective theory. The microscopic Dirac spectrum of the theory is governed by the BCS gap, rather than the conventional chiral condensate. We also show that with a different choice of a parameter the random matrix theory yields the effective partition function at low density.

  2. Weak lensing calibration of mass bias in the REFLEX+BCS X-ray galaxy cluster catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simet, Melanie; Battaglia, Nicholas; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uroš

    2017-04-01

    The use of large, X-ray-selected Galaxy cluster catalogues for cosmological analyses requires a thorough understanding of the X-ray mass estimates. Weak gravitational lensing is an ideal method to shed light on such issues, due to its insensitivity to the cluster dynamical state. We perform a weak lensing calibration of 166 galaxy clusters from the REFLEX and BCS cluster catalogue and compare our results to the X-ray masses based on scaled luminosities from that catalogue. To interpret the weak lensing signal in terms of cluster masses, we compare the lensing signal to simple theoretical Navarro-Frenk-White models and to simulated cluster lensing profiles, including complications such as cluster substructure, projected large-scale structure and Eddington bias. We find evidence of underestimation in the X-ray masses, as expected, with = 0.75 ± 0.07 stat. ±0.05 sys. for our best-fitting model. The biases in cosmological parameters in a typical cluster abundance measurement that ignores this mass bias will typically exceed the statistical errors.

  3. From BCS to Vortices: A 40 Year Personal Journey through Superconductivity from Basic Research to Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Paul M.

    2011-03-01

    A century has passed since the discovery of superconductivity in Leiden followed 75 years later by the Great Leap Forward in Zuerich. This talk will chronicle the author's trajectory through the science and technology of superconductivity first taking off with his IBM career in fundamental research on organic and layered copper oxide perovskite superconductors to a final landing at EPRI to explore applications of the latter to the electric power industry. Although many fundamental mysteries remain with respect to the copper and iron compounds, especially regarding the BCS pairing mechanism, nonetheless a significant number of successful demonstrations of cables, rotating machinery, storage and power conditioning equipment employing both low-and high- T superconducting materials have been undertaken worldwide since the decade of the 1960s to the present. However, massive application to the power industry has yet to take place or be inserted into utility long-range planning. Although there will certainly be a relatively small number of opportunistic deployments in those situations where superconductivity has a compelling advantage over conventional technology, its time will more likely await a future revolution in energy and electricity infrastructure such as a symbiosis of nuclear and hydrogen with superconductivity. Perhaps the distant future will even deliver the dream of a room temperature superconductor. ``20th Anniversary of the Woodstock of Physics,'' APS March Meeting 2007, Denver, CO.

  4. Unified description of neutron superfluidity in the neutron-star crust with analogy to anisotropic multiband BCS superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chamel, N.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.; Onsi, M.

    2010-04-15

    The neutron superfluidity in the inner crust of a neutron star has traditionally been studied considering either homogeneous neutron matter or a small number of nucleons confined inside the spherical Wigner-Seitz cell. Drawing analogies with the recently discovered multiband superconductors, we have solved the anisotropic multiband BCS gap equations with Bloch boundary conditions, thus providing a unified description taking consistently into account both the free neutrons and the nuclear clusters. Calculations have been carried out using the effective interaction underlying our recent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear mass model HFB-16. We have found that even though the presence of inhomogeneities lowers the neutron pairing gaps, the reduction is much less than that predicted by previous calculations using the Wigner-Seitz approximation. We have studied the disappearance of superfluidity with increasing temperature. As an application we have calculated the neutron specific heat, which is an important ingredient for modeling the thermal evolution of newly born neutron stars. This work provides a new scheme for realistic calculations of superfluidity in neutron-star crusts.

  5. Polymer strip films as a robust, surfactant-free platform for delivery of BCS Class II drug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krull, Scott M; Susarla, Ramana; Afolabi, Afolawemi; Li, Meng; Ying, Ye; Iqbal, Zafar; Bilgili, Ecevit; Davé, Rajesh N

    2015-07-15

    The robustness of the polymer strip film platform to successfully deliver a variety of BCS Class II drug nanoparticles without the need for surfactant while retaining positive characteristics such as nanoparticle redispersibility and fast dissolution is demonstrated. Fenofibrate (FNB), griseofulvin (GF), naproxen (NPX), phenylbutazone (PB), and azodicarbonamide (AZD) were considered as model poorly water-soluble drugs. Their aqueous nanosuspensions, produced via wet stirred media milling, were mixed with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solution containing glycerin as plasticizer, followed by casting and drying to form films. For the purpose of comparison, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as surfactant, but was found to be unnecessary for achieving fast dissolution (t80 between 18 and 28 min) for all five drugs. Interestingly, SDS was required for the full recovery of nanoparticles for PB, yet lack of it did not impact the dissolution. Interactions between drug and polymer were investigated with FTIR spectroscopy whereas drug crystallinity within the film was investigated via Raman spectroscopy. Films for all drugs, even for very small samples, exhibited excellent content uniformity (RSD <4%) regardless of use of surfactant. Overall, these results demonstrate the novelty and robustness of the polymer strip film platform for fast release of poorly water-soluble drugs without requiring any surfactants.

  6. Solubility enhancement of BCS Class II drug by solid phospholipid dispersions: Spray drying versus freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Fong, Sophia Yui Kau; Ibisogly, Asiye; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2015-12-30

    The poor aqueous solubility of BCS Class II drugs represents a major challenge for oral dosage form development. Using celecoxib (CXB) as model drug, the current study adopted a novel solid phospholipid nanoparticle (SPLN) approach and compared the effect of two commonly used industrial manufacturing methods, spray- and freeze-drying, on the solubility and dissolution enhancement of CXB. CXB was formulated with Phospholipoid E80 (PL) and trehalose at different CXB:PL:trehalose ratios, of which 1:10:16 was the optimal formulation. Spherical amorphous SPLNs with average diameters <1μm were produced by spray-drying; while amorphous 'matrix'-like structures of solid PL dispersion with larger particle sizes were prepared by freeze-drying. Formulations from both methods significantly enhanced the dissolution rates, apparent solubility, and molecularly dissolved concentration of CXB in phosphate buffer (PBS, pH 6.5) and in biorelevant fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF, pH 6.5) (p<0.05). While similar dissolution rates were found, the spray-dried SPLNs had a larger enhancement in apparent solubility (29- to 132-fold) as well as molecular solubility (18-fold) of CXB at equilibrium (p<0.05). The strong capability of the spray-dried SPLNs to attain 'true' supersaturation state makes them a promising approach for bioavailability enhancement of poorly soluble drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure and functioning of a multidisciplinary 'Heart Team' for patients with coronary artery disease: rationale and recommendations from a joint BCS/BCIS/SCTS working group.

    PubMed

    Luckraz, Heyman; Norell, Michael; Buch, Mamta; James, Rachael; Cooper, Graham

    2015-10-01

    The decision-making process in the management of patients with ischaemic heart disease has historically been the responsibility of the cardiologist and encompasses medical management, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). Currently, there is significant geographical variability in the PCI:CABG ratio. There are now emerging recommendations that this decision-making process should be carried out through a multidisciplinary approach, namely the Heart Team. This work was carried out on behalf of The British Cardiovascular Society (BCS), Society for Cardiothoracic Surgery in Great Britain and Ireland (SCTS) and British Cardiovascular Intervention Society (BCIS). This manuscript sets out the principles for the functioning of the Heart Team. This work has been approved by the Executive Committees of BCS/BCIS/SCTS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  8. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms based on biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) literature data: chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine sulfate, and chloroquine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, R K; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Barends, D M

    2005-07-01

    Literature data on the properties of chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine sulfate, and chloroquine hydrochloride related to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) are reviewed. The available information indicates that these chloroquine salts can be classified as highly soluble and highly permeable, i.e., BCS class I. The qualitative composition of immediate release (IR) tablets containing these Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) with a Marketing Authorization (MA) in Belgium (BE), Germany (DE), Finland (FI), and The Netherlands (NL) is provided. In view of these MA's and the critical therapeutic indication of chloroquine, it is assumed that the registration authorities had evidence that these formulations are bioequivalent to the innovator. It is concluded that IR tablets formulated with these excipients are candidates for a biowaiver.

  9. Part i: Numerical Investigation of the Rkky Interaction in a BCS Superconductor; Part II: Dynamical Analysis of Leed from the (110) Surfaces of Substitutionally Disordered GALLIUM(X)ALUMINUM(1-X)ARSENIDE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Steven Leslie

    In Part I the spatial spin susceptibility (chi)(r) of a BCS superconductor is calculated using finite temperature Green's functions. A numerical study of the results reveals that the RKKY interaction is only modified by about 2 - 3% from its normal value for distances less than 10 p(,o)(' -1) where p(,o) is the Fermi momentum, and that the change in the RKKY interaction is exponentially damped out at further distances. In Part II we discuss how low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), which has been successful in determining the surface atomic geometries of compound semiconductors, can be extended to surface structure studies of substitutionally disordered ternary semiconductor interfaces. We use an average T-matrix approximation (ATA) to compute the intensities of 30 - 240 eV low-energy electrons diffracted from the (110) surfaces of Ga(,x)Al(,1-x)As(110), for values of x = 0.00, 0.25, 0.32, 0.50, 1.00. We find that our computed diffracted intensities correctly mimic the trends in the experimental data and attempt a structure search for Ga(,0.50)Al(,0.50)As.

  10. Modified cyanobacteria

    DOEpatents

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  11. Evaluation of changes in oral drug absorption in preterm and term neonates for Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class I and II compounds.

    PubMed

    Somani, Amit A; Thelen, Kirstin; Zheng, Songmao; Trame, Mirjam N; Coboeken, Katrin; Meyer, Michaela; Schnizler, Katrin; Ince, Ibrahim; Willmann, Stefan; Schmidt, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the rate of oral drug absorption changes during early childhood. Yet, respective clinical implications are currently unclear, particularly for preterm neonates. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in oral drug absorption after birth for different Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class I and II compounds to better understand respective implications for paediatric pharmacotherapy. Two paradigm compounds were selected for BCS class I (paracetamol (acetaminophen) and theophylline) and II (indomethacin and ibuprofen), respectively, based on the availability of clinical literature data following intravenous and oral dosing. A comparative population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in a step-wise manner in NONMEM® 7.2 to characterize and predict changes in oral drug absorption after birth for paracetamol, theophylline and indomethacin. A one compartment model with an age-dependent maturation function for oral drug absorption was found appropriate to characterize the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol. Our findings indicate that the rate at which a drug is absorbed from the GI tract reaches adult levels within about 1 week after birth. The maturation function for paracetamol was found applicable to theophylline and indomethacin once solubility limitations were overcome via drug formulation. The influence of excipients on solubility and, hence, oral bioavailability was confirmed for ibuprofen, a second BCS class II compound. The findings of our study suggest that the processes underlying changes in oral drug absorption after birth are drug-independent and that the maturation function identified for paracetamol may be generally applicable to other BCS class I and II compounds for characterizing drug absorption in preterm as well as term neonates. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Superconductivity theory applied to the periodic table of the elements

    SciTech Connect

    Elifritz, T.L.

    1994-12-31

    The modern theory of superconductivity, based upon the BCS to Bose-Einstein transition, is applied to the periodic table of the elements, in order to isolate the essential features of high temperature superconductivity and to predict its occurrence within the periodic table. It is predicted that Sodium-Ammonia, Sodium Zinc Phosphide and Bismuth (I) Iodide are promising materials for experimental explorations of high temperature superconductivity.

  13. Superconductivity theory applied to the periodic table of the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elifritz, Thomas Lee

    1995-01-01

    The modern theory of superconductivity, based upon the BCS to Bose-Einstein transition is applied to the periodic table of the elements, in order to isolate the essential features of of high temperature superconductivity and to predict its occurrence with the periodic table. It is predicted that Sodium-Ammonia, Sodium Zinc Phosphide and Bismuth (I) Iodide are promising materials for experimental explorations of high temperature superconductivity.

  14. Superconductivity theory applied to the periodic table of the elements

    SciTech Connect

    Elifritz, T.L.

    1995-04-01

    The modern theory of superconductivity, based upon the BCS to Bose-Einstein transition is applied to the periodic table of the elements, in order to isolate the essential features of high temperature superconductivity and to predict its occurrence with the periodic table. It is predicted that Sodium-Ammonia, Sodium Zinc Phosphide and Bismuth (I) Iodide are promising materials for experimental explorations of high temperature superconductivity.

  15. Geometrical Construction of the Hirota Bilinear Form of the Modified Korteweg-De Vries Equation on a Thin Elastic Rod:. Bosonic Classical Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Shigeki

    Recently there have been several studies of a nonrelativistic elastic rod in R2 whose dynamics is governed by the modified Korteweg-de Vries (MKdV) equation. Goldstein and Petrich found the MKdV hierarchy through its dynamics [Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 555 (1992).] In this article, we will show the physical meaning of the Hirota bilinear form along the lines of the elastica problem after we formally complexify its arc length.

  16. Sugars as solid dispersion carrier to improve solubility and dissolution of the BCS class II drug: clotrimazole.

    PubMed

    Madgulkar, Ashwini; Bandivadekar, Mithun; Shid, Tanaji; Rao, Shivani

    2016-01-01

    Solid dispersion of poorly soluble BCS class II drug, clotrimazole, was prepared with the aim of enhancing its dissolution profile. Solid dispersions were prepared using various sugars as carriers at different weight ratio to drug-like d-mannitol, d-fructose, d-dextrose and d-maltose by fusion method. The solubility of plain clotrimazole in different percent of sugar solutions was measured. Also, its solubility in solid dispersion and their physical mixture were assessed. The dissolution of all the prepared SD tablets, direct compressed clotrimazole tablet and plain drug were tested using the U.S. Pharmacopeia convention (USP) apparatus II. The dissolution profiles were characterized by parameters like area under curve (AUC), mean residence time (MRT), mean dissolution time (MDT) and percent dissolution efficiency (% DE). The release kinetics study was performed using DD Solver TM software. The selected solid dispersions (SDs) were evaluated for antifungal activity. A 100% solution of mannitol showed 806-fold increases in solubility as compared with plain clotrimazole in water. It was observed that the dissolution profile of clotrimazole was improved by mannitol SD at drug to sugar ration of 1:3. The percent DE value for mannitol SD tablet was found to be 77.3516% as against plain drug and directly compressed tablet of clotrimazole at 50.9439% and 31.33%, respectively. Also the antifungal activity indicated by inhibition zone was found to be 54 mm indicating enhance activity against Candida albicans as compared with plain CTZ at 6.6 mm. Thus, it can be concluded that the sugar alcohol, that is, mannitol is a more promising hydrophilic carrier for solid dispersion preparation to improve the solubility and dissolution of poorly soluble drugs.

  17. Implicit Personality Theories on the Modifiability and Stability of the Action Repertoire as a Meaningful Framework for Individual Motivation: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Albert; Fidelman, Marina; Reutlinger, Marold; Vialle, Wilma; Stoeger, Heidrun

    2010-01-01

    The attainment of exceptional accomplishments requires extremely long periods of time. It has yet to be explained, though, how individuals find the motivation for such protracted learning. Carol Dweck proposed that an incremental theory of an individual's abilities is an important factor in this process since it would account for the optimism…

  18. A Robust Algorithm for Optimisation and Customisation of Fractal Dimensions of Time Series Modified by Nonlinearly Scaling Their Time Derivatives: Mathematical Theory and Practical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Standard methods for computing the fractal dimensions of time series are usually tested with continuous nowhere differentiable functions, but not benchmarked with actual signals. Therefore they can produce opposite results in extreme signals. These methods also use different scaling methods, that is, different amplitude multipliers, which makes it difficult to compare fractal dimensions obtained from different methods. The purpose of this research was to develop an optimisation method that computes the fractal dimension of a normalised (dimensionless) and modified time series signal with a robust algorithm and a running average method, and that maximises the difference between two fractal dimensions, for example, a minimum and a maximum one. The signal is modified by transforming its amplitude by a multiplier, which has a non-linear effect on the signal's time derivative. The optimisation method identifies the optimal multiplier of the normalised amplitude for targeted decision making based on fractal dimensions. The optimisation method provides an additional filter effect and makes the fractal dimensions less noisy. The method is exemplified by, and explained with, different signals, such as human movement, EEG, and acoustic signals. PMID:24151522

  19. A robust algorithm for optimisation and customisation of fractal dimensions of time series modified by nonlinearly scaling their time derivatives: mathematical theory and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Franz Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Standard methods for computing the fractal dimensions of time series are usually tested with continuous nowhere differentiable functions, but not benchmarked with actual signals. Therefore they can produce opposite results in extreme signals. These methods also use different scaling methods, that is, different amplitude multipliers, which makes it difficult to compare fractal dimensions obtained from different methods. The purpose of this research was to develop an optimisation method that computes the fractal dimension of a normalised (dimensionless) and modified time series signal with a robust algorithm and a running average method, and that maximises the difference between two fractal dimensions, for example, a minimum and a maximum one. The signal is modified by transforming its amplitude by a multiplier, which has a non-linear effect on the signal's time derivative. The optimisation method identifies the optimal multiplier of the normalised amplitude for targeted decision making based on fractal dimensions. The optimisation method provides an additional filter effect and makes the fractal dimensions less noisy. The method is exemplified by, and explained with, different signals, such as human movement, EEG, and acoustic signals.

  20. CO2 Flux from a Subtropical Mangrove Ecosystem in Magdalena Bay BCS, Mexico Josediego Uribe, Walter C. Oechel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, J.; Oechel, W. C.

    2012-12-01

    Mangrove forests are among the most productive ecosystems within the tropical and subtropical coastlines of the world. There is currently limited research on mangrove carbon sequestration potentials but with ongoing climate change and rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, an understanding of carbon exchange in mangroves forests and the environmental controls influencing fluxes is extremely important for understanding their role in the global carbon cycle and their potential as stores of CO2. In this study, CO2 flux was evaluated for a subtropical mangrove ecosystem in the arid region of Magdalena Bay BCS, Mexico. Measurements were taken using an eddy covariance system above the canopy during January 8 to the 30, and currently from June 21 to August 28, in 2012. The mangrove forest is located (N25° 15'75", W112° 04'79") near the town of Puerto Lopez Mateos, Mexico. During this time period environmental variables such as Net Radiation, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), air temperature, humidity, ground heat flux, soil temperature and tidal height were measured together with the CO2 flux in order to determine the environmental influence on the fluxes. Preliminary results showed a clear diurnal pattern in CO2 flux that showed high sinks when light availability was high. During January, the winter dry season environmental conditions remained relatively cool with an average air temperature of 17 oC and consistently cloudless days. During this period CO2 flux was -1.3 μmol C m-2s-1, which means that for the month of January, there was a net uptake of carbon by the mangrove ecosystem. For the summer period the development of the data collection for a longer term as well as further correlation analysis with environmental data is currently underway, however expectations are that seasonal variations of CO2 flux can be seen due to longer and more intense periods of solar irradiance as well as the effect of high temperature (+30° C) days. Indirect effects

  1. XX International Workshop on Condensed Matter Theories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Density Matrix Theory J. W. Clark, M. L. Ristig, T. Lindenau and M. Serhan 7 Can BCS and BEC be Synthesized? V. C. Aguilera-Navarro, M. Casas, S...Louis, MO 63130 USA M. L. Ristig, T. Lindenau, and M. Serhan Institut für Theoretische Physik Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Köln, Germany 1...E. Campbell, and J. W. Clark, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 218, 116 (1992). [10] M. L. Ristig, G. Senger, M. Serhan , and J. W. Clark, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 243

  2. Isolation of a solventogenic Clostridium sp. strain: fermentation of glycerol to n-butanol, analysis of the bcs operon region and its potential regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Panitz, J C; Zverlov, V V; Pham, V T T; Stürzl, S; Schieder, D; Schwarz, W H

    2014-02-01

    A new solventogenic bacterium, strain GT6, was isolated from standing water sediment. 16S-rRNA gene analysis revealed that GT6 belongs to the heterogeneous Clostridium tetanomorphum group of bacteria exhibiting 99% sequence identity with C. tetanomorphum 4474(T). GT6 can utilize a wide range of carbohydrate substrates including glucose, fructose, maltose, xylose and glycerol to produce mainly n-butanol without any acetone. Additional products of GT6 metabolism were ethanol, butyric acid, acetic acid, and trace amounts of 1,3-propanediol. Medium and substrate composition, and culture conditions such as pH and temperature influenced product formation. The major fermentation product from glycerol was n-butanol with a final concentration of up to 11.5 g/L. 3% (v/v) glycerol lead to a total solvent concentration of 14 g/L within 72 h. Growth was not inhibited by glycerol concentrations as high as 15% (v/v). The solventogenesis genes crt, bcd, etfA/B and hbd composing the bcs (butyryl-CoA synthesis) operon of C. tetanomorphum GT6 were sequenced. They occur in a genomic arrangement identical to those in other solventogenic clostridia. Furthermore, the sequence of a potential regulator gene highly similar to that of the NADH-sensing Rex family of regulatory genes was found upstream of the bcs operon. Potential binding sites for Rex have been identified in the promoter region of the bcs operon of solvent producing clostridia as well as upstream of other genes involved in NADH oxidation. This indicates a fundamental role of Rex in the regulation of fermentation products in anaerobic, and especially in solventogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of supersaturation level for oral absorption of BCS class IIb drugs, dipyridamole and ketoconazole, using in vivo predictive dissolution system: Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS).

    PubMed

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Matsui, Kazuki; Searls, Amanda L; Takeuchi, Susumu; Amidon, Gregory E; Sun, Duxin; Amidon, Gordon L

    2017-05-01

    The development of formulations and the assessment of oral drug absorption for Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class IIb drugs is often a difficult issue due to the potential for supersaturation and precipitation in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The physiological environment in the GI tract largely influences in vivo drug dissolution rates of those drugs. Thus, those physiological factors should be incorporated into the in vitro system to better assess in vivo performance of BCS class IIb drugs. In order to predict oral bioperformance, an in vitro dissolution system with multiple compartments incorporating physiologically relevant factors would be expected to more accurately predict in vivo phenomena than a one-compartment dissolution system like USP Apparatus 2 because, for example, the pH change occurring in the human GI tract can be better replicated in a multi-compartmental platform. The Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS) consists of three compartments, the gastric, duodenal and jejunal chambers, and is a practical in vitro dissolution apparatus to predict in vivo dissolution for oral dosage forms. This system can demonstrate supersaturation and precipitation and, therefore, has the potential to predict in vivo bioperformance of oral dosage forms where this phenomenon may occur. In this report, in vitro studies were performed with dipyridamole and ketoconazole to evaluate the precipitation rates and the relationship between the supersaturation levels and oral absorption of BCS class II weak base drugs. To evaluate the impact of observed supersaturation levels on oral absorption, a study utilizing the GIS in combination with mouse intestinal infusion was conducted. Supersaturation levels observed in the GIS enhanced dipyridamole and ketoconazole absorption in mouse, and a good correlation between their supersaturation levels and their concentration in plasma was observed. The GIS, therefore, appears to represent in vivo dissolution phenomena and

  4. Magnetic-modulation spectroscopy of an atomic Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Dissociation spectra in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, J.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of magnetic-field modulation on a Fermi gas of atoms in the BCS-BEC crossover is studied analytically. Recent experimental findings on the system response to a sinusoidal variation of the field are explained. Specifically, the dissociation processes induced by the modulation in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime are described. The role played by the frequency, amplitude, and application time of the perturbation in the emergence of the observed behavior is clarified. The results uncover also the relevance of the detuning from the Feshbach resonance to the appearance of particular spectral features. The applicability of the field modulation as a spectroscopic tool for probing the crossover is discussed.

  5. Gain of a New Exon by a Lineage-Specific Alu Element-Integration Event in the BCS1L Gene during Primate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choe, Se-Hee; Kim, Myung-Jin; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Sim, Bo-Woong; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Lee, Youngjeon; Park, Young-Ho; Park, Young Il; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2015-01-01

    BCS1L gene encodes mitochondrial protein and is a member of conserved AAA protein family. This gene is involved in the incorporation of Rieske FeS and Qcr10p into complex III of respiratory chain. In our previous study, AluYRa2-derived alternative transcript in rhesus monkey genome was identified. However, this transcript has not been reported in human genome. In present study, we conducted evolutionary analysis of AluYRa2-exonized transcript with various primate genomic DNAs and cDNAs from humans, rhesus monkeys, and crab-eating monkeys. Remarkably, our results show that AluYRa2 element has only been integrated into genomes of Macaca species. This Macaca lineage-specific integration of AluYRa2 element led to exonization event in the first intron region of BCS1L gene by producing a conserved 3′ splice site. Intriguingly, in rhesus and crab-eating monkeys, more diverse transcript variants by alternative splicing (AS) events, including exon skipping and different 5′ splice sites from humans, were identified. Alignment of amino acid sequences revealed that AluYRa2-exonized transcript has short N-terminal peptides. Therefore, AS events play a major role in the generation of various transcripts and proteins during primate evolution. In particular, lineage-specific integration of Alu elements and species-specific Alu-derived exonization events could be important sources of gene diversification in primates. PMID:26537194

  6. Effect of Gastric Fluid Volume on the In Vitro Dissolution and In Vivo Absorption of BCS Class II Drugs: a Case Study with Nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Nader, Ahmed M; Quinney, Sara K; Fadda, Hala M; Foster, David R

    2016-07-01

    Nifedipine is a BCS Class II drug used for treatment of hypertension and preterm labor. Large inter-patient variability in nifedipine absorption results in variable exposure among different patients. We conducted in vitro dissolution studies to compare nifedipine dissolution from immediate release (IR) capsules with different volumes of dissolution media. Results from dissolution studies were used to design a crossover study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the effect of coadministered water volume with nifedipine 10 mg IR capsules on nifedipine pharmacokinetics, especially absorption (C max, t max, and AUC0-6). Dissolution studies demonstrated that larger gastric fluid volumes result in enhanced nifedipine dissolution from 10 mg IR cosolvent capsules (73 vs. 17% in 200 and 100 mL simulated gastric fluid, respectively, at 30 min). The pharmacokinetic crossover study in healthy volunteers (N = 6) did not show a significant effect of the water volume administered with the capsule (50 vs. 250 mL) on C max, t max, or AUC0-6 of orally administered nifedipine IR capsules (10 mg). However, administration of large water volumes resulted in lower variability in nifedipine C max (47 vs. 70% for 250 and 50 mL, respectively). Administration of large water volumes with nifedipine 10 mg IR cosolvent capsules may reduce inter-individual variability in plasma exposure. Evaluation of similar effects in other BCS Class II drugs is recommended.

  7. The impact of the EMA change in definition of "dose" on the BCS dose-solubility ratio: a review of the biowaiver monographs.

    PubMed

    Sediq, Ahmad; Kubbinga, Marlies; Langguth, Peter; Dressman, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) defines the solubility characteristics of an active pharmaceutical substance based on its dose-solubility ratio: for highly soluble drugs this ratio is less than 250 mL over a defined pH range. Prior to the revision of the European Medicines Agency (EMA, formerly EMEA) guideline in 2010, the "dose" in this ratio was consistently defined by the US FDA, the EMA, and the WHO biowaiver guidelines as the highest dosage strength. However, in the revised EMA guideline, the dose is defined as the highest single dose administered according to the Summary of Product Characteristics. The new EMA criterion for highly soluble may be closer to the actual conditions of use, but it is not in line with the dose that would be used in the in vivo bioequivalence study. This paper evaluates the impact on the BCS classification of the active pharmaceutical ingredients of the published biowaiver monographs and discusses the consequences of the possible change in classification on biowaiver recommendations. Using the current definition of dose by the EMA, the biowaiver recommendations for metoclopramide hydrochloride and verapamil hydrochloride are no longer valid according to EMA criteria. For prednisolone and prednisone, a reevaluation of the biowaiver recommendation, taking into account the usual dosing levels, seems appropriate.

  8. Effect of Gastric Fluid Volume on the in Vitro Dissolution and in Vivo Absorption of BCS Class II Drugs: A Case Study with Nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Ahmed M.; Quinney, Sara K.; Fadda, Hala M.; Foster, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nifedipine is a BCS Class II drug used for treatment of hypertension and preterm labor. Large inter-patient variability in nifedipine absorption results in variable exposure among different patients. Methods and Materials We conducted in vitro dissolution studies to compare nifedipine dissolution from immediate release (IR) capsules with different volumes of dissolution media. Results from dissolution studies were used to design a cross-over study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the effect of co-administered water volume with nifedipine 10 mg IR capsules on nifedipine pharmacokinetics, especially absorption (Cmax, tmax, and AUC0–6). Results and Discussion Dissolution studies demonstrated that larger gastric fluid volumes result in enhanced nifedipine dissolution from 10 mg IR cosolvent capsules (73% vs. 17% in 200 and 100 mL simulated gastric fluid, respectively, at 30 min). The pharmacokinetic crossover study in healthy volunteers (N=6) did not show a significant effect of the water volume administered with the capsule (50 vs. 250 ml) on Cmax, tmax, or AUC0–6 of orally administered nifedipine IR capsules (10 mg). However, administration of large water volumes resulted in lower variability in nifedipine Cmax (47% vs.70% for 250 mL and 50 mL, respectively). Conclusion Administration of large water volumes with nifedipine 10 mg IR cosolvent capsules reduces inter-individual variability in plasma exposure. Evaluation of similar effects in other BCS Class-II drugs is recommended. PMID:27106837

  9. Insight into the Development of Dissolution Media for BCS Class II Drugs: A Review from Quality Control and Prediction of In Vivo Performance Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunnuan; Liu, Yan; He, Zhonggui; Sun, Jin

    2016-01-01

    To assess in vivo behavior through in vitro method, the dissolution test is mostly used, both for quality control (QC) and for development purpose. In view of the fact that a dissolution test can hardly achieve two goals at the same time, the design of dissolution testing generally varies along with the development stage of drug products and therefore the selection of dissolution media may change with the goals of the dissolution test. To serve the QC purpose, a dissolution medium is designed to provide a sink condition; for development purpose, the dissolution medium is required to simulate the physiological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract as far as possible. In this review, we intended to provide an initial introduction to the various dissolution media applied for QC and formulation development purposes for poorly water soluble drugs. We focused on these methods like addition of cosolvents, surfactants and utilization of biphasic media, applied to provide sink conditions which are difficult to be achieved by simple aqueous buffers for lipophilic drugs, and introduced the development of physiologically relevant media for human and animals like dog and rat with respect to the choice of buffers, bile salts, lipids and so on. In addition, we further discussed the influence of biorelevant dissolution media on the modification of drug Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) classification, especially for BCS class II drugs with low solubility and high permeability, the solubility of which is relatively sensitive to the presence of bile salts and lipids.

  10. Probing of exopolysaccharides with green fluorescence protein-labeled carbohydrate-binding module in Escherichia coli biofilms and flocs induced by bcsB overexpression.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Hong; Ojima, Yoshihiro; Sakka, Makiko; Sakka, Kazuo; Taya, Masahito

    2014-10-01

    Polysaccharides are major structural constituents to develop the three-dimensional architecture of Escherichia coli biofilms. In this study, confocal laser scanning microscopy was applied in combination with a fluorescent probe to analyze the location and arrangement of exopolysaccharide (EPSh) in microcolonies of E. coli K-12 derived strains, formed as biofilms on solid surfaces and flocs in the liquid phase. For this purpose, a novel fluorescent probe was constructed by conjugating a carbohydrate-binding module 3, from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus, with the green fluorescence protein (GFP-CBM3). The GFP-CBM3 fused protein exhibited strong affinity to microcrystalline cellulose. Moreover, GFP-CBM3 specifically bound to cell-dense microcolonies in the E. coli biofilms, and to their flocs induced by bcsB overexpression. Therefore, the fused protein presents as a novel marker for EPSh produced by E. coli cells. Overexpression of bcsB was associated with abundant EPSh production and enhanced E. coli biofilm formation, which was similarly detectable by GFP-CBM3 probing.

  11. Elucidating the role of dose in the biopharmaceutics classification of drugs: the concepts of critical dose, effective in vivo solubility, and dose-dependent BCS.

    PubMed

    Charkoftaki, Georgia; Dokoumetzidis, Aristides; Valsami, Georgia; Macheras, Panos

    2012-11-01

    To develop a dose dependent version of BCS and identify a critical dose after which the amount absorbed is independent from the dose. We utilized a mathematical model of drug absorption in order to produce simulations of the fraction of dose absorbed (F) and the amount absorbed as function of the dose for the various classes of BCS and the marginal cases in between classes. Simulations based on the mathematical model of F versus dose produced patterns of a constant F throughout a wide range of doses for drugs of Classes I, II and III, justifying biowaiver claim. For Classes I and III the pattern of a constant F stops at a critical dose Dose(cr) after which the amount of drug absorbed, is independent from the dose. For doses higher than Dose(cr), Class I drugs become Class II and Class III drugs become Class IV. Dose(cr) was used to define an in vivo effective solubility as S(eff) = Dose(cr)/250 ml. Literature data were used to support our simulation results. A new biopharmaceutic classification of drugs is proposed, based on F, separating drugs into three regions, taking into account the dose, and Dose(cr), while the regions for claiming biowaiver are clearly defined.

  12. Modified two-fluid model of conductivity for superconducting surface resistance calculation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, D.S.

    1993-05-01

    The traditional two-fluid model of superconducting conductivity was modified to make it accurate, while remaining fast, for designing and simulating microwave devices. The modification reflects the BCS coherence effects in the conductivity of a superconductor, and is incorporated through the ratio of normal to superconducting electrons. This modified ratio is a simple analytical expression which depends on frequency, temperature and material parameters. This modified two-fluid model allows accurate and rapid calculation of the microwave surface impedance of a superconductor in the clean and dirty limits and in the weak- and strong-coupled regimes. The model compares well with surface resistance data for Nb and provides insight into Nb3Sn and Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta). Numerical calculations with the modified two-fluid model are an order of magnitude faster than the quasi-classical program by Zimmermann (1), and two to five orders of magnitude faster than Halbritter's BCS program (2) for surface resistance.

  13. Modified SEAGULL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.; Kuehn, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    Original version of program incorporated into program SRGULL (LEW-15093) for use on National Aero-Space Plane project, its duty being to model forebody, inlet, and nozzle portions of vehicle. However, real-gas chemistry effects in hypersonic flow fields limited accuracy of that version, because it assumed perfect-gas properties. As a result, SEAGULL modified according to real-gas equilibrium-chemistry methodology. This program analyzes two-dimensional, hypersonic flows of real gases. Modified version of SEAGULL maintains as much of original program as possible, and retains ability to execute original perfect-gas version.

  14. CHALLENGES OF MODERN CONTROL THEORY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The fundamental objective of the new scientific discipline called ’ control theory ’ is that of modifying the behavior of a system subject to various...possible contributions of modern control theory to the biomedical domain are briefly indicated.

  15. The XMM-BCS galaxy cluster survey: I. The X-ray selected cluster catalog from the initial 6 deg$^2$

    SciTech Connect

    Suhada, R.; Song, J.; Bohringer, H.; Mohr, J.J.; Chon, G.; Finoguenov, A.; Fassbender, R.; Desai, S.; Armstrong, R.; Zenteno, A.; Barkhouse, W.A.; /North Dakota U. /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.

    2011-11-01

    The XMM-Newton - Blanco Cosmology Survey project (XMM-BCS) is a coordinated X-ray, optical and mid-infrared cluster survey in a field also covered by Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect (SZE) surveys by the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The aim of the project is to study the cluster population in a 14 deg{sup 2} field (center: {alpha} {approx} 23:29:18.4, {delta} {approx} -54:40:33.6). The uniform multi-wavelength coverage will also allow us for the first time to comprehensively compare the selection function of the different cluster detection approaches in a single test field and perform a cross-calibration of cluster scaling relations. In this work, we present a catalog of 46 X-ray selected clusters from the initial 6 deg{sup 2} survey core.We describe the XMM-BCS source detection pipeline and derive physical properties of the clusters. We provide photometric redshift estimates derived from the BCS imaging data and spectroscopic redshift measurements for a low redshift subset of the clusters. The photometric redshift estimates are found to be unbiased and in good agreement with the spectroscopic values. Our multi-wavelength approach gives us a comprehensive look at the cluster and group population up to redshifts z {approx} 1. The median redshift of the sample is 0.47 and the median mass M{sub 500} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 14} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 2 keV). From the sample, we derive the cluster log N - log S using an approximation to the survey selection function and find it in good agreement with previous studies. We compare optical mass estimates from the Southern Cosmology Survey available for part of our cluster sample with our estimates derived from the X-ray luminosity. Weak lensing masses available for a subset of the cluster sample are in agreement with our estimates. Optical masses based on cluster richness and total optical luminosity are found to be significantly higher than the X-ray values. The present results illustrate the

  16. Collective Inertia and Fission Barriers Within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous fission barriers, quadrupole inertia tensor, and zero-point quadrupole correlation energy are calculated for 252,256,258Fm in the framework of the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS theory. Two ways of computing collective inertia are employed: the Gaussian Overlap Approximation to the Generator Coordinate Method and cranking ansatz. The Skyrme results are compared with those of the Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model.

  17. Modifiability Tactics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    about purchasing paper copies of SEI reports, please visit the publications portion of our Web site (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/ publications /pubweb.html...architects need to understand how architectural tactics and patterns relate and how to use them effectively. In this report, we explore the relation ...architecture transformations that support the achievement of modifiability [Bass 2003]. In this report, we relate coupling and cohesion to tactics

  18. Dielectric saturation of the ion hydration shell and interaction between two double helices of DNA in mono- and multivalent electrolyte solutions: foundations of the epsilon-modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory.

    PubMed

    Gavryushov, Sergei

    2007-05-17

    Potentials of mean force between single Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ cations and a highly charged spherical macroion in SPC/E water have been determined using molecular dynamics simulations. Results are compared to the electrostatic energy calculations for the primitive polarization model (PPM) of hydrated cations describing the ion hydration shell as a dielectric sphere of low permittivity (Gavryushov, S.; Linse, P. J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 7135). Parameters of the ion dielectric sphere and radius of the macroion/water dielectric boundary were extracted by means of this comparison to approximate the short-range repulsion of ions near the interface. To explore the counterion distributions around a simplified model of DNA, the obtained PPM parameters for Na+ and Ca2+ have been substituted into the modified Poisson-Boltzmann (MPB) equations derived for the PPM and named the epsilon-MPB (epsilon-MPB) theory. epsilon-MPB results for DNA suggest that such polarization effects are important in the case of 2:1 electrolyte and highly charged macromolecules. The three-dimensional implementation of the epsilon-MPB theory was also applied to calculation of the energies of interaction between two parallel macromolecules of DNA in solutions of NaCl and CaCl2. Being compared to results of MPB calculations without the ion polarization effects, it suggests that the ion hydration shell polarization and inhomogeneous solvent permittivity might be essential factors in the experimentally known hydration forces acting between charged macromolecules and bilayers at separations of less than 20 A between their surfaces.

  19. Equation for the superfluid gap obtained by coarse graining the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations throughout the BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonucci, S.; Strinati, G. C.

    2014-02-01

    We derive a nonlinear differential equation for the gap parameter of a superfluid Fermi system by performing a suitable coarse graining of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) equations throughout the BCS-BEC crossover, with the aim of replacing the time-consuming solution of the original BdG equations by the simpler solution of this novel equation. We perform a favorable numerical test on the validity of this new equation over most of the temperature-coupling phase diagram, by an explicit comparison with the full solution of the original BdG equations for an isolated vortex. We also show that the new equation reduces both to the Ginzburg-Landau equation for Cooper pairs in weak coupling close to the critical temperature and to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for composite bosons in strong coupling at low temperature.

  20. Scientific considerations concerning the EMA change in the definition of "dose" of the BCS-based biowaiver guideline and implications for bioequivalence.

    PubMed

    Daousani, Chrysa; Macheras, Panos

    2015-01-30

    This work discusses the scientific aspects of the definition of dose as the 'highest single oral IR dose' recommended for administration in the SmPC (summary of product characteristics) in the current European Medicines Agency (EMA) 2010 Guideline, for the purpose of biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS)-based biowaiver decision making. Analysis of theoretical and experimental data dealing with drug dissolution and biopharmaceutic drug classification reveals that the drug dose is an important parameter for both drug dissolution and biopharmaceutic classification. The relevant implications for the dose considerations in bioequivalence studies are also discussed briefly. It is suggested that the concept of "the highest single dose oral IR dose recommended for administration in the SmPC" of the EMA 2010 Guideline be abolished. It is advisable, each dose strength be considered separately i.e., whether or not it meets the solubility-dissolution regulatory criteria.

  1. Characteristics of a New Enantioselective Thermostable Dipeptidase from Brevibacillus borstelensis BCS-1 and Its Application to Synthesis of a d-Amino-Acid-Containing Dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Dae Heoun; Song, Jae Jun; Kwon, Seok-Joon; Park, Chung; Jung, Chang-Min; Sung, Moon-Hee

    2004-01-01

    A new thermostable dipeptidase gene was cloned from the thermophile Brevibacillus borstelensis BCS-1 by genetic complementation of the d-Glu auxotroph Escherichia coli WM335 on a plate containing d-Ala-d-Glu. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the gene included an open reading frame coding for a 307-amino-acid sequence with an Mr of 35,000. The deduced amino acid sequence of the dipeptidase exhibited 52% similarity with the dipeptidase from Listeria monocytogenes. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from recombinant E. coli WM335 harboring the dipeptidase gene from B. borstelensis BCS-1. Investigation of the enantioselectivity (E) to the P1 and P1′ site of Ala-Ala revealed that the ratio of the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for l-enantioselectivity to the P1 site of Ala-Ala was 23.4 ± 2.2 [E = (kcat/Km)l,d/(kcat/Km)d,d], while the d-enantioselectivity to the P1′ site of Ala-Ala was 16.4 ± 0.5 [E = (kcat/Km)l,d/(kcat/Km)l,l] at 55°C. The enzyme was stable up to 55°C, and the optimal pH and temperature were 8.5 and 65°C, respectively. The enzyme was able to hydrolyze l-Asp-d-Ala, l-Asp-d-AlaOMe, Z-d-Ala-d-AlaOBzl, and Z-l-Asp-d-AlaOBzl, yet it could not hydrolyze d-Ala-l-Asp, d-Ala-l-Ala, d-AlaNH2, and l-AlaNH2. The enzyme also exhibited β-lactamase activity similar to that of a human renal dipeptidase. The dipeptidase successfully synthesized the precursor of the dipeptide sweetener Z-l-Asp-d-AlaOBzl. PMID:15006780

  2. Investigation of the effect of solubility increase at the main absorption site on bioavailability of BCS class II drug (risperidone) using liquisolid technique.

    PubMed

    Khames, Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    BCS class II drugs usually suffer inadequate bioavailability as dissolution step is the absorption rate limiting step. In this work, the effect of solubility increase at the main absorption site for these drugs was investigated using risperidone as a drug model. Liquisolid technique was applied to prepare risperidone per-oral tablets of high dissolution rate at intestinal pH (6.8) using versatile nonionic surfactants of high solubilizing ability [Transcutol HP, Labrasol and Labrasol/Labrafil (1:1) mixture] as liquid vehicles at different drug concentrations (10-30%) and fixed (R). The prepared liquisolid tablets were fully evaluated and the dissolution rate at pH 6.8 was investigated. The formulae that showed significantly different release rate were selected and subjected to mathematical modeling using DE25, MDT and similarity factor (f2). Depending on mathematical modeling results, formula of higher dissolution rate was subjected to solid state characterization using differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Finally, the drug bioavailability was studied in comparison to conventional tablets in rabbits. Results showed that liquisolid tablet prepared using Labrasol/Labrafil (1:1) mixture as liquid vehicle containing 10% risperidone is a compatible formula with law drug crystallinity and higher dissolution rate (100% in 25 min). The drug bioavailability was significantly increased in comparison to the conventional tablets (1441.711 μg h/mL and 137.518 μg/mL in comparison to 321.011 μg h/mL and 38.673 μg/mL for AUC and Cpmax, respectively). This led to the conclusion that liquisolid technique was efficiently improved drug solubility and solubility increase of BCS class II drugs at their main absorption site significantly increases their bioavailability.

  3. The BCS BE crossover phase diagram at T = 0 K for a d-wave superconductor: the importance of the Debye frequency and the tight binding band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, J. J.; Schmidt, A. A.; Alvarez-Llamoza, O.; Orozco, E.

    2004-06-01

    We consider the phase diagram of the BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer)-BE (Bose-Einstein) crossover in the ground state (T = 0 K) of a dx2-y2-wave superconductor, with a nearest neighbour tight binding structure, when we take into account the Debye (phononic) frequency around the chemical potential, mgr. This approach is a continuation of the work of den Hertog (1999 Phys. Rev. B 60 559) and that of Soares et al (2002 Phys. Rev. B 65 174506). The latter authors considered the influence of the second-nearest neighbours, but neither set of authors took into account the effect of the Debye frequency, ohgrD, or the influence of the next nearest neighbour matrix hopping element. We have found the following results: (1) there is not a metallic phase—that is, \\Delta /4t \\rightarrow 0 when V/4t \\rightarrow 0 , \\forall \\, \\omega_{\\mathrm {D}}/4t , \\forall \\, \\alpha ' \\in (-1/2,+1/2) , and \\forall \\,n , where n is the carrier density per site, V is the attractive interaction, t is the nearest neighbour hopping integral, and \\alpha ' is the next nearest neighbour hopping ratio; (2) the BCS-BE crossover line is strongly affected by the presence of ohgrD/4t and that of \\alpha ' —actually, the values of V/4t needed to achieve the Bose-Einstein regime become extremely large for small values of ohgrD/4t; and (3) both Dgr/4t and mgr/4t strongly depend on the values of ohgrD/4t and \\alpha ' . The results (1) are in agreement with the ones found by Perali et al (2003 Phys. Rev. B 68 066501 (Preprint cond-mat/0211132)) and Rodríguez-Núñez et al (2003 Phys. Rev. B 68 066502), and in disagreement with those of den Hertog and Soares et al.

  4. Stellar oscillations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2013-12-01

    Starting from the equations of modified gravity hydrodynamics, we derive the equations of motion governing linear, adiabatic, radial perturbations of stars in scalar-tensor theories. There are two new features: first, the eigenvalue equation for the period of stellar oscillations is modified such that the eigenfrequencies are always larger than predicted by general relativity. Second, the general relativity condition for stellar instability is altered so that the adiabatic index can fall below 4/3 before unstable modes appear. Stars are more stable in modified gravity theories. Specializing to the case of chameleonlike theories, we investigate these effects numerically using both polytropic Lane-Emden stars and models coming from modified gravity stellar structure simulations. We find that the change in the oscillation period of Cepheid star models can be as large as 30% for order-one matter couplings and the change in the inferred distance using the period-luminosity relation can be up to three times larger than if one had only considered the modified equilibrium structure. We discuss the implications of these results for recent and upcoming astrophysical tests and estimate that previous methods can produce new constraints such that the modifications are screened in regions of Newtonian potential of O(10-8).

  5. Generalized gravity from modified DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakatani, Yuho; Uehara, Shozo; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2017-04-01

    Recently, generalized equations of type IIB supergravity have been derived from the requirement of classical kappa-symmetry of type IIB superstring theory in the Green-Schwarz formulation. These equations are covariant under generalized T -duality transformations and hence one may expect a formulation similar to double field theory (DFT). In this paper, we consider a modification of the DFT equations of motion by relaxing a condition for the generalized covariant derivative with an extra generalized vector. In this modified double field theory (mDFT), we show that the flatness condition of the modified generalized Ricci tensor leads to the NS-NS part of the generalized equations of type IIB supergravity. In particular, the extra vector fields appearing in the generalized equations correspond to the extra generalized vector in mDFT. We also discuss duality symmetries and a modification of the string charge in mDFT.

  6. Modified entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun

    2010-04-15

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration g{sub D}. It is found the Debye acceleration is g{sub D}=10{sup -15} N kg{sup -1}. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -4} N kg{sup -1} which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -10} N kg{sup -1} felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  7. Band-gap engineering of La1-x Nd x AlO3 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1) perovskite using density functional theory: A modified Becke Johnson potential study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep; D, P. Rai; A, Shankar; M, P. Ghimire; Anup Pradhan, Sakhya; T, P. Sinha; R, Khenata; S, Bin Omran; R, K. Thapa

    2016-06-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the Nd-doped Rare earth aluminate, La1-x Nd x AlO3 (x = 0% to 100%) alloys are studied using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the density functional theory. The effects of the Nd substitution in LaAlO3 are studied using the supercell calculations. The computed electronic structure with the modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) potential based approximation indicates that the La1-x Nd x AlO3 alloys may possess half-metallic (HM) behaviors when doped with Nd of a finite density of states at the Fermi level (E F). The direct and indirect band gaps are studied each as a function of x which is the concentration of Nd-doped LaAlO3. The calculated magnetic moments in the La1-x Nd x AlO3 alloys are found to arise mainly from the Nd-4f state. A probable half-metallic nature is suggested for each of these systems with supportive integral magnetic moments and highly spin-polarized electronic structures in these doped systems at E F. The observed decrease of the band gap with the increase in the concentration of Nd doping in LaAlO3 is a suitable technique for harnessing useful spintronic and magnetic devices. Project supported by the DST-SERB, Dy (Grant No. SERB/3586/2013-14), the UGCBSR, FRPS (Grant No. F.30-52/2014), the UGC (New Delhi, India) Inspire Fellowship DST (India), and the Deanship of Scientific Research at King Saud University (Grant No. RPG-VPP-088). M P Ghimire thanks the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany for the financial support.

  8. Variation of photoluminescence features in Pr{sup 3+} doped lithium-fluoro-borate glass by changing different modifier oxides (MgO, CaO, CdO and PbO)-Judd-Ofelt theory application

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishna, A.; Rajesh, D.; Babu, S.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2015-06-24

    Pr{sup 3+} (1.0 mol%) doped different modifier oxide based six lithium-fluoro-borate glasses with chemical composition of 49Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}-20BaF{sub 2}-10NaF-20MO (where M= Mg, Ca, Cd and Pb), 49Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}-20BaF{sub 2}-10NaF-10MgO-10CaO and 49Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}-20BaF{sub 2}-10NaF-10CdO-10PbO were prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. Judd-Ofelt theory has been applied for evaluating the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters for Pr{sup 3+} ion in these glass compositions and are in turn to used to predict radiative properties such as radiative transition probabilities (A{sub T}), branching ratios (β) and stimulated emission cross-section (σ{sub P}). Stimulated emission cross-section (σ{sub p}) of prominent emission transitions, {sup 3}P{sub 0}→{sup 3}H{sub 4} and {sup 1}D{sub 2}→{sup 3}H{sub 4} of Pr{sup 3+} ion in all lithium-fluoro-borate glasses were calculated. Among all the emission transitions, {sup 3}P{sub 0}→{sup 3}H{sub 4} posseses higher branching ratio and stimulated emission cross-section in Mg-Ca glass, which leads to the best laser excitation at 487 nm wavelength.

  9. Translation of Ligand-Centered Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Activity and Mechanism of a Rhenium-Thiolate from Solution to Modified Electrodes: A Combined Experimental and Density Functional Theory Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wuyu; Haddad, Andrew Z; Garabato, Brady D; Kozlowski, Pawel M; Buchanan, Robert M; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2017-02-20

    The homogeneous, nonaqueous catalytic activity of the rhenium-thiolate complex ReL3 (L = diphenylphosphinobenzenethiolate) for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been transferred from nonaqueous homogeneous to aqueous heterogeneous conditions by immobilization on a glassy carbon electrode surface. A series of modified electrodes based on ReL3 and its oxidized precursor [ReL3][PF6] were fabricated by drop-cast methods, yielding catalytically active species with HER overpotentials for a current density of 10 mA/cm(2), ranging from 357 to 919 mV. The overpotential correlates with film resistance as measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and film morphology as determined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The lowest overpotential was for films based on the ionic [ReL3][PF6] precursor with the inclusion of carbon black. Stability measurements indicate a 2 to 3 h conditioning period in which the overpotential increases, after which no change in activity is observed within 24 h or upon reimmersion in fresh aqueous, acidic solution. Electronic spectroscopy results are consistent with ReL3 as the active species on the electrode surface; however, the presence of an undetected quantity of catalytically active degradation species cannot be excluded. The HER mechanism was evaluated by Tafel slope analysis, which is consistent with a novel Volmer-Heyrovsky-Tafel-like mechanism that parallels the proposed homogeneous HER pathway. Proposed mechanisms involving traditional metal-hydride processes vs ligand-centered reactivity were examined by density functional theory, including identification and characterization of relevant transition states. The ligand-centered path is energetically favored with protonation of cis-sulfur sites culminating in homolytic S-H bond cleavage with H2 evolution via H atom coupling.

  10. Constraints on modified gravity models from white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Srimanta; Shankar, Swapnil; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2017-10-01

    Modified gravity theories can introduce modifications to the Poisson equation in the Newtonian limit. As a result, we expect to see interesting features of these modifications inside stellar objects. White dwarf stars are one of the most well studied stars in stellar astrophysics. We explore the effect of modified gravity theories inside white dwarfs. We derive the modified stellar structure equations and solve them to study the mass-radius relationships for various modified gravity theories. We also constrain the parameter space of these theories from observations.

  11. Quasiparticle Excitations in the Superconducting State of FeSe Probed by Thermal Hall Conductivity in the Vicinity of the BCS-BEC Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watashige, Tatsuya; Arsenijević, Stevan; Yamashita, Takuya; Terazawa, Daiki; Onishi, Takafumi; Opherden, Lars; Kasahara, Shigeru; Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Kasahara, Yuichi; Shibauchi, Takasada; von Löhneysen, Hilbert; Wosnitza, Jochen; Matsuda, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the superconducting semimetal FeSe (Tc ˜ 8 K) is in the crossover regime between weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and strong-coupling Bose-Einstein-condensate (BEC) limits. We report on longitudinal and transverse thermal conductivities, κxx and κxy, respectively, in magnetic fields up to 20 T. The field dependences of κxx and κxy imply that a highly anisotropic small superconducting gap forms at the electron Fermi-surface pocket whereas a more isotropic and larger gap forms at the hole pocket. Below ˜1.0 K, both κxx and κxy exhibit distinct anomalies (kinks) at the upper critical field Hc2 and at a field H* slightly below Hc2. The analysis of the thermal Hall angle (κxy/κxx) indicates a change of the quasiparticle scattering rate at H*. These results provide strong support to the previous suggestion that above H* a distinct field-induced superconducting phase emerges with an unprecedented large spin imbalance.

  12. Assessment of formulation factors on the release behaviour of BCS Class II drug from tablet dosage form using DoE.

    PubMed

    Syamala, Urmila Sri; Kumar, Raman Suresh; Pushkarajan, Tambi Anuj; Gowthamarajan, Kuppuswamy

    2014-01-01

    A model immunosuppressant BCS Class II drug was selected for the work to assess the formulation variables on the release rate using design of experiment (DoE) - Stat-Ease software. Surface solid dispersion was prepared with dichloromethane (DCM) and ethanol mixture (4:1), and converted to tablet by adsorption on a neutral carrier. Different batches were prepared with DoE full factorial design. The concentrations of Polaxamer 188, Kollidon CL and magnesium stearate were found to be the critical factors affecting the performance of the tablets. These parameters were selected as the independent variables in DoE and the formulated batches were evaluated for their percentage release at 120 minutes. The actual and predicted plots fall close to the line. ANOVA (partial sum squares-type-III) reveals the model with F-value of 1417.12 which implies significant. The optimized batch with dissolution profile of 99.6% falls close to the innovator product 98.8%.

  13. The role of lipid-based nano delivery systems on oral bioavailability enhancement of fenofibrate, a BCS II drug: comparison with fast-release formulations.

    PubMed

    Weng, Tengfei; Qi, Jianping; Lu, Yi; Wang, Kai; Tian, Zhiqiang; Hu, Kaili; Yin, Zongning; Wu, Wei

    2014-09-24

    The aim of this study was to compare various formulations solid dispersion pellets (SDP), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) generally accepted to be the most efficient drug delivery systems for BCS II drugs using fenofibrate (FNB) as a model drug. The size and morphology of NLCs and SMEDDS was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their release behaviors were investigated in medium with or without pancreatic lipase. The oral bioavailability of the various formulations was compared in beagle dogs using commercial Lipanthyl® capsules (micronized formulation) as a reference. The release of FNB from SDP was much faster than that from NLCs and SMEDDS in medium without lipase, whereas the release rate from NLCs and SMEDDS was increased after adding pancreatic lipase into the release medium. However, NLCs and SMEDDS increased the bioavailability of FNB to 705.11% and 809.10%, respectively, in comparison with Lipanthyl® capsules, although the relative bioavailability of FNB was only 366.05% after administration of SDPs. Thus, lipid-based drug delivery systems (such as NLCs and SMEDDS) may have more advantages than immediate release systems (such as SDPs and Lipanthyl® capsules).

  14. Use of conventional surfactant media as surrogates for FaSSIF in simulating in vivo dissolution of BCS class II drugs.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Paula; Kortejärvi, Hanna; Liimatainen, Anni; Ojala, Krista; Kangas, Heli; Hirvonen, Jouni; Tanninen, Veli Pekka; Peltonen, Leena

    2011-08-01

    The usefulness of selected conventional surfactant media to enhance dissolution of BCS class II drugs similarly to fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) and to predict the absorption of drugs in vivo was evaluated. Dissolution behavior of danazol (Danol), spironolactone (Spiridon) and N74 (phase I compound) was compared between FaSSIF, containing physiological levels of sodium taurocholate (STC) and lecithin, and dissolution media containing various concentrations of anionic surfactant, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or non-ionic surfactant, polysorbate (Tween) 80. Although these media differed largely in their solubilization ability, micelle size, diffusivity and surface tension, similar dissolution enhancing levels were achieved between FaSSIF and drug-specific concentrations of conventional surfactants. The dissolution enhancement was shown, however, to be important only for danazol and N74, molecules that are characterized by high hydrophobicity. An in vivo pharmacokinetic dog study was carried out with N74. Comparison of observed plasma profiles with simulated profiles obtained using compartmental absorption and transit model (CAT) indicated that 0.1% SLS medium was the best to predict in vivo plasma profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max) and AUC). This study demonstrates the potential of substituting FaSSIF with more simple and cost-effective conventional surfactant media. Use of in vivo prognostic amounts of synthetic surfactants in dissolution testing could largely assist in industrial drug development as well as in quality control purposes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Single-particle excitations in a trapped gas of Fermi atoms in the BCS-BEC crossover region. II. Broad Feshbach resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Y.; Griffin, A.

    2005-12-15

    We apply the formulation developed in a recent paper [Y. Ohashi and A. Griffin, Phys. Rev. A 72, 013601 (2005)] for single-particle excitations in the BCS-BEC crossover to the case of a broad Feshbach resonance. At T=0, we solve the Bogoliubov-de Gennes coupled equations taking into account a Bose condensate of bound states (molecules). In the case of a broad resonance, the density profile n(r), as well as the profile of the superfluid order parameter {delta}-tilde(r), are spatially spread out to the Thomas-Fermi radius, even in the crossover region. This order parameter {delta}-tilde(r) suppresses the effects of low-energy Andreev bound states on the rf tunneling current. As a result, the peak energy in the rf spectrum is found to occur at an energy equal to the superfluid order parameter {delta}-tilde(r=0) at the center of the trap, in contrast to the case of a narrow resonance, and in agreement with recent measurements. The local density approximation is found to give a good approximation for the rf-tunneling spectrum.

  16. Contact Stress of Modified Curvilinear Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Cheng; Gu, Ming-Lune

    2010-10-01

    The contact characteristics of a modified curvilinear gear set were investigated based on finite element analysis in this study. Firstly, the mathematical model of the modified curvilinear gears was developed based on the theory of gearing. Then a solid model of a modified curvilinear gear set was built by utilizing computer-aided design software. Finite element analysis enabled us to investigate the contact stress of a contact teeth pair. The variation and distribution of the contact stresses and bending stresses are also studied under different gear design parameters. Finally, illustrative examples were presented to demonstrate the contact characteristics of the modified curvilinear gears.

  17. An improved prediction of the human in vivo intestinal permeability and BCS class of drugs using the in vitro permeability ratio obtained for rat intestine using an Ussing chamber system.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Shim, Won-Sik; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2013-10-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) was developed to facilitate estimation of the in vivo pharmacokinetic performance of drugs from human intestinal permeability and solubility. However, the measurement of human in vivo intestinal permeability, unlike that of solubility, is problematic and inefficient. Thus, rat in vitro intestinal permeability results obtained via the Ussing chamber technique are often used instead. However, these data could be unreliable due to difficulty in maintaining the viability of the dissected intestinal membrane in the Ussing chamber. Therefore, a more efficient method to obtain a reliable in vitro permeability is mandatory. Here, we propose a new approach by introducing a novel factor called the permeability ratio (PR). Basically, PR is a rat in vitro intestinal permeability obtained from the Ussing chamber, which is then corrected by the permeability of lucifer yellow, a paracellular permeability marker. To prove the validity of the method, 12 model drugs representing different BCS classes were tested, and the correlation with human in vivo intestinal permeability was high. More importantly, the new method perfectly classified all 12 model drugs. The results indicate that PR is a reliable factor with high correlation to human in vivo intestinal permeability, which can further be used to accurately predict the BCS classification.

  18. POCT PT INR - Is it adequate for patient care? A comparison of the Roche Coaguchek XS vs. Stago Star vs. Siemens BCS in patients routinely seen in an anticoagulation clinic.

    PubMed

    Baker, Wendy S; Albright, Kathleen J; Berman, Megan; Spratt, Heidi; Mann, Peggy A; Unabia, Jaime; Petersen, John R

    2017-09-01

    In this study we examined the difference in patient INR values as measured by the POCT CoaguChek XS device and central laboratory Stago Evolution and Siemens BCS XP analyzers. This study composed of 100 warfarin therapy patients and 20 coagulation normal subjects, showed that the difference between the POCT and clinical laboratory values increased with increasing INR and was exacerbated by the use of different thromboplastin reagents by the POCT and central lab. The CoaguChek XS and on-site Stago analyzers which used human recombinant (ISI=1.01) and rabbit brain thromboplastin (ISI=1.25), respectively, showed reasonable agreement for INR<3.0 (k=0.62) but significant difference for INR≥3.0 (k=0.10). In contrast, the CoaguChek XS and Siemens BCS XP, which both employed human recombinant thromboplastin (BCS ISI=1.02), showed greater agreement for the complete range INR values (INR<3.0 k=0.84; INR≥3.0 k=0.70). ECAA Poller calibrant data showed the automated instruments were performing as expected, indicating that ISI calibrations were correct but insufficient to standardize the INR values for the different thromboplastin methods across the full range of measured INRs. Central lab verification of POCT INR>5.0 with the Stago Evolution prevented adverse treatment events for the warfarin therapy patients in the six months preceding and following this investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modified gravity inside astrophysical bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Ryo; Langlois, David; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Gleyzes, Jérôme E-mail: yamauchi@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr

    2015-06-01

    Many theories of modified gravity, including the well studied Horndeski models, are characterized by a screening mechanism that ensures that standard gravity is recovered near astrophysical bodies. In a recently introduced class of gravitational theories that goes beyond Horndeski, it has been found that new derivative interactions lead to a partial breaking of the Vainshtein screening mechanism inside any gravitational source, although not outside. We study the impact of this new type of deviation from standard gravity on the density profile of a spherically symmetric matter distribution, in the nonrelativistic limit. For simplicity, we consider a polytropic equation of state and derive the modifications to the standard Lane-Emden equations. We also show the existence of a universal upper bound on the amplitude of this type of modified gravity, independently of the details of the equation of state.

  20. QGP and Modified Jet Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Recent progresses in the study of jet modification in hotmedium and their consequences in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. In particular, I will discuss energy loss for propagating heavy quarks and the resulting modified fragmentation function. Medium modification of the parton fragmentation function due to quark recombination are formulated within finite temperature field theory and their implication on the search for deconfined quark-gluon plasma is also discussed.

  1. (Research in the theory of condensed matter and elementary particles. ) Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Progress is summarized in these areas: a new formulation of two dimensional critical phenomena and string theory, supersymmetric critical phenomena and string compactification, conformal field theory on orbifolds, Gaussian models with twisted boundary conditions, modular invariance and supersymmetric critical phenomena, critical indices, conformal invariance, and current algebra, renormalization group fixed points and the string equation of motion, fermionic string field theory, N = 2 super Riemann surfaces, the spinor field in covariant superstring theory, covariant quantization of superstrings, models of aggregation, and quasi-supersymmetry in the BCS mechanism. Further work is proposed in the areas of two dimensional critical phenomena, two dimensional conformal field theory and string theory, the physics of computation, models of aggregation, and the many vortex Aharonov-Bohm problem. 57 refs. (LEW)

  2. Comparison of the Permeability of Metoprolol and Labetalol in Rat, Mouse and Caco-2 Cells: Use as a Reference Standard for BCS Classification

    PubMed Central

    Incecayir, Tuba; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate labetalol as a potential high permeability reference standard for the application of Biopharmaceutics Classification Systems (BCS). Permeabilities of labetalol and metoprolol were investigated in animal intestinal perfusion models and Caco-2 cell monolayers. After isolating specific intestinal segments, in situ single-pass intestinal perfusions (SPIP) were performed in rats and mice. The effective permeabilities (Peff) of labetalol and metoprolol, an FDA standard for the low/high Peff class boundary, were investigated in two different segments of rat intestine (proximal jejunum and distal ileum), and in the proximal jejunum of mouse. No significant difference was found between Peff of metoprolol and labetalol in the jejunum and ileum of rat (0.33±0.11 ×10−4 vs. 0.38±0.06 ×10−4 and 0.57±0.17 ×10−4 vs. 0.64±0.30 ×10−4 cm/s, respectively) and in the jejunum of mouse (0.55±0.05 ×10−4 vs. 0.59±0.13 ×10−4 cm/s). However, Peff of metoprolol and labetalol were 1.7 and 1.6 times higher in the jejunum of mouse, compared to the jejunum of rat, respectively. Metoprolol and labetalol showed segmental dependent permeability through the rat intestine, with increased Peff in the distal ileum in comparison to the proximal jejunum. Most significantly, Peff of labetalol was found to be concentration dependent. Decreasing concentrations of labetalol in the perfusate resulted in decreased Peff compared to Peff of metoprolol. The intestinal epithelial permeability of labetalol was lower than that of metoprolol in Caco-2 cells at both apical pH 6.5 and 7.5 (5.96±1.96 ×10−6 vs. 9.44±3.44 ×10−6 and 15.9±2.2 ×10−6 vs. 23.2±7.1 ×10−6 cm/s, respectively). Labetalol exhibited higher permeability in basolateral to apical (BL-AP) compared to AP-BL direction in Caco-2 cells at 0.1 times the highest dose strength (HDS) (46.7±6.5 ×10−6 vs. 14.2±1.5 ×10−6 cm/s). The P-gp inhibitor, verapamil significantly

  3. Comparison of the permeability of metoprolol and labetalol in rat, mouse, and Caco-2 cells: use as a reference standard for BCS classification.

    PubMed

    Incecayir, Tuba; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-03-04

    The purpose of this study was to investigate labetalol as a potential high permeability reference standard for the application of Biopharmaceutics Classification Systems (BCS). Permeabilities of labetalol and metoprolol were investigated in animal intestinal perfusion models and Caco-2 cell monolayers. After isolating specific intestinal segments, in situ single-pass intestinal perfusions (SPIP) were performed in rats and mice. The effective permeabilities (Peff) of labetalol and metoprolol, an FDA standard for the low/high Peff class boundary, were investigated in two different segments of rat intestine (proximal jejunum and distal ileum) and in the proximal jejunum of mouse. No significant difference was found between Peff of metoprolol and labetalol in the jejunum and ileum of rat (0.33 ± 0.11 × 10(-4) vs 0.38 ± 0.06 × 10(-4) and 0.57 ± 0.17 × 10(-4) vs 0.64 ± 0.30 × 10(-4) cm/s, respectively) and in the jejunum of mouse (0.55 ± 0.05 × 10(-4) vs 0.59 ± 0.13 × 10(-4) cm/s). However, Peff of metoprolol and labetalol were 1.7 and 1.6 times higher in the jejunum of mouse, compared to the jejunum of rat, respectively. Metoprolol and labetalol showed segmental-dependent permeability through the rat intestine, with increased Peff in the distal ileum in comparison to the proximal jejunum. Most significantly, Peff of labetalol was found to be concentration-dependent. Decreasing concentrations of labetalol in the perfusate resulted in decreased Peff compared to Peff of metoprolol. The intestinal epithelial permeability of labetalol was lower than that of metoprolol in Caco-2 cells at both apical pH 6.5 and 7.5 (5.96 ± 1.96 × 10(-6) vs 9.44 ± 3.44 × 10(-6) and 15.9 ± 2.2 × 10(-6) vs 23.2 ± 7.1 × 10(-6) cm/s, respectively). Labetalol exhibited higher permeability in basolateral to apical (BL-AP) compared to AP-BL direction in Caco-2 cells at 0.1 times the highest dose strength (HDS) (46.7 ± 6.5 × 10(-6) vs 14.2 ± 1.5 × 10(-6) cm/s). The P

  4. Population-imbalanced lattice fermions near the BCS-BEC crossover: Thermal physics of the breached pair and Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Madhuparna; Majumdar, Pinaki

    2016-05-01

    We study s -wave superconductivity in the two-dimensional attractive Hubbard model in an applied magnetic field, assume the extreme Pauli limit, and examine the role of spatial fluctuations in the coupling regime corresponding to BCS-BEC crossover. We use a decomposition of the interaction in terms of an auxiliary pairing field, retain the static mode, and sample the pairing field via a Monte Carlo approach. The method requires iterative solution of the Bogoliubov-de-Gennes equations for amplitude- and phase-fluctuating configurations of the pairing field. We establish the full thermal phase diagram of this strong-coupling problem. At low field we observe the magnetized but homogeneous "breached pair" superfluid phase. It reveals that Tc scales an order of magnitude below the mean-field estimate, spontaneous inhomogeneity in the field-induced magnetization, and a strong nonmonotonicity in the temperature dependence of the low-energy density of states. We compare our results to the experimental phase diagram of the imbalanced Fermi gas at unitarity. At higher field we obtain the modulated Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) phases. The thermal transition from the FFLO phases to the normal state is strongly first order. We track the fermionic momentum distribution, the density of states, and the pairing structure factor deep into the normal state. The pairing structure factor retains weak signature of finite momentum pairing to a high temperature despite the low Tc itself, while the spin-resolved density of states changes from the "pseudogapped" FFLO character to gapless and pseudogapped again with increasing temperature.

  5. Sodium alginate as a potential carrier in solid dispersion formulations to enhance dissolution rate and apparent water solubility of BCS II drugs.

    PubMed

    Borba, Paola Aline Amarante; Pinotti, Marihá; de Campos, Carlos Eduardo Maduro; Pezzini, Bianca Ramos; Stulzer, Hellen Karine

    2016-02-10

    The solid dispersion technique is the most effective method for improving the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs, however it depends on a suitable carrier selection. The work explored the use of the biopolymer sodium alginate (SA) as a potential carrier in solid dispersions (SD). The data demonstrated that SA was able to improve the biopharmaceutical properties of the BCS II drug telmisartan (TEL) of low solubility even using relative small drug:polymer ratio. A solid state grinding process was used to prepare the solid dispersions (SD) during 45 min. The SD were prepared in different proportions of drug and carrier of 1:1, 1:3, 1:5, 1:7 and 1:9 (mass/mass). DSC, XRPD, FTIR and Raman confirmed the presence of molecular interactions between TEL and the carrier. FTIR supports the presence of hydrogen bonds between TEL and the carrier. SD_1:5, SD_1:7 and SD_1:9 enhanced the dissolution rate of the drug releasing more than 80% of the drug in just 30 min (83%, 84% and 87%). The the t-test results demonstrated equal dissolution efficiency values for SD_1:7 and Micardis(®), however the similarity (f2) and difference (f1) fit factors showed that the SD and Micardis(®) are statistically different. The physical stability studies demonstrated that SD using sodium alginate as a carrier remained unchanged during the period of 90 days at room temperature, showing that the sodium alginate acts as a good anti plasticizer agent, preventing the drug recrystallization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. pH-Dependent Solubility and Dissolution Behavior of Carvedilol--Case Example of a Weakly Basic BCS Class II Drug.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Rania; Awadallah, Areeg; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Tarawneh, Ola; Nazzal, Sami; AlBaraghthi, Tamadur; Al Sayyad, Jihan; Abbas, Aiman

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the pH-dependent solubility and dissolution of weakly basic Biopharmaceutical Classification Systems (BCS) class II drugs, characterized by low solubility and high permeability, using carvedilol, a weak base with a pK a value of 7.8, as a model drug. A series of solubility and in vitro dissolution studies was carried out using media that simulate the gastric and intestinal fluids and cover the physiological pH range of the GI from 1.2 to 7.8. The effect of ionic strength, buffer capacity, and buffer species of the dissolution media on the solubility and dissolution behavior of carvedilol was also investigated. The study revealed that carvedilol exhibited a typical weak base pH-dependent solubility profile with a high solubility at low pH (545.1-2591.4 μg/mL within the pH range 1.2-5.0) and low solubility at high pH (5.8-51.9 μg/mL within the pH range 6.5-7.8). The dissolution behavior of carvedilol was consistent with the solubility results, where carvedilol release was complete (95.8-98.2% released within 60 min) in media simulating the gastric fluid (pH 1.2-5.0) and relatively low (15.9-86.2% released within 240 min) in media simulating the intestinal fluid (pH 6.5-7.8). It was found that the buffer species of the dissolution media may influence the solubility and consequently the percentage of carvedilol released by forming carvedilol salts of varying solubilities. Carvedilol solubility and dissolution decreased with increasing ionic strength, while lowering the buffer capacity resulted in a decrease in carvedilol solubility and dissolution rate.

  7. Instantons from perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serone, Marco; Spada, Gabriele; Villadoro, Giovanni

    2017-07-01

    In quantum mechanics and quantum field theory perturbation theory generically requires the inclusion of extra contributions nonperturbative in the coupling, such as instantons, to reproduce exact results. We show how full nonperturbative results can be encoded in a suitable modified perturbative series in a class of quantum mechanical problems. We illustrate this explicitly in examples which are known to contain nonperturbative effects, such as the (supersymmetric) double-well potential, the pure anharmonic oscillator, and the perturbative expansion around a false vacuum.

  8. Chern-Simons Modified Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstratiou, P.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation will be based on my, undergraduate, thesis at Aristotle University of Thessoliniki with the same subject, supervised by Professor Demetrios Papadopoulos. I will first present the general mathematical formulation of the Chern-Simons (CS) modified gravity, which is split in a dynamical and a non-dynamical context, and the different physical theories which suggest this modification. Then proceed by examing the possibility that the CS theory shares solutions with General Relativity in both contexts. In the non-dynamical context I will present a new, undocumented solution as well as all the other possible solutions found to date. I will conclude by arguing that General Relativity and CS Theory share any solutions in the dynamical context.

  9. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  10. Cosmological tests of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard Λ CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  11. A fast route to modified gravitational growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Tessa; Ferreira, Pedro; Skordis, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    The growth rate of the large-scale structure of the Universe has been advocated as the observable par excellence for testing gravity on cosmological scales. By considering linear-order deviations from general relativity, we show that corrections to the growth rate, f, can be expressed as an integral over a "source" term, weighted by a theory-independent "response kernel." This leads to an efficient and accurate "plug-and-play" expression for generating growth rates in alternative gravity theories, bypassing lengthy theory-specific computations. We use this approach to explicitly show that f is sensitive to a degenerate combination of modified expansion and modified clustering effects. Hence the growth rate, when used in isolation, is not a straightforward diagnostic of modified gravity.

  12. Emergent cosmic space in Rastall theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang-Fang; Huang, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Padmanabhan’s emergent cosmic space proposal is exploited to study the Rastall theory which involves modifying the covariant conservation law of energy-momentum tensor. As necessary elements for this approach, we firstly find the Komar energy and the general entropy of apparent horizon in this theory. After that, a modified expansion law is invoked to re-obtain the Friedmann equations.

  13. Quantum field theory for condensation of bosons and fermions

    SciTech Connect

    De Souza, Adriano N.; Filho, Victo S.

    2013-03-25

    In this brief review, we describe the formalism of the quantum field theory for the analysis of the condensation phenomenon in bosonic systems, by considering the cases widely verified in laboratory of trapped gases as condensate states, either with attractive or with repulsive two-body interactions. We review the mathematical formulation of the quantum field theory for many particles in the mean-field approximation, by adopting contact interaction potential. We also describe the phenomenon of condensation in the case of fermions or the degenerate Fermi gas, also verified in laboratory in the crossover BEC-BCS limit. We explain that such a phenomenon, equivalent to the bosonic condensation, can only occur if we consider the coupling of particles in pairs behaving like bosons, as occurs in the case of Cooper's pairs in superconductivity.

  14. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the p53 Binding Protein 1 (TP53BP1) Gene in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Irradiation (BCS + RT)

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad; Kulkarni, Diptee; Green, Camille; Vazquez, Alexi; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirsfield, Kim M.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: TP53BP1 is a key component of radiation-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of a known common single nucleotide polymorphism in this gene (rs560191) in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation (BCS + RT). Methods and Materials: The population consisted of 176 premenopausal women treated with BCS + RT (median follow-up, 12 years). Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was processed by use of TaqMan assays. Each allele for rs560191 was either C or G, so each patient was therefore classified as CC, CG, or GG. Patients were grouped as GG if they were homozygous for the variant G allele or CC-CG if they carried at least one copy of the common C allele (CC or CG). Results: Of the 176 women, 124 (71%) were CC-CG and 52 (29%) were GG. The mean age was 44 years for GG vs. 38 years for CC-CG (p < 0.001). GG was more common in African-American women than white women (69% vs. 13%, p < 0.001) and more commonly estrogen receptor negative (70% vs. 49%, p = 0.02). There were no significant correlations of rs560191 with other critical variables. Despite the fact that GG patients were older, the 10-year rate of local relapses was higher (22% for GG vs. 12% for CC-CG, p = 0.04). Conclusions: This novel avenue of investigation of polymorphisms in radiation repair/response genes in patients treated with BCS + RT suggests a correlation to local relapse. Additional evaluation is needed to assess the biological and functional significance of these single nucleotide polymorphisms, and larger confirmatory validation studies will be required to determine the clinical implications.

  15. String Theory and Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Maldacena, Juan

    2009-02-20

    We will see how gauge theories, in the limit that the number of colors is large, give string theories. We will discuss some examples of particular gauge theories where the corresponding string theory is known precisely, starting with the case of the maximally supersymmetric theory in four dimensions which corresponds to ten dimensional string theory. We will discuss recent developments in this area.

  16. Geographical Theories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golledge, Reginald G.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the origin of theories in geography and particularly the development of location theories. Considers the influence of economic theory on agricultural land use, industrial location, and geographic location theories. Explores a set of interrelated activities that show how the marketing process illustrates process theory. (MJP)

  17. Studying temperature dependence of pairing gap parameter in a nucleus as a small superconducting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmatinejad, A.; Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we have taken the effect of small size of nucleus and static fluctuations into account in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity calculations of 45Ti nucleus. Thermodynamic quantities of 45Ti have been extracted within the BCS model with the inclusion of the average value of the pairing gap square, extracted by the modified Ginzburg-Landau (MGL) method for small systems. Calculated values of the excitation energy and entropy within the MGL+BCS method improve the extracted results within the usual BCS model and show a smooth behavior around the critical temperature with a very good agreement with the semi-empirical values. The result of using MGL+BCS method for the heat capacity of 45Ti is compared with the corresponding semi-empirical values and the calculated values within the BCS, static path approximation (SPA) and Modified Pairing gap BCS (MPBCS) which is a method that was proposed in our previous publications. Both MGL+BCS and MPBCS avoid the discontinuity of the heat capacity curve, which is observed in the usual BCS method, and lead to an S-shaped curve with a good agreement with the semi-empirical results.

  18. Mixed Micelles Loaded with Bile Salt: An Approach to Enhance Intestinal Transport of the BCS Class III Drug Cefotaxime in Rats.

    PubMed

    Arafat, Mosab; Kirchhoefer, Cathrin; Mikov, Momir

    2017-08-01

    %). Maximum concentration (C max) of cefotaxime in mixed micellar formulation was higher (1.08 ± 0.1 µg/ml) compared to the cefotaxime-3α,7α-dihydroxy-12-keto-5β-cholanate complex (0.69 ± 0.1 µg/ml) and cefotaxime in aqueous solution (0.52 ± 0.1 µg/ml). Similarly, the mean values for area under the plasma concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-∞) of cefotaxime in the mixed micellar formulation was higher (3.89 ± 0.9 μg·h/mL) compared to the cefotaxime-3α,7α-dihydroxy-12-keto-5β-cholanate complex (1.52 ± 0.2 μg·h/mL) and cefotaxime in aqueous solution (1.03 ± 0.4 μg·h/mL), respectively. The mixed micellar formulation was able to increase the oral bioavailability of the BCS Class III drug cefotaxime up to fourfold by enhancing drug permeation through the mucosal membrane of the small intestine.

  19. Educational Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Leo

    1973-01-01

    Briefly describes two antagonistic learning theories: the Association Theory proposed by Skinner and the Field or Cognitive Theory supported by Piaget. Suggests the need for consistency in theoretical approach in the teaching of science at the college level. (JR)

  20. Scientific perspectives on extending the provision for waivers of in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for drug products containing high solubility-low permeability drugs (BCS-Class 3).

    PubMed

    Stavchansky, Salomon

    2008-06-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in extending the provision for waivers of in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence (BA-BE) studies that appeared in the guidance published by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (1) to pharmaceutical products containing Class 3 drugs (High solubility-Low Permeability). The extension of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) to Class 3 drugs is meritorious because of its impact on public health policy considerations. The rate limiting step in the absorption of Class 3 drugs is the permeability through the intestinal membrane. This commentary will focus its attention on the scientific considerations which need to be examined to assess the risk and the benefit prior to granting a waiver of in vivo bioavailability and/or bioequivalence studies for Class 3 drugs. It will examine the forces affecting the interconnectivity of the neuronal, immunological and hormonal systems in the gastrointestinal tract that may affect its permeability and functionality. It will also challenge the assumption that in vitro dissolution and in vitro permeability studies in tissue cultures in the presence and absence of excipients are good predictors for in vivo dissolution and in vivo permeability which are at the heart of the BCS.

  1. Computational Aspects of a Modified Bernoulli Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, A.

    We introduce a modified Bernoulli map, which presents f(-1) spectrum. This map is equivalent to a certain symbolic operation of continued fraction representation. From this fact, we can derive various properties of the map, e.g., concerning residence times, from the theory of continued fractions. Furthermore, we can generate true chaotic orbits with intermittent behavior long enough to investigate their statistical properties.

  2. Black hole thermodynamics in MOdified Gravity (MOG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mureika, Jonas R.; Moffat, John W.; Faizal, Mir

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the thermodynamical properties of black holes in a modified theory of gravity, which was initially proposed to obtain correct dynamics of galaxies and galaxy clusters without dark matter. The thermodynamics of non-rotating and rotating black hole solutions resembles similar solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with the electric charge being replaced by a new mass dependent gravitational charge Q =√{ αGN } M. This new mass dependent charge modifies the effective Newtonian constant from GN to G =GN (1 + α), and this in turn critically affects the thermodynamics of the black holes. We also investigate the thermodynamics of regular solutions, and explore the limiting case when no horizons forms. So, it is possible that the modified gravity can lead to the absence of black hole horizons in our universe. Finally, we analyze corrections to the thermodynamics of a non-rotating black hole and obtain the usual logarithmic correction term.

  3. Toward a Cultural Advancement of Tinto's Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiffrida, Douglas A.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the broad appeal of Tinto's (1993) theory, it is not well supported by empirical research, especially when applied to minority students. While prior critiques of the theory indicate the need to modify Tinto's concept of "breaking away" when applying the theory to diverse students, research suggests a need for additional refinements. In…

  4. Anisotropic singularities in chiral modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfray, Yannick; Krasnov, Kirill; Shtanov, Yuri

    2016-12-01

    In four spacetime dimensions, there exists a special infinite-parameter family of chiral modified gravity theories. All these theories describe just two propagating polarisations of the graviton. General relativity (GR) with an arbitrary cosmological constant is the only parity-invariant member of this family. We review how these modified gravity theories arise within the framework of pure-connection formulation. We introduce a new convenient parametrisation of this family of theories by using a certain set of auxiliary fields. Modifications of GR can be arranged so as to become important in regions with large Weyl curvature, while the behaviour is indistinguishable from GR where Weyl curvature is small. We show how the Kasner singularity of GR is resolved in a particular class of modified gravity theories of this type, leading to solutions in which the fundamental connection field is regular all through the spacetime. There arises a new asymptotically De Sitter region ‘behind’ the would-be singularity, the complete solution thus being of a bounce type.

  5. Wave propagation in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Jan Ø.; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the nonlinear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within general relativity this approximation is valid and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and nonlinearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated with the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that the group velocity is smaller than the speed of light. It is therefore important, within such a framework, to take into account the fact that different parts of a galaxy will see changes in the environment at different times. A full nonstatic analysis may be necessary under those conditions.

  6. Modeling void abundance in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voivodic, Rodrigo; Lima, Marcos; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2017-01-01

    We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f (R ) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surveys, the combination of void and halo statistics including their abundances, profiles and correlations should be effective in distinguishing modified gravity models that display different screening mechanisms.

  7. Modifying Curriculum. Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petch, Beverly

    This module on modifying curriculum is 1 in a series of 10 modules written for vocational education teacher education programs. It is designed to prepare the learner to identify the varying learning styles of learners and to modify curriculum by providing alternative techniques for curriculum modification. Introductory materials include the…

  8. Newton modified barrier method in constrained optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polyak, R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we develop and investigate the Newton method for solving constrained (non-smooth) optimization problems. This approach is based on the modified barrier functions (MBF) theory and on the global converging step-size version of the Newton method for smooth unconstrained optimization. Due to the excellent properties of the MBF near primal-dual solution, the Newton modified barrier method (NMBM) has a better rate of convergence, better complexity bound, and is much more stable in the final stage of the computational process than the methods which are based on the classical barrier functions (CBF).

  9. Structural optimization using Newton Modified Barrier Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khot, N. S.; Polyak, R.; Schneur, R.

    1992-09-01

    The Newton Modified Barrier Method (NMBM) was applied to a structural optimization problem with large numbers of design variables and constraints. This mathematical optimization algorithm was based on Modified Barrier Function (MBF) theory and the global converging step version of the Newton Method for smooth unconstrained optimization. For illustrating the convergence characteristics of this method to structural optimization, a truss structure with 721 design variables with constraints on displacements and minimum size requirements was solved. The convergence to the optimum was found to be monotonic. The rate of convergence was compared with solving the same problem with ASTROS and optimality criteria approach.

  10. In vitro dissolution of generic immediate-release solid oral dosage forms containing BCS class I drugs: comparative assessment of metronidazole, zidovudine, and amoxicillin versus relevant comparator pharmaceutical products in South Africa and India.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Nallagundla H S; Patnala, Srinivas; Löbenberg, Raimar; Kanfer, Isadore

    2014-10-01

    Biowaivers are recommended for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms using dissolution testing as a surrogate for in vivo bioequivalence studies. Several guidance are currently available (the World Health Organization (WHO), the US FDA, and the EMEA) where the conditions are described. In this study, definitions, criteria, and methodologies according to the WHO have been applied. The dissolution performances of immediate-release metronidazole, zidovudine, and amoxicillin products purchased in South African and Indian markets were compared to the relevant comparator pharmaceutical product (CPP)/reference product. The dissolution performances were studied using US Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus 2 (paddle) set at 75 rpm in each of three dissolution media (pH1.2, 4.5, and 6.8). Concentrations of metronidazole, zidovudine, and amoxicillin in each dissolution media were determined by HPLC. Of the 11 metronidazole products tested, only 8 could be considered as very rapidly dissolving products as defined by the WHO, whereas 2 of those products could be considered as rapidly dissolving products but did not comply with the f 2 acceptance criteria in pH 6.8. All 11 zidovudine products were very rapidly dissolving, whereas in the case of the 14 amoxicillin products tested, none of those products met any of the WHO criteria. This study indicates that not all generic products containing the same biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) I drug and in similar strength and dosage form are necessarily in vitro equivalent. Hence, there is a need for ongoing market surveillance to determine whether marketed generic products containing BCS I drugs meet the release requirements to confirm their in vitro bioequivalence to the respective reference product.

  11. Advantageous Solubility-Permeability Interplay When Using Amorphous Solid Dispersion (ASD) Formulation for the BCS Class IV P-gp Substrate Rifaximin: Simultaneous Increase of Both the Solubility and the Permeability.

    PubMed

    Beig, Avital; Fine-Shamir, Noa; Lindley, David; Miller, Jonathan M; Dahan, Arik

    2017-02-15

    Rifaximin is a BCS class IV (low-solubility, low-permeability) drug and also a P-gp substrate. The aims of this work were to assess the efficiency of different rifaximin amorphous solid dispersion (ASDs) formulations in achieving and maintaining supersaturation and to investigate the consequent solubility-permeability interplay. Spray-dried rifaximin ASDs were prepared with different hydrophilic polymers and their ability to achieve and maintain supersaturation was assessed. Then, rifaximin's apparent intestinal permeability was investigated as a function of increasing supersaturation both in vitro using the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) and in vivo using the single-pass rat intestinal perfusion (SPIP) model. The efficiency of the different ASDs to achieve and maintain supersaturation of rifaximin was found to be highly polymer dependent, and the copovidone/HPC-SL formulation was found to be superior to the other two, allowing supersaturation of 200× that of the crystalline solubility for 20 h. In vitro, rifaximin flux was increased and the apparent permeability was constant as a function of increasing supersaturation level. In vivo, on the other hand, absorption rate coefficient (k a) was first constant as a function of increasing supersaturation, but at 250×, the crystalline solubility k a was doubled, similar to the k a in the presence of the strong P-gp inhibitor GF120918. In conclusion, a new and favorable nature of solubility-permeability interplay was revealed in this work: delivering high supersaturation level of the BCS class IV drug rifaximin via ASD, thereby saturating the drugs' P-gp-mediated efflux transport, led to the favorable unique win-win situation, where both the solubility and the permeability increased simultaneously.

  12. Current-voltage measurements of thin YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.9} films compared with a modified Ambegaokar-Halperin theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liebenberg, D.H.; Soulen, R.J. Jr.; Francavilla, T.L.; Fuller-Mora, W.W.; McIntyre, P.C.; Cima, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    We have measured and interpreted the current-voltage characteristics of several thin YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.9} films. They were prepared by metal-organic deposition and microscopy revealed that they had numerous stacking faults. The measurements were taken at temperatures of 77 and 4.2 K in applied magnetic fields varying from 0 to 6 T. Values of {ital J}{sub {ital c}} as large as 2 MA/cm{sup 2} were found at 77 K for films with {ital T}{sub {ital c}}=92 K, whereas values of {ital J}{sub {ital c}} as large as 80 MA/cm{sup 2} were found at 4.2 K for the same films. The data were compared with the predictions of a modified Ambegaokar-Halperin model, a conventional power-law model, and a vortex-glass model. The data were generally fit best by the Ambegaokar-Halperin model from which were obtained the resistance of the film, the critical current density, and the pinning potential as functions of the magnetic field and temperature. These parameters varied widely but systematically among the films and were interpreted in terms of differences in their imperfections. The critical current density and pinning potential obtained from this analysis were compared to the same quantities inferred from a more traditional method. The dependencies on the magnetic field were very similar, although the magnitudes were different. The advantage of defining the critical current density in terms of a physical model is emphasized.

  13. Vantage Theory and Linguistic Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Rob MacLaury's Vantage Theory, VT, models the way in which a cognizer constructs, recalls, uses, and modifies a category in terms of point of view or vantage. Alongside of VT, there is place for the kind of semantic specification found in the lexicon. VT2 [Allan, Keith, 2002. "Vantage theory, VT2, and number." "Language Sciences" 24(5-6), 679-703…

  14. Vantage Theory and Linguistic Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Rob MacLaury's Vantage Theory, VT, models the way in which a cognizer constructs, recalls, uses, and modifies a category in terms of point of view or vantage. Alongside of VT, there is place for the kind of semantic specification found in the lexicon. VT2 [Allan, Keith, 2002. "Vantage theory, VT2, and number." "Language Sciences" 24(5-6), 679-703…

  15. In vitro - in vivo correlation: from theory to applications.

    PubMed

    Emami, Jaber

    2006-01-01

    A key goal in pharmaceutical development of dosage forms is a good understanding of the in vitro and in vivo performance of the dosage forms. One of the challenges of biopharmaceutics research is correlating in vitro drug release information of various drug formulations to the in vivo drug profiles (IVIVC). Thus the need for a tool to reliably correlate in vitro and in vivo drug release data has exceedingly increased. Such a tool shortens the drug development period, economizes the resources and leads to improved product quality. Increased activity in developing IVIVCs indicates the value of IVIVCs to the pharmaceutical industry. IVIVC can be used in the development of new pharmaceuticals to reduce the number of human studies during the formulation development as the main objective of an IVIVC is to serve as a surrogate for in vivo bioavailability and to support biowaivers. It supports and/or validates the use of dissolution methods and specification settings. This is because the IVIVC includes in vivo relevance to in vitro dissolution specifications. It can also assist in quality control for certain scale-up and post-approval changes (SUPAC). With the proliferation of modified-release products, it becomes necessary to examine the concept of IVIVC in greater depth. Investigations of IVIVC are increasingly becoming an integral part of extended release drug development. There must be some in vitro means of assuring that each batch of the same product will perform identically in vivo. This review article represents the FDA guidance, development, evaluation, and validation of an IVIVC to grant biowaivers, and to set dissolution specifications for oral dosage forms, biopharmaceutics classification systems (BCS), BCS biowaivers, application of BCS in IVIVC development and concept of mapping. The importance of dissolution media and methodology and pharmacokinetic studies in the context of IVIVC has been highlighted. The review also covers the literature examples of IVIVCs

  16. Packaging Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    Considers the recent flood of anthologies of literary criticism and theory as exemplifications of the confluence of pedagogical concerns, economics of publishing, and other historical factors. Looks specifically at how these anthologies present theory. Cites problems with their formatting theory and proposes alternative ways of organizing theory…

  17. Some Aspects of Generalized Modified Gravity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrzakulov, R.; Sebastiani, L.; Zerbini, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we review some general aspects of modified gravity theories, investigating mathematical and physical properties and, more specifically, the feature of viable and realistic models able to reproduce the dark energy (DE) epoch and the early-time inflation. We will discuss the black hole (BH) solutions in generalized theories of gravity: it is of fundamental interest to understand how properties and laws of BHs in General Relativity (GR) can be addressed in the framework of modified theories. In particular, we will discuss the energy issue and the possibility to derive the First Law of thermodynamics from the field equations. Then, in the analysis of cosmological solutions, we will pay particular attention to the occurrence of finite-time future singularities and to the possibility to avoid them in F(R,G)-gravity. Furthermore, realistic models of F(R)-gravity will be analyzed in detail. A general feature occurring in matter era will be shown, namely, the high derivatives of Hubble parameter may be influenced by the high frequency oscillation of the DE and some correction term may be required in order to stabilize the theory at high redshift. The inflationary scenario is also carefully analyzed and a unified description of the universe is evolved. In the final part of the work, we will look at the last developments in modified gravity, namely, we will investigate cosmological and BH solutions in a covariant field theory of gravity and we will introduce the extended "teleparallel" F(T)-gravity theories. A nice application to the dark matter (DM) problem will be presented.

  18. Modifying toxicokinetics with antidotes.

    PubMed

    Baud, F J; Borron, S W; Bismuth, C

    1995-12-01

    Five approaches may be described through which antidotes can modify toxicokinetics: (1) Decreased bioavailability of the toxins; (2) Cellular redistribution of the toxin in the organism; (3) Promotion of elimination in an unchanged form; (4) Slowing of metabolic activation pathways; (5) Acceleration of metabolic deactivation pathways. However, the ability to modify toxicokinetics with a new treatment, while demonstrating an understanding of the mechanism of action, must never be construed to be, in and of itself, the goal of therapy. The ultimate evaluation of an antidote modifying toxicokinetics is strictly clinical.

  19. Grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tina

    2015-04-29

    Grounded theory is a popular research approach in health care and the social sciences. This article provides a description of grounded theory methodology and its key components, using examples from published studies to demonstrate practical application. It aims to demystify grounded theory for novice nurse researchers, by explaining what it is, when to use it, why they would want to use it and how to use it. It should enable nurse researchers to decide if grounded theory is an appropriate approach for their research, and to determine the quality of any grounded theory research they read.

  20. Motion in Kaluza-Klein type theories

    SciTech Connect

    Kahil, M.E.

    2006-05-15

    Path and path deviation equations for charged, spinning and spinning charged objects in different versions of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory using a modified Bazanski Lagrangian have been derived. The significance of motion in five dimensions, especially for a charged spinning object, has been examined. We have also extended the modified Bazanski approach to derive the path and path deviation equations of a test particle in a version of non-symmetric KK theory.

  1. Modified Mason number for charged paramagnetic colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Du, Di; Hilou, Elaa; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of magnetorheological fluids have typically been described by the Mason number, a governing parameter defined as the ratio between viscous and magnetic forces in the fluid. For most experimental suspensions of magnetic particles, surface forces, such as steric and electrostatic interactions, can significantly influence the dynamics. Here we propose a theory of a modified Mason number that accounts for surface forces and show that this modified Mason number is a function of interparticle distance. We demonstrate that this modified Mason number is accurate in describing the dynamics of a rotating pair of paramagnetic colloids of identical or mismatched sizes in either high or low salt solutions. The modified Mason number is confirmed to be pseudoconstant for particle pairs and particle chains undergoing a stable-metastable transition during rotation. The interparticle distance term can be calculated using theory or can be measured experimentally. This modified Mason number is more applicable to magnetorheological systems where surface forces are not negligible.

  2. Modified Mason number for charged paramagnetic colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Di; Hilou, Elaa; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of magnetorheological fluids have typically been described by the Mason number, a governing parameter defined as the ratio between viscous and magnetic forces in the fluid. For most experimental suspensions of magnetic particles, surface forces, such as steric and electrostatic interactions, can significantly influence the dynamics. Here we propose a theory of a modified Mason number that accounts for surface forces and show that this modified Mason number is a function of interparticle distance. We demonstrate that this modified Mason number is accurate in describing the dynamics of a rotating pair of paramagnetic colloids of identical or mismatched sizes in either high or low salt solutions. The modified Mason number is confirmed to be pseudoconstant for particle pairs and particle chains undergoing a stable-metastable transition during rotation. The interparticle distance term can be calculated using theory or can be measured experimentally. This modified Mason number is more applicable to magnetorheological systems where surface forces are not negligible.

  3. Probability Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaynes, E. T.; Bretthorst, G. Larry

    2003-04-01

    Foreword; Preface; Part I. Principles and Elementary Applications: 1. Plausible reasoning; 2. The quantitative rules; 3. Elementary sampling theory; 4. Elementary hypothesis testing; 5. Queer uses for probability theory; 6. Elementary parameter estimation; 7. The central, Gaussian or normal distribution; 8. Sufficiency, ancillarity, and all that; 9. Repetitive experiments, probability and frequency; 10. Physics of 'random experiments'; Part II. Advanced Applications: 11. Discrete prior probabilities, the entropy principle; 12. Ignorance priors and transformation groups; 13. Decision theory: historical background; 14. Simple applications of decision theory; 15. Paradoxes of probability theory; 16. Orthodox methods: historical background; 17. Principles and pathology of orthodox statistics; 18. The Ap distribution and rule of succession; 19. Physical measurements; 20. Model comparison; 21. Outliers and robustness; 22. Introduction to communication theory; References; Appendix A. Other approaches to probability theory; Appendix B. Mathematical formalities and style; Appendix C. Convolutions and cumulants.

  4. Cystic fibrosis modifier genes.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jane; Alton, Eric; Griesenbach, Uta

    2005-01-01

    Since the recognition that CFTR genotype was not a good predictor of pulmonary disease severity in CF, several candidate modifier genes have been identified. It is unlikely that a single modifier gene will be found, but more probable that several haplotypes in combination may contribute, which in itself presents a major methodological challenge. The aims of such studies are to increase our understanding of disease pathogenesis, to aid prognosis and ultimately to lead to the development of novel treatments. PMID:16025767

  5. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  6. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects. Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response by increasing the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction, increasing the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response, augmenting the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response, decreasing the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells, or increasing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  7. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  8. Equivalence theorem in effective theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicherin, D.; Gorbenko, V.; Vereshagin, V.

    2011-11-01

    The famous equivalence theorem is reexamined in order to make it applicable to the case of effective theories. We slightly modify the formulation of this theorem and prove it based on the notion of the generating functional for Green functions. This allows one to trace (directly in terms of graphs) the mutual cancellation of different groups of contributions.

  9. Theoretical priors on modified growth parametrisations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yong-Seon; Hollenstein, Lukas; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Koyama, Kazuya E-mail: Lukas.Hollenstein@unige.ch E-mail: Kazuya.Koyama@port.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    Next generation surveys will observe the large-scale structure of the Universe with unprecedented accuracy. This will enable us to test the relationships between matter over-densities, the curvature perturbation and the Newtonian potential. Any large-distance modification of gravity or exotic nature of dark energy modifies these relationships as compared to those predicted in the standard smooth dark energy model based on General Relativity. In linear theory of structure growth such modifications are often parameterised by virtue of two functions of space and time that enter the relation of the curvature perturbation to, first, the matter over- density, and second, the Newtonian potential. We investigate the predictions for these functions in Brans-Dicke theory, clustering dark energy models and interacting dark energy models. We find that each theory has a distinct path in the parameter space of modified growth. Understanding these theoretical priors on the parameterisations of modified growth is essential to reveal the nature of cosmic acceleration with the help of upcoming observations of structure formation.

  10. Nonderivative modified gravity: a classification

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@irb.hr

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the theories of gravity modified by a generic nonderivative potential built from the metric, under the minimal requirement of unbroken spatial rotations. Using the canonical analysis, we classify the potentials V according to the number of degrees of freedom (DoF) that propagate at the nonperturbative level. We then compare the nonperturbative results with the perturbative DoF propagating around Minkowski and FRW backgrounds. A generic V implies 6 propagating DoF at the non-perturbative level, with a ghost on Minkowski background. There exist potentials which propagate 5 DoF, as already studied in previous works. Here, no V with unbroken rotational invariance admitting 4 DoF is found. Theories with 3 DoF turn out to be strongly coupled on Minkowski background. Finally, potentials with only the 2 DoF of a massive graviton exist. Their effect on cosmology is simply equivalent to a cosmological constant. Potentials with 2 or 5 DoF and explicit time dependence appear to be a further viable possibility.

  11. Generalized teleparallel theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Ednaldo L. B.; Rodrigues, Manuel E.

    2016-07-01

    We construct a theory in which the gravitational interaction is described only by torsion, but that generalizes the teleparallel theory still keeping the invariance of local Lorentz transformations in one particular case. We show that our theory falls, in a certain limit of a real parameter, under f(bar{R}) gravity or, in another limit of the same real parameter, under modified f( T) gravity; on interpolating between these two theories it still can fall under several other theories. We explicitly show the equivalence with f(bar{R}) gravity for the cases of a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker flat metric for diagonal tetrads, and a metric with spherical symmetry for diagonal and non-diagonal tetrads. We study four applications, one in the reconstruction of the de Sitter universe cosmological model, for obtaining a static spherically symmetric solution of de Sitter type for a perfect fluid, for evolution of the state parameter ω _{DE}, and for the thermodynamics of the apparent horizon.

  12. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)˜ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3-2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  13. Theory on Superconducting Transition from Pseudogap State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanase, Youichi; Jujo, Takanobu; Yamada, Kosaku

    2000-11-01

    The anomalous properties of High-T c cuprates are investigated both in the normal state and in the superconducting state. In particular, we pay attention to the pseudogap in the normal state and the phase transition from the pseudogap state to the superconducting state. The pseudogap phenomena observed in cuprates are naturally understood as a precursor of the strong coupling superconductivity. We have previously shown by using the self-consistent T-matrix calculation that the pseudogap is a result of the strong superconducting fluctuations which are accompanied by the strong coupling superconductivity in quasi-two dimensional systems [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 68 (1999) 2999]. We extend the scenario to the superconducting state. The close relation between the pseudogap state and the superconducting state is pointed out. Once the superconducting phase transition occurs, the superconducting order parameter rapidly grows rather than the result of BCS theory. With the rapid growth of the order parameter, the gap structure becomes sharp, while it is remarkably broad in the pseudogap state. The characteristic energy scale of the gap does not change. These results well explain the phase transition observed in the spectroscopic measurements. Further, we calculate the magnetic and transport properties which show the pseudogap phenomena. The comprehensive understanding of the NMR, the neutron scattering, the optical conductivity and the London penetration depth is obtained both in the pseudogap state and in the superconducting state.

  14. Predictions from String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuflik, Eric

    String theory is the leading candidate for an underlying theory of nature, as it provides a framework through which to address critical questions left unanswered by the Standard Model and Supersymmetry. A number of predictions of string constructions can be empirically tested at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and dark matter experiments. In this work I aim to make generic predictions of string theory, while combining bottom-up approaches to fill in the gaps in our understanding of string theory to make predictions for current and upcoming experiments. First I study moduli masses and claim that moduli dominated the energy density of the universe prior to big bang nucleosynthesis. We argue that in any string theory with stabilized moduli there will be at least one modulus field whose mass is of order the gravitino mass. Cosmology then generically requires the gravitino mass to be greater than 30 TeV and the early cosmological history of the Universe be non-thermal. We are then led to believe that the best-motivated channel for early LHC discovery is gluino pair-production events decaying into a high multiplicity of third generation quarks. We analyze signals and background at the LHC for 7 TeV center of mass energy for 1 fb -1 integrated luminosity, suggesting a reach for gluinos for masses about 650 GeV. Second, I seek to construct a Grand Unified Theory (GUT) within different branches of string theory. One promising GUT, developed outside of string theory, is Flipped-SU(5), which I show has serious phenomenological difficulties. I demonstrate both that Flipped-SU(5) requires an R-symmetry to solve the mu-problem, and that no R-symmetries exist in F-theory. Thus Flipped-SU(5) cannot serve as a GUT within F-theory. Similarly, I seek to construct a GUT within M-theory. My study is based upon the discrete symmetry proposed by Witten that forbids the mu-term and solves the doublet-triplet splitting problem, but does not address how the symmetry might be broken. I find

  15. Confabulation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, Soren; Smith, Andrew; Minnett, Rupert; Hecht-Nielsen, Robert

    2008-06-01

    Confabulation Theory [Hecht-Nielsen R. Confabulation theory. Springer-Verlag; 2007] is the first comprehensive theory of human and animal cognition. Here, we briefly describe Confabulation Theory and discuss experimental results that suggest the theory is correct. Simply put, Confabulation Theory proposes that thinking is like moving. In humans, the theory postulates that there are roughly 4000 thalamocortical modules, the “muscles of thought”. Each module performs an internal competition ( confabulation) between its symbols, influenced by inputs delivered via learned axonal associations with symbols in other modules. In each module, this competition is controlled, as in an individual muscle, by a single graded (i.e., analog) thought control signal. The final result of this confabulation process is a single active symbol, the expression of which also results in launching of action commands that trigger and control subsequent movements and/or thought processes. Modules are manipulated in groups under coordinated, event-contingent control, in a similar manner to our 700 muscles. Confabulation Theory hypothesizes that the control of thinking is a direct evolutionary outgrowth of the control of movement. Establishing a complete understanding of Confabulation Theory will require launching and sustaining a massive new phalanx of confabulation neuroscience research.

  16. Game theory.

    PubMed

    Dufwenberg, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Game theory is a toolkit for examining situations where decision makers influence each other. I discuss the nature of game-theoretic analysis, the history of game theory, why game theory is useful for understanding human psychology, and why game theory has played a key role in the recent explosion of interest in the field of behavioral economics. WIREs Cogni Sci 2011 2 167-173 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.119 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  17. Graph Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2005-12-27

    Graph theory is a branch of discrete combinatorial mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The theory was pioneered by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century, commenced its formal development during the second half of the 19th century, and has witnessed substantial growth during the last seventy years, with applications in areas as diverse as engineering, computer science, physics, sociology, chemistry and biology. Graph theory has also had a strong impact in computational linguistics by providing the foundations for the theory of features structures that has emerged as one of the most widely used frameworks for the representation of grammar formalisms.

  18. Modified blank ammunition injuries.

    PubMed

    Ogunc, Gokhan I; Ozer, M Tahir; Coskun, Kagan; Uzar, Ali Ihsan

    2009-12-15

    Blank firing weapons are designed only for discharging blank ammunition cartridges. Because they are cost-effective, are easily accessible and can be modified to live firearms plus their unclear legal situation in Turkish Law makes them very popular in Turkey. 2004 through 2008, a total of 1115 modified blank weapons were seized in Turkey. Blank firing weapons are easily modified by owners, making them suitable for discharging live firearm ammunition or modified blank ammunitions. Two common methods are used for modification of blank weapons. After the modification, these weapons can discharge the live ammunition. However, due to compositional durability problems with these types of weapons; the main trend is to use the modified blank ammunitions rather than live firearm ammunition fired from modified blank firing weapons. In this study, two types of modified blank weapons and two types of modified blank cartridges were tested on three different target models. Each of the models' shooting side was coated with 1.3+/-2 mm thickness chrome tanned cowhide as a skin simulant. The first model was only coated with skin simulant. The second model was coated with skin simulant and 100% cotton police shirt. The third model was coated with skin simulant and jean denim. After the literature evaluation four high risky anatomic locations (the neck area; the eyes; the thorax area and inguinal area) were pointed out for the steel and lead projectiles are discharged from the modified blank weapons especially in close range (0-50 cm). The target models were designed for these anatomic locations. For the target models six Transparent Ballistic Candle blocks (TCB) were prepared and divided into two test groups. The first group tests were performed with lead projectiles and second group with steel projectile. The shortest penetration depth (lead projectile: 4.358 cm; steel projectile 8.032 cm) was recorded in the skin simulant and jean denim coated block for both groups. In both groups

  19. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  20. The Dynamical Theory of X Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes the Darwin theory of x-ray diffraction in thin crystals or crystals with a mosaic texture and its modified application to crystals with three-dimensional electrostatic dipoles. Indicates that the dynamical theory is brought into its present relevance by the improvement of single crystal growth techniques. (CC)