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Sample records for modified cam-clay model

  1. Ductile damage Cam-Clay plasticity and fracture modeling of shale based on nano-characterization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K. C.; Borja, R. I.

    2015-12-01

    A finite strain ductile damage formulation of Modified Cam-Clay (MCC) plasticity has been developed in order to model the observed elastoplastic behavior of shale at nano- to micro-scales. Nano-indentation combined with both 2D and 3D imaging was performed on a sample of Woodford shale. Significant plastic deformation was observed in the nano-indentation testing, and nano-scale resolution FIB-SEM imaging of the post-indented regions has revealed that the plastic deformation is accompanied by extensive micro-fracture of the shale's highly heterogeneous micro-structure. A spatial tensor that is similar to Eshelby's energy momentum tensor is shown to be energy conjugate to the plastic velocity gradient under large inelastic volume strain. These results are cast in MCC framework drawing on the concept of continuum damage. The resulting formulation provides a connection between density (porosity), elastic (and plastic) moduli, and micro damage/healing. Nonlinear finite element modeling is used for implementation of the constitutive model in simulation of both laboratory-scale and nano- to micro-scale experiments. The results show that the model is able to predict the inception and propagation of micro-fractures around inhomogeneities, as well as capture the resulting behavior observed at the much larger laboratory scale.

  2. SHEARING AND WATER RETENTION BEHAVIOR OF UNSATURATED LOAM WITH MODELING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Yukoh; Kazama, Motoki

    Unsaturated triaxial tests were carried out to study deformation behavior, effective stress path and water retention property of consolidated loam during consolidation and shearing processes. Initial matric suction was set as 0, 50, and 90 kPa, and confining pressures (net normal stresses) were set as 100 kPa. Then shearing processes were done under undrained and drained conditions. We clarified the relation between void ratio and Van Genuchten model parameter by using water retention curve. To predict the unsaturated shearing behavior, a modified Cam Clay model considering void ratio dependent Van Genuchten parameter was proposed. Those numerical test results were agreed well with laboratory tests results.

  3. Distinguishing modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Modified gravity models with screening in local environments appear in three different guises: chameleon, K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms. We propose to look for differences between these classes of models by considering cosmological observations at low redshift. In particular, we analyse the redshift dependence of the fine structure constant and the proton to electron mass ratio in each of these scenarios. When the absorption lines belong to unscreened regions of space such as dwarf galaxies, a time variation would be present for chameleons. For both K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms, the cosmological time variation of the scalar field is not suppressed in both unscreened and screened environments, therefore enhancing the variation of constants and their detection prospect. We also consider the time variation of the redshift of distant objects using their spectrocopic velocities. We find that models of the K-mouflage and Vainshtein types have very different spectroscopic velocities as a function of redshift and that their differences with the Λ-CDM template should be within reach of the future ELT-HIRES observations.

  4. Modify the JACCHIA model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Existing Jacchia were converted from the UNIVAC 1108 to the SSL REEDA computer system and the overall program capabilities were enhanced. The Jacchia Models and the associated data bases reside on a REEDA System dedicated "JACCHIA" disc pack. The Jacchia programs, their operation, and the outputs generated outputs are described.

  5. Model selection for modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Kitching, T D; Simpson, F; Heavens, A F; Taylor, A N

    2011-12-28

    In this article, we review model selection predictions for modified gravity scenarios as an explanation for the observed acceleration of the expansion history of the Universe. We present analytical procedures for calculating expected Bayesian evidence values in two cases: (i) that modified gravity is a simple parametrized extension of general relativity (GR; two nested models), such that a Bayes' factor can be calculated, and (ii) that we have a class of non-nested models where a rank-ordering of evidence values is required. We show that, in the case of a minimal modified gravity parametrization, we can expect large area photometric and spectroscopic surveys, using three-dimensional cosmic shear and baryonic acoustic oscillations, to 'decisively' distinguish modified gravity models over GR (or vice versa), with odds of ≫1:100. It is apparent that the potential discovery space for modified gravity models is large, even in a simple extension to gravity models, where Newton's constant G is allowed to vary as a function of time and length scale. On the time and length scales where dark energy dominates, it is only through large-scale cosmological experiments that we can hope to understand the nature of gravity.

  6. Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Constitutive Model for Vegetated Soils: Validation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switala, Barbara Maria; Veenhof, Rick; Wu, Wei; Askarinejad, Amin

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, that presence of vegetation influences stability of the slope. However, the quantitative assessment of this contribution remains challenging. It is essential to develop a numerical model, which combines mechanical root reinforcement and root water uptake, and allows modelling rainfall induced landslides of vegetated slopes. Therefore a novel constitutive formulation is proposed, which is based on the modified Cam-clay model for unsaturated soils. Mechanical root reinforcement is modelled introducing a new constitutive parameter, which governs the evolution of the Cam-clay failure surface with the degree of root reinforcement. Evapotranspiration is modelled in terms of the root water uptake, defined as a sink term in the water flow continuity equation. The original concept is extended for different shapes of the root architecture in three dimensions, and combined with the mechanical model. The model is implemented in the research finite element code Comes-Geo, and in the commercial software Abaqus. The formulation is tested, performing a series of numerical examples, which allow validation of the concept. The direct shear test and the triaxial test are modelled in order to test the performance of the mechanical part of the model. In order to validate the hydrological part of the constitutive formulation, evapotranspiration from the vegetated box is simulated and compared with the experimental results. Obtained numerical results exhibit a good agreement with the experimental data. The implemented model is capable of reproducing results of basic geotechnical laboratory tests. Moreover, the constitutive formulation can be used to model rainfall induced landslides of vegetated slopes, taking into account the most important factors influencing the slope stability (root reinforcement and evapotranspiration).

  7. Genetically modified pig models for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Fan, Nana; Lai, Liangxue

    2013-02-20

    Genetically modified animal models are important for understanding the pathogenesis of human disease and developing therapeutic strategies. Although genetically modified mice have been widely used to model human diseases, some of these mouse models do not replicate important disease symptoms or pathology. Pigs are more similar to humans than mice in anatomy, physiology, and genome. Thus, pigs are considered to be better animal models to mimic some human diseases. This review describes genetically modified pigs that have been used to model various diseases including neurological, cardiovascular, and diabetic disorders. We also discuss the development in gene modification technology that can facilitate the generation of transgenic pig models for human diseases.

  8. Cosmological models of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon Keith

    The recent discovery of dark energy has prompted an investigation of ways in which the accelerated expansion of the universe can be realized. In this dissertation, we present two separate projects related to dark energy. The first project analyzes a class of braneworld models in which multiple branes float in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter bulk, while the second investigates a class of dark energy models from an effective field theory perspective. Investigations of models including extra dimensions have led to modifications of gravity involving a number of interesting features. In particular, the Randall-Sundrum model is well-known for achieving an amelioration of the hierarchy problem. However, the basic model relies on Minkowski branes and is subject to solar system constraints in the absence of a radion stabilization mechanism. We present a method by which a four-dimensional low-energy description can be obtained for braneworld scenarios, allowing for a number of generalizations to the original models. This method is applied to orbifolded and uncompactified N-brane models, deriving an effective four-dimensional action. The parameter space of this theory is constrained using observational evidence, and it is found that the generalizations do not weaken solar system constraints on the original model. Furthermore, we find that general N-brane systems are qualitatively similar to the two-brane case, and do not naturally lead to a viable dark energy model. We next investigate dark energy models using effective field theory techniques. We describe dark energy through a quintessence field, employing a derivative expansion. To the accuracy of the model, we find transformations to write the description in a form involving no higher-order derivatives in the equations of motion. We use a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson construction to motivate the theory, and find the regime of validity and scaling of the operators using this. The regime of validity is restricted to a

  9. Goldstone models of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Valageas, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    We investigate scalar-tensor theories where matter couples to the scalar field via a kinetically dependent conformal coupling. These models can be seen as the low-energy description of invariant field theories under a global Abelian symmetry. The scalar field is then identified with the Goldstone mode of the broken symmetry. It turns out that the properties of these models are very similar to the ones of ultralocal theories where the scalar-field value is directly determined by the local matter density. This leads to a complete screening of the fifth force in the Solar System and between compact objects, through the ultralocal screening mechanism. On the other hand, the fifth force can have large effects in extended structures with large-scale density gradients, such as galactic halos. Interestingly, it can either amplify or damp Newtonian gravity, depending on the model parameters. We also study the background cosmology and the linear cosmological perturbations. The background cosmology is hardly different from its Λ -CDM counterpart while cosmological perturbations crucially depend on whether the coupling function is convex or concave. For concave functions, growth is hindered by the repulsiveness of the fifth force while it is enhanced in the convex case. In both cases, the departures from the Λ -CDM cosmology increase on smaller scales and peak for galactic structures. For concave functions, the formation of structure is largely altered below some characteristic mass, as smaller structures are delayed and would form later through fragmentation, as in some warm dark matter scenarios. For convex models, small structures form more easily than in the Λ -CDM scenario. This could lead to an over-abundance of small clumps. We use a thermodynamic analysis and show that although convex models have a phase transition between homogeneous and inhomogeneous phases, on cosmological scales the system does not enter the inhomogeneous phase. On the other hand, for galactic

  10. Modeling void abundance in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voivodic, Rodrigo; Lima, Marcos; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2017-01-01

    We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f (R ) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surveys, the combination of void and halo statistics including their abundances, profiles and correlations should be effective in distinguishing modified gravity models that display different screening mechanisms.

  11. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions.

  12. Genetically modified pigs to model human diseases.

    PubMed

    Flisikowska, Tatiana; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika

    2014-02-01

    Genetically modified mice are powerful tools to investigate the molecular basis of many human diseases. Mice are, however, of limited value for preclinical studies, because they differ significantly from humans in size, general physiology, anatomy and lifespan. Considerable efforts are, thus, being made to develop alternative animal models for a range of human diseases. These promise powerful new resources that will aid the development of new diagnostics, medicines and medical procedures. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of genetically modified porcine models described in the scientific literature: various cancers, cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, autosomal polycystic kidney disease, Huntington’s disease, spinal muscular atrophy, haemophilia A, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, retinitis pigmentosa, Stargardt disease, Alzheimer’s disease, various forms of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Degeneracies in parametrized modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Hojjati, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    We study degeneracies between parameters in some of the widely used parametrized modified gravity models. We investigate how different observables from a future photometric weak lensing survey such as LSST, correlate the effects of these parameters and to what extent the degeneracies are broken. We also study the impact of other degenerate effects, namely massive neutrinos and some of the weak lensing systematics, on the correlations.

  14. Systematic simulations of modified gravity: chameleon models

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Li, Baojiu; Winther, Hans A.; Zhao, Gong-Bo E-mail: a.c.davis@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: h.a.winther@astro.uio.no

    2013-04-01

    In this work we systematically study the linear and nonlinear structure formation in chameleon theories of modified gravity, using a generic parameterisation which describes a large class of models using only 4 parameters. For this we have modified the N-body simulation code ecosmog to perform a total of 65 simulations for different models and parameter values, including the default ΛCDM. These simulations enable us to explore a significant portion of the parameter space. We have studied the effects of modified gravity on the matter power spectrum and mass function, and found a rich and interesting phenomenology where the difference with the ΛCDM paradigm cannot be reproduced by a linear analysis even on scales as large as k ∼ 0.05 hMpc{sup −1}, since the latter incorrectly assumes that the modification of gravity depends only on the background matter density. Our results show that the chameleon screening mechanism is significantly more efficient than other mechanisms such as the dilaton and symmetron, especially in high-density regions and at early times, and can serve as a guidance to determine the parts of the chameleon parameter space which are cosmologically interesting and thus merit further studies in the future.

  15. Anisotropic singularities in modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiró, Michele Ferraz; Saa, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    We show that the common singularities present in generic modified gravity models governed by actions of the type S=∫d4x-gf(R,ϕ,X), with X=-(1)/(2)gab∂aϕ∂bϕ, are essentially the same anisotropic instabilities associated to the hypersurface F(ϕ)=0 in the case of a nonminimal coupling of the type F(ϕ)R, enlightening the physical origin of such singularities that typically arise in rather complex and cumbersome inhomogeneous perturbation analyses. We show, moreover, that such anisotropic instabilities typically give rise to dynamically unavoidable singularities, precluding completely the possibility of having physically viable models for which the hypersurface (∂f)/(∂R)=0 is attained. Some examples are explicitly discussed.

  16. Implementation of Bounding Surface Model into ABAQUS and Its Application to Wellbore Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Al-Muntasheri, G.; Abousleiman, Y. N.

    2014-12-01

    The critical state concept based bounding surface model is one of the most widely used elastoplastic constitutive models for geomaterials, attributed mainly to its essential feature of allowing plastic deformation to occur for stress points within the bounding surface and thus the capability to represent the realistic non-recoverable behaviour of soils and rocks observed under the cyclic loading. This paper develops an implicit integration algorithm for the bounding surface model, using the standard return mapping approach (elastic predictor-plastic corrector), to obtain the updated stresses for the given strain increments. The formulation of the constitutive integration requires the derivation of a supplementary differential equation to describe the evolution of a key variable, i.e., the ratio between the image stress and the current stress quantities. It is essentially an extension of the integration scheme presented in an earlier work used for the simple bounding surface version of modified Cam Clay associated with a substantially simplified hardening rule. The integration algorithm for the bounding surface model is implemented into the finite element analysis commercial program, ABAQUS, through the material interface of UMAT (user defined material subroutine), and then used for the analysis of wellbore stability problem. The predictions from the ABAQUS simulations are generally in excellent agreement with the available analytical solutions, thus demonstrating the accuracy and robustness of the proposed integration scheme.

  17. Some general remarks on hyperplasticity modelling and its extension to partially saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xiaoqin; Wong, Henry; Fabbri, Antonin; Bui, Tuan Anh; Limam, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The essential ideas and equations of classic plasticity and hyperplasticity are successively recalled and compared, in order to highlight their differences and complementarities. The former is based on the mathematical framework proposed by Hill (The mathematical theory of plasticity. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1950), whereas the latter is founded on the orthogonality hypothesis of Ziegler (An introduction to thermomechanics. Elsevier, North-Holland, 1983). The main drawback of classic plasticity is the possibility of violating the second principle of thermodynamics, while the relative ease to conjecture the yield function in order to approach experimental results is its main advantage. By opposition, the a priori satisfaction of thermodynamic principles constitutes the chief advantage of hyperplasticity theory. Noteworthy is also the fact that this latter approach allows a finer energy partition; in particular, the existence of frozen energy emerges as a natural consequence from its theoretical formulation. On the other hand, the relative difficulty to conjecture an efficient dissipation function to produce accurate predictions is its main drawback. The two theories are thus better viewed as two complementary approaches. Following this comparative study, a methodology to extend the hyperplasticity approach initially developed for dry or saturated materials to the case of partially saturated materials, accounting for interface energies and suction effects, is developed. A particular example based on the yield function of modified Cam-Clay model is then presented. It is shown that the approach developed leads to a model consistent with other existing works.

  18. Equivalence principle implications of modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Lam; Nicolis, Alberto; Stubbs, Christopher W.

    2009-11-15

    Theories that attempt to explain the observed cosmic acceleration by modifying general relativity all introduce a new scalar degree of freedom that is active on large scales, but is screened on small scales to match experiments. We demonstrate that if such screening occurs via the chameleon mechanism, such as in f(R) theory, it is possible to have order unity violation of the equivalence principle, despite the absence of explicit violation in the microscopic action. Namely, extended objects such as galaxies or constituents thereof do not all fall at the same rate. The chameleon mechanism can screen the scalar charge for large objects but not for small ones (large/small is defined by the depth of the gravitational potential and is controlled by the scalar coupling). This leads to order one fluctuations in the ratio of the inertial mass to gravitational mass. We provide derivations in both Einstein and Jordan frames. In Jordan frame, it is no longer true that all objects move on geodesics; only unscreened ones, such as test particles, do. In contrast, if the scalar screening occurs via strong coupling, such as in the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld model, equivalence principle violation occurs at a much reduced level. We propose several observational tests of the chameleon mechanism: 1. small galaxies should accelerate faster than large galaxies, even in environments where dynamical friction is negligible; 2. voids defined by small galaxies would appear larger compared to standard expectations; 3. stars and diffuse gas in small galaxies should have different velocities, even if they are on the same orbits; 4. lensing and dynamical mass estimates should agree for large galaxies but disagree for small ones. We discuss possible pitfalls in some of these tests. The cleanest is the third one where the mass estimate from HI rotational velocity could exceed that from stars by 30% or more. To avoid blanket screening of all objects, the most promising place to look is in

  19. Modified Numerical Simulation Model of Blood Flow in Bend

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X; Zhou, X; Hao, X; Sang, X

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The numerical simulation model of blood flow in bend is studied in this paper. The curvature modification is conducted for the blood flow model in bend to obtain the modified blood flow model in bend. The modified model is verified by U tube. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results obtained by measuring the flow data in U tube, it was found that the modified blood flow model in bend can effectively improve the prediction accuracy of blood flow data affected by the curvature effect. PMID:27398727

  20. Cosmological constraints on the modified entropic force model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hao

    2010-08-01

    Very recently, Verlinde considered a theory in which space is emergent through a holographic scenario, and proposed that gravity can be explained as an entropic force caused by changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. Then, motivated by the Debye model in thermodynamics which is very successful in very low temperatures, Gao modified the entropic force scenario. The modified entropic force (MEF) model is in fact a modified gravity model, and the universe can be accelerated without dark energy. In the present work, we consider the cosmological constraints on the MEF model, and successfully constrain the model parameters to a narrow range. We also discuss many other issues of the MEF model. In particular, we clearly reveal the implicit root to accelerate the universe in the MEF model.

  1. A Modified Dark Energy Model and Quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Dehnavi, Naser; Fathi, Mohsen; Tavakoli, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The observational data indicate that about 70 % of the total energy density of the current state universe has been occupied by Dark Energy. This is said to be the cause of the accelerated expansion of universe. In this letter we shall use a curvature constant as a scalar field in the quintessence Dark Energy model, for an isotropic universe. Connected to the so-called model, we will specify a definite dynamical field equation from the initial action of the theory.

  2. Modified Invasion Percolation Models for Multiphase Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpyn, Zuleima

    2015-01-31

    This project extends current understanding and modeling capabilities of pore-scale multiphase flow physics in porous media. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography imaging experiments are used to investigate structural and surface properties of the medium that influence immiscible displacement. Using experimental and computational tools, we investigate the impact of wetting characteristics, as well as radial and axial loading conditions, on the development of percolation pathways, residual phase trapping and fluid-fluid interfacial areas.

  3. Theoretical modelling of epigenetically modified DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alexandra Teresa Pires; Gouveia, Maria Leonor; Raju Kanna, Charan; Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.; Platts, Jamie; Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2015-01-01

    We report herein a set of calculations designed to examine the effects of epigenetic modifications on the structure of DNA. The incorporation of methyl, hydroxymethyl, formyl and carboxy substituents at the 5-position of cytosine is shown to hardly affect the geometry of CG base pairs, but to result in rather larger changes to hydrogen-bond and stacking binding energies, as predicted by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) methods. The same modifications within double-stranded GCG and ACA trimers exhibit rather larger structural effects, when including the sugar-phosphate backbone as well as sodium counterions and implicit aqueous solvation. In particular, changes are observed in the buckle and propeller angles within base pairs and the slide and roll values of base pair steps, but these leave the overall helical shape of DNA essentially intact. The structures so obtained are useful as a benchmark of faster methods, including molecular mechanics (MM) and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. We show that previously developed MM parameters satisfactorily reproduce the trimer structures, as do QM/MM calculations which treat bases with dispersion-corrected DFT and the sugar-phosphate backbone with AMBER. The latter are improved by inclusion of all six bases in the QM region, since a truncated model including only the central CG base pair in the QM region is considerably further from the DFT structure. This QM/MM method is then applied to a set of double-stranded DNA heptamers derived from a recent X-ray crystallographic study, whose size puts a DFT study beyond our current computational resources. These data show that still larger structural changes are observed than in base pairs or trimers, leading us to conclude that it is important to model epigenetic modifications within realistic molecular contexts. PMID:26448859

  4. ENU mutagenesis to generate genetically modified rat models.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Gould, Michael N; Cuppen, Edwin; Smits, Bart M G

    2010-01-01

    The rat is one of the most preferred model organisms in biomedical research and has been extremely useful for linking physiology and pathology to the genome. However, approaches to genetically modify specific genes in the rat germ line remain relatively scarce. To date, the most efficient approach for generating genetically modified rats has been the target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis-based technology. Here, we describe the detailed protocols for ENU mutagenesis and mutant retrieval in the rat model organism.

  5. A modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii modeling method for hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruili; Tan, Yonghong

    2009-05-01

    A modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii modeling method for rate-independent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators is proposed in this paper. In this method, a generalized backlash operator (GBO) regarded as the elementary operator is introduced into the model so as to be more flexible for modeling of complex hysteresis. Moreover, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to estimate the parameters of the model. Thus, all the parameters of the modified PI model can be determined automatically. From this way, it avoids the tedious procedure for the selection of the operator parameters by trial and error. Then, a group of proper Clarke subgradients of the GBO outputs with respect to their parameters at a non-smooth point is obtained based on the bundle method. Finally, the experimental results of applying the proposed method to the modeling of hysteresis in a piezoelectric actuator and an ultrasonic motor (USM) are illustrated, respectively.

  6. Modified fractal model and rheological properties of colloidal networks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dongming; Marangoni, Alejandro G

    2008-02-15

    The scaling relationship between the storage modulus (G(')) and the volume fraction of solids (Phi) in fat crystal networks has been explained by the fractal model developed by our group. However, many experimental results and simulation studies suggest that the stress distribution within a colloidal network is dramatically heterogeneous, which means that a small part of the network carries most of the stress, while the other part of the network does not contribute much to the elastic properties of the system. This concept was introduced into a modified fractal model. The volume fraction of solids term (Phi) in the original fractal model was replaced by Phi(e), the effective volume fraction of solids, in the modified fractal model, which represents the volume fraction of stress-carrying solids. A proposed expression for Phi(e) is given and a modified expression for the scaling relationship between G(') and Phi is obtained. The modified fractal model fits the experiment data well and successfully explains the sometimes observed nonlinear log-log behavior between the storage modulus of colloidal networks and their volume fraction of solids.

  7. Anterior EEG Asymmetry and the Modifier Model of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnette, Courtney P.; Henderson, Heather A.; Inge, Anne Pradella; Zahka, Nicole E.; Schwartz, Caley B.; Mundy, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    Individual differences in the expression of autism complicate research on the nature and treatment of this disorder. In the Modifier Model of Autism (Mundy et al. 2007), we proposed that individual differences in autism may result not only from syndrome specific causal processes, but also from variability in generic, non-syndrome specific…

  8. A Modified Theoretical Model of Intrinsic Hardness of Crystalline Solids.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fu-Zhi; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-09-08

    Super-hard materials have been extensively investigated due to their practical importance in numerous industrial applications. To stimulate the design and exploration of new super-hard materials, microscopic models that elucidate the fundamental factors controlling hardness are desirable. The present work modified the theoretical model of intrinsic hardness proposed by Gao. In the modification, we emphasize the critical role of appropriately decomposing a crystal to pseudo-binary crystals, which should be carried out based on the valence electron population of each bond. After modification, the model becomes self-consistent and predicts well the hardness values of many crystals, including crystals composed of complex chemical bonds. The modified model provides fundamental insights into the nature of hardness, which can facilitate the quest for intrinsic super-hard materials.

  9. A Modified Theoretical Model of Intrinsic Hardness of Crystalline Solids

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fu-Zhi; Zhou, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Super-hard materials have been extensively investigated due to their practical importance in numerous industrial applications. To stimulate the design and exploration of new super-hard materials, microscopic models that elucidate the fundamental factors controlling hardness are desirable. The present work modified the theoretical model of intrinsic hardness proposed by Gao. In the modification, we emphasize the critical role of appropriately decomposing a crystal to pseudo-binary crystals, which should be carried out based on the valence electron population of each bond. After modification, the model becomes self-consistent and predicts well the hardness values of many crystals, including crystals composed of complex chemical bonds. The modified model provides fundamental insights into the nature of hardness, which can facilitate the quest for intrinsic super-hard materials. PMID:27604165

  10. GENERAL: A modified weighted probabilistic cellular automaton traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Qian; Jia, Bin; Li, Xin-Gang

    2009-08-01

    This paper modifies the weighted probabilistic cellular automaton model (Li X L, Kuang H, Song T, et al 2008 Chin. Phys. B 17 2366) which considered a diversity of traffic behaviors under real traffic situations induced by various driving characters and habits. In the new model, the effects of the velocity at the last time step and drivers' desire for acceleration are taken into account. The fundamental diagram, spatial-temporal diagram, and the time series of one-minute data are analyzed. The results show that this model reproduces synchronized flow. Finally, it simulates the on-ramp system with the proposed model. Some characteristics including the phase diagram are studied.

  11. Speech enhancement using the modified phase-opponency model.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Om D; Espy-Wilson, Carol Y; Carney, Laurel H

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we present a model called the Modified Phase-Opponency (MPO) model for single-channel speech enhancement when the speech is corrupted by additive noise. The MPO model is based on the auditory PO model, proposed for detection of tones in noise. The PO model includes a physiologically realistic mechanism for processing the information in neural discharge times and exploits the frequency-dependent phase properties of the tuned filters in the auditory periphery by using a cross-auditory-nerve-fiber coincidence detection for extracting temporal cues. The MPO model alters the components of the PO model such that the basic functionality of the PO model is maintained but the properties of the model can be analyzed and modified independently. The MPO-based speech enhancement scheme does not need to estimate the noise characteristics nor does it assume that the noise satisfies any statistical model. The MPO technique leads to the lowest value of the LPC-based objective measures and the highest value of the perceptual evaluation of speech quality measure compared to other methods when the speech signals are corrupted by fluctuating noise. Combining the MPO speech enhancement technique with our aperiodicity, periodicity, and pitch detector further improves its performance.

  12. Test of a modified habitat suitability model for bighorn sheep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeigenfuss, L.C.; Singer, F.J.; Gudorf, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Translocation of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) is time, labor, and cost intensive and, therefore, high levels of success are desirable. We tested a widely used habitat suitability model against translocation success and then modified it to include additional factors which improved its usefulness in predicting appropriate translocation sites. The modified Smith habitat suitability model for bighorn sheep was 64% accurate in predicting success or failure of 32 translocations of bighorn sheep into the Rocky Mountains, Colorado Plateau desert, and prairie-badlands of six states. We had sheep location data for 13 populations, and the modified habitat model predicted the areas used by bighorn sheep with greater than 905 accuracy in eight populations, greater than 55% accuracy in four populations, and less than 55% accuracy in one population. Translocations were more successful when sheep were placed into discrete habitat patches containing a high proportion of lambing period habitat (>10% of suitable habitat, p = 0.05), where animals had a migratory tendency (p = 0.02), no contact with domestic sheep (p = 0.02), or greater distance to domestic sheep (>23 km, p = 0.02). Rate of population growth was best predicted by area of lambing period habitat, potential area of winter range, and distance to domestic sheep. We retested the model using these refined criteria and the refined model then predicted success or failure of these 32 translocated populations with 82% accuracy.

  13. Modified-Gravity-GADGET: a new code for cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchwein, Ewald; Baldi, Marco; Springel, Volker

    2013-11-01

    We present a new massively parallel code for N-body and cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models. The code employs a multigrid-accelerated Newton-Gauss-Seidel relaxation solver on an adaptive mesh to efficiently solve for perturbations in the scalar degree of freedom of the modified gravity model. As this new algorithm is implemented as a module for the P-GADGET3 code, it can at the same time follow the baryonic physics included in P-GADGET3, such as hydrodynamics, radiative cooling and star formation. We demonstrate that the code works reliably by applying it to simple test problems that can be solved analytically, as well as by comparing cosmological simulations to results from the literature. Using the new code, we perform the first non-radiative and radiative cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of an f (R)-gravity model. We also discuss the impact of active galactic nucleus feedback on the matter power spectrum, as well as degeneracies between the influence of baryonic processes and modifications of gravity.

  14. Limiting case of modified electroweak model for contracted gauge group

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2011-06-15

    The modification of the Electroweak Model with 3-dimensional spherical geometry in the matter fields space is suggested. The Lagrangian of this model is given by the sum of the free (without any potential term) matter fields Lagrangian and the standard gauge fields Lagrangian. The vector boson masses are generated by transformation of this Lagrangian from Cartesian coordinates to coordinates on the sphere S{sup 3}. The limiting case of the bosonic part of the modified model, which corresponds to the contracted gauge group SU(2; j) x U(1) is discussed. Within framework of the limit model Z boson and electromagnetic fields can be regarded as external ones with respect to W-boson fields in the sence that W-boson fields do not effect on these external fields. The masses of all particles of the Electroweak Model remain the same, but field interactions in contracted model are more simple as compared with the standard Electroweak Model.

  15. The Modified Semidirect Onlay Technique With Articulated Elastic Model.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Efstratios; Diamantopoulou, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    The modified semidirect onlay technique with articulated elastic model involves the fabrication of a stone model that is quickly mounted on an articulator and it includes an elastic part that enables the fabrication of a restoration with proper occlusal anatomy. The technique overcomes the disadvantages of the direct technique such as polymerization shrinkage stress and difficulty in achieving proper contours and, compared to the indirect technique, treatment is completed in a single appointment, without laboratory cost. The novelty of the technique is that, since the restoration is fabricated on an articulated model it eliminates time for occlusal adjustments.

  16. Hydrodynamic modeling of granular flows in a modified Couette cell.

    PubMed

    Jop, Pierre

    2008-03-01

    We present simulations of granular flows in a modified Couette cell, using a continuum model recently proposed for dense granular flows. Based on a friction coefficient, which depends on an inertial number, the model captures the positions of the wide shear bands. We show that a smooth transition in velocity-profile shape occurs when the height of the granular material is increased, leading to a differential rotation of the central part close to the surface. The numerical predictions are in qualitative agreement with previous experimental results. The model provides predictions for the increase of the shear band width when the rotation rate is increased.

  17. Suppression of Spiral Wave in Modified Orengonator Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Jin, Wu-Yin; Yi, Ming; Wang, Chun-Ni

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, a spatial perturbation scheme is proposed to suppress the spiral wave in the modified Orengonator model, which is used to describe the chemical reaction in the light-sensitive media. The controllable external illumination Φ is perturbed with a spatial linear function. In our numerical simulation, the scheme is investigated by imposing the external controllable illumination on the space continuously and/or intermittently. The numerical simulation results confirm that the stable rotating spiral wave still can be removed with the scheme proposed in this paper even if the controllable Φ changed vs. time and space synchronously. Then the scheme is also used to control the spiral wave and turbulence in the modified Fitzhugh Nagumo model. It is found that the scheme is effective to remove the sable rotating and meandering spiral wave but it costs long transient period and intensity of the gradient parameter to eliminate the spiral turbulence.

  18. A solidification model for unmodified, Na-modified and Sr-modified Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedje, N. S.; Hattel, J.; Taylor, J. A.; Easton, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    An addition of small amounts of Na and Sr is commonly used in the industry to modify the eutectic in Al-Si alloys. Both Na and Sr suppress nucleation of the eutectic forcing nucleation and growth to take place at higher undercooling than in the unmodified material. Thus the scale of the eutectic and the shape of the Si crystals are modified to a fine fibrous form so that the ductility of the material is increased. In the present work a one-dimensional numerical model is proposed that describes nucleation and growth of both primary dendrites and eutectic grains as a function of cooling conditions and modification. The model assumes that dendrites nucleate easily when the liquidus temperature is reached and that they grow as heat is extracted by the mould. Nucleation of the eutectic grains depends on local undercooling and growth is governed by a balance between growth of the eutectic grains and the rate at which heat is extracted by the mould. Experimental data is used to determine constants in the nucleation function. It is shown how cooling conditions and mode of modification influence nucleation and growth conditions.

  19. A review on the application of modified continuum models in modeling and simulation of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. F.; Wang, B. L.; Kitamura, T.

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of the mechanical behavior of nanostructures has been very challenging. Surface energy and nonlocal elasticity of materials have been incorporated into the traditional continuum analysis to create modified continuum mechanics models. This paper reviews recent advancements in the applications of such modified continuum models in nanostructures such as nanotubes, nanowires, nanobeams, graphenes, and nanoplates. A variety of models for these nanostructures under static and dynamic loadings are mentioned and reviewed. Applications of surface energy and nonlocal elasticity in analysis of piezoelectric nanomaterials are also mentioned. This paper provides a comprehensive introduction of the development of this area and inspires further applications of modified continuum models in modeling nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  20. Implementation of the Barcelona Basic Model into TOUGH-FLAC for simulations of the geomechanical behavior of unsaturated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Ijiri, Y.; Yamamoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the implementation of the Barcelona Basic Model (BBM) into the TOUGH-FLAC simulator analyzing the geomechanical behavior of unsaturated soils. We implemented the BBM into TOUGH-FLAC by (1) extending an existing FLAC{sup 3D} module for the Modified Cam-Clay (MCC) model in FLAC{sup 3D} and (2) adding computational routines for suction-dependent strain and net stress (i.e., total stress minus gas pressure) for unsaturated soils. We implemented a thermo-elasto-plastic version of the BBM, wherein the soil strength depends on both suction and temperature. The implementation of the BBM into TOUGH-FLAC was verified and tested against several published numerical model simulations and laboratory experiments involving the coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) behavior of unsaturated soils. The simulation tests included modeling the mechanical behavior of bentonite-sand mixtures, which are being considered as back-fill and buffer materials for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. We also tested and demonstrated the use of the BBM and TOUGH-FLAC for a problem involving the coupled THM processes within a bentonite-backfilled nuclear waste emplacement tunnel. The simulation results indicated complex geomechanical behavior of the bentonite backfill, including a nonuniform distribution of buffer porosity and density that could not be captured in an alternative, simplified, linear-elastic swelling model. As a result of the work presented in this paper, TOUGH-FLAC with BBM is now fully operational and ready to be applied to problems associated with nuclear waste disposal in bentonite-backfilled tunnels, as well as other scientific and engineering problems related to the mechanical behavior of unsaturated soils.

  1. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2005-12-15

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy.

  2. A discrete model of a modified Burgers' partial differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.; Shoosmith, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    A new finite-difference scheme is constructed for a modified Burger's equation. Three special cases of the equation are considered, and the 'exact' difference schemes for the space- and time-independent forms of the equation are presented, along with the diffusion-free case of Burger's equation modeled by a difference equation. The desired difference scheme is then obtained by imposing on any difference model of the initial equation the requirement that, in the appropriate limits, its difference scheme must reduce the results of the obtained equations.

  3. Erosion Modeling Analysis For Modified DWPF SME Tank

    SciTech Connect

    LEE, SI

    2004-05-03

    In support of an erosion evaluation for the modified cooling coil guide and its supporting structure in the DWPF SME vessel, a computational model was developed to identify potential sites of high erosion using the same methodology established by previous work. The erosion mechanism identified in the previous work was applied to the evaluation of high erosion locations representative of the actual flow process in the modified coil guide of the SME vessel, abrasive erosion which occurs by high wall shear of viscous liquid. The results show that primary locations of the highest erosion due to the abrasive wall erosion are at the leading edge of the guide, external surface of the insert plate, the tank floor next to the insert plate of the coil guide support, and the upstream lead-in plate. The present modeling results show a good comparison between the original and the modified cases in terms of high erosion sites, as well as the degree of erosion and the calculated shear stress. Wall she ar of the tank floor is reduced by about 30 per cent because of the new coil support plate. Calculations for the impeller speed lower than 103 rpm in the SME showed similar erosion patterns but significantly reduced wall shear stresses and reduced overall erosion. Comparisons of the 103 rpm results with SME measurements indicated that no significant erosion of the tank floor in the SME is to be expected. Thus, it is recommended that the agitator speed of SME does not exceed 103 rpm.

  4. Conceptual model for assessment of inhalation exposure: defining modifying factors.

    PubMed

    Tielemans, Erik; Schneider, Thomas; Goede, Henk; Tischer, Martin; Warren, Nick; Kromhout, Hans; Van Tongeren, Martie; Van Hemmen, Joop; Cherrie, John W

    2008-10-01

    The present paper proposes a source-receptor model to schematically describe inhalation exposure to help understand the complex processes leading to inhalation of hazardous substances. The model considers a stepwise transfer of a contaminant from the source to the receptor. The conceptual model is constructed using three components, i.e. (i) the source, (ii) various transmission compartments and (iii) the receptor, and describes the contaminant's emission and its pattern of transport. Based on this conceptual model, a list of nine mutually independent principal modifying factors (MFs) is proposed: activity emission potential, substance emission potential, localized control, separation, segregation, dilution, worker behavior, surface contamination and respiratory protection. These MFs describe the exposure process at a high level of abstraction so that the model can be generically applicable. A list of exposure determinants underlying each of these principal MFs is proposed to describe the exposure process at a more detailed level. The presented conceptual model is developed in conjunction with an activity taxonomy as described in a separate paper. The proposed conceptual model and MFs should be seen as 'building blocks' for development of higher tier exposure models.

  5. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  6. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-05-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  7. Temperature-dependent bursting pattern analysis by modified Plant model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Many electrophysiological properties of neuron including firing rates and rhythmical oscillation change in response to a temperature variation, but the mechanism underlying these correlations remains unverified. In this study, we analyzed various action potential (AP) parameters of bursting pacemaker neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia juliana to examine whether or not bursting patterns are altered in response to temperature change. Here we found that the inter-burst interval, burst duration, and number of spike during burst decreased as temperature increased. On the other hand, the numbers of bursts per minute and numbers of spikes per minute increased and then decreased, but interspike interval during burst firstly decreased and then increased. We also tested the reproducibility of temperature-dependent changes in bursting patterns and AP parameters. Finally we performed computational simulations of these phenomena by using a modified Plant model composed of equations with temperature-dependent scaling factors to mathematically clarify the temperature-dependent changes of bursting patterns in burst-firing neurons. Taken together, we found that the modified Plant model could trace the ionic mechanism underlying the temperature-dependent change in bursting pattern from experiments with bursting pacemaker neurons in the abdominal ganglia of Aplysia juliana. PMID:25051923

  8. A user-friendly modified pore-solid fractal model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dian-yuan; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Hao; Si, Bing-cheng; Hill, Robert Lee

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a range of calculation points on water retention curves (WRC) instead of the singularity point at air-entry suction in the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model, which additionally considered the hysteresis effect based on the PSF theory. The modified pore-solid fractal (M-PSF) model was tested using 26 soil samples from Yangling on the Loess Plateau in China and 54 soil samples from the Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Database. The derivation results showed that the M-PSF model is user-friendly and flexible for a wide range of calculation point options. This model theoretically describes the primary differences between the soil moisture desorption and the adsorption processes by the fractal dimensions. The M-PSF model demonstrated good performance particularly at the calculation points corresponding to the suctions from 100 cm to 1000 cm. Furthermore, the M-PSF model, used the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution, exhibited an accepted performance of WRC predictions for different textured soils when the suction values were ≥100 cm. To fully understand the function of hysteresis in the PSF theory, the role of allowable and accessible pores must be examined. PMID:27996013

  9. A user-friendly modified pore-solid fractal model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dian-Yuan; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Hao; Si, Bing-Cheng; Hill, Robert Lee

    2016-12-20

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a range of calculation points on water retention curves (WRC) instead of the singularity point at air-entry suction in the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model, which additionally considered the hysteresis effect based on the PSF theory. The modified pore-solid fractal (M-PSF) model was tested using 26 soil samples from Yangling on the Loess Plateau in China and 54 soil samples from the Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Database. The derivation results showed that the M-PSF model is user-friendly and flexible for a wide range of calculation point options. This model theoretically describes the primary differences between the soil moisture desorption and the adsorption processes by the fractal dimensions. The M-PSF model demonstrated good performance particularly at the calculation points corresponding to the suctions from 100 cm to 1000 cm. Furthermore, the M-PSF model, used the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution, exhibited an accepted performance of WRC predictions for different textured soils when the suction values were ≥100 cm. To fully understand the function of hysteresis in the PSF theory, the role of allowable and accessible pores must be examined.

  10. A user-friendly modified pore-solid fractal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dian-Yuan; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Hao; Si, Bing-Cheng; Hill, Robert Lee

    2016-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a range of calculation points on water retention curves (WRC) instead of the singularity point at air-entry suction in the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model, which additionally considered the hysteresis effect based on the PSF theory. The modified pore-solid fractal (M-PSF) model was tested using 26 soil samples from Yangling on the Loess Plateau in China and 54 soil samples from the Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Database. The derivation results showed that the M-PSF model is user-friendly and flexible for a wide range of calculation point options. This model theoretically describes the primary differences between the soil moisture desorption and the adsorption processes by the fractal dimensions. The M-PSF model demonstrated good performance particularly at the calculation points corresponding to the suctions from 100 cm to 1000 cm. Furthermore, the M-PSF model, used the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution, exhibited an accepted performance of WRC predictions for different textured soils when the suction values were ≥100 cm. To fully understand the function of hysteresis in the PSF theory, the role of allowable and accessible pores must be examined.

  11. A modified two-lane traffic model considering drivers' personality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. B.; Zhang, N. X.; Wu, W. J.

    2015-06-01

    Based on the two-lane traffic model proposed by Chowdhury et al., a modified traffic model (R-STCA model, for short) is presented, in which the new symmetric lane changing rules are introduced by considering driving behavioral difference and dynamic headway. After the numerical simulation, a broad scattering of simulated points is exhibited in the moderate density region on the flow-density plane. The synchronized flow phase accompanied with the wide moving jam phase is reproduced. The spatial-temporal profiles indicate that the vehicles move according to the R-STCA model can change lane more easily and more realistically. Then vehicles are convenient to get rid of the slow vehicles that turn into plugs ahead, and hence the capacity increases. Furthermore the phenomenon of the high speed car-following is discovered by using the R-STCA model, which has been already observed in the traffic measured data. All these results indicate that the presented model is reasonable and more realistic.

  12. Modified Chaplygin gas inspired inflationary model in braneworld scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila; Mohsaneen, Sidra

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the modified Chaplygin gas inspired inflationary regime in the brane-world framework in the presence of standard and tachyon scalar fields. We consider the intermediate inflationary scenario and construct the slow-roll parameters, e-folding numbers, spectral index, scalar and tensor power spectra, tensor to scalar ratio for both scalar field models. We develop the ns - N and r - N planes and concluded that ns˜eq96^{+0.5}_{-0.5} and r≤0.0016 for N˜eq60^{+5}_{-5} in both cases of scalar field models as well as for all values of m. These constraints are consistent with observational data such as WMAP7, WMAP9 and Planck data.

  13. Modified pendulum model for mean step length estimation.

    PubMed

    González, Rafael C; Alvarez, Diego; López, Antonio M; Alvarez, Juan C

    2007-01-01

    Step length estimation is an important issue in areas such as gait analysis, sport training or pedestrian localization. It has been shown that the mean step length can be computed by means of a triaxial accelerometer placed near the center of gravity of the human body. Estimations based on the inverted pendulum model are prone to underestimate the step length, and must be corrected by calibration. In this paper we present a modified pendulum model in which all the parameters correspond to anthropometric data of the individual. The method has been tested with a set of volunteers, both males and females. Experimental results show that this method provides an unbiased estimation of the actual displacement with a standard deviation lower than 2.1%.

  14. Ultralocal models of modified gravity without kinetic term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Rizzo, Luca Alberto; Valageas, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    We present a class of modified-gravity theories which we call ultralocal models. We add a scalar field, with negligible kinetic terms, to the Einstein-Hilbert action. We also introduce a conformal coupling to matter. This gives rise to a new screening mechanism which is not entirely due to the nonlinearity of the scalar-field potential or the coupling function but to the absence of the kinetic term. As a result this removes any fifth force between isolated objects in vacuum. It turns out that these models are similar to chameleon-type theories with a large mass when considered outside the Compton wavelength but differ on shorter scales. The predictions of these models only depend on a single free function, as the potential and the coupling function are degenerate, with an amplitude given by a parameter α ≲10-6 , whose magnitude springs from requiring a small modification of Newton's potential astrophysically and cosmologically. This singles out a redshift zα˜α-1 /3≳100 where the fifth force is the greatest. The cosmological background follows the Λ cold dark matter (Λ CDM ) history within a 10-6 accuracy, while cosmological perturbations are significantly enhanced (or damped) on small scales, k ≳2 h Mpc-1 at z =0 . The spherical collapse and the halo mass function are modified in the same manner. We find that the modifications of gravity are greater for galactic or subgalactic structures. We also present a thermodynamic analysis of the nonlinear and inhomogeneous fifth-force regime where we find that the Universe is not made more inhomogeneous before zα when the fifth force dominates, and does not lead to the existence of clumped matter on extra small scales inside halos for large masses while this possibility exists for masses M ≲1 011M⊙ where the phenomenology of ultralocal models would be most different from Λ CDM .

  15. A modified symplectic PRK scheme for seismic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaolin; Yang, Dinghui; Ma, Jian

    2017-02-01

    A new scheme for the temporal discretization of the seismic wave equation is constructed based on symplectic geometric theory and a modified strategy. The ordinary differential equation in terms of time, which is obtained after spatial discretization via the spectral-element method, is transformed into a Hamiltonian system. A symplectic partitioned Runge-Kutta (PRK) scheme is used to solve the Hamiltonian system. A term related to the multiplication of the spatial discretization operator with the seismic wave velocity vector is added into the symplectic PRK scheme to create a modified symplectic PRK scheme. The symplectic coefficients of the new scheme are determined via Taylor series expansion. The positive coefficients of the scheme indicate that its long-term computational capability is more powerful than that of conventional symplectic schemes. An exhaustive theoretical analysis reveals that the new scheme is highly stable and has low numerical dispersion. The results of three numerical experiments demonstrate the high efficiency of this method for seismic wave modeling.

  16. A marked correlation function for constraining modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Future large scale structure surveys will provide increasingly tight constraints on our cosmological model. These surveys will report results on the distance scale and growth rate of perturbations through measurements of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations and Redshift-Space Distortions. It is interesting to ask: what further analyses should become routine, so as to test as-yet-unknown models of cosmic acceleration? Models which aim to explain the accelerated expansion rate of the Universe by modifications to General Relativity often invoke screening mechanisms which can imprint a non-standard density dependence on their predictions. This suggests density-dependent clustering as a `generic' constraint. This paper argues that a density-marked correlation function provides a density-dependent statistic which is easy to compute and report and requires minimal additional infrastructure beyond what is routinely available to such survey analyses. We give one realization of this idea and study it using low order perturbation theory. We encourage groups developing modified gravity theories to see whether such statistics provide discriminatory power for their models.

  17. Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escofet, Anna; Elizalde, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    The following issue is addressed: How the addition of a Gauss-Bonnet term (generically coming from most fundamental theories, as string and M theories), to a viable model, can change the specific properties, and even the physical nature, of the corresponding cosmological solutions? Specifically, brand new original dark energy models are obtained in this way with quite interesting properties, which exhibit, in a unified fashion, the three distinguished possible cosmological phases corresponding to phantom matter, quintessence and ordinary matter, respectively. A model, in which the equation of state (EoS) parameter, w, is a function of time, is seen to lead either to a singularity of the Big Rip kind or to a bouncing solution which evolves into a de Sitter universe with w = -1. Moreover, new Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior in the early stages of the universe evolution are obtained and tested for the validity and stability of the corresponding solutions. They allow for a remarkably natural, unified description of a bouncing behavior at early times and accelerated expansion at present.

  18. Entropy corrected holographic dark energy models in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Azhar, Nadeem; Rani, Shamaila

    We consider the power law and the entropy corrected holographic dark energy (HDE) models with Hubble horizon in the dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity. We explore various cosmological parameters and planes in this framework. The Hubble parameter lies within the consistent range at the present and later epoch for both entropy corrected models. The deceleration parameter explains the accelerated expansion of the universe. The equation of state (EoS) parameter corresponds to quintessence and cold dark matter (ΛCDM) limit. The ωΛ‑ωΛ‧ approaches to ΛCDM limit and freezing region in both entropy corrected models. The statefinder parameters are consistent with ΛCDM limit and dark energy (DE) models. The generalized second law of thermodynamics remain valid in all cases of interacting parameter. It is interesting to mention here that our results of Hubble, EoS parameter and ωΛ‑ωΛ‧ plane show consistency with the present observations like Planck, WP, BAO, H0, SNLS and nine-year WMAP.

  19. Vector field models of modified gravity and the dark sector

    SciTech Connect

    Zuntz, J.; Ferreira, P. G.; Zlosnik, T. G; Bourliot, F.; Starkman, G. D.

    2010-05-15

    We present a comprehensive investigation of cosmological constraints on the class of vector field formulations of modified gravity called generalized Einstein-aether models. Using linear perturbation theory we generate cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure spectra for general parameters of the theory, and then constrain them in various ways. We investigate two parameter regimes: a dark matter candidate where the vector field sources structure formation, and a dark energy candidate where it causes late-time acceleration. We find that the dark matter candidate does not fit the data, and identify five physical problems that can restrict this and other theories of dark matter. The dark energy candidate does fit the data, and we constrain its fundamental parameters; most notably we find that the theory's kinetic index parameter n{sub ae} can differ significantly from its {Lambda}CDM value.

  20. Anterior EEG asymmetry and the Modifier Model of Autism.

    PubMed

    Burnette, Courtney P; Henderson, Heather A; Inge, Anne Pradella; Zahka, Nicole E; Schwartz, Caley B; Mundy, Peter C

    2011-08-01

    Individual differences in the expression of autism complicate research on the nature and treatment of this disorder. In the Modifier Model of Autism (Mundy et al. 2007), we proposed that individual differences in autism may result not only from syndrome specific causal processes, but also from variability in generic, non-syndrome specific modifier processes that affect the social and emotional development of all people. One study supporting this model found that measures of resting anterior EEG asymmetry, a measure reflecting complex brain processes associated with generic individual differences in approach and avoidance motivation, may help explain differences in the expression of autism in children without intellectual disabilities (Sutton et al. 2005). In the current study, we partially replicated the observation that children with autism who exhibited a pattern of left frontal EEG asymmetry tended to display milder levels of social symptoms, although in the current sample this pattern applied only to HFA children with relatively lower verbal IQs. New observations indicated that left frontal EEG asymmetry was also associated with retrospective parent reports of significantly later age of onset of symptoms, but also higher levels of self-reported outward expressions of anger as well as symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder in school-age higher functioning children with ASD. Therefore, the results of this study provide a new and fully independent set of observations, which indicate that individual differences in anterior EEG asymmetry may significantly moderate the expression and developmental course of autism. This observation may have clinical implications for identifying meaningful diagnostic sub-groups among children with autism.

  1. Geographically Isolated Wetlands and Catchment Hydrology: A Modified Model Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, G.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.; D'Amico, E.

    2014-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), typically defined as depressional wetlands surrounded by uplands, support an array of hydrological and ecological processes. However, key research questions concerning the hydrological connectivity of GIWs and their impacts on downgradient surface waters remain unanswered. This is particularly important for regulation and management of these systems. For example, in the past decade United States Supreme Court decisions suggest that GIWs can be afforded protection if significant connectivity exists between these waters and traditional navigable waters. Here we developed a simulation procedure to quantify the effects of various spatial distributions of GIWs across the landscape on the downgradient hydrograph using a refined version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a catchment-scale hydrological simulation model. We modified the SWAT FORTRAN source code and employed an alternative hydrologic response unit (HRU) definition to facilitate an improved representation of GIW hydrologic processes and connectivity relationships to other surface waters, and to quantify their downgradient hydrological effects. We applied the modified SWAT model to an ~ 202 km2 catchment in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, USA, exhibiting a substantial population of mapped GIWs. Results from our series of GIW distribution scenarios suggest that: (1) Our representation of GIWs within SWAT conforms to field-based characterizations of regional GIWs in most respects; (2) GIWs exhibit substantial seasonally-dependent effects upon downgradient base flow; (3) GIWs mitigate peak flows, particularly following high rainfall events; and (4) The presence of GIWs on the landscape impacts the catchment water balance (e.g., by increasing groundwater outflows). Our outcomes support the hypothesis that GIWs have an important catchment-scale effect on downgradient streamflow.

  2. Modified Navier-Stokes model for nonequilibrium stationary states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Colin, L. S.; Velasco, R. M.

    1982-10-01

    A hydrodynamic model is developed in order to study the features of the behavior of a fluid which is brought to a stationary state by the action of an external gradient in the cases of the action of a thermal gradient and of a constant shear rate. An examination of the sound absorption of the fluid shows that the Stokes-Kirchhoff formula is modified by the presence of the gradients, which suggests an experimental verification of the model which is independent of the magnitude of the real wave vector. In addition, the light scattering of the fluid is examined by computing the Brillouin-Rayleigh spectra which yields in both cases the same shift in the Brillouin peaks previously predicted. However, a small change in the intensity of the peaks due to the modification of the sound-absorption coefficient is predicted by this model. Calculations show a shift of the Rayleigh peak arising from the entropy flow in the case of the thermal gradient and an entropy-production term in the case of the constant rate of shear, while in both cases the order of magnitude of this correction in terms of the wave vector is the same as the terms responsible for the shift in the Brillouin peaks.

  3. Modified Petri net model sensitivity to workload manipulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. A.; Mackinnon, D. P.; Lyman, J.

    1986-01-01

    Modified Petri Nets (MPNs) are investigated as a workload modeling tool. The results of an exploratory study of the sensitivity of MPNs to work load manipulations in a dual task are described. Petri nets have been used to represent systems with asynchronous, concurrent and parallel activities (Peterson, 1981). These characteristics led some researchers to suggest the use of Petri nets in workload modeling where concurrent and parallel activities are common. Petri nets are represented by places and transitions. In the workload application, places represent operator activities and transitions represent events. MPNs have been used to formally represent task events and activities of a human operator in a man-machine system. Some descriptive applications demonstrate the usefulness of MPNs in the formal representation of systems. It is the general hypothesis herein that in addition to descriptive applications, MPNs may be useful for workload estimation and prediction. The results are reported of the first of a series of experiments designed to develop and test a MPN system of workload estimation and prediction. This first experiment is a screening test of MPN model general sensitivity to changes in workload. Positive results from this experiment will justify the more complicated analyses and techniques necessary for developing a workload prediction system.

  4. Modeling flow for modified concentric cylinder rheometer geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekeruche, Karen; Connelly, Kelly; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz

    2016-11-01

    Rheology experiments on biological fluids can be difficult when samples are limited in volume, sensitive to degradation, and delicate to extract from tissues. A probe-like geometry has been developed to perform shear creep experiments on biological fluids and to use the creep response to characterize fluid material properties. This probe geometry is a modified concentric cylinder setup, where the gap is large and we assume the inner cylinder rotates in an infinite fluid. To validate this assumption we perform shear creep tests with the designed probe on Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids and vary the outer cylinder container diameter. We have also created a numerical model based on the probe geometry setup to compare with experimental results at different outer cylinder diameters. A creep test is modeled by applying rotation to the inner cylinder and solving for the deformation of the fluid throughout the gap. Steady state viscosity values are calculated from creep compliance curves and compared between experimental and numerical results.

  5. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM).

  6. Onset of simple liquid behaviour in modified water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Saurav; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2014-04-01

    The transition to simple liquid behaviour is studied in a set of modified hybrid water models where the potential energy contribution of the Lennard-Jones dispersion-repulsion contribution is progressively enhanced relative to the electrostatic contribution. Characteristics of simple liquid behaviour that indicate the extent to which a given system can be mapped onto an inverse power law fluid are examined, including configurational energy-virial correlations, functional form of temperature dependence of the excess entropy along isochores, and thermodynamic and excess entropy scaling of diffusivities. As the Lennard-Jones contribution to the potential energy function increases, the strength of the configurational energy-virial correlations increases. The Rosenfeld-Tarazona temperature dependence of the excess entropy is found to hold for the range of state points studied here for all the hybrid models, regardless of the degree of correlating character. Thermodynamic scaling is found to hold for weakly polar fluids with a moderate degree of energy-virial correlations. Rosenfeld-scaling of transport properties is found not to be necessarily linked with the strength of energy-virial correlations but may hold for systems with poor thermodynamic scaling if diffusivities and excess entropies show correlated departures from the isomorph-invariant behaviour characteristic of approximate inverse power law fluids. The state-point dependence of the configurational energy-virial correlation coefficient and the implications for thermodynamic and excess entropy scalings are considered.

  7. Onset of simple liquid behaviour in modified water models

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Saurav; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2014-04-28

    The transition to simple liquid behaviour is studied in a set of modified hybrid water models where the potential energy contribution of the Lennard-Jones dispersion-repulsion contribution is progressively enhanced relative to the electrostatic contribution. Characteristics of simple liquid behaviour that indicate the extent to which a given system can be mapped onto an inverse power law fluid are examined, including configurational energy-virial correlations, functional form of temperature dependence of the excess entropy along isochores, and thermodynamic and excess entropy scaling of diffusivities. As the Lennard-Jones contribution to the potential energy function increases, the strength of the configurational energy-virial correlations increases. The Rosenfeld-Tarazona temperature dependence of the excess entropy is found to hold for the range of state points studied here for all the hybrid models, regardless of the degree of correlating character. Thermodynamic scaling is found to hold for weakly polar fluids with a moderate degree of energy-virial correlations. Rosenfeld-scaling of transport properties is found not to be necessarily linked with the strength of energy-virial correlations but may hold for systems with poor thermodynamic scaling if diffusivities and excess entropies show correlated departures from the isomorph-invariant behaviour characteristic of approximate inverse power law fluids. The state-point dependence of the configurational energy-virial correlation coefficient and the implications for thermodynamic and excess entropy scalings are considered.

  8. Pattern formation through spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Primavera, Leonardo; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    The Daisyworld model is based on a hypothetical planet, like the Earth, which receives the radiant energy coming from a Sun-like star, and populated by two kinds of identical plants differing by their colour: white daisies reflecting light and black daisies absorbing light. The interactions and feedbacks between the collective biota of the planet and the incoming radiation form a self-regulating system where the conditions for life are maintained. We investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model where a spatial dependency on latitude is introduced, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitude and a simple greenhouse model are included. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can generate some equilibrium patterns which can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate new equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions. The extension to spatial Daisyworld gives room to the possibility of inhomogeneous solar forcing in a curved planet, with explicit differences between poles and equator and the direct use of the heat diffusion equation. As a first approach, to describe a spherical planet, we consider the temperature T(θ,t) and the surface coverage as depending only on time and on latitude θ (-90° ≤ θ ≤ 90°). A second step is the introduction of the greenhouse effect in the model, the process by which outgoing infrared radiation is partly screened by greenhouse gases. This effect can be described by relaxing the black-body radiation hypothesis and by introducing a grayness function g(T) in the heat equation. As a third step, we consider a latitude dependence of the Earth's conductivity, χ = χ(θ). Considering these terms, using spherical coordinates and symmetry with respect to θ, the modified Daisyworld equations reduce to the

  9. Hyperon stars in a modified quark meson coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. N.; Sahoo, H. S.; Panda, P. K.; Barik, N.; Frederico, T.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter with the inclusion of hyperons in a self-consistent manner by using a modified quark meson coupling model where the confining interaction for quarks inside a baryon is represented by a phenomenological average potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The hadron-hadron interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to σ ,ω , and ρ mesons through mean-field approximations. The effect of a nonlinear ω -ρ term on the EOS is studied. The hyperon couplings are fixed from the optical potential values and the mass-radius curve is determined satisfying the maximum mass constraint of 2 M⊙ for neutron stars, as determined in recent measurements of the pulsar PSR J0348+0432. We also observe that there is no significant advantage of introducing the nonlinear ω -ρ term in the context of obtaining the star mass constraint in the present set of parametrizations.

  10. Prospects for genetically modified non-human primate models, including the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Genetically modified mice have contributed much to studies in the life sciences. In some research fields, however, mouse models are insufficient for analyzing the molecular mechanisms of pathology or as disease models. Often, genetically modified non-human primate (NHP) models are desired, as they are more similar to human physiology, morphology, and anatomy. Recent progress in studies of the reproductive biology in NHPs has enabled the introduction of exogenous genes into NHP genomes or the alteration of endogenous NHP genes. This review summarizes recent progress in the production of genetically modified NHPs, including the common marmoset, and future perspectives for realizing genetically modified NHP models for use in life sciences research.

  11. Aftershocks and Omori's law in a modified Carlson-Langer model with nonlinear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Okamura, Kazuki

    2015-05-01

    A modified Carlson-Langer model for earthquakes is proposed, which includes nonlinear viscoelasticity. Several aftershocks are generated after the main shock owing to the damping of the additional viscoelastic force. Both the Gutenberg-Richter law and Omori's law are reproduced in a numerical simulation of the modified Carlson-Langer model on a critical percolation cluster of a square lattice.

  12. Multi-Valued Neural Network Modified Model and Its Optical Realization,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-07

    This paper presents a modified optical neural networK model, and the optical system, constructed with spatial light modulator PROM, can materialize...modified model improves cognitive ability of an optical neural network and also improves the storage capacity to a certain extent.

  13. Modeling Particle Rolling Behavior by the Modified Eccentric Circle Model of DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi-Long; Chen, Tsung-Hsien; Weng, Meng-Chia

    2012-09-01

    This study proposes a modified eccentric circle model to simulate the rolling resistance of circle particles through the distinct element method (DEM) simulation. The proposed model contains two major concepts: eccentric circle and local rotational damping. The mass center of a circular particle is first adjusted slightly for eccentricity to provide rotational stiffness. Local rotational damping is adopted to dissipate energy in the rotational direction. These associated material parameters can be obtained easily from the rolling behavior of one rod. This study verifies the proposed model with the repose angle tests of chalk rod assemblies, and the simulated results were satisfactory. Simulations using other existing models were also conducted for comparison, showing that the proposed model achieved better results. A landslide model test was further simulated, and this simulation agreed with both the failure pattern and the sliding process. In conclusion, particle rolling simulation using the proposed model appears to approach the actual particle trajectory, making it useful for various applications.

  14. Reduced-order model based feedback control of the modified Hasegawa-Wakatani model

    SciTech Connect

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Ma, Z.; Gates, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; Parker, J. B.

    2013-04-15

    In this work, the development of model-based feedback control that stabilizes an unstable equilibrium is obtained for the Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation (a model reduction technique that has proven successful in flow control design problems) is applied to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. Then, a model-based feedback controller is designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators. Finally, a linear quadratic Gaussian controller which is more resistant to disturbances is deduced. The controller is applied on the non-reduced, nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulence.

  15. Employing a Modified Diffuser Momentum Model to Simulate Ventilation of the Orion CEV (DRAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, John; Ball, Tyler; OHara, William; Barido, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used to model the flow field in the Orion CEV cabin. The CFD model employs a momentum model used to account for the effect of supply grilles on the supply flow. The momentum model is modified to account for non-uniform velocity profiles at the approach of the supply grille. The modified momentum model is validated against a detailed vane-resolved model before inclusion into the Orion CEV cabin model. Results for this comparison, as well as that of a single ventilation configuration are presented.

  16. A Modified Theta Projection Model for Creep Behavior of Metals and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manish; Singh, I. V.; Mishra, B. K.; Ahmad, S.; Venugopal Rao, A.; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a modified theta projection model is proposed for the constitutive modeling of creep behavior of metals and alloys. In the conventional theta projection model, strain hardening exponent is a function of time and theta, whereas in the modified theta projection model, the exponent is taken as a function of time, theta, and applied stress. The results obtained by the modified theta projection model for Al 2124 T851 alloy at constant uniaxial tensile stress are compared with the experimental results and with the predictions of the conventional theta projection method. The creep behavior of Al 7075 T651 alloy is also predicted using modified and conventional theta projection model and compared with the available experimental data. It is observed that the modified theta projection model captures the creep behavior more accurately as compared to the conventional theta projection model. The modified theta projection model can be used to predict the creep strain of pure metals and class M alloys (similar creep behavior to pure metals) for intermediate range of stress and temperature.

  17. Accurate Critical Parameters for the Modified Lennard-Jones Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazuma; Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    The critical parameters of the modified Lennard-Jones system were examined. The isothermal-isochoric ensemble was generated by conducting a molecular dynamics simulation for the system consisting of 6912, 8788, 10976, and 13500 particles. The equilibrium between the liquid and vapor phases was judged from the chemical potential of both phases upon establishing the coexistence envelope, from which the critical temperature and density were obtained invoking the renormalization group theory. The finite-size scaling enabled us to finally determine the critical temperature, pressure, and density as Tc = 1.0762(2), pc = 0.09394(17), and ρc = 0.331(3), respectively.

  18. Results on a binding neuron model and their implications for modified hourglass model for neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Viswanathan; Akhavan-Tabatabaei, Raha; Lopez, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The classical models of single neuron like Hodgkin-Huxley point neuron or leaky integrate and fire neuron assume the influence of postsynaptic potentials to last till the neuron fires. Vidybida (2008) in a refreshing departure has proposed models for binding neurons in which the trace of an input is remembered only for a finite fixed period of time after which it is forgotten. The binding neurons conform to the behaviour of real neurons and are applicable in constructing fast recurrent networks for computer modeling. This paper develops explicitly several useful results for a binding neuron like the firing time distribution and other statistical characteristics. We also discuss the applicability of the developed results in constructing a modified hourglass network model in which there are interconnected neurons with excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs. Limited simulation results of the hourglass network are presented.

  19. Modified 2CLJDQP model and the second virial coefficients for linear molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Sheng; He, Mao-Gang

    2014-12-01

    A modified form of 2CLJDQP potential model is proposed to calculate the second virial coefficients of two-center Lennard-Jones molecules. In the presented potential model, the potential parameters σ and ɛ are considered as the temperature-dependent parameters in the form of hyperbolical temperature function based on the theory of temperature-dependent potential parameters. With this modified model, the second virial coefficients of some homonuclear molecules (such as O2, Cl2, CH3CH3, and CF3CF3) and heteronuclear molecules (such as CO, NO, CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3CF3, CH3CHF2, and CF3CH2F) are calculated. Then the Lorentz—Berthelot mixing rule is modified with a temperature-dependent expression, and the second virial coefficients of the heteronuclear molecules (such as CH3F, CH3Cl, and CH3CF3) are calculated. Moreover, CO2 and N2O are also studied with the modified 3CLJDQP model. The calculated results from the modified 2CLJDQP model accord better with the experimental data than those from the original model. It is shown that the presented model improves the positive deviation in low temperature range and negative deviation in high temperature range. So the modified 2CLJDQP potential model with the temperature-dependent parameters can be employed satisfactorily in large temperature range.

  20. The modified Black-Scholes model via constant elasticity of variance for stock options valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edeki, S. O.; Owoloko, E. A.; Ugbebor, O. O.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the classical Black-Scholes option pricing model is visited. We present a modified version of the Black-Scholes model via the application of the constant elasticity of variance model (CEVM); in this case, the volatility of the stock price is shown to be a non-constant function unlike the assumption of the classical Black-Scholes model.

  1. A Modified Pressure-Impulse Blast Damage Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    rndldontffy by b!ock number) ComputerSimulation Iso -DamageModeling StructuralDamageModeling Overpressure Blast Damage ZO.ABSTRACT(==@nJ*UMr-W- ti+~f~ -fd.tuf...11 2. Pressure-Impulse Iso -Damage Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3. Representation of Youngdahl’s Model...and REPSIL Computer Codes . , . . 29 II. Single Degree-of-Freedom Iso -Damage Data . . . . . . . . 32 III. Five Degree-of-FreedomIso-Damage Data

  2. USE OF MODELING APPROACHES TO UNDERSTAND POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED PLANTS ON PLANT COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model development is of interest to ecologists, regulators and developers, since it may assist theoretical understanding, decision making in experimental design, product development and risk assessment. In order to predict the potential impacts of genetically modified (GM) plants...

  3. Anisotropic stress and stability in modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Saltas, Ippocratis D.; Kunz, Martin

    2011-03-15

    The existence of anisotropic stress of a purely geometrical origin seems to be a characteristic of higher order gravity models, and has been suggested as a probe to test these models observationally, for example, in weak lensing experiments. In this paper, we seek to find a class of higher order gravity models of f(R,G) type that would give us a zero anisotropic stress and study the consequences for the viability of the actual model. For the special case of a de Sitter background, we identify a subclass of models with the desired property. We also find a direct link between anisotropic stress and the stability of the model as well as the presence of extra degrees of freedom, which seems to be a general feature of higher order gravity models. Particularly, setting the anisotropic stress equal to zero for a de Sitter background leads to a singularity that makes it impossible to reach the de Sitter evolution.

  4. A Modified Mechanical Threshold Stress Constitutive Model for Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. Sajun; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Singh, Yashjeet; Singh, Swadesh Kumar

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a modified mechanical threshold stress (m-MTS) constitutive model. The m-MTS model incorporates variable athermal and dynamic strain aging (DSA) Components to accurately predict the flow stress behavior of austenitic stainless steels (ASS)-316 and 304. Under strain rate variations between 0.01-0.0001 s-1, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 50-650 °C to evaluate the material constants of constitutive models. The test results revealed the high dependence of flow stress on strain, strain rate and temperature. In addition, it was observed that DSA occurred at elevated temperatures and very low strain rates, causing an increase in flow stress. While the original MTS model is capable of predicting the flow stress behavior for ASS, statistical parameters point out the inefficiency of the model when compared to other models such as Johnson Cook model, modified Zerilli-Armstrong (m-ZA) model, and modified Arrhenius-type equations (m-Arr). Therefore, in order to accurately model both the DSA and non-DSA regimes, the original MTS model was modified by incorporating variable athermal and DSA components. The suitability of the m-MTS model was assessed by comparing the statistical parameters. It was observed that the m-MTS model was highly accurate for the DSA regime when compared to the existing models. However, models like m-ZA and m-Arr showed better results for the non-DSA regime.

  5. Emergence of Influential Spreaders in Modified Rumor Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Meloni, Sandro; Gonçalves, Bruno; Moreno, Yamir

    2013-04-01

    The burst in the use of online social networks over the last decade has provided evidence that current rumor spreading models miss some fundamental ingredients in order to reproduce how information is disseminated. In particular, recent literature has revealed that these models fail to reproduce the fact that some nodes in a network have an influential role when it comes to spread a piece of information. In this work, we introduce two mechanisms with the aim of filling the gap between theoretical and experimental results. The first model introduces the assumption that spreaders are not always active whereas the second model considers the possibility that an ignorant is not interested in spreading the rumor. In both cases, results from numerical simulations show a higher adhesion to real data than classical rumor spreading models. Our results shed some light on the mechanisms underlying the spreading of information and ideas in large social systems and pave the way for more realistic diffusion models.

  6. A-Priori Tuning of Modified Magnussen Combustion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, A. T.

    2016-01-01

    In the application of CFD to turbulent reacting flows, one of the main limitations to predictive accuracy is the chemistry model. Using a full or skeletal kinetics model may provide good predictive ability, however, at considerable computational cost. Adding the ability to account for the interaction between turbulence and chemistry improves the overall fidelity of a simulation but adds to this cost. An alternative is the use of simple models, such as the Magnussen model, which has negligible computational overhead, but lacks general predictive ability except for cases that can be tuned to the flow being solved. In this paper, a technique will be described that allows the tuning of the Magnussen model for an arbitrary fuel and flow geometry without the need to have experimental data for that particular case. The tuning is based on comparing the results of the Magnussen model and full finite-rate chemistry when applied to perfectly and partially stirred reactor simulations. In addition, a modification to the Magnussen model is proposed that allows the upper kinetic limit for the reaction rate to be set, giving better physical agreement with full kinetic mechanisms. This procedure allows a simple reacting model to be used in a predictive manner, and affords significant savings in computational costs for simulations.

  7. [Genetically modified animals as model systems of psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Soboleva, A G; Mezentsev, A V; Bruskin, S A

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune skin disorder. Experimental models of psoriasis can be used to study the disease in controlled conditions. Moreover, the experimental models allow to study a certain aspect of the pathological process. Although none of the multiple mouse models reproduces the human disease precisely, lab animals as model systems can be very helpful because of two reasons. First, introduction of new mutations into animal genome allows to reveal the new genes that may play a certain role in pathogenesis of the disease. Second, the experiments that are carried on the lab animals can be used for testing the new drugs and selection of the most efficient chemical agents from a variety of the proposed experimental preparations. The aim of this paper was to summarize the data on the lab animals that serve as experimental models of psoriasis.

  8. A modified elastic foundation contact model for application in 3D models of the prosthetic knee.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, Antonio; Fenollosa-Esteve, Carlos; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L; Sánchez-Marín, Francisco T; Vergara, Margarita; Rodríguez-Cervantes, Pablo J

    2008-04-01

    Different models have been used in the literature for the simulation of surface contact in biomechanical knee models. However, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of these models applied to the simulation of a common case, which will provide relevant information about their accuracy and suitability for application in models of the implanted knee. In this work a comparison of the Hertz model (HM), the elastic foundation model (EFM) and the finite element model (FEM) for the simulation of the elastic contact in a 3D model of the prosthetic knee is presented. From the results of this comparison it is found that although the nature of the EFM offers advantages when compared with that of the HM for its application to realistic prosthetic surfaces, and when compared with the FEM in CPU time, its predictions can differ from FEM in some circumstances. These differences are considerable if the comparison is performed for prescribed displacements, although they are less important for prescribed loads. To solve these problems a new modified elastic foundation model (mEFM) is proposed that maintains basically the simplicity of the original model while producing much more accurate results. In this paper it is shown that this new mEFM calculates pressure distribution and contact area with accuracy and short computation times for toroidal contacting surfaces. Although further work is needed to confirm its validity for more complex geometries the mEFM is envisaged as a good option for application in 3D knee models to predict prosthetic knee performance.

  9. Modified Finch and Skea stellar model compatible with observational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, D. M.; Thomas, V. O.; Sharma, R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a new class of solutions to the Einstein's field equations corresponding to a static spherically symmetric anisotropic system by generalizing the ansatz of Finch and Skea [Class. Quantum Grav. 6:467, 1989] for the gravitational potential g rr . The anisotropic stellar model previously studied by Sharma and Ratanpal [Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 13:1350074, 2013] is a sub-class of the solutions provided here. Based on physical requirements, regularity conditions and stability, we prescribe bounds on the model parameters. By systematically fixing values of the model parameters within the prescribed bound, we demonstrate that our model is compatible with the observed masses and radii of a wide variety of compact stars like 4U 1820-30, PSR J1903+327, 4U 1608-52, Vela X-1, PSR J1614-2230, SAX J1808.4-3658 and Her X-1.

  10. Predicted model for hydrous modified olivine (HyM-α)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Y.

    A possible structure for hydrous modified olivine (HyM-α) has been obtained by the subtraction of Mg3SiO5 from forsterite by crystallographic shear along a direction parallel to the [010] direction of olivine. The subtraction of Mg3SiO5 results in the subtraction of MgO from bulk chemistry (-Mg3SiO5=-Mg2SiO4-MgO). A possible structure for HyM-α thus obtained has the chemical formula Mg9Si5H2O20 (= 5 × Mg1.8SiH0.4O4) with monoclinic unit cell a=4.754 Å, b=10.19 Å, c=29.90 Å, ρ=3.126 g cm-3, and space group=Ac2m (no. 39). Since the X-ray powder diffraction pattern of HyM-α proposed in this study is very close to that of clinohumite, there is the possibility of this phase having been undiscovered. The humite group minerals and HyM-α proposed in this study make a homologous series as recombination structures: Mg(2m+n)SimH2nO2(2m+n) for the humite group and Mg(2m+n)Si(m+n)H2nO4(m+n) for HyM-α A characteristic feature is that Mg/Si > 2 for the humite group and Mg/Si < 2 for HyM-α. Forsterite specimens containing around 100 ppm H2O reported in mantle xenoliths might be the disordered case with n=1 and m=1200 of the humite group or HyM-α.

  11. [Dynamic analysis of ecological footprint of Dongying City based on a modified model].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Bo; Wang, Zong-Min; Zhao, Hong-Ling; Li, Ji-Ren

    2009-07-01

    Taking the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of water-heat condition into consideration, the traditional ecological footprint (EF) model was modified with net primary productivity (NPP). In the meanwhile, water resource EF was calculated to complement the deficiency of water EF account which only included water's fishing function. The EF dynamics of Dongying City from 1996 to 2003 was analyzed by using the modified model. Based on traditional model, the EF of Dongying City in 1996-2003 increased from 1.766 hm2 to 2.644 hm2, and the ecological capacity (EC) decreased from 0.889 hm2 to 0.813 hm2; while based on the modified model, the EF increased from 2.819 hm2 to 3.776 hm2, and the EC decreased from 1.935 hm2 to 1.865 hm2. Comparing with that from traditional model, the ecological pressure calculated by the modified model was lesser, which suggested that to increase the utilization of water resource would alleviate the ecological pressure on the region. The modified EF model was more precise to reflect the natural resource utilization of Dongying City.

  12. Modified version of the combined model of photonucleon reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.

    2015-07-15

    A refined version of the combined photonucleon-reaction model is described. This version makes it possible to take into account the effect of structural features of the doorway dipole state on photonucleon reactions in the energy range of E{sub γ} ≤ 30 MeV. In relation to the previous version of the model, the treatment of isospin effects at the preequilibrium and evaporation reaction stages is refined; in addition, the description of the semidirect effect caused by nucleon emission from the doorway dipole state is improved. The model in question is used to study photonucleon reactions on the isotopes {sup 35-56}Ca and {sup 102-134}Sn in the energy range indicated above.

  13. A modified Bogoliubov method applied to a simple boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, O.; Bassichis, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    We use a non-gauge-invariant modification of the exact Hamiltonian to obtain a new Hamiltonian-like operator for a simple exactly solvable boson model. The eigenvalues of the new operator are close to those of the original Hamiltonian. We make a one-body approximation of the new two-body operator in the spirit of the Bogoliubov approximation. Because only the number operator appears, the c-number approximation is not required individually for the creation or annihilation operators in the ground state. For the simple model, the results using the new approximation are closer to the exact results than the usual Bogoliubov results over a wide range of parameters. The improvement increases dramatically as the model interaction strength increases.

  14. Multilevel systems biology modeling characterized the atheroprotective efficiencies of modified dairy fats in a hamster model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-Charles; Berton, Amélie; Ginies, Christian; Bott, Romain; Scheercousse, Pierre; Saddi, Alessandra; Gripois, Daniel; Landrier, Jean-François; Dalemans, Daniel; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Delplanque, Bernadette

    2015-09-01

    We assessed the atheroprotective efficiency of modified dairy fats in hyperlipidemic hamsters. A systems biology approach was implemented to reveal and quantify the dietary fat-related components of the disease. Three modified dairy fats (40% energy) were prepared from regular butter by mixing with a plant oil mixture, by removing cholesterol alone, or by removing cholesterol in combination with reducing saturated fatty acids. A plant oil mixture and a regular butter were used as control diets. The atherosclerosis severity (aortic cholesteryl-ester level) was higher in the regular butter-fed hamsters than in the other four groups (P < 0.05). Eighty-seven of the 1,666 variables measured from multiplatform analysis were found to be strongly associated with the disease. When aggregated into 10 biological clusters combined into a multivariate predictive equation, these 87 variables explained 81% of the disease variability. The biological cluster "regulation of lipid transport and metabolism" appeared central to atherogenic development relative to diets. The "vitamin E metabolism" cluster was the main driver of atheroprotection with the best performing transformed dairy fat. Under conditions that promote atherosclerosis, the impact of dairy fats on atherogenesis could be greatly ameliorated by technological modifications. Our modeling approach allowed for identifying and quantifying the contribution of complex factors to atherogenic development in each dietary setup.

  15. Modelling of Scenedesmus obliquus; function of nutrients with modified Gompertz model.

    PubMed

    Celekli, Abuzer; Balci, Muharrem; Bozkurt, Hüseyin

    2008-12-01

    This study attempted to investigate variation in biovolume of Scenedesmus obliquus, in the modified Johnson medium at 20+/-2 degrees C, under 16kergcm(-2)s(-1) continuous illumination. The experiments were carried out at four nitrate (8, 12, 16, and 20mM) and four phosphate (0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7mM) concentrations at pH 7 and 8. The best response for algal growth was found at 0.3mM phosphate and 12mM nitrate at pH 7, as it was obtained from weight averaging method. Besides, optimum phosphate and nitrate concentrations significantly distinguished (p<0.01) from other concentrations according to Turkey's HSD test. Key features of the growth of S. obliquus under phosphate and nitrate influenced batch culture was successfully predicted by modified Gompertz model. Through the cultivations, specific growth rate (mu) ranged from 0.30 to 1.02 day(-1), while biovolume doubling time (td) varied from 0.68 to 2.30 days. There were important differences (p<0.05) for both mu and td among response variables. Both nutrients displayed noteworthy effect (p<0.01) on the algal biovolume.

  16. Cylindrically symmetric cosmological model of the universe in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Vadrevu, Samhita

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have constructed the cosmological models of the universe in a cylindrically symmetric space time in two classes of f(R,T) gravity (Harko et al. in Phys. Rev. D 84:024020, 2011). We have discussed two cases: one in the linear form and the other in the quadratic form of R. The matter is considered to be in the form of perfect fluid. It is observed that in the first case, the pressure and energy density remain the same, which reduces to a Zeldovich fluid. In the second case we have studied the quadratic function of f(R,T) gravity in the form f(R)=λ(R+R2) and f(T)=λ T. In the second case the pressure is in the negative domain and the energy density is in the positive domain, which confirms that the equation of state parameter is negative. The physical properties of the constructed models are studied.

  17. Justification of sexual reproduction by modified Penna model of ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá Martins, J. S.; Stauffer, D.

    2001-05-01

    We generalize the standard Penna bit-string model of biological ageing by assuming that each deleterious mutation diminishes the survival probability in every time interval by a small percentage. This effect is added to the usual lethal but age-dependent effect of the same mutation. We then find strong advantages or disadvantages of sexual reproduction (with males and females) compared to asexual cloning, depending on parameters.

  18. The analysis of MHD blood flows through porous arteries using a locally modified homogenous nanofluids model.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Pooria

    2016-05-12

    In this paper, magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous arteries are numerically simulated using a locally modified homogenous nanofluids model. Blood is taken into account as the third-grade non-Newtonian fluid containing nanoparticles. In the modified nanofluids model, the viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity of the solid-liquid mixture (nanofluids) which are commonly utilized as an effective value, are locally combined with the prevalent single-phase model. The modified governing equations are solved numerically using Newton's method and a block tridiagonal matrix solver. The results are compared to the prevalent nanofluids single-phase model. In addition, the efficacies of important physical parameters such as pressure gradient, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter, magnetic-field parameter, porosity parameter, and etc. on temperature, velocity and nanoparticles concentration profiles are examined.

  19. Modeling of adsorption of toxic chromium on natural and surface modified lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalhori, Ebrahim Mohammadi; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Uygur, Nihan; Zarrabi, Mansur; Shmeis, Reham M. Abu

    2013-12-01

    Lightweight Expanded Clay Aggregate (LECA) modified with an aqueous solution of magnesium chloride MgCl2 and hydrogen peroxide H2O2 was used to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption properties of the used adsorbents were investigated through batch studies, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effect created by magnesium chloride on the modification of the LECA surface was greater than that of hydrogen peroxide solution and showed a substantial increase in the specific surface area which has a value of 76.12 m2/g for magnesium chloride modified LECA while the values of 53.72 m2/g, and 11.53 m2/g were found for hydrogen peroxide modified LECA and natural LECA, respectively. The extent of surface modification with enhanced porosity in modified LECA was apparent from the recorded SEM patterns. XRD and FTIR studies of themodified LECA surface did not show any structural distortion. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the modified Freundlich kinetic model and the equilibrium data fitted the Sips and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations better than other models. Maximum sorption capacities were found to be 198.39, 218.29 and 236.24 mg/g for natural LECA, surface modified LECA with H2O2 and surface modified LECA with MgCl2, respectively. Adsorbents were found to have only a weak effect on conductivity and turbidity of aqueous solutions. Spent natural and surface modified LECA with MgCl2 was best regenerated with HCl solution, while LECA surface modified with H2O2 was best regenerated with HNO3 concentrated solution. Thermal method showed a lower regeneration percentage for all spent adsorbents.

  20. Codeswitching and Generative Grammar: A Critique of the MLF Model and Some Remarks on "Modified Minimalism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacSwan, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an empirical and theoretical critique of the Matrix Language Frame (MLF) model (Myers-Scotton, 1993; Myers-Scotton and Jake, 2001), and includes a response to Jake, Myers-Scotton and Gross's (2002) (JMSG) critique of MacSwan (1999, 2000) and reactions to their revision of the MLF model as a "modified minimalist approach." The…

  1. Murine Cervical Heart Transplantation Model Using a Modified Cuff Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Markus; Ritschl, Paul; Oellinger, Robert; Aigner, Felix; Sucher, Robert; Schneeberger, Stefan; Pratschke, Johann; Brandacher, Gerald; Maglione, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models are of special interest in research since a wide variety of monoclonal antibodies and commercially defined inbred and knockout strains are available to perform mechanistic in vivo studies. While heart transplantation models using a suture technique were first successfully developed in rats, the translation into an equally widespread used murine equivalent was never achieved due the technical complexity of the microsurgical procedure. In contrast, non-suture cuff techniques, also developed initially in rats, were successfully adapted for use in mice1-3. This technique for revascularization involves two major steps I) everting the recipient vessel over a polyethylene cuff; II) pulling the donor vessel over the formerly everted recipient vessel and holding it in place with a circumferential tie. This ensures a continuity of the endothelial layer, short operating time and very high patency rates4. Using this technique for vascular anastomosis we performed more than 1,000 cervical heart transplants with an overall success rate of 95%. For arterial inflow the common carotid artery and the proximal aortic arch were anastomosed resulting in a retrograde perfusion of the transplanted heart. For venous drainage the pulmonary artery of the graft was anastomosed with the external jugular vein of the recipient5. Herein, we provide additional details of this technique to supplement the video. PMID:25350682

  2. An empirical modified fatigue damage model for impacted GFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, S.; Hassan, M. A.; Bushroa, A. R.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the residual strength of GFRP laminates following a low-velocity impact event under cyclic loading. The residual strength is calculated using a linear fatigue damage model. According to an investigation into the effect of low-velocity impact on the fatigue behavior of laminates, it seems laminate fatigue life decreases after impact. By normalizing the fatigue stress against undamaged static strength, the Fatigue Damage parameter “FD” is presented with a linear relationship as its slope which is a linear function of the initial impact energy; meanwhile, the constants were attained from experimental data. FD is implemented into a plane-stress continuum damage mechanics based model for GFRP composite laminates, in order to predict damage threshold in composite structures. An S-N curve is implemented to indicate the fatigue behavior for 2 mm thickness encompassing both undamaged and impacted samples. A decline in lifespan is evident when the impact energy level increases. Finally, the FD is intended to capture the unique GFRP composite characteristics.

  3. Frame junction vibration transmission with a modified frame deformation model.

    PubMed

    Moore, J A

    1990-12-01

    A previous paper dealt with vibration transmission through junctions of connected frame members where the allowed frame deformations included bending, torsion, and longitudinal motions [J.A. Moore, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 2766-2776 (1990)]. In helicopter and aircraft structures the skin panels can constitute a high impedance connection along the length of the frames that effectively prohibits in-plane motion at the elevation of the skin panels. This has the effect of coupling in-plane bending and torsional motions within the frame. This paper discusses the transmission behavior through frame junctions that accounts for the in-plane constraint in idealized form by assuming that the attached skin panels completely prohibit inplane motion in the frames. Also, transverse shear deformation is accounted for in describing the relatively deep web frame constructions common in aircraft structures. Longitudinal motion in the frames is not included in the model. Transmission coefficient predictions again show the importance of out-of-plane bending deformation to the transmission of vibratory energy in an aircraft structure. Comparisons are shown with measured vibration transmission data along the framing in the overhead of a helicopter airframe, with good agreement. The frame junction description has been implemented within a general purpose statistical energy analysis (SEA) computer code in modeling the entire airframe structure including skin panels.

  4. Sentiment Contagion Based on the Modified SOSa-SPSa Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhijie; Jia, Jie; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Sentiment contagion is similar to an infectious disease that spreads in a crowd. In this study, we extend the proposed SOSa-SPSa model (susceptible-optimistic-susceptible and susceptible-pessimistic-susceptible) by considering the interaction between optimists and pessimists. Simulation results show that our model is reasonable and can better explain the entire contagion process by considering three groups of people. The recovery speed of pessimists has an obvious regulative effect on the number of pessimists and the possibility of optimists coming in contact with pessimists to be infected as pessimism plays a greater role than that of reverting to susceptibility. The number of pessimists is positively related to the possibility that optimists come in contact with pessimists to become pessimistic but is negatively related to the possibility of the other way around. When the speed of spontaneous generation is slow, the number of pessimists sharply increases. However, the increase is not so apparent when the speed of spontaneous generation reaches a certain number. PMID:27746827

  5. Genetically modified mouse models for oral drug absorption and disposition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Seng Chuan; Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Beijnen, Jos H; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal absorption is an essential step in the therapeutic use of most orally administered drugs and often mediated by enterocyte transmembrane transporters. Here we discuss several of these drug transport systems and knockout mouse models to study them. These studies showed that Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) can limit intestinal drug absorption. Organic cation transporter n1 (Octn1) and Octn2 might also facilitate intestinal drug absorption, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. On the other hand, intestinal uptake of drugs is facilitated by the Equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (Ent1), Mrp3 and possibly Mrp4. No significant role in intestinal absorption for Oct1 and Oct2 or for Organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatp) 1a and 1b was found so far.

  6. Existence of Periodic Solutions for a Modified Growth Solow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabião, Fátima; Borges, Maria João

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we analyze the dynamic of the Solow growth model with a Cobb-Douglas production function. For this purpose, we consider that the labour growth rate, L'(t)/L(t), is a T-periodic function, for a fixed positive real number T. We obtain the closed form solutions for the fundamental Solow equation with the new description of L(t). Using notions of the qualitative theory of ordinary differential equations and nonlinear functional analysis, we prove that there exists one T-periodic solution for the Solow equation. From the economic point of view this is a new result which allows a more realistic interpretation of the stylized facts.

  7. New creep-fatigue damage model based on the frequency modified strain range method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Park, J.J.

    1996-12-01

    For mechanical systems operating at high temperature, damage due to the interaction effect of creep and fatigue plays an important role. The objective of this paper is to propose a modified creep-fatigue damage model which separately analyzes the pure creep damage due to the hold time and the creep-fatigue interaction damage during the startup and the shutdown period. The creep damage was calculated by the general creep damage equation and the creep-fatigue interaction damage was calculated by the modified equation which is based on the frequency modified strain range method with strain rate term. In order to verify the proposed model, a series of high temperature low cycle fatigue tests were performed. The test specimens were made from Inconel-718 superalloy and the test parameters were wave form and hold time. A good agreement between the predicted lives based on the proposed model and experimentally obtained ones was obtained.

  8. Breather-like structures in modified sine-Gordon models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Zakrzewski, Wojtek J.

    2016-05-01

    We report analytical and numerical results on breather-like field configurations in a theory which is a deformation of the integrable sine-Gordon model in (1  +  1) dimensions. The main motivation of our study is to test the ideas behind the recently proposed concept of quasi-integrability, which emerged from the observation that some field theories possess an infinite number of quantities which are asymptotically conserved in the scattering of solitons, and periodic in time in the case of breather-like configurations. Even though the mechanism responsible for such phenomena is not well understood yet, it is clear that special properties of the solutions under a space-time parity transformation play a crucial role. The numerical results of the present paper give support for the ideas on quasi-integrability, as it is found that extremely long-lived breather configurations satisfy these parity properties. We also report on a mechanism, particular to the theory studied here, that favours the existence of long lived breathers even in cases of significant deformations of the sine-Gordon potential. We also find numerically that our breather-like configurations decay through the gradual increase of their frequency of oscillations.

  9. Comparison of Nonlinear Model Results Using Modified Recorded and Synthetic Ground Motions

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Spears; J. Kevin Wilkins

    2011-11-01

    A study has been performed that compares results of nonlinear model runs using two sets of earthquake ground motion time histories that have been modified to fit the same design response spectra. The time histories include applicable modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories and synthetic ground motion time histories. The modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories are modified from time history records that are selected based on consistent magnitude and distance. The synthetic ground motion time histories are generated using appropriate Fourier amplitude spectrums, Arias intensity, and drift correction. All of the time history modification is performed using the same algorithm to fit the design response spectra. The study provides data to demonstrate that properly managed synthetic ground motion time histories are reasonable for use in nonlinear seismic analysis.

  10. Cellular and molecular modifier pathways in tauopathies: the big picture from screening invertebrate models.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Shabab B; Dräger, Nina M; Rasse, Tobias M; Voigt, Aaron; Jahn, Thomas R

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal tau accumulations were observed and documented in post-mortem brains of patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) long before the identification of mutations in the Microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene, encoding the tau protein, in a different neurodegenerative disease called Frontotemporal dementia and Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). The discovery of mutations in the MAPT gene associated with FTDP-17 highlighted that dysfunctions in tau alone are sufficient to cause neurodegeneration. Invertebrate models have been diligently utilized in investigating tauopathies, contributing to the understanding of cellular and molecular pathways involved in disease etiology. An important discovery came with the demonstration that over-expression of human tau in Drosophila leads to premature mortality and neuronal dysfunction including neurodegeneration, recapitulating some key neuropathological features of the human disease. The simplicity of handling invertebrate models combined with the availability of a diverse range of experimental resources make these models, in particular Drosophila a powerful invertebrate screening tool. Consequently, several large-scale screens have been performed using Drosophila, to identify modifiers of tau toxicity. The screens have revealed not only common cellular and molecular pathways, but in some instances the same modifier has been independently identified in two or more screens suggesting a possible role for these modifiers in regulating tau toxicity. The purpose of this review is to discuss the genetic modifier screens on tauopathies performed in Drosophila and C. elegans models, and to highlight the common cellular and molecular pathways that have emerged from these studies. Here, we summarize results of tau toxicity screens providing mechanistic insights into pathological alterations in tauopathies. Key pathways or modifiers that have been identified are associated with a broad range of processes

  11. Odor emission rate estimation of indoor industrial sources using a modified inverse modeling method.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Tingting; Sattayatewa, Chakkrid; Venkatesan, Dhesikan; Noll, Kenneth E; Pagilla, Krishna R; Moschandreas, Demetrios J

    2011-08-01

    Odor emission rates are commonly measured in the laboratory or occasionally estimated with inverse modeling techniques. A modified inverse modeling approach is used to estimate source emission rates inside of a postdigestion centrifuge building of a water reclamation plant. Conventionally, inverse modeling methods divide an indoor environment in zones on the basis of structural design and estimate source emission rates using models that assume homogeneous distribution of agent concentrations within a zone and experimentally determined link functions to simulate airflows among zones. The modified approach segregates zones as a function of agent distribution rather than building design and identifies near and far fields. Near-field agent concentrations do not satisfy the assumption of homogeneous odor concentrations; far-field concentrations satisfy this assumption and are the only ones used to estimate emission rates. The predictive ability of the modified inverse modeling approach was validated with measured emission rate values; the difference between corresponding estimated and measured odor emission rates is not statistically significant. Similarly, the difference between measured and estimated hydrogen sulfide emission rates is also not statistically significant. The modified inverse modeling approach is easy to perform because it uses odor and odorant field measurements instead of complex chamber emission rate measurements.

  12. An improved model for natural convection heat loss from modified cavity receiver of solar dish concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.S.; Sendhil Kumar, N.

    2009-10-15

    A 2-D model has been proposed to investigate the approximate estimation of the natural convection heat loss from modified cavity receiver of without insulation (WOI) and with insulation (WI) at the bottom of the aperture plane in our previous article. In this paper, a 3-D numerical model is presented to investigate the accurate estimation of natural convection heat loss from modified cavity receiver (WOI) of fuzzy focal solar dish concentrator. A comparison of 2-D and 3-D natural convection heat loss from a modified cavity receiver is carried out. A parametric study is carried out to develop separate Nusselt number correlations for 2-D and 3-D geometries of modified cavity receiver for estimation of convective heat loss from the receiver. The results show that the 2-D and 3-D are comparable only at higher angle of inclinations (60 {<=} {beta} {<=} 90 ) of the receiver. The present 3-D numerical model is compared with other well known cavity receiver models. The 3-D model can be used for accurate estimation of heat losses from solar dish collector, when compared with other well known models. (author)

  13. Low temperature performance prediction model of GAC-20 modified asphalt mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. H.; Cheng, H. Y.; Zhu, G. Q.; Ma, J.

    2017-01-01

    25 sets of GAC-20 modified asphalt mixture were designed by means of orthogonal design method. The bending and low temperature creep tests of the GAC-20 were carried out. The related models of the fractal dimension and the road performance evaluation index including low temperature bending failure strain εB and bending strength RB are established by using fractal theory. The model can be used to predict the low temperature performance of GAC-20 modified asphalt mixture according to the design gradation, which can reduce the test workload and improve the working efficiency, so as to provide the reference for engineering design.

  14. Real-time inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric actuators with a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Yang, Mei-Ju; Zhu, Li-Min

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a novel real-time inverse hysteresis compensation method for piezoelectric actuators exhibiting asymmetric hysteresis effect. The proposed method directly utilizes a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii hysteresis model to characterize the inverse hysteresis effect of piezoelectric actuators. The hysteresis model is then cascaded in the feedforward path for hysteresis cancellation. It avoids the complex and difficult mathematical procedure for constructing an inversion of the hysteresis model. For the purpose of validation, an experimental platform is established. To identify the model parameters, an adaptive particle swarm optimization algorithm is adopted. Based on the identified model parameters, a real-time feedforward controller is implemented for fast hysteresis compensation. Finally, tests are conducted with various kinds of trajectories. The experimental results show that the tracking errors caused by the hysteresis effect are reduced by about 90%, which clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed inverse compensation method with the modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

  15. A modified Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model for mesons and baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masayuki, Katô; Wolfgang, Bentz; Koichi, Yazaki; Kazuhiro, Tanaka

    1993-01-01

    A baryon-like bound state of three valence quarks in the NJL model is investigated. We find that in the flavor SU(2) case there exists no such state. Using the modified flavor SU(3) model we can obtain a baryon-like state. The essential ingredient which stabilizes the system is the "instanton-induced" six-fermion interaction describing the U A(1) anomaly in a phenomenological way. The properties of mesons are also investigated in this model.

  16. Hydrophobic solvation of Gay-Berne particles in modified water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Gordon, Teresa; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M.

    2008-03-01

    The solvation of large hydrophobic solutes, modeled as repulsive and attractive Gay-Berne oblate ellipsoids, is characterized in several modified water liquids using the SPC/E model as the reference water fluid. We find that small amounts of attraction between the Gay-Berne particle and any model fluid result in wetting of the hydrophobic surface. However, significant differences are found among the modified and SPC/E water models and the critical distances in which they dewet the hydrophobic surfaces of pairs of repulsive Gay-Berne particles. We find that the dewetting trends for repulsive Gay-Berne particles in the various model liquids correlate directly with their surface tensions, the widths of the interfaces they form, and the openness of their network structure. The largest critical separations are found in liquids with the smallest surface tensions and the broadest interfaces as measured by the Egelstaff-Widom length.

  17. Hydrophobic solvation of Gay-Berne particles in modified water models.

    PubMed

    Head-Gordon, Teresa; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M

    2008-03-14

    The solvation of large hydrophobic solutes, modeled as repulsive and attractive Gay-Berne oblate ellipsoids, is characterized in several modified water liquids using the SPC/E model as the reference water fluid. We find that small amounts of attraction between the Gay-Berne particle and any model fluid result in wetting of the hydrophobic surface. However, significant differences are found among the modified and SPC/E water models and the critical distances in which they dewet the hydrophobic surfaces of pairs of repulsive Gay-Berne particles. We find that the dewetting trends for repulsive Gay-Berne particles in the various model liquids correlate directly with their surface tensions, the widths of the interfaces they form, and the openness of their network structure. The largest critical separations are found in liquids with the smallest surface tensions and the broadest interfaces as measured by the Egelstaff-Widom length.

  18. Modified model of gate leakage currents in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-Gang; Feng, Zhi-Hong; Lv, Yuan-Jie; Tan, Xin; Dun, Shao-Bo; Fang, Yu-Long; Cai, Shu-Jun

    2016-10-01

    It has been reported that the gate leakage currents are described by the Frenkel-Poole emission (FPE) model, at temperatures higher than 250 K. However, the gate leakage currents of our passivated devices do not accord with the FPE model. Therefore, a modified FPE model is developed in which an additional leakage current, besides the gate (I II), is added. Based on the samples with different passivations, the I II caused by a large number of surface traps is separated from total gate currents, and is found to be linear with respect to (φ B-V g)0.5. Compared with these from the FPE model, the calculated results from the modified model agree well with the I g-V g measurements at temperatures ranging from 295 K to 475 K. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61306113).

  19. 76 FR 27239 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company (Cessna) Model 172 Airplanes Modified by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... Company (Cessna) Model 172 Airplanes Modified by Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) SA01303WI AGENCY... products listed above. The numbering of paragraphs (j)(3), (j)(4), and (j)(5) in the Material Incorporated... airplane flight manual, and replacing the FADEC backup battery every 12 calendar months for Cessna...

  20. A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermansen, Christian; Mauro, John C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-04-01

    In the present paper we establish a temperature dependent constraint model of alkali phosphate glasses considering the structural and topological role of the modifying ion sub-network constituted by alkali ions and their non-bonding oxygen coordination spheres. The model is consistent with available structural data by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations and with dynamic data such glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid fragility (m). Alkali phosphate glasses are exemplary systems for developing constraint model since the modifying cation network plays an important role besides the primary phosphate network. The proposed topological model predicts the changing trend of the Tg and m with increasing alkali oxide content for alkali phosphate glasses, including an anomalous minimum at around 20 mol.% alkali oxide content. We find that the minimum in Tg and m is caused by increased connectivity of the modifying ion sub-network, as the alkali ions must share non-bonding oxygen to satisfy their coordination requirements at higher alkali oxide contents. We argue that the systematically decreasing the Tg values of alkali phosphate glasses from Li2O to Na2O to Cs2O could be caused by a weakening of the modifying ion sub-network and can be accounted for by lower constraint onset temperatures.

  1. Modified two-fluid model of conductivity for superconducting surface resistance calculation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, D.S.

    1993-05-01

    The traditional two-fluid model of superconducting conductivity was modified to make it accurate, while remaining fast, for designing and simulating microwave devices. The modification reflects the BCS coherence effects in the conductivity of a superconductor, and is incorporated through the ratio of normal to superconducting electrons. This modified ratio is a simple analytical expression which depends on frequency, temperature and material parameters. This modified two-fluid model allows accurate and rapid calculation of the microwave surface impedance of a superconductor in the clean and dirty limits and in the weak- and strong-coupled regimes. The model compares well with surface resistance data for Nb and provides insight into Nb3Sn and Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta). Numerical calculations with the modified two-fluid model are an order of magnitude faster than the quasi-classical program by Zimmermann (1), and two to five orders of magnitude faster than Halbritter's BCS program (2) for surface resistance.

  2. Accurate halo-model matter power spectra with dark energy, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Heymans, C.; Lombriser, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Steele, O. I.; Winther, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate non-linear matter power spectrum prediction scheme for a variety of extensions to the standard cosmological paradigm, which uses the tuned halo model previously developed in Mead et al. We consider dark energy models that are both minimally and non-minimally coupled, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces with chameleon and Vainshtein screening mechanisms. In all cases, we compare halo-model power spectra to measurements from high-resolution simulations. We show that the tuned halo-model method can predict the non-linear matter power spectrum measured from simulations of parametrized w(a) dark energy models at the few per cent level for k < 10 h Mpc-1, and we present theoretically motivated extensions to cover non-minimally coupled scalar fields, massive neutrinos and Vainshtein screened modified gravity models that result in few per cent accurate power spectra for k < 10 h Mpc-1. For chameleon screened models, we achieve only 10 per cent accuracy for the same range of scales. Finally, we use our halo model to investigate degeneracies between different extensions to the standard cosmological model, finding that the impact of baryonic feedback on the non-linear matter power spectrum can be considered independently of modified gravity or massive neutrino extensions. In contrast, considering the impact of modified gravity and massive neutrinos independently results in biased estimates of power at the level of 5 per cent at scales k > 0.5 h Mpc-1. An updated version of our publicly available HMCODE can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  3. Simulating a cyclic activated sludge system by employing a modified ASM3 model for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Nan, Jun; Zhang, Xinhui

    2017-03-13

    To interpret the biological nutrient removal in a cyclic activated sludge system (CAS), a modified model was developed by combining the process of simultaneous storage and growth, and the kinetics of soluble microbial product (S SMP) and extracellular polymeric substance (X EPS) with activated sludge model no. 3 (ASM3). These most sensitive parameters were initially selected whilst parameters with low sensitivity were given values from literature. The selected parameters were then calibrated on an oxygen uptake rate test and a batch CAS reactor on an operational cycle. The calibrated model was validated using a combination of the measurements from a batch CAS reactor operated for 1 month and the average deviation method. The simulations demonstrated that the modified model was capable of predicting higher effluent concentrations compared to outputs of the ASM3 model. Additionally, it was also shown that the average deviation of effluent S COD, S NH, S SMP and X EPS simulated with the modified model was all less than 1 mg L(-1). In summary, the model could effectively describe biological processes in a CAS reactor and provide a wonderful tool for operation.

  4. Hydrocode Simulation with Modified Johnson-Cook Model and Experimental Analysis of Explosively Formed Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, G.; Hameed, A.; Hetherington, J. G.; Barton, P. C.; Malik, A. Q.

    2013-04-01

    The formation of mild steel (MS) and copper (Cu) explosively formed projectiles (EFPs) was simulated in AUTODYN using both the Johnson-Cook (JC) and modified Johnson-Cook (JCM) constitutive models. The JC model was modified by increasing the hardening constant by 10%. The previously established semi-empirical equations for diameter, length, velocity, and depth of penetration were used to verify the design of the EFP. The length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of the warhead used in the simulation varied between 1 < L/D < 2. To avoid projectile distortion or breakup for large standoff applications, the design of the EFP warhead was modified to obtain a lower L/D ratio. Simulations from the JC model underestimated the EFP diameter, resulting in an unrealistically elongated projectile. This shortcoming was resolved by employing the JCM model, giving good agreement with the experimental results. The projectile velocity and hole characteristics in 10-mm-thick aluminum target plates were studied for both models. The semi-empirical equations and the JC model overestimated the projectile velocity, whereas the JCM model underestimated the velocity slightly when compared to the experimental results. The depths of penetration calculated by the semi-empirical equations in the aluminum (Al) target plate were 55 and 52 mm for Cu and MS EFPs, respectively.

  5. Modified social force model based on information transmission toward crowd evacuation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yanbin; Liu, Hong

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the information transmission mechanism is introduced into the social force model to simulate pedestrian behavior in an emergency, especially when most pedestrians are unfamiliar with the evacuation environment. This modified model includes a collision avoidance strategy and an information transmission model that considers information loss. The former is used to avoid collision among pedestrians in a simulation, whereas the latter mainly describes how pedestrians obtain and choose directions appropriate to them. Simulation results show that pedestrians can obtain the correct moving direction through information transmission mechanism and that the modified model can simulate actual pedestrian behavior during an emergency evacuation. Moreover, we have drawn four conclusions to improve evacuation based on the simulation results; and these conclusions greatly contribute in optimizing a number of efficient emergency evacuation schemes for large public places.

  6. Modified graphical autocatalytic set model of combustion process in circulating fluidized bed boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Nurul Syazwani; Bakar, Sumarni Abu; Ismail, Razidah

    2014-07-01

    Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler (CFB) is a device for generating steam by burning fossil fuels in a furnace operating under a special hydrodynamic condition. Autocatalytic Set has provided a graphical model of chemical reactions that occurred during combustion process in CFB. Eight important chemical substances known as species were represented as nodes and catalytic relationships between nodes are represented by the edges in the graph. In this paper, the model is extended and modified by considering other relevant chemical reactions that also exist during the process. Catalytic relationship among the species in the model is discussed. The result reveals that the modified model is able to gives more explanation of the relationship among the species during the process at initial time t.

  7. Rosenbrock methods in biogeochemical modelling - A comparison to Runge-Kutta methods and modified Patankar schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippmann, Bianca; Burchard, Hans

    Modelling biogeochemical processes in the surface ocean is still a difficult task due to the challenge to identify the most convenient integration scheme for the reaction terms. The scheme is expected to deal with the model characteristics of positivity and conservativity as well as with the different time scales involved, which occur e.g., whenever photochemical reactions take place in the water column. This paper presents a numerical comparison of the Rosenbrock methods, ROS3 and ROS4, often used for solving chemical reactions, to the explicit fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and the unconditionally positive modified Patankar schemes. Following their successful application in air chemistry, we here test the hypothesis that the Rosenbrock methods are an optimal choice for marine biogeochemical modelling in terms of efficiency and accuracy. In this study the schemes are compared in terms of runtime and accuracy and are applied to two test cases of different complexity: a zero-dimensional nutrient-phytoplankton-detritus (NPD)-type model and a one-dimensional nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD)-type model. Applying the Rosenbrock methods to the simple NPD model shows their advantage over the other applied methods. They give the most accurate results of all solvers, especially for large step sizes, in less computing time due to their semi-implicitness and adaptive step sizing. On the contrary, for the one-dimensional NPZD model problem this is only the case in comparison to the Runge-Kutta solver, while their performance is worse than that of the second-order modified Patankar scheme. They need longer runtimes than the latter ones in order to achieve similarly accurate results. However, the modified Patankar schemes are not conservative if the system reactions contain more than one source compound. Thus, for more complex marine biogeochemical problems, it is recommended to apply the Rosenbrock methods while for simpler models the use of the second

  8. Identification of total reversible cysteine oxidation in an atherosclerosis model using a modified biotin switch assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Ru; Huang, Jiqing; Kast, Juergen

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative stress due to the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resulting reversible cysteine oxidation (CysOX) are involved in the early proatherogenic aspect of atherosclerosis. Given that the corresponding redox signaling pathways are still unclear, a modified biotin switch assay was developed to quantify the reversible CysOX in an atherosclerosis model established by using a monocytic cell line treated with platelet releasate. The accumulation of ROS was observed in the model system and validated in human primary monocytes. Through the application of the modified biotin switch assay, we obtained the first reversible CysOX proteome for this model. A total of 75 peptides, corresponding to 53 proteins, were quantified with oxidative modification. The bioinformatics analysis of these CysOX-containing proteins highlighted biological processes including glycolysis, cytoskeleton arrangement, and redox regulation. Moreover, the reversible oxidation of three glycolysis enzymes was observed using this method, and the regulation influence was verified by an enzyme activity assay. NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibition treatment, in conjunction with the modified biotin switch method, was used to evaluate the global CysOX status. In conclusion, this versatile modified biotin switch assay provides an approach for the quantification of all reversible CysOX and for the study of redox signaling in atherosclerosis as well as in diseases in other biological systems.

  9. Modified Continuum Mechanics Modeling on Size-Dependent Properties of Piezoelectric Nanomaterials: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhi; Jiang, Liying

    2017-01-01

    Piezoelectric nanomaterials (PNs) are attractive for applications including sensing, actuating, energy harvesting, among others in nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS) because of their excellent electromechanical coupling, mechanical and physical properties. However, the properties of PNs do not coincide with their bulk counterparts and depend on the particular size. A large amount of efforts have been devoted to studying the size-dependent properties of PNs by using experimental characterization, atomistic simulation and continuum mechanics modeling with the consideration of the scale features of the nanomaterials. This paper reviews the recent progresses and achievements in the research on the continuum mechanics modeling of the size-dependent mechanical and physical properties of PNs. We start from the fundamentals of the modified continuum mechanics models for PNs, including the theories of surface piezoelectricity, flexoelectricity and non-local piezoelectricity, with the introduction of the modified piezoelectric beam and plate models particularly for nanostructured piezoelectric materials with certain configurations. Then, we give a review on the investigation of the size-dependent properties of PNs by using the modified continuum mechanics models, such as the electromechanical coupling, bending, vibration, buckling, wave propagation and dynamic characteristics. Finally, analytical modeling and analysis of nanoscale actuators and energy harvesters based on piezoelectric nanostructures are presented. PMID:28336861

  10. Modified Continuum Mechanics Modeling on Size-Dependent Properties of Piezoelectric Nanomaterials: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi; Jiang, Liying

    2017-01-26

    Piezoelectric nanomaterials (PNs) are attractive for applications including sensing, actuating, energy harvesting, among others in nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS) because of their excellent electromechanical coupling, mechanical and physical properties. However, the properties of PNs do not coincide with their bulk counterparts and depend on the particular size. A large amount of efforts have been devoted to studying the size-dependent properties of PNs by using experimental characterization, atomistic simulation and continuum mechanics modeling with the consideration of the scale features of the nanomaterials. This paper reviews the recent progresses and achievements in the research on the continuum mechanics modeling of the size-dependent mechanical and physical properties of PNs. We start from the fundamentals of the modified continuum mechanics models for PNs, including the theories of surface piezoelectricity, flexoelectricity and non-local piezoelectricity, with the introduction of the modified piezoelectric beam and plate models particularly for nanostructured piezoelectric materials with certain configurations. Then, we give a review on the investigation of the size-dependent properties of PNs by using the modified continuum mechanics models, such as the electromechanical coupling, bending, vibration, buckling, wave propagation and dynamic characteristics. Finally, analytical modeling and analysis of nanoscale actuators and energy harvesters based on piezoelectric nanostructures are presented.

  11. Groundwater vulnerability assessment in agricultural areas using a modified DRASTIC model.

    PubMed

    Sadat-Noori, Mahmood; Ebrahimi, Kumars

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater contamination is a major concern for groundwater resource managers worldwide. We evaluated groundwater pollution potential by producing a vulnerability map of an aquifer using a modified Depth to water, Net recharge, Aquifer media, Soil media, Topography, Impact of vadose zone, and Hydraulic conductivity (DRASTIC) model within a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. The proposed modification which incorporated the use of statistical techniques optimizes the rating function of the DRASTIC model parameters, to obtain a more accurate vulnerability map. The new rates were computed using the relationships between the parameters and point data chloride concentrations in groundwater. The model was applied on Saveh-Nobaran plain in central Iran, and results showed that the coefficient of determination (R (2)) between the point data and the relevant vulnerability map increased significantly from 0.52 to 0.78 after modification. As compared to the original DRASTIC model, the modified version produced better vulnerability zonation. Additionally, single-parameter and parameter removal sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the relative importance of each DRASTIC parameter. The results from both analyses revealed that the vadose zone is the most sensitive parameter influencing the variability of the aquifers' vulnerability index. Based on the results, for non-point source pollution in agricultural areas, using the modified DRASTIC model is efficient compared to the original model. The proposed method can be effective for future groundwater assessment and plain-land management where agricultural activities are dominant.

  12. Noise reduction with low dose CT data based on a modified ROF model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yining; Zhao, Mengliu; Zhao, Yunsong; Li, Hongwei; Zhang, Peng

    2012-07-30

    In order to reduce the radiation exposure caused by Computed Tomography (CT) scanning, low dose CT has gained much interest in research as well as in industry. One fundamental difficulty for low dose CT lies in its heavy noise pollution in the raw data which leads to quality deterioration for reconstructed images. In this paper, we propose a modified ROF model to denoise low dose CT measurement data in light of Poisson noise model. Experimental results indicate that the reconstructed CT images based on measurement data processed by our model are in better quality, compared to the original ROF model or bilateral filtering.

  13. Discrete-time models with mosquitoes carrying genetically-modified bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia

    2012-11-01

    We formulate a homogeneous model and a stage-structured model for the interactive wild mosquitoes and mosquitoes carrying genetically-modified bacteria. We establish conditions for the existence and stability of fixed points for both models. We show that a unique positive fixed point exists and is asymptotically stable if the two boundary fixed points are both unstable. The unique positive fixed point exists and is unstable if the two boundary fixed points are both locally asymptotically stable. Using numerical examples, we demonstrate the models undergoing a period-doubling bifurcation.

  14. Holographik, the k-essential approach to interactive models with modified holographic Ricci dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Mónica

    2016-12-01

    We make a scalar representation of interactive models with cold dark matter and modified holographic Ricci dark energy through unified models driven by scalar fields with non-canonical kinetic term. These models are applications of the formalism of exotic k-essences generated by the global description of cosmological models with two interactive fluids in the dark sector and in these cases they correspond to the usual k-essences. The formalism is applied to the cases of constant potential in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker geometries.

  15. Metabolism of modified mycotoxins studied through in vitro and in vivo models: an overview.

    PubMed

    Boevre, Marthe De; Graniczkowska, Kinga; Saeger, Sarah De

    2015-02-17

    Mycotoxins are toxic, secondary metabolites produced by fungi. They occur in a wide variety of food and feed commodities, and are of major public health concern because they are the most hazardous of all food and feed contaminants in terms of chronic toxicity. In the past decades, it has become clear that in mycotoxin-contaminated commodities, many structurally related compounds generated by plant metabolism, fungi or food processing coexist with their free mycotoxins, defined as modified mycotoxins. These modified xenobiotics might endanger animal and human health as they are possibly hydrolysed into their free toxins in the digestive tract of mammals, and may consequently contribute to an unexpected high toxicity. As modified toxins represent an emerging issue, it is not a surprise that for most toxicological tests data are scarce to non-existent. Therefore, there is a need to elucidate the disposition and kinetics of both free and modified mycotoxins in mammals to correctly interpret occurrence data and biomonitoring results. This review emphasizes the current knowledge on the metabolism of modified mycotoxins using in vitro and in vivo models.

  16. Modeling the grazing effect on dry grassland carbon cycling with modified Biome-BGC grazing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Geping; Han, Qifei; Li, Chaofan; Yang, Liao

    2014-05-01

    Identifying the factors that determine the carbon source/sink strength of ecosystems is important for reducing uncertainty in the global carbon cycle. Arid grassland ecosystems are a widely distributed biome type in Xinjiang, Northwest China, covering approximately one-fourth the country's land surface. These grasslands are the habitat for many endemic and rare plant and animal species and are also used as pastoral land for livestock. Using the modified Biome-BGC grazing model, we modeled carbon dynamics in Xinjiang for grasslands that varied in grazing intensity. In general, this regional simulation estimated that the grassland ecosystems in Xinjiang acted as a net carbon source, with a value of 0.38 Pg C over the period 1979-2007. There were significant effects of grazing on carbon dynamics. An over-compensatory effect in net primary productivity (NPP) and vegetation carbon (C) stock was observed when grazing intensity was lower than 0.40 head/ha. Grazing resulted in a net carbon source of 23.45 g C m-2 yr-1, which equaled 0.37 Pg in Xinjiang in the last 29 years. In general, grazing decreased vegetation C stock, while an increasing trend was observed with low grazing intensity. The soil C increased significantly (17%) with long-term grazing, while the soil C stock exhibited a steady trend without grazing. These findings have implications for grassland ecosystem management as it relates to carbon sequestration and climate change mitigation, e.g., removal of grazing should be considered in strategies that aim to increase terrestrial carbon sequestrations at local and regional scales. One of the greatest limitations in quantifying the effects of herbivores on carbon cycling is identifying the grazing systems and intensities within a given region. We hope our study emphasizes the need for large-scale assessments of how grazing impacts carbon cycling. Most terrestrial ecosystems in Xinjiang have been affected by disturbances to a greater or lesser extent in the past

  17. Investigation of modified AD/RANS models for wind turbine wake predictions in large wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L. L.; Zhu, W. J.; Shen, W. Z.; Sørensen, J. N.; Zhao, N.

    2014-06-01

    Average power losses due to multiple wind turbine wakes in the large offshore wind farm is studied in this paper using properly modified k-ω SST turbulence models. The numerical simulations are carried out by the actuator disc methodology implemented in the flow solver EllipSys3D. In these simulations, the influence of different inflow conditions such as wind direction sectors are considered and discussed. Comparisons with measurements in terms of wake speed ratio and the corresponding power outputs show that the modified turbulence models had significant improvements; especially the SST-Csust model reflects the best ability in predicting the wake defect. The investigations of various inflow angles reveal that the agreement between predicted and measured data is improved for the wider sector case than the narrow case because of the wind direction uncertainty.

  18. Operant-based instrumental learning for analysis of genetically modified models of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Trueman, R C; Dunnett, S B; Brooks, S P

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease is the result of an expanded CAG repeat in the gene that codes for the protein huntingtin and results in a progressive sequelae of motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. The development of genetically modified rodent models of Huntington's disease has led to the need for sensitive behavioural phenotyping. Operant tests for rodents have been developed that can determine the functional deficits in these genetically modified models, from motor, cognitive and emotional domains. The current review discusses tests that employ operant equipment, an automated and highly flexible method for testing rodents. Different operant paradigms are examined in relation to their relevance to Huntington's disease symptomology, as well as summarising research to date on genetic models with these tests.

  19. A model to simulate the haemodynamic effects of right heart pulsatile flow after modified Fontan procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, S; Kawazoe, K; Yagihara, T; Abe, T

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pulsatile pulmonary flow after the modified Fontan procedure was examined in a model that simulated the right heart. An inlet overflow tank (preload), axial pulsatile pump, Wind-Kessel model (afterload), and an outlet overflow tank were connected in series. The standard conditions were flow 2.00 l/min with 12 mm Hg preload pressure, 3.0 Wood units resistance, and an outlet overflow tank pressure at 6 mm Hg. The pump rate was set at 80 beats/min. The simulated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary flow waves produced by this model closely resembled those obtained from patients who had undergone the modified Fontan procedure. All variables except the preload were fixed and changes in pulmonary flow were examined at preload pressures of 8, 12, 15, and 17 mm Hg. As the peak pulmonary arterial pressure increased so did pulmonary flow, until it was greater than during the non-pulsatile state. Because the afterload of this model was fixed, this result suggests that there was a concomitant decrease in resistance. This model indicates that pulsatile pulmonary blood flow is likely to have a beneficial effect on the pulmonary circulation after the modified Fontan procedure. PMID:1540439

  20. Modified release itraconazole amorphous solid dispersion to treat Aspergillus fumigatus: importance of the animal model selection.

    PubMed

    Maincent, Julien P; Najvar, Laura K; Kirkpatrick, William R; Huang, Siyuan; Patterson, Thomas F; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Peters, Jay I; Williams, Robert O

    2017-02-01

    Previously, modified release itraconazole in the form of a melt-extruded amorphous solid dispersion based on a pH dependent enteric polymer combined with hydrophilic additives (HME-ITZ), exhibited improved in vitro dissolution properties. These properties agreed with pharmacokinetic results in rats showing high and sustained itraconazole (ITZ) systemic levels. The objective of the present study was to better understand the best choice of rodent model for evaluating the pharmacokinetic and efficacy of this orally administered modified release ITZ dosage form against invasive Aspergillus fumigatus. A mouse model and a guinea pig model were investigated and compared to results previously published. In the mouse model, despite similar levels as previously reported values, plasma and lung levels were variable and fungal burden was not statistically different for placebo controls, HME-ITZ and Sporanox(®) (ITZ oral solution). This study demonstrated that the mouse model is a poor choice for studying modified release ITZ dosage forms based on pH dependent enteric polymers due to low fluid volume available for dissolution and low intestinal pH. To the contrary, guinea pig was a suitable model to evaluate modified release ITZ dosage forms. Indeed, a significant decrease in lung fungal burden as a result of high and sustained ITZ tissue levels was measured. Sufficiently high intestinal pH and fluids available for dissolution likely facilitated the dissolution process. Despite high ITZ tissue level, the primary therapeutic agent voriconazole exhibited an even more pronounced decrease in fungal burden due to its reported higher clinical efficacy specifically against Aspergillus fumigatus.

  1. A modified Klobuchar model for single-frequency GNSS users over the polar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Tong; An, Jiachun; Yang, Jian; Liu, Shulun

    2017-02-01

    For single-frequency Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) users, it is necessary to select a simple and effective broadcast ionospheric model to mitigate the ionospheric delay, which is one of the most serious error sources in GNSS measurement. The widely used Global Positioning System (GPS) Klobuchar model can achieve better performance in mid-latitudes, however, this model is not applicable in high-latitudes due to the more complex ionospheric structure over the polar region. Under the premise of no additional coefficients, a modified Klobuchar model is established for single-frequency GNSS users over the polar region by improving the nighttime term and the amplitude of the cosine term. The performance of the new model is validated by different ionospheric models and their applications in single-frequency single-point positioning, during different seasons and different levels of solar activities. The new model can reduce the ionospheric error by 60% over the polar region, while the GPS-Klobuchar even increases the ionospheric error in many cases. Over the polar region, the single-frequency SPP error using the new model is approximately 3 m in vertical direction and 1 m in horizontal direction, which is superior to GPS-Klobuchar. This study suggests that the modified Klobuchar model is more accurate to depict the polar ionosphere and could be used to achieve better positioning accuracy for single-frequency GNSS users over the polar region.

  2. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k =km will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k =0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k =km will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C , but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  3. Modified kinetic-hydraulic UASB reactor model for treatment of wastewater containing biodegradable organic substrates.

    PubMed

    El-Seddik, Mostafa M; Galal, Mona M; Radwan, A G; Abdel-Halim, Hisham S

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a modified kinetic-hydraulic model for up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor aimed to treat wastewater of biodegradable organic substrates as acetic acid based on Van der Meer model incorporated with biological granules inclusion. This dynamic model illustrates the biomass kinetic reaction rate for both direct and indirect growth of microorganisms coupled with the amount of biogas produced by methanogenic bacteria in bed and blanket zones of reactor. Moreover, the pH value required for substrate degradation at the peak specific growth rate of bacteria is discussed for Andrews' kinetics. The sensitivity analyses of biomass concentration with respect to fraction of volume of reactor occupied by granules and up-flow velocity are also demonstrated. Furthermore, the modified mass balance equations of reactor are applied during steady state using Newton Raphson technique to obtain a suitable degree of freedom for the modified model matching with the measured results of UASB Sanhour wastewater treatment plant in Fayoum, Egypt.

  4. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k=k(m) will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k=0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k=k(m) will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C, but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  5. Regularized cosmological power spectrum and correlation function in modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Bernardeau, Francis; Hiramatsu, Takashi; Koyama, Kazuya

    2014-12-01

    Based on the multipoint propagator expansion, we present resummed perturbative calculations for cosmological power spectra and correlation functions in the context of modified gravity. In a wide class of modified gravity models that have a screening mechanism to recover general relativity (GR) on small scales, we apply the eikonal approximation to derive the governing equation for resummed propagator that partly includes the nonperturbative effect in the high-k limit. The resultant propagator in the high-k limit contains the new corrections arising from the screening mechanism as well as the standard exponential damping. We explicitly derive the expression for new high-k contributions in specific modified gravity models, and find that in the case of f (R ) gravity for a currently constrained model parameter, the corrections are basically of the subleading order and can be neglected. Thus, in f (R ) gravity, similarly to the GR case, we can analytically construct the regularized propagator that reproduces both the resummed high-k behavior and the low-k results computed with standard perturbation theory, consistently taking account of the nonlinear modification of gravity valid at large scales. With the regularized multipoint propagators, we give predictions for power spectrum and correlation function at one-loop order, and compare those with N -body simulations in f (R ) gravity model. As an important application, we also discuss the redshift-space distortions and compute the anisotropic power spectra and correlation functions.

  6. Modified Lennard-Jones model: virial coefficients to the 7th order.

    PubMed

    Ushcats, M V

    2014-06-21

    The modified Lennard-Jones potential, which simplifies the numerical simulations and maintains the realistic behavior of its parent, is proposed to a role of the standard interaction model for both the experimental and theoretical studies. The virial coefficients of this model up to the seventh order have been calculated for the range of temperatures kT/ɛ = 0.3-70. In the computations, a technique has been used, that combines the quadrature integration and Mayer Sampling Monte Carlo method (MSMC). Unlike the original MSMC, this technique does not require the reference coefficients of another potential and can be used in a wide range of temperatures for various interaction models.

  7. A modified homogeneous relaxation model for CO2 two-phase flow in vapour ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haida, M.; Palacz, M.; Smolka, J.; Nowak, A. J.; Hafner, A.; Banasiak, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the homogenous relaxation model (HRM) for CO2 flow in a two-phase ejector was modified in order to increase the accuracy of the numerical simulations The two- phase flow model was implemented on the effective computational tool called ejectorPL for fully automated and systematic computations of various ejector shapes and operating conditions. The modification of the HRM was performed by a change of the relaxation time and the constants included in the relaxation time equation based on the experimental result under the operating conditions typical for the supermarket refrigeration system. The modified HRM was compared to the HEM results, which were performed based on the comparison of motive nozzle and suction nozzle mass flow rates.

  8. Neimark-Sacker Bifurcation and Chaotic Behaviour of a Modified Host-Parasitoid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Qamar; Gümüş, Özlem Ak; Khalil, Hammad

    2017-01-01

    We study some qualitative behaviour of a modified discrete-time host-parasitoid model. Modification of classical Nicholson-Bailey model is considered by introducing Pennycuick growth function for the host population. Furthermore, the existence and uniqueness of positive equilibrium point of proposed system is investigated. We prove that the positive solutions of modified system are uniformly bounded and the unique positive equilibrium point is locally asymptotically stable under certain parametric conditions. Moreover, it is also investigated that system undergoes Neimark-Sacker bifurcation by using standard mathematical techniques of bifurcation theory. Complexity and chaotic behaviour are confirmed through the plots of maximum Lyapunov exponents. In order to stabilise the unstable steady state, the feedback control strategy is introduced. Finally, in order to support theoretical discussions, numerical simulations are provided.

  9. Late time acceleration in a non-commutative model of modified cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekolkalami, B.; Atazadeh, K.; Vakili, B.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of non-commutativity between the position-position, position-momentum and momentum-momentum of a phase space corresponding to a modified cosmological model. We show that the existence of such non-commutativity results in a Moyal Poisson algebra between the phase space variables in which the product law between the functions is of the kind of an α-deformed product. We then transform the variables in such a way that the Poisson brackets between the dynamical variables take the form of a usual Poisson bracket but this time with a noncommutative structure. For a power law expression for the function of the Ricci scalar with which the action of the gravity model is modified, the exact solutions in the commutative and noncommutative cases are presented and compared. In terms of these solutions we address the issue of the late time acceleration in cosmic evolution.

  10. Correlation of ph dependant equilibrium isotherms of heavy metal biosorption with a modified Freundlich model.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Goodfellow, M R; Yu, Q; Zheng, C

    2004-12-01

    Equilibrium isotherms of heavy metal biosorption are commonly correlated with adsorption models such as the Freundlich model. On the other hand, the adsorption properties of heavy metal biosorption are strongly influenced by the solution pH of the biosorption system. Therefore, standard adsorption models are limited to the correlation of equilibrium isotherms under constant pH values. In this paper, a modified Freundlich model was developed for the correlation of pH dependent equilibrium isotherms of heavy metal biosorption. The model was based on the mechanism that the functional groups for heavy metal interactions are weakly acidic groups and the uptake capacities of the biomass are affected through the association and dissociation equilibrium between two apparent ionic forms. Both the standard and the modified Freundlich models were tested with isotherm data for Cd2+, Cu2+ and Ni2+ biosorption onto pre-treated biomass of marine alga Durvillaea potatorum under various solution pH values. Regression analyses indicated that the developed model correlated the experimental data well.

  11. Numerical simulation of supersonic jet flow using a modified k-ɛ model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandra, D. S.; Kaliazine, A.; Cormack, D. E.; Tran, H. N.

    2006-01-01

    Many papers have reported that the standard k-ɛ model fails to accurately predict the mean velocity profile of turbulent axisymmetric jets (Thies and Tam, Computation of turbulent axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric jet flows using the K-ɛ model, AIAA J., 1996, 34(2), 309 316; Pope, Turbulent Flows, 2002 (Cambridge University press: Cambridge). As the jet velocity increases, the deviation of the model with respect to the experimental measurements also increases. This work is aimed at the development of a modified k-ɛ model that can be used to predict the mean properties of an axisymmetric jet as it (i) flows as a free jet, (ii) propagates between walls, and (iii) impinges on a solid object. Three additional terms are proposed to improve the standard k-ɛ model predictions. They are Durbin realizable, Heinz turbulence production and Sarkar compressibility correction terms. The performance of the modified model in predicting the velocity and the impact pressure profiles of a free jet with an exit Mach number range of 0.6 2.8 has been confirmed by its close agreement with the experimental measurements. In addition, the study suggests that the model is also capable of predicting the impact pressure of a supersonic jet propagating between smooth walls and impinging on the front edge of the wall in various degrees of intensity.

  12. Suppression of B function strongly supports the modified ABCE model in Tricyrtis sp. (Liliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Masahiro; Sharifi, Ahmad; Kubota, Shosei; Oizumi, Kanako; Uetake, Fumi; Hirai, Masayo; Hoshino, Yoichiro; Kanno, Akira; Nakano, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    B class MADS-box genes play important roles in petal and stamen development. Some monocotyledonous species, including liliaceous ones, produce flowers with petaloid tepals in whorls 1 and 2. A modified ABCE model has been proposed to explain the molecular mechanism of development of two-layered petaloid tepals. However, direct evidence for this modified ABCE model has not been reported to date. To clarify the molecular mechanism determining the organ identity of two-layered petaloid tepals, we used chimeric repressor gene-silencing technology (CRES-T) to examine the suppression of B function in the liliaceous ornamental Tricyrtis sp. Transgenic plants with suppressed B class genes produced sepaloid tepals in whorls 1 and 2 instead of the petaloid tepals as expected. In addition, the stamens of transgenic plants converted into pistil-like organs with ovule- and stigma-like structures. This report is the first to describe the successful suppression of B function in monocotyledonous species with two-layered petaloid tepals, and the results strongly support the modified ABCE model. PMID:27079267

  13. Improved simulation of precipitation in the tropics using a modified BMJ scheme in the WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. M.; Zhang, T.; Yong, K.-T.

    2015-09-01

    The successful modelling of the observed precipitation, a very important variable for a wide range of climate applications, continues to be one of the major challenges that climate scientists face today. When the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to dynamically downscale the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) over the Indo-Pacific region, with analysis (grid-point) nudging, it is found that the cumulus scheme used, Betts-Miller-Janjić (BMJ), produces excessive rainfall suggesting that it has to be modified for this region. Experimentation has shown that the cumulus precipitation is not very sensitive to changes in the cloud efficiency but varies greatly in response to modifications of the temperature and humidity reference profiles. A new version of the scheme, denoted "modified BMJ" scheme, where the humidity reference profile is more moist, was developed. In tropical belt simulations it was found to give a better estimate of the observed precipitation as given by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42 data set than the default BMJ scheme for the whole tropics and both monsoon seasons. In fact, in some regions the model even outperforms CFSR. The advantage of modifying the BMJ scheme to produce better rainfall estimates lies in the final dynamical consistency of the rainfall with other dynamical and thermodynamical variables of the atmosphere.

  14. Modified optimal control pilot model for computer-aided design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John B.; Schmidt, David K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical development of a modified optimal control pilot model based upon the optimal control model (OCM) of the human operator developed by Kleinman, Baron, and Levison. This model is input compatible with the OCM and retains other key aspects of the OCM, such as a linear quadratic solution for the pilot gains with inclusion of control rate in the cost function, a Kalman estimator, and the ability to account for attention allocation and perception threshold effects. An algorithm designed for each implementation in current dynamic systems analysis and design software is presented. Example results based upon the analysis of a tracking task using three basic dynamic systems are compared with measured results and with similar analyses performed with the OCM and two previously proposed simplified optimal pilot models. The pilot frequency responses and error statistics obtained with this modified optimal control model are shown to compare more favorably to the measured experimental results than the other previously proposed simplified models evaluated.

  15. Development of modified cable models to simulate accurate neuronal active behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In large network and single three-dimensional (3-D) neuron simulations, high computing speed dictates using reduced cable models to simulate neuronal firing behaviors. However, these models are unwarranted under active conditions and lack accurate representation of dendritic active conductances that greatly shape neuronal firing. Here, realistic 3-D (R3D) models (which contain full anatomical details of dendrites) of spinal motoneurons were systematically compared with their reduced single unbranched cable (SUC, which reduces the dendrites to a single electrically equivalent cable) counterpart under passive and active conditions. The SUC models matched the R3D model's passive properties but failed to match key active properties, especially active behaviors originating from dendrites. For instance, persistent inward currents (PIC) hysteresis, frequency-current (FI) relationship secondary range slope, firing hysteresis, plateau potential partial deactivation, staircase currents, synaptic current transfer ratio, and regional FI relationships were not accurately reproduced by the SUC models. The dendritic morphology oversimplification and lack of dendritic active conductances spatial segregation in the SUC models caused significant underestimation of those behaviors. Next, SUC models were modified by adding key branching features in an attempt to restore their active behaviors. The addition of primary dendritic branching only partially restored some active behaviors, whereas the addition of secondary dendritic branching restored most behaviors. Importantly, the proposed modified models successfully replicated the active properties without sacrificing model simplicity, making them attractive candidates for running R3D single neuron and network simulations with accurate firing behaviors. The present results indicate that using reduced models to examine PIC behaviors in spinal motoneurons is unwarranted. PMID:25277743

  16. A modified Kelvin impact model for pounding simulation of base-isolated building with adjacent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Kun; Li, Li; Zhu, Hongping

    2009-09-01

    Base isolation can effectively reduce the seismic forces on a superstructure, particularly in low- to medium-rise buildings. However, under strong near-fault ground motions, pounding may occur at the isolation level between the base-isolated building (BIB) and its surrounding retaining walls. To effectively investigate the behavior of the BIB pounding with adjacent structures, after assessing some commonly used impact models, a modified Kelvin impact model is proposed in this paper. Relevant parameters in the modified Kelvin model are theoretically derived and numerically verified through a simple pounding case. At the same time, inelasticity of the isolated superstructure is introduced in order to accurately evaluate the potential damage to the superstructure caused by the pounding of the BIB with adjacent structures. The reliability of the modified Kelvin impact model is validated through numerical comparisons with other impact models. However, the difference between the numerical results from the various impact analytical models is not significant. Many numerical simulations of BIBs are conducted to investigate the influence of various design parameters and conditions on the peak inter-story drifts and floor accelerations during pounding. It is shown that pounding can substantially increase floor accelerations, especially at the ground floor where impacts occur. Higher modes of vibration are excited during poundings, increasing the inter-story drifts instead of keeping a nearly rigid-body motion of the superstructure. Furthermore, higher ductility demands can be imposed on lower floors of the superstructure. Moreover, impact stiffness seems to play a significant role in the acceleration response at the isolation level and the inter-story drifts of lower floors of the superstructure. Finally, the numerical results show that excessive flexibility of the isolation system used to minimize the floor accelerations may cause the BIB to be more susceptible to pounding

  17. Levitation force on a permanent magnet over a superconducting plane: Modified critical-state model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.J.

    1997-08-01

    The authors consider a model system of a permanent magnet above a semi-infinite superconductor. They introduce a modified critical-state model, and carry out derivations of the levitation force acting on the magnet. A key feature of the modification allows the current density to be less than the critical value. The theoretical results show an exponential relationship between the force and the distance. Analytical expressions are developed for permanent magnets in the form of a point dipole, a tip of a magnetic force microscope, and a cylindrical magnet. In the latter case, the exponential relationship has been observed in numerous experiments but without previous interpretation.

  18. Modified pressure loss model for T-junctions of engine exhaust manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenhui; Lu, Xiaolu; Cui, Yi; Deng, Kangyao

    2014-11-01

    The T-junction model of engine exhaust manifolds significantly influences the simulation precision of the pressure wave and mass flow rate in the intake and exhaust manifolds of diesel engines. Current studies have focused on constant pressure models, constant static pressure models and pressure loss models. However, low model precision is a common disadvantage when simulating engine exhaust manifolds, particularly for turbocharged systems. To study the performance of junction flow, a cold wind tunnel experiment with high velocities at the junction of a diesel exhaust manifold is performed, and the variation in the pressure loss in the T-junction under different flow conditions is obtained. Despite the trend of the calculated total pressure loss coefficient, which is obtained by using the original pressure loss model and is the same as that obtained from the experimental results, large differences exist between the calculated and experimental values. Furthermore, the deviation becomes larger as the flow velocity increases. By improving the Vazsonyi formula considering the flow velocity and introducing the distribution function, a modified pressure loss model is established, which is suitable for a higher velocity range. Then, the new model is adopted to solve one-dimensional, unsteady flow in a D6114 turbocharged diesel engine. The calculated values are compared with the measured data, and the result shows that the simulation accuracy of the pressure wave before the turbine is improved by 4.3% with the modified pressure loss model because gas compressibility is considered when the flow velocities are high. The research results provide valuable information for further junction flow research, particularly the correction of the boundary condition in one-dimensional simulation models.

  19. Measurement and Modeling of Respiration Rate of Tomato (Cultivar Roma) for Modified Atmosphere Storage.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Palani; Moitra, Ranabir; Mukherjee, Souti

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the respiration rate of tomato at 10, 20 and 30 °C using closed respiration system. Oxygen depletion and carbon dioxide accumulation in the system containing tomato was monitored. Respiration rate was found to decrease with increasing CO2 and decreasing O2 concentration. Michaelis-Menten type model based on enzyme kinetics was evaluated using experimental data generated for predicting the respiration rate. The model parameters that obtained from the respiration rate at different O2 and CO2 concentration levels were used to fit the model against the storage temperatures. The fitting was fair (R2 = 0.923 to 0.970) when the respiration rate was expressed as O2 concentation. Since inhibition constant for CO2 concentration tended towards negetive, the model was modified as a function of O2 concentration only. The modified model was fitted to the experimental data and showed good agreement (R2 = 0.998) with experimentally estimated respiration rate.

  20. Estimating parameters of a multiple autoregressive model by the modified maximum likelihood method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrak, Özlem Türker; Akkaya, Aysen D.

    2010-02-01

    We consider a multiple autoregressive model with non-normal error distributions, the latter being more prevalent in practice than the usually assumed normal distribution. Since the maximum likelihood equations have convergence problems (Puthenpura and Sinha, 1986) [11], we work out modified maximum likelihood equations by expressing the maximum likelihood equations in terms of ordered residuals and linearizing intractable nonlinear functions (Tiku and Suresh, 1992) [8]. The solutions, called modified maximum estimators, are explicit functions of sample observations and therefore easy to compute. They are under some very general regularity conditions asymptotically unbiased and efficient (Vaughan and Tiku, 2000) [4]. We show that for small sample sizes, they have negligible bias and are considerably more efficient than the traditional least squares estimators. We show that our estimators are robust to plausible deviations from an assumed distribution and are therefore enormously advantageous as compared to the least squares estimators. We give a real life example.

  1. The Modified Rayleigh-Benard Convection Problem and its Application to Permafrost Methane Emission Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudakov, Ivan; Vakulenko, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The original Rayleigh-Benard convection is a standard example of the system where the critical transitions occur with changing of a control parameter. We will discuss the modified Rayleigh-Benard convection problem which includes the radiative effects as well as the specific gas sources on a surface. Such formulation of this problem leads to identification a new kind of nonlinear phenomenon, besides the well-known Benard cells. Modeling of methane emissions from permafrost into the atmosphere drives to difficult problems, involving the Navier-Stokes equations. Taking into account the modified Rayleigh-Benard convection problem, we will discuss a new approach which makes the problem of a climate catastrophe in the result of a greenhouse effect more tractable and allows us to describe catastrophic transitions in the atmosphere induced by permafrost greenhouse gas sources.

  2. A modified resistance equation for modeling underwater spark discharge with salinity and high pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Pengfei; Roy, Subrata

    2014-05-07

    This work investigates the performance of underwater spark discharge relating to bubble growth and decay under high pressure and with salinity conditions by introducing a modified form of the resistance equation. Here, we study salinity influence on circuit parameters by fitting the experimental data for which gap resistance is much larger in conductive water than in dielectric water. Accordingly, the resistance equation is modified by considering the influence of both plasma and its surrounding liquid. Thermal radiation effect of the bubble is also studied by comparing two different radiation models. Numerical results predict a larger bubble pressure for saline water but a reduced size and a smaller bubble cycle at a greater water depth. Such study may be useful in many saltwater applications, including that for deep sea conditions.

  3. A self-modifying cellular automaton model of historical urbanization in the San Francisco Bay area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, K.C.; Hoppen, S.; Gaydos, L.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe a cellular automaton (CA) simulation model developed to predict urban growth as part of a project for estimating the regional and broader impact of urbanization on the San Francisco Bay area's climate. The rules of the model are more complex than those of a typical CA and involve the use of multiple data sources, including topography, road networks, and existing settlement distributions, and their modification over time. In addition, the control parameters of the model are allowed to self-modify: that is, the CA adapts itself to the circumstances it generates, in particular, during periods of rapid growth or stagnation. In addition, the model was written to allow the accumulation of probabilistic estimates based on Monte Carlo methods. Calibration of the model has been accomplished by the use of historical maps to compare model predictions of urbanization, based solely upon the distribution in year 1900, with observed data for years 1940, 1954, 1962, 1974, and 1990. The complexity of this model has made calibration a particularly demanding step. Lessons learned about the methods, measures, and strategies developed to calibrate the model may be of use in other environmental modeling contexts. With the calibration complete, the model is being used to generate a set of future scenarios for the San Francisco Bay area along with their probabilities based on the Monte Carlo version of the model. Animated dynamic mapping of the simulations will be used to allow visualization of the impact of future urban growth.

  4. Entropy-corrected new agegraphic dark energy model in the context of Chern-Simons modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Ayman A.; Fekry, M.; Mansour, H.

    2015-04-01

    Within the framework of Chern-Simons (CS) modified gravity, we studied dark energy models. The new agegraphic dark energy (NADE) model, entropy-corrected new agegraphic dark energy (ECNADE) model and NADE model with generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) are investigated. For these models, we studied the evolution of scale factor a, Hubble parameter H and deceleration parameter q. On meantime, we studied the state finder parameters s and r. These models show some similar behavior with modified Chaplygin gas model in some regions, while in other regions some similarity with phantom and quintessence dark energy is noticed.

  5. Pregnancy-associated homeostasis and dysregulation: lessons from genetically modified animal models.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Junji; Matsuoka, Toshiki; Saito-Fujita, Tomoko; Inaba, Saki; Kunita, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2011-07-01

    Physiological alterations occur in many organ systems during pregnancy. These changes are necessary for the adaptation to pregnancy-specific physiological processes in mother and fetus, and the placenta plays a critical role in the maintenance of homeostasis in pregnancy. Dysregulation of these functional feto-maternal interactions leads to severe complications. There have been many attempts to create animal models that mimic the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, especially pre-eclampsia. In this review, we summarize the physiology of pregnancy and placental function, and discuss the placental gene expression in normal pregnancy. In addition, we assess a number of established animal models focusing on a specific pathogenic mechanism of pre-eclampsia, including genetically modified mouse models involving the renin-angiotensin system. Validation of these animal models would contribute significantly to understanding the basic principles of pregnancy-associated homeostasis and the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia.

  6. A Study of Holographic Dark Energy Models in Chern-Simon Modified Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sarfraz; Amir, M. Jamil

    2016-12-01

    This paper is devoted to study some holographic dark energy models in the context of Chern-Simon modified gravity by considering FRW universe. We analyze the equation of state parameter using Granda and Oliveros infrared cut-off proposal which describes the accelerated expansion of the universe under the restrictions on the parameter α. It is shown that for the accelerated expansion phase -1<ω _{Λ }<-1/3, the parameter α varies according as 1<α <2/3. Furthermore, for 0< α<1, the holographic energy and pressure density illustrates phantom-like theory of the evolution when ω Λ<-1. Also, we discuss the correspondence between the quintessence, K-essence, tachyon and dilaton field models and holographic dark energy models on similar fashion. To discuss the accelerated expansion of the universe, we explore the potential and the dynamics of quintessence, K-essence, tachyon and dilaton field models.

  7. Application of modified Patankar schemes to stiff biogeochemical models for the water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchard, Hans; Deleersnijder, Eric; Meister, Andreas

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we apply recently developed positivity preserving and conservative Modified Patankar-type solvers for ordinary differential equations to a simple stiff biogeochemical model for the water column. The performance of this scheme is compared to schemes which are not unconditionally positivity preserving (the first-order Euler and the second- and fourth-order Runge-Kutta schemes) and to schemes which are not conservative (the first- and second-order Patankar schemes). The biogeochemical model chosen as a test ground is a standard nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, which has been made stiff by substantially decreasing the half saturation concentration for nutrients. For evaluating the stiffness of the biogeochemical model, so-called numerical time scales are defined which are obtained empirically by applying high-resolution numerical schemes. For all ODE solvers under investigation, the temporal error is analysed for a simple exponential decay law. The performance of all schemes is compared to a high-resolution high-order reference solution. As a result, the second-order modified Patankar-Runge-Kutta scheme gives a good agreement with the reference solution even for time steps 10 times longer than the shortest numerical time scale of the problem. Other schemes do either compute negative values for non-negative state variables (fully explicit schemes), violate conservation (the Patankar schemes) or show low accuracy (all first-order schemes).

  8. Evaluation of teledermatology adoption by health-care professionals using a modified Technology Acceptance Model.

    PubMed

    Orruño, Estibalitz; Gagnon, Marie Pierre; Asua, José; Ben Abdeljelil, Anis

    2011-01-01

    We examined the main factors affecting the intention of physicians to use teledermatology using a modified Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). The investigation was carried out during a teledermatology pilot study conducted in Spain. A total of 276 questionnaires were sent to physicians by email and 171 responded (62%). Cronbach's alpha was acceptably high for all constructs. Theoretical variables were well correlated with each other and with the dependent variable (Intention to Use). Logistic regression indicated that the original TAM model was good at predicting physicians' intention to use teledermatology and that the variables Perceived Usefulness and Perceived Ease of Use were both significant (odds ratios of 8.4 and 7.4, respectively). When other theoretical variables were added, the model was still significant and it also became more powerful. However, the only significant predictor in the modified model was Facilitators with an odds ratio of 9.9. Thus the TAM was good at predicting physicians' intention to use teledermatology. However, the most important variable was the perception of Facilitators to using the technology (e.g. infrastructure, training and support).

  9. Modeling and Qualification of a Modified Emission Unit for Radioactive Air Emissions Stack Sampling Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2016-01-01

    A planned laboratory space and exhaust system modification to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Material Science and Technology Building indicated a new evaluation of the mixing at the air sampling system location would be required for compliance to ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011. The modified exhaust system would add a third fan thereby increasing the overall exhaust rate out the stack thus voiding the previous mixing study. Prior to modifying the radioactive air emissions exhaust system, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics computer model was used to evaluate the mixing at the sampling system location. Modeling of the new original three-fan system indicated that not all mixing criteria could be met. A second modeling effort was conducted with the addition of an air blender downstream of the confluence of the three fans which then showed satisfactory mixing results. The final installation included an air blender, and the exhaust system underwent full-scale tests to verify velocity, cyclonic flow, gas, and particulate uniformity. The modeling results and those of the full-scale tests show agreement between each of the evaluated criteria. The use of a computational fluid dynamics code was an effective aid in the design process and allowed the sampling system to remain in its original location while still meeting the requirements for sampling at a well-mixed location.

  10. A modified procedure for mixture-model clustering of regional geochemical data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Smith, David B.; Horton, John D.

    2014-01-01

    A modified procedure is proposed for mixture-model clustering of regional-scale geochemical data. The key modification is the robust principal component transformation of the isometric log-ratio transforms of the element concentrations. This principal component transformation and the associated dimension reduction are applied before the data are clustered. The principal advantage of this modification is that it significantly improves the stability of the clustering. The principal disadvantage is that it requires subjective selection of the number of clusters and the number of principal components. To evaluate the efficacy of this modified procedure, it is applied to soil geochemical data that comprise 959 samples from the state of Colorado (USA) for which the concentrations of 44 elements are measured. The distributions of element concentrations that are derived from the mixture model and from the field samples are similar, indicating that the mixture model is a suitable representation of the transformed geochemical data. Each cluster and the associated distributions of the element concentrations are related to specific geologic and anthropogenic features. In this way, mixture model clustering facilitates interpretation of the regional geochemical data.

  11. Optical coherence elastography assessment of corneal viscoelasticity with a modified Rayleigh-Lamb wave model.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-Hao; Raghunathan, Raksha; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Twa, Michael D; Larin, Kirill V

    2017-02-01

    The biomechanical properties of the cornea play a critical role in forming vision. Diseases such as keratoconus can structurally degenerate the cornea causing a pathological loss in visual acuity. UV-A/riboflavin corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) is a clinically available treatment to stiffen the cornea and restore its healthy shape and function. However, current CXL techniques do not account for pre-existing biomechanical properties of the cornea nor the effects of the CXL treatment itself. In addition to the inherent corneal structure, the intraocular pressure (IOP) can also dramatically affect the measured biomechanical properties of the cornea. In this work, we present the details and development of a modified Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation model for quantifying corneal biomechanical properties. After comparison with finite element modeling, the model was utilized to quantify the viscoelasticity of in situ porcine corneas in the whole eye-globe configuration before and after CXL based on noncontact optical coherence elastography measurements. Moreover, the viscoelasticity of the untreated and CXL-treated eyes was quantified at various IOPs. The results showed that the stiffness of the cornea increased after CXL and that corneal stiffness is close to linear as a function of IOP. These results show that the modified Rayleigh-Lamb wave model can provide an accurate assessment of corneal viscoelasticity, which could be used for customized CXL therapies.

  12. A modified Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model for simulating pH-dependent adsorption effects.

    PubMed

    Jeppu, Gautham P; Clement, T Prabhakar

    2012-03-15

    Analytical isotherm equations such as Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms are widely used for modeling adsorption data. However, these isotherms are primarily useful for simulating data collected at a fixed pH value and cannot be easily adapted to simulate pH-dependent adsorption effects. Therefore, most adsorption studies currently use numerical surface-complexation models (SCMs), which are more complex and time consuming than traditional analytical isotherm models. In this work, we propose a new analytical isotherm model, identified as the modified Langmuir-Freundlich (MLF) isotherm, which can be used to simulate pH-dependent adsorption. The MLF isotherm uses a linear correlation between pH and affinity coefficient values. We validated the proposed MLF isotherm by predicting arsenic adsorption onto two different types of sorbents: pure goethite and goethite-coated sand. The MLF model gave good predictions for both experimental and surface complexation-model predicted datasets for these two sorbents. The proposed analytical isotherm framework can help reduce modeling complexity, model development time, and computational efforts. One of the limitations of the proposed method is that it is currently valid only for single-component systems. Furthermore, the model requires a system-specific pH. vs. affinity coefficient relation. Despite these limitations, the approach provides a promising analytical framework for simulating pH-dependent adsorption effects.

  13. A modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach to modeling customer satisfaction for affective design.

    PubMed

    Kwong, C K; Fung, K Y; Jiang, Huimin; Chan, K Y; Siu, Kin Wai Michael

    2013-01-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1) the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2) the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort.

  14. A Modified Dynamic Evolving Neural-Fuzzy Approach to Modeling Customer Satisfaction for Affective Design

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, C. K.; Fung, K. Y.; Jiang, Huimin; Chan, K. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1) the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2) the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort. PMID:24385884

  15. Modified virtual internal bond model for concrete subjected to dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Mayuri

    Concrete is often used as a primary material to build protective structures. There is a wide range of research work being performed to simulate the behavior of reinforced concrete under impact and blast loading. This behavior is studied from both material and structural points of view. The research study presented in this thesis focuses on material aspects of modeling. LS-DYNARTM is an effective software for modeling and finite element analysis of structural members. It allows the user to define the material through commercially available or user-defined constitutive material models. Each material model has a distinct set of parameters to define a material which is further assigned to elements and used for simulations. This research study presents a user defined material model called Modified Concrete Virtual Internal Bond Model (MC-VIB). The basic constitutive model of VIB assumes the body as a collection of randomly oriented material points interconnected by a network of internal bonds. The model was modified by several researchers for different purposes. This research presents the MC-VIB for concrete under dynamic loading and studies its implementation into LS-DYNARTM. The modifications include incorporation of shear behavior and accounting for the difference in behavior of concrete in tension and compression. This project includes the calibration of the model based on stress-strain behavior of single element and cylinder model of concrete. The parameters are based on concrete with a uniaxial compressive strength of 27.6 MPa (4 ksi). These numerical curves are compared to those obtained from conventionally used material models for concrete and standard curves obtained by accepted equations to check the accuracy of prediction. The material model available in LS-DYNARTM requires a number of input parameters to define concrete behavior. These properties are normally derived from actual tests performed on the concrete under consideration. Often the properties are

  16. A Modified Adaptive Lasso for Identifying Interactions in the Cox Model with the Heredity Constraint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Shen, Jincheng; Thall, Peter F

    2014-10-01

    In many biomedical studies, identifying effects of covariate interactions on survival is a major goal. Important examples are treatment-subgroup interactions in clinical trials, and gene-gene or gene-environment interactions in genomic studies. A common problem when implementing a variable selection algorithm in such settings is the requirement that the model must satisfy the strong heredity constraint, wherein an interaction may be included in the model only if the interaction's component variables are included as main effects. We propose a modified Lasso method for the Cox regression model that adaptively selects important single covariates and pairwise interactions while enforcing the strong heredity constraint. The proposed method is based on a modified log partial likelihood including two adaptively weighted penalties, one for main effects and one for interactions. A two-dimensional tuning parameter for the penalties is determined by generalized cross-validation. Asymptotic properties are established, including consistency and rate of convergence, and it is shown that the proposed selection procedure has oracle properties, given proper choice of regularization parameters. Simulations illustrate that the proposed method performs reliably across a range of different scenarios.

  17. Modeling gravity-driven fingering in rough-walled fractures using modified percolation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Pore scale invasion percolation theory is modified for imbibition of.wetting fluids into fractures. The effects of gravity, local aperture field geometry, and local in-plane air/water interfacial curvatureare included in the calculation of aperture filling potential which controls wetted structure growth within the fracture. The inclusion of gravity yields fingers oriented in the direction of the gravitational gradient. These fingers widen and tend to meander and branch more as the gravitational gradient decreases. In-plane interfacial curvature also greatly affects the wetted structure in both horizontal and nonhorizontal fractures causing the formation of macroscopic wetting fronts. The modified percolation model is used to simulate imbibition into an analogue rough-walled fracture where both fingering and horizontal imbibition experiments were previously conducted. Comparison of numerical and experimental results showed reasonably good agreement. This process oriented physical and numerical modeling is-a necessary step toward including gravity-driven fingering in models of flow and transport through unsaturated, fractured rock.

  18. Speeding up N-body simulations of modified gravity: chameleon screening models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sownak; Li, Baojiu; Barreira, Alexandre; He, Jian-hua; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Koyama, Kazuya; Llinares, Claudio; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-02-01

    We describe and demonstrate the potential of a new and very efficient method for simulating certain classes of modified gravity theories, such as the widely studied f(R) gravity models. High resolution simulations for such models are currently very slow due to the highly nonlinear partial differential equation that needs to be solved exactly to predict the modified gravitational force. This nonlinearity is partly inherent, but is also exacerbated by the specific numerical algorithm used, which employs a variable redefinition to prevent numerical instabilities. The standard Newton-Gauss-Seidel iterative method used to tackle this problem has a poor convergence rate. Our new method not only avoids this, but also allows the discretised equation to be written in a form that is analytically solvable. We show that this new method greatly improves the performance and efficiency of f(R) simulations. For example, a test simulation with 5123 particles in a box of size 512 Mpc/h is now 5 times faster than before, while a Millennium-resolution simulation for f(R) gravity is estimated to be more than 20 times faster than with the old method. Our new implementation will be particularly useful for running very high resolution, large-sized simulations which, to date, are only possible for the standard model, and also makes it feasible to run large numbers of lower resolution simulations for covariance analyses. We hope that the method will bring us to a new era for precision cosmological tests of gravity.

  19. Inferring the spatial variation of the wedge strength based on a modified critical taper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Liu, H.; Hsieh, Y.; Dong, J.

    2013-12-01

    Critical taper wedge theory has been widely applied to evaluate the strength of the detachment fault and the wedge by measuring taper angle. Traditional taper model, which incorporated constant cohesion and friction angle, fails to explain the lateral variation of the taper angle. A modified critical taper model adopting nonlinear Hoek-Brown failure criterion is proposed accordingly. The fold-and-thrust belt of central Taiwan was studied. Based on the field works and laboratory tests, the geological strength index (GSI) and the uniaxial compressive strength were obtained and the wedge strength can be estimated accordingly. The GSI values from investigation are decreased from the west to the east along the cross section due to the wedge strength heterogeneity. The uniaxial compressive strength of intact rock varies from the age of formation and lithology. The estimated wedge strength exhibits a strong spatial variation. The strength of the detachment fault was derived from rotary shear tests using fault gouge materials under different velocities and normal stresses. General speaking, the steady-state friction coefficient are about 0.29-0.46 when the shear velocity less than 0.1 m/s. The friction coefficient is not sensitive to the normal stress. Consequently, the lateral variation of the taper angle, which calculated by modified critical taper model, is mainly dominated by the wedge strength heterogeneity and the thickening of the wedge from the west to the east.

  20. The PPP model of alternant cyclic polyenes with modified boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bendazzoli, G.L.; Evangelisti, S.

    1995-08-15

    The extension of the PPP Hamiltonian for alternant cyclic polyenes to noninteger values of the pseudomomentum by imposing modified boundary conditions is discussed in detail. It is shown that a computer program for periodic boundary conditions can be easily adapted to the new boundary conditions. Full CI computations are carried out for some low-lying states of the PPP model of alternant cyclic polyenes (CH){sub N} (N even) at half-filling. The energy values obtained by using periodic (Bloch) and antiperiodic (Moebius) orbitals are used to perform energy extrapolations for N {yields} {infinity}. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Pulsatile flow of blood using a modified second-grade fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Tran, P.X.

    2008-07-01

    We study the unsteady pulsatile flow of blood in an artery, where the effects of body acceleration are included. The blood is modeled as a modified second-grade fluid where the viscosity and the normal stress coefficients depend on the shear rate. It is assumed that the blood near the wall behaves as a Newtonian fluid, and in the core as a non-Newtonian fluid. This phenomenon is also known as the Fahraeus–Lindqvist effect. The equations are made dimensionless and solved numerically.

  2. A Modified BFGS Formula Using a Trust Region Model for Nonsmooth Convex Minimizations

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zengru; Yuan, Gonglin; Sheng, Zhou; Liu, Wenjie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Duan, Xiabin

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a modified BFGS formula using a trust region model for solving nonsmooth convex minimizations by using the Moreau-Yosida regularization (smoothing) approach and a new secant equation with a BFGS update formula. Our algorithm uses the function value information and gradient value information to compute the Hessian. The Hessian matrix is updated by the BFGS formula rather than using second-order information of the function, thus decreasing the workload and time involved in the computation. Under suitable conditions, the algorithm converges globally to an optimal solution. Numerical results show that this algorithm can successfully solve nonsmooth unconstrained convex problems. PMID:26501775

  3. Finite size scaling and first-order phase transition in a modified XY model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Suman; Roy, Soumen Kumar

    2010-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulation has been performed in a two-dimensional modified XY -model first proposed by Domany [Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 1535 (1984)] The cluster algorithm of Wolff has been used and multiple histogram reweighting is performed. The first-order scaling behavior of the quantities such as specific heat and free-energy barrier are found to be obeyed accurately. While the lowest-order correlation function was found to decay to zero at long distance just above the transition, the next-higher-order correlation function shows a nonzero plateau.

  4. Finite size scaling and first-order phase transition in a modified XY model.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Suman; Roy, Soumen Kumar

    2010-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulation has been performed in a two-dimensional modified XY -model first proposed by Domany [Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 1535 (1984)] The cluster algorithm of Wolff has been used and multiple histogram reweighting is performed. The first-order scaling behavior of the quantities such as specific heat and free-energy barrier are found to be obeyed accurately. While the lowest-order correlation function was found to decay to zero at long distance just above the transition, the next-higher-order correlation function shows a nonzero plateau.

  5. Path Loss Prediction Over the Lunar Surface Utilizing a Modified Longley-Rice Irregular Terrain Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foore, Larry; Ida, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    This study introduces the use of a modified Longley-Rice irregular terrain model and digital elevation data representative of an analogue lunar site for the prediction of RF path loss over the lunar surface. The results are validated by theoretical models and past Apollo studies. The model is used to approximate the path loss deviation from theoretical attenuation over a reflecting sphere. Analysis of the simulation results provides statistics on the fade depths for frequencies of interest, and correspondingly a method for determining the maximum range of communications for various coverage confidence intervals. Communication system engineers and mission planners are provided a link margin and path loss policy for communication frequencies of interest.

  6. Application of a shear-modified GTN model to incremental sheet forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Malhotra, Rajiv; Liu, W. K.; Cao, Jian

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates the effects of using a shear-modified Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model, which is based on the mechanics of voids, for simulating material behavior in the incremental forming process. The problem chosen for analysis is a simplified version of the NUMISHEET 2014 incremental forming benchmark test. The implications of the shear-modification of the model specifically for incremental sheet forming processes are confirmed using finite element analysis. It is shown that including the shear term has a significant effect on fracture timing in incremental forming, which is not well reflected in the observed tensile test simulations for calibration. The numerical implementation and the need for comprehensive calibration of the model are briefly discussed.

  7. Ghrelin and eating behavior: evidence and insights from genetically-modified mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Aki; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Perelló, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide hormone, produced by endocrine cells of the stomach, which acts in the brain to increase food intake and body weight. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ghrelin's effects on eating behaviors has been greatly improved by the generation and study of several genetically manipulated mouse models. These models include mice overexpressing ghrelin and also mice with genetic deletion of ghrelin, the ghrelin receptor [the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)] or the enzyme that post-translationally modifies ghrelin [ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT)]. In addition, a GHSR-null mouse model in which GHSR transcription is globally blocked but can be cell-specifically reactivated in a Cre recombinase-mediated fashion has been generated. Here, we summarize findings obtained with these genetically manipulated mice, with the aim to highlight the significance of the ghrelin system in the regulation of both homeostatic and hedonic eating, including that occurring in the setting of chronic psychosocial stress. PMID:23882175

  8. Emerging Modified Transverse-Field Ising Model On A Hydrogenated Silicon Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Burkhard; Beach, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Advances in the precise placement of dangling bonds on a hydrogenated silicon surface open the prospect of manufacturing large scale quantum dot arrays. Small clusters of specifically arranged quantum dots comprise a system of bistable, interacting cells. Starting from an extended Hubbard model and using a set of controlled Hilbert space truncations, we show that such a system of quantum dot cells can be mapped to a modified transverse-field Ising model with long-ranged interactions. Each cell is described by a pseudo-spin. Because we control cell orientation and placement, we can construct a wide range of structures, with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic chains as simple examples. The Ising-like model is amenable to stochastic series expansion Monte Carlo, allowing the simulation and characterization of large systems. Work supported by Alberta Innovates Technology Futures.

  9. A modified cellular automaton method for polydimensional modelling of dendritic growth and microsegregation in multicomponent alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelic, S. C.; Thuswaldner, J. M.; Bernhard, C.

    2012-07-01

    Numerous numerical models for simulating solidification of metals on a microscopic scale have been proposed in the past, among them are most importantly the phase-field method and models based on cellular automata. Especially the models based on cellular automata (adopting the virtual front tracking (VFT) concept) published so far are often only suitable for the consideration of one alloying element. Since industrial alloys are usually constituted of multicomponent alloys, the possibility of applying cellular automata is rather limited. With the aim of enhancing this modelling technique, a new, modified VFT model, which allows for the treatment of several alloying elements, in the low Péclet number regime is presented. The model uses the physical fundamentals of solute and heat diffusion in two dimensions as a basis for determining the solidification progress. By a new and effective approach, based on a functional extrapolation of the concentration gradient, dendritic growth in multicomponent Fe-C-Si-Mn-P-S alloys could be studied. The model shows the typical behaviour of dendritic solidification, such as parabolic tip and secondary dendrite arm formation as well as selection of preferably aligned columnar dendrites. A validation of the model is performed by the evaluation of morphological parameters and comparing them to experimentally determined values. The results for free and constrained dendritic growth effectively demonstrate the capabilities of this new model. The model is especially attractive for bridging the gap between one-dimensional microsegregation models and multidimensional morphology models with regard to modelling the complex interrelations between segregation on a multidimensional level and morphology formation.

  10. Holistic versus monomeric strategies for hydrological modelling of human-modified hydrosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbantis, I.; Efstratiadis, A.; Rozos, E.; Kopsiafti, M.; Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2011-03-01

    The modelling of human-modified basins that are inadequately measured constitutes a challenge for hydrological science. Often, models for such systems are detailed and hydraulics-based for only one part of the system while for other parts oversimplified models or rough assumptions are used. This is typically a bottom-up approach, which seeks to exploit knowledge of hydrological processes at the micro-scale at some components of the system. Also, it is a monomeric approach in two ways: first, essential interactions among system components may be poorly represented or even omitted; second, differences in the level of detail of process representation can lead to uncontrolled errors. Additionally, the calibration procedure merely accounts for the reproduction of the observed responses using typical fitting criteria. The paper aims to raise some critical issues, regarding the entire modelling approach for such hydrosystems. For this, two alternative modelling strategies are examined that reflect two modelling approaches or philosophies: a dominant bottom-up approach, which is also monomeric and, very often, based on output information, and a top-down and holistic approach based on generalized information. Critical options are examined, which codify the differences between the two strategies: the representation of surface, groundwater and water management processes, the schematization and parameterization concepts and the parameter estimation methodology. The first strategy is based on stand-alone models for surface and groundwater processes and for water management, which are employed sequentially. For each model, a different (detailed or coarse) parameterization is used, which is dictated by the hydrosystem schematization. The second strategy involves model integration for all processes, parsimonious parameterization and hybrid manual-automatic parameter optimization based on multiple objectives. A test case is examined in a hydrosystem in Greece with high complexities

  11. Interaction study between maltose-modified PPI dendrimers and lipidic model membranes.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Dominika; Appelhans, Dietmar; Signorelli, Marco; Wiesner, Brigitte; Fessas, Dimitrios; Scheler, Ulrich; Voit, Brigitte; Maly, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The influence of maltose-modified poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPC/DMPG) (3%) liposomes was studied. Fourth generation (G4) PPI dendrimers with primary amino surface groups were partially (open shell glycodendrimers - OS) or completely (dense shell glycodendrimers - DS) modified with maltose residues. As a model membrane, two types of 100nm diameter liposomes were used to observe differences in the interactions between neutral DMPC and negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers. Interactions were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate the membrane fluidity of both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the lipid bilayer and using differential scanning calorimetry to investigate thermodynamic parameter changes. Pulsed-filed gradient NMR experiments were carried out to evaluate common diffusion coefficient of DMPG and DS PPI in D2O when using below critical micelle concentration of DMPG. Both OS and DS PPI G4 dendrimers show interactions with liposomes. Neutral DS dendrimers exhibit stronger changes in membrane fluidity compared to OS dendrimers. The bilayer structure seems more rigid in the case of anionic DMPC/DMPG liposomes in comparison to pure and neutral DMPC liposomes. Generally, interactions of dendrimers with anionic DMPC/DMPG and neutral DMPC liposomes were at the same level. Higher concentrations of positively charged OS dendrimers induced the aggregation process with negatively charged liposomes. For all types of experiments, the presence of NaCl decreased the strength of the interactions between glycodendrimers and liposomes. Based on NMR diffusion experiments we suggest that apart from electrostatic interactions for OS PPI hydrogen bonds play a major role in maltose-modified PPI dendrimer interactions with anionic and neutral model membranes where a contact surface is needed for undergoing multiple H-bond interactions between

  12. Simulation of fluid-solid coexistence via thermodynamic integration using a modified cell model.

    PubMed

    Nayhouse, Michael; Amlani, Ankur M; Heng, Vincent R; Orkoulas, G

    2012-04-18

    Despite recent advances, precise simulation of fluid-solid transitions still remains a challenging task. Thermodynamic integration techniques are the simplest methods to study fluid-solid coexistence. These methods are based on the calculation of the free energies of the fluid and the solid phases, starting from a state of known free energy which is usually an ideal-gas state. Despite their simplicity, the main drawback of thermodynamic integration techniques is the large number of states that must be simulated. In the present work, a thermodynamic integration technique, which reduces the number of simulated states, is proposed and tested on a system of particles interacting via an inverse twelfth-power potential energy function. The simulations are implemented at constant pressure and the solid phase is modeled according to the constrained cell model of Hoover and Ree. The fluid and the solid phases are linked together by performing constant-pressure simulations of a modified cell model. The modified cell model, which was originally proposed by Hoover and Ree, facilitates transitions between the fluid and the solid phase by tuning a homogeneous external field. This model is simulated on a constant-pressure path for a series of progressively increasing values of the field, thus allowing for direct determination of the free energy difference between the fluid and the solid phase via histogram reweighting. The size-dependent results are analyzed using histogram reweighting and finite-size scaling techniques. The scaling analysis is based on studying the size-dependent behavior of the second- and higher-order derivatives of the free energy as well as the dimensionless moment ratios of the order parameter. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of accounting for size effects in simulation studies of fluid-solid transitions.

  13. A modified QWASI model for fate and transport modeling of mercury between the water-ice-sediment in Lake Ulansuhai.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Li, Changyou; Anderson, Bruce; Zhang, Sheng; Shi, Xiaohong; Zhao, Shengnan

    2017-06-01

    Mercury contamination from industrial and agricultural drainage into lakes and rivers is a growing concern in Northern China. Lake Ulansuhai, located in Hetao irrigation district in Inner Mongolia, is the only sink for the all industrial and agricultural drainage and sole outlet for this district to the Yellow River, which is one of the main source of drinking water for the numerous cities and towns downstream. Because Ulansuahi is ice-covered during winter, the QWASI model was modified by adding an ice equation to get a more accurate understanding of the fate and transport of mercury within the lake. Both laboratory and field tests were carried out during the ice growth period. The aquivalence and mass balance approaches were used to develop the modified QWASI + ice model. The margins of error between the modelled and the measured average concentrations of Hg in ice, water, and sediment were 30%, 26.2%, and 19.8% respectively. These results suggest that the new QWASI + ice model could be used to more accurately represent the fate and transport of mercury in the seasonally ice-covered lakes, during the ice growth period.

  14. Disease-modifying effect of intravenous immunoglobulin in an experimental model of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Leanage, Gayeshika; Tieng, Quang M.; Yadav, Ashwin; Ullmann, Jeremy F. P.; She, David T.; Truong, Vy; Ruitenberg, Marc J.; Reutens, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Novel therapies that prevent or modify the development of epilepsy following an initiating brain insult could significantly reduce the burden of this disease. In light of evidence that immune mechanisms play an important role in generating and maintaining the epileptic condition, we evaluated the effect of a well-established immunomodulatory treatment, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), on the development of epilepsy in an experimental model of epileptogenesis. In separate experiments, IVIg was administered either before (pre-treatment) or after (post-treatment) the onset of pilocarpine status epilepticus (SE). Our results show that both pre- and post-treatment with IVIg attenuated acute inflammation in the SE model. Specifically, IVIg reduced local activation of glial cells, complement system activation, and blood-brain barrier damage (BBB), which are all thought to play important roles in the development of epilepsy. Importantly, post-treatment with IVIg was also found to reduce the frequency and duration of subsequent spontaneous recurrent seizures as detected by chronic video-electroencephalographic (video-EEG) recordings. This finding supports a novel application for IVIg, specifically its repurposing as a disease-modifying therapy in epilepsy. PMID:28074934

  15. Preparation and characterization of physically modified glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Redlinger-Pohn, Jakob Dominik; Kappl, Michael; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work is the physical modification and characterization of the surface topography of glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). By surface modification the contact area between drug and carrier and thereby interparticle forces may be modified. Thus the performance of DPIs that relies on interparticle interactions may be improved. Glass beads were chosen as model carriers because various prospects of physical surface modification may be applied without affecting other factors also impacting interparticle interactions like particle size and shape. To generate rough surfaces glass beads were processed mechanically by friction and impaction in a ball mill with different grinding materials that were smaller and harder with respect to the glass beads. By varying the grinding time (4 h, 8 h) and by using different grinding media (tungsten carbide, quartz) surfaces with different shades of roughness were generated. Depending on the hardness of the grinding material and the grinding time the surface roughness was more or less pronounced. Surface roughness parameters and specific surface area were determined via several complementary techniques in order to get an enhanced understanding of the impact of the modifying procedure on the surface properties of the glass beads.

  16. A modified full velocity difference model with the consideration of velocity deviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Shi, Zhong-Ke

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a modified full velocity difference model (FVDM) based on car-following theory is proposed with the consideration of velocity deviation which represents the inexact judgement of velocity. The stability condition is obtained by the use of linear stability analysis. It is shown that the stability of traffic flow varies with the deviation extent of velocity. The Burgers, Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified K-dV (MKdV) equations are derived to describe the triangular shock waves, soliton waves and kink-antikink waves in the stable, metastable and unstable region, respectively. The numerical simulations show a good agreement with the analytical results, such as density wave, hysteresis loop, acceleration, deceleration and so on. The results show that traffic congestion can be suppressed by taking the positive effect of velocity deviation into account. By taking the positive effect of high estimate of velocity into account, the unrealistic high deceleration and negative velocity which occur in FVDM will be eliminated in the proposed model.

  17. A model for the control of malaria using genetically modified vectors.

    PubMed

    Diaz, H; Ramirez, A A; Olarte, A; Clavijo, C

    2011-05-07

    Recent works have considered the problem of using transgenic mosquitoes to control a malaria epidemic. These insects have been genetically engineered to reduce their capacity to infect humans with malaria parasites. We analyze a model of the mosquito population dynamics when genetically modified individuals are introduced into a wild type population so that the effect of their introduction can be assessed. The model describes the dynamics of gene selection under sexual reproduction in a closed vector population. Our results show that the fitness of the resulting heterozygous population is the key parameter for the success of the invasion, independently of the fitness of homozygous vectors. The vector population dynamics model is then combined with an epidemiological model to study the feasibility of controlling a malaria epidemic. Basic reproductive numbers are calculated for both models, and conditions are obtained for preventing reappearance of the epidemic. Simulations on this model show that it may be possible to reduce or even eradicate the epidemic only if the heterozygous population is better adapted than the wild type. They also show that this can be achieved without completely eliminating the wild type mosquitoes.

  18. Modified energy cascade model adapted for a multicrop Lunar greenhouse prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscheri, G.; Kacira, M.; Patterson, L.; Giacomelli, G.; Sadler, P.; Furfaro, R.; Lobascio, C.; Lamantea, M.; Grizzaffi, L.

    2012-10-01

    Models are required to accurately predict mass and energy balances in a bioregenerative life support system. A modified energy cascade model was used to predict outputs of a multi-crop (tomatoes, potatoes, lettuce and strawberries) Lunar greenhouse prototype. The model performance was evaluated against measured data obtained from several system closure experiments. The model predictions corresponded well to those obtained from experimental measurements for the overall system closure test period (five months), especially for biomass produced (0.7% underestimated), water consumption (0.3% overestimated) and condensate production (0.5% overestimated). However, the model was less accurate when the results were compared with data obtained from a shorter experimental time period, with 31%, 48% and 51% error for biomass uptake, water consumption, and condensate production, respectively, which were obtained under more complex crop production patterns (e.g. tall tomato plants covering part of the lettuce production zones). These results, together with a model sensitivity analysis highlighted the necessity of periodic characterization of the environmental parameters (e.g. light levels, air leakage) in the Lunar greenhouse.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Triaxially Braided Composites Utilizing a Modified Subcell Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cater, Christopher; Xiao, Xinran; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2015-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical approach was performed for characterizing and modeling triaxially braided composites with a modified subcell modeling strategy. Tensile coupon tests were conducted on a [0deg/60deg/-60deg] braided composite at angles of 0deg, 30deg, 45deg, 60deg and 90deg relative to the axial tow of the braid. It was found that measured coupon strength varied significantly with the angle of the applied load and each coupon direction exhibited unique final failures. The subcell modeling approach implemented into the finite element software LS-DYNA was used to simulate the various tensile coupon test angles. The modeling approach was successful in predicting both the coupon strength and reported failure mode for the 0deg, 30deg and 60deg loading directions. The model over-predicted the strength in the 90deg direction; however, the experimental results show a strong influence of free edge effects on damage initiation and failure. In the absence of these local free edge effects, the subcell modeling approach showed promise as a viable and computationally efficient analysis tool for triaxially braided composite structures. Future work will focus on validation of the approach for predicting the impact response of the braided composite against flat panel impact tests.

  20. A modified elastance model to control mock ventricles in real-time: numerical and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Colacino, Francesco Maria; Moscato, Francesco; Piedimonte, Fabio; Danieli, Guido; Nicosia, Salvatore; Arabia, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an elastance-based mock ventricle able to reproduce the correct ventricular pressure-volume relationship and its correct interaction with the hydraulic circuit connected to it. A real-time control of the mock ventricle was obtained by a new left ventricular mathematical model including resistive and inductive terms added to the classical Suga-Sagawa elastance model throughout the whole cardiac cycle. A valved piston pump was used to mimic the left ventricle. The pressure measured into the pump chamber was fed back into the mathematical model and the calculated reference left ventricular volume was used to drive the piston. Results show that the classical model is very sensitive to pressure disturbances, especially during the filling phase, while the modified model is able to filter out the oscillations thus eliminating their detrimental effects. The presented model is thus suitable to control mock ventricles in real-time, where sudden pressure disturbances represent a key issue and are not negligible. This real-time controlled mock ventricle is able to reproduce the elastance mechanism of a natural ventricle by mimicking its preload (mean atrial pressure) and afterload (mean aortic pressure) sensitivity, i.e., the Starling law. Therefore, it can be used for designing and testing cardiovascular prostheses due to its capability to reproduce the correct ventricle-vascular system interaction.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Triaxially Braided Composites Utilizing a Modified Subcell Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cater, Christopher; Xiao, Xinran; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2015-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical approach was performed for characterizing and modeling triaxially braided composites with a modified subcell modeling strategy. Tensile coupon tests were conducted on a [0deg/60deg/-60deg] braided composite at angles [0deg, 30deg, 45deg, 60deg and 90deg] relative to the axial tow of the braid. It was found that measured coupon strength varied significantly with the angle of the applied load and each coupon direction exhibited unique final failures. The subcell modeling approach implemented into the finite element software LS-DYNA was used to simulate the various tensile coupon test angles. The modeling approach was successful in predicting both the coupon strength and reported failure mode for the 0deg, 30deg and 60deg loading directions. The model over-predicted the strength in the 90deg direction; however, the experimental results show a strong influence of free edge effects on damage initiation and failure. In the absence of these local free edge effects, the subcell modeling approach showed promise as a viable and computationally efficient analysis tool for triaxially braided composite structures. Future work will focus on validation of the approach for predicting the impact response of the braided composite against flat panel impact tests.

  2. The KdV—Burgers equation in a modified speed gradient continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ling-Ling; Cheng, Rong-Jun; Li, Zhi-Peng; Ge, Hong-Xia

    2013-06-01

    Based on the full velocity difference model, Jiang et al. put forward the speed gradient model through the micro-macro linkage (Jiang R, Wu Q S and Zhu Z J 2001 Chin. Sci. Bull. 46 345 and Jiang R, Wu Q S and Zhu Z J 2002 Trans. Res. B 36 405). In this paper, the Taylor expansion is adopted to modify the model. The backward travel problem is overcome by our model, which exists in many higher-order continuum models. The neutral stability condition of the model is obtained through the linear stability analysis. Nonlinear analysis shows clearly that the density fluctuation in traffic flow leads to a variety of density waves. Moreover, the Korteweg-de Vries—Burgers (KdV—Burgers) equation is derived to describe the traffic flow near the neutral stability line and the corresponding solution for traffic density wave is derived. The numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the local cluster effects. The results are consistent with the realistic traffic flow and also further verify the results of nonlinear analysis.

  3. Modified hyperspheres algorithm to trace homotopy curves of nonlinear circuits composed by piecewise linear modelled devices.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Leal, H; Jimenez-Fernandez, V M; Benhammouda, B; Filobello-Nino, U; Sarmiento-Reyes, A; Ramirez-Pinero, A; Marin-Hernandez, A; Huerta-Chua, J

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation.

  4. Spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model: Heat diffusivity and greenhouse effects.

    PubMed

    Alberti, T; Primavera, L; Vecchio, A; Lepreti, F; Carbone, V

    2015-11-01

    In this work we investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model, originally introduced by Lovelock and Watson to describe in a simple way the interactions between an Earth-like planet, its biosphere, and the incoming solar radiation. Here a spatial dependency on latitude is included, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitudes and a simple greenhouse effect description are introduced in the model. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions.

  5. Specific-heat exponent and modified hyperscaling in the 4D random-field Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytas, N. G.; Martín-Mayor, V.; Picco, M.; Sourlas, N.

    2017-03-01

    We report a high-precision numerical estimation of the critical exponent α of the specific heat of the random-field Ising model in four dimensions. Our result α =0.12(1) indicates a diverging specific-heat behavior and is consistent with the estimation coming from the modified hyperscaling relation using our estimate of θ via the anomalous dimensions η and \\barη . Our analysis benefited from a high-statistics zero-temperature numerical simulation of the model for two distributions of the random fields, namely a Gaussian and Poissonian distribution, as well as recent advances in finite-size scaling and reweighting methods for disordered systems. An original estimate of the critical slowing down exponent z of the maximum-flow algorithm used is also provided.

  6. LRS Bianchi type-II string cosmological models in a modified theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakavalli, T.; Ananda Rao, G.; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of spatially homogeneous anisotropic LRS Bianchi type-II cosmological models with string source in a modified theory of gravitation formulated by Harko et al. (Phys. Rev. D 84:024020, 2011) which is universally known as f( R, T) gravity. Here R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy momentum tensor. By solving the field equation we have presented massive string and Takabyasi or p-string models in this theory. However it is interesting to note that geometric string in this space-time does not exist in this theory. Physical and geometrical properties of the strings obtained are also discussed.

  7. Modified Hyperspheres Algorithm to Trace Homotopy Curves of Nonlinear Circuits Composed by Piecewise Linear Modelled Devices

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Leal, H.; Jimenez-Fernandez, V. M.; Benhammouda, B.; Filobello-Nino, U.; Sarmiento-Reyes, A.; Ramirez-Pinero, A.; Marin-Hernandez, A.; Huerta-Chua, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation. PMID:25184157

  8. Spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model: Heat diffusivity and greenhouse effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, T.; Primavera, L.; Vecchio, A.; Lepreti, F.; Carbone, V.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model, originally introduced by Lovelock and Watson to describe in a simple way the interactions between an Earth-like planet, its biosphere, and the incoming solar radiation. Here a spatial dependency on latitude is included, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitudes and a simple greenhouse effect description are introduced in the model. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions.

  9. Stochastic model reduction using a modified Hill-type kinetic rate law.

    PubMed

    Smadbeck, Patrick; Kaznessis, Yiannis

    2012-12-21

    In the present work, we address a major challenge facing the modeling of biochemical reaction networks: when using stochastic simulations, the computational load and number of unknown parameters may dramatically increase with system size and complexity. A proposed solution to this challenge is the reduction of models by utilizing nonlinear reaction rate laws in place of a complex multi-reaction mechanism. This type of model reduction in stochastic systems often fails when applied outside of the context in which it was initially conceived. We hypothesize that the use of nonlinear rate laws fails because a single reaction is inherently Poisson distributed and cannot match higher order statistics. In this study we explore the use of Hill-type rate laws as an approximation for gene regulation, specifically transcription repression. We matched output data for several simple gene networks to determine Hill-type parameters. We show that the models exhibit inaccuracies when placed into a simple feedback repression model. By adding an additional abstract reaction to the models we account for second-order statistics. This split Hill rate law matches higher order statistics and demonstrates that the new model is able to more accurately describe the mean protein output. Finally, the modified Hill model is shown to be modular and models retain accuracy when placed into a larger multi-gene network. The work as presented may be used in gene regulatory or cell-signaling networks, where multiple binding events can be captured by Hill kinetics. The added benefit of the proposed split-Hill kinetics is the improved accuracy in modeling stochastic effects. We demonstrate these benefits with a few specific reaction network examples.

  10. Density functional description of adsorption in slitlike pores modified with chain molecules: a simple model for pillaredlike materials.

    PubMed

    Matusewicz, M; Patrykiejew, A; Sokołowski, S; Pizio, O

    2007-11-07

    We propose a density functional theory to describe adsorption of Lennard-Jones fluid in slitlike pores modified by chain molecules. Specifically, the chains are bonded by their ends to the opposite pore walls, so they can form pillaredlike structure. Two models are studied. In the first model, the nonterminating segments of chains can change their configuration inside the pore upon adsorption of spherical species. In the second model, the chains configuration remains fixed, so that the system is similar to a nonuniform quenched-annealed mixture. We study capillary condensation of fluid species inside such modified pores and compare the results obtained for two models.

  11. A Modified Mixing Length Turbulence Model for Zero and Adverse Pressure Gradients. M.S. Thesis - Akron Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.; Leonard, B. P.

    1994-01-01

    The modified mixing length (MML) turbulence model was installed in the Proteus Navier-Stokes code, then modified to make it applicable to a wider range of flows typical of aerospace propulsion applications. The modifications are based on experimental data for three flat-plate flows having zero, mild adverse, and strong adverse pressure gradients. Three transonic diffuser test cases were run with the new version of the model in order to evaluate its performance. All results are compared with experimental data and show improvements over calculations made using the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, the standard algebraic model in Proteus.

  12. Mapping genetic modifiers of survival in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Alison R.; Hawkins, Nicole A.; McCollom, Clint E.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population. Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for several monogenic epilepsy syndromes. More than 800 mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN1A have been reported in patients with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus and Dravet syndrome. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in SCN1A result in Dravet syndrome, a severe infant-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by intractable seizures, developmental delays and increased mortality. A common feature of monogenic epilepsies is variable expressivity among individuals with the same mutation, suggesting that genetic modifiers may influence clinical severity. Mice with heterozygous deletion of Scn1a (Scn1a+/−) model a number of Dravet syndrome features, including spontaneous seizures and premature lethality. Phenotype severity in Scn1a+/− mice is strongly dependent on strain background. On the 129S6/SvEvTac strain Scn1a+/− mice exhibit no overt phenotype, while on the (C57BL/6J × 129S6/SvEvTac)F1 strain Scn1a+/− mice exhibit spontaneous seizures and early lethality. To systematically identify loci that influence premature lethality in Scn1a+/− mice, we performed genome scans on reciprocal backcrosses. QTL mapping revealed modifier loci on mouse chromosomes 5, 7, 8 and 11. RNA-seq analysis of strain-dependent gene expression, regulation and coding sequence variation provided a list of potential functional candidate genes at each locus. Identification of modifier genes that influence survival in Scn1a+/− mice will improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of Dravet syndrome and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for improved treatment of human patients. PMID:24152123

  13. Choosing and using Drosophila models to characterize modifiers of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Edward W; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2012-08-01

    HD (Huntington's disease) is a fatal inherited gain-of-function disorder caused by a polyQ (polyglutamine) expansion in the htt (huntingtin protein). Expression of mutant htt in model organisms is sufficient to recapitulate many of the cellular defects found in HD patients. Many groups have independently developed Drosophila models of HD, taking advantage of its rapid life cycle, carefully annotated genome and well-established molecular toolkits. Furthermore, unlike simpler models, Drosophila have a complex nervous system, displaying a range of carefully co-ordinated behaviours which offer an exquisitely sensitive readout of neuronal disruption. Measuring HD-associated changes in behaviour in Drosophila therefore offers a window into the earliest stages of HD, when therapeutic interventions might be particularly effective. The present review describes a number of recently developed Drosophila models of HD and offers practical guidance on the advantages and disadvantages of various experimental approaches that can be used to screen these models for modifiers of mutant htt-mediated toxicity.

  14. Genome editing revolutionize the creation of genetically modified pigs for modeling human diseases.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhao, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    Pigs have anatomical, physiological and genomic characteristics that make them highly suitable for modeling human diseases. Genetically modified (GM) pig models of human diseases are critical for studying pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention. The emergence of nuclease-mediated genome editing technology has been successfully employed for engineering of the pig genome, which has revolutionize the creation of GM pig models with highly complex pathophysiologies and comorbidities. In this review, we summarize the progress of recently developed genome editing technologies, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), which enable highly efficient and precise introduction of genome modifications into pigs, and tailored disease models that have been generated in various disciplines via genome editing technology. We also summarize the GM pig models that have been generated by conventional transgenic strategies. Additionally, perspectives regarding the application of GM pigs in biomedical research are discussed.

  15. Acoustic wave propagation in bovine cancellous bone: Application of the Modified Biot-Attenborough model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il; Roh, Heui-Seol; Yoon, Suk Wang

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in bovine cancellous bone is experimentally and theoretically investigated in the frequency range of 0.5-1 MHz. The phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and broadband ultrasonic attenuation (BUA) of bovine cancellous bone are measured as functions of frequency and porosity. For theoretical estimation, the Modified Biot-Attenborough (MBA) model is employed with three new phenomenological parameters: the boundary condition, phase velocity, and impedance parameters. The MBA model is based on the idealization of cancellous bone as a nonrigid porous medium with circular cylindrical pores oriented normal to the surface. It is experimentally observed that the phase velocity is approximately nondispersive and the attenuation coefficient linearly increases with frequency. The MBA model predicts a slightly negative dispersion of phase velocity linearly with frequency and the nonlinear relationships of attenuation and BUA with porosity. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical results estimated with the MBA model. It is expected that the MBA model can be usefully employed in the field of clinical bone assessment for the diagnosis of osteoporosis.

  16. Computational Analysis and Predictive Cheminformatics Modeling of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Epigenetic Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Scaria, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Background The dynamic and differential regulation and expression of genes is majorly governed by the complex interactions of a subset of biomolecules in the cell operating at multiple levels starting from genome organisation to protein post-translational regulation. The regulatory layer contributed by the epigenetic layer has been one of the favourite areas of interest recently. This layer of regulation as we know today largely comprises of DNA modifications, histone modifications and noncoding RNA regulation and the interplay between each of these major components. Epigenetic regulation has been recently shown to be central to development of a number of disease processes. The availability of datasets of high-throughput screens for molecules for biological properties offer a new opportunity to develop computational methodologies which would enable in-silico screening of large molecular libraries. Methods In the present study, we have used data from high throughput screens for the inhibitors of epigenetic modifiers. Computational predictive models were constructed based on the molecular descriptors. Machine learning algorithms for supervised training, Naive Bayes and Random Forest, were used to generate predictive models for the small molecule inhibitors of histone methyl-transferases and demethylases. Random forest, with the accuracy of 80%, was identified as the most accurate classifier. Further we complemented the study with substructure search approach filtering out the probable pharmacophores from the active molecules leading to drug molecules. Results We show that effective use of appropriate computational algorithms could be used to learn molecular and structural correlates of biological activities of small molecules. The computational models developed could be potentially used to screen and identify potential new biological activities of molecules from large molecular libraries and prioritise them for in-depth biological assays. To the best of our knowledge

  17. Modelling fast forms of visual neural plasticity using a modified second-order motion energy model.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Andrea; Contillo, Adriano; Mather, George

    2014-12-01

    The Adelson-Bergen motion energy sensor is well established as the leading model of low-level visual motion sensing in human vision. However, the standard model cannot predict adaptation effects in motion perception. A previous paper Pavan et al.(Journal of Vision 10:1-17, 2013) presented an extension to the model which uses a first-order RC gain-control circuit (leaky integrator) to implement adaptation effects which can span many seconds, and showed that the extended model's output is consistent with psychophysical data on the classic motion after-effect. Recent psychophysical research has reported adaptation over much shorter time periods, spanning just a few hundred milliseconds. The present paper further extends the sensor model to implement rapid adaptation, by adding a second-order RC circuit which causes the sensor to require a finite amount of time to react to a sudden change in stimulation. The output of the new sensor accounts accurately for psychophysical data on rapid forms of facilitation (rapid visual motion priming, rVMP) and suppression (rapid motion after-effect, rMAE). Changes in natural scene content occur over multiple time scales, and multi-stage leaky integrators of the kind proposed here offer a computational scheme for modelling adaptation over multiple time scales.

  18. Genetically modified plants and food hypersensitivity diseases: usage and implications of experimental models for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Vanessa E; Hogan, Simon P

    2006-08-01

    The recent advances in biotechnology in the plant industry have led to increasing crop production and yield that in turn has increased the usage of genetically modified (GM) food in the human food chain. The usage of GM foods for human consumption has raised a number of fundamental questions including the ability of GM foods to elicit potentially harmful immunological responses, including allergic hypersensitivity. To assess the safety of foods derived from GM plants including allergenic potential, the US FDA, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)/World Health Organization (WHO), and the EU have developed approaches for evaluation assessment. One assessment approach that has been a very active area of research and debate is the development and usage of animal models to assess the potential allergenicity of GM foods. A number of specific animal models employing rodents, pigs, and dogs have been developed for allergenicity assessment. However, validation of these models is needed and consideration of the criteria for an appropriate animal model for the assessment of allergenicity in GM plants is required. We have recently employed a BALB/c mouse model to assess the potential allergenicity of GM plants. We have been able to demonstrate that this model is able to detect differences in antigenicity and identify aspects of protein post-translational modifications that can alter antigenicity. Furthermore, this model has also enabled us to examine the usage of GM plants as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic diseases. This review discusses the current approaches to assess the allergenic potential of GM food and particularly focusing on the usage of animal models to determine the potential allergenicity of GM foods and gives an overview of our recent findings and implications of these studies.

  19. Speeding up N-body simulations of modified gravity: Vainshtein screening models

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Bose, Sownak; Li, Baojiu E-mail: sownak.bose@durham.ac.uk

    2015-12-01

    We introduce and demonstrate the power of a method to speed up current iterative techniques for N-body modified gravity simulations. Our method is based on the observation that the accuracy of the final result is not compromised if the calculation of the fifth force becomes less accurate, but substantially faster, in high-density regions where it is relatively weak due to screening. We focus on the nDGP model which employs Vainshtein screening, and test our method by running AMR simulations in which the fifth force on the finer levels of the mesh (high density) is not obtained iteratively, but instead interpolated from coarser levels. The calculation of the standard gravity component of the force still employs the full AMR structure. We show that the impact this has on the matter power spectrum is below 1% for k < 5h/Mpc at 0z = , and even smaller at higher redshift. The impact on halo properties is also small (∼< 3% for abundance, profiles, mass; and ∼< 0.05% for positions and velocities). The method can boost the performance of modified gravity simulations by more than a factor of 10. This allows them to run on timescales similar to GR simulations and to push them to resolution levels that were previously hard to achieve.

  20. A modified Verhoeff's elastin histochemical stain to enable pulmonary arterial hypertension model characterization.

    PubMed

    Percival, K R; Radi, Z A

    2016-02-11

    Optimal histochemical staining is critical to ensure excellent quality stained sections to enable light microscopic and histomorphometric image analysis.  Verhoeff-van Gieson is the most widely used histochemical stain for the visualization of vascular elastic fibers. However, it is notoriously difficult to differentiate fine elastic fibers of small vasculature to enable histomorphometric image analysis of vasculature size characterization especially in organs such as the lung. A tissue fixation regime of 10% neutral buffered formalin with subsequent fixation in 70% ethanol further compounds the problem of small vessel staining and identification.  Therefore, a modified Verhoeff's elastin stain was developed as a reliable method to optimally highlight the internal and external elastic lamina of small arteries (50-100 µm) and intra-acinar vessels (10-50 µm) in 3 µm thick lung tissue sections from models of pulmonary arterial hypertension.  This modified Verhoeff's elastin stain demonstrated optimal staining of fine elastic fibers of pulmonary blood vessels. As a result, high-quality histomorphometric image analysis evaluation of vessel wall thickness in small arteries and intra-acinar vessels was successfully accomplished.  In conclusion, modification of the standard Verhoeff-van Gieson histochemical stain is needed to visualize small caliber vessels' elastic fibers especially in tissues not fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin only.

  1. Modeling mechanical properties of core-shell rubber-modified epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Xiao, K.; Ye, L.; Mai, Y.W.; Wang, C.H.; Rose, L.R.F.

    2000-01-24

    Experiments have been carried out to quantify the effects of rubber content and strain rate on the elastic and plastic deformation behavior of core-shell rubber-modified epoxies. Both the Young's modulus and the yield stress were found to be slightly dependent on strain rate, but very sensitive to the volume fraction of rubber particles. Finite element analyses have also been performed to determine the influences of rubber content on the bulk elasticity modulus and the yield stress. By comparing with experimental results, it is found that the Young's modulus of rubber-toughened epoxies can be accurately estimated using the Mori-Tanaka method, provided that the volume fraction of rubber particles is appropriately evaluated. A yield function is provided that the volume fraction of rubber particles is appropriately evaluated. A yield function is proposed to quantify the effects of hydrostatic stress on the plastic yielding behaviors of rubber-modified epoxies. Agreement with experimental results is good. Also, a visco-plastic model is developed to simulate the strain-rate-dependent stress-strain relations.

  2. Model-based process development for the purification of a modified human growth hormone using multimodal chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sejergaard, Lars; Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Krarup, Janus Kristian; Hagel, Anne Birgitte Bagge; Cramer, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates how the multimodal Capto adhere resin can be used in concert with calcium chloride or arginine hydrochloride as mobile phase modifiers to create a highly selective purification process for a modified human growth hormone. Importantly, these processes are shown to result in significant clearance of product related aggregates and host cell proteins. Furthermore, the steric mass action model is shown to be capable of accurately describing the chromatographic process and the aggregate removal. Finally, justification of the selected operating ranges is evaluated using the model together with Latin hypercube sampling. The results in this article establish the utility of multimodal chromatography when used with appropriate mobile phase modifiers for the downstream bioprocessing of a modified human growth hormone and offer new approaches for bioprocess verification.

  3. Modified scaling principle for rotational relaxation in a model for suspensions of rigid rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Andersen, Hans C.

    2013-07-01

    We have performed simulations of the model of infinitely thin rigid rods undergoing rotational and translational diffusion, subject to the restriction that no two rods can cross one another, for various concentrations well into the semidilute regime. We used a modification of the algorithm of Doi et al. [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 53, 3000 (1984)], 10.1143/JPSJ.53.3000 that simulates diffusive dynamics using a Monte Carlo method and a nonzero time step. In the limit of zero time step, this algorithm is an exact description of diffusive dynamics subject to the noncrossing restriction. For a wide range of concentrations in the semidilute regime, we report values of the long time rotational diffusion constant of the rods, extrapolated to the limit of zero time step, for various sets of values of the infinite dilution (bare) diffusion constants. These results are compared with the results of a previous simulation of the model by Doi et al. and of previous simulations of rods with finite aspect ratio by Fixman and by Cobb and Butler that had been extrapolated to the limit of infinitely thin rods. The predictions of the Doi-Edwards (DE) scaling law do not hold for this model for the concentrations studied. The simulation data for the model display two deviations from the predictions of the DE theory that have been observed in experimental systems in the semidilute regime, namely, the very slow approach toward DE scaling behavior as the concentration is increased and the large value of the prefactor in the DE scaling law. We present a modified scaling principle for this model that is consistent with the simulation results for a broad range of concentrations in the semidilute regime. The modified scaling principle takes into account two physical effects, which we call "leakage" and "drift," that were found to be important for the transport properties of a simpler model of nonrotating rods on a lattice [Y.-L. S. Tse and H. C. Andersen, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024904 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3673791.

  4. Simulation of emotional contagion using modified SIR model: A cellular automaton approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Libi; Song, Weiguo; Lv, Wei; Lo, Siuming

    2014-07-01

    Emotion plays an important role in the decision-making of individuals in some emergency situations. The contagion of emotion may induce either normal or abnormal consolidated crowd behavior. This paper aims to simulate the dynamics of emotional contagion among crowds by modifying the epidemiological SIR model to a cellular automaton approach. This new cellular automaton model, entitled the “CA-SIRS model”, captures the dynamic process ‘susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible', which is based on SIRS contagion in epidemiological theory. Moreover, in this new model, the process is integrated with individual movement. The simulation results of this model show that multiple waves and dynamical stability around a mean value will appear during emotion spreading. It was found that the proportion of initial infected individuals had little influence on the final stable proportion of infected population in a given system, and that infection frequency increased with an increase in the average crowd density. Our results further suggest that individual movement accelerates the spread speed of emotion and increases the stable proportion of infected population. Furthermore, decreasing the duration of an infection and the probability of reinfection can markedly reduce the number of infected individuals. It is hoped that this study will be helpful in crowd management and evacuation organization.

  5. MRI-based strain and strain rate analysis of left ventricle: a modified hierarchical transformation model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Different from other indicators of cardiac function, such as ejection fraction and transmitral early diastolic velocity, myocardial strain is promising to capture subtle alterations that result from early diseases of the myocardium. In order to extract the left ventricle (LV) myocardial strain and strain rate from cardiac cine-MRI, a modified hierarchical transformation model was proposed. Methods A hierarchical transformation model including the global and local LV deformations was employed to analyze the strain and strain rate of the left ventricle by cine-MRI image registration. The endocardial and epicardial contour information was introduced to enhance the registration accuracy by combining the original hierarchical algorithm with an Iterative Closest Points using Invariant Features algorithm. The hierarchical model was validated by a normal volunteer first and then applied to two clinical cases (i.e., the normal volunteer and a diabetic patient) to evaluate their respective function. Results Based on the two clinical cases, by comparing the displacement fields of two selected landmarks in the normal volunteer, the proposed method showed a better performance than the original or unmodified model. Meanwhile, the comparison of the radial strain between the volunteer and patient demonstrated their apparent functional difference. Conclusions The present method could be used to estimate the LV myocardial strain and strain rate during a cardiac cycle and thus to quantify the analysis of the LV motion function. PMID:25602778

  6. Corresponding-states behavior of SPC/E-based modified (bent and hybrid) water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Volker C.

    2017-02-01

    The remarkable and sometimes anomalous properties of water can be traced back at the molecular level to the tetrahedral coordination of molecules due to the ability of a water molecule to form four hydrogen bonds to its neighbors; this feature allows for the formation of a network that greatly influences the thermodynamic behavior. Computer simulations are becoming increasingly important for our understanding of water. Molecular models of water, such as SPC/E, are needed for this purpose, and they have proved to capture many important features of real water. Modifications of the SPC/E model have been proposed, some changing the H-O-H angle (bent models) and others increasing the importance of dispersion interactions (hybrid models), to study the structural features that set water apart from other polar fluids and from simple fluids such as argon. Here, we focus on the properties at liquid-vapor equilibrium and study the coexistence curve, the interfacial tension, and the vapor pressure in a corresponding-states approach. In particular, we calculate Guggenheim's ratio for the reduced apparent enthalpy of vaporization and Guldberg's ratio for the reduced normal boiling point. This analysis offers additional insight from a more macroscopic, thermodynamic perspective and augments that which has already been learned at the molecular level from simulations. In the hybrid models, the relative importance of dispersion interactions is increased, which turns the modified water into a Lennard-Jones-like fluid. Consequently, in a corresponding-states framework, the typical behavior of simple fluids, such as argon, is seen to be approached asymptotically. For the bent models, decreasing the bond angle turns the model essentially into a polar diatomic fluid in which the particles form linear molecular arrangements; as a consequence, characteristic features of the corresponding-states behavior of hydrogen halides emerge.

  7. Corresponding-states behavior of SPC/E-based modified (bent and hybrid) water models.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Volker C

    2017-02-07

    The remarkable and sometimes anomalous properties of water can be traced back at the molecular level to the tetrahedral coordination of molecules due to the ability of a water molecule to form four hydrogen bonds to its neighbors; this feature allows for the formation of a network that greatly influences the thermodynamic behavior. Computer simulations are becoming increasingly important for our understanding of water. Molecular models of water, such as SPC/E, are needed for this purpose, and they have proved to capture many important features of real water. Modifications of the SPC/E model have been proposed, some changing the H-O-H angle (bent models) and others increasing the importance of dispersion interactions (hybrid models), to study the structural features that set water apart from other polar fluids and from simple fluids such as argon. Here, we focus on the properties at liquid-vapor equilibrium and study the coexistence curve, the interfacial tension, and the vapor pressure in a corresponding-states approach. In particular, we calculate Guggenheim's ratio for the reduced apparent enthalpy of vaporization and Guldberg's ratio for the reduced normal boiling point. This analysis offers additional insight from a more macroscopic, thermodynamic perspective and augments that which has already been learned at the molecular level from simulations. In the hybrid models, the relative importance of dispersion interactions is increased, which turns the modified water into a Lennard-Jones-like fluid. Consequently, in a corresponding-states framework, the typical behavior of simple fluids, such as argon, is seen to be approached asymptotically. For the bent models, decreasing the bond angle turns the model essentially into a polar diatomic fluid in which the particles form linear molecular arrangements; as a consequence, characteristic features of the corresponding-states behavior of hydrogen halides emerge.

  8. Nuclear symmetry energy in a modified quark-meson coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. N.; Sahoo, H. S.; Panda, P. K.; Barik, N.; Frederico, T.

    2015-10-01

    We study nuclear symmetry energy and the thermodynamic instabilities of asymmetric nuclear matter in a self-consistent manner by using a modified quark-meson coupling model where the confining interaction for quarks inside a nucleon is represented by a phenomenologically averaged potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to σ ,ω , and ρ mesons through mean-field approximations. We find an analytic expression for the symmetry energy Esym as a function of its slope L . Our result establishes a linear correlation between L and Esym. We also analyze the constraint on neutron star radii in (p n ) matter with β equilibrium.

  9. Shallow subsurface storm flow in a forested headwater catchment: Observations and modeling using a modified TOPMODEL

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, T.M.; Raffensperger, J.P.; Hornberger, G.M.; Clapp, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Transient, perched water tables in the shallow subsurface are observed at the South Fork Brokenback Run catchment in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Crest piezometers installed along a hillslope transect show that the development of saturated conditions in the upper 1.5 m of the subsurface is controlled by total precipitation and antecedent conditions, not precipitation intensity, although soil heterogeneities strongly influence local response. The macroporous subsurface storm flow zone provides a hydrological pathway for rapid runoff generation apart from the underlying groundwater zone, a conceptualization supported by the two-storage system exhibited by hydrograph recession analysis. A modified version of TOPMODEL is used to simulate the observed catchment dynamics. In this model, generalized topographic index theory is applied to the subsurface storm flow zone to account for logarithmic storm flow recessions, indicative of linearly decreasing transmissivity with depth. Vertical drainage to the groundwater zone is required, and both subsurface reservoirs are considered to contribute to surface saturation.

  10. Real-time integrated process supervision for autotuners and modified cerebellar model articulation controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Abdul; Quek, H. C.; Lim, B. H.

    1998-10-01

    This paper presents the use of a micro-controller-based Integrated Process Supervision as a tool for investigate work in expert control. Two different control theories integrated within process serve as examples of structured approach to expert control. The Integrated Process Supervision is a refinement of the Expert Control Architecture as proposed by Karl J. Astrom by allowing integration of several control techniques in a single generic framework. Specifically, the paper presents the result for experiments performed on an implementation of the Integrated Process Supervision on a PC and micro-controller environment. Autotuning techniques were first integrated within the process supervision. Three Autotuners based on specification of phase and amplitude margins were investigated. A modified version of Cerebellar MOdel Articulation Controller was then implemented in IPS as a direct controller. Results collected verify its integration in the integrated process supervision and also provide evidence of improved performance as compared to Autotuning.

  11. A modified predator-prey model for the interaction of police and gangs.

    PubMed

    Sooknanan, J; Bhatt, B; Comissiong, D M G

    2016-09-01

    A modified predator-prey model with transmissible disease in both the predator and prey species is proposed and analysed, with infected prey being more vulnerable to predation and infected predators hunting at a reduced rate. Here, the predators are the police and the prey the gang members. In this system, we examine whether police control of gangs is possible. The system is analysed with the help of stability analyses and numerical simulations. The system has five steady states-four of which involve no core gang members and one in which all the populations coexist. Thresholds are identified which determine when the predator and prey populations survive and when the disease remains endemic. For parameter values where the spread of disease among the police officers is greater than the death of the police officers, the diseased predator population survives, when it would otherwise become extinct.

  12. Modified Levenberg-Marquardt Method for RÖSSLER Chaotic System Fuzzy Modeling Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Hui; Wu, Qing-Xian; Jiang, Chang-Sheng; Xue, Ya-Li; Fang, Wei

    Generally, fuzzy approximation models require some human knowledge and experience. Operator's experience is involved in the mathematics of fuzzy theory as a collection of heuristic rules. The main goal of this paper is to present a new method for identifying unknown nonlinear dynamics such as Rössler system without any human knowledge. Instead of heuristic rules, the presented method uses the input-output data pairs to identify the Rössler chaotic system. The training algorithm is a modified Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) method, which can adjust the parameters of each linear polynomial and fuzzy membership functions on line, and do not rely on experts' experience excessively. Finally, it is applied to training Rössler chaotic system fuzzy identification. Comparing this method with the standard L-M method, the convergence speed is accelerated. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. A modified predator–prey model for the interaction of police and gangs

    PubMed Central

    Sooknanan, J.; Bhatt, B.

    2016-01-01

    A modified predator–prey model with transmissible disease in both the predator and prey species is proposed and analysed, with infected prey being more vulnerable to predation and infected predators hunting at a reduced rate. Here, the predators are the police and the prey the gang members. In this system, we examine whether police control of gangs is possible. The system is analysed with the help of stability analyses and numerical simulations. The system has five steady states—four of which involve no core gang members and one in which all the populations coexist. Thresholds are identified which determine when the predator and prey populations survive and when the disease remains endemic. For parameter values where the spread of disease among the police officers is greater than the death of the police officers, the diseased predator population survives, when it would otherwise become extinct. PMID:27703682

  14. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Advanced High-Strength Steels Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingdong, Zhang; Qiang, Cao; Xiaofeng, Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is widely used in automotive industry. In order to investigate the mechanical behaviors of AHSS over a wide range of temperatures, quasi-static tensile experiments were conducted at the temperatures from 298 to 1073 K on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-simulation machine. The results show that flow behaviors are affected by testing temperature significantly. In order to describe the flow features of AHSS, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model is employed. By introducing polynomial functions to consider the effects of temperature on hardening behavior, the JC model is modified and used to predict flow behavior of AHSS at different experimental conditions. The accuracy of the modified JC model is verified and the predicted flow stress is in good agreement with experimental results, which confirms that the modified JC model can give an accurate and precise estimate over a wide range of temperatures.

  15. Bulk-friction modeling of afterslip and the modified Omori law

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wennerberg, Leif; Sharp, Robert V.

    1997-01-01

    Afterslip data from the Superstition Hills fault in southern California, a creep event on the same fault, the modified Omori law, and cumulative moments from aftershocks of the 1957 Aleutian Islands earthquake all indicate that the original formulation by Dieterich (1981) [Constitutive properties of faults with simulated gouge. AGU, Geophys. Monogr. 24, 103–120] for friction evolution is more appropriate for systems far from instability than the commonly used approximation developed by Ruina (1983) [Slip instability and state variable friction laws. J. Geophys. Res. 88, 10359–10370] to study instability. The mathematical framework we use to test the friction models is a one-dimensional, massless spring-slider under the simplifying assumption, proposed by Scholz (1990) [The Mechanics of Earthquakes and Faulting. Cambridge University Press] and used by Marone et al. (1991) [On the mechanics of earthquake afterslip. J. Geophys. Res., 96: 8441–8452], that the state variable takes on its velocity-dependent steady-state value throughout motion in response to a step in stress. This assumption removes explicit state-variable dependence from the model, obviating the need to consider state-variable evolution equations. Anti-derivatives of the modified Omori law fit our data very well and are very good approximate solutions to our model equations. A plausible friction model with Omori-law solutions used by Wesson (1988) [Dynamics of fault creep. J. Geophys. Res. 93, 8929–8951] to model fault creep and generalized by Rice (1983) [Constitutive relations for fault slip and earthquake instabilities. Pure Appl. Geophys. 121, 443–475] to a rate-and-state variable friction model yields exactly Omori's law with exponents greater than 1, but yields unstable solutions for Omori exponents less than 1. We estimate from the Dieterich formulation the dimensionless parameter a∗ which is equal to the product of the nominal coefficient of friction and the more commonly reported

  16. A modified chronic ocular hypertension rat model for retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lichun

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to modify a chronic ocular hypertension (OHT) rat model to screen for potential compounds to protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from responding to increased intraocular pressure (IOP). A total of 266 rats were prepared and randomly grouped according to different time-points, namely, weeks 3, 8, 16, and 24. Rats were sedated and eye examination was performed to score as the corneal damage on a scale of 1 to 4. The OHT rat model was created via the injection of a hypertonic saline solution into the episcleral veins once weekly for two weeks. OHT was identified when the IOP at week 0 was [Symbol: see text] 6 mmHg than that at week -2 for the same eye. Viable RGCs were labeled by injecting 4% FluoroGold. Rats were sacrificed, and the eyes were enucleated and fixed. The fixed retinas were dissected to prepare flat whole-mounts. The viable RGCs were visualized and imaged. The IOP (mean ± SD) was calculated, and data were analyzed by the paired t-test and one-way ANOVA. The OHT model was created in 234 of 266 rats (87.97%), whereas 32 rats (12.03%) were removed from the study because of the absence of IOP elevation (11.28%) and/or corneal damage scores over 4 (0.75%). IOP was elevated by as much as 81.35% for 24 weeks. The average IOP was (16.68 ± 0.98) mmHg in non-OHT eyes (n = 234), but was (27.95 ± 0.97) mmHg in OHTeyes (n = 234). Viable RGCs in the OHT eyes were significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner by 29.41%, 38.24%, 55.32%, and 59.30% at weeks 3, 8, 16, and 24, respectively, as compared to viable RGCs in the non-OHT eyes (P < 0.05). The OHT model was successfully created in 88% of the rats. The IOP in the OHT eyes was elevated by approximately 81% for 24 weeks. The number of viable RGCs was decreased by 59% of the rats in a time-dependent manner. The modified OHT model may provide an effective and reliable method for screening drugs to protect RGCs from glaucoma.

  17. Modified conceptual model for compensated root water uptake - A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andre

    2016-03-01

    Modeling root water uptake within the macroscopic approach is usually done by introducing a sink term in the Richards equation. This sink term represents potential water uptake reduced by a so-called stress reduction factor accounting for stress due to high suctions, oxygen deficit or salinity. Since stress in some parts of the soil can be compensated by enhanced water uptake in less stressed parts, several compensation models have been suggested. One of them is the empirical model of Jarvis, which is often applied due to its mathematical elegance and simplicity. However, it has been discussed that under certain conditions and assumptions this model might predict too high transpiration rates, which are not in agreement with the assumed stress reduction function. The aim of this paper is (i) to analyze these inconsistencies and (ii) to introduce a simple constraint for transpiration in a way as if the complete water would be taken form the location with highest uptake rate in the uncompensated case. Transpiration from 50 cm deep soils with hydraulic functions representing different textures, ranging from a clay loam to a coarse sand, was simulated with the original and the modified model using HYDRUS-1D. Root distribution was assumed to be uniform or linearly decreasing with depth. In case of the fine textured soils and uniform root density, the original model predicted transpiration equal to potential transpiration even when the complete root domain was already heavily stressed if the maximum enhancement factor for uptake was 2. These results are not in agreement with the original meaning of the stress reduction function. The modification eliminates the inconsistencies by limiting transpiration to a maximum value based on the highest uncompensated uptake rate in the root zone. It does neither increase the mathematical complexity nor require any additional parameters.

  18. Organic Pollutant Penetration through Fruit Polyester Skin: A Modified Three-compartment Diffusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yungui; Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-03-01

    The surface of plants is covered by a continuous but heterogeneous cuticular membrane (CM). Serving as the first protective barrier, the uptake and transport behavior of organic pollutants at this interface continue to engage the research efforts of environmental chemist. To date, the contributions of cuticular components as a defense against the organic pollutants penetration remain unresolved. In this study, the unsteady-state penetration characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) through isolated fruit CM was investigated. PHE penetration was differentiated by three cuticular compartments: epicuticular waxes (EW), cuticle proper (CP) and cuticular layer (CL). The driving force for PHE penetration was ascribed to the sharp concentration gradient built up endogenously by cuticular compartments with different lipophilic affinities. A modified penetration model was established and verified in terms of its general suitability for the hydrophobic chemicals and CMs of various plant species (apple, tomato and potato). The new three-compartment model demonstrates much higher accuracy in characterizing the uptake and transport behavior of semivolatile chemicals with fewer limitations in terms of environmental conditions and complexity (e.g., coexisting contaminants and temperature). This model could contribute to a more comprehensive understanding on the role of polymeric lipids in the organic pollutant sorption and transport into plants.

  19. A modified rabbit ulna defect model for evaluating periosteal substitutes in bone engineering: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    El Backly, Rania M; Chiapale, Danilo; Muraglia, Anita; Tromba, Giuliana; Ottonello, Chiara; Santolini, Federico; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm) were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane) scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia) or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib). For group II, an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) (GORE-TEX(®)) membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa) or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb). Animals were euthanized after 12-16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (μCT), and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX(®)) membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute.

  20. Real-time robot path planning based on a modified pulse-coupled neural network model.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hong; Yang, Simon X; Willms, Allan R; Yi, Zhang

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a modified pulse-coupled neural network (MPCNN) model for real-time collision-free path planning of mobile robots in nonstationary environments. The proposed neural network for robots is topologically organized with only local lateral connections among neurons. It works in dynamic environments and requires no prior knowledge of target or barrier movements. The target neuron fires first, and then the firing event spreads out, through the lateral connections among the neurons, like the propagation of a wave. Obstacles have no connections to their neighbors. Each neuron records its parent, that is, the neighbor that caused it to fire. The real-time optimal path is then the sequence of parents from the robot to the target. In a static case where the barriers and targets are stationary, this paper proves that the generated wave in the network spreads outward with travel times proportional to the linking strength among neurons. Thus, the generated path is always the global shortest path from the robot to the target. In addition, each neuron in the proposed model can propagate a firing event to its neighboring neuron without any comparing computations. The proposed model is applied to generate collision-free paths for a mobile robot to solve a maze-type problem, to circumvent concave U-shaped obstacles, and to track a moving target in an environment with varying obstacles. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated through simulation and comparison studies.

  1. Organic Pollutant Penetration through Fruit Polyester Skin: A Modified Three-compartment Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yungui; Li, Qingqing; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-01-01

    The surface of plants is covered by a continuous but heterogeneous cuticular membrane (CM). Serving as the first protective barrier, the uptake and transport behavior of organic pollutants at this interface continue to engage the research efforts of environmental chemist. To date, the contributions of cuticular components as a defense against the organic pollutants penetration remain unresolved. In this study, the unsteady-state penetration characteristics of phenanthrene (PHE) through isolated fruit CM was investigated. PHE penetration was differentiated by three cuticular compartments: epicuticular waxes (EW), cuticle proper (CP) and cuticular layer (CL). The driving force for PHE penetration was ascribed to the sharp concentration gradient built up endogenously by cuticular compartments with different lipophilic affinities. A modified penetration model was established and verified in terms of its general suitability for the hydrophobic chemicals and CMs of various plant species (apple, tomato and potato). The new three-compartment model demonstrates much higher accuracy in characterizing the uptake and transport behavior of semivolatile chemicals with fewer limitations in terms of environmental conditions and complexity (e.g., coexisting contaminants and temperature). This model could contribute to a more comprehensive understanding on the role of polymeric lipids in the organic pollutant sorption and transport into plants. PMID:27009902

  2. Numerical solution of the Penna model of biological aging with age-modified mutation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdoń-Maksymowicz, M. S.; Maksymowicz, A. Z.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we present results of numerical calculation of the Penna bit-string model of biological aging, modified for the case of a -dependent mutation rate m(a) , where a is the parent’s age. The mutation rate m(a) is the probability per bit of an extra bad mutation introduced in offspring inherited genome. We assume that m(a) increases with age a . As compared with the reference case of the standard Penna model based on a constant mutation rate m , the dynamics of the population growth shows distinct changes in age distribution of the population. Here we concentrate on mortality q(a) , a fraction of items eliminated from the population when we go from age (a) to (a+1) in simulated transition from time (t) to next time (t+1) . The experimentally observed q(a) dependence essentially follows the Gompertz exponential law for a above the minimum reproduction age. Deviation from the Gompertz law is however observed for the very old items, close to the maximal age. This effect may also result from an increase in mutation rate m with age a discussed in this paper. The numerical calculations are based on analytical solution of the Penna model, presented in a series of papers by Coe [J. B. Coe, Y. Mao, and M. E. Cates, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 288103 (2002)]. Results of the numerical calculations are supported by the data obtained from computer simulation based on the solution by Coe

  3. Features of non-congruent phase transition in modified Coulomb model of the binary ionic mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroev, N. E.; Iosilevskiy, I. L.

    2016-11-01

    Non-congruent gas-liquid phase transition (NCPT) have been studied previously in modified Coulomb model of a binary ionic mixture C(+6) + O(+8) on a uniformly compressible ideal electronic background /BIM(∼)/. The features of NCPT in improved version of the BIM(∼) model for the same mixture on background of non-ideal electronic Fermi-gas and comparison it with the previous calculations are the subject of present study. Analytical fits for Coulomb corrections to equation of state of electronic and ionic subsystems were used in present calculations within the Gibbs-Guggenheim conditions of non-congruent phase equilibrium. Parameters of critical point-line were calculated on the entire range of proportions of mixed ions 0 < X < 1. Strong “distillation” effect was found for NCPT in the present BIM(∼) model. Just similar distillation was obtained in the variant of NCPT in dense nuslear matter. The absence of azeotropic compositions was revealed in studied variants of BIM(∼) in contrast to an explicit existence of the azeotropic compositions for the NCPT in chemically reacting plasmas and in astrophysical applications.

  4. Overall picture of the cascade gamma decay of neutron resonances within a modified practical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhovoj, A. M.; Mitsyna, L. V.; Jovancevic, N.

    2016-05-01

    The intensities of two-step cascades in 43 nuclei of mass number in the range of 28 ≤ A ≤ 200 were approximated to a high degree of precision within a modified version of the practical cascade-gammadecay model introduced earlier. In this version, the rate of the decrease in the model-dependent density of vibrational levels has the same value for any Cooper pair undergoing breakdown. The most probable values of radiative strength functions both for E1 and for M1 transitions are determined by using one or two peaks against a smooth model dependence on the gamma-transition energy. The statement that the thresholds for the breaking of Cooper pairs are higher for spherical than for deformed nuclei is a basic result of the respective analysis. The parameters of the cascade-decay process are now determined to a precision that makes it possible to observe the systematic distinctions between them for nuclei characterized by different parities of neutrons and protons.

  5. A Modified Rabbit Ulna Defect Model for Evaluating Periosteal Substitutes in Bone Engineering: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    El Backly, Rania M.; Chiapale, Danilo; Muraglia, Anita; Tromba, Giuliana; Ottonello, Chiara; Santolini, Federico; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm) were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane) scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia) or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib). For group II, an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) (GORE-TEX®) membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa) or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb). Animals were euthanized after 12–16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (μCT), and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX®) membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute. PMID:25610828

  6. Using Modified Contour Deformable Model to Quantitatively Estimate Ultrasound Parameters for Osteoporosis Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Fu; Du, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chen, Tainsong

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease, which is characterized by low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to bone fragility. Finding an effective method for prevention and early diagnosis of the disease is very important. Several parameters, including broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), speed of sound (SOS), and stiffness index (STI), have been used to measure the characteristics of bone tissues. In this paper, we proposed a method, namely modified contour deformable model (MCDM), bases on the active contour model (ACM) and active shape model (ASM) for automatically detecting the calcaneus contour from quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parametric images. The results show that the difference between the contours detected by the MCDM and the true boundary for the phantom is less than one pixel. By comparing the phantom ROIs, significant relationship was found between contour mean and bone mineral density (BMD) with R=0.99. The influence of selecting different ROI diameters (12, 14, 16 and 18 mm) and different region-selecting methods, including fixed region (ROI fix ), automatic circular region (ROI cir ) and calcaneal contour region (ROI anat ), were evaluated for testing human subjects. Measurements with large ROI diameters, especially using fixed region, result in high position errors (10-45%). The precision errors of the measured ultrasonic parameters for ROI anat are smaller than ROI fix and ROI cir . In conclusion, ROI anat provides more accurate measurement of ultrasonic parameters for the evaluation of osteoporosis and is useful for clinical application.

  7. Large-scale hydrological modelling by using modified PUB recommendations: the India-HYPE case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechlivanidis, I. G.; Arheimer, B.

    2015-11-01

    The scientific initiative Prediction in Ungauged Basins (PUB) (2003-2012 by the IAHS) put considerable effort into improving the reliability of hydrological models to predict flow response in ungauged rivers. PUB's collective experience advanced hydrologic science and defined guidelines to make predictions in catchments without observed runoff data. At present, there is a raised interest in applying catchment models to large domains and large data samples in a multi-basin manner, to explore emerging spatial patterns or learn from comparative hydrology. However, such modelling involves additional sources of uncertainties caused by the inconsistency between input data sets, i.e. particularly regional and global databases. This may lead to inaccurate model parameterisation and erroneous process understanding. In order to bridge the gap between the best practices for flow predictions in single catchments and multi-basins at the large scale, we present a further developed and slightly modified version of the recommended best practices for PUB by Takeuchi et al. (2013). By using examples from a recent HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) hydrological model set-up across 6000 subbasins for the Indian subcontinent, named India-HYPE v1.0, we explore the PUB recommendations, identify challenges and recommend ways to overcome them. We describe the work process related to (a) errors and inconsistencies in global databases, unknown human impacts, and poor data quality; (b) robust approaches to identify model parameters using a stepwise calibration approach, remote sensing data, expert knowledge, and catchment similarities; and (c) evaluation based on flow signatures and performance metrics, using both multiple criteria and multiple variables, and independent gauges for "blind tests". The results show that despite the strong physiographical gradient over the subcontinent, a single model can describe the spatial variability in dominant hydrological processes at the

  8. Salted matters: modifying gelatine rheology for subduction thrust fault seismicity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizzi, Silvia; Funiciello, Francesca; Corbi, Fabio; Di Giuseppe, Erika; Mojoli, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Most of the world's greatest earthquakes (Mw > 8.5, usually known as mega-earthquakes) occur at shallow depths along the subduction thrust fault (STF), i.e., the frictional interface between the subducting and overriding plates. The contribution of each subduction zone to the globally released seismic moment is not homogeneous, as well as the maximum Mw recorded in the instrumental and historical catalogues. To contribute to the unravelling of the seismic cycle along the STF, we used analogue models. Viscoelastic laboratory experiments realised with type A gelatine 2.5 wt% at 10 °C (Corbi et al., 2013) successfully simulate the seismic cycle along the STF, providing dynamic similarities with earthquakes in nature. However, analogue earthquakes are still not perfectly comparable to the natural prototype. In this work, we try to improve STF seismicity models by modifying the rheological behaviour of gelatine with the addition of NaCl. After testing salted gelatine rheology as a function of increasing concentration of NaCl, we selected 20 wt% NaCl gelatine, as this NaCl concentration provides a quasi-viscoelastic lithospheric analogue. Subduction interplate seismicity models were performed using both pure and salted gelatine to highlight the strengths and advantages this new material can provide for simulating the seismic cycle along the STF. We analysed analogue earthquakes Mw, recurrence time and rupture duration, which at first-order characterise the seismogenic behaviour of the STF. Results show that the experimental source parameters cover a wider range of values than obtained with pure gelatine, which is more compatible to the high variability globally observed. In particular, salted gelatine allows to simulate also smaller seismic events, giving the opportunity to apply the G-R law to the experimental seismicity of STF. Recurrence time and rupture duration are also characterised by an increased range of values when salted gelatine is used as analogue material

  9. Models for low-energy Lorentz violation in the photon sector: Addendum to 'Consistency of isotropic modified Maxwell theory'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.; Schreck, M.

    2012-03-01

    In a previous article, Klinkhamer and Schreck (2011) [1], we established the consistency of isotropic modified Maxwell theory for a finite range of the Lorentz-violating parameter κ, which includes both positive and negative values of κ. As an aside, we mentioned the existence of a physical model which, for low-energy photons, gives rise to isotropic modified Maxwell theory with a positive parameter κ (corresponding to a "slow" photon). Here, we present a related model which gives rise to isotropic modified Maxwell theory with a negative parameter κ (corresponding to a "fast" photon). Both models have an identical particle content, photon and Dirac particles, but differ in the type of spacetime manifold considered.

  10. The pressure-volume curve is greatly modified by recruitment. A mathematical model of ARDS lungs.

    PubMed

    Hickling, K G

    1998-07-01

    A mathematical model of the ARDS lung, with simulated gravitational superimposed pressure, evaluated the effect of varying alveolar threshold opening pressures (TOP), PEEP and peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) on the static pressure-volume (PV) curve. The lower inflection point (Pflex) was affected by SP and TOP, and did not accurately indicate PEEP required to prevent end-expiratory collapse. Reinflation of collapsed lung units (recruitment) continued on the linear portion of the PV curve, which had a slope at any volume greater than the total compliance of aerated alveoli. As recruitment diminished, the reduced PV slope could produce an upper Pflex at 20 to 30 cm H2O pressure. An upper Pflex caused by alveolar overdistension could be modified or eliminated by recruitment with high TOP. With constant PIP as PEEP increased, and TOP range of 5 to 60 cm H2O, PEEP to prevent end-expiratory collapse was indicated by minimum PV slope above 20 cm H2O, minimum hysteresis, and maximum volume at a pressure of 20 cm H2O. With constant inflation volume as PEEP increased, the effect on PV slope was unpredictable. Although increased PV slope indicated recruitment, maximum PV slope usually underestimated PEEP required to prevent end-expiratory collapse. Therefore, with this model the PV curve did not reliably predict optimal ventilator settings.

  11. Design and development of a modified runway model of mouse drug self-administration

    PubMed Central

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Khan, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study established a novel mouse model of a runway drug self-administration in our laboratory. The operant runway apparatus consisted of three long runways arranged in a zig-zag manner. The methodology consisted of six distinct phases: habituation, preconditioning, conditioning, post-conditioning, extinction and reinstatement. The effects of saline were compared with escalating doses of either ethanol (0.5–4.0 g/kg, i.p), heroin (5–40 mg/kg, i.p), or nicotine (0.1–0.5mg/kg, i.p) administered in the goal box during the conditioning phase (day 1 to day 5). A significant decrease in the time of trained (conditioned) mice to reach the goal box confirmed the subjects’ motivation to seek those drugs on day 6 (expression). The mice were then subjected to non-rewarded extinction trials for 5 days over which run times were significantly increased. After 5 days of abstinence, a priming dose of ethanol or heroin (1/5th of maximum dose used in conditioning) significantly reinstated the drug-seeking behavior. These results suggest that the modified runway model can serve as a powerful behavioral tool for the study of the behavioral and neurobiological bases of drug self-administration and, as such, is appropriate simple but powerful tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of laboratory mice. PMID:26902717

  12. Protease-resistant modified human β-hexosaminidase B ameliorates symptoms in GM2 gangliosidosis model.

    PubMed

    Kitakaze, Keisuke; Mizutani, Yasumichi; Sugiyama, Eiji; Tasaki, Chikako; Tsuji, Daisuke; Maita, Nobuo; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Sato, Kohei; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Urano, Yasuteru; Togawa, Tadayasu; Otaka, Akira; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Itoh, Kohji

    2016-05-02

    GM2 gangliosidoses, including Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases, are neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases that are caused by deficiency of β-hexosaminidase A, which comprises an αβ heterodimer. There are no effective treatments for these diseases; however, various strategies aimed at restoring β-hexosaminidase A have been explored. Here, we produced a modified human hexosaminidase subunit β (HexB), which we have termed mod2B, composed of homodimeric β subunits that contain amino acid sequences from the α subunit that confer GM2 ganglioside-degrading activity and protease resistance. We also developed fluorescent probes that allow visualization of endocytosis of mod2B via mannose 6-phosphate receptors and delivery of mod2B to lysosomes in GM2 gangliosidosis models. In addition, we applied imaging mass spectrometry to monitor efficacy of this approach in Sandhoff disease model mice. Following i.c.v. administration, mod2B was widely distributed and reduced accumulation of GM2, asialo-GM2, and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate in brain regions including the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Moreover, mod2B administration markedly improved motor dysfunction and a prolonged lifespan in Sandhoff disease mice. Together, the results of our study indicate that mod2B has potential for intracerebrospinal fluid enzyme replacement therapy and should be further explored as a gene therapy for GM2 gangliosidoses.

  13. Operational forecasting based on a modified Weather Research and Forecasting model

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J; Glascoe, L; Obrecht, J

    2010-03-18

    Accurate short-term forecasts of wind resources are required for efficient wind farm operation and ultimately for the integration of large amounts of wind-generated power into electrical grids. Siemens Energy Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with the University of Colorado at Boulder, are collaborating on the design of an operational forecasting system for large wind farms. The basis of the system is the numerical weather prediction tool, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model; large-eddy simulations and data assimilation approaches are used to refine and tailor the forecasting system. Representation of the atmospheric boundary layer is modified, based on high-resolution large-eddy simulations of the atmospheric boundary. These large-eddy simulations incorporate wake effects from upwind turbines on downwind turbines as well as represent complex atmospheric variability due to complex terrain and surface features as well as atmospheric stability. Real-time hub-height wind speed and other meteorological data streams from existing wind farms are incorporated into the modeling system to enable uncertainty quantification through probabilistic forecasts. A companion investigation has identified optimal boundary-layer physics options for low-level forecasts in complex terrain, toward employing decadal WRF simulations to anticipate large-scale changes in wind resource availability due to global climate change.

  14. Design and development of a modified runway model of mouse drug self-administration.

    PubMed

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Khan, Yasmin

    2016-02-23

    The present study established a novel mouse model of a runway drug self-administration in our laboratory. The operant runway apparatus consisted of three long runways arranged in a zig-zag manner. The methodology consisted of six distinct phases: habituation, preconditioning, conditioning, post-conditioning, extinction and reinstatement. The effects of saline were compared with escalating doses of either ethanol (0.5-4.0 g/kg, i.p), heroin (5-40 mg/kg, i.p), or nicotine (0.1-0.5mg/kg, i.p) administered in the goal box during the conditioning phase (day 1 to day 5). A significant decrease in the time of trained (conditioned) mice to reach the goal box confirmed the subjects' motivation to seek those drugs on day 6 (expression). The mice were then subjected to non-rewarded extinction trials for 5 days over which run times were significantly increased. After 5 days of abstinence, a priming dose of ethanol or heroin (1/5th of maximum dose used in conditioning) significantly reinstated the drug-seeking behavior. These results suggest that the modified runway model can serve as a powerful behavioral tool for the study of the behavioral and neurobiological bases of drug self-administration and, as such, is appropriate simple but powerful tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of laboratory mice.

  15. Protease-resistant modified human β-hexosaminidase B ameliorates symptoms in GM2 gangliosidosis model

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Yasumichi; Sugiyama, Eiji; Tasaki, Chikako; Tsuji, Daisuke; Maita, Nobuo; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Sato, Kohei; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Urano, Yasuteru; Togawa, Tadayasu; Otaka, Akira; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidoses, including Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases, are neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases that are caused by deficiency of β-hexosaminidase A, which comprises an αβ heterodimer. There are no effective treatments for these diseases; however, various strategies aimed at restoring β-hexosaminidase A have been explored. Here, we produced a modified human hexosaminidase subunit β (HexB), which we have termed mod2B, composed of homodimeric β subunits that contain amino acid sequences from the α subunit that confer GM2 ganglioside–degrading activity and protease resistance. We also developed fluorescent probes that allow visualization of endocytosis of mod2B via mannose 6-phosphate receptors and delivery of mod2B to lysosomes in GM2 gangliosidosis models. In addition, we applied imaging mass spectrometry to monitor efficacy of this approach in Sandhoff disease model mice. Following i.c.v. administration, mod2B was widely distributed and reduced accumulation of GM2, asialo-GM2, and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate in brain regions including the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Moreover, mod2B administration markedly improved motor dysfunction and a prolonged lifespan in Sandhoff disease mice. Together, the results of our study indicate that mod2B has potential for intracerebrospinal fluid enzyme replacement therapy and should be further explored as a gene therapy for GM2 gangliosidoses. PMID:27018595

  16. Testing of modified curvature-rotation correction for k-ω SST model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabnikov, A. S.; Garbaruk, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Using eddy viscosity models (EVM) for solving Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations is the most popular and economical way of turbulent flow computations up to date. However this approach, while being very convenient, is not flawless. For example, for accurate prediction of rotating flows and flows with significant streamline curvature (turbine rotors, various vortices etc.) special corrections must be used along with EVM to account for effects of these factors on turbulence. Current work presents the results of testing of the recently suggested modification of the Menter-Smirnov rotation and curvature correction for SST model. A range of internal and external flows is considered: flow in a plane rotating channel, flow in a channel with 180° turn, airfoil tip vortex and 3D boundary layer with the streamwise vortices produced by vortex generators. It is shown that the modified correction results in better prediction than the original version for the three dimensional vortex flows and gives virtually the same results for the 2D boundary layer flows.

  17. Forward modelling the rubber hand: illusion of ownership modifies motor-sensory predictions by the brain

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Damien; Kheddar, Abderrahmane; Ganesh, Gowrishankar

    2016-01-01

    The question of how we attribute observed body parts as our own, and the consequences of this attribution on our sensory-motor processes, is fundamental to understand how our brain distinguishes between self and other. Previous studies have identified interactions between the illusion of ownership, and multi-sensory integration and cross-sensory predictions by the brain. Here we show that illusory ownership additionally modifies the motor-sensory predictions by the brain. In our preliminary experiments, we observed a new numbness illusion following the classical rubber-hand illusion (RHI); brushing only the rubber hand after induction of the RHI results in illusory numbness in one's real hand. Previous studies have shown that self-generated actions (like tickling) are attenuated by motor-sensory predictions by the so-called forward model. Motivated by this finding, here we examined whether the numbness illusion after the RHI is different when the rubber hand is brushed oneself, compared with when the brushing is performed by another. We observed that, all other conditions remaining the same, haptic perception in the real hand was lower (numbness higher) during self-generated brushing. Our result suggests that RHI reorganizes the forward model, such that we predict haptic consequences of self-generated motor actions on the rubber hand. PMID:27853620

  18. Unification of Dark Matter and Dark Energy in a Modified Entropic Force Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhe; Li, Ming-Hua; Li, Xin

    2011-07-01

    In Verlinde's entropic force scenario of gravity, Newton's laws and Einstein equations can be obtained from the first principles and general assumptions. However, the equipartition law of energy is invalid at very low temperatures. We show clearly that the threshold of the equipartition law of energy is related with horizon of the universe. Thus, a one-dimensional Debye (ODD) model in the direction of radius of the modified entropic force (MEF) may be suitable in description of the accelerated expanding universe. We present a Friedmann cosmic dynamical model in the ODD-MEF framework. We examine carefully constraints on the ODD-MEF model from the Union2 compilation of the Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) collaboration, the data from the observation of the large-scale structure (LSS) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB), i.e. SNe Ia+LSS+CMB. The combined numerical analysis gives the best-fit value of the model parameters ζ ≃ 10-9 and Ωm0 = 0.224, with χ2min = 591.156. The corresponding age of the universe agrees with the result of D. Spergel et al. [J.M. Bardeen, B. Carter, and S.W. Hawking, Commun. Math. Phys. 31 (1973) 161] at 95% confidence level. The numerical result also yields an accelerated expanding universe without invoking any kind of dark energy. Taking ζ(≡ 2πωD/H0) as a running parameter associated with the structure scale r, we obtain a possible unified scenario of the asymptotic flatness of the radial velocity dispersion of spiral galaxies, the accelerated expanding universe and the Pioneer 10/11 anomaly in the entropic force framework of Verlinde.

  19. Large-scale hydrological modelling by using modified PUB recommendations: the India-HYPE case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechlivanidis, I. G.; Arheimer, B.

    2015-03-01

    The Prediction in Ungauged Basins (PUB) scientific initiative (2003-2012 by IAHS) put considerable effort into improving the reliability of hydrological models to predict flow response in ungauged rivers. PUB's collective experience advanced hydrologic science and defined guidelines to make predictions in catchments without observed runoff data. At present, there is a raised interest in applying catchment models for large domains and large data samples in a multi-basin manner. However, such modelling involves several sources of uncertainties, which may be caused by the imperfectness of input data, i.e. particularly regional and global databases. This may lead to inaccurate model parameterisation and incomplete process understanding. In order to bridge the gap between the best practices for single catchments and large-scale hydrology, we present a further developed and slightly modified version of the recommended best practices for PUB by Takeuchi et al. (2013). By using examples from a recent HYPE hydrological model set-up on the Indian subcontinent, named India-HYPE v1.0, we explore the recommendations, indicate challenges and recommend quality checks to avoid erroneous assumptions. We identify the obstacles, ways to overcome them and describe the work process related to: (a) errors and inconsistencies in global databases, unknown human impacts, poor data quality, (b) robust approaches to identify parameters using a stepwise calibration approach, remote sensing data, expert knowledge and catchment similarities; and (c) evaluation based on flow signatures and performance metrics, using both multiple criteria and multiple variables, and independent gauges for "blind tests". The results show that despite the strong hydro-climatic gradient over the subcontinent, a single model can adequately describe the spatial variability in dominant hydrological processes at the catchment scale. Eventually, during calibration of India-HYPE, the median Kling-Gupta Efficiency for

  20. Introducing a decomposition rate modifier in the Rothamsted Carbon Model to predict soil organic carbon stocks in saline soils.

    PubMed

    Setia, Raj; Smith, Pete; Marschner, Petra; Baldock, Jeff; Chittleborough, David; Smith, Jo

    2011-08-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) models such as the Rothamsted Carbon Model (RothC) have been used to estimate SOC dynamics in soils over different time scales but, until recently, their ability to accurately predict SOC stocks/carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions from salt-affected soils has not been assessed. Given the large extent of salt-affected soils (19% of the 20.8 billion ha of arable land on Earth), this may lead to miss-estimation of CO(2) release. Using soils from two salt-affected regions (one in Punjab, India and one in South Australia), an incubation study was carried out measuring CO(2) release over 120 days. The soils varied both in salinity (measured as electrical conductivity (EC) and calculated as osmotic potential using EC and water content) and sodicity (measured as sodium adsorption ratio, SAR). For soils from both regions, the osmotic potential had a significant positive relationship with CO(2)-C release, but no significant relationship was found between SAR and CO(2)-C release. The monthly cumulative CO(2)-C was simulated using RothC. RothC was modified to take into account reductions in plant inputs due to salinity. A subset of non-salt-affected soils was used to derive an equation for a "lab-effect" modifier to account for changes in decomposition under lab conditions and this modifier was significantly related with pH. Using a subset of salt-affected soils, a decomposition rate modifier (as a function of osmotic potential) was developed to match measured and modelled CO(2)-C release after correcting for the lab effect. Using this decomposition rate modifier, we found an agreement (R(2) = 0.92) between modelled and independently measured data for a set of soils from the incubation experiment. RothC, modified by including reduced plant inputs due to salinity and the salinity decomposition rate modifier, was used to predict SOC stocks of soils in a field in South Australia. The predictions clearly showed that SOC stocks are reduced in saline soils

  1. Modified MODFLOW-based model for simulating the agglomeration and transport of polymer-modified Fe(0) nanoparticles in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Babakhani, Peyman; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Shamsai, Abolfazl; Lowry, Gregory V; Phenrat, Tanapon

    2015-08-25

    The solute transport model MODFLOW has become a standard tool in risk assessment and remediation design. However, particle transport models that take into account both particle agglomeration and deposition phenomena are far less developed. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of adapting the standard code MODFLOW/MT3D to simulate the agglomeration and transport of three different types of polymer-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) in one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) saturated porous media. A first-order decay of the particle population was used to account for the agglomeration of particles. An iterative technique was used to optimize the model parameters. The model provided good matches to 1-D NZVI-breakthrough data sets, with R (2) values ranging from 0.96 to 0.99, and mass recovery differences between the experimental results and simulations ranged from 0.1 to 1.8 %. Similarly, simulations of NZVI transport in the heterogeneous 2-D model demonstrated that the model can be applied to more complicated heterogeneous domains. However, the fits were less good, with the R (2) values in the 2-D modeling cases ranging from 0.75 to 0.95, while the mass recovery differences ranged from 0.7 to 6.5 %. Nevertheless, the predicted NZVI concentration contours during transport were in good agreement with the 2-D experimental observations. The model provides insights into NZVI transport in porous media by mathematically decoupling agglomeration, attachment, and detachment, and it illustrates the importance of each phenomenon in various situations. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Control-oriented thermal management of solid oxide fuel cells based on a modified Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Li, Xi; Mou, Hong-Gang; Jian, Li

    Thermal management for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is actually temperature control, due to the importance of cell temperature for the performance of an SOFC. An SOFC stack is a nonlinear and multi-variable system which is difficult to model by traditional methods. A modified Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model that is suitable for nonlinear systems is built to model the SOFC stack. The model parameters are initialized by the fuzzy c-means clustering method, and learned using an off-line back-propagation algorithm. In order to obtain the training data to identify the modified T-S model, a SOFC physical model via MATLAB is established. The temperature model is the center of the physical model and is developed by enthalpy-balance equations. It is shown that the modified T-S fuzzy model is sufficiently accurate to follow the temperature response of the stack, and can be conveniently utilized to design temperature control strategies.

  3. Modelling galaxy clustering on small scales to tighten constraints on dark energy and modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach to measuring cosmic expansion history and growth rate of large-scale structure using the anisotropic two-dimensional galaxy correlation function (2DCF) measured from data; it makes use of the empirical modelling of small-scale galaxy clustering derived from numerical simulations by Zheng et al. We validate this method using mock catalogues, before applying it to the analysis of the CMASS sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We find that this method enables accurate and precise measurements of cosmic expansion history and growth rate of large-scale structure. Modelling the 2DCF fully including non-linear effects and redshift space distortions in the scale range of 16-144 h-1 Mpc, we find H(0.57)rs(zd)/c = 0.0459 ± 0.0006, DA(0.57)/rs(zd) = 9.011 ± 0.073, and fg(0.57)σ8(0.57) = 0.476 ± 0.050, which correspond to precisions of 1.3 per cent, 0.8 per cent, and 10.5 per cent, respectively. We have defined rs(zd) to be the sound horizon at the drag epoch computed using a simple integral, fg(z) as the growth rate at redshift z, and σ8(z) as the matter power spectrum normalization on 8 h-1 Mpc scale at z. We find that neglecting the small-scale information significantly weakens the constraints on H(z) and DA(z), and leads to a biased estimate of fg(z). Our results indicate that we can significantly tighten constraints on dark energy and modified gravity by reliably modelling small-scale galaxy clustering.

  4. Modeling Huntington disease in Drosophila: Insights into axonal transport defects and modifiers of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Krench, Megan; Littleton, J Troy

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) gene. Despite years of research, there is no treatment that extends life for patients with the disorder. Similarly, little is known about which cellular pathways that are altered by pathogenic Huntingtin (Htt) protein expression are correlated with neuronal loss. As part of a longstanding effort to gain insights into HD pathology, we have been studying the protein in the context of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. We generated transgenic HD models in Drosophila by engineering flies that carry a 12-exon fragment of the human Htt gene with or without the toxic trinucleotide repeat expansion. We also created variants with a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) tag fused to Htt that allows in vivo imaging of Htt protein localization and aggregation. While wild-type Htt remains diffuse throughout the cytoplasm of cells, pathogenic Htt forms insoluble aggregates that accumulate in neuronal soma and axons. Aggregates can physically block transport of numerous organelles along the axon. We have also observed that aggregates are formed quickly, within just a few hours of mutant Htt expression. To explore mechanisms of neurodegeneration in our HD model, we performed in vivo and in vitro screens to search for modifiers of viability and pathogenic Htt aggregation. Our results identified several novel candidates for HD therapeutics that can now be tested in mammalian models of HD. Furthermore, these experiments have highlighted the complex relationship between aggregates and toxicity that exists in HD.

  5. Estimating Modifying Effect of Age on Genetic and Environmental Variance Components in Twin Models

    PubMed Central

    He, Liang; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pitkäniemi, Janne

    2016-01-01

    more insights into age-specific heritability of BMI and evidence of G × E interactions. These findings highlight the fundamental importance and implication of the proposed models in facilitating twin studies to investigate the heritability specific to age and other modifying factors. PMID:26868768

  6. Influence of surface characteristics of modified glass beads as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs) on the aerosolization performance.

    PubMed

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of surface characteristics (surface roughness and specific surface area) of surface-modified glass beads as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs) on the aerosolization, and thus, the in vitro respirable fraction often referred to as fine particle fraction (FPF). By processing glass beads in a ball mill with different grinding materials (quartz and tungsten carbide) and varying grinding time (4 h and 8 h), and by plasma etching for 1 min, glass beads with different shades of surface roughness and increased surface area were prepared. Compared with untreated glass beads, the surface-modified rough glass beads show increased FPFs. The drug detachment from the modified glass beads is also more reproducible than from untreated glass beads indicated by lower standard deviations for the FPFs of the modified glass beads. Moreover, the FPF of the modified glass beads correlates with their surface characteristics. The higher the surface roughness and the higher the specific surface area of the glass beads the higher is the FPF. Thus, surface-modified glass beads make an ideal carrier for tailoring the performance of DPIs in the therapy of asthma and chronically obstructive pulmonary diseases.

  7. Optimization of the cell seeding density and modeling of cell growth and metabolism using the modified Gompertz model for microencapsulated animal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Wen-tao, Qi; Ying, Zhang; Juan, Ma; Xin, Guo; Yu-bing, Xie; Wei, Wang; Xiaojun, Ma

    2006-04-05

    Cell microencapsulation is one of the promising strategies for the in vitro production of proteins or in vivo delivery of therapeutic products. In order to design and fabricate the optimized microencapsulated cell system, the Gompertz model was applied and modified to describe the growth and metabolism of microencapsulated cell, including substrate consumption and product formation. The Gompertz model successfully described the cell growth kinetics and the modified Gompertz models fitted the substrate consumption and product formation well. It was demonstrated that the optimal initial cell seeding density was about 4-5 x 10(6) cells/mL of microcapsule, in terms of the maximum specific growth rate, the glucose consumption potential and the product formation potential calculated by the Gompertz and modified Gompertz models. Modeling of cell growth and metabolism in microcapsules provides a guideline for optimizing the culture of microencapsulated cells.

  8. A passive movement method for parameter estimation of a musculo-skeletal arm model incorporating a modified hill muscle model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tung Fai; Wilson, Adrian J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we present an experimental method of parameterising the passive mechanical characteristics of the bicep and tricep muscles in vivo, by fitting the dynamics of a two muscle arm model incorporating anatomically meaningful and structurally identifiable modified Hill muscle models to measured elbow movements. Measurements of the passive flexion and extension of the elbow joint were obtained using 3D motion capture, from which the elbow angle trajectories were determined and used to obtain the spring constants and damping coefficients in the model through parameter estimation. Four healthy subjects were used in the experiments. Anatomical lengths and moment of inertia values of the subjects were determined by direct measurement and calculation. There was good reproducibility in the measured arm movement between trials, and similar joint angle trajectory characteristics were seen between subjects. Each subject had their own set of fitted parameter values determined and the results showed good agreement between measured and simulated data. The average fitted muscle parallel spring constant across all subjects was 143 N/m and the average fitted muscle parallel damping constant was 1.73 Ns/m. The passive movement method was proven to be successful, and can be applied to other joints in the human body, where muscles with similar actions are grouped together.

  9. REAC technology modifies pathological neuroinflammation and motor behaviour in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Lorenzini; Alessandro, Giuliani; Sandra, Sivilia; Antonio, Baldassarro Vito; Mercedes, Fernandez; Matteo, Lotti Margotti; Luciana, Giardino; Vania, Fontani; Salvatore, Rinaldi; Laura, Calzà

    2016-01-01

    The search for new therapeutic approaches to Alzheimer disease (AD) is a major goal in medicine and society, also due to the impressive economic and social costs of this disease. In this scenario, biotechnologies play an important role. Here, it is demonstrated that the Radio Electric Asymmetric Conveyer (REAC), an innovative technology platform for neuro- and bio-modulation, used according to the neuro-regenerative protocol (RGN-N), significantly increases astroglial reaction around the amyloid plaques in an AD mouse model, as evaluated by GFAP-immunoreactivity, and reduces microglia-associated neuroinflammation markers, as evaluated by Iba1-immunoreactivity and mRNA expression level of inflammatory cytokines TREM. IL1beta, iNOS and MRC1 were not affected neither by the genotype or by REAC RGN-N treatment. Also observed was an increase in locomotion in treated animals. The study was performed in 24-month-old male Tg2576 mice and age-matching wild-type animals, tested for Y-maze, contextual fear conditioning and locomotion immediately after the end of a specific REAC treatment administered for 15 hours/day for 15 days. These results demonstrated that REAC RGN-N treatment modifies pathological neuroinflammation, and mitigates part of the complex motor behaviour alterations observed in very old Tg2576 mice. PMID:27775040

  10. The rheological properties of modified microcrystalline cellulose containing high levels of model drugs.

    PubMed

    Knight, Paul E; Podczeck, Fridrun; Newton, J Michael

    2009-06-01

    The rheological properties of different types of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) mixed with model drugs and water have been evaluated to identify the influence of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) added to the cellulose during preparation. A ram extruder was used as a capillary rheometer. The mixtures consisted of 20% spheronizing agent (standard grade MCC or modified types with 6% or 8% of low viscosity grade SCMC) and 80% of ascorbic acid, ibuprofen or lactose monohydrate. The introduction of SCMC changed all rheological parameters assessed. It produced more rigid systems, requiring more stress to induce and maintain flow. Degree of non-Newtonian flow, angle of convergence, extensional viscosity, yield and die land shear stress at zero velocity, and static wall friction were increased, but recoverable shear and compliance were decreased. The presence of SCMC did not remove the influence of the type of drug. The mixture of ibuprofen and standard MCC had the lowest values for shear stress as a function of the rate of shear, extensional viscosity, and angle of convergence, but the highest values for recoverable shear and compliance. The findings indicate that the system has insufficient rigidity to form pellets.

  11. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  12. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    PubMed

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-Lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  13. FUS/TLS acts as an aggregation-dependent modifier of polyglutamine disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Yoshihiro; Washizu, Chika; Kurosawa, Masaru; Yamada, Mizuki; Doi, Hiroshi; Takumi, Toru; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Hicks, Geoffrey G.; Hattori, Nobutaka; Shimogori, Tomomi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    FUS/TLS is an RNA/DNA-binding protein associated with neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Previously, we found that a prion-like domain in the N-terminus of FUS/TLS mediates co-aggregation between FUS/TLS and mutant huntingtin, the gene product of Huntington’s disease (HD). Here, we show that heterozygous knockout of FUS/TLS worsened the phenotypes of model mice of (HD, but not spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). This difference was correlated with the degree of pathological association between disease proteins and FUS/TLS. Co-aggregation between FUS/TLS and mutant huntingtin resulted in the depletion of free FUS/TLS protein in HD mice that was detected as a monomer in SDS-PAGE analysis. Recently, we found that FUS/TLS paralogs, TAF15 and EWS, were up-regulated in homozygous FUS/TLS knockout mice. These two proteins were up-regulated in both HD and FUS/TLS heterozygote mice, and were further elevated in HD-TLS+/− double mutant mice, consistent with the functional impairment of FUS/TLS. These results suggest that FUS/TLS sequestration by co-aggregation is a rate-limiting factor of disease phenotypes of HD and that inclusions may have an adverse aspect, rather than being simply benign or protective. In addition, our results highlight inclusions as repositories of potential modifiers of neurodegeneration. PMID:27739513

  14. Radial-searching contour extraction method based on a modified active contour model for mammographic masses.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Toshiaki; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Horita, Katsuhei; Iwase, Takuji; Endo, Tokiko

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we developed an automatic extraction scheme for the precise recognition of the contours of masses on digital mammograms in order to improve a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system. We propose a radial-searching contour extraction method based on a modified active contour model (ACM). In this technique, after determining the central point of a mass by searching for the direction of the density gradient, we arranged an initial contour at the central point, and the movement of a control point was limited to directions radiating from the central point. Moreover, it became possible to increase the extraction accuracy by sorting out the pixel used for processing and using two images-an edge-intensity image and a degree-of-separation image defined based on the pixel-value histogram-for calculation of the image forces used for constraints on deformation of the ACM. We investigated the accuracy of the automated extraction method by using 53 masses with several "difficult contours" on 53 digitized mammograms. The extraction results were compared quantitatively with the "correct segmentation" represented by an experienced physician's sketches. The numbers of cases in which the extracted region corresponded to the correct region with overlap ratios of more than 81 and 61% were 30 and 45, respectively. The initial results obtained with this technique show that it will be useful for the segmentation of masses in CAD schemes.

  15. A modified Wenzel model for water wetting on van der Waals layered materials with topographic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Huang, Yongfeng; Shen, Yutian; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng

    2017-03-02

    A modified Wenzel model is proposed for describing the wetting behavior of van der Waals layered materials with topographic surfaces, based on the measured linear relationship between water wetting and surface roughness for high quality Bi2Se3 thin films, synthesized using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in the optimized temperature window of 180-200 °C. The water contact angles are found to have apparent dependence on the nanoscale surface morphology, enabling film wettability as a new tool to quickly characterize the quality of atomically thin films. The water contact angle of the ideal Bi2Se3 surface is inferred to be ∼98.4°, indicating its intrinsic hydrophobic nature; however, the edge of the terrace on its surface is extremely hydrophilic, leading to easy hydrophobic/hydrophilic transitions. The atomistic mechanism is further revealed by first principles calculations. The regulated wettability is of great importance for electronic applications of Bi2Se3 and other two-dimensional materials with distinctive electronic structures.

  16. Statistical density model for composite system scattering: Modified ensemble densities and bounded amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Y. K.

    2016-09-01

    A statistical density model for composite system scattering is formulated, by incorporating the ensemble density functional approach in describing the correlation dynamics during the collision. The principal difficulty of non-integrable propagating waves is first resolved by treating the open and closed channels separately; only the closed channel part does allow a density description. The unique open/closed channel separation adopted here allows not only the closed channel Hamiltonian MQ to support integrable densities, but also to establish the important bounds on the scattering amplitude. A modified ensemble energy functional for the MQ is constructed, and the statistical densities ρmtQ for the closed channels are generated. The scattering amplitude is then formulated in terms of the ρmtQ and the coefficients of variation that connect the closed channels to the asymptotic source. Evaluation of the amplitude integrals requires the determinantal functions deduced from the ρmtQ, which also leads to a coupled channel approach. The bound property of the amplitude allows variational optimization of the coefficients. Approximate procedures for securing the orthogonality of the MQ and for evaluation of the source term itself are discussed, including a judicious choice of configurations with zero and one inner-shell holes. Validity of the several critical modifications introduced is assessed.

  17. Dark-polariton bound pairs in the modified Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggitti, A.; Radonjić, M.; Jelenković, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional modified Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard chain of N identical QED cavities with nearest-neighbor photon tunneling and periodic boundary conditions. Each cavity contains an embedded three-level atom which is coupled to a cavity mode and an external classical control field. In the case of two excitations and common large detuning of two Raman-resonant fields, we show the emergence of two different species of dark-polariton bound pairs (DPBPs) that are mutually localized in their relative spatial coordinates. Due to the high degree of controllability, we show the appearance of either one or two DPBPs, having the energies within the energy gaps between three bands of mutually delocalized eigenstates. Interestingly, in a different parameter regime with negatively detuned Raman fields, we find that the ground state of the system is a DPBP which can be utilized for the photon storage, retrieval, and controllable state preparation. Moreover, we propose an experimental realization of our model system.

  18. Modified Maxium Likelihood Estimation Method for Completely Separated and Quasi-Completely Separated Data for a Dose-Response Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    MODIFIED MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION METHOD FOR COMPLETELY SEPARATED AND QUASI-COMPLETELY SEPARATED DATA...Likelihood Estimation Method for Completely Separated and Quasi-Completely Separated Data for a Dose-Response Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...quasi-completely separated , the traditional maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method generates infinite estimates. The bias-reduction (BR) method

  19. Modeling the ferrochelatase c.315-48C modifier mutation for erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bansode, Vijay B.; Koentgen, Frank; Trüb, Judith; Pelczar, Pawel; Schneider-Yin, Xiaoye; Minder, Elisabeth I.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is caused by deficiency of ferrochelatase (FECH), which incorporates iron into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) to form heme. Excitation of accumulated PPIX by light generates oxygen radicals that evoke excessive pain and, after longer light exposure, cause ulcerations in exposed skin areas of individuals with EPP. Moreover, ∼5% of the patients develop a liver dysfunction as a result of PPIX accumulation. Most patients (∼97%) have a severe FECH mutation (Mut) in trans to an intronic polymorphism (c.315-48C), which reduces ferrochelatase synthesis by stimulating the use of an aberrant 3′ splice site 63 nt upstream of the normal site for exon 4. In contrast, with the predominant c.315-48T allele, the correct splice site is mostly used, and individuals with a T/Mut genotype do not develop EPP symptoms. Thus, the C allele is a potential target for therapeutic approaches that modify this splicing decision. To provide a model for pre-clinical studies of such approaches, we engineered a mouse containing a partly humanized Fech gene with the c.315-48C polymorphism. F1 hybrids obtained by crossing these mice with another inbred line carrying a severe Fech mutation (named m1Pas) show a very strong EPP phenotype that includes elevated PPIX in the blood, enlargement of liver and spleen, anemia, as well as strong pain reactions and skin lesions after a short period of light exposure. In addition to the expected use of the aberrant splice site, the mice also show a strong skipping of the partly humanized exon 3. This will limit the use of this model for certain applications and illustrates that engineering of a hybrid gene may have unforeseeable consequences on its splicing. PMID:28093505

  20. Experimental Reactivation of Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection in a Modified Cornell-Like Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hong Min; Kwon, Kee Woong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been well studied. However, there have been few studies of the latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), the most common etiological non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species next to M. tuberculosis in humans worldwide. We hypothesized that latent MAC infections can be reactivated following immunosuppression after combination chemotherapy with clarithromycin and rifampicin under experimental conditions. To this end, we employed a modified Cornell-like murine model of tuberculosis and investigated six strains consisting of two type strains and four clinical isolates of M. avium and M. intracellulare. After aerosol infection of each MAC strain, five to six mice per group were euthanized at 2, 4, 10, 18, 28 and 35 weeks post-infection, and lungs were sampled to analyze bacterial burden and histopathology. One strain of each species maintained a culture-negative state for 10 weeks after completion of 6 weeks of chemotherapy, but was reactivated after 5 weeks of immunosuppression in the lungs with dexamethasone (three out of six mice in M. avium infection) or sulfasalazine (four out of six mice in both M. avium and M. intracellulare infection). The four remaining MAC strains exhibited decreased bacterial loads in response to chemotherapy; however, they remained at detectable levels and underwent regrowth after immunosuppression. In addition, the exacerbated lung pathology demonstrated a correlation with bacterial burden after reactivation. In conclusion, our results suggest the possibility of MAC reactivation in an experimental mouse model, and experimentally demonstrate that a compromised immune status can induce reactivation and/or regrowth of MAC infection. PMID:26406237

  1. Modeling zero-modified count and semicontinuous data in health services research Part 1: background and overview.

    PubMed

    Neelon, Brian; O'Malley, A James; Smith, Valerie A

    2016-11-30

    Health services data often contain a high proportion of zeros. In studies examining patient hospitalization rates, for instance, many patients will have no hospitalizations, resulting in a count of zero. When the number of zeros is greater or less than expected under a standard count model, the data are said to be zero modified relative to the standard model. A similar phenomenon arises with semicontinuous data, which are characterized by a spike at zero followed by a continuous distribution with positive support. When analyzing zero-modified count and semicontinuous data, flexible mixture distributions are often needed to accommodate both the excess zeros and the typically skewed distribution of nonzero values. Various models have been introduced over the past three decades to accommodate such data, including hurdle models, zero-inflated models, and two-part semicontinuous models. This tutorial describes recent modeling strategies for zero-modified count and semicontinuous data and highlights their role in health services research studies. Part 1 of the tutorial, presented here, provides a general overview of the topic. Part 2, appearing as a companion piece in this issue of Statistics in Medicine, discusses three case studies illustrating applications of the methods to health services research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mechanistic study of methanol synthesis from CO₂ and H₂ on a modified model Mo₆S₈ cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-12

    We report the methanol synthesis from CO₂ and H₂ on metal (M = K, Ti, Co, Rh, Ni, and Cu)-modified model Mo₆S₈ catalyst using density functional theory (DFT). The results show that the catalytic behavior of a Mo₆S₈ cluster is changed significantly due to the modifiers, via the electron transfer from M to Mo₆S₈ and therefore the reduction of the Mo cation (ligand effect) and the direct participation of M in the reaction (ensemble effect) to promote some elementary steps. With the most positively charged modifier, the ligand effect in the case of K-Mo₆S₈ is the most obvious among the systems studied; however it cannot compete with the ensemble effect, which plays a dominate role in determining activity via the electrostatic attraction in particular to stabilize the CHxOy species adsorbed at the Mo sites of Mo₆S₈. In comparison, the ligand effect is weaker and the ensemble effect is more important when the other modifiers are used. In addition, the modifiers also vary the optimal reaction pathway for methanol synthesis on Mo₆S₈, ranging from the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) + CO hydrogenation as that of Mo₆S₈ to the formate pathway. Finally, K is able to accelerate the methanol synthesis on Mo₆S₈ the most; while the promotion by Rh is relatively small. Using the modifiers like Ti, Co, Ni, and Cu, the activity of Mo₆S₈ is decreased instead. The relative stability between *HCOO and *HOCO is identified as a descriptor to capture the variation in mechanism and scales well with the estimated activity. Our study not only provides better understanding of the reaction mechanism and actives on the modified Mo₆S₈, but also predicts some possible candidates, which can be used a promoter to facilitate the CH₃OH synthesis on Mo sulfides.

  3. Mechanistic study of methanol synthesis from CO₂ and H₂ on a modified model Mo₆S₈ cluster

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Cheng; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-12

    We report the methanol synthesis from CO₂ and H₂ on metal (M = K, Ti, Co, Rh, Ni, and Cu)-modified model Mo₆S₈ catalyst using density functional theory (DFT). The results show that the catalytic behavior of a Mo₆S₈ cluster is changed significantly due to the modifiers, via the electron transfer from M to Mo₆S₈ and therefore the reduction of the Mo cation (ligand effect) and the direct participation of M in the reaction (ensemble effect) to promote some elementary steps. With the most positively charged modifier, the ligand effect in the case of K-Mo₆S₈ is the most obvious among themore » systems studied; however it cannot compete with the ensemble effect, which plays a dominate role in determining activity via the electrostatic attraction in particular to stabilize the CHxOy species adsorbed at the Mo sites of Mo₆S₈. In comparison, the ligand effect is weaker and the ensemble effect is more important when the other modifiers are used. In addition, the modifiers also vary the optimal reaction pathway for methanol synthesis on Mo₆S₈, ranging from the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) + CO hydrogenation as that of Mo₆S₈ to the formate pathway. Finally, K is able to accelerate the methanol synthesis on Mo₆S₈ the most; while the promotion by Rh is relatively small. Using the modifiers like Ti, Co, Ni, and Cu, the activity of Mo₆S₈ is decreased instead. The relative stability between *HCOO and *HOCO is identified as a descriptor to capture the variation in mechanism and scales well with the estimated activity. Our study not only provides better understanding of the reaction mechanism and actives on the modified Mo₆S₈, but also predicts some possible candidates, which can be used a promoter to facilitate the CH₃OH synthesis on Mo sulfides.« less

  4. The protective effect of modified intravenous immunoglobulin in LPS sepsis model is associated with an increased IRA B cells response.

    PubMed

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Pashova, Shina; Vassilev, Tchavdar; Pashov, Anastas

    2013-04-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin preparations (IVIg) that have undergone a mild oxidizing treatment with ferrous ions have an increased polyspecificity, which is not associated with a higher propensity to form aggregates. Among other biological properties of the modified IVIg, a protective effect in LPS sepsis model stands out as the native preparation is totally devoid of it or even exacerbates sepsis. A recent finding identified an LPS induced subset of B1 lymphocytes that migrate from the peritoneal cavity to the spleen acquiring the expression of CD93, GM-CSF as well as the capacity to control sepsis. This report demonstrates that modified IVIg, but not the native preparation, causes a further increase in this population during LPS sepsis. Partial targeted suppression of the peritoneal B cell proliferation by an intracellular dye abrogates this effect and the clinical benefit of modified IVIg.

  5. Precise Characterization of the Penumbra Revealed by MRI: A Modified Photothrombotic Stroke Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yun; Yao, Hong-Hong; Chen, Yu-Chen; Yang, Jian; Ding, Jie; Yang, Xiang-Yu; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Aims To precisely characterize the penumbra by MRI based on a modified photothrombotic stroke mouse model. Methods The proximal middle cerebral artery was occluded by a convenient laser system in conjunction with an intravenous injection of Rose Bengal in mice. And the suture MCAO model was performed in seven mice as a comparison of the reproducibility. One hour after occlusion, the penumbra was defined in six random photothrombotic stroke mice by mismatch between perfusion-weighted imaging and the apparent diffusion coefficient map on a home-made workstation. After imaging, three random mice of them were chosen to perform the reperfusion surgery. And the other three mice were sacrificed to stain for several potential penumbra markers, such as c-fos and heart shock protein 90. In the remaining mice, the evolution of the lesions was detected on the apparent diffusion coefficient map, diffusion-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours. After evaluating the neurological deficit scores, the brains were sectioned and stained by triphenyltetrazolium chloride and Nissl. Results The mice subjected to photothrombosis showed significant behavioral deficits. One hour after occlusion, the low perfusion areas on the perfusion-weighted imaging interlaced with the hypointense areas on the apparent diffusion coefficient map, demonstrating that the penumbra was located both surrounding and inside the lesions. This phenomenon was subsequently confirmed by the c-fos and heart shock protein 90 staining. The final T2-weighted images of the mice subjected to the reperfusion surgery were also consistent with the penumbra images at one hour. At early stages, the lesions were clearly identified on the apparent diffusion coefficient map; the volumes of the lesions on the diffusion-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging did not reach a maximum until 12 hours. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the final lesions in the photothrombotic stroke mice was 21.7% (0

  6. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Castro, Nathan J; Condon, Brian; Costable, Carmen; Goheen, Steven C

    2012-05-01

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatographic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressings is adsorption and accumulation of proteins like albumin at the solid-liquid interface of the biological fluid and wound dressing fiber. To better understand the effect of fiber charge and molecular modifications in cellulose-containing fibers on the binding of serum albumin as observed in protease sequestrant dressings, albumin binding to modified cotton fibers was compared with traditional and chromatographic isotherms. Modified cotton including carboxymethylated, citrate-crosslinked, dialdehyde and phosphorylated cotton, which sequester elastase and collagenase, were compared for their albumin binding isotherms. Albumin isotherms on citrate-cellulose, cross-linked cotton demonstrated a two-fold increased binding affinity over untreated cotton. A comparison of albumin binding between traditional, solution isotherms and chromatographic isotherms on modified cellulose yielded similar equilibrium constants. Application of the binding affinity of albumin obtained in the in vitro protein isotherm to the in vivo wound dressing uptake of the protein is discussed. The chromatographic approach to assessment of albumin isotherms on modified cellulose offers a more rapid approach to evaluating protein binding on modified cellulose over traditional solution approaches.

  7. Evaluation of the Doraiswamy-Thompson winter wheat crop calendar model incorporating a modified spring restart sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. W.; Ravet, F. W.; Smika, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The Robertson phenology was used to provide growth stage information to a wheat stress indicator mode. A stress indicator model demands two acurate predictions from a crop calendar: date of spring growth initiation; and crop calendar stage at growth initiation. Several approaches for restarting the Robertson phenology model at spring growth initiation were studied. Although best results were obtained with a solar thermal unit method, an alternate approach which indicates soil temperature as the controlling parameter for spring growth initiation was selected and tested. The modified model (Doraiswamy-Thompson) is compared to LACIE-Robertson model predictions.

  8. A modified inverse procedure to calibrate parameters of land subsidence model and its field application in shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Ye, S.; Wu, J.

    2012-12-01

    Land subsidence prediction depends on a theoretical model and values of involved parameters. An advanced inverse model (called for InvCOMPAC) has been developed for calibrating five parameters (K'v, S'skv, S'ske, S'sk and p'max0) in a compacting confined aquifer system (Liu and Helm, 2008). InvCOMPAC combines two steps: graphic analysis for initial set of parameters and Newton-Raphson method for adjustment procedure. Both steps were modified to improve the procedure involved, so the modified inverse model presented in this study was called MInvCOMPAC. Some improved procedures were introduced in both steps. For graphic analysis, smoothed data was used to get regular smooth hydrographs, compaction history curves and stress-strain curves, which could reduce the uncertainties for initial values of parameters. For Newton-Raphson method, three procedures were introduced to improve robustness and practicability of Newton-Raphson method. First procedure is to remove outliers from actual data by using smoothed data. This procedure can reduce risk of failure of numerical optimization. Second procedure is to use modified Newton method instead of Newton-Raphson, which can improve robustness of numerical optimization. Third procedure is to develop variable scale factor in modified Newton method instead of fixed scale factor. This procedure can simplify the modified Newton method. As a case study, MInvCOMPAC was applied to obtain values of five parameters mentioned above for Shanghai land subsidence model. Results of MInvCOMPAC were evaluated by the fit of observed and calculated data, and also compared to those of InvCOMPAC. Reference: Liu Y, Helm DC. Inverse procedure for calibrating parameters that control land subsidence caused by subsurface fluid withdrawal: 2. Field application. Water Resour Res. 2008 Jul 31;44(7). Acknowledgements Funding for this research from 973 Program No. 2010CB428803, and from NSFC No. 40872155, 40725010 and 41030746, is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Pore Size Distributions Inferred from Modified Inversion Percolation Modeling of Drainage Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dralus, D. E.; Wang, H. F.; Strand, T. E.; Glass, R. J.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Experiments have been conducted of drainage in sand packs. At equilibrium, the interface between the fluids forms a saturation transition fringe where the saturation decreases monotonically with height. This behavior was observed in a 1-inch thick pack of 20-30 sand contained front and back within two thin, 12-inch-by-24-inch glass plates. The translucent chamber was illuminated from behind by a bank of fluorescent bulbs. Acquired data were in the form of images captured by a CCD camera with resolution on the grain scale. The measured intensity of the transmitted light was used to calculate the average saturation at each point in the chamber. This study used a modified invasion percolation (MIP) model to simulate the drainage experiments to evaluate the relationship between the saturation-versus-height curve at equilibrium and the pore size distribution associated with the granular medium. The simplest interpretation of a drainage curve is in terms of a distribution of capillary tubes whose radii reproduce the the observed distribution of rise heights. However, this apparent radius distribution obtained from direct inversion of the saturation profile did not yield the assumed radius distribution. Further investigation demonstrated that the equilibrium height distribution is controlled primarily by the Bond number (ratio of gravity to capillary forces) with some influence from the width of the pore radius distribution. The width of the equilibrium fringe is quantified in terms of the ratio of Bond number to the standard deviation of the pore throat distribution. The normalized saturation-vs-height curves exhibit a power-law scaling behavior consistent with both Brooks-Corey and Van Genuchten type curves. Fundamental tenets of percolation theory were used to quantify the relationship between the apparent and actual radius distributions as a function of the mean coordination number and of the ratio of Bond number to standard deviation, which was supported by both MIP

  10. A modified collagen gel enhances healing outcome in a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Dasghatak, Piya; Das, Amitava; Mohammed, Kareem; Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-based dressings are of great interest in wound care. However, evidence supporting their mechanism of action is scanty. This work provides first results from a preclinical swine model of excisional wounds, elucidating the mechanism of action of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing. Following wounding, wound-edge tissue was collected at specific time intervals (3, 7, 14, and 21 days postwounding). On day 7, histological analysis showed significant increase in the length of rete ridges, suggesting improved biomechanical properties of the healing wound tissue. Rapid and transient mounting of inflammation is necessary for efficient healing. MCG significantly accelerated neutrophil and macrophage recruitment to the wound site on day 3 and day 7 with successful resolution of inflammation on day 21. MCG induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in neutrophil-like human promyelocytic leukemia-60 cells in vitro. In vivo, MCG-treated wound tissue displayed elevated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Consistently, MCG-treated wounds displayed significantly higher abundance of endothelial cells with increased blood flow to the wound area indicating improved vascularization. This observation was explained by the finding that MCG enhanced proliferation of wound-site endothelial cells. In MCG-treated wound tissue, Masson's trichrome and picrosirius red staining showed higher abundance of collagen and increased collagen type I:III ratio. This work presents first evidence from a preclinical setting explaining how a collagen-based dressing may improve wound closure by targeting multiple key mechanisms. The current findings warrant additional studies to determine whether the responses to the MCG are different from other collagen-based products used in clinical setting.

  11. A modified collagen gel dressing promotes angiogenesis in a preclinical swine model of chronic ischemic wounds.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Ganesh, Kasturi; Dickerson, Jennifer; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; Ghatak, Piya Das; Dixit, Sriteja; Bergdall, Valerie; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2014-01-01

    We recently performed proteomic characterization of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing and reported promising effects of the gel in healing full-thickness excisional wounds. In this work, we test the translational relevance of our aforesaid findings by testing the dressing in a swine model of chronic ischemic wounds recently reported by our laboratory. Full-thickness excisional wounds were established in the center of bipedicle ischemic skin flaps on the backs of animals. Ischemia was verified by laser Doppler imaging, and MCG was applied to the test group of wounds. Seven days post wounding, macrophage recruitment to the wound was significantly higher in MCG-treated ischemic wounds. In vitro, MCG up-regulated expression of Mrc-1 (a reparative M2 macrophage marker) and induced the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and of fibroblast growth factor-basic (β-FGF). An increased expression of CCR2, an M2 macrophage marker, was noted in the macrophages from MCG treated wounds. Furthermore, analyses of wound tissues 7 days post wounding showed up-regulation of transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, von Willebrand's factor, and collagen type I expression in MCG-treated ischemic wounds. At 21 days post wounding, MCG-treated ischemic wounds displayed higher abundance of proliferating endothelial cells that formed mature vascular structures and increased blood flow to the wound. Fibroblast count was markedly higher in MCG-treated ischemic wound-edge tissue. In addition, MCG-treated wound-edge tissues displayed higher abundance of mature collagen with increased collagen type I : III deposition. Taken together, MCG helped mount a more robust inflammatory response that resolved in a timely manner, followed by an enhanced proliferative phase, angiogenic outcome, and postwound tissue remodeling. Findings of the current study warrant clinical testing of MCG in a setting of ischemic chronic wounds.

  12. Modified ADM1 for modeling free ammonia inhibition in anaerobic acidogenic fermentation with high-solid sludge.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jie; Liu, He; Yin, Bo; Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xinchun

    2017-02-01

    Anaerobic acidogenic fermentation with high-solid sludge is a promising method for volatile fatty acid (VFA) production to realize resource recovery. In this study, to model inhibition by free ammonia in high-solid sludge fermentation, the anaerobic digestion model No. 1 (ADM1) was modified to simulate the VFA generation in batch, semi-continuous and full scale sludge. The ADM1 was operated on the platform AQUASIM 2.0. Three kinds of inhibition forms, e.g., simple inhibition, Monod and non-inhibition forms, were integrated into the ADM1 and tested with the real experimental data for batch and semi-continuous fermentation, respectively. The improved particle swarm optimization technique was used for kinetic parameter estimation using the software MATLAB 7.0. In the modified ADM1, the Ks of acetate is 0.025, the km,ac is 12.51, and the KI_NH3 is 0.02, respectively. The results showed that the simple inhibition model could simulate the VFA generation accurately while the Monod model was the better inhibition kinetics form in semi-continuous fermentation at pH10.0. Finally, the modified ADM1 could successfully describe the VFA generation and ammonia accumulation in a 30m(3) full-scale sludge fermentation reactor, indicating that the developed model can be applicable in high-solid sludge anaerobic fermentation.

  13. A modified inverse procedure for calibrating parameters in a land subsidence model and its field application in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yue; Ye, Shujun; Wu, Jichun; Wang, Hanmei; Jiao, Xun

    2016-05-01

    Land-subsidence prediction depends on an appropriate subsidence model and the calibration of its parameter values. A modified inverse procedure is developed and applied to calibrate five parameters in a compacting confined aquifer system using records of field data from vertical extensometers and corresponding hydrographs. The inverse procedure of COMPAC (InvCOMPAC) has been used in the past for calibrating vertical hydraulic conductivity of the aquitards, nonrecoverable and recoverable skeletal specific storages of the aquitards, skeletal specific storage of the aquifers, and initial preconsolidation stress within the aquitards. InvCOMPAC is modified to increase robustness in this study. There are two main differences in the modified InvCOMPAC model (MInvCOMPAC). One is that field data are smoothed before diagram analysis to reduce local oscillation of data and remove abnormal data points. A robust locally weighted regression method is applied to smooth the field data. The other difference is that the Newton-Raphson method, with a variable scale factor, is used to conduct the computer-based inverse adjustment procedure. MInvCOMPAC is then applied to calibrate parameters in a land subsidence model of Shanghai, China. Five parameters of aquifers and aquitards at 15 multiple-extensometer sites are calibrated. Vertical deformation of sedimentary layers can be predicted by the one-dimensional COMPAC model with these calibrated parameters at extensometer sites. These calibrated parameters could also serve as good initial values for parameters of three-dimensional regional land subsidence models of Shanghai.

  14. Disease modifying and antiangiogenic activity of 2-Methoxyestradiol in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Plum, Stacy M; Park, Eun J; Strawn, Steve J; Moore, Elizabeth G; Sidor, Carolyn F; Fogler, William E

    2009-01-01

    prevented neovascularization into the joint. Examination of gene expression on dissected hind limbs from mice treated for 5 or 14 days with 2ME2 showed inhibition of inflammatory cytokine message for IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17, as well as the angiogenic cytokines, VEGF and FGF-2. Conclusion These data demonstrate that in the CAIA mouse model of RA, 2ME2 has disease modifying activity that is at least partially attributable to the inhibition of neovascular development. Further, the data suggests new mechanistic points of intervention for 2ME2 in RA, specifically inhibition of inflammatory mediators and osteoclast activity. PMID:19409094

  15. Transplantation of NGF-gene-modified bone marrow stromal cells into a rat model of Alzheimer' disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Yan; Li, Jin-Tao; Wu, Qing-Ying; Li, Jin; Feng, Zhong-Tang; Liu, Su; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2008-02-01

    It is well known that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) grafted into the hippocampus of the rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) could survive and differentiate into cholinergic neurons as well as contribute towards functional restoration. The present study evaluated the effects of BMSC as a seed cell modified by nerve growth factor (NGF) gene into the hippocampus of AD rats. The beta-amyloid protein was injected bilaterally into the rat hippocampus to reproduce the AD model. After the human total RNA was extracted, the NGF gene was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, then cloned into the pcDNA3. BMSC derived from a green fluorescence protein transgenic mouse were isolated, cultured, identified, and transfected by the NGF recombinant. The NGF-gene-modified BMSC were then transplanted into the hippocampus of AD rats. The results showed that implanted BMSC survived, migrated and expressed NGF as well as differentiated into ChAT-positive neurons. A significant improvement in learning and memory in AD rats was also seen in NGF-gene-modified BMSC group, when compared with the BMSC group. The present findings suggested that BMSC provided an effective carrier for delivery of NGF into AD rats, and the administration of NGF-gene-modified BMSC may be considered as a potential strategy for the development of effective therapies for the treatment of AD.

  16. Advantages of modified osteosynthesis in treatment of osteoporotic long bones fractures--experimental model.

    PubMed

    Sisljagić, Vladimir; Jovanović, Savo; Mrcela, Tomislav; Radić, Radivoje; Belovari, Tatjana

    2009-12-01

    In surgery of fractured long bones, a patient suffering from osteoporosis represents constant challenge to a surgeon and applied material and instruments that need to destroy as little as possible of an already damaged bone. One potential way of increasing the contact surface between the implants and osteoporotic bone is injection of bone cement (methyl-metacrilat, Palakos) into a prepared screw bed. This method of osteosynthesis was therefore subjected to experimental research to prove that application of modified osteosynthesis using bone cement in treatment of fractures in osteoporotic patients has advantage over the standard method of osteosynthesis because this modified method enables significantly greater firmness and stability of the osteosynthesis, which is the essential precondition of a successful fracture healing. The research was carried out on six macerated cadaveric preparations of a shin bone from the osteological collection from Institute for Anatomy, School of Medicine, University "J. J. Strossmayer". All samples of long bones were artificially broken in the middle part of the diaphysis and then standard osteosynthesis and modified osteosynthesis with screws filled with bone cement were performed on the samples. Results show that under identical static action of the moment of torsion in the modified osteosynthesis torsion angle deviation is lower than in the standard osteosynthesis. In modified osteosynthesis with bone cement the first results for angle of torsion deviation greater than 0.2 degrees were noticed after 120 minutes, while in the standard method of osteosynthesis they were noticed already in the first minute.

  17. A deadtime model for the calibration of impact sensors with an application to a modified miniphone sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurk, Brian P.; Hansen, Edward C.; Hazle, Dean

    2013-12-01

    Due to deadtime effects, undercounting by aeolian impact sensors is present at all sediment flux levels. During a short time interval following an impact (the deadtime), an impact sensor is unable to detect new impacts. The degree of undercounting increases with increasing flux so that the sensor eventually becomes saturated. We develop an undercounting model for aeolian impact sensors that accounts for deadtime. This model was applied to field data obtained using a miniphone sensor modified from Ellis et al. (2009). The modified miniphone is inexpensive ($75.00 USD per pair, including datalogging) and easy to assemble. A protective layer of foil increases longevity at the probable expense of sensitivity. Modified Wilson and Cooke (MWAC) sand traps were paired with modified miniphones (MM) for intervals of up to 50 min during two winter storms along the coast of Lake Michigan. Sand from each MWAC was sieved, and the masses were fit to a continuous density function to estimate grain counts. MM deployed for cumulative periods of up to 200 showed no evidence of signal degradation. Fitting a deadtime model to the MM/MWAC data yielded a R2 value of 0.9766. While short segments of the response curve can be approximated by a linear fit, linear models will fail if applied much beyond the experimental conditions at which they were calibrated. The deadtime curve is based on a more realistic model of how impact sensors work and should give a better approximation of aeolian sand flux over a broader range of impact rates.

  18. A transgenic-cloned pig model expressing non-fluorescent modified Plum

    PubMed Central

    NAGAYA, Masaki; WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAKANO, Kazuaki; ARAI, Yoshikazu; ASANO, Yoshinori; TAKEISHI, Toki; UMEKI, Ikuma; FUKUDA, Tooru; YASHIMA, Sayaka; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs that express fluorescent proteins such as green and red fluorescent proteins have become indispensable biomedical research tools in recent years. Cell or tissue transplantation studies using fluorescent markers should be conducted, wherein the xeno-antigenicity of the fluorescent proteins does not affect engraftment or graft survival. Thus, we aimed to create a transgenic (Tg)-cloned pig that was immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. In the present study, we generated a Tg-cloned pig harboring a derivative of Plum modified by a single amino acid substitution in the chromophore. The cells and tissues of this Tg-cloned pig expressing the modified Plum (mPlum) did not fluoresce. However, western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses clearly showed that the mPlum had the same antigenicity as Plum. Thus, we have obtained primary proof of principle for creating a cloned pig that is immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. PMID:27396383

  19. Measurement and modeling of high-linearity modified uni-traveling carrier photodiode with highly-doped absorber.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huapu; Li, Zhi; Beling, Andreas; Campbell, Joe C

    2009-10-26

    The third-order intermodulation distortions of InGaAs/InP modified uni-traveling carrier photodiodes with a highly-doped p-type absorber are characterized. The third-order local intercept point is 55 dBm at low frequency (< 3 GHz) and remains as high as 47.5 dBm up to 20 GHz. The frequency characteristics of the OIP3 are well explained by an equivalent circuit model.

  20. Modeling a bench-scale alternating aerobic/anoxic activated sludge system for nitrogen removal using a modified ASM1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunook; Noh, Soohong; Colosimo, Mark

    2009-07-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1), developed by The International Association of Water Pollution Research and Control, was applied to model dynamics of NH4+, and NO3- in a bench scale alternating aerobic-anoxic (AAA) activated sludge system for nitrogen removal. The model was modified by eliminating inert soluble COD (S(I)) and inert particulate COD (X(I)) from the model's state variables as these two variables are not involved in any biological reaction and are not readily measurable with conventional routine COD analysis. It was assumed that the soluble COD and particulate COD of wastewater represent readily biodegradable COD (S(S)) and slowly biodegradable (X(S)) in the model, respectively. In addition, alkalinity was also removed from the model, since alkalinity of an AAA system remains stable due to the cyclic modes of the system. Even with the elimination of the three state variables and the assumption made, the model could reasonably predict the NH4+ and NO3- dynamics of the AAA system, and effluent NH4+ and NO3- concentrations with adjustment of only a few kinetic parameters. Compared to the original ASM1, it is expected that the modified ASM1 presented in this study can be more easily utilized by engineers in designing or operating an AAA system in practice, since it requires simple characterization of wastewater COD.

  1. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatogrpahic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressin...

  2. Modified local diatomite as potential functional drug carrier--A model study for diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Janićijević, Jelena; Krajišnik, Danina; Čalija, Bojan; Vasiljević, Bojana Nedić; Dobričić, Vladimir; Daković, Aleksandra; Antonijević, Milan D; Milić, Jela

    2015-12-30

    Diatomite makes a promising candidate for a drug carrier because of its high porosity, large surface area, modifiable surface chemistry and biocompatibility. Herein, refined diatomite from Kolubara coal basin, which complied with the pharmacopoeial requirements for heavy metals content and microbiological quality, was used as a starting material. Inorganic modification of the starting material was performed through a simple, one-step procedure. Significant increase in adsorbent loading with diclofenac sodium (DS) was achieved after the modification process (∼373mg/g) which enabled the preparation of comprimates containing therapeutic dose of the adsorbed drug. Adsorption of DS onto modified diatomite resulted in the alteration of the drug's XRD pattern and FTIR spectrum. In vitro drug release studies in phosphate buffer pH 7.5 demonstrated prolonged DS release over 8h from comprimates containing DS adsorbed on modified diatomite (up to 37% after 8h) and those containing physical mixture of the same composition (up to 45% after 8h). The results of in vivo toxicity testing on mice pointed on potential safety of both unmodified (starting) and modified diatomite. All these findings favor the application of diatomite as a potential functional drug carrier.

  3. Modified World Café Discussion Model for Conference and Course Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Alice; Fox, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    A group facilitation technique called World Café usually involves dividing a large number of people into smaller groups at tables, exploring a variety of topics around a key focus, and collecting ideas from the discussions to debrief later as a large group. We used a modified version of World Café during the new Cracker Barrel session format at…

  4. Applying Rasch Model and Generalizability Theory to Study Modified-Angoff Cut Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce, Alvaro J.; Wang, Ze

    2012-01-01

    The traditional approach to scale modified-Angoff cut scores transfers the raw cuts to an existing raw-to-scale score conversion table. Under the traditional approach, cut scores and conversion table raw scores are not only seen as interchangeable but also as originating from a common scaling process. In this article, we propose an alternative…

  5. Model-independent constraints on modified gravity from current data and from the Euclid and SKA future surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Laura; Martinelli, Matteo; Amendola, Luca

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to constrain modified gravity with redshift space distortion observations and supernovae measurements. Compared with a standard ΛCDM analysis, we include three additional free parameters, namely the initial conditions of the matter perturbations, the overall perturbation normalization, and a scale-dependent modified gravity parameter modifying the Poisson equation, in an attempt to perform a more model-independent analysis. First, we constrain the Poisson parameter Y (also called Geff) by using currently available fσ8 data and the recent SN catalog JLA. We find that the inclusion of the additional free parameters makes the constraints significantly weaker than when fixing them to the standard cosmological value. Second, we forecast future constraints on Y by using the predicted growth-rate data for Euclid and SKA missions. Here again we point out the weakening of the constraints when the additional parameters are included. Finally, we adopt as modified gravity Poisson parameter the specific Horndeski form, and use scale-dependent forecasts to build an exclusion plot for the Yukawa potential akin to the ones realized in laboratory experiments, both for the Euclid and the SKA surveys.

  6. A synergistic approach for soil moisture estimation using modified Dubois model with dual-polarized SAR and optical satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanabalan, P.; Vidhya, R.

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses about an estimation of soil moisture in agricultural region using SAR data with the use of HH and HV polarization. In this study the semi empirical approach derived by Dubois et al (1) was modified to work using (σdegHH) and σ°VV) so that soil moisture can be obtained for the larger area extent. The optical remote sensing is helps to monitor changes in vegetation biomass and canopy cover surface reflectance by using NDVI and LAI from which the site suitability from different land use/land cover are identified. The second use involves retrieve the backscattering coefficient valuesσ°) derived from SAR for soil moisture studies. In SAR techniques, the relative surface roughness can be directly estimate using surface roughness derivation empirical algorithms. The mid incidence angle is used to overcome the incidence angle effect and it worked successfully to this study. The modified Dubois Model (MDM) in combination with The Topp's et al (2) model is used to retrieve soil moisture. These two models have equations (HH, VV) and two independent variables i.e. root mean square height (s) and dielectric constant (epsilon). The linear regression analysis is performed and the surface roughness derived from SAR is well correlated with ground surface roughness having the value of (r2 = 0.69). By using the dielectric constant (epsilon) the modified Dubois model in combination with Topp's model are performed and the soil moisture is derived from SAR having value of (r2 = 0.60). Thus, the derived model is having good scope for soil moisture monitoring with present availability of SAR datasets.

  7. A comparison between the stability properties in a DDE model for leukemia and the modified fractional counterpart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rǎdulescu, I. R.; Cândea, D.; Kaslik, E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a delay differential equations (DDEs) model of leukemia is introduced and its dynamical properties are investigated in comparison with the modified fractional-order system where the Caputo's derivative is used. The model takes into account three types of division that a stem-like cell can undergo and cell competition between healthy and leukemia cell populations. The action of the immune system on the leukemic cell populations is also considered. The stability properties of the equilibrium points are established through numerical results and the differences between the two types of approaches are discussed. Medical conclusions are drawn in view of the obtained numerical simulations.

  8. Developing, mechanizing and testing of a digital active flutter suppression system for a modified B-52 wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthew, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    A digital flutter suppression system was developed and mechanized for a significantly modified version of the 1/30-scale B-52E aeroelastic wind tunnel model. A model configuration was identified that produced symmetric and antisymmetric flutter modes that occur at 2873N/sq m (60 psf) dynamic pressure with violent onset. The flutter suppression system, using one trailing edge control surface and the accelerometers on each wing, extended the flutter dynamic pressure of the model beyond the design limit of 4788N/sq m (100 psf). The hardware and software required to implement the flutter suppression system were designed and mechanized using digital computers in a fail-operate configuration. The model equipped with the system was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center and results showed the flutter dynamic pressure of the model was extended beyond 4884N/sq m (102 psf).

  9. Simulations of a modified SOP model applied to retrospective revaluation of human causal learning.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Michael R F; Dickinson, Anthony

    2005-05-01

    Dickinson and Burke (1996) proposed a modified version of Wagner's (1981) SOP associative theory to explain retrospective revaluation of human causal judgments. In this modified SOP (MSOP), excitatory learning occurs when cue and outcome representations are either both directly activated or both associatively activated. By contrast, inhibitory learning occurs when one representation is directly activated while the other is associatively activated. Finite node simulations of MSOP yielded simple acquisition, overshadowing, blocking, and inhibitory learning under forward contingencies. Importantly, retrospective revaluation was predicted in the form of unovershadowing and backward inhibitory learning. However, MSOP did not yield backward blocking. These predictions are evaluated against the relevant empirical evidence and contrasted with the predictions of other associative theories that have been applied to retrospective revaluation of human causal and predictive learning.

  10. A 3D finite element simulation model for TBM tunnelling in soft ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Thomas; Meschke, Günther

    2004-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element simulation model for shield-driven tunnel excavation is presented. The model takes into account all relevant components of the construction process (the soil and the ground water, the tunnel boring machine with frictional contact to the soil, the hydraulic jacks, the tunnel lining and the tail void grouting). The paper gives a detailed description of the model components and the stepwise procedure to simulate the construction process. The soil and the grout material are modelled as saturated porous media using a two-field finite element formulation. This allows to take into account the groundwater, the grouting pressure and the fluid interaction between the soil and slurry at the cutting face and between the soil and grout around the tail void. A Cam-Clay plasticity model is used to describe the material behaviour of cohesive soils. The cementitious grouting material in the tail void is modelled as an ageing elastic material with time-dependent stiffness and permeability. To allow for an automated computation of arbitrarily long and also curvilinear driving paths with suitable finite element meshes, the simulation procedure has been fully automated. The simulation of a tunnel advance in soft cohesive soil below the ground water table is presented and the results are compared with measurements taken from the literature. Copyright

  11. Biocompatibility of Portland Cement Modified with Titanium Oxide and Calcium Chloride in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hoshyari, Narjes; Labbaf, Hossein; Jalayer Naderi, Nooshin; Kazemi, Ali; Bastami, Farshid; Koopaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of two modified formulations of Portland cement (PC) mixed with either titanium oxide or both titanium oxide and calcium chloride. Methods and Materials: Polyethylene tubes were filled with modified PCs or Angelus MTA as the control; the tubes were then implanted in 28 Wistar rats subcutaneously. One tube was left empty as a negative control in each rat. Histologic samples were taken after 7, 15, 30 and 60 days. Sections were assessed histologically for inflammatory responses and presence of fibrous capsule and granulation tissue formation. Data were analyzed using the Fisher’s exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Result: PC mixed with titanium oxide showed the highest mean scores of inflammation compared with others. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean inflammatory grades between all groups in each of the understudy time intervals. Conclusion: The results showed favorable biocompatibility of these modified PC mixed with calcium chloride and titanium oxide. PMID:27141221

  12. Active Aeroelastic Wing Aerodynamic Model Development and Validation for a Modified F/A-18A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Diebler, Corey G.

    2005-01-01

    A new aerodynamic model has been developed and validated for a modified F/A-18A airplane used for the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) research program. The goal of the program was to demonstrate the advantages of using the inherent flexibility of an aircraft to enhance its performance. The research airplane was an F/A-18A with wings modified to reduce stiffness and a new control system to increase control authority. There have been two flight phases. Data gathered from the first flight phase were used to create the new aerodynamic model. A maximum-likelihood output-error parameter estimation technique was used to obtain stability and control derivatives. The derivatives were incorporated into the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F-18 simulation, validated, and used to develop new AAW control laws. The second phase of flights was used to evaluate the handling qualities of the AAW airplane and the control law design process, and to further test the accuracy of the new model. The flight test envelope covered Mach numbers between 0.85 and 1.30 and dynamic pressures from 600 to 1250 pound-force per square foot. The results presented in this report demonstrate that a thorough parameter identification analysis can be used to improve upon models that were developed using other means. This report describes the parameter estimation technique used, details the validation techniques, discusses differences between previously existing F/A-18 models, and presents results from the second phase of research flights.

  13. Heterotopic expression of class B floral homeotic genes supports a modified ABC model for tulip (Tulipa gesneriana).

    PubMed

    Kanno, Akira; Saeki, Hiroshi; Kameya, Toshiaki; Saedler, Heinz; Theissen, Günter

    2003-07-01

    In higher eudicotyledonous angiosperms the floral organs are typically arranged in four different whorls, containing sepals, petals, stamens and carpels. According to the ABC model, the identity of these organs is specified by floral homeotic genes of class A, A+B, B+C and C, respectively. In contrast to the sepal and petal whorls of eudicots, the perianths of many plants from the Liliaceae family have two outer whorls of almost identical petaloid organs, called tepals. To explain the Liliaceae flower morphology, van Tunen et al. (1993) proposed a modified ABC model, exemplified with tulip. According to this model, class B genes are not only expressed in whorls 2 and 3, but also in whorl 1. Thus the organs of both whorls 1 and 2 express class A plus class B genes and, therefore, get the same petaloid identity. To test this modified ABC model we have cloned and characterized putative class B genes from tulip. Two DEF- and one GLO-like gene were identified, named TGDEFA, TGDEFB and TGGLO. Northern hybridization analysis showed that all of these genes are expressed in whorls 1, 2 and 3 (outer and inner tepals and stamens), thus corroborating the modified ABC model. In addition, these experiments demonstrated that TGGLO is also weakly expressed in carpels, leaves, stems and bracts. Gel retardation assays revealed that TGGLO alone binds to DNA as a homodimer. In contrast, TGDEFA and TGDEFB cannot homodimerize, but make heterodimers with PI. Homodimerization of GLO-like protein has also been reported for lily, suggesting that this phenomenon is conserved within Liliaceae plants or even monocot species.

  14. Modifying Health Behavior for Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Prevention with the Health Belief Model and Social Support Theory.

    PubMed

    Padchasuwan, Natnapa; Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Rujirakul, Ratana; Wakkuwattapong, Parichart; Norkaew, Jun; Kujapun, Jirawoot; Ponphimai, Sukanya; Chavenkun, Wasugree; Kompor, Pontip; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is a serious health problem in Thailand. Infection is associated with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), endemic among human populations in northeast and north Thailand where raw fish containing fluke metacercariae are frequently consumed. Recently, Thailand public health authorities have been organized to reduce morbidity and mortality particularly in the northeast through O. viverrini and CCA screening projects. Health modfication is one of activities included in this campaign, but systemic guidelines of modifying and developing health behavior for liver flukes and CCA prevention in communities towards health belief and social support theory are still various and unclear. Here we review the guidelines for modifying and developing health behavior among populations in rural communities to strengthen understanding regarding perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers to liver fluke and CCA prevention. This model may be useful for public health of cancers and related organizations to further health behavior change in endemic areas.

  15. Modified Johnson model for ferroelectric lead lanthanum zirconate titanate at very high fields and below Curie temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, M.; Tong, S.; Ma, B.; Liu, S.; Balachandran, U.

    2012-01-01

    A modified Johnson model is proposed to describe the nonlinear field dependence of the dielectric constant ({var_epsilon}-E loop) in ferroelectric materials below the Curie temperature. This model describes the characteristic ferroelectric 'butterfly' shape observed in typical {var_epsilon}-E loops. The predicted nonlinear behavior agreed well with the measured values in both the low- and high-field regions for lead lanthanum zirconate titanate films. The proposed model was also validated at different temperatures below the ferroelectric-to-paraelectric Curie point. The anharmonic coefficient in the model decreased from 6.142 x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 2}/V{sup 2} to 2.039 x 10{sup -19} cm{sup 2}/V{sup 2} when the temperature increased from 25 C to 250 C.

  16. Modified Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 for dry and semi-dry anaerobic digestion of solid organic waste.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Flavia; Chatellier, Patrice; Esposito, Giovanni; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Frunzo, Luigi; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The role of total solids (TS) content in anaerobic digestion of selected complex organic matter, e.g. rice straw and food waste, was investigated. A range of TS from wet (4.5%) to dry (23%) was evaluated. A modified version of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 for a complex organic substrate is proposed to take into account the effect of the TS content on anaerobic digestion. A linear function that correlates the kinetic constants of three specific processes (i.e. disintegration, acetate and propionate up-take) was included in the model. Results of biomethanation and volatile fatty acids production tests were used to calibrate the proposed model. Model simulations showed a good agreement between numerical and observed data.

  17. Mechanistic model coupling gas exchange dynamics and Listeria monocytogenes growth in modified atmosphere packaging of non respiring food.

    PubMed

    Chaix, E; Broyart, B; Couvert, O; Guillaume, C; Gontard, N; Guillard, V

    2015-10-01

    A mechanistic model coupling O2 and CO2 mass transfer (namely diffusion and solubilisation in the food itself and permeation through the packaging material) to microbial growth models was developed aiming at predicting the shelf life of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) systems. It was experimentally validated on a non-respiring food by investigating concomitantly the O2/CO2 partial pressure in packaging headspace and the growth of Listeria monocytogenes (average microbial count) within the food sample. A sensitivity analysis has revealed that the reliability of the prediction by this "super-parametrized" model (no less than 47 parameters were required for running one simulation) was strongly dependent on the accuracy of the microbial input parameters. Once validated, this model was used to decipher the role of O2/CO2 mass transfer on microbial growth and as a MAP design tool: an example of MAP dimensioning was provided in this paper as a proof of concept.

  18. The analysis and application of a new hybrid pollutants forecasting model using modified Kolmogorov-Zurbenko filter.

    PubMed

    Li, Peizhi; Wang, Yong; Dong, Qingli

    2017-04-01

    Cities in China suffer from severe smog and haze, and a forecasting system with high accuracy is of great importance to foresee the concentrations of the airborne particles. Compared with chemical transport models, the growing artificial intelligence models can simulate nonlinearities and interactive relationships and getting more accurate results. In this paper, the Kolmogorov-Zurbenko (KZ) filter is modified and firstly applied to construct the model using an artificial intelligence method. The concentration of inhalable particles and fine particulate matter in Dalian are used to analyze the filtered components and test the forecasting accuracy. Besides, an extended experiment is made by implementing a comprehensive comparison and a stability test using data in three other cities in China. Results testify the excellent performance of the developed hybrid models, which can be utilized to better understand the temporal features of pollutants and to perform a better air pollution control and management.

  19. Modifying the affective behavior of preschoolers with autism using in-vivo or video modeling and reinforcement contingencies.

    PubMed

    Gena, Angeliki; Couloura, Sophia; Kymissis, Effie

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to modify the affective behavior of three preschoolers with autism in home settings and in the context of play activities, and to compare the effects of video modeling to the effects of in-vivo modeling in teaching these children contextually appropriate affective responses. A multiple-baseline design across subjects, with a return to baseline condition, was used to assess the effects of treatment that consisted of reinforcement, video modeling, in-vivo modeling, and prompting. During training trials, reinforcement in the form of verbal praise and tokens was delivered contingent upon appropriate affective responding. Error correction procedures differed for each treatment condition. In the in-vivo modeling condition, the therapist used modeling and verbal prompting. In the video modeling condition, video segments of a peer modeling the correct response and verbal prompting by the therapist were used as corrective procedures. Participants received treatment in three categories of affective behavior--sympathy, appreciation, and disapproval--and were presented with a total of 140 different scenarios. The study demonstrated that both treatments--video modeling and in-vivo modeling--systematically increased appropriate affective responding in all response categories for the three participants. Additionally, treatment effects generalized across responses to untrained scenarios, the child's mother, new therapists, and time.

  20. A modified Nordic prediction model of road traffic noise in a Taiwanese city with significant motorcycle traffic.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Lin, Hsiao-Ching; Yang, Wei-Ting; Bao, Bo-Ying; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2012-08-15

    A prediction model was developed to map road traffic noise in an area with significant motorcycle traffic in Taichung City, Taiwan. This model was modified from the Nordic prediction method by adding three types of traffic flow rates, including heavy vehicles, light vehicles, and motorcycles, as well as local traffic speeds and road characteristics to the calculating equations. The parameters that were input into the equations include traffic flow, vehicle speed, distance from the center of the road, height of the road surface, position and height of the barriers, thickness of the barriers, location of the receiver relative to the surrounding road surface or barriers, reflecting vertical surfaces, type of ground, and height of the buildings. The model was validated by comparing the measured noise levels at 42 sampling sites close to main roads with the predicted values. A significant correlation was found between the predicted and measured noise levels (Pearson correlation coefficient=0.75, p<0.001). The deviation between the predicted and measured noise levels within the range of ±3.5 A-weighted decibel (dB(A)) was 90.5%. The mean difference between the predicted and measured noise levels was 0.9±2.1 dB(A). The modified Nordic prediction model is therefore applicable to estimate the noise exposure in this urban environment in Taiwan.

  1. A modified ABC model in InGaN MQW LED using compositionally step graded Alternating Barrier for efficiency improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajoon, P.; Nirmal, D.; Anuja Menokey, M.; Charles Pravin, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) with compositionally step graded (CSG) Alternating Barriers (AB) of InGaN-AlGaN with p-doped GaN barrier is designed and analysed. The improved crystal structure and modified band bending in the device enhances the carrier confinement and diminishes the polarization-related efficiency reduction. Furthermore, the good crystalline quality increases the hole injection and transportation; this significantly improves the radiative recombination rate and reduces the non-radiative recombination as well as carrier leakage out of the active region. Simulation result show mitigated efficiency droop of 3% and light output power of 1500 mW at the injection current of 500 mA. A modified ABC model is also developed to model the carrier leakage mechanism at high injection current density. In the model, total carrier leakage currents from the active region due to thermionic emission and electron overflow at high injection current are considered. Also, the obtained result of the modelled conventional LED shows a good fit with experimental data. Moreover, the SiC substrate technology in the design is attributed with improved crystal structure, reduced polarization effect and thermal conductivity, which improve the optical performance of the device.

  2. Computational issues and applications of line-elements to model subsurface flow governed by the modified Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Mark; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.

    2011-09-01

    Two new approaches are presented for the accurate computation of the potential due to line elements that satisfy the modified Helmholtz equation with complex parameters. The first approach is based on fundamental solutions in elliptical coordinates and results in products of Mathieu functions. The second approach is based on the integration of modified Bessel functions. Both approaches allow evaluation of the potential at any distance from the element. The computational approaches are applied to model transient flow with the Laplace transform analytic element method. The Laplace domain solution is computed using a combination of point elements and the presented line elements. The time domain solution is obtained through a numerical inversion. Two applications are presented to transient flow fields, which could not be modeled with the Laplace transform analytic element method prior to this work. The first application concerns transient single-aquifer flow to wells near impermeable walls modeled with line-doublets. The second application concerns transient two-aquifer flow to a well near a stream modeled with line-sinks.

  3. Modeling the impact of vapor thymol concentration, temperature, and modified atmosphere condition on growth behavior of Salmonella on raw shrimp.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Siyuan; Sheen, Shiowshuh; Pang, Yu-Hsin; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2015-02-01

    Salmonella is a microorganism of concern on a global basis for raw shrimp. This research modeled the impact of vapor thymol concentration (0, 0.8, and 1.6 mg/liter), storage temperature (8, 12, and 16°C), and modified atmosphere condition (0.04 as in the natural atmosphere and 59.5% CO2) against the growth behavior of a Salmonella cocktail (six strains) on raw shrimp. Lag time (hour) and maximum growth rate (log CFU per gram per hour), chosen as two growth indicators, were obtained through DMFit software and then developed into polynomial as well as nonlinear modified secondary models (dimensional and/or dimensionless), consisting of two or even three impact factors in the equations. The models were validated, and results showed that the predictive values from both models demonstrated good matches to the observed experimental values, yet the prediction based on lag time was more accurate than maximum growth rate. The information will provide the food industry with insight into the potential safety risk of Salmonella growth on raw shrimp under stressed conditions.

  4. A modified metabolic model for mixed culture fermentation with energy conserving electron bifurcation reaction and metabolite transport energy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Man; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Zeng, Raymond J

    2013-07-01

    A modified metabolic model for mixed culture fermentation (MCF) is proposed with the consideration of an energy conserving electron bifurcation reaction and the transport energy of metabolites. The production of H2 related to NADH/NAD(+) and Fdred/Fdox is proposed to be divided in three processes in view of energy conserving electron bifurcation reaction. This assumption could fine-tune the intracellular redox balance and regulate the distribution of metabolites. With respect to metabolite transport energy, the proton motive force is considered to be constant, while the transport rate coefficient is proposed to be proportional to the octanol-water partition coefficient. The modeling results for a glucose fermentation in a continuous stirred tank reactor show that the metabolite distribution is consistent with the literature: (1) acetate, butyrate, and ethanol are main products at acidic pH, while the production shifts to acetate and propionate at neutral and alkali pH; (2) the main products acetate, ethanol, and butyrate shift to ethanol at higher glucose concentration; (3) the changes for acetate and butyrate are following an increasing hydrogen partial pressure. The findings demonstrate that our modified model is more realistic than previous proposed model concepts. It also indicates that inclusion of an energy conserving electron bifurcation reaction and metabolite transport energy for MCF is sound in the viewpoint of biochemistry and physiology.

  5. Predictive model for the growth of spoilage bacteria on modified atmosphere packaged Atlantic salmon produced in Australia.

    PubMed

    Powell, S M; Ratkowsky, D A; Tamplin, M L

    2015-05-01

    Most existing models for the spoilage of modified atmosphere packed Atlantic salmon are based on the growth of the spoilage organism Photobacterium phosphoreum. However, there is evidence that this organism is not the specific spoilage organism on salmon produced and packaged in Australia. We developed a predictive model for the growth of bacteria in Australian-produced Atlantic salmon stored under modified atmosphere conditions (30-98% carbon dioxide in nitrogen) at refrigeration temperatures (0-10 °C). As expected, both higher levels of carbon dioxide and lower temperatures decreased the observed growth rates of the total population. A Bělehrádek-type model for growth rate fitted the data best with an acceptably low root mean square error. At low temperatures (∼0 °C) the growth rates in this study were similar to those predicted by other models but at higher temperatures (∼10 °C) the growth rates were significantly lower in the current study.

  6. Mesh-free modeling of liquid crystals using modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yakutovich, M V; Care, C M; Newton, C J P; Cleaver, D J

    2010-10-01

    We present a generalization of the modified smooth particle hydrodynamics simulation technique capable of simulating static and dynamic liquid crystalline behavior. This generalization is then implemented in the context of the Qian-Sheng description of nematodynamics. To test the method, we first use it to simulate switching in both a Fréedericksz setup and a chiral hybrid aligned nematic cell. In both cases, the results obtained give excellent agreement with previously published results. We then apply the technique in a three-dimensional simulation of the switching dynamics of the post aligned bistable nematic device.

  7. Model studies on the detectability of genetically modified feeds in milk.

    PubMed

    Poms, R E; Hochsteiner, W; Luger, K; Glössl, J; Foissy, H

    2003-02-01

    Detecting the use of genetically modified feeds in milk has become important, because the voluntary labeling of milk and dairy products as "GMO free" or as "organically grown" prohibits the employment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The aim of this work was to investigate whether a DNA transfer from foodstuffs like soya and maize was analytically detectable in cow's milk after digestion and transportation via the bloodstream of dairy cows and, thus, whether milk could report for the employment of transgene feeds. Blood, milk, urine, and feces of dairy cows were examined, and foreign DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction by specifically amplifying a 226-bp fragment of the maize invertase gene and a 118-bp fragment of the soya lectin gene. An intravenous application of purified plant DNA showed a fast elimination of marker DNA in blood or its reduction below the detection limit. With feeding experiments, it could be demonstrated that a specific DNA transfer from feeds into milk was not detectable. Therefore, foreign DNA in milk cannot serve as an indicator for the employment of transgene feeds unless milk is directly contaminated with feed components or airborne feed particles.

  8. Modeling flows over gravel beds by a drag force method and a modified S-A turbulence closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, C.; Li, C. W.

    2012-09-01

    A double-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (DANS) model has been developed for depth-limited open channel flows over gravels. Three test cases are used to validate the model: an open-channel flow over a densely packed gravel bed with small-scale uniform roughness (D/d50 ˜ 13, d50 = median diameter of roughness elements, D = water depth), open-channel flows over large-scale sparsely distributed roughness elements (D/Δ ˜ 2.3-8.7, Δ = roughness height) and steep slope gravel-bed river flows with D/d50 ˜ 7-25. Various methods of treatment of the gravel-induced resistance effect have been investigated. The results show that the wall function approach (WFA) is successful in simulating flows over small gravels but is not appropriate for large gravels since the vertical profile of the longitudinal velocity does not follow the logarithmic-linear relationship. The drag force method (DFM) performs better but the non-logarithmic velocity distribution generated by sparsely distributed gravels cannot be simulated accurately. Noting that the turbulence length scale within the gravel layer is governed by the gravel size, the DANS model incorporating the DFM and a modified Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) turbulence closure is proposed. The turbulence length scale parameter in the S-A model is modified to address the change in the turbulence structure within the gravel layer. The computed velocity profiles agree well with the corresponding measured profiles in all cases. Particularly, the model reproduces the S-shape velocity profile for sparsely distributed large size roughness elements. The modeling methodology is robust and can be easily integrated into the existing numerical models.

  9. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans.

  10. Hot compression deformation behavior and a modified physically-based constitutive model of Cu-6 %Ag alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lie; Wang, Menghan; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Fenglin

    2016-04-01

    In order to reveal the flow characteristics of Cu-6 %Ag alloy on the condition of hot deformation, the isothermal compression experiments are carried out at the temperatures of 973-1123 K under strain rates of 0.01-10 s-1. The effects of deformation condition on the hot compression deformation behavior are investigated. The low instability strain (ɛ i) behavior at high strain rate (10 s-1) is discussed in this paper. According to the experiment results and analyses, the deformation twinning and inhomogeneous grains are thought to be the possible reasons for low strain cracking. Then, a modified physically based constitutive model is established. The strain for maximum softening rate (\\varepsilon_{ *} ) is quoted in the constitutive equation which is proved that there is a nearly linear relationship between { ln }\\varepsilon_{ *} and { ln }Z . What's more, the correlation coefficient (R) and the average absolute relative error (AARE) are used to evaluate the accuracy of the established constitutive model. The values of R and AARE are 0.99612 and 3.47 %, respectively, which show that the modified constitutive model can exactly reveal the flow stress of Cu-6 %Ag alloy.

  11. Description of transdermal transport of hydrophilic solutes during low-frequency sonophoresis based on a modified porous pathway model.

    PubMed

    Tezel, Ahmet; Sens, Ashley; Mitragotri, Samir

    2003-02-01

    Application of low-frequency ultrasound has been shown to increase skin permeability, thereby facilitating delivery of macromolecules (low-frequency sonophoresis). In this study, we sought to determine a theoretical description of transdermal transport of hydrophilic permeants induced by low-frequency sonophoresis. Parameters such as pore size distribution, absolute porosity, and dependence of effective tortuosity on solute characteristics were investigated. Pig skin was exposed to low-frequency ultrasound at 58 kHz to achieve different skin resistivities. Transdermal delivery of four permeants [mannitol, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), inulin, dextran] in the presence and absence of ultrasound was measured. The porous pathway model was modified to incorporate the permeant characteristics into the model and to achieve a detailed understanding of the pathways responsible for hydrophilic permeant delivery. The slopes of the log kp(p) versus log R graphs for individual solutes changed with solute molecular area, suggesting that the permeability-resistivity correlation for each permeant is related to its size. The tortuosity that a permeant experiences within the skin also depends on its size, where larger molecules experience a less tortuous path. With the modified porous pathway model, the effective tortuosities and skin porosity were calculated independently. The results of this study show that low-frequency sonophoresis creates pathways for permeant delivery with a wide range of pore sizes. The optimum pore size utilized by solutes is related to their molecular radii.

  12. A modified ABCDE model of flowering in orchids based on gene expression profiling studies of the moth orchid Phalaenopsis aphrodite.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-Lin; Chen, Wan-Chieh; Lee, Ann-Ying; Chen, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yao-Chien Alex; Chao, Ya-Ting; Shih, Ming-Che

    2013-01-01

    Previously we developed genomic resources for orchids, including transcriptomic analyses using next-generation sequencing techniques and construction of a web-based orchid genomic database. Here, we report a modified molecular model of flower development in the Orchidaceae based on functional analysis of gene expression profiles in Phalaenopsis aphrodite (a moth orchid) that revealed novel roles for the transcription factors involved in floral organ pattern formation. Phalaenopsis orchid floral organ-specific genes were identified by microarray analysis. Several critical transcription factors including AP3, PI, AP1 and AGL6, displayed distinct spatial distribution patterns. Phylogenetic analysis of orchid MADS box genes was conducted to infer the evolutionary relationship among floral organ-specific genes. The results suggest that gene duplication MADS box genes in orchid may have resulted in their gaining novel functions during evolution. Based on these analyses, a modified model of orchid flowering was proposed. Comparison of the expression profiles of flowers of a peloric mutant and wild-type Phalaenopsis orchid further identified genes associated with lip morphology and peloric effects. Large scale investigation of gene expression profiles revealed that homeotic genes from the ABCDE model of flower development classes A and B in the Phalaenopsis orchid have novel functions due to evolutionary diversification, and display differential expression patterns.

  13. In search of a depressed mouse: utility of models for studying depression-related behavior in genetically modified mice.

    PubMed

    Cryan, J F; Mombereau, C

    2004-04-01

    The ability to modify mice genetically has been one of the major breakthroughs in modern medical science affecting every discipline including psychiatry. It is hoped that the application of such technologies will result in the identification of novel targets for the treatment of diseases such as depression and to gain a better understanding of the molecular pathophysiological mechanisms that are regulated by current clinically effective antidepressant medications. The advent of these tools has resulted in the need to adopt, refine and develop mouse-specific models for analyses of depression-like behavior or behavioral patterns modulated by antidepressants. In this review, we will focus on the utility of current models (eg forced swim test, tail suspension test, olfactory bulbectomy, learned helplessness, chronic mild stress, drug-withdrawal-induced anhedonia) and research strategies aimed at investigating novel targets relevant to depression in the mouse. We will focus on key questions that are considered relevant for examining the utility of such models. Further, we describe other avenues of research that may give clues as to whether indeed a genetically modified animal has alterations relevant to clinical depression. We suggest that it is prudent and most appropriate to use convergent tests that draw on different antidepressant-related endophenotypes, and complimentary physiological analyses in order to provide a program of information concerning whether a given phenotype is functionally relevant to depression-related pathology.

  14. NASA-modified precipitation products to improve USEPA nonpoint source water quality modeling for the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The USEPA has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires states to monitor the total maximum daily load, or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted," for any watershed in the United States (Copeland, 2005). In response to this mandate, the USEPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a decision support tool for assessing pollution and to guide the decision-making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF), computes continuous streamflow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events, especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA-modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, streamflow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better streamflow statistics and, potentially, in improved water quality assessment.

  15. Modified Heisenberg model for the zig-zag structure in multiferroic RMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Bahoosh, Safa Golrokh; Wesselinowa, Julia M.; Trimper, Steffen

    2015-08-28

    The class of RMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} (R = Ho, Tb, Y, Eu) compounds offers multiferroic properties where the refined magnetic zig-zag order breaks the inversion symmetry. Varying the temperature, the system undergoes a magnetic and a subsequent ferroelectric phase transition where the ferroelectricity is magnetically induced. We propose a modified anisotropic Heisenberg model that can be used as a tractable analytical model studying the properties of those antiferromagnetic zig-zag spin chains. Based on a finite temperature Green's function method, it is shown that the polarization is induced solely by different exchange couplings of the two different Mn{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 3+} magnetic ions. We calculate the excitation energy of the spin system for finite temperatures, which for its part determines the temperature dependent magnetization and polarization. The ferroelectric phase transition is manifested as a kink in the excitation energy. The variation of the polarization by an external magnetic field depends strongly on the direction of that field. Whereas, the polarization in b-direction increases with an external magnetic field as well in b-direction it can be switched for strong fields in a-direction. The results based on that modified Heisenberg model are in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  16. Monoquaternary pyridinium salts with modified side chain-synthesis and evaluation on model of tabun- and paraoxon-inhibited acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Musilek, Kamil; Kucera, Jiri; Jun, Daniel; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Opletalova, Veronika; Kuca, Kamil

    2008-09-01

    Acetylcholinesterase reactivators are crucial antidotes for the treatment of organophosphate intoxication. Eighteen monoquaternary reactivators of acetylcholinesterase with modified side chain were developed in an effort to extend the properties of pralidoxime. The known reactivators (pralidoxime, HI-6, obidoxime, trimedoxime, methoxime) and the prepared compounds were tested in vitro on a model of tabun- and paraoxon-inhibited AChE. Monoquaternary reactivators were not able to exceed the best known compounds for tabun poisoning, but some of them did show reactivation better or comparable with pralidoxime for paraoxon poisoning. However, extensive differences were found by a SAR study for various side chains on the non-oxime part of the reactivator molecule.

  17. Excitation dynamics in Phycoerythrin 545: modeling of steady-state spectra and transient absorption with modified Redfield theory.

    PubMed

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Doust, Alexander B; Curutchet, Carles; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2010-07-21

    We model the spectra and excitation dynamics in the phycobiliprotein antenna complex PE545 isolated from the unicellular photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS24. The excitonic couplings between the eight bilins are calculated using the CIS/6-31G method. The site energies are extracted from a simultaneous fit of the absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and excitation anisotropy spectra together with the transient absorption kinetics using the modified Redfield approach. Quantitative fit of the data enables us to assign the eight exciton components of the spectra and build up the energy transfer picture including pathways and timescales of energy relaxation, thus allowing a visualization of excitation dynamics within the complex.

  18. A Modified Brain MR Image Segmentation and Bias Field Estimation Model Based on Local and Global Information

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wang; Luan, Kuan; Liang, Hong; Ma, Xingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Because of the poor radio frequency coil uniformity and gradient-driven eddy currents, there is much noise and intensity inhomogeneity (bias) in brain magnetic resonance (MR) image, and it severely affects the segmentation accuracy. Better segmentation results are difficult to achieve by traditional methods; therefore, in this paper, a modified brain MR image segmentation and bias field estimation model based on local and global information is proposed. We first construct local constraints including image neighborhood information in Gaussian kernel mapping space, and then the complete regularization is established by introducing nonlocal spatial information of MR image. The weighting between local and global information is automatically adjusted according to image local information. At the same time, bias field information is coupled with the model, and it makes the model reduce noise interference but also can effectively estimate the bias field information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has strong robustness to noise and bias field is well corrected. PMID:27660649

  19. Bianchi type-I and -III modified holographic Ricci Dark energy models in Saez-Ballester theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. U. M.; Divya Prasanthi, U. Y.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we study the spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III (B-III) and locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Binachi type-I (B-I) models filled with matter and dark energy in the framework of the Saez-Ballester (1986) scalar-tensor theory of gravitation. Here, we consider the modified holographic Ricci dark energy as the viable candidate to dark energy. To obtain a deterministic solution we consider the time-varying deceleration parameter, which leads to the average scale factor a(t)=[sinh(α t)]^{1/k}. This average scale factor describes a model which generates a smooth transition of the universe from the early decelerating phase to the recent accelerating phase. The physical and kinematical aspects of the models are discussed through figures and also found to be in good agreement with recent astrophysical observations under suitable conditions.

  20. Precision improving solutions based on ARMA model and modified self-adapted Kalman filter for MEMS gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Yu; Zong, Yan-Tao; Wang, Xi; Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Zhong-Xuan

    2010-11-01

    MEMS gyro is used in inertial measuring fields more and more widely, but random drift is considered as an important error restricting the precision of it. Establishing the proper models closed to actual state of movement and random drift, and designing a kind of effective filter are available to enhance the precision of the MEMS gyro. The dynamic model of angle movement is studied, the ARMA model describing random drift is established based on time series analysis method, and a modified self-adapted Kalman filter is designed for the signal processing. Finally, the random drift is distinguished and analyzed clearly by Allan variance. It is included that the above method can effectively eliminate the random drift and improve the precision of MEMS gyro.

  1. Modified ADM1 for modelling an UASB reactor laboratory plant treating starch wastewater and synthetic substrate load tests.

    PubMed

    Hinken, L; Huber, M; Weichgrebe, D; Rosenwinkel, K-H

    2014-11-01

    A laboratory plant consisting of two UASB reactors was used for the treatment of industrial wastewater from the wheat starch industry. Several load tests were carried out with starch wastewater and the synthetic substrates glucose, acetate, cellulose, butyrate and propionate to observe the impact of changing loads on gas yield and effluent quality. The measurement data sets were used for calibration and validation of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). For a precise simulation of the detected glucose degradation during load tests with starch wastewater and glucose, it was necessary to incorporate the complete lactic acid fermentation into the ADM1, which contains the formation and degradation of lactate and a non-competitive inhibition function. The modelling results of both reactors based on the modified ADM1 confirm an accurate calculation of the produced gas and the effluent concentrations. Especially, the modelled lactate effluent concentrations for the load cases are similar to the measurements and justified by literature.

  2. Tracking Control of a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator Using an Inverse Preisach Model with Modified Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys are a new class of smart materials with extraordinary strains up to 12% and frequencies in the range of 1 to 2 kHz. The MSM actuator is a potential device which can achieve high performance electromagnetic actuation by using the properties of MSM alloys. However, significant non-linear hysteresis behavior is a significant barrier to control the MSM actuator. In this paper, the Preisach model was used, by capturing experiments from different input signals and output responses, to model the hysteresis of MSM actuator, and the inverse Preisach model, as a feedforward control, provided compensational signals to the MSM actuator to linearize the hysteresis non-linearity. The control strategy for path tracking combined the hysteresis compensator and the modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) which served as a path controller. Based on the experimental results, it was verified that a tracking error in the order of micrometers was achieved. PMID:27571081

  3. Tracking Control of a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator Using an Inverse Preisach Model with Modified Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2016-08-25

    Magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys are a new class of smart materials with extraordinary strains up to 12% and frequencies in the range of 1 to 2 kHz. The MSM actuator is a potential device which can achieve high performance electromagnetic actuation by using the properties of MSM alloys. However, significant non-linear hysteresis behavior is a significant barrier to control the MSM actuator. In this paper, the Preisach model was used, by capturing experiments from different input signals and output responses, to model the hysteresis of MSM actuator, and the inverse Preisach model, as a feedforward control, provided compensational signals to the MSM actuator to linearize the hysteresis non-linearity. The control strategy for path tracking combined the hysteresis compensator and the modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) which served as a path controller. Based on the experimental results, it was verified that a tracking error in the order of micrometers was achieved.

  4. Comparing the Penman-Monteith equation and a modified Jarvis-Stewart model with an artificial neural network to estimate stand-scale transpiration and canopy conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Rhys; Medlyn, Belinda; Zeppel, Melanie; Macinnis-Ng, Catriona; Eamus, Derek

    2009-06-01

    SUMMARYThe responses of canopy conductance to variation in solar radiation, vapour pressure deficit and soil moisture have been extensively modelled using a Jarvis-Stewart (JS) model. Modelled canopy conductance has then often been used to predict transpiration using the Penman-Monteith (PM) model. We previously suggested an alternative approach in which the JS model is modified to directly estimate transpiration rather than canopy conductance. In the present study we used this alternative approach to model tree water fluxes from an Australian native forest over an annual cycle. For comparative purposes we also modelled canopy conductance and estimated transpiration via the PM model. Finally we applied an artificial neural network as a statistical benchmark to compare the performance of both models. Both the PM and modified JS models were parameterised using solar radiation, vapour pressure deficit and soil moisture as inputs with results that compare well with previous studies. Both models performed comparably well during the summer period. However, during winter the PM model was found to fail during periods of high rates of transpiration. In contrast, the modified JS model was able to replicate observed sapflow measurements throughout the year although it too tended to underestimate rates of transpiration in winter under conditions of high rates of transpiration. Both approaches to modelling transpiration gave good agreement with hourly, daily and total sums of sapflow measurements with the modified JS and PM models explaining 87% and 86% of the variance, respectively. We conclude that these three approaches have merit at different time-scales.

  5. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Sheet Metal Forming at Elevated Temperatures and Its Application for Cooled Stress-Strain Curve and Spring-Back Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Duc-Toan, Nguyen; Tien-Long, Banh; Young-Suk, Kim; Dong-Won, Jung

    2011-08-22

    In this study, a modified Johnson-Cook (J-C) model and an innovated method to determine (J-C) material parameters are proposed to predict more correctly stress-strain curve for tensile tests in elevated temperatures. A MATLAB tool is used to determine material parameters by fitting a curve to follow Ludwick's hardening law at various elevated temperatures. Those hardening law parameters are then utilized to determine modified (J-C) model material parameters. The modified (J-C) model shows the better prediction compared to the conventional one. As the first verification, an FEM tensile test simulation based on the isotropic hardening model for boron sheet steel at elevated temperatures was carried out via a user-material subroutine, using an explicit finite element code, and compared with the measurements. The temperature decrease of all elements due to the air cooling process was then calculated when considering the modified (J-C) model and coded to VUMAT subroutine for tensile test simulation of cooling process. The modified (J-C) model showed the good agreement between the simulation results and the corresponding experiments. The second investigation was applied for V-bending spring-back prediction of magnesium alloy sheets at elevated temperatures. Here, the combination of proposed J-C model with modified hardening law considering the unusual plastic behaviour for magnesium alloy sheet was adopted for FEM simulation of V-bending spring-back prediction and shown the good comparability with corresponding experiments.

  6. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Sheet Metal Forming at Elevated Temperatures and Its Application for Cooled Stress-Strain Curve and Spring-Back Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc-Toan, Nguyen; Tien-Long, Banh; Young-Suk, Kim; Dong-Won, Jung

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a modified Johnson-Cook (J-C) model and an innovated method to determine (J-C) material parameters are proposed to predict more correctly stress-strain curve for tensile tests in elevated temperatures. A MATLAB tool is used to determine material parameters by fitting a curve to follow Ludwick's hardening law at various elevated temperatures. Those hardening law parameters are then utilized to determine modified (J-C) model material parameters. The modified (J-C) model shows the better prediction compared to the conventional one. As the first verification, an FEM tensile test simulation based on the isotropic hardening model for boron sheet steel at elevated temperatures was carried out via a user-material subroutine, using an explicit finite element code, and compared with the measurements. The temperature decrease of all elements due to the air cooling process was then calculated when considering the modified (J-C) model and coded to VUMAT subroutine for tensile test simulation of cooling process. The modified (J-C) model showed the good agreement between the simulation results and the corresponding experiments. The second investigation was applied for V-bending spring-back prediction of magnesium alloy sheets at elevated temperatures. Here, the combination of proposed J-C model with modified hardening law considering the unusual plastic behaviour for magnesium alloy sheet was adopted for FEM simulation of V-bending spring-back prediction and shown the good comparability with corresponding experiments.

  7. Modified Likelihood-Based Item Fit Statistics for the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Orlando and Thissen (2000) developed an item fit statistic for binary item response theory (IRT) models known as S-X[superscript 2]. This article generalizes their statistic to polytomous unfolding models. Four alternative formulations of S-X[superscript 2] are developed for the generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM). The GGUM is a…

  8. Quantification of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and soluble microbial product (SMP) production by a modified AOB-NOB-N2O-SMP model.

    PubMed

    Kim, MinJeong; Wu, Guangxue; Yoo, ChangKyoo

    2017-03-01

    A modified AOB-NOB-N2O-SMP model able to quantify nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and soluble microbial product (SMP) production during wastewater treatment is proposed. The modified AOB-NOB-N2O-SMP model takes into account: (1) two-step nitrification by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), (2) N2O production by AOB denitrification under oxygen-limited conditions and (3) SMP production by microbial growth and endogenous respiration. Validity of the modified model is demonstrated by comparing the simulation results with experimental data from lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). To reliably implement the modified model, a model calibration that adjusts model parameters to fit the model outputs to the experimental data is conducted. The results of this study showed that the modeling accuracy of the modified AOB-NOB-N2O-SMP model increases by 19.7% (NH4), 51.0% (NO2), 57.8% (N2O) and 16.7% (SMP) compared to the conventional model which does not consider the two-step nitrification and SMP production by microbial endogenous respiration.

  9. Computational modeling of latent-heat-storage in PCM modified interior plaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Maděra, Jiří; Trník, Anton; Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    The latent heat storage systems represent a promising way for decrease of buildings energy consumption with respect to the sustainable development principles of building industry. The presented paper is focused on the evaluation of the effect of PCM incorporation on thermal performance of cement-lime plasters. For basic characterization of the developed materials, matrix density, bulk density, and total open porosity are measured. Thermal conductivity is accessed by transient impulse method. DSC analysis is used for the identification of phase change temperature during the heating and cooling process. Using DSC data, the temperature dependent specific heat capacity is calculated. On the basis of the experiments performed, the supposed improvement of the energy efficiency of characteristic building envelope system where the designed plasters are likely to be used is evaluated by a computational analysis. Obtained experimental and computational results show a potential of PCM modified plasters for improvement of thermal stability of buildings and moderation of interior climate.

  10. The modified Yule-Walker method for α-stable time series models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruczek, Piotr; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Teuerle, Marek; Gajda, Janusz

    2017-03-01

    This paper discusses the problem of parameters estimation for stable periodic autoregressive (PAR) time series. Considered models generalize popular and widely accepted autoregressive (AR) time series. By examining measures of dependence for α-stable processes, first we introduce new empirical estimator of autocovariation for α-stable sequences. Based on this approach we generalize Yule-Walker method for estimation of parameter for PAR time series. Thus we fill a gap in estimation methods for non-Gaussian models. We test proposed procedure and show its consistency. Moreover, we use our approach to model real empirical data thus showing usefulness of heavy tailed models in statistical modelling.

  11. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron; Isern, Nancy G.; Robillard Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO, although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we closely examined the role of prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation in modifying metabolic parameters during the unique conditions of ventricular unloading provided by ECMO. Twelve male mixed breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30-49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (Group C) or pyruvate (Group P) during ECMO for 8 hours. Over the final hour piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, and [13C6]-L-leucine, as an indicator for oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of all measured CAC intermediates. Group P showed greater anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation although pyruvate oxidation relative to citrate synthase flux was similar to Group C. The groups demonstrated similar leucine fractional contributions to acetyl-CoA and fractional protein synthesis rates. Pyruvate also promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient sensitive enzymes, such as AMPK and ACC, and promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In conclusion, prolonged pyruvate supplementation during ECMO modified anaplerotic pyruvate flux and elicited changes in important nutrient and energy sensitive pathways, while preserving protein synthesis. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of nutritional supplementation and its downstream effects on cardiac adaptation during ventricular unloading.

  12. A statistical simulation model for field testing of non-target organisms in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants

    PubMed Central

    Goedhart, Paul W; van der Voet, Hilko; Baldacchino, Ferdinando; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Genetic modification of plants may result in unintended effects causing potentially adverse effects on the environment. A comparative safety assessment is therefore required by authorities, such as the European Food Safety Authority, in which the genetically modified plant is compared with its conventional counterpart. Part of the environmental risk assessment is a comparative field experiment in which the effect on non-target organisms is compared. Statistical analysis of such trials come in two flavors: difference testing and equivalence testing. It is important to know the statistical properties of these, for example, the power to detect environmental change of a given magnitude, before the start of an experiment. Such prospective power analysis can best be studied by means of a statistical simulation model. This paper describes a general framework for simulating data typically encountered in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants. The simulation model, available as Supplementary Material, can be used to generate count data having different statistical distributions possibly with excess-zeros. In addition the model employs completely randomized or randomized block experiments, can be used to simulate single or multiple trials across environments, enables genotype by environment interaction by adding random variety effects, and finally includes repeated measures in time following a constant, linear or quadratic pattern in time possibly with some form of autocorrelation. The model also allows to add a set of reference varieties to the GM plants and its comparator to assess the natural variation which can then be used to set limits of concern for equivalence testing. The different count distributions are described in some detail and some examples of how to use the simulation model to study various aspects, including a prospective power analysis, are provided. PMID:24834325

  13. Comparing Band Ratio, Semi-Empirical, and Modified Gaussian Models in Predicting Cyanobacterial Pigments in Eutrophic Inland Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. L.; Lin, L.; Tedesco, L.; Wilson, J.; Soyeux, E.

    2008-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are known to produce toxins harmful to humans and compounds that alter the taste/odor of water. Monitoring cyanobacteria is of interest to surface water managers because eutrophication of these surface water bodies are common thus increasing the chances of cyanobacterial blooms. Traditionally cyanobacteria are remotely sensed using the spectral properties of the two pigments: chlorophyll a (Chl-a), indicative of all algal and cyanobacteria species, and phycocyanin (PC), specific to cyanobacteria in most freshwater systems. Initial algorithms identifying cyanobacterial pigments used ratios of reflectance at specific wavelengths. In an effort to increase transferability between different systems researchers have included optical properties of water and water constituents to build semi-empirical models. Recently researchers have applied a curve-fitting, modified Gaussian model (MGM), to predict these cyanobacterial pigments. To determine the best performing algorithm this study compares the performance of 4 band ratio, 4 semi-empirical, and 2 modified Gaussian models in predicting PC and Chl-a on three central Indiana reservoirs (Eagle Creek, Geist, Morse). For each of these reservoirs, spectral data were collected with three different sensors (boat-based: ASD Fieldspec, Ocean Optics USB4000; Ariel: AISA Eagle) over a three year period (2005-2007), and water samples concomitant with these spectra were analyzed for concentration of the two pigments and other water constituents. Comparison shows that a model using the MGM strength at 620 nm from a 2005 Morse Reservoir ASD Fieldspec data set shows that the MGM has the best transferability to a 2006 Morse Reservoir ASD Fieldspec data set in predicting phycocyanin (R2 = 0.77; RMSE= 52.45 ppb), and a band ratio model published by Mittenzwey et al. 1991 has the best transferability in predicting chlorophyll a (R2 = 0.74; RMSE 16.31=ppb).

  14. A statistical simulation model for field testing of non-target organisms in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Goedhart, Paul W; van der Voet, Hilko; Baldacchino, Ferdinando; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2014-04-01

    Genetic modification of plants may result in unintended effects causing potentially adverse effects on the environment. A comparative safety assessment is therefore required by authorities, such as the European Food Safety Authority, in which the genetically modified plant is compared with its conventional counterpart. Part of the environmental risk assessment is a comparative field experiment in which the effect on non-target organisms is compared. Statistical analysis of such trials come in two flavors: difference testing and equivalence testing. It is important to know the statistical properties of these, for example, the power to detect environmental change of a given magnitude, before the start of an experiment. Such prospective power analysis can best be studied by means of a statistical simulation model. This paper describes a general framework for simulating data typically encountered in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants. The simulation model, available as Supplementary Material, can be used to generate count data having different statistical distributions possibly with excess-zeros. In addition the model employs completely randomized or randomized block experiments, can be used to simulate single or multiple trials across environments, enables genotype by environment interaction by adding random variety effects, and finally includes repeated measures in time following a constant, linear or quadratic pattern in time possibly with some form of autocorrelation. The model also allows to add a set of reference varieties to the GM plants and its comparator to assess the natural variation which can then be used to set limits of concern for equivalence testing. The different count distributions are described in some detail and some examples of how to use the simulation model to study various aspects, including a prospective power analysis, are provided.

  15. Employing a Modified Diffuser Momentum Model to Simulate Ventilation of the Orion CEV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, John; Lewis, John F.

    2011-01-01

    The Ansys CFX CFD modeling tool was used to support the design efforts of the ventilation system for the Orion CEV. CFD modeling was used to establish the flow field within the cabin for several supply configurations. A mesh and turbulence model sensitivity study was performed before the design studies. Results were post-processed for comparison with performance requirements. Most configurations employed straight vaned diffusers to direct and throw the flow. To manage the size of the models, the diffuser vanes were not resolved. Instead, a momentum model was employed to account for the effect of the diffusers. The momentum model was tested against a separate, vane-resolved side study. Results are presented for a single diffuser configuration for a low supply flow case.

  16. Modifying high-order aeroelastic math model of a jet transport using maximum likelihood estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anissipour, Amir A.; Benson, Russell A.

    1989-01-01

    The design of control laws to damp flexible structural modes requires accurate math models. Unlike the design of control laws for rigid body motion (e.g., where robust control is used to compensate for modeling inaccuracies), structural mode damping usually employs narrow band notch filters. In order to obtain the required accuracy in the math model, maximum likelihood estimation technique is employed to improve the accuracy of the math model using flight data. Presented here are all phases of this methodology: (1) pre-flight analysis (i.e., optimal input signal design for flight test, sensor location determination, model reduction technique, etc.), (2) data collection and preprocessing, and (3) post-flight analysis (i.e., estimation technique and model verification). In addition, a discussion is presented of the software tools used and the need for future study in this field.

  17. The mathematical model of dye diffusion and adsorption on modified cellulose with triazine derivatives containing cationic and anionic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, K.; Hou, A.; Chen, Y.

    2008-02-01

    Cellulose fabric is chemically modified with the compounds containing cationic and anionic groups. The molecular chains of modified cellulose have both cationic and anionic groups. Dye diffusion properties on modified cellulose are discussed. The dye adsorption and diffusion on modified cellulose are higher than those on unmodified cellulose. The diffusion properties of dyes at different temperature are discussed. Compared with unmodified cellulose, the diffusion processing of dyes in the modified cotton cellulose shows significant change.

  18. The Model-Size Effect on Traditional and Modified Tests of Covariance Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Walter; Boomsma, Anne; Reinecke, Sven

    2007-01-01

    According to Kenny and McCoach (2003), chi-square tests of structural equation models produce inflated Type I error rates when the degrees of freedom increase. So far, the amount of this bias in large models has not been quantified. In a Monte Carlo study of confirmatory factor models with a range of 48 to 960 degrees of freedom it was found that…

  19. KdV-Burgers equation in the modified continuum model considering anticipation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaqing; Zheng, Pengjun; Zhu, Keqiang; Ge, Hongxia

    2015-11-01

    The new continuum model mentioned in this paper is developed based on optimal velocity car-following model, which takes the drivers' anticipation effect into account. The critical condition for traffic flow is derived, and nonlinear analysis shows density waves occur in traffic flow because of the small disturbance. Near the neutral stability line, the KdV-Burgers equation is derived and one of the solutions is given. Numerical simulation is carried out to show the local cluster described by the model.

  20. Genetically modified animal models recapitulating molecular events altered in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Aránzazu; Fabregat, Isabel

    2009-04-01

    New advancements have been made in recent years in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern human liver tumorigenesis. Experimental animal models have been widely used, especially mouse models. In this review we highlight some of the genetically engineered mouse models that have proved to be excellent tools to study the intracellular signalling pathways altered in hepatocarcinogenesis and establish potential correlations with data from humans, with special focus on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of primary liver cancer. Information obtained from these animal models will help to design future therapeutic approaches to HCC, particularly those that explore drugs that specifically target the altered molecular pathways.

  1. Kinetic models for batch ethanol production from sweet sorghum juice under normal and high gravity fermentations: Logistic and modified Gompertz models.

    PubMed

    Phukoetphim, Niphaphat; Salakkam, Apilak; Laopaiboon, Pattana; Laopaiboon, Lakkana

    2017-02-10

    The aim of this study was to model batch ethanol production from sweet sorghum juice (SSJ), under normal gravity (NG, 160g/L of total sugar) and high gravity (HG, 240g/L of total sugar) conditions with and without nutrient supplementation (9g/L of yeast extract), by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NP 01. Growth and ethanol production increased with increasing initial sugar concentration, and the addition of yeast extract enhanced both cell growth and ethanol production. From the results, either logistic or a modified Gompertz equation could be used to describe yeast growth, depending on information required. Furthermore, the modified Gompertz model was suitable for modeling ethanol production. Both the models fitted the data very well with coefficients of determination exceeding 0.98. The results clearly showed that these models can be employed in the development of ethanol production processes using SSJ under both NG and HG conditions. The models were also shown to be applicable to other ethanol fermentation systems employing pure and mixed sugars as carbon sources.

  2. Theoretical study of different features of the fission process of excited nuclei in the framework of the modified statistical model and four-dimensional dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamizadeh, H.

    2017-02-01

    Evaporation residue cross section, fission probability, anisotropy of fission fragment angular distribution, mass and energy distributions of fission fragments and the pre-scission neutron multiplicity for the excited compound nuclei {}168{{Y}}{{b}}, {}172{{Y}}{{b}}, {}178{{W}} and {}227{{P}}{{a}} produced in fusion reactions have been calculated in the framework of the modified statistical model and multidimensional dynamical model. In the dynamical calculations, the dynamics of fission of excited nuclei has been studied by solving three- and four-dimensional Langevin equations with dissipation generated through the chaos-weighted wall and window friction formula. Three collective shape coordinates plus the projection of total spin of the compound nucleus to the symmetry axis, K, were considered in the four-dimensional dynamical model. A non-constant dissipation coefficient of K, {γ }k, was applied in the four-dimensional dynamical calculations. A comparison of the results of the three- and four-dimensional dynamical models with the experimental data showed that the results of the four-dimensional dynamical model for the evaporation residue cross section, fission probability, anisotropy of fission fragment angular distribution, mass and energy distributions of fission fragments and the pre-scission neutron multiplicity are in better agreement with the experimental data. It was also shown that the modified statistical model can reproduce the above-mentioned experimental data by choosing appropriate values of the temperature coefficient of the effective potential, λ , and the scaling factor of the fission-barrier height, {r}s.

  3. A modified intramedullary nail interlocking design yields improved stability for fatigue cycling in a canine femur fracture model.

    PubMed

    Garlock, Adam N; Donovan, Jim; LeCronier, David J; Houghtaling, John; Burton, Stephen; Atkinson, Patrick J

    2012-06-01

    Intramedullary nailing has evolved to become the standard of care for most diaphyseal femoral and tibial fractures, as well as an expanding number of metaphyseal fractures. Owing to the unstable nature of some fractures, the intramedullary device may be subjected to significant stresses owing to a lack of solid cortical contact after nailing. In such cases, excessive interfragmentary motion (due to construct toggle) has been shown to occur. Such motion increases the likelihood of a non- or delayed-union. In the current study, two versions of a modified, angle stable interlocking design were subjected to fatigue testing in a segmental defect fracture model representing a canine femur. As a control, a third group of constructs were stabilized with a traditional nail that allowed a small amount of toggle. All constructs were subjected to 50,000 fatigue cycles representing 12 weeks of cage activity at physiologic levels of combined axial-torsional loading. Torsional testing pre- and post-fatigue revealed 4.6 +/- 1.3 degrees of toggle in the traditional nail and no toggle with the angle stable nail designs. The stable nails were also significantly stiffer in axial compression and torsion before and after cycling. These data indicate that the enhanced stability of the modified interlocking designs can be maintained throughout fatigue cycling in a challenging fracture model.

  4. Modified natural clinoptilolite detoxifies small mammal's organism loaded with lead I. Lead disposition and kinetic model for lead bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Beltcheva, Michaela; Metcheva, Roumiana; Popov, Nikolay; Teodorova, Svetla E; Heredia-Rojas, J Antonio; Rodríguez-de la Fuente, Abraham O; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Topashka-Ancheva, Margarita

    2012-06-01

    Zeolites, especially clinoptilolites, have wide application in removing heavy metals from different solutions and wastewater. The detoxification capacity of the clinoptilolite sorbent KLS-10-MA, a modified natural Bulgarian zeolite, applied as a food supplement in conditions of an ecotoxicological experiment with conventional food and lead was demonstrated for the first time. Laboratory mice, inbred imprinting control region strain, were used in a 90-day ecotoxicological experiment. Animals were divided into four experimental groups. Lead bioaccumulations in exposed and non-supplemented/supplemented with KLS-10-MA animals were compared. As additional control, healthy animals non-exposed to Pb were fed with conventional forage mixed with 12.5% KLS-10-MA. The dietary inclusion of the sorbent reduced Pb concentrations in exposed and supplemented mice by 84%, 89%, 91%, 77%, and 88% in carcass, liver, kidneys, bones, and feces, respectively. A mathematical model was proposed to outline the common trends of bone Pb bioaccumulation in exposed and non-supplemented/supplemented animals. Characteristic parameters of the kinetics of Pb concentrations were determined. Based on the model, the coefficient of absorption of Pb by gastrointestinal mucosa in the supplemented mice was found-η = 3.53% (versus η = 15% in non-supplemented ones). The present study clearly indicates that there is a realistic perspective to create a new drug based on modified natural clinoptilolites in cases of chronic heavy metal intoxication, without negatively affecting the environment.

  5. Analysis of the effect of older drivers’ driving behaviors on traffic flow based on a modified CA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Mei-Ying; Shi, Jing; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    As the global population ages, there are more and more older drivers on the road. The decline in driving performance of older drivers may influence the properties of traffic flow and safety. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of older drivers’ driving behaviors on traffic flow. A modified cellular automaton (CA) model which takes driving behaviors of older drivers into account is proposed. The simulation results indicate that older drivers’ driving behaviors induce a reduction in traffic flow especially when the density is higher than 15 vehicles per km per lane and an increase in Lane-changing frequency. The analysis of stability shows that a number of disturbances could frequently emerge, be propagated and eventually dissipate in this modified model. The results also reflect that with the increase of older drivers on the road, the probability of the occurrence of rear-end collisions increases greatly and obviously. Furthermore, the value of acceleration influences the traffic flow and safety significantly. These results provide the theoretical basis and reference for the traffic management departments to develop traffic management measure in the aging society.

  6. Modeling sorption and diffusion of organic sorbate in hexadecyltrimethylammonium-modified clay nanopores - a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Burns, Susan E

    2013-03-19

    Organoclays are highly sorptive engineered materials that can be used as amendments in barrier systems or geosynthetic liners. The performance of confining and isolating the nonpolar organic contaminants by those barrier/lining systems is essentially controlled by the process of organic contaminant mass transport in nanopores of organoclays. In this article, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the sorption and diffusion of organic sorbates in interlayers of sodium montmorillonite and hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA(+))-modified montmorillonite clays. Simulated system consisted of the clay framework, interlayer organic cation, water, and organic sorbate. Their interactions were addressed by the combined force field of ClayFF, constant-valence force field, and SPC water model. Simulation results indicated that in HDTMA coated clay nanopores, diffusion of nonpolar species benzene was slowed because they were subjected to influence of both the pore wall and the HDTMA surfactant. This suggested the nonpolar organic compound diffusion in organophilic clays can be affected by molecular size of diffusive species, clay pore size, and organic surfactant loading. Additionally, a model that connected the diffusion rate of organic compounds in the bulk organoclay matrix with macropores and nanopores was established. The impact of intercalated organic cations on the diffusion dominated mass transport of organic compounds yielded insight into the prediction of the apparent diffusion behavior of organic compounds in organic-modified clays.

  7. Simulation of Maneuvering Characteristics of a Destroyer Study Ship Using a Modified Nonlinear Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    propulsion machinery dynamics and the ship equations of motion. The model couples the ship propulsion dynamics equations with nonlinear maneuvering...This report describes an analog computer maneuvering simulation of a destroyer study ship. The mathematical model which is used includes the ship

  8. A modified double distribution lattice Boltzmann model for axisymmetric thermal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuo; Liu, Yan; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Jiazhong

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a double distribution lattice Boltzmann model for axisymmetric thermal flow is proposed. In the model, the flow field is solved by a multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme while the temperature field by a newly proposed lattice-kinetic-based Boltzmann scheme. Chapman-Enskog analysis demonstrates that the axisymmetric energy equation in the cylindrical coordinate system can be recovered by the present lattice-kinetic-based Boltzmann scheme for temperature field. Numerical tests, including the thermal Hagen-Poiseuille flow and natural convection in a vertical annulus, have been carried out, and the results predicted by the present model agree well with the existing numerical data. Furthermore, the present model shows better numerical stability than the existing model.

  9. A Modified Active Appearance Model Based on an Adaptive Artificial Bee Colony

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Zulaiha Ali

    2014-01-01

    Active appearance model (AAM) is one of the most popular model-based approaches that have been extensively used to extract features by highly accurate modeling of human faces under various physical and environmental circumstances. However, in such active appearance model, fitting the model with original image is a challenging task. State of the art shows that optimization method is applicable to resolve this problem. However, another common problem is applying optimization. Hence, in this paper we propose an AAM based face recognition technique, which is capable of resolving the fitting problem of AAM by introducing a new adaptive ABC algorithm. The adaptation increases the efficiency of fitting as against the conventional ABC algorithm. We have used three datasets: CASIA dataset, property 2.5D face dataset, and UBIRIS v1 images dataset in our experiments. The results have revealed that the proposed face recognition technique has performed effectively, in terms of accuracy of face recognition. PMID:25165748

  10. Biosorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic modelling of naphthalene removal from aqueous solution onto modified spent tea leaves.

    PubMed

    Agarry, S E; Ogunleye, O O; Aworanti, O A

    2013-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using modified spent tea leaves to remove naphthalene from its aqueous solution under batch mode. The effects on the removal process of physical factors, such as initial naphthalene concentration, contact time, biosorbent dosage, pH and temperature, have been evaluated. The equilibrium biosorption data were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherm models. These models provided a good fit to the experimental data, but the Langmuir isotherm model provided the best correlation (R2 = 0.993) to the experimental data. The biosorption kinetic data of naphthalene were analyzed by pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion and surface mass transfer kinetic models. These four kinetic models fitted the biosorption kinetic data well, but the pseudo-first-order kinetic model gave the best fit. The activation energy (E(a)) was found to be 15.89 kJ per mole and the thermodynamic properties of the biosorption process, such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and the entropic change of biosorption, were also evaluated. It was established that the biosorption process was spontaneous, feasible and endothermic in nature.

  11. Modifying Cadzow's algorithm to generate the optimal TLS-solution for the structured EIV-Model of a similarity transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffrin, B.; Neitzel, F.; Uzun, S.; Mahboub, V.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, Felus and Schaffrin discussed the problem of a Structured Errors-in-Variables (EIV) Model in the context of a parameter adjustment for a classical similarity transformation. Their proposal, however, to perform a Total Least-Squares (TLS) adjustment, followed by a Cadzow step to imprint the proper structure, would not always guarantee the identity of this solution with the optimal Structured TLS solution, particularly in view of the residuals. Here, an attempt will be made to modify the Cadzow step in order to generate the optimal solution with the desired structure as it would, for instance, also result from a traditional LS-adjustment within an iteratively linearized Gauss-Helmert Model (GHM). Incidentally, this solution coincides with the (properly) Weighted TLS solution which does not need a Cadzow step.

  12. Gene knockdown by morpholino-modified oligonucleotides in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model: applications for developmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Timme-Laragy, Alicia R; Karchner, Sibel I; Hahn, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has long been used as a model for developmental biology, making it an excellent model to use also in developmental toxicology. The many advantages of zebrafish include their small size, prolific spawning, rapid development, and transparent embryos. They can be easily manipulated genetically through the use of transgenic technology and gene knockdown via morpholino-modified antisense oligonucleotides (MOs). Knocking down specific genes to assess their role in the response to toxicant exposure provides a way to further our knowledge of how developmental toxicants work on a molecular and mechanistic level while establishing a relationship between these molecular events and morphological, behavioral, and/or physiological effects (i.e., phenotypic anchoring). In this chapter, we address important considerations for using MOs to study developmental toxicology in zebrafish embryos and provide a protocol for their use.

  13. The modified nodal analysis method applied to the modeling of the thermal circuit of an asynchronous machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, O.; Salisteanu, C. I.; Popa, F.; Salisteanu, B.; Oprescu, C. V.; Dogaru, V.

    2017-01-01

    The complexity of electrical circuits or of equivalent thermal circuits that were considered to be analyzed and solved requires taking into account the method that is used for their solving. Choosing the method of solving determines the amount of calculation necessary for applying one of the methods. The heating and ventilation systems of electrical machines that have to be modeled result in complex equivalent electrical circuits of large dimensions, which requires the use of the most efficient methods of solving them. The purpose of the thermal calculation of electrical machines is to establish the heating, the overruns of temperatures or over-temperatures in some parts of the machine compared to the temperature of the ambient, in a given operating mode of the machine. The paper presents the application of the modified nodal analysis method for the modeling of the thermal circuit of an asynchronous machine.

  14. A modified exponential behavioral economic demand model to better describe consumption data.

    PubMed

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Franck, Christopher T; Stein, Jeffrey S; Bickel, Warren K

    2015-12-01

    Behavioral economic demand analyses that quantify the relationship between the consumption of a commodity and its price have proven useful in studying the reinforcing efficacy of many commodities, including drugs of abuse. An exponential equation proposed by Hursh and Silberberg (2008) has proven useful in quantifying the dissociable components of demand intensity and demand elasticity, but is limited as an analysis technique by the inability to correctly analyze consumption values of zero. We examined an exponentiated version of this equation that retains all the beneficial features of the original Hursh and Silberberg equation, but can accommodate consumption values of zero and improves its fit to the data. In Experiment 1, we compared the modified equation with the unmodified equation under different treatments of zero values in cigarette consumption data collected online from 272 participants. We found that the unmodified equation produces different results depending on how zeros are treated, while the exponentiated version incorporates zeros into the analysis, accounts for more variance, and is better able to estimate actual unconstrained consumption as reported by participants. In Experiment 2, we simulated 1,000 datasets with demand parameters known a priori and compared the equation fits. Results indicated that the exponentiated equation was better able to replicate the true values from which the test data were simulated. We conclude that an exponentiated version of the Hursh and Silberberg equation provides better fits to the data, is able to fit all consumption values including zero, and more accurately produces true parameter values.

  15. Sampling and modeling for the quantification of adventitious genetically modified presence in maize.

    PubMed

    Allnutt, Theodore Richard; Dwyer, Mark; McMillan, Jillian; Henry, Christine; Langrell, Stephen

    2008-05-14

    The coexistence of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM crops is an important economic and political issue in the European Union. We examined the GM content in non-GM maize crops in Spain in 2005. Both the standing crop and the harvest were tested, and the %GM DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. We compared the level of GM as a function of distance from known GM source fields in a 1.2 km2 landscape. The distribution of GM was compared to predictions from previous studies, and good agreement was found. Control and monitoring of adventitious GM presence in non-GM crops can only be achieved by fit-for-purpose sampling and testing schemes. We used a GM dispersal function to simulate non-GM crops in the studied zone and tested the accuracy of five different sampling schemes. Random sampling was found to be the most accurate and least susceptible to bias by GM spatial structure or gradients. Simulations showed that to achieve greater than 95% confidence in a GM labeling decision of a harvest (when treated as a single marketed lot), 34 samples would be needed when the harvest was outside 50% of the GM threshold value. The number of samples required increased rapidly as the harvest approached the GM threshold, implying that accurate labeling when the harvest is within +/-17% of the threshold may not be possible with high confidence.

  16. Evaluation of β-cyclodextrin-modified gemini surfactant-based delivery systems in melanoma models

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Deborah; Mohammed-Saeid, Waleed; Getson, Heather; Roy, Caitlin; Poorghorban, Masoomeh; Chitanda, Jackson M; Verrall, Ronald; Badea, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    Novel drug delivery systems are developed to improve the biological behavior of poorly soluble drugs and to improve therapeutic outcomes. In melanoma therapy, the goal is efficient drug delivery and mitigation of drug resistance. Melphalan (Mel), a currently used therapeutic agent for melanoma, requires solvent system for solubilization, leading to poor chemical stability. Moreover, drug resistance often renders the drug inefficient in clinical setting. A novel β-cyclodextrin-modified gemini surfactant (CDgemini) delivery system was developed to incorporate Mel in order to improve its physicochemical and biological behavior. Melphalan nanoparticles (Mel-NP) showed optimal particle size in the 200–250 nm range for endocytosis and induced significantly higher cell death compared with Mel (50% of inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 36 µM for the complexes vs 82 µM for Mel). The CDgemini delivery system did not alter the pathway of the cellular death triggered by Mel and caused no intrinsic toxicity to the cells. The Mel-NP complexes induced significant cell death in melanoma cells that were rendered resistant to Mel. These findings demonstrate in principle the applicability of the CDgemini delivery system as safe and efficient alternative to the current melanoma therapy, especially in chemoresistant cases. PMID:28003746

  17. A modified minimal model analysis of insulin sensitivity and glucose-mediated glucose disposal in insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ward, G M; Weber, K M; Walters, I M; Aitken, P M; Lee, B; Best, J D; Boston, R C; Alford, F P

    1991-01-01

    Although glucose utilization is impaired in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), it is unclear whether this is due to reductions in insulin sensitivity (Si) and/or glucose-mediated glucose disposal (SG). The minimal model of Bergman et al can be applied to a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT) to simultaneously estimate Sl and SG, but cannot accommodate data from diabetics. Exogenous insulin approximating the normal pattern of insulin secretion was infused during FSIGTs in eight young non-obese C-peptide-negative IDDM subjects, but with the total dose modified to achieve sufficient glucose disappearance rates (KG) to allow analysis of data. The minimal model was modified to model the effects of the exogenous insulin on glucose kinetics to estimate SI and SG. Despite deliberately achieving supranormal plasma-free insulin levels during the FSIGT ("first-phase insulin" = 62 +/- 9 SE mU/L; "second phase insulin" = 34 +/- 9 mU/L), the diabetics showed low-normal KG values (1.3 +/- 0.29 min-1 X 10(2). Using the model, good parameter resolution (fractional SD [FSD] less than .5) was achieved (IDDM v controls: SI = 2.5 +/- 0.6 v 8.3 +/- 1.5 min-1.mU-1.L-1 X 10(4); SG = 1.6 +/- 0.5 v 2.6 +/- 0.2 min-1 X 10(2); P less than .05). This reduction in SG was confirmed in the same IDDM subjects by FSIGT during basal insulin infusion only (SG = 1.0 +/- 0.3 min-1 X 10(2)).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The Modified Debye-Grüneisen Model for Highly Compressed Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, Eugene

    2017-04-01

    A new modification of the Debye-Grüneisen model is proposed. It takes explicitly into account the anharmonicity of phonon modes, which leads to the nonlinear dependence of energy levels on quantum numbers. The low-temperature version of this model considering anharmonic displacement of only the lowest energy levels of both longitudinal and transverse phonons is developed. This model, calibrated on results of DFT ab initio calculations, reproduces all predicted low-temperature thermodynamic properties of diamond at pressures up to 1 TPa, including the region of its negative thermal expansion.

  19. One model of modified gravity with dynamical torsion and its cosmological consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforova, Vasilisa

    2016-10-01

    We consider a model belonging to the class of Poincarè gauge gravities. The model is free of ghosts, tachyons and gradient instabilities about Minkowski and torsionless Einstein backgrounds of sufficiently small curvature. At zero cosmological constant, the model admits a self-accelerating solution with non-Riemannian connection. We study scalar perturbations about the self-accelerating solution and find that the number of scalar modes is the same as in Minkow ski background; moreover, in the limit of small effective cosmological constant and below the UV cutoff of the low energy effective theory, the scalar sector does not have pathologies like ghosts or rapid gradient instabilities.

  20. Development and evaluation of bevacizumab-modified pegylated cationic liposomes using cellular and in vivo models of human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, Geoffrey M.

    Targeting the tumor vascular supply in a homogenous manner is a difficult task to achieve with the use of pegylated cationic liposomes (PCLs) alone. Our formulation consisting of bevacizumab conjugated to the distal end of PEG on PCLs was thus developed in an effort to eliminate some of this heterogeneity as well as to increase tumor targeting overall. This study focuses on pancreatic cancer, which has the poorest five-year survival rate of all cancers because of its late diagnosis. The addition of bevacizumab will target tumor areas because it binds to VEGF which is secreted by tumors in high levels. In vitro, we showed that pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, HPAF-II and PANC-1) all secrete VEGF into media at different levels, with Capan-1 producing the most and HPAF-II producing the least. A murine endothelial cell line, MS1-VEGF, produces and secretes the most VEGF. A human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) was grown in two different conditions, with and without VEGF in the media. Modifying PCLs with bevacizumab enhanced the binding and uptake of PCLs by some pancreatic and endothelial cells in vitro, particularly the cells that had or secreted the most significant amount of VEGF in the media. This translated into enhanced tumor targeting in a biodistribution study using a Capan-1 subcutaneous pancreatic tumor model. This also showed enhanced blood retention compared to the unmodified PCLs while it diminished uptake by the spleen and increased uptake by the kidney. To test the therapeutic benefit of this enhanced uptake and targeting, an anti-angiogenic agent, 2-methoxyestradiol was incorporated into the formulation with 20% incorporation efficiency. Both the unmodified and modified drug-loaded PCLs were the least efficacious against Capan-1, moderately effective against HPAF-II, PANC-1, MS1-VEGF and HMEC-1 grown without VEGF in the media and most efficacious against HMEC-1 grown with VEGF which had the most VEGF present in the media. Multiple in vivo

  1. A novel hybrid classification model of genetic algorithms, modified k-Nearest Neighbor and developed backpropagation neural network.

    PubMed

    Salari, Nader; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Najafi, Farid; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Karishnarajah, Isthrinayagy

    2014-01-01

    Among numerous artificial intelligence approaches, k-Nearest Neighbor algorithms, genetic algorithms, and artificial neural networks are considered as the most common and effective methods in classification problems in numerous studies. In the present study, the results of the implementation of a novel hybrid feature selection-classification model using the above mentioned methods are presented. The purpose is benefitting from the synergies obtained from combining these technologies for the development of classification models. Such a combination creates an opportunity to invest in the strength of each algorithm, and is an approach to make up for their deficiencies. To develop proposed model, with the aim of obtaining the best array of features, first, feature ranking techniques such as the Fisher's discriminant ratio and class separability criteria were used to prioritize features. Second, the obtained results that included arrays of the top-ranked features were used as the initial population of a genetic algorithm to produce optimum arrays of features. Third, using a modified k-Nearest Neighbor method as well as an improved method of backpropagation neural networks, the classification process was advanced based on optimum arrays of the features selected by genetic algorithms. The performance of the proposed model was compared with thirteen well-known classification models based on seven datasets. Furthermore, the statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test followed by post-hoc tests. The experimental findings indicated that the novel proposed hybrid model resulted in significantly better classification performance compared with all 13 classification methods. Finally, the performance results of the proposed model was benchmarked against the best ones reported as the state-of-the-art classifiers in terms of classification accuracy for the same data sets. The substantial findings of the comprehensive comparative study revealed that performance of the

  2. A Novel Hybrid Classification Model of Genetic Algorithms, Modified k-Nearest Neighbor and Developed Backpropagation Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Nader; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Najafi, Farid; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Karishnarajah, Isthrinayagy

    2014-01-01

    Among numerous artificial intelligence approaches, k-Nearest Neighbor algorithms, genetic algorithms, and artificial neural networks are considered as the most common and effective methods in classification problems in numerous studies. In the present study, the results of the implementation of a novel hybrid feature selection-classification model using the above mentioned methods are presented. The purpose is benefitting from the synergies obtained from combining these technologies for the development of classification models. Such a combination creates an opportunity to invest in the strength of each algorithm, and is an approach to make up for their deficiencies. To develop proposed model, with the aim of obtaining the best array of features, first, feature ranking techniques such as the Fisher's discriminant ratio and class separability criteria were used to prioritize features. Second, the obtained results that included arrays of the top-ranked features were used as the initial population of a genetic algorithm to produce optimum arrays of features. Third, using a modified k-Nearest Neighbor method as well as an improved method of backpropagation neural networks, the classification process was advanced based on optimum arrays of the features selected by genetic algorithms. The performance of the proposed model was compared with thirteen well-known classification models based on seven datasets. Furthermore, the statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test followed by post-hoc tests. The experimental findings indicated that the novel proposed hybrid model resulted in significantly better classification performance compared with all 13 classification methods. Finally, the performance results of the proposed model was benchmarked against the best ones reported as the state-of-the-art classifiers in terms of classification accuracy for the same data sets. The substantial findings of the comprehensive comparative study revealed that performance of the

  3. Activated Oncogenic Pathway Modifies Iron Network in Breast Epithelial Cells: A Dynamic Modeling Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lemler, Erica; Kochen, Michael A.; Akman, Steven A.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of iron metabolism in cancer is well documented and it has been suggested that there is interdependence between excess iron and increased cancer incidence and progression. In an effort to better understand the linkages between iron metabolism and breast cancer, a predictive mathematical model of an expanded iron homeostasis pathway was constructed that includes species involved in iron utilization, oxidative stress response and oncogenic pathways. The model leads to three predictions. The first is that overexpression of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) recapitulates many aspects of the alterations in free iron and iron-related proteins in cancer cells without affecting the oxidative stress response or the oncogenic pathways included in the model. This prediction was validated by experimentation. The second prediction is that iron-related proteins are dramatically affected by mitochondrial ferritin overexpression. This prediction was validated by results in the pertinent literature not used for model construction. The third prediction is that oncogenic Ras pathways contribute to altered iron homeostasis in cancer cells. This prediction was validated by a combination of simulation experiments of Ras overexpression and catalase knockout in conjunction with the literature. The model successfully captures key aspects of iron metabolism in breast cancer cells and provides a framework upon which more detailed models can be built. PMID:28166223

  4. Modified cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  5. Evaluation of a Modified Priestly-Taylor Model for Actual Evapotranspiration in sub- Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, M. T.; Michaelsen, J.; Funk, C.; Artan, G.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change and the intensification of the water cycle is an important field of study, as global warming is expected to lead to dramatic increases in the frequency and magnitude of storms, floods, and droughts worldwide. In sub-tropical Africa, it is expected that the increase in evaporation and subsequent decrease in surface runoff will increase water demand in an already climate sensitive region. Studies also show that modeled soil moisture, a surrogate for evapotranspiration (ET), can improve rainfall and streamflow forecasts in these areas. Our objective, here therefore, is to evaluate a new ET model (Fisher et al., 2008) at inter- seasonal catchment scales. The Fisher et al. (2008) model uses functional eco-physiological relationships to adjust the Priestly-Taylor formulation of potential ET. It has performed well against several flux towers at tropical, sub-tropical, and temperate latitudes (R2=0.90). Although the model was extrapolated using remote sensing and climate reanalysis data, the validation was performed using site specific monthly average net radiation (Rn), monthly surface vapor pressure, and maximum monthly surface temperature. Two additional inputs are required for the model that can be acquired from remote sensing: the monthly average normalized difference vegetation index and soil-adjusted vegetation index. The vegetation indices will be calculated from a new atmospherically corrected AVHRR dataset of global daily reflectance at 0.05° resolution (NASA Land Long Term Data Record). The climate variables will be extracted from the bias-corrected European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis dataset at 0.05° resolution. The model will be evaluated at a seasonal timestep from 1981-1999 using cumulative runoff and lagged precipitation for seven major catchments in sub-Saharan Africa. It is expected that the highest model performance will be in areas where Rn is the dominant control on ET and advection is relatively small

  6. FOG Random Drift Signal Denoising Based on the Improved AR Model and Modified Sage-Husa Adaptive Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Yiting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2016-07-12

    In order to reduce the influence of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) random drift error on inertial navigation systems, an improved auto regressive (AR) model is put forward in this paper. First, based on real-time observations at each restart of the gyroscope, the model of FOG random drift can be established online. In the improved AR model, the FOG measured signal is employed instead of the zero mean signals. Then, the modified Sage-Husa adaptive Kalman filter (SHAKF) is introduced, which can directly carry out real-time filtering on the FOG signals. Finally, static and dynamic experiments are done to verify the effectiveness. The filtering results are analyzed with Allan variance. The analysis results show that the improved AR model has high fitting accuracy and strong adaptability, and the minimum fitting accuracy of single noise is 93.2%. Based on the improved AR(3) model, the denoising method of SHAKF is more effective than traditional methods, and its effect is better than 30%. The random drift error of FOG is reduced effectively, and the precision of the FOG is improved.

  7. FOG Random Drift Signal Denoising Based on the Improved AR Model and Modified Sage-Husa Adaptive Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Yiting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the influence of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) random drift error on inertial navigation systems, an improved auto regressive (AR) model is put forward in this paper. First, based on real-time observations at each restart of the gyroscope, the model of FOG random drift can be established online. In the improved AR model, the FOG measured signal is employed instead of the zero mean signals. Then, the modified Sage-Husa adaptive Kalman filter (SHAKF) is introduced, which can directly carry out real-time filtering on the FOG signals. Finally, static and dynamic experiments are done to verify the effectiveness. The filtering results are analyzed with Allan variance. The analysis results show that the improved AR model has high fitting accuracy and strong adaptability, and the minimum fitting accuracy of single noise is 93.2%. Based on the improved AR(3) model, the denoising method of SHAKF is more effective than traditional methods, and its effect is better than 30%. The random drift error of FOG is reduced effectively, and the precision of the FOG is improved. PMID:27420062

  8. Estimation of Enthalpy of Formation of Liquid Transition Metal Alloys: A Modified Prescription Based on Macroscopic Atom Model of Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Subramanian; Saibaba, Saroja

    2016-09-01

    The enthalpy of formation Δo H f is an important thermodynamic quantity, which sheds significant light on fundamental cohesive and structural characteristics of an alloy. However, being a difficult one to determine accurately through experiments, simple estimation procedures are often desirable. In the present study, a modified prescription for estimating Δo H f L of liquid transition metal alloys is outlined, based on the Macroscopic Atom Model of cohesion. This prescription relies on self-consistent estimation of liquid-specific model parameters, namely electronegativity ( ϕ L) and bonding electron density ( n b L ). Such unique identification is made through the use of well-established relationships connecting surface tension, compressibility, and molar volume of a metallic liquid with bonding charge density. The electronegativity is obtained through a consistent linear scaling procedure. The preliminary set of values for ϕ L and n b L , together with other auxiliary model parameters, is subsequently optimized to obtain a good numerical agreement between calculated and experimental values of Δo H f L for sixty liquid transition metal alloys. It is found that, with few exceptions, the use of liquid-specific model parameters in Macroscopic Atom Model yields a physically consistent methodology for reliable estimation of mixing enthalpies of liquid alloys.

  9. Rhodopsins carrying modified chromophores--the 'making of', structural modelling and their light-induced reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ockenfels, Andreas; Schapiro, Igor; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    A series of vitamin-A aldehydes (retinals) with modified alkyl group substituents (9-demethyl-, 9-ethyl-, 9-isopropyl-, 10-methyl, 10-methyl-13-demethyl-, and 13-demethyl retinal) was synthesized and their 11-cis isomers were used as chromophores to reconstitute the visual pigment rhodopsin. Structural changes were selectively introduced around the photoisomerizing C11=C12 bond. The effect of these structural changes on rhodopsin formation and bleaching was determined. Global fit of assembly kinetics yielded lifetimes and spectral features of the assembly intermediates. Rhodopsin formation proceeds stepwise with prolonged lifetimes especially for 9-demethyl retinal (longest lifetime τ3 = 7500 s, cf., 3500 s for retinal), and for 10-methyl retinal (τ3 = 7850 s). These slowed-down processes are interpreted as either a loss of fixation (9dm) or an increased steric hindrance (10me) during the conformational adjustment within the protein. Combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations provided structural insight into the retinal analogues-assembled, full-length rhodopsins. Extinction coefficients, quantum yields and kinetics of the bleaching process (μs-to-ms time range) were determined. Global fit analysis yielded lifetimes and spectral features of bleaching intermediates, revealing remarkably altered kinetics: whereas the slowest process of wild-type rhodopsin and of bleached and 11-cis retinal assembled rhodopsin takes place with lifetimes of 7 and 3.8 s, respectively, this process for 10-methyl-13-demethyl retinal was nearly 10 h (34670 s), coming to completion only after ca. 50 h. The structural changes in retinal derivatives clearly identify the precise interactions between chromophore and protein during the light-induced changes that yield the outstanding efficiency of rhodopsin.

  10. Linking a modified EPIC-based growth model (UPGM) with a component-based watershed model (AGES-W)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural models and decision support systems (DSS) for assessing water use and management are increasingly being applied to diverse geographic regions at different scales. This requires models that can simulate different crops, however, very few plant growth models are available that “easily” ...

  11. A modified Green-Ampt model for water infiltration and preferential flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.

    2015-12-01

    Preferential flow is significant for its contribution to rapid response to hydrologic inputs at the soil surface and unsaturated zone flow, which is critical for flow generation in rainfall-runoff models. In combination with the diffuse and source-responsive flow equations, a new model for water infiltration that incorporates preferential flow is proposed in this paper. Its performance in estimating soil moisture at the catchment scale was tested with observed water content data from the Elder sub-basin of the South Fork Eel River, located in northern California, USA. The case study shows that the new model can improve the accuracy of soil water content simulation even at the catchment scale. The impacts of preferential flow on rainfall-runoff simulation were tested by the MISDc lumped hydrological model for the Elder River basin. 11 significant floods events, which were defined as having flood peak magnitudes greater than 10 times average discharge during the study period, were employed to assess runoff simulation improvement. The accuracy of the runoff simulation incorporating the preferential flow at the catchment scale improved significantly even though more model parameters were expected through the likelihood ratio test.

  12. Three-lane changing behaviour simulation using a modified optimal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei; Song, Wei-guo; Fang, Zhi-ming

    2011-06-01

    In real urban traffic, roadways are usually multilane and are divided into fast, medium and slow lanes according to different velocity restrictions. Microscopic modelling of single lane has been studied widely using discrete cellular automata and continuous optimal velocity models. In this paper, we extend the continuous single-lane models (OV model and FVD model) to simulate the lane-changing behaviour on an urban roadway that consists of three lanes. Considering headway difference, velocity difference, safety distance, and the probability of lane-changing intention, a comprehensive lane-changing rule set is constructed. We analyse the fundamental diagram and reveal the “faster-is-slower” effect in urban traffic induced by lane-changing behaviour. We also investigate the effect of lane-changing behaviour on the distribution of vehicles, velocity, flow and headway. Asymmetrical phenomenon with symmetrical rules on urban roadway and density inversion on the slow lane were also found. The simulation results indicate that lane-changing behaviour is not advisable on crowded urban roadway. It is hoped that information from this study may be useful for traffic control and individual moving strategy on urban roadway.

  13. NASA-Modified Precipitation Products to Improve EPA Nonpoint Source Water Quality Modeling for the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. Ninety percent of the impairments are typically caused by nonpoint sources. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires States to monitor the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted", for any watershed in the U.S.. In response to this mandate, the EPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a Decision Support Tool (DST) for assessing pollution and to guide the decision making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program -- Fortran (HSPF), computes daily stream flow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, stream flow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better stream flow statistics and, ultimately, in improved water quality assessment.

  14. MODELING THE NONLINEAR CLUSTERING IN MODIFIED GRAVITY MODELS. I. A FITTING FORMULA FOR THE MATTER POWER SPECTRUM OF f(R) GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Based on a suite of N-body simulations of the Hu-Sawicki model of f(R) gravity with different sets of model and cosmological parameters, we develop a new fitting formula with a numeric code, MGHalofit, to calculate the nonlinear matter power spectrum P(k) for the Hu-Sawicki model. We compare the MGHalofit predictions at various redshifts (z ≤ 1) to the f(R) simulations and find that the relative error of the MGHalofit fitting formula of P(k) is no larger than 6% at k ≤ 1 h Mpc{sup –1} and 12% at k in (1, 10] h Mpc{sup –1}, respectively. Based on a sensitivity study of an ongoing and a future spectroscopic survey, we estimate the detectability of a signal of modified gravity described by the Hu-Sawicki model using the power spectrum up to quasi-nonlinear scales.

  15. Development of a modified independent parallel reactions kinetic model and comparison with the distributed activation energy model for the pyrolysis of a wide variety of biomass fuels.

    PubMed

    Sfakiotakis, Stelios; Vamvuka, Despina

    2015-12-01

    The pyrolysis of six waste biomass samples was studied and the fuels were kinetically evaluated. A modified independent parallel reactions scheme (IPR) and a distributed activation energy model (DAEM) were developed and their validity was assessed and compared by checking their accuracy of fitting the experimental results, as well as their prediction capability in different experimental conditions. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a fitting procedure, based on least squares minimization, was performed simultaneously at different experimental conditions. A modification of the IPR model, considering dependence of the pre-exponential factor on heating rate, was proved to give better fit results for the same number of tuned kinetic parameters, comparing to the known IPR model and very good prediction results for stepwise experiments. Fit of calculated data to the experimental ones using the developed DAEM model was also proved to be very good.

  16. A new peak detection algorithm for MALDI mass spectrometry data based on a modified Asymmetric Pseudo-Voigt model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass Spectrometry (MS) is a ubiquitous analytical tool in biological research and is used to measure the mass-to-charge ratio of bio-molecules. Peak detection is the essential first step in MS data analysis. Precise estimation of peak parameters such as peak summit location and peak area are critical to identify underlying bio-molecules and to estimate their abundances accurately. We propose a new method to detect and quantify peaks in mass spectra. It uses dual-tree complex wavelet transformation along with Stein's unbiased risk estimator for spectra smoothing. Then, a new method, based on the modified Asymmetric Pseudo-Voigt (mAPV) model and hierarchical particle swarm optimization, is used for peak parameter estimation. Results Using simulated data, we demonstrated the benefit of using the mAPV model over Gaussian, Lorentz and Bi-Gaussian functions for MS peak modelling. The proposed mAPV model achieved the best fitting accuracy for asymmetric peaks, with lower percentage errors in peak summit location estimation, which were 0.17% to 4.46% less than that of the other models. It also outperformed the other models in peak area estimation, delivering lower percentage errors, which were about 0.7% less than its closest competitor - the Bi-Gaussian model. In addition, using data generated from a MALDI-TOF computer model, we showed that the proposed overall algorithm outperformed the existing methods mainly in terms of sensitivity. It achieved a sensitivity of 85%, compared to 77% and 71% of the two benchmark algorithms, continuous wavelet transformation based method and Cromwell respectively. Conclusions The proposed algorithm is particularly useful for peak detection and parameter estimation in MS data with overlapping peak distributions and asymmetric peaks. The algorithm is implemented using MATLAB and the source code is freely available at http://mapv.sourceforge.net. PMID:26680279

  17. Modeling resilience to schizophrenia in genetically modified mice: a novel approach to drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Mihali, Andra; Subramani, Shreya; Kaunitz, Genevieve; Rayport, Stephen; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna

    2012-01-01

    Complex psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, arise from a combination of genetic, developmental, environmental and social factors. These vulnerabilities can be mitigated by adaptive factors in each of these domains engendering resilience. Modeling resilience in mice using transgenic approaches offers a direct path to intervention, as resilience mutations point directly to therapeutic targets. As prototypes for this approach, we discuss the three mouse models of schizophrenia resilience, all based on modulating glutamatergic synaptic transmission. This motivates the broader development of schizophrenia resilience mouse models independent of specific pathophysiological hypotheses as a strategy for drug discovery. Three guiding validation criteria are presented. A resilience-oriented approach should identify pharmacologically tractable targets and in turn offer new insights into pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:22853787

  18. Modified Flamelet-Based Model for Non-Premixed High Speed Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Zhipeng; Ladeinde, Foluso; Li, Wenhai

    2016-11-01

    The influence of static pressure and the use of Troe's model on flamelet solutions in supersonic combustion are studied. With various values of the background static pressure, we have observed significant effects on the flamelet solutions in such quantities as the quenching stoichiometric scalar dissipation rate, reaction rate of species and progress variable, heat release rate, and the temperature profile. In addition, the Troe's model shows opposite effects for low and high pressure conditions. The baseline flamelet table has been constructed with respect to mixture fraction and its stoichiometric scalar dissipation rate, where the information on both the stable and unstable flamelet solutions have been included. We have also experimented with the addition of pressure as an independent variable in the table, toward modeling compressibility and/or pressure-sensitive properties and the variable quenching conditions in real dual-mode scramjet operations.

  19. Extension of the modified Poisson regression model to prospective studies with correlated binary data.

    PubMed

    Zou, G Y; Donner, Allan

    2013-12-01

    The Poisson regression model using a sandwich variance estimator has become a viable alternative to the logistic regression model for the analysis of prospective studies with independent binary outcomes. The primary advantage of this approach is that it readily provides covariate-adjusted risk ratios and associated standard errors. In this article, the model is extended to studies with correlated binary outcomes as arise in longitudinal or cluster randomization studies. The key step involves a cluster-level grouping strategy for the computation of the middle term in the sandwich estimator. For a single binary exposure variable without covariate adjustment, this approach results in risk ratio estimates and standard errors that are identical to those found in the survey sampling literature. Simulation results suggest that it is reliable for studies with correlated binary data, provided the total number of clusters is at least 50. Data from observational and cluster randomized studies are used to illustrate the methods.

  20. A modified two-state empirical valence bond model for proton transport in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mabuchi, Takuya; Fukushima, Akinori; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-07-07

    A detailed analysis of the proton solvation structure and transport properties in aqueous solutions is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations. A refined two-state empirical valence bond (aTS-EVB) method, which is based on the EVB model of Walbran and Kornyshev and the anharmonic water force field, is developed in order to describe efficiently excess proton transport via the Grotthuss mechanism. The new aTS-EVB model clearly satisfies the requirement for simpler and faster calculation, because of the simplicity of the two-state EVB algorithm, while providing a better description of diffusive dynamics of the excess proton and water in comparison with the previous two-state EVB models, which significantly improves agreement with the available experimental data. The results of activation energies for the excess proton and water calculated between 300 and 340 K (the temperature range used in this study) are also found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  1. A Modified Obesity Proneness Model Predicts Adolescent Weight Concerns and Inability to Self-Regulate Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickelson, Jen; Bryant, Carol A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Buhi, Eric R.; DeBate, Rita D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity among high school students has risen in recent decades. Many high school students report trying to lose weight and some engage in disordered eating to do so. The obesity proneness model suggests that parents may influence their offspring's development of disordered eating. This study examined the viability of…

  2. Experimental evidence for modifying the current physical model for ice accretion on aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.; Walker, E.

    1986-01-01

    Closeup movies, still photographs, and other experimental data suggest that the current physical model for ice accretion needs significant modification. At aircraft airspeeds there was no flow of liquid over the surface of the ice after a short initial flow, even at barely subfreezing temperatures. Instead, there were very large stationary drops on the ice surface that lose water from their bottoms by freezing and replenish their liquid by catching the microscopic cloud droplets. This observation disagrees with the existing physical model, which assumes there is a thin liquid film continuously flowing over the ice surface. With no such flow, the freezing-fraction concept of the model fails when a mass balance is performed on the surface water. Rime ice does, as the model predicts, form when the air temperature is low enough to cause the cloud droplets to freeze almost immediately on impact. However, the characteristic shapes of horn-glaze ice or rime ice are primarily caused by the ice shape affecting the airflow locally and consequently the droplet catch and the resulting ice shape. Ice roughness greatly increases the heat transfer coefficient, stops the movement of drops along the surface, and may also affect the airflow initially and thereby the droplet catch. At high subreezing temperatures the initial flow and shedding of surface drops have a large effect on the ice shape. At the incipient freezing limit, no ice forms.

  3. Fetal wound healing using a genetically modified murine model: the contribution of P-selectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During early gestation, fetal wounds heal with paucity of inflammation and absent scar formation. P-selectin is an adhesion molecule that is important for leukocyte recruitment to injury sites. We used a murine fetal wound healing model to study the specific contribution of P-selectin to scarless wo...

  4. A Systematic Homogeneous Archival Ultraviolet Spectral Analysis of Cataclysmic Variables using a Modified Standard Disk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godon, Patrick

    Many ultraviolet spectra of cataclysmic variables (CVs) with a white dwarf (WD) accreting at a high rate have been difficult, even impossible, to model with standard disk models. The standard disk models appear to be too blue in comparison to the observed spectra. We propose to carry out a systematic and consistent analysis of archival ultraviolet spectra of 90 CVs using a truncated inner disk model (based and backed by observational data and theoretical results). We use the synthetic stellar spectra codes TLUSTY and SYNSPEC to generate these synthetic spectra. Deriving mass accretion rates for CVs will advance the theories of evolution of CVs as well as shed light on the Physics of accretion disks. As a by product we will make our theoretical spectra publicly available online. This will be of invaluable importance to future NASA UV missions. The WD is the most common end-product of stellar evolution and the accretion disk is the most common universal structure resulting from mass transfer with angular momentum, and both can be observed in CVs in the UV. As a consequence, an understanding of accretion in CV systems is the first step toward a global understanding of accretion in other systems throughout the universe, ranging from Young Stellar Objects, galactic binaries to AGN. This ADP proposal address the NASA Strategic Goals and Science Outcomes 3D: Discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe, and search for Earth-like planets.

  5. An Architectural Overlay: Modifying an Architecture to Help Cognitive Models Understand and Explain Themselves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-24

    the metacognitive facilities Herbal can include in a model to create an intelligent opponent in dTank. dTank works, but it needs to be made even easier...the portfolio of mitigation projects that provides the overall greatest net benefit given resource constraints. Such planning is rarely performed in a

  6. Modeling of boldine alkaloid adsorption onto pure and propyl-sulfonic acid-modified mesoporous silicas. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Geszke-Moritz, Małgorzata; Moritz, Michał

    2016-12-01

    The present study deals with the adsorption of boldine onto pure and propyl-sulfonic acid-functionalized SBA-15, SBA-16 and mesocellular foam (MCF) materials. Siliceous adsorbents were characterized by nitrogen sorption analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Temkin isotherms. Moreover, the Dubinin-Radushkevich and Dubinin-Astakhov isotherm models based on the Polanyi adsorption potential were employed. The latter was calculated using two alternative formulas including solubility-normalized (S-model) and empirical C-model. In order to find the best-fit isotherm, both linear regression and nonlinear fitting analysis were carried out. The Dubinin-Astakhov (S-model) isotherm revealed the best fit to the experimental points for adsorption of boldine onto pure mesoporous materials using both linear and nonlinear fitting analysis. Meanwhile, the process of boldine sorption onto modified silicas was described the best by the Langmuir and Temkin isotherms using linear regression and nonlinear fitting analysis, respectively. The values of adsorption energy (below 8kJ/mol) indicate the physical nature of boldine adsorption onto unmodified silicas whereas the ionic interactions seem to be the main force of alkaloid adsorption onto functionalized sorbents (energy of adsorption above 8kJ/mol).

  7. APTES-modified mesoporous silicas as the carriers for poorly water-soluble drug. Modeling of diflunisal adsorption and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geszke-Moritz, Małgorzata; Moritz, Michał

    2016-04-01

    Four mesoporous siliceous materials such as SBA-16, SBA-15, PHTS and MCF functionalized with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane were successfully prepared and applied as the carriers for poorly water-soluble drug diflunisal. Several techniques including nitrogen sorption analysis, XRD, TEM, FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis were employed to characterize mesoporous matrices. Adsorption isotherms were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. In order to find the best-fit isotherm for each model, both linear and nonlinear regressions were carried out. The equilibrium data were best fitted by the Langmuir isotherm model revealing maximum adsorption capacity of 217.4 mg/g for aminopropyl group-modified SBA-15. The negative values of Gibbs free energy change indicated that the adsorption of diflunisal is a spontaneous process. Weibull release model was employed to describe the dissolution profile of diflunisal. At pH 4.5 all prepared mesoporous matrices exhibited the improvement of drug dissolution kinetics as compared to the dissolution rate of pure diflunisal.

  8. Cyanide uptake from wastewater by modified natrolite zeolite-iron oxyhydroxide system: application of isotherm and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Noroozifar, Meissam; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Fard, Parisa Ahmadzadeh

    2009-07-30

    A method for the removal of cyanides from wastewater is described. The method involves the adsorption of cyanides by a modified natural zeolite (natrolite) using batch technique. A new iron oxyhydroxide-natrolite system was used in this study. A combination of XRD, XRF and FTIR spectroscopies, as well as TG/DSC thermal analyses was used for characterization of zeolitic materials. Effects of parameters such as pH, amount of adsorbent and contact time on the cyanide removing yield are studied. It was observed that the yield increases by increasing dosage of adsorbent and contact time at a fixed pH 7.5. A yield of 82% was achieved at optimum conditions for removing cyanide from industrial wastewaters. The experimental data obtained for optimum conditions were selected for modeling the adsorption behavior of the materials using six isotherm equations (Freundlich, Langmuir, Langmuir-Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Redlich-Peterson and Toth). The obtained modeling results indicated that, although the three-parameter models, taking into account the surface heterogeneity, provided the closest approach to the measurement data, the parameters estimates could be highly biased. The kinetic studies proved that the second-order kinetic was the applicable model.

  9. Landfill area estimation based on integrated waste disposal options and solid waste forecasting using modified ANFIS model.

    PubMed

    Younes, Mohammad K; Nopiah, Z M; Basri, N E Ahmad; Basri, H; Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Younes, Mohammed Y

    2016-09-01

    Solid waste prediction is crucial for sustainable solid waste management. The collection of accurate waste data records is challenging in developing countries. Solid waste generation is usually correlated with economic, demographic and social factors. However, these factors are not constant due to population and economic growth. The objective of this research is to minimize the land requirements for solid waste disposal for implementation of the Malaysian vision of waste disposal options. This goal has been previously achieved by integrating the solid waste forecasting model, waste composition and the Malaysian vision. The modified adaptive neural fuzzy inference system (MANFIS) was employed to develop a solid waste prediction model and search for the optimum input factors. The performance of the model was evaluated using the root mean square error (RMSE) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)). The model validation results are as follows: RMSE for training=0.2678, RMSE for testing=3.9860 and R(2)=0.99. Implementation of the Malaysian vision for waste disposal options can minimize the land requirements for waste disposal by up to 43%.

  10. Modified Penna bit-string network evolution model for scale-free networks with assortative mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yup; Choi, Woosik; Yook, Soon-Hyung

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by biological aging dynamics, we introduce a network evolution model for social interaction networks. In order to study the effect of social interactions originating from biological and sociological reasons on the topological properties of networks, we introduce the activitydependent rewiring process. From the numerical simulations, we show that the degree distribution of the obtained networks follows a power-law distribution with an exponentially decaying tail, P( k) ˜ ( k + c)- γ exp(- k/k 0). The obtained value of γ is in the range 2 < γ š 3, which is consistent with the values for real social networks. Moreover, we also show that the degree-degree correlation of the network is positive, which is a characteristic of social interaction networks. The possible applications of our model to real systems are also discussed.

  11. A nested-grid mesoscale numerical weather prediction model modified for Space Shuttle operational requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Coats, G. D.

    1983-01-01

    A nested-grid mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is tested over Florida for the case of intense seabreeze-induced convection. The goal of this modeling system is to provide real-time aviation weather support which is designed to fit local terminal operations such as those supporting NASA's STS. Results from a 58 km and a 14.5 km nested-grid simulation show that this version of the MASS is capable of simulating many of the basic characteristics of convective complexes during periods of relatively weak synoptic scale flow regimes. However, it is noted that extensive development work is required with nested-grid cumulus and planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes before many of the meso-beta scale features such as thunderstorm downdraft-produced bubble high pressure centers can be accurately simulated. After these schemes are properly tuned, MASS can be utilized to initialize microscale modeling systems.

  12. Processing, characterization and modeling of carbon nanofiber modified carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samalot Rivera, Francis J.

    Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites are used in high temperature applications because they exhibit excellent thermomechanical properties. There are several challenges associated with the processing of C/C composites that include long cycle times, formation of closed porosity within fabric woven architecture and carbonization induced cracks that can lead to reduction of mechanical properties. This work addresses various innovative approaches to reduce processing uncertainties and thereby improve thermomechanical properties of C/C by using vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) in conjunction with carbon fabric and precursor phenolic matrix. The different aspects of the proposed research contribute to understanding of the translation of VGCNFs properties in a C/C composite. The specific objectives of the research are; (a) To understand the mechanical properties and microstructural features of phenolic resin precursor with and without modification with VGCNFs; (b) To develop innovative processing concepts that incorporate VGCNFs by spraying them on carbon fabric and/or adding VGCNFs to the phenolic resin precursor; and characterizing the process induced thermal and mechanical properties; and (c) To develop a finite element model to evaluate the thermal stresses developed in the carbonization of carbon/phenolic with and without VGCNFs. Addition of VGCNFs to phenolic resin enhanced the thermal and physical properties in terms of flexure and interlaminar properties, storage modulus and glass transition temperature and lowered the coefficient of thermal expansion. The approaches of spraying VGCNFs on the fabric surface and mixing VGCNFs with the phenolic resin was found to be effective in enhancing mechanical and thermal properties of the resulting C/C composites. Fiber bridging, improved carbon yield and minimization of carbonization-induced damage were the benefits of incorporating VGCNFs in C/C composites. Carbonization induced matrix cracking predicted by the finite

  13. Communication: Low-temperature approximation of the virial series for the Lennard-Jones and modified Lennard-Jones models.

    PubMed

    Ushcats, M V

    2014-09-14

    The regularity of the existing data on the virial coefficients for the Lennard-Jones and modified Lennard-Jones models has allowed a rough extrapolation to the coefficients of higher orders. The corresponding approximation of the infinite virial series has been proposed for the limited temperature interval: 0.4-0.8 of the critical temperature. The loci of zero points of isothermal bulk modulus obtained on the basis of this approximation are close to the vapor-liquid branch of the experimental binodal rather than spinodal. In addition, those points ((dP/dV)T = 0) almost coincide with the divergence points of the approximated virial series that may eliminate some disputable questions about the boundaries of adequacy for the virial equation of state and makes the theoretical isotherms qualitatively similar to the real in the condensation region.

  14. Reaction-Diffusion Model Simulations relevant to Modified Taylor-Couette Flow in Systems of Varying Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmstad, Andrew; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Previously, we have observed a period-doubling cascade to chaos in Modified Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry. Such behavior had been predicted by The Reaction-Diffusion model simulations. The chaotic formation of Taylor-Vortex pair formation was restricted to a very narrow band about the waist of the hourglass. It was suggested that with increasing lengths of systems, the chaotic region would expand. We present a battery of simulations to determine the variation of the size of the chaotic region with length, seeking the transition to spatio- temporal chaos. Richard J. Wiener et al, Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997). H. Riecke and H.-G. Paap, Europhys. Lett. 14, 1235 (1991).

  15. Estimating modal abundances from the spectra of natural and laboratory pyroxene mixtures using the modified Gaussian model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunshine, J. M.; Pieters, C. M.

    1993-05-01

    The modified Gaussian model (MGM) is used to explore spectra of samples containing multiple pyroxene components as a function of modal abundance. The MGM allows spectra to be analyzed directly, without the use of actual or assumed end-member spectra and therefore holds great promise for remote applications. A series of mass fraction mixtures created from several different particle size fractions are analyzed with the MGM to quantify the properties of pyroxene mixtures as a function of both modal abundance and grain size. Band centers, band widths, and relative band strengths of absorptions from individual pyroxenes in mixture spectra are found to be largely independent of particle size. Spectral properties of both zoned and exsolved pyroxene components are resolved in exsolved samples using the MGM, and modal abundances are accurately estimated to within 5-10 percent without predetermined knowledge of the end-member spectra.

  16. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study of bamboo waste treated by Echinodontium taxodii using a modified three-parallel-reactions model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbo; Liu, Fang; Ke, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of pretreatment with Echinodontium taxodii on thermal decomposition characteristics and kinetics of bamboo wastes was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed fungal pretreatment can enhance the thermal degradation of bamboo. The negative effect of extractives in bamboo on the thermal decomposition can be decreased by the pretreatment. A modified three-parallel-reactions model based on isolated lignin was firstly proposed to study pyrolysis kinetics of bamboo lignocellulose. Kinetic analysis showed that with increasing pretreatment time fungal delignification was enhanced to transform the lignin component with high activation energy into that with low activation energy and raise the cellulose content in bamboo, making the thermal decomposition easier. These results demonstrated fungal pretreatment provided a potential way to improve thermal conversion efficiency of bamboo.

  17. Estimating modal abundances from the spectra of natural and laboratory pyroxene mixtures using the modified Gaussian model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunshine, Jessica M.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1993-01-01

    The modified Gaussian model (MGM) is used to explore spectra of samples containing multiple pyroxene components as a function of modal abundance. The MGM allows spectra to be analyzed directly, without the use of actual or assumed end-member spectra and therefore holds great promise for remote applications. A series of mass fraction mixtures created from several different particle size fractions are analyzed with the MGM to quantify the properties of pyroxene mixtures as a function of both modal abundance and grain size. Band centers, band widths, and relative band strengths of absorptions from individual pyroxenes in mixture spectra are found to be largely independent of particle size. Spectral properties of both zoned and exsolved pyroxene components are resolved in exsolved samples using the MGM, and modal abundances are accurately estimated to within 5-10 percent without predetermined knowledge of the end-member spectra.

  18. Modeling seasonal variability of fecal coliform in natural surface waters using the modified SWAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Pachepsky, Yakov A.; Kim, Minjeong; Pyo, JongCheol; Park, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Young Mo; Kim, Jung-Woo; Kim, Joon Ha

    2016-04-01

    Fecal coliforms are indicators of pathogens and thereby, understanding of their fate and transport in surface waters is important to protect drinking water sources and public health. We compiled fecal coliform observations from four different sites in the USA and Korea and found a seasonal variability with a significant connection to temperature levels. In all observations, fecal coliform concentrations were relatively higher in summer and lower during the winter season. This could be explained by the seasonal dominance of growth or die-off of bacteria in soil and in-stream. Existing hydrologic models, however, have limitations in simulating the seasonal variability of fecal coliform. Soil and in-stream bacterial modules of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model are oversimplified in that they exclude simulations of alternating bacterial growth. This study develops a new bacteria subroutine for the SWAT in an attempt to improve its prediction accuracy. We introduced critical temperatures as a parameter to simulate the onset of bacterial growth/die-off and to reproduce the seasonal variability of bacteria. The module developed in this study will improve modeling for environmental management schemes.

  19. Qualitative mathematical modelling of coupled coast and estuary morphodynamics: a modified Boolean network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, J.; Burningham, H.

    2011-12-01

    A major challenge in coastal geomorphology is the prediction of morphological change at a meso-scale (10 to 100 km; 10 to 100 yr). This scale sits awkwardly between understanding of geomorphological processes at the micro-scale, and broader aspects of coastal evolution informed by the Holocene stratigraphic record. In this paper, we explore the potential of a new kind of qualitative mathematical model implemented at a system level. Qualitative models derive predictions from the structure of the system rather from the detailed physics of the underlying processes. Although systems thinking is well established in geomorphology methodologies for converting system diagrams into simulation tools have not been widely investigated. In a recent Defra-funded project in the UK, a Boolean network approach was piloted and applied to the simulation of generic aspects of estuary response to environmental and anthropogenic forcing. We build on this to present a generic approach to the construction of system diagrams for estuaries and adjacent open coasts and their conversion into a network graph. In a Boolean model, each node of this graph is assigned a binary value, the state of which is determined by a logical function that specifies the combined influence of other nodes to which it is connected. System evolution is simulated by specifying a set of initial conditions and repeatedly evaluating the logical functions until an equilibrium condition is reached (either a steady state or a cyclical sequence between two end states). In our enhanced Boolean scheme, changes in morphology are allowed to feed back into intrinsic process variables (e.g. estuary waves or tidal prism), although some processes are externally imposed (e.g. sea-level rise). Arbitrary time lags condition the response of morphology to a change in process, such that some landforms adjust more rapidly than others. We also present a simulator architecture based around a solver and externally specified model components

  20. A Modified Heterotopic Swine Hind Limb Transplant Model for Translational Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) Research

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Cooney, Damon S.; Shores, Jaimie T.; Sacks, Justin M.; Wimmers, Eric G.; Bonawitz, Steven C.; Gordon, Chad; Ruben, Dawn; Schneeberger, Stefan; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) such as hand and face transplants represent a viable treatment option for complex musculoskeletal trauma and devastating tissue loss. Despite favorable and highly encouraging early and intermediate functional outcomes, rejection of the highly immunogenic skin component of a VCA and potential adverse effects of chronic multi-drug immunosuppression continue to hamper widespread clinical application of VCA. Therefore, research in this novel field needs to focus on translational studies related to unique immunologic features of VCA and to develop novel immunomodulatory strategies for immunomodulation and tolerance induction following VCA without the need for long term immunosuppression. This article describes a reliable and reproducible translational large animal model of VCA that is comprised of an osteomyocutaneous flap in a MHC-defined swine heterotopic hind limb allotransplantation. Briefly, a well-vascularized skin paddle is identified in the anteromedial thigh region using near infrared laser angiography. The underlying muscles, knee joint, distal femur, and proximal tibia are harvested on a femoral vascular pedicle. This allograft can be considered both a VCA and a vascularized bone marrow transplant with its unique immune privileged features. The graft is transplanted to a subcutaneous abdominal pocket in the recipient animal with a skin component exteriorized to the dorsolateral region for immune monitoring. Three surgical teams work simultaneously in a well-coordinated manner to reduce anesthesia and ischemia times, thereby improving efficiency of this model and reducing potential confounders in experimental protocols. This model serves as the groundwork for future therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing and potentially eliminating the need for chronic multi-drug immunosuppression in VCA. PMID:24145603

  1. Stringy models of modified gravity: space-time defects and structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Yusaf, Muhammad Furqaan E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2013-03-01

    Starting from microscopic models of space-time foam, based on brane universes propagating in bulk space-times populated by D0-brane defects (''D-particles''), we arrive at effective actions used by a low-energy observer on the brane world to describe his/her observations of the Universe. These actions include, apart from the metric tensor field, also scalar (dilaton) and vector fields, the latter describing the interactions of low-energy matter on the brane world with the recoiling point-like space-time defect (D-particle). The vector field is proportional to the recoil velocity of the D-particle and as such it satisfies a certain constraint. The vector breaks locally Lorentz invariance, which however is assumed to be conserved on average in a space-time foam situation, involving the interaction of matter with populations of D-particle defects. In this paper we clarify the role of fluctuations of the vector field on structure formation and galactic growth. In particular we demonstrate that, already at the end of the radiation era, the (constrained) vector field associated with the recoil of the defects provides the seeds for a growing mode in the evolution of the Universe. Such a growing mode survives during the matter dominated era, provided the variance of the D-particle recoil velocities on the brane is larger than a critical value. We note that in this model, as a result of specific properties of D-brane dynamics in the bulk, there is no issue of overclosing the brane Universe for large defect densities. Thus, in these models, the presence of defects may be associated with large-structure formation. Although our string inspired models do have (conventional, from a particle physics point of view) dark matter components, nevertheless it is interesting that the role of ''extra'' dark matter is also provided by the population of massive defects. This is consistent with the weakly interacting character of the D-particle defects, which predominantly interact only

  2. Modelling reduction of urban heat load in Vienna by modifying surface properties of roofs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žuvela-Aloise, Maja; Andre, Konrad; Schwaiger, Hannes; Bird, David Neil; Gallaun, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    The study examines the potential of urban roofs to reduce the urban heat island (UHI) effect by changing their reflectivity and implementing vegetation (green roofs) using the example of the City of Vienna. The urban modelling simulations are performed based on high-resolution orography and land use data, climatological observations, surface albedo values from satellite imagery and registry of the green roof potential in Vienna. The modelling results show that a moderate increase in reflectivity of roofs (up to 0.45) reduces the mean summer temperatures in the densely built-up environment by approximately 0.25 °C. Applying high reflectivity materials (roof albedo up to 0.7) leads to average cooling in densely built-up area of approximately 0.5 °C. The green roofs yield a heat load reduction in similar order of magnitude as the high reflectivity materials. However, only 45 % of roof area in Vienna is suitable for greening and the green roof potential mostly applies to industrial areas in city outskirts and is therefore not sufficient for substantial reduction of the UHI effect, particularly in the city centre which has the highest heat load. The strongest cooling effect can be achieved by combining the green roofs with high reflectivity materials. In this case, using 50 or 100 % of the green roof potential and applying high reflectivity materials on the remaining surfaces have a similar cooling effect.

  3. Optimizing adsorption of fluoride from water by modified banana peel dust using response surface modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Ria; Mondal, Naba Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present work highlighted the effective application of banana peel dust (BPD) for removal of fluoride (F-) from aqueous solution. The effects of operating parameters such as pH, initial concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time, agitation speed and temperature were analysed using response surface methodology. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by the analysis of variance and t test statistics. Experimental results revealed that BPD has higher F- adsorption capacity (17.43, 26.31 and 39.5 mg/g). Fluoride adsorption kinetics followed pseudo-second-order model with high correlation of coefficient value (0.998). On the other hand, thermodynamic data suggest that adsorption is favoured at lower temperature, exothermic in nature and enthalpy driven. The adsorbents were characterised through scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and point of zero charges (pHZPC) ranges from pH 6.2-8.2. Finally, error analysis clearly demonstrates that all three adsorbents are well fitted with Langmuir isotherm compared to the other isotherm models. The reusable properties of the material support further development for commercial application purpose.

  4. Fingolimod: A Disease-Modifier Drug in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Rosa Luisa; De Simone, Roberta; Armida, Monica; Mazziotti, Valentina; Pèzzola, Antonella; Popoli, Patrizia; Minghetti, Luisa

    2016-10-01

    Fingolimod phosphate (FTY720), the first approved oral therapy for multiple sclerosis, primarily acts as an immunomodulator. Its concomitant effects in the central nervous system, however, indicate a potentially broader spectrum of activity in neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible effects of fingolimod in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a strong neuroinflammatory component. Fingolimod (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p.) was administered to mSOD1(G93A) mice, a well-characterized mouse model of ALS, starting from the onset of motor symptoms to the end stage of the disease. The drug was able to improve the neurological phenotype (p < 0.05) and to extend the survival (p < 0.01) of ALS mice. The beneficial effect of fingolimod administration was associated with a significant modulation of neuroinflammatory and protective genes (CD11b, Foxp3, iNOS, Il1β, Il10, Arg1, and Bdnf) in motor cortex and spinal cord of animals. Our data show, for the first time, that fingolimod is protective in ALS mice and that its beneficial effects are accompanied by a modulation of microglial activation and innate immunity. Considering that the treatment was started in already symptomatic mice, our data strongly support fingolimod as a potential new therapeutic approach to ALS.

  5. Modeling microbial populations with the original and modified versions of the continuous and discrete logistic equations.

    PubMed

    Peleg, M

    1997-08-01

    The life histories of microbial populations, under favorable and adverse conditions, exhibit a variety of growth, decay, and fluctuation patterns. They have been described by numerous mathematical models that varies considerably in structure and number of constants. The continuous logistic equation alone and combined with itself or with its mirror image, the Fermi function, can produce many of the observed growth patterns. They include those that are traditionally described by the Gompertz equation and peaked curves, with the peak being symmetric or asymmetric narrow or wide. The shape of survival and dose response curves appears to be determined by the distribution of the resistance's to the lethal agent among the individual organisms. Thus, exponential decay and Fermian or Gompertz-type curves can be considered manifestations of skewed to the right, symmetric, and skewed to the left distributions, respectively. Because of the mathematical constraints and determinism, the original discrete logistic equation can rarely be an adequate model of real microbial populations. However, by making its proportionality constant a normal-random variate it can simulate realistic histories of fluctuating microbial populations, including scenarios of aperiodic population explosions of varying intensities of the kind found in food-poisoning episodes.

  6. Modelling drug degradation in a spray dried polymer dispersion using a modified Arrhenius equation.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Adele; Ferreira, Ana P; Banks, Elizabeth; Skeene, Kirsty; Clarke, Graham; Nicholson, Sarah; Rawlinson-Malone, Clare

    2015-01-15

    The Pharmaceutical industry is increasingly utilizing amorphous technologies to overcome solubility challenges. A common approach is the use of drug in polymer dispersions to prevent recrystallization of the amorphous drug. Understanding the factors affecting chemical and physical degradation of the drug within these complex systems, e.g., temperature and relative humidity, is an important step in the selection of a lead formulation, and development of appropriate packaging/storage control strategies. The Arrhenius equation has been used as the basis of a number of models to predict the chemical stability of formulated product. In this work, we investigate the increase in chemical degradation seen for one particular spray dried dispersion formulation using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMC-AS). Samples, prepared using polymers with different substitution levels, were placed on storage for 6 months under a range of different temperature and relative humidity conditions and the degradant level monitored using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). While the data clearly illustrates the impact of temperature and relative humidity on the degradant levels detected, it also highlighted that these terms do not account for all the variability in the data. An extension of the Arrhenius equation to include a term for the polymer chemistry, specifically the degree of succinoyl substitution on the polymer backbone, was shown to improve the fit of the model to the data.

  7. On a modified Monte-Carlo method and variable soft sphere model for rarefied binary gas mixture flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourazar, S. S.; Jahangiri, P.; Aboutalebi, A.; Ganjaei, A. A.; Nourazar, M.; Khadem, J.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of new terms in the improved algorithm, the modified direct simulation Monte-Carlo (MDSMC) method, is investigated by simulating a rarefied binary gas mixture flow inside a rotating cylinder. Dalton law for the partial pressures contributed by each species of the binary gas mixture is incorporated into our simulation using the MDSMC method and the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method. Moreover, the effect of the exponent of the cosine of deflection angle (α) in the inter-molecular collision models, the variable soft sphere (VSS) and the variable hard sphere (VHS), is investigated in our simulation. The improvement of the results of simulation is pronounced using the MDSMC method when compared with the results of the DSMC method. The results of simulation using the VSS model show some improvements on the result of simulation for the mixture temperature at radial distances close to the cylinder wall where the temperature reaches the maximum value when compared with the results using the VHS model.

  8. A low power cryogenic 512 × 512-pixel infrared readout integrated circuit with modified MOS device model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongliang; Liu, Xinghui; Xu, Chao

    2013-11-01

    A low power cryogenic readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for 512 × 512-pixel infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) image system, is presented. In order to improve the precision of the circuit simulation at cryogenic temperatures, a modified MOS device model is proposed. The model is based on BSIM3 model, and uses correction parameters to describe carrier freeze-out effect at low temperatures to improve the fitting accuracy for low temperature MOS device simulation. A capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA) with inherent correlated double sampling (CDS) configuration is employed to realize a high performance readout interfacing circuit in a pixel area of 30 × 30 μm2. Optimized column readout timing and structure are applied to reduce the power consumption. The experimental chip fabricated by a standard 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process shows more than 10 MHz readout rate with less than 70 mW power consumption under 3.3 V supply voltage at 77-150 K operated temperatures. And it occupies an area of 18 × 17 mm2.

  9. Finger Vein Segmentation from Infrared Images Based on a Modified Separable Mumford Shah Model and Local Entropy Thresholding.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Marios; Dermatas, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for finger vein pattern extraction from infrared images is presented. This method involves four steps: preprocessing which performs local normalization of the image intensity, image enhancement, image segmentation, and finally postprocessing for image cleaning. In the image enhancement step, an image which will be both smooth and similar to the original is sought. The enhanced image is obtained by minimizing the objective function of a modified separable Mumford Shah Model. Since, this minimization procedure is computationally intensive for large images, a local application of the Mumford Shah Model in small window neighborhoods is proposed. The finger veins are located in concave nonsmooth regions and, so, in order to distinct them from the other tissue parts, all the differences between the smooth neighborhoods, obtained by the local application of the model, and the corresponding windows of the original image are added. After that, veins in the enhanced image have been sufficiently emphasized. Thus, after image enhancement, an accurate segmentation can be obtained readily by a local entropy thresholding method. Finally, the resulted binary image may suffer from some misclassifications and, so, a postprocessing step is performed in order to extract a robust finger vein pattern.

  10. Severity of Demyelinating and Axonal Neuropathy Mouse Models Is Modified by Genes Affecting Structure and Function of Peripheral Nodes.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Kathryn H; Seburn, Kevin L; Schroeder, David G; Spaulding, Emily L; Dionne, Loiuse A; Cox, Gregory A; Burgess, Robert W

    2017-03-28

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited polyneuropathies. Mutations in 80 genetic loci can cause forms of CMT, resulting in demyelination and axonal dysfunction. The clinical presentation, including sensory deficits, distal muscle weakness, and atrophy, can vary greatly in severity and progression. Here, we used mouse models of CMT to demonstrate genetic interactions that result in a more severe neuropathy phenotype. The cell adhesion molecule Nrcam and the Na(+) channel Scn8a (NaV1.6) are important components of nodes. Homozygous Nrcam and heterozygous Scn8a mutations synergized with both an Sh3tc2 mutation, modeling recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4C, and mutations in Gars, modeling dominant axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D. We conclude that genetic variants perturbing the structure and function of nodes interact with mutations affecting the cable properties of axons by thinning myelin or reducing axon diameter. Therefore, genes integral to peripheral nodes are candidate modifiers of peripheral neuropathy.

  11. A two-gene model for schizophrenia with the possibility to detect carriers of the modifier gene.

    PubMed

    Maricq, H R

    1975-10-01

    A two-gene model for the hereditary transmission of schizophrenia is presented involving two pairs of autosomal alleles Ss and Pp. It is hypothesized that the recessive gene can produce schizophrenia in homozygous state with a penetrance of .40. In the presence of the gene P schizophrenia can occur in the heterozygote Ss, resulting in a more serious form of the disease and having a manifestation rate of .70. The population frequencies best fitting the available data are estimated to be approximately .03 for P and .07 or .08 for s. It is also hypothesized that the reproductive fitness is .80 in manifest schizophrenics with genotype ss pp and .50 in overt schizophrenics carrying the modifier gene P. The model is proposed to cover only the so-called "process" or "nuclear" type of schizophrenia. The remaining schizophrenics of "reactive" and other types may belong to different genotypes or consist in phenocopies. The model is discussed in relation to literature observations and our own previous studies. The possibilities for increased fitness of non-schizophrenic carriers of P and s are also discussed.

  12. A Modified Wilson Cycle Scenario Based on Thermo-Mechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    The major problem of classical Wilson Cycle concept is the suggested conversion of the passive continental margin to the active subduction zone. Previous modeling studies assumed either unusually thick felsic continental crust at the margin (over 40 km) or unusually low lithospheric thickness (less than 70 km) to simulate this process. Here we propose a new triggering factor in subduction initiation process that is mantle suction force. Based on this proposal we suggest a modification of Wilson Cycle concept. Sometime after opening and extension of oceanic basin, continental passive margin moves over the slab remnants of the former active subduction zones in deep mantle. Such slab remnants or deep slabs of neighboring active subduction zones produce a suction mantle flow introducing additional compression at the passive margin. It results in the initiation of a new subduction zone, hence starting the closing phase of Wilson Cycle. In this scenario the weakness of continental crust near the passive margin which is inherited from the rifting phase and horizontal push force induced from far-field topographic gradient within the continent facilitate and speed up subduction initiation process. Our thermo-mechanical modeling shows that after a few tens of million years a shear zone may indeed develop along the passive margin that has typical two-layered 35 km thick continental crust and thermal lithosphere thicker than 100 km if there is a broad mantle down-welling flow below the margin. Soon after formation of this shear zone oceanic plate descends into mantle and subduction initiates. Subduction initiation occurs following over-thrusting of continental crust and retreating of future trench. In models without far-field topographic gradient within the continent subduction initiation requires weaker passive margin. Our results also indicate that subduction initiation depends on several parameters such as magnitude, domain size and location of suction mantle flow

  13. Erroneous Arrhenius: modified arrhenius model best explains the temperature dependence of ectotherm fitness.

    PubMed

    Knies, Jennifer L; Kingsolver, Joel G

    2010-08-01

    The initial rise of fitness that occurs with increasing temperature is attributed to Arrhenius kinetics, in which rates of reaction increase exponentially with increasing temperature. Models based on Arrhenius typically assume single rate-limiting reactions over some physiological temperature range for which all the rate-limiting enzymes are in 100% active conformation. We test this assumption using data sets for microbes that have measurements of fitness (intrinsic rate of population growth) at many temperatures and over a broad temperature range and for diverse ectotherms that have measurements at fewer temperatures. When measurements are available at many temperatures, strictly Arrhenius kinetics are rejected over the physiological temperature range. However, over a narrower temperature range, we cannot reject strictly Arrhenius kinetics. The temperature range also affects estimates of the temperature dependence of fitness. These results indicate that Arrhenius kinetics only apply over a narrow range of temperatures for ectotherms, complicating attempts to identify general patterns of temperature dependence.

  14. Animal models to detect allergenicity to foods and genetically modified products: workshop summary.

    PubMed Central

    Tryphonas, Helen; Arvanitakis, George; Vavasour, Elizabeth; Bondy, Genevieve

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory allergy and allergy to foods continue to be important health issues. There is evidence to indicate that the incidence of food allergy around the world is on the rise. Current estimates indicate that approximately 5% of young children and 1-2% of adults suffer from true food allergy (Kagan 2003). Although a large number of in vivo and in vitro tests exist for the clinical diagnosis of allergy in humans, we lack validated animal models of allergenicity. This deficiency creates serious problems for regulatory agencies and industries that must define the potential allergenicity of foods before marketing. The emergence of several biotechnologically derived foods and industrial proteins, as well as their potential to sensitize genetically predisposed populations to develop allergy, has prompted health officials and regulatory agencies around the world to seek approaches and methodologies to screen novel proteins for allergenicity. PMID:12573909

  15. Animal models to detect allergenicity to foods and genetically modified products: workshop summary.

    PubMed

    Tryphonas, Helen; Arvanitakis, George; Vavasour, Elizabeth; Bondy, Genevieve

    2003-02-01

    Respiratory allergy and allergy to foods continue to be important health issues. There is evidence to indicate that the incidence of food allergy around the world is on the rise. Current estimates indicate that approximately 5% of young children and 1-2% of adults suffer from true food allergy (Kagan 2003). Although a large number of in vivo and in vitro tests exist for the clinical diagnosis of allergy in humans, we lack validated animal models of allergenicity. This deficiency creates serious problems for regulatory agencies and industries that must define the potential allergenicity of foods before marketing. The emergence of several biotechnologically derived foods and industrial proteins, as well as their potential to sensitize genetically predisposed populations to develop allergy, has prompted health officials and regulatory agencies around the world to seek approaches and methodologies to screen novel proteins for allergenicity.

  16. Modified impact of emotion on temporal discrimination in a transgenic rat model of Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Alexis; Es-seddiqi, Mouna; Brown, Bruce L.; Nguyen, Hoa P.; Riess, Olaf; von Hörsten, Stephan; Le Blanc, Pascale; Desvignes, Nathalie; Bozon, Bruno; El Massioui, Nicole; Doyère, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by triad of motor, cognitive, and emotional symptoms along with neuropathology in fronto-striatal circuit and limbic system including amygdala. Emotional alterations, which have a negative impact on patient well-being, represent some of the earliest symptoms of HD and might be related to the onset of the neurodegenerative process. In the transgenic rat model (tgHD rats), evidence suggest emotional alterations at the symptomatic stage along with neuropathology of the central nucleus of amygdala (CE). Studies in humans and animals demonstrate that emotion can modulate time perception. The impact of emotion on time perception has never been tested in HD, nor is it known if that impact could be part of the presymptomatic emotional phenotype of the pathology. The aim of this paper was to characterize the effect of emotion on temporal discrimination in presymptomatic tgHD animals. In the first experiment, we characterized the acute effect of an emotion (fear) conditioned stimulus on temporal discrimination using a bisection procedure, and tested its dependency upon an intact central amygdala. The second experiment was aimed at comparing presymptomatic homozygous transgenic animals at 7-months of age and their wild-type littermates (WT) in their performance on the modulation of temporal discrimination by emotion. Our principal findings show that (1) a fear cue produces a short-lived decrease of temporal precision after its termination, and (2) animals with medial CE lesion and presymptomatic tgHD animals demonstrate an alteration of this emotion-evoked temporal distortion. The results contribute to our knowledge about the presymptomatic phenotype of this HD rat model, showing susceptibility to emotion that may be related to dysfunction of the central nucleus of amygdala. PMID:24133419

  17. Predictors of condom use behaviour among male street labourers in urban Vietnam using a modified Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model.

    PubMed

    Van Huy, Nguyen; P Dunne, Michael; Debattista, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    HIV risk in vulnerable groups such as itinerant male street labourers is often examined via a focus on individual determinants. This study provides a test of a modified Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model to predict condom use behaviour among male street workers in urban Vietnam. In a cross-sectional survey using a social mapping technique, 450 male street labourers from 13 districts of Hanoi, Vietnam were recruited and interviewed. Collected data were first examined for completeness; structural equation modelling was then employed to test the model fit. Condoms were used inconsistently by many of these men, and usage varied in relation to a number of factors. A modified IMB model had a better fit than the original IMB model in predicting condom use behaviour. This modified model accounted for 49% of the variance, versus 10% by the original version. In the modified model, the influence of psychosocial factors was moderately high, whilst the influence of HIV prevention information, motivation and perceived behavioural skills was moderately low, explaining in part the limited level of condom use behaviour. This study provides insights into social factors that should be taken into account in public health planning to promote safer sexual behaviour among Asian male street labourers.

  18. Hemolysis assessment and antioxidant activity evaluation modified in an oxidized erythrocyte model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; He, Jiayi; Liu, Guoyan; Diao, Xinyu; Cao, Yingying; Ye, Qun; Xu, Guangxin; Mao, Wendong

    2014-03-05

    Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced hemolysis is a commonly used model for antioxidant activity evaluation, and the hemolysis index is often presented as the absorbance of supernatant hemoglobin (Hb), which releases from injured cells. However, in previous studies, as an oxidation-sensitive protein, it has been recognized that Hb easily forms other types or substances, such as metHb, Heinz, and some fluorescent products. This study concerns whether Hb oxidation participated in H₂O₂-induced hemolysis and confirmed that the destruction of Hb under oxidizing condition had been a novel interfering factor that could reduce the absorbance in Hb quantitative detection. To correct the lower absorbance, the stable fluorescent products found in Hb degradation were selected, and the absorbance correction factor of 6.436 was drawn on the basis of the absorbance and fluorescent intensity. This correction factor obviously altered the results of both dose-dependent hemolysis of H₂O₂ and antioxidant activity. In addition, the assessment difference was innovatively discussed by altering the sequences of adding antioxidant and oxidant. These different sequences caused variations in hemolysis, indicating that multiple evaluations may be related to the antioxidant pathways which are necessary for more accurate bioactivity data.

  19. Cosmological models in modified gravity theories with extended nonminimal derivative couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Tsoukalas, Minas

    2017-02-01

    We construct gravitational modifications that go beyond Horndeski, namely theories with extended nonminimal derivative couplings, in which the coefficient functions depend not only on the scalar field but also on its kinetic energy. Such theories prove to be ghost-free in a cosmological background. We investigate the early-time cosmology and show that a de Sitter inflationary phase can be realized as a pure result of the novel gravitational couplings. Additionally, we study the late-time evolution, where we obtain an effective dark energy sector which arises from the scalar field and its extended couplings to gravity. We extract various cosmological observables and analyze their behavior at small redshifts for three choices of potentials, namely for the exponential, the power-law, and the Higgs potentials. We show that the Universe passes from deceleration to acceleration in the recent cosmological past, while the effective dark energy equation-of-state parameter tends to the cosmological-constant value at present. Finally, the effective dark energy can be phantomlike, although the scalar field is canonical, which is an advantage of the model.

  20. Modified Amber Force Field Correctly Models the Conformational Preference for Tandem GA pairs in RNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mechanics with all-atom models was used to understand the conformational preference of tandem guanine-adenine (GA) noncanonical pairs in RNA. These tandem GA pairs play important roles in determining stability, flexibility, and structural dynamics of RNA tertiary structures. Previous solution structures showed that these tandem GA pairs adopt either imino (cis Watson–Crick/Watson–Crick A-G) or sheared (trans Hoogsteen/sugar edge A-G) conformations depending on the sequence and orientation of the adjacent closing base pairs. The solution structures (GCGGACGC)2 [Biochemistry, 1996, 35, 9677–9689] and (GCGGAUGC)2 [Biochemistry, 2007, 46, 1511–1522] demonstrate imino and sheared conformations for the two central GA pairs, respectively. These systems were studied using molecular dynamics and free energy change calculations for conformational changes, using umbrella sampling. For the structures to maintain their native conformations during molecular dynamics simulations, a modification to the standard Amber ff10 force field was required, which allowed the amino group of guanine to leave the plane of the base [J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2009, 5, 2088–2100] and form out-of-plane hydrogen bonds with a cross-strand cytosine or uracil. The requirement for this modification suggests the importance of out-of-plane hydrogen bonds in stabilizing the native structures. Free energy change calculations for each sequence demonstrated the correct conformational preference when the force field modification was used, but the extent of the preference is underestimated. PMID:24803859

  1. A Prognostic Model for Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Importance of the Modified Nottingham Prognostic Index and Age

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeanny; Eom, Keun-Yong; Koo, Tae Ryool; Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Kim, Yu Jung; Park, So Yeon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Considering the distinctive biology of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), this study aimed to identify TNBC-specific prognostic factors and determine the prognostic value of the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) and its variant indices. Methods A total of 233 patients with newly diagnosed stage I to III TNBC from 2003 to 2012 were reviewed. We retrospectively analyzed the patients' demographics, clinicopathologic parameters, treatment, and survival outcomes. The NPI was calculated as follows: tumor size (cm)×0.2+node status+Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade. The modified NPI (MNPI) was obtained by adding the modified SBR grade rather than the SBR grade. Results The median follow-up was 67.8 months. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 81.4% and 89.9%, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that the MNPI was the most significant and common prognostic factor of DFS (p=0.001) and OS (p=0.019). Young age (≤35 years) was also correlated with poor DFS (p=0.006). A recursive partitioning for establishing the prognostic model for DFS was performed based on the results of multivariate analysis. Patients with a low MNPI (≤6.5) were stratified into the low-risk group (p<0.001), and patients with a high MNPI (>6.5) were subdivided into the intermediate (>35 years) and high-risk (≤35 years) groups. Age was not a prognostic factor in patients with a low MNPI, whereas in patients with a high MNPI, it was the second key factor in subdividing patients according to prognosis (p=0.023). Conclusion The MNPI could be used to stratify patients with stage I to III TNBC according to prognosis. It was the most important prognosticator for both DFS and OS. The prognostic significance of young age for DFS differed by MNPI. PMID:28382096

  2. A modified Wright-Fisher model that incorporates Ne: A variant of the standard model with increased biological realism and reduced computational complexity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Gossmann, Toni I; Waxman, David

    2016-03-21

    The Wright-Fisher model is an important model in evolutionary biology and population genetics. It has been applied in numerous analyses of finite populations with discrete generations. It is recognised that real populations can behave, in some key aspects, as though their size that is not the census size, N, but rather a smaller size, namely the effective population size, Ne. However, in the Wright-Fisher model, there is no distinction between the effective and census population sizes. Equivalently, we can say that in this model, Ne coincides with N. The Wright-Fisher model therefore lacks an important aspect of biological realism. Here, we present a method that allows Ne to be directly incorporated into the Wright-Fisher model. The modified model involves matrices whose size is determined by Ne. Thus apart from increased biological realism, the modified model also has reduced computational complexity, particularly so when Ne⪡N. For complex problems, it may be hard or impossible to numerically analyse the most commonly-used approximation of the Wright-Fisher model that incorporates Ne, namely the diffusion approximation. An alternative approach is simulation. However, the simulations need to be sufficiently detailed that they yield an effective size that is different to the census size. Simulations may also be time consuming and have attendant statistical errors. The method presented in this work may then be the only alternative to simulations, when Ne differs from N. We illustrate the straightforward application of the method to some problems involving allele fixation and the determination of the equilibrium site frequency spectrum. We then apply the method to the problem of fixation when three alleles are segregating in a population. This latter problem is significantly more complex than a two allele problem and since the diffusion equation cannot be numerically solved, the only other way Ne can be incorporated into the analysis is by simulation. We have

  3. Probiotics modify tight-junction proteins in an animal model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Briskey, David; Heritage, Mandy; Jaskowski, Lesley-Anne; Peake, Jonathan; Gobe, Glenda; Subramaniam, V. Nathan; Crawford, Darrell; Campbell, Catherine; Vitetta, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have investigated the effects of a multispecies probiotic preparation containing a combination of probiotic bacterial genera that included Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli and a Streptococcus in a mouse model of high-fat diet or obesity-induced liver steatosis. Methods: Three groups of C57B1/6J mice were fed either a standard chow or a high-fat diet for 20 weeks, while a third group was fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks and then concomitantly administered probiotics for a further 10 weeks. Serum, liver and large bowel samples were collected for analysis. Results: The expression of the tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 was reduced (p < 0.05) in high-fat diet-fed mice compared to chow-fed mice. Probiotic supplementation helped to maintain tight ZO-1 and ZO-2 expression compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05), but did not restore ZO-1 or ZO-2 expression compared with chow-fed mice. Mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics had significant steatosis development compared with chow-fed mice (p < 0.05); steatosis was less severe in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group. Hepatic triglyceride concentration was higher in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics compared with the chow group (p < 0.05), and was lower in the probiotics group compared with the high-fat diet group (p < 0.05). Compared with chow-fed mice, serum glucose, cholesterol concentration and the activity of alanine transaminase were higher (p < 0.05), whereas serum triglyceride concentration was lower (p < 0.05) in mice fed a high-fat diet ± probiotics. Conclusions: Supplementation with a multispecies probiotic formulation helped to maintain tight-junction proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2, and reduced hepatic triglyceride concentration compared with a high-fat diet alone. PMID:27366215

  4. Modified activity-stress paradigm in an animal model of the female athlete triad.

    PubMed

    Dimarco, Nancy M; Dart, Lyn; Sanborn, Charlotte Barney

    2007-11-01

    The exercising woman with nutritional deficits and related menstrual irregularities is at risk of compromising long-term bone health, i.e., the female athlete triad. There is no animal model of the female athlete triad. The purpose of this study was to examine long-term energy restriction in voluntary wheel-running female rats on estrous cycling, bone mineral content, and leptin levels. Twelve female Sprague-Dawley rats (age 34 days) were fed ad libitum and given access to running wheels during an initial 14-wk period, providing baseline and age-related data. Daily collection included dietary intake, body weight, estrous cycling, and voluntary running distance. At 4 mo, rats were randomized into two groups, six restrict-fed rats (70% of ad libitum intake) and six rats continuing as ad libitum-fed controls. Energy intake, energy expenditure, and energy availability (energy intake - energy expenditure) were calculated for each animal. Serum estradiol and leptin concentrations were measured by RIA. Femoral and tibial bone mineral density and bone mineral content (BMC) were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Restrict-fed rats exhibited a decrease in energy availability during Weight Loss and Anestrous phases (P = 0.002). Compared with controls after 12 wk, restrict-fed rats showed reduced concentrations of serum estradiol (P = 0.002) and leptin (P = 0.002), lower ovarian weight (P = 0.002), and decreased femoral (P = 0.041) and tibial (P = 0.05) BMC. Decreased energy availability resulted in anestrus and significant decreases in BMC, estrogen and leptin levels, and body weight. Finally, there is a critical level of energy availability to maintain estrous cycling.

  5. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Infection Modifies Gut Microbiota under Different Dietary Conditions in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Arrazuria, Rakel; Elguezabal, Natalia; Juste, Ramon A.; Derakhshani, Hooman; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) the causative agent of paratuberculosis, produces a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants. It has been recently suggested that MAP infection may be associated with dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota in ruminants. Since diet is one of the key factors affecting the balance of microbial populations in the digestive tract, we intended to evaluate the effect of MAP infection in a rabbit model fed a regular or high fiber diet during challenge. The composition of microbiota of the cecal content and the sacculus rotundus was studied in 20 New Zealand white female rabbits. The extracted DNA was subjected to paired-end Illumina sequencing of the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene for microbiota analysis. Microbial richness (Chao1) in the cecal content was significantly increased by MAP infection in regular diet rabbits (p = 0.0043) and marginally increased (p = 0.0503) in the high fiber group. Analysis of beta-diversity showed that MAP infection produces deeper changes in the microbiota of sacculus rotundus than in the cecal content. A lower abundance of Proteobacteria in the cecal content of infected animals fed the high fiber diet and also lower abundance of Bacteroidetes in the sacculus rotundus of infected animals fed the regular diet were observed. Based on OPLS-DA analysis, we observed that some bacteria repeatedly appear to be positively associated with infection in different samples under different diets (families Dehalobacteriaceae, Coriobacteriaceae, and Mogibacteriaceae; genus Anaerofustis). The same phenomenon was observed with some of the bacteria negatively associated with MAP infection (genera Anaerostipes and Coprobacillus). However, other groups of bacteria (Enterobacteriaceae family and ML615J-28 order) were positively associated with infection in some circumstances and negatively associated with infection in others. Data demonstrate that MAP infection

  6. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    PubMed Central

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron K.; Isern, Nancy; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation activates pyruvate oxidation in an immature swine model in vivo. Twelve male mixed-breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30–49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (group C) or pyruvate (group P) during the final 6 h of 8 h of ECMO. Over the final hour, piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, as a reference substrate for oxidation, and [13C6]-l-leucine, as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of the citric acid cycle intermediates. An increase in anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation in group P occurred compared with no change in pyruvate oxidation. Additionally, pyruvate promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient-sensitive enzymes, like AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase, suggesting activation for fatty acid oxidation. Pyruvate also promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. In conclusion, although prolonged pyruvate supplementation did not alter pyruvate oxidation, it did elicit changes in nutrient- and energy-sensitive pathways. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of pyruvate and its downstream effect on cardiac function. PMID:25910802

  7. A hierarchical Bayesian approach to the modified Bartlett-Lewis rectangular pulse model for a joint estimation of model parameters across stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jang-Gyeong; Kwon, Hyun-Han; Kim, Dongkyun

    2017-01-01

    Poisson cluster stochastic rainfall generators (e.g., modified Bartlett-Lewis rectangular pulse, MBLRP) have been widely applied to generate synthetic sub-daily rainfall sequences. The MBLRP model reproduces the underlying distribution of the rainfall generating process. The existing optimization techniques are typically based on individual parameter estimates that treat each parameter as independent. However, parameter estimates sometimes compensate for the estimates of other parameters, which can cause high variability in the results if the covariance structure is not formally considered. Moreover, uncertainty associated with model parameters in the MBLRP rainfall generator is not usually addressed properly. Here, we develop a hierarchical Bayesian model (HBM)-based MBLRP model to jointly estimate parameters across weather stations and explicitly consider the covariance and uncertainty through a Bayesian framework. The model is tested using weather stations in South Korea. The HBM-based MBLRP model improves the identification of parameters with better reproduction of rainfall statistics at various temporal scales. Additionally, the spatial variability of the parameters across weather stations is substantially reduced compared to that of other methods.

  8. Lipid-modified oligonucleotide conjugates: Insights into gene silencing, interaction with model membranes and cellular uptake mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Uribe, Begoña; Grijalvo, Santiago; Pertíñez, Samuel Núñez; Busto, Jon V; Martín, César; Alagia, Adele; Goñi, Félix M; Eritja, Ramón; Alkorta, Itziar

    2017-01-01

    The ability of oligonucleotides to silence specific genes or inhibit the biological activity of specific proteins has generated great interest in their use as research tools and therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, their biological applications meet the limitation of their poor cellular accessibility. Developing an appropriate delivery system for oligonucleotides is essential to achieve their efficient cellular uptake. In the present work a series of phosphorothioate lipid-oligonucleotide hybrids were synthesized introducing covalently single or double lipid tails at both 3'- and 5'-termini of an antisense oligonucleotide. Gene transfections in cultured cells showed antisense luciferase inhibition without the use of a transfecting agent for conjugates modified with the double-lipid tail at 5'-termini. The effect of the double lipid-tailed modification was further studied in detail in several model membrane systems as well as in cellular uptake experiments. During these studies the spontaneous formation of self-assembled microstructures is clearly observed. Lipidation allowed the efficient incorporation of the oligonucleotide in HeLa cells by a macropinocytosis mechanism without causing cytotoxicity in cells or altering the binding properties of the oligonucleotide conjugates. In addition, both single- and double-tailed compounds showed a similar behavior in lipid model membranes, making them useful in nucleotide-based technologies.

  9. Kinetics and isothermal modeling of liquid phase adsorption of rhodamine B onto urea modified Raphia hookerie epicarp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inyinbor, A. A.; Adekola, F. A.; Olatunji, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    Epicarp of Raphia hookerie, a bioresource material, was modified with urea (UMRH) to adsorb Rhodamine B (RhB) from aqueous solution. Adsorbent morphology and surface chemistry were established by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area determination, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as the pH point of zero charge (pHpzc) determination. Prepared material was subsequently utilized for the uptake of Rhodamine B (RhB). Operational parameters, such as adsorbent dosage, concentration, time, and temperature, were investigated. Evidence of effective urea modification was confirmed by vivid absorption bands at 1670 and 1472 cm-1 corresponding to C=O and C-N stretching vibrations, respectively. Optimum adsorption was obtained at pH 3. Freundlich adsorption isotherm best fits the equilibrium adsorption data, while evidence of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction was revealed by Temkin isotherm model. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity (q max) was 434.78 mg/g. Kinetics of the adsorption process was best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. Desorption efficiency was less than or equal to 25 % for all the eluents, and it follows the order HCl > H2O > CH3COOH.

  10. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model to Predict Stress-strain Curves of Boron Steel Sheets at Elevated and Cooling Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc-Toan, Nguyen; Tien-Long, Banh; Dong-Won, Jung; Seung-Han, Yang; Young-Suk, Kim

    2012-02-01

    In order to predict correctly stress-strain curve for tensile tests at elevated and cooling temperatures, a modification of a Johnson-Cook (J-C) model and a new method to determine (J-C) material parameters are proposed. A MATLAB tool is used to determine material parameters by fitting a curve to follow Ludwick and Voce's hardening law at various elevated temperatures. Those hardening law parameters are then utilized to determine modified (J-C) model material parameters. The modified (J-C) model shows the better prediction compared to the conventional one. An FEM tensile test simulation based on the isotropic hardening model for metal sheet at elevated temperatures was carried out via a user-material subroutine, using an explicit finite element code. The simulation results at elevated temperatures were firstly presented and then compared with the measurements. The temperature decrease of all elements due to the air cooling process was then calculated when considering the modified (J-C) model and coded to VUMAT subroutine for tensile test simulation. The modified (J-C) model showed the good comparability between the simulation results and the corresponding experiments.

  11. Results of tests performed on the Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel: Report on the Modified D.S.M.A. Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous tests were performed on the original Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel, scaled down from the full-scale plans. Results of tests performed on the original scale model tunnel were reported in April 1995, which clearly showed that this model was lacking in performance. Subsequently this scale model was modified to attempt to possibly improve the tunnel performance. The modifications included: (a) redesigned diffuser; (b) addition of a collector; (c) addition of a Nozzle-Diffuser; (d) changes in location of vent-air. Tests performed on the modified tunnel showed a marked improvement in performance amounting to a nominal increase of pressure recovery in the diffuser from 34 percent to 54 percent. Results obtained in the tests have wider application. They may also be applied to other tunnels operating with an open test section not necessarily having similar geometry as the model under consideration.

  12. Development of a modified factor analysis/multiple regression model to apportion suspended particulate matter in a complex urban airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, Maria T.; Daisey, Joan M.; Lioy, Paul J.

    A modified factor analysis/multiple regression (FA/MR) receptor-oriented source apportionment model has been developed which permits application of FA/MR statistical methods when some of the tracers are not unique to an individual source type. The new method uses factor and regression analyses to apportion non-unique tracer ambient concentrations in situations where there are unique tracers for all sources contributing to the non-unique tracer except one, and ascribes the residual concentration to that source. This value is then used as the source tracer in the final FA/MR apportionment model for ambient paniculate matter. In addition, factor analyses results are complemented with examination of regression residuals in order to optimize the number of identifiable sources. The new method has been applied to identify and apportion the sources of inhalable particulate matter (IPM; D5015 μm), Pb and Fe at a site in Newark, NJ. The model indicated that sulfate/secondary aerosol contributed an average of 25.8 μ -3 (48%) to IPM concentrations, followed by soil resuspension (8.2 μ -3 or 15%), paint spraying/paint pigment (6.7/gmm -3or 13%), fuel oil burning/space heating (4.3 μ -3 or 8 %), industrial emissions (3.6 μm -3 or 7 %) and motor vehicle exhaust (2.7 μ -3 or 15 %). Contributions to ambient Pb concentrations were: motor vehicle exhaust (0.16μm -3or 36%), soil resuspension (0.10μm -3 or 24%), fuel oil burning/space heating (0.08μm -3or 18%), industrial emissions (0.07 μ -3 or 17 %), paint spraying/paint pigment (0.036 μm -3or 9 %) and zinc related sources (0.022 μ -3 or 5 %). Contributions to ambient Fe concentrations were: soil resuspension (0.43μ -3or 51%), paint spraying/paint pigment (0.28 μm -3or 33 %) and industrial emissions (0.15 μ -3or 18 %). The models were validated by comparing partial source profiles calculated from modeling results with the corresponding published source emissions composition.

  13. A cosmological exclusion plot: towards model-independent constraints on modified gravity from current and future growth rate data

    SciTech Connect

    Taddei, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Most cosmological constraints on modified gravity are obtained assuming that the cosmic evolution was standard ΛCDM in the past and that the present matter density and power spectrum normalization are the same as in a ΛCDM model. Here we examine how the constraints change when these assumptions are lifted. We focus in particular on the parameter Y (also called G{sub eff}) that quantifies the deviation from the Poisson equation. This parameter can be estimated by comparing with the model-independent growth rate quantity fσ{sub 8}(z) obtained through redshift distortions. We reduce the model dependency in evaluating Y by marginalizing over σ{sub 8} and over the initial conditions, and by absorbing the degenerate parameter Ω{sub m,0} into Y. We use all currently available values of fσ{sub 8}(z). We find that the combination Y-circumflex =YΩ{sub m,0}, assumed constant in the observed redshift range, can be constrained only very weakly by current data, Y-circumflex =0.28{sub −0.23}{sup +0.35} at 68% c.l. We also forecast the precision of a future estimation of Y-circumflex in a Euclid-like redshift survey. We find that the future constraints will reduce substantially the uncertainty, Y-circumflex =0.30{sub −0.09}{sup +0.08} , at 68% c.l., but the relative error on Y-circumflex around the fiducial remains quite high, of the order of 30%. The main reason for these weak constraints is that Y-circumflex is strongly degenerate with the initial conditions, so that large or small values of Y-circumflex are compensated by choosing non-standard initial values of the derivative of the matter density contrast. Finally, we produce a forecast of a cosmological exclusion plot on the Yukawa strength and range parameters, which complements similar plots on laboratory scales but explores scales and epochs reachable only with large-scale galaxy surveys. We find that future data can constrain the Yukawa strength to within 3% of the Newtonian one if the range is around a few

  14. Experimental and numerical study of nanofluid in heat exchanger fitted by modified twisted tape: exergy analysis and ANN prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddah, Heydar; Ghasemi, Nahid; Keyvani, Bahram; Cheraghali, Ramin

    2016-09-01

    Present study provides an experimental investigation of the exergetic efficiency due to the flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in different geometries and flow regimes of the double pipe heat exchangers. The experiments with different Geometrical Progression Ratio (GPR) of twists as the new modified twisted tapes and different nanofluid concentration were performed under similar operation condition. Pitch length of the proposed twisted tapes and consequently the twist ratios changed along the twists with respect to the Geometrical Progression Ratio (GPR) whether reducer (RGPR < 1) or increaser (IGPR > 1). Regarding the experimental data, utilization of RGPR twists together with nanofluids tends to increase exergetic efficiency. Since the Prediction of exergetic efficiency from experimental process is complex and time consuming, artificial neural networks for identification of the relationship, which may exist between the thermal and flow parameters and exergetic efficiency, have been utilized. The network input consists of five parameters (Re,Pr ,φ, Tr, GPR) that crucially dominate the heat transfer process. The results proved that the introduced ANN model is reliable and capable in proposing a proper development plan for a heat exchanger and/or to determine the optimal plan of operation for heat transfer process.

  15. Opinion dynamics of modified Hegselmann-Krause model in a group-based population with heterogeneous bounded confidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guiyuan; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Zhijun

    2015-02-01

    Continuous opinion dynamics in a group-based population with heterogeneous bounded confidences is considered in this paper. A slightly modified Hegselmann-Krause model is proposed, and agents are classified into three categories: open-minded-, moderate-minded-, and closed-minded-agents, while the whole population is divided into three subgroups accordingly. We study how agents of each category and the population size can affect opinion dynamics. It is observed that the number of final opinion clusters is dominated by the closed-minded agents; open-minded agents cannot contribute to forming opinion consensus and the existence of open-minded agents may diversify the final opinions instead; for the fixed population size and proportion of closed-minded agents, the relative size of the largest final opinion cluster varies along concave-parabola-like curve as the proportion of open-minded agents increases, and there is a tipping point when the number of open-minded agents is almost equal to that of moderate-minded agents; for the fixed proportion of the three categories in the population, as the population size becomes larger, the number of final opinion clusters will reach a plateau. Some of the results are different from the previous studies.

  16. Delivery system for DNAzymes using arginine-modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for therapeutic application in a nasopharyngeal carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Yang, Lifang; Huang, Suping; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Lu; He, Jiang; Xu, Zhijie; Liu, Liyu; Cao, Ya; Sun, Lunquan

    2013-01-01

    DNAzymes are synthetic, single-stranded, catalytic nucleic acids that bind and cleave target mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, and have been explored for genotherapeutics. One bottleneck restricting their application is the lack of an efficient delivery system. As an inorganic nanomaterial with potentially wide application, nano-hydroxyapatite particles (nHAP) have attracted increasing attention as new candidates for nonviral vectors. In this study, we developed an nHAP-based delivery system and explored its cellular uptake mechanisms, intracellular localization, and biological effects. Absorption of arginine-modified nanohydroxyapatite particles (Arg-nHAP) and DZ1 (latent membrane protein 1 [LMP1]-targeted) reached nearly 100% efficiency under in vitro conditions. Using specific inhibitors, cellular uptake of the Arg-nHAP/DZ1 complex was shown to be mediated by the energy-dependent endocytosis pathway. Further, effective intracellular delivery and nuclear localization of the complex was confirmed by confocal microscopy. Biologically, the complex successfully downregulated the expression of LMP1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. In a mouse tumor xenograft model, the complex was shown to be delivered efficiently to tumor tissue, downregulating expression of LMP1 and suppressing tumor growth. These results suggest that Arg-nHAP may be an efficient vector for nucleic acid-based drugs with potential clinical application. PMID:23983464

  17. The myelopoietic effects of a Serratia marcescens-derived biologic response modifier in a mouse model of thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Peterson, V M; Rundus, C H; Reinoehl, P J; Schroeter, S R; McCall, C A; Bartle, E J

    1992-04-01

    The proliferative defects observed in phagocytic stem cells after major thermal injuries may be caused by an inadequate production of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), a family of hemopoietic cytokines necessary for the production and function of granulocytes and monocytes. In this study a biologic response modifier (S-BRM) consisting of sized vesicles derived from the cell membrane and ribosomes of Serratia marcescens was investigated in a mouse model of thermal injury to determine its ability to augment postburn myelopoiesis. Treatment of burned mice with S-BRM was well tolerated and was associated with statistically significant increases in absolute numbers of circulating granulocytes and monocytes compared with burned mice receiving saline solution. In addition, the size of the splenic myeloid stem cell compartment, as measured by granulocyte-macrophage stem cell colony formation in soft agar, was markedly expanded. Finally, plasma levels of CSF were increased significantly in burned mice receiving S-BRM but were not elevated in burned littermates treated with saline solution. These data suggest that production of CSF is suboptimal after thermal injury and S-BRM is capable of up-regulating postburn myelopoiesis by causing the release of CSF into the systemic circulation.

  18. Testing the 2.2% HSR Reference H Model with a Modified Wing Planform in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Wahls, Richard A.; Hamner, Marvine P.

    1999-01-01

    The HSR program moved into phase two with the selection of a new airplane configuration, the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA). The TCA was designed based on the experiences gained while investigating both the Reference H and the Arrow Wing configurations in different wind tunnels and CFD studies. Part of that investigation included performing extensive high Reynolds number testing on the Reference H configuration in the NTF to provide data for predicting full-scale flight performance, as well as developing techniques for testing these types of configurations in the NTF. With the selection of the TCA configuration, a smaller investigation was designed to examine whether or not the scaling characteristics of the TCA configuration are similar to those observed for the Reference H configuration. This presentation will include a description of the 2.2% Modified Reference H model used in this investigation (highlighting the similarities and the differences when compared to the TCA configuration), the testing objectives, and some preliminary findings that are relevant to the current high-lift system.

  19. The modified ABC model explains the development of the petaloid perianth of Agapanthus praecox ssp. orientalis (Agapanthaceae) flowers.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toru; Fukuda, Tatsuya; Nakano, Masaru; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Kameya, Toshiaki; Kanno, Akira

    2005-06-01

    The class B genes, which belong to the MADS-box gene family, play important roles in regulating the development of petals and stamens in flowering plants. To understand the molecular mechanisms of floral development in Agapanthus praecox ssp. orientalis (Agapanthaceae), we isolated and characterized the homologs of the Antirrhinum majus genes GLOBOSA and DEFICIENS in this plant. These were designated as ApGLO and ApDEF, respectively. ApGLO and ApDEF contain open reading frames that encode deduced protein with 210 and 214 amino acid residues, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that ApGLO and ApDEF belong to the monocot class B gene family. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that hybridization signals of ApGLO and ApDEF were observed in whorl 1 as well as in whorls 2 and 3. Moreover, the flowers of transgenic Arabidopsis plants that ectopically expressed ApGLO formed petal-like organs in whorl 1. These observations indicate that the flower developmental mechanism of Agapanthus follows the modified ABC model.

  20. Use of murine models to detect the allergenicity of genetically modified Lactococcus lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Shen-Shih; Liu, Chin-Feng; Ku, Ting-Wei; Mau, Jeng-Leun; Lin, Hsin-Tang; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-04-27

    By introducing aprN into Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, the genetically modified L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK successfully expressed the nattokinase. The safety assessment of this novel strain was based on allergenicity of pepsin digestion stability and murine model serologic identity. Subjecting to the GM strain and host to pepsin digestion, the soluble fractions and cell debris were fast degraded completely. Feeding with ovalbumin resulted in significantly higher production of IgG1 and IgE as compared to that of L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK or L. lactis NZ9000. Further, the serum IgG2a level increased dose-dependently at week 2 and induced immune reaction toward Th1 pathway. Secretion of cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 fed with lactococci was significantly lower than that of the OVA group. L. lactis NZ9000/pNZPNK did not increase the proliferation of type 2 helper T cells in spleen or induce allergenicity in BALB/c mice. On the basis of the results, the new GM lactic acid bacterium is regarded as safe to use.

  1. Active Microwave Remote Sensing of a Natural, Tallgrass Prairie and a Projected Disk Component Model to Explain the Behavior of a Modified Dielectric Disk Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert David, Jr.

    C-band scatterometer measurements were made of a tallgrass prairie in an attempt to determine the degree of correlation between (1) the backscattering coefficient (sigma_sp{rm tr}{ circ}) and different expressions of soil moisture and (2) the backscattering coefficient and various canopy parameters. The findings of this study support those made in previous studies in terms of the optimum polarization and view angle selection for soil moisture work (i.e., near-nadir view angles and HH and VV polarizations). In contrast to previous studies, view angles of 30 ^circ and 45^circ also produced strong correlations with soil moisture. A moderately strong correlation and partial correlation was found between sigma_sp{rm tr}{circ} and leaf water potential, indicating some capability of C-band measurements to detect extremes in the water status of prairie vegetation under shallow soil conditions. Also, site differences due to burn treatments appeared to cause significant differences in the sensitivity of sigma_sp{ rm tr}{circ} to soil moisture. In a second study, the disk model developed by Drs. Eom and Fung was tested against a set of field measurements of sigma_sp{rm tr} {circ} from a crop of sunflowers. The model overestimated sigma_sp{ rm tr}{circ} at early growth stages, but decreased the overestimate as the crop matured. The author modified the model to accommodate canopies with non-uniform, continuous leaf angle distributions. The modification altered the shape of the response curve for predicted sigma_sp{rm tr }{circ} versus view angle, but failed to reduce the overestimate in the early growth states. Additional modifications (e.g., incorporating row structure information) may be necessary. A new model, called the Projected Disk Component Model (PDCM), was developed to help explain the behavior of the modified disk model (MDM). By reducing several types of theoretical disk canopies to a simple, quantitative measure of their constituent horizontal and vertical

  2. Feasibility of a Day-Camp Model of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with and without Botulinum Toxin A Injection for Children with Hemiplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Shaw, Karin; Ponten, Eva; Boyd, Roslyn; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the feasibility of modified constraint-induced (CI) therapy provided in a 2-week day-camp model with and without intramuscular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections for children with congenital cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with congenital hemiplegia, Manual Ability Classification System (MACS)…

  3. Measuring Children's Environmental Attitudes and Values in Northwest Mexico: Validating a Modified Version of Measures to Test the Model of Ecological Values (2-MEV)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneller, A. J.; Johnson, B.; Bogner, F. X.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the validation process of measuring children's attitudes and values toward the environment within a Mexican sample. We applied the Model of Ecological Values (2-MEV), which has been shown to be valid and reliable in 20 countries, including one Spanish speaking culture. Items were initially modified to fit the regional dialect,…

  4. Modeling the impact of vapor thymol concentration, temperature and modified atmosphere condition on growth behavior of Salmonella spp. on raw shrimp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella spp. is a microorganism of concern, on a global basis, for raw shrimp. This research modeled the impact of vapor thymol concentration (0, 0.8 and 1.6 mg/l), storage temperature (8, 12 and 16 degree C) and modified atmosphere packaging (0.04 and 59.5 percent CO2) against the growth behavio...

  5. A modified murine model of systemic sclerosis: bleomycin given by pump infusion induced skin and pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Minrui; Lv, Jiaoyan; Zou, Linlin; Yang, Wei; Xiong, Yingluo; Chen, Xiangjun; Guan, Ming; He, Rui; Zou, Hejian

    2015-03-01

    Daily subcutaneous (sc) injection of bleomycin (BLM) causes dermal fibrosis but rarely causes lung changes in mice. There are also significant disadvantages to this traditional model for systemic sclerosis, including a variable distribution of lesions and a requirement for repetitive procedures. The present study was undertaken to develop a convenient method of BLM administration that yields stable dermal inflammation and fibrosis with extensive and reproducible interstitial lung disease (ILD) in mice. Osmotic minipumps containing BLM (150 mg/kg) or saline were implanted sc in C57BL/6 mice and the drug was delivered as a continuous infusion over 1∼4 weeks. The time course of morphological features, collagen content, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the skin and the lungs were analyzed. Pathological examination demonstrated dominant inflammatory infiltrates at week 1 and significant fibrosis at week 4. Decreased microvessel density and increased myofibroblast counts were observed in the skin of BLM-treated mice at week 4. In addition, there were obvious increases in dermal infiltration of CD45(+) leukocytes, including F4/80(+) macrophages, Gr-1(+) neutrophils, and CD3(+) T lymphocytes in BLM-treated mice. IL-1β, IL-4, and CXCL2 transcripts were continually upregulated by BLM in the skin and lung tissues. In addition, lungs from BLM-treated mice showed significant inflammatory infiltrates and confluent subpleural fibrosis at week 4. In conclusion, this modified murine model for drug-induced systemic inflammation and fibrosis uses a single procedure and provides reproducible skin and lung lesions, mimicking human systemic sclerosis (SSc) with ILD-like manifestation.

  6. Vancomycin-Modified Implant Surface Inhibits Biofilm Formation and Supports Bone-Healing in an Infected Osteotomy Model in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Suzanne; Barr, Stephanie; Engiles, Julie; Hickok, Noreen J.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Richardson, Dean W.; Parvizi, Javad; Schaer, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Implant-associated infections contribute to patient morbidity and health care costs. We hypothesized that surface modification of titanium fracture hardware with vancomycin would support bone-healing and prevent bacterial colonization of the implant in a large-animal model. Methods: A unilateral transverse mid-diaphyseal tibial osteotomy was performed and repaired with a titanium locking compression plate in nine sheep. Four control animals were treated with an unmodified plate and five experimental animals were treated with a vancomycin-modified plate. The osteotomy was inoculated with 2.5 × 106 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus. The animals were killed at three months postoperatively, and implants were retrieved aseptically. Microbiologic and histologic analyses, scanning electron and confocal microscopy, and microcomputed tomography were performed. Results: All animals completed the study. Compared with the treatment cohort, control animals exhibited protracted lameness in the operatively treated leg. Gross findings during necropsy were consistent with an infected osteotomy accompanied by a florid and lytic callus. Microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis of the tibiae further supported the presence of septic osteomyelitis in the control cohort. Thick biofilms were also evident, and bacterial cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus in three of four control animals. In contrast, animals treated with vancomycin-treated plates exhibited a healed osteotomy site with homogenous remodeling, there was no evidence of biofilm formation on the retrieved plate, and bacterial cultures from only one of five animals were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions: Vancomycin-derivatized plate surfaces inhibited implant colonization with Staphylococcus aureus and supported bone-healing in an infected large-animal model. Clinical Relevance: Binding of vancomycin to the surface of implants holds great promise in helping to reduce

  7. Modified Glauber model and a new interpretation of collective effects in AA and pA at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seryakov, Andrey; Feofilov, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    The Monte Carlo version of the Modified Glauber Model (MGM) [1] is updated and applied to the analysis of the total multiplicity yields of charged particles in mucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions in a broad energy range. The MGM takes into account the energy conservation and momentum loss for particle production in each nucleon-nucleon inelastic collision. This is done by introducing a mean fraction of the initial nucleon momentum which is allowed to be lost in each inelastic interaction between nucleons of colliding nuclei. Therefore, the next nucleon-nucleon inelastic collision takes place at a lower energy √{s } and with the relevant cross-section σinel (√{s }) . Comparison of the MGM calculations to the available experimental data on mean total multiplicity < Nch > in central nucleus-nucleus collisions from AGS to RHIC energies allows to fit a single model parameter k=0.35. The same value of k is found to be valid for successful description of the scaling of < Nch >/2Npart with the number of nucleon-participants Npart in Pb-Pb collisions observed in ALICE at the LHC [2]. A considerable reduction of Ncoll is obtained in MGM for the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC energy in omparison with the standard Glauber approach, while the number of participants Npart is practically unchanged. In the MGM approach the nucleon stopping phenomenon is observed, that has dramatic effect in case of proton-nucleus collisions. The MGM predicts considerable decrease (by a factor of about 3 for central collisions in comparison with the standard Glauber-based estimates) of the number of participants < Npart >= < Ncoll > +1 in case of pA interactions at the LHC.

  8. Wind tunnel and ground static tests of a .094 scale powered model of a modified T-39 lift/cruise fan V/STOL research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, D.; Clinglan, J.; Salemann, V.; Omar, E.

    1977-01-01

    Ground static and wind tunnel test of a scale model modified T-39 airplane are reported. The configuration in the nose and replacement of the existing nacelles with tilting lift/cruise fans. The model was powered with three 14 cm diameter tip driven turbopowered simulators. Forces and moments were measured by an internal strain guage balance. Engine simulator thrust and mass flow were measured by calibrated pressure and temperature instrumentation mounted downstream of the fans. The low speed handling qualities and general aerodynamic characteristics of the modified T-39 were defined. Test variables include thrust level and thrust balance, forward speed, model pitch and sideslip angle at forward speeds, model pitch, roll, and ground height during static tests, lift/cruise fan tilt angle, flap and aileron deflection angle, and horizonal stabilizer angle. The effects of removing the landing gear, the lift/cruise fans, and the tail surfaces were also investigated.

  9. Modified three-dimensional skull base model with artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, and venous sinuses for training in skull base surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Oyama, Kazutaka; Ueno, Hideaki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Honma, Keiichirou

    2008-12-01

    Experience with dissection of the cavernous sinus and the temporal bone is essential for training in skull base surgery, but the opportunities for cadaver dissection are very limited. A modification of a commercially available prototype three-dimensional (3D) skull base model, made by a selective laser sintering method and incorporating surface details and inner bony structures such as the inner ear structures and air cells, is proposed to include artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, venous sinuses, and the internal carotid artery for such surgical training. The transpetrosal approach and epidural cavernous sinus surgery (Dolenc's technique) were performed on this modified model using a high speed drill or ultrasonic bone curette under an operating microscope. The model could be dissected in almost the same way as a real cadaver. The modified 3D skull base model provides a good educational tool for training in skull base surgery.

  10. Study of the tornado event in Greece on March 25, 2009: Synoptic analysis and numerical modeling using modified topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsangouras, I. T.; Nastos, P. T.; Pytharoulis, I.

    2016-03-01

    Recent research revealed that western Greece and NW Peloponnese are regions that favor prefrontal tornadic incidence. On March 25, 2009 a tornado developed approximately at 10:30 UTC near Varda village (NW Peloponnese). Tornado intensity was T4-T5 (TORRO scale) and consequently caused an economic impact of 350,000 € over the local society. The goals of this study are: (i) to analyze synoptic and remote sensing features regarding the tornado event over NW Peloponnese and (ii) to investigate the role of topography in tornadogenesis triggered under strong synoptic scale forcing over that area. Synoptic analysis was based on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) data sets. The analysis of daily anomaly of synoptic conditions with respect to 30 years' climatology (1981-2010), was based on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR) reanalysis data sets. In addition, numerous remote sensing data sets were derived by the Hellenic National Meteorological Service (HNMS) weather station network in order to better interpret the examined tornado event. Finally, numerical modeling was performed using the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), initialized by ECMWF gridded analyses, with telescoping nested grids that allow the representation of atmospheric circulations ranging from the synoptic scale down to the meso-scale. The two numerical experiments were performed on the basis of: (a) the presence and (b) the absence of topography (landscape), so as to determine whether the occurrence of a tornado - identified by diagnostic instability indices - could be indicated by modifying topography. The energy helicity index (EHI), the bulk Richardson number (BRN) shear, the storm-relative environmental helicity (SRH), and the maximum convective available potential energy (MCAPE, for parcels with maximum θe) were considered as principal diagnostic instability variables and

  11. Mixture and non-mixture cure fraction models based on the generalized modified Weibull distribution with an application to gastric cancer data.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Edson Z; Achcar, Jorge A; Jácome, Alexandre A A; Santos, José S

    2013-12-01

    The cure fraction models are usually used to model lifetime time data with long-term survivors. In the present article, we introduce a Bayesian analysis of the four-parameter generalized modified Weibull (GMW) distribution in presence of cure fraction, censored data and covariates. In order to include the proportion of "cured" patients, mixture and non-mixture formulation models are considered. To demonstrate the ability of using this model in the analysis of real data, we consider an application to data from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Inferences are obtained by using MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) methods.

  12. Altered expression of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in a mouse model whose glycemic status is controlled by a low carbohydrate ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsuya; Fukui, Asami; Morita, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    Abnormal modification of proteins by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is known to be associated with the pathology induced by hyperglycemia. However, the dynamic mechanism of O-GlcNAc modification under hyperglycemic conditions in vivo has not been fully characterized. To understand the mechanism, we established an animal model in which the glycemic status is controlled by the diet. A mutant mouse (ob/ob) which exhibits diet-induced hyperglycemia when fed a regular chow (chow) was used to establish this model; the mice were fed a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) to improve hyperglycemia. Using this model, we evaluated the levels of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in tissues under a hyperglycemic or its improved condition. ELISA and Western blot analyses revealed that altered expression of certain proteins modified by O-GlcNAc were found in the mice tissues, although global O-GlcNAc levels in the tissues remained unaltered by improvement of hyperglycemia. We also found the Akt protein kinase was modified by O-GlcNAc in the liver of ob/ob mice, and the modification levels were decreased by improvement of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, aberrant phosphorylation of Akt was found in the liver of ob/ob mice under hyperglycemic condition. In conclusion, our established mouse model is useful for evaluating the dynamics of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in tissues associated with glycemic status. This study revealed that the expression level of certain proteins modified by O-GlcNAc is altered when KD improves the hyperglycemia. These proteins could be prospective indexes for nutritional therapy for hyperglycemia-associated diseases, such as diabetes mellitus.

  13. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells). We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  14. Analyzing signal attenuation in PFG anomalous diffusion via a modified Gaussian phase distribution approximation based on fractal derivative model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoxing

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique is a noninvasive tool, and has been increasingly employed to study anomalous diffusions in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). However, the analysis of PFG anomalous diffusion is much more complicated than normal diffusion. In this paper, a fractal derivative model based modified Gaussian phase distribution method is proposed to describe PFG anomalous diffusion. By using the phase distribution obtained from the effective phase shift diffusion method based on fractal derivatives, and employing some of the traditional Gaussian phase distribution approximation techniques, a general signal attenuation expression for free fractional diffusion is derived. This expression describes a stretched exponential function based attenuation, which is distinct from both the exponential attenuation for normal diffusion obtained from conventional Gaussian phase distribution approximation, and the Mittag-Leffler function based attenuation for anomalous diffusion obtained from fractional derivative. The obtained signal attenuation expression can analyze the finite gradient pulse width (FGPW) effect. Additionally, it can generally be applied to all three types of PFG fractional diffusions classified based on time derivative order α and space derivative order β. These three types of fractional diffusions include time-fractional diffusion with { 0 < α ≤ 2 , β = 2 } , space-fractional diffusion with { α = 1 , 0 < β ≤ 2 } , and general fractional diffusion with { 0 < α , β ≤ 2 } . The results in this paper are consistent with reported results based on effective phase shift diffusion equation method and instantaneous signal attenuation method. This method provides a new, convenient approximation formalism for analyzing PFG anomalous diffusion experiments. The expression that can simultaneously interpret general fractional diffusion and FGPW effect could be especially important in PFG MRI, where the narrow

  15. Modifying the catalytic preference of tributyrin in Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase through in-silico modeling of enzyme-substrate complex.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Emel; Kuyucak, Serdar; Sezerman, Ugur O

    2013-05-01

    In this study, rational design for Bacillus thermocatenulatus lipase (BTL2) was carried out to lower the activation barrier for hydrolysis of short-chain substrates. In this design, we used computational models for the enzyme-substrate (ES) complexes of tributyrin (C4) and tricaprylin (C8), which were generated through docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. These ES complexes were employed in steered MD (SMD) simulations with Jarzynski's equality to estimate their relative binding free energies. Potential mutation sites for modifying the chain-length selectivity of BTL2 were found by inspecting the SMD trajectories and fine-tuning the volume and hydrophobicity of the cleft. Seven mutations (F17A, L57F, V175A, V175F, I320A, I320F and L360F) were performed to cover three binding pockets for sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 acyl chains. The relative binding free energies of the mutant ES complexes formed by C4 and C8 ligands were calculated similarly. The experimental routines of protein engineering including site-directed mutagenesis, heterologous protein expression and purification were performed for all lipases. Steady-state specific activities towards C4 and C8 were determined for wild-type and mutant lipases, which gave an estimate of the relative change in the binding free energy of transition state complex (ES(‡)). The chain-length selectivity of mutants was determined from the relative changes in the activation barrier of hydrolysis of C4 and C8 triacylglycerol with respect to wild-type using computational and experimental findings. The most promising mutant for C4 over C8 preference was found to be L360F. We suggest that L360F may be at a critical position to lower the activation barrier for C4 and elevate it for C8 hydrolysis.

  16. Farm to Work: Development of a Modified Community-Supported Agriculture Model at Worksites, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Karissa D.; Loyo, Jennifer; Jowers, Esbelle M.; Rodgers, Lindsay Faith; Smiley, Andrew W.; Leversen, Eric; Hoelscher, Deanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Farm to Work program is a modified community-supported agriculture model at worksites in Texas. Community Context The objective of the Farm to Work program is to increase fruit and vegetable intake among employees and their households by decreasing cost, improving convenience, and increasing access while also creating a new market for local farmers at worksites. The objectives of this article were to describe the development, implementation, and outcome of a 5-year participation trend analysis and to describe the community relationships that were formed to enable the successful implementation of the program. Methods The Farm to Work program began in November 2007 as a collaborative effort between the nonprofit Sustainable Food Center, the Texas Department of State Health Services, the Web development company WebChronic Consulting LLC, and Naegelin Farm. The program provides a weekly or biweekly opportunity for employees to order a basket of produce online to be delivered to the worksite by a local farmer. A 5-year participation trend analysis, including seasonal variation and sales trends, was conducted using sales data from November 2007 through December 2012. Outcome The total number of baskets delivered from November 2007 through December 2012 was 38,343; of these, 37,466 were sold and 877 were complimentary. The total value of sold and complimentary baskets was $851,035 and $21,925, respectively. Participation in the program increased over time and was highest in 2012. Interpretation The Farm to Work program increased access to locally grown fruits and vegetables for employees and created a new market for farmers. Increased program participation indicates that Farm to Work can increase employees’ fruit and vegetable consumption and thus help prevent chronic diseases in this population PMID:26491816

  17. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy of a small-molecule SMN2 splicing modifier in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Feng, Zhihua; Ling, Karen K. Y.; Mollin, Anna; Sheedy, Josephine; Yeh, Shirley; Petruska, Janet; Narasimhan, Jana; Dakka, Amal; Welch, Ellen M.; Karp, Gary; Chen, Karen S.; Metzger, Friedrich; Ratni, Hasane; Lotti, Francesco; Tisdale, Sarah; Naryshkin, Nikolai A.; Pellizzoni, Livio; Paushkin, Sergey; Ko, Chien-Ping; Weetall, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by the loss or mutation of both copies of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The related SMN2 gene is retained, but due to alternative splicing of exon 7, produces insufficient levels of the SMN protein. Here, we systematically characterize the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics properties of the SMN splicing modifier SMN-C1. SMN-C1 is a low-molecular weight compound that promotes the inclusion of exon 7 and increases production of SMN protein in human cells and in two transgenic mouse models of SMA. Furthermore, increases in SMN protein levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and skin correlate with those in the central nervous system (CNS), indicating that a change of these levels in blood or skin can be used as a non-invasive surrogate to monitor increases of SMN protein levels in the CNS. Consistent with restored SMN function, SMN-C1 treatment increases the levels of spliceosomal and U7 small-nuclear RNAs and corrects RNA processing defects induced by SMN deficiency in the spinal cord of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. A 100% or greater increase in SMN protein in the CNS of SMNΔ7 SMA mice robustly improves the phenotype. Importantly, a ∼50% increase in SMN leads to long-term survival, but the SMA phenotype is only partially corrected, indicating that certain SMA disease manifestations may respond to treatment at lower doses. Overall, we provide important insights for the translation of pre-clinical data to the clinic and further therapeutic development of this series of molecules for SMA treatment. PMID:26931466

  18. Castration modifies aortic vasoreactivity and serum fatty acids in a sucrose-fed rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perez, Israel; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Carvajal, Karla; Baños, Guadalupe

    2009-03-01

    Levels of testosterone and estradiol influence the incidence of cardiovascular diseases: generally, estrogens in females are protective before menopause; coronaropathies, hypertension, and dyslipidemias in normal men are more frequent at comparable ages. We investigated the modulation by castration of in vitro vasoreactivity, serum lipid content, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in rats with sucrose-induced metabolic syndrome. The main characteristics of the rat model are: hypertriglyceridemia, moderately high blood pressure, intra-abdominal accumulation of adipose tissue, hyperinsulinemia, nephropathy, increased oxidative stress, and altered vasoreactivity. Male weanling rats received 30% sucrose solution for 16 weeks (metabolic syndrome; MS), controls (C) had plain water; both had commercial rodent chow. They were subdivided into five groups with two subgroups each: Group 1, intact C and MS rats, Groups 2-5, C and MS rats castrated for periods of 16, 12, 8, and 4 weeks. At the end of the study period, systolic blood pressure was measured, and blood and aortas were obtained for fatty acid determination and vasoreactivity assays, respectively. After 16 weeks' sucrose treatment MS aortas showed hypercontractility and decreased vasodilation. Palmitic and palmitoleic acids were increased in MS versus C. Arachidonic acid levels in MS were lower than in intact or castrated C. Long-term castration of 16 weeks normalized the levels of palmitic and oleic acids. With the shorter periods of castration, contractility increased and relaxation decreased in C and MS, but it was more significant in C. Regarding fatty acid composition, long-term castration increased polyunsaturated (arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic) fatty acids. The shorter periods did not modify the fatty acid profile in either C or MS. Metabolic syndrome altered SBP, aortic reactivity, and levels of fatty acids; castration of long duration normalized them in some cases.

  19. Assessment of groundwater contamination risk using hazard quantification, a modified DRASTIC model and groundwater value, Beijing Plain, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; He, Jiangtao; Chen, Honghan

    2012-08-15

    Groundwater contamination risk assessment is an effective tool for groundwater management. Most existing risk assessment methods only consider the basic contamination process based upon evaluations of hazards and aquifer vulnerability. In view of groundwater exploitation potentiality, including the value of contamination-threatened groundwater could provide relatively objective and targeted results to aid in decision making. This study describes a groundwater contamination risk assessment method that integrates hazards, intrinsic vulnerability and groundwater value. The hazard harmfulness was evaluated by quantifying contaminant properties and infiltrating contaminant load, the intrinsic aquifer vulnerability was evaluated using a modified DRASTIC model and the groundwater value was evaluated based on groundwater quality and aquifer storage. Two groundwater contamination risk maps were produced by combining the above factors: a basic risk map and a value-weighted risk map. The basic risk map was produced by overlaying the hazard map and the intrinsic vulnerability map. The value-weighted risk map was produced by overlaying the basic risk map and the groundwater value map. Relevant validation was completed by contaminant distributions and site investigation. Using Beijing Plain, China, as an example, thematic maps of the three factors and the two risks were generated. The thematic maps suggested that landfills, gas stations and oil depots, and industrial areas were the most harmful potential contamination sources. The western and northern parts of the plain were the most vulnerable areas and had the highest groundwater value. Additionally, both the basic and value-weighted risk classes in the western and northern parts of the plain were the highest, indicating that these regions should deserve the priority of concern. Thematic maps should be updated regularly because of the dynamic characteristics of hazards. Subjectivity and validation means in assessing the

  20. Experiment and numerical simulation on cross-die forming of SUS304 metastable austenitic stainless using a modified Johnson-Cook model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Ding, Wei; Ye, Liyan; Chen, Jun

    2013-12-01

    True stress-strain curves of SUS304 metastable austenitic stainless steel at various strain rates were fitted by a modified Johnson-Cook material model. The effect of blank-holder force on Cross-die forming of SUS304 stainless steel was studied. The forming process was also simulated by the software Marc based on this model. Major strain distribution, thickness distribution and load-displacement were compared between experiment and simulation. The results indicated the modified Johnson-Cook model could well predict the deformation behavior of SUS304 stainless steel. The martensitie volume fraction at different positions of the formed part was in good agreement with what can be expected.

  1. [Heavy metal adsorption research on different size fractions of sediment in the Baotou section of the Yellow River by using modified fractal dimension model].

    PubMed

    Xue, Hong-Xi; He, Jiang; Fan, Qing-Yun; Lü, Chang-Wei; Wang, Xia; Liang, Ying; Sun, Ying; Shen, Li-Li; Sa, Ru-Li

    2008-01-01

    The expression of surface fractal dimension (SFD) for size fractions of the Yellow River sediment was deduced. Based on the expression, the SFD value of different size fractions of the sediment was calculated. The SFD value of the sediment in the Baotou section of the Yellow River is 1.91, and the SFD value of the sediment smaller than 63 microm is 1.36, indicating strong ablation and separating ability of the Yellow River water. Using the modified fractal model, Freundlich model and Langmuir model to fit the data of heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd) adsorption, it is found that the modified fractal model is more available. And the adsorptive thermodynamics is better described by combining the modified fractal model and metastable equilibrium adsorption (MEA) theory. The variation extents of equilibrium adsorption capacity influenced by different grain size are ranked as Cu > Pb > Zn approximately equal to Cd. For each selected heavy metal, the higher initial concentration is, the stronger variation of adsorption capacity will be. The adsorptions of Cu and Pb are mainly associated with mineral composition of the sediment, while the adsorptions of Zn and Cd are mainly associated with physical characteristics of the sediment surface.

  2. Artificial neural network (ANN) modeling of adsorption of methylene blue by NaOH-modified rice husk in a fixed-bed column system.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shamik; Saha, Papita Das

    2013-02-01

    In this study, rice husk was modified with NaOH and used as adsorbent for dynamic adsorption of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Continuous removal of MB from aqueous solutions was studied in a laboratory scale fixed-bed column packed with NaOH-modified rice husk (NMRH). Effect of different flow rates and bed heights on the column breakthrough performance was investigated. In order to determine the most suitable model for describing the adsorption kinetics of MB in the fixed-bed column system, the bed depth service time (BDST) model as well as the Thomas model was fitted to the experimental data. An artificial neural network (ANN)-based model was also developed for describing the dynamic dye adsorption process. An extensive error analysis was carried out between experimental data and data predicted by the models by using the following error functions: correlation coefficient (R(2)), average relative error, sum of the absolute error and Chi-square statistic test (χ(2)). Results show that with increasing bed height and decreasing flow rate, the breakthrough time was delayed. All the error functions yielded minimum values for the ANN model than the traditional models (BDST and Thomas), suggesting that the ANN model is the most suitable model to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of MB by NMRH. It is also more rational and reliable to interpret dynamic dye adsorption data through a process of ANN architecture.

  3. Impact of electro-stimulation on denitrifying bacterial growth and analysis of bacterial growth kinetics using a modified Gompertz model in a bio-electrochemical denitrification reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hengyuan; Chen, Nan; Feng, Chuanping; Tong, Shuang; Li, Rui

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of electro-stimulation on denitrifying bacterial growth in a bio-electrochemical reactor, and the growth were modeled using modified Gompertz model under different current densities at three C/Ns. It was found that the similar optimum current density of 250mA/m(2) was obtained at C/N=0.75, 1.00 and 1.25, correspondingly the maximum nitrate removal efficiencies were 98.0%, 99.2% and 99.9%. Moreover, ATP content and cell membrane permeability of denitrifying bacteria were significantly increased at optimum current density. Furthermore, modified Gompertz model fitted well with the microbial growth curves, and the highest maximum growth rates (µmax) and shorter lag time were obtained at the optimum current density for all C/Ns. This study demonstrated that the modified Gompertz model could be used for describing microbial growth under different current densities and C/Ns in a bio-electrochemical denitrification reactor, and it provided an alternative for improving the performance of denitrification process.

  4. BÄCKLUND Transformation and Analytic Solutions for a Generalized Variable-Coefficient Modified Korteweg-De Vries Model from Fluid Dynamics and Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fu-Wei; Gao, Yi-Tian; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ge

    We investigate a generalized variable-coefficient modified Korteweg-de Vries model with perturbed factor and external force (vc-GmKdV) describing fluid dynamics and space plasmas. In this paper, we propose an extended variable-coefficient balancing-act method (Evc-BAM), which is concise and straightforward, to obtain the generalized analytic solutions including solitary wave solution of the vc-GmKdV model with symbolic computation. Meanwhile, using the Evc-BAM, we obtain an auto-Bäcklund transformation for the vc-GmKdV model on the relevant constraint conditions of the coefficient functions. Using the given auto-Bäcklund transformation, the solutions of special equations for the vc-GmKdV model are also obtained as the variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries (vc-KdV) equation, the generalized KdV equation with perturbed factor and external force (GKdV), the variable-coefficient modified Korteweg-de Vries (vc-mKdV) equation, and the variable-coefficient cylindrical modified Korteweg-de Vries (vc-cmKdV) equation, respectively.

  5. Ethanol consumption modifies the body turnover of cadmium: a study in a rat model of human exposure.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Malgorzata M; Galażyn-Sidorczuk, Malgorzata; Dzwilewska, Ilona

    2013-08-01

    Ethanol (Et) abusers may also be exposed to excessive amounts of cadmium (Cd). Thus, the study was aimed at estimating the influence of Et on the body turnover of Cd in a rat model reflecting excessive alcohol consumption in humans chronically exposed to moderate and relatively high levels of this metal. For this purpose, Cd apparent absorption, retention in the body and concentration in the blood, stomach, duodenum, liver, kidney, spleen, brain, heart, testis and femur as well as its fecal and urinary excretion in the rats exposed to 5 and 50mg Cd l(-1) (in drinking water; for 16 weeks from the fifth week of the animal's life) and/or Et (5 g kg(-1) b.w. per 24 h, by oral gavage; for 12 weeks from the ninth week of life) were estimated. Moreover, the duodenal, liver and kidney pool of the nonmetallothionein (Mt)-bound Cd was evaluated. The administration of Et during the exposure to 5 or 50mg Cd l(-1) increased Cd accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract and its urinary excretion, and decreased Cd concentration in the blood, femur and numerous soft tissues (including liver and kidney) as well as the total pool of this metal in internal organs. Et modified or not the pool of the non-Mt-bound Cd, depending on the level of treatment with this metal. The results show that excessive Et consumption during Cd exposure may decrease the body burden of this metal, at least partly, by its lower absorption and increased urinary excretion. Based on this study, it can be concluded that Cd concentration in the blood and tissues of alcohol abusers chronically exposed to moderate and relatively high levels of this metal may be lower, whereas its urinary excretion is higher than in their nondrinking counterparts. However, since Et is toxic itself, the decreased body burden of Cd owing to alcohol consumption does not allow for the conclusion that the risk of health damage may be lower at co-exposure to these xenobiotics. In a further study, it will be investigated how the Et

  6. A modified genetic model for the Huangshandong magmatic sulfide deposit in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, Xinjiang, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ya-Jing; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Li, Chusi; Tang, Dong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    The Huangshandong Ni-Cu deposit is the largest magmatic sulfide deposit discovered to date in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt in northern Xinjiang, western China. The host intrusion is a 274-Ma composite mafic-ultramafic intrusion consisting of four separate intrusive units: a large layered gabbroic sequence (phase I), a sheet-like ultramafic body (phase II), a dyke-like gabbronorite body (phase III), and an irregular ultramafic unit (phase IV). Important sulfide mineralization is present in the last three intrusive units, predominantly as disseminated and net-textured sulfides (pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite). The Huangshandong mafic-ultramafic intrusive rocks are characterized by arc-like geochemical signatures such as low Ca content in olivine and negative Nb-Ta anomalies in whole rocks. This, together with a post-subduction setting for the East Tianshan in the Permian, suggests that the source mantle was modified previously by slab-derived fluids in the Carboniferous. The mantle-derived magma was ponded in a staging chamber in the lower part of the newly formed arc crust. The first batch of magma to arrive at Huangshandong was most fractionated and depleted in Ni, crystallizing Fe-rich and Ni-depleted olivine (Fo67, <300 ppm Ni). The second batch of magma was more primitive, crystallizing more primitive olivine (Fo81-84). The third batch of magma was also highly fractionated and depleted in Ni, crystallizing Fe-rich and Ni-depleted olivine (Fo72, ~600 ppm Ni). The final batch of magma became more primitive again, crystallizing the most primitive olivine (Fo81-86). The occurrence of rounded sulfide inclusions in olivine primocrysts in the Huangshandong ultramafic rocks indicates that immiscible sulfide liquid droplets were present during olivine crystallization. The Ni tenors of disseminated sulfide ores in the gabbronorite dyke vary mainly between 5 and 8 wt%, which are too high to have been produced by the parental magma of the dyke. The Ni, Cu, and

  7. A three-dimensional ground-water-flow model modified to reduce computer-memory requirements and better simulate confining-bed and aquifer pinchouts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leahy, P.P.

    1982-01-01

    The Trescott computer progr