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Sample records for modified linear response

  1. Enlarging the linear response range of velocity with optimum imaging parameters and modified data processing in laser speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Ul'yanov, Sergey S.; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2008-02-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) technique is considered as a promising method of accessing cerebral blood flow (CBF) of animals for its high spatiotemporal resolution and simplicity. It is important in LSI that optimum imaging parameters and limited noises should be confirmed to promote the imaging precision. We investigated in this paper different factors which may affect the imaging results with a moving white plate model, and then proposed a method of enlarging the linear response range of velocity. Through experiment, we proposed in our LSI system the optimum imaging parameters, including the numerical aperture and magnification of microscopy, the integration time, the gain mode of CCD camera. The average intensity was found optimum at about 800 counts out of 4096 grey level, which permits the highest contrast in our experiment. To eliminate the influence of uneven illumination, a direct current weight of 27 counts was subtracted during data processing. The result indicated that the relationship between measured velocity and the real one remained linear with R2 equaling to 0.99 throughout the scale of 80 mm/s.

  2. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects. Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response by increasing the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction, increasing the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response, augmenting the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response, decreasing the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells, or increasing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  3. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  4. Specific absorption rate calculations of magnetite, using a modified linear response model for applications in magnetic hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández S, A. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Cano, M. E. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Torres-Arenas, J.

    2014-11-07

    Currently the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by magnetic nanoparticles is studied for biomedical applications of cancer thermotherapy. Several experiments are conduced following the framework of the Rosensweig model, in order to estimate their specific absorption rate. Nevertheless, this linear approximation involves strong simplifications which constrain their accuracy and validity range. The main aim of this work is to incorporate the deviation of the sphericity assumption in particles shapes, to improve the determination of their specific absorption rate. The correction to the effective particles volume is computed as a measure of the apparent amount of magnetic material, interacting with the external AC magnetic field. Preliminary results using the physical properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, exhibit an important correction in their estimated specific absorption rate, as a function of the apparent mean particles radius. Indeed, we have observed using a small deviation (6% of the apparent radius), up to 40% of the predicted specific absorption rate by the Rosensweig linear approximation.

  5. A linear combination of modified Bessel functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shitzer, A.; Chato, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    A linear combination of modified Bessel functions is defined, discussed briefly, and tabulated. This combination was found to recur in the analysis of various heat transfer problems and in the analysis of the thermal behavior of living tissue when modeled by cylindrical shells.

  6. Nonadiabatic couplings from time-dependent density functional theory: formulation in the Casida formalism and practical scheme within modified linear response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunping; Hirai, Hirotoshi; Sugino, Osamu

    2007-08-14

    We present an efficient method to compute nonadiabatic couplings (NACs) between the electronically ground and excited states of molecules, within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in frequency domain. Based on the comparison of dynamic polarizability formulated both in the many-body wave function form and the Casida formalism, a rigorous expression is established for NACs, which is similar to the calculation of oscillator strength in the Casida formalism. The adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) gives results in reasonable accuracy as long as the conical intersection (ci) is not approached too closely, while its performance quickly degrades near the ci point. This behavior is consistent with the real-time TDDFT calculation. Through the use of modified linear response theory together with the ground-state-component separation scheme, the performance of ALDA can be greatly improved, not only in the vicinity of ci but also for Rydberg transitions and charge-transfer excitations. Several calculation examples, including the quantization of NACs from the Jahn-Teller effect in the H3 system, have been given to show that TDDFT can efficiently give NACs with an accuracy comparable to that of wave-function-based methods.

  7. Linear Response for Intermittent Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, Viviane; Todd, Mike

    2016-11-01

    We consider the one parameter family {α mapsto T_{α}} ({α in [0,1)}) of Pomeau-Manneville type interval maps {T_{α}(x) = x(1+2^{α} x^{α})} for {x in [0,1/2)} and {T_{α}(x)=2x-1} for {x in [1/2, 1]}, with the associated absolutely continuous invariant probability measure {μ_{α}}. For {α in (0,1)}, Sarig and Gouëzel proved that the system mixes only polynomially with rate {n^{1-1/{α}}} (in particular, there is no spectral gap). We show that for any {ψ in Lq}, the map {α to int_01 ψ d μ_{α}} is differentiable on {[0,1-1/q)}, and we give a (linear response) formula for the value of the derivative. This is the first time that a linear response formula for the SRB measure is obtained in the setting of slowly mixing dynamics. Our argument shows how cone techniques can be used in this context. For {α ≥ 1/2} we need the {n^{-1/{α}}} decorrelation obtained by Gouëzel under additional conditions.

  8. Biological Response Modifiers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reang, Purabi; Gupta, Madhur; Kohli, Kamlesh

    2006-01-01

    We have seen a surge in the use of immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. Biological response modifiers can act passively by enhancing the immunologic response to tumor cells or actively by altering the differentiation/growth of tumor cells. Active immunotherapy with cytokines such as interferons (IFNs) and interleukins (IL-2) is a form of nonspecific active immune stimulation. The use of IL-2 has recently been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and metastatic colorectal cancer. Considerable success has been achieved with the use of immunotherapy, especially in the area of passive immunotherapy using monoclonal antibodies – in particular, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. In addition to the various monoclonal antibodies that have been used in clinical trials, other strategies such as the use of antiangiogenic agents and matrix metalloprotease inhibitors (MMPIs) have also met with some success. Recently, the FDA approved bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agent, for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This review also sheds light on the various angiogenesis inhibitors in clinical trials, the increasing use of thalidomide in cancer, and the upcoming potential cancer vaccines designed to activate cell-mediated immune responses against tumor antigens. PMID:17415315

  9. Non-linear structure in modified action theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Marcos V.

    We study the effects and carry out a suite of cosmological simulations of modified action f(R) models where cosmic acceleration arises from an alteration of gravity instead of dark energy. These models introduce an extra scalar degree of freedom which enhances the force of gravity below the Compton scale of the scalar. The simulations exhibit the so-called chameleon mechanism, necessary for satisfying local constraints on gravity, where this scale depends on environment, in particular the depth of the local gravitational potential. We find that the chameleon mechanism can substantially suppress the enhancement of power spectrum in the non-linear regime if the background field value is comparable to or smaller than the depth of the gravitational potentials of typical structures. Nonetheless power spectrum enhancements at intermediate scales remain at a measurable level even when the expansion history is indistinguishable from a cosmological constant, cold dark matter model. We also investigate the effects of the modified dynamics on halo properties such as their abundance and clustering. We find that the f(R) effects on the halo mass- function and bias depend mostly on the linear power spectrum modifications, but that the chameleon mechanism suppresses the modifications at high-mass halos with deep potential wells. The f(R) modifications also affect the threshold density for collapse, or similarly the overdensity for virialization and therefore can change halo definitions from those of ACDM. As a result, simple scaling relations that take the linear matter power spectrum into a non-linear spectrum fail to capture the modifications of f(R) due to the change in collapsed structures, the chameleon mechanism, and the time evolution of the modifications. A quantification of these effects, including modifications on halo profiles, is necessary to accurately describe halo properties and potentially construct a halo model of the non-linear power spectrum.

  10. Optically isolated signal coupler with linear response

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    An optocoupler for isolating electrical signals that translates an electrical input signal linearly to an electrical output signal. The optocoupler comprises a light emitter, a light receiver, and a light transmitting medium. The light emitter, preferably a blue, silicon carbide LED, is of the type that provides linear, electro-optical conversion of electrical signals within a narrow wavelength range. Correspondingly, the light receiver, which converts light signals to electrical signals and is preferably a cadmium sulfide photoconductor, is linearly responsive to light signals within substantially the same wavelength range as the blue LED.

  11. Response properties of pigeon otolith afferents to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Si, X.; Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the sensitivity to sinusoidal linear accelerations in the plane of the utricular macula was tested in afferents. The head orientation relative to the translation axis was varied in order to determine the head position that elicited the maximal and minimal responses for each afferent. The response gain and phase values obtained to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz linear acceleration stimuli were then plotted as a function of head orientation and a modified cosine function was fit to the data. From the best-fit cosine function, the predicted head orientations that would produce the maximal and minimal response gains were estimated. The estimated maximum response gains to linear acceleration in the utricular plane for the afferents varied between 75 and 1420 spikes s-1 g-1. The mean maximal gains for all afferents to 0.5-Hz and 2-Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration stimuli were 282 and 367 spikes s-1 g-1, respectively. The minimal response gains were essentially zero for most units. The response phases always led linear acceleration and remained constant for each afferent, regardless of head orientation. These response characteristics indicate that otolith afferents are cosine tuned and behave as one-dimensional linear accelerometers. The directions of maximal sensitivity to linear acceleration for the afferents varied throughout the plane of the utricle; however, most vectors were directed out of the opposite ear near the interaural axis. The response dynamics of the afferents were tested using stimulus frequencies ranging between 0.25 Hz and 10 Hz (0.1 g peak acceleration). Across stimulus frequencies, most afferents had increasing gains and constant phase values. These dynamic properties for individual afferents were fit with a simple transfer function that included three parameters: a mechanical time constant, a gain constant, and a fractional order distributed adaptation operator.

  12. Linear ubiquitination signals in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2015-07-01

    Ubiquitin can form eight different linkage types of chains using the intrinsic Met 1 residue or one of the seven intrinsic Lys residues. Each linkage type of ubiquitin chain has a distinct three-dimensional topology, functioning as a tag to attract specific signaling molecules, which are so-called ubiquitin readers, and regulates various biological functions. Ubiquitin chains linked via Met 1 in a head-to-tail manner are called linear ubiquitin chains. Linear ubiquitination plays an important role in the regulation of cellular signaling, including the best-characterized tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Linear ubiquitin chains are specifically generated by an E3 ligase complex called the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) and hydrolyzed by a deubiquitinase (DUB) called ovarian tumor (OTU) DUB with linear linkage specificity (OTULIN). LUBAC linearly ubiquitinates critical molecules in the TNF pathway, such as NEMO and RIPK1. The linear ubiquitin chains are then recognized by the ubiquitin readers, including NEMO, which control the TNF pathway. Accumulating evidence indicates an importance of the LUBAC complex in the regulation of apoptosis, development, and inflammation in mice. In this article, I focus on the role of linear ubiquitin chains in adaptive immune responses with an emphasis on the TNF-induced signaling pathways.

  13. Linear Response Laws and Causality in Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuffa, Alex J.; Scales, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Linear response laws and causality (the effect cannot precede the cause) are of fundamental importance in physics. In the context of classical electrodynamics, students often have a difficult time grasping these concepts because the physics is obscured by the intermingling of the time and frequency domains. In this paper, we analyse the linear…

  14. Linear Response Function of Bond-Order

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nayuta; Mitsuta, Yuki; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Yamanaka, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    We present the linear response function of bond-orders (LRF-BO) based on a real space integration scheme for molecular systems. As in the case of the LRF of density, the LRF-BO is defined as the response of the bond order of the molecule for the virtual perturbation. Our calculations show that the LRF-BO enables us not only to detect inductive and resonating effects of conjugating systems, but also to predict pKa values on substitution groups via linear relationships between the Hammett constants and the LRF-BO values for meta- and para-substituted benzoic acids. More importantly, the LRF-BO values for the O-H bonds strongly depend on the sites to which the virtual perturbation is applied, implying that the LRF-BO values include essential information about reaction mechanism of the acid-dissociation of substituted benzoic acids. PMID:27792148

  15. An update on the nonequilibrium linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiesi, M.; Maes, C.

    2013-01-01

    The unique fluctuation-dissipation theorem for equilibrium stands in contrast with the wide variety of nonequilibrium linear response formulae. Their most traditional approach is ‘analytic’, which, in the absence of detailed balance, introduces the logarithm of the stationary probability density as observable. The theory of dynamical systems offers an alternative with a formula that continues to work even when the stationary distribution is not smooth. We show that this method works equally well for stochastic dynamics, and we illustrate it with a numerical example for the perturbation of circadian cycles. A second ‘probabilistic’ approach starts from dynamical ensembles and expands the probability weights on path space. This line suggests new physical questions, as we meet the frenetic contribution to linear response, and the relevance of the change in dynamical activity in the relaxation to a (new) nonequilibrium condition.

  16. Random Response of Linear Hysteretic Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Floris, Claudio

    2008-07-08

    The probabilistic characterization of the response of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) oscillator with linear hysteretic damping excited by ground motion described by zero mean stationary Gaussian processes is achieved by profiting from a steady-state solution of the motion equation, valid when the excitation is given by the superposition of harmonics. The model of linear hysteretic damping has been introduced to fit damping mechanisms in which the dissipation rate is independent of frequency, and mathematically it is described by the Hilbert transform of the response. Though this model is debated since it violates the principle of causality, its intrinsic simplicity makes it preferable to other models. The steady-state solution of the motion equation proposed in this paper allows a closed form evaluation of the respone mean square value. However, the numerical examples show that this quantity is affected by the mechanism of energy dissipation only when this is large. On the contrary, for a low capacity of dissipation the response mean square value is rather insensitive to the dissipation mechanism.

  17. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  18. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  19. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    1997-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  20. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    1998-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  1. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1998-10-20

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 67 figs.

  2. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1997-11-18

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 31 figs.

  3. Biological Response Modifier in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ronghua; Luo, Feifei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Luman; Yang, Jiao; Deng, Yuting; Huang, Enyu; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Jiang, Xuechao; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-01-01

    Biological response modifiers (BRMs) emerge as a lay of new compounds or approaches used in improving cancer immunotherapy. Evidences highlight that cytokines, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, and noncoding RNAs are of crucial roles in modulating antitumor immune response and cancer-related chronic inflammation, and BRMs based on them have been explored. In particular, besides some cytokines like IFN-α and IL-2, several Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists like BCG, MPL, and imiquimod are also licensed to be used in patients with several malignancies nowadays, and the first artificial small noncoding RNA (microRNA) mimic, MXR34, has entered phase I clinical study against liver cancer, implying their potential application in cancer therapy. According to amounts of original data, this chapter will review the regulatory roles of TLR signaling, some noncoding RNAs, and several key cytokines in cancer and cancer-related immune response, as well as the clinical cases in cancer therapy based on them.

  4. Linear Stepper Actuation Driving Drop Resonance and Modifying Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Katariya, Mayur; Huynh, So Hung; McMorran, Darren; Lau, Chun Yat; Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2016-08-23

    In this work, 2 μL water drops are placed on substrates that are created to have a circular hydrophilic region bounded by superhydrophobicity so that they exhibit high contact angles. When the substrate is translated by a linear stepper actuator, the random force components present in the actuator are shown to cause the drop to rock resonantly. When the substrate is translated downward at inclination angles of up to 6° with respect to the horizontal, the contact angle hysteresis increases progressively to a limiting condition. When the substrate is moved up at inclined angles, alternatively, the contact angle hysteresis increases initially to the limiting condition before it is progressively restored to its static state. These behaviors are accounted for by the reversible micro-Cassie to Wenzel wetting state transformations that are made possible by the hierarchical microscale and nanoscale structures present in the superhydrophobic regions.

  5. Linear response theory for open systems: Quantum master equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Masashi; Kitajima, Sachiko; Arimitsu, Toshihico; Shibata, Fumiaki

    2017-02-01

    A linear response theory for open quantum systems is formulated by means of the time-local and time-nonlocal quantum master equations, where a relevant quantum system interacts with a thermal reservoir as well as with an external classical field. A linear response function that characterizes how a relaxation process deviates from its intrinsic process by a weak external field is obtained by extracting the linear terms with respect to the external field from the quantum master equation. It consists of four parts. One represents the linear response of a quantum system when system-reservoir correlation at an initial time and correlation between reservoir states at different times are neglected. The others are correction terms due to these effects. The linear response function is compared with the Kubo formula in the usual linear response theory. To investigate the properties of the linear response of an open quantum system, an exactly solvable model for a stochastic dephasing of a two-level system is examined. Furthermore, the method for deriving the linear response function is applied for calculating two-time correlation functions of open quantum systems. It is shown that the quantum regression theorem is not valid for open quantum systems unless their reduced time evolution is Markovian.

  6. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; Govind, Niranjan; Yang, Chao; Saad, Yousef; Ng, Esmond

    2015-10-06

    We present two iterative algorithms for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within linear response of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. These methods do not attempt to compute eigenvalues or eigenvectors of the linear response matrix. They are designed to approximate the absorption spectrum as a function directly. They take advantage of the special structure of the linear response matrix. Neither method requires the linear response matrix to be constructed explicitly. They only require a procedure that performs the multiplication of the linear response matrix with a vector. These methods can also be easily modified to efficiently estimate the density of states (DOS) of the linear response matrix without computing the eigenvalues of this matrix. We show by computational experiments that the methods proposed in this paper can be much more efficient than methods that are based on the exact diagonalization of the linear response matrix. We show that they can also be more efficient than real-time TDDFT simulations. We compare the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost.

  7. Descriptive Linear modeling of steady-state visual evoked response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Junker, A. M.; Kenner, K.

    1986-01-01

    A study is being conducted to explore use of the steady state visual-evoke electrocortical response as an indicator of cognitive task loading. Application of linear descriptive modeling to steady state Visual Evoked Response (VER) data is summarized. Two aspects of linear modeling are reviewed: (1) unwrapping the phase-shift portion of the frequency response, and (2) parsimonious characterization of task-loading effects in terms of changes in model parameters. Model-based phase unwrapping appears to be most reliable in applications, such as manual control, where theoretical models are available. Linear descriptive modeling of the VER has not yet been shown to provide consistent and readily interpretable results.

  8. A modified post damping ring bunch compressor beamline for the TESLA linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe R.-G. Piot; Winfried Decking

    2004-03-23

    We propose a modified bunch compressor beamline, downstream of the damping ring, for the TESLA linear collider. This modified beamline uses a third harmonic radio-frequency section based on the 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity under development at Fermilab. In our design the beam deceleration is about {approx}50 MeV instead of {approx}450 MeV in the original design proposed.

  9. Linear and nonlinear response in sheared soft spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Brian

    2013-11-01

    Packings of soft spheres provide an idealized model of foams, emulsions, and grains, while also serving as the canonical example of a system undergoing a jamming transition. Packings' mechanical response has now been studied exhaustively in the context of ``strict linear response,'' i.e. by linearizing about a stable static packing and solving the resulting equations of motion. Both because the system is close to a critical point and because the soft sphere pair potential is non-analytic at the point of contact, it is reasonable to ask under what circumstances strict linear response provides a good approximation to the actual response. We simulate sheared soft sphere packings close to jamming and identify two distinct strain scales: (i) the scale on which strict linear response fails, coinciding with a topological change in the packing's contact network; and (ii) the scale on which linear superposition of the averaged stress-strain curve breaks down. This latter scale provides a ``weak linear response'' criterion and is likely to be more experimentally relevant.

  10. Linear response of an instrument entitled Sky Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Zhe; Wang, Dong; Xu, Wen-qing; Fan, Ren-jie

    2016-11-01

    In order to validate the good linear response of an instrument entitled Sky Radiometer(abbreviated to DTL-1) and check the great accuracy of radiance, the experiments which checked the DTL-1 using the large diameter integrating sphere system verified that the instrument had fine linearity and working stability. At the same time, the sky radiance in Hefei was measured, and the validity and correctness of DTL-1 were verified using fibre-optical spectrometer. The results indicated that the instrument had fine work ability, including good linear response, and could satisfy the scientific research and the actual application. However, the linear response of the instrument entitled Sky Radiometer in different region will be validated.

  11. Linear optical response of finite systems using multishift linear system solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Hübener, Hannes; Giustino, Feliciano

    2014-07-28

    We discuss the application of multishift linear system solvers to linear-response time-dependent density functional theory. Using this technique the complete frequency-dependent electronic density response of finite systems to an external perturbation can be calculated at the cost of a single solution of a linear system via conjugate gradients. We show that multishift time-dependent density functional theory yields excitation energies and oscillator strengths in perfect agreement with the standard diagonalization of the response matrix (Casida's method), while being computationally advantageous. We present test calculations for benzene, porphin, and chlorophyll molecules. We argue that multishift solvers may find broad applicability in the context of excited-state calculations within density-functional theory and beyond.

  12. Linear polymer separation using carbon-nanotube-modified centrifugal filter units.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Tomasz; Marian, Karolina; Pawlyta, Mirosława

    2016-02-01

    The separation of linear polymers such as polysaccharides and polyethylene glycol was performed with modified commercial centrifugal filter units. The deposition of a 0.16-0.35 μm layer of modified carbon nanotubes prevented permeation of linear polymers of molecular weight higher than 20 000 Da through the membrane. It allowed facile purification of solution of 0.1 g of polymer samples from small molecules within 25 min by using a bench-top centrifuge. The structure of modified carbon nanotubes was optimized in order to achieve good adhesion to the low binding regenerated cellulose surface and low solubility in aqueous solutions after deposition. The best modification of carbon nanotubes was oxidation and subsequent amide formation of diethanolamine. Introduction of acetic acid groups using sodium chloroacetate worked equally well. The modified filter could be used multiple times without the decrease of the efficiency. The carbon nanotubes layer was stable in aqueous solutions in a pH range of 1-7. The proposed method provides a convenient way of purification of modified polymers in research areas such as drug delivery or macromolecular probes synthesis.

  13. Learning in higher order Boltzmann machines using linear response.

    PubMed

    Leisink, M A; Kappen, H J

    2000-04-01

    We introduce an efficient method for learning and inference in higher order Boltzmann machines. The method is based on mean field theory with the linear response correction. We compute the correlations using the exact and the approximated method for a fully connected third order network of ten neurons. In addition, we compare the results of the exact and approximate learning algorithm. Finally we use the presented method to solve the shifter problem. We conclude that the linear response approximation gives good results as long as the couplings are not too large.

  14. A review of linear response theory for general differentiable dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruelle, David

    2009-04-01

    The classical theory of linear response applies to statistical mechanics close to equilibrium. Away from equilibrium, one may describe the microscopic time evolution by a general differentiable dynamical system, identify nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) and study how these vary under perturbations of the dynamics. Remarkably, it turns out that for uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems (those satisfying the 'chaotic hypothesis'), the linear response away from equilibrium is very similar to the linear response close to equilibrium: the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations hold, and the fluctuation-dispersion theorem survives in a modified form (which takes into account the oscillations around the 'attractor' corresponding to the NESS). If the chaotic hypothesis does not hold, two new phenomena may arise. The first is a violation of linear response in the sense that the NESS does not depend differentiably on parameters (but this nondifferentiability may be hard to see experimentally). The second phenomenon is a violation of the dispersion relations: the susceptibility has singularities in the upper half complex plane. These 'acausal' singularities are actually due to 'energy nonconservation': for a small periodic perturbation of the system, the amplitude of the linear response is arbitrarily large. This means that the NESS of the dynamical system under study is not 'inert' but can give energy to the outside world. An 'active' NESS of this sort is very different from an equilibrium state, and it would be interesting to see what happens for active states to the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem.

  15. A new modified differential evolution algorithm scheme-based linear frequency modulation radar signal de-noising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood Al-Dabbagh, Mohanad; Dawoud Al-Dabbagh, Rawaa; Raja Abdullah, R. S. A.; Hashim, F.

    2015-06-01

    The main intention of this study was to investigate the development of a new optimization technique based on the differential evolution (DE) algorithm, for the purpose of linear frequency modulation radar signal de-noising. As the standard DE algorithm is a fixed length optimizer, it is not suitable for solving signal de-noising problems that call for variability. A modified crossover scheme called rand-length crossover was designed to fit the proposed variable-length DE, and the new DE algorithm is referred to as the random variable-length crossover differential evolution (rvlx-DE) algorithm. The measurement results demonstrate a highly efficient capability for target detection in terms of frequency response and peak forming that was isolated from noise distortion. The modified method showed significant improvements in performance over traditional de-noising techniques.

  16. Qubit Measurement with a Nonlinear Cavity Detector Beyond Linear Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme, Catherine; Clerk, Aashish

    2012-02-01

    We consider theoretically the use of a driven, nonlinear superconducting microwave cavity to measure a coupled superconducting qubit. This is similar to setups studied in recent experiments.ootnotetextM. Hatridge et al. Phys.Rev.B, 83,134501 (2011)^,ootnotetextF.R. Ong et al. PRL 106,167002 (2011) In a previous work, we demonstrated that for weak coupling (where linear response theory holds) one misses the quantum limit on QND detection in this system by a large factor proportional to the parametric gain.ootnotetextC. Laflamme and A.A. Clerk, Phys. Rev. A 83, 033803 (2011) Here we calculate measurement backaction beyond linear response by using an approximate mapping to a detuned degenerate parametric amplifier having both linear and dispersive couplings to the qubit. We find surprisingly that the backaction dephasing rate is far more sensitive to corrections beyond linear response than the detector response. Thus, increasing the coupling strength can significantly increase the efficiency of the measurement. We interpret this behavior in terms of the non-Gaussian photon number fluctuations of the nonlinear cavity. Our results have applications to quantum information processing and quantum amplification with superconducting microwave circuits.

  17. Chaos pass filter: linear response of synchronized chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Steffen; Kestler, Johannes; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The linear response of synchronized time-delayed chaotic systems to small external perturbations, i.e., the phenomenon of chaos pass filter, is investigated for iterated maps. The distribution of distances, i.e., the deviations between two synchronized chaotic units due to external perturbations on the transferred signal, is used as a measure of the linear response. It is calculated numerically and, for some special cases, analytically. Depending on the model parameters this distribution has power law tails in the region of synchronization leading to diverging moments of distances. This is a consequence of multiplicative and additive noise in the corresponding linear equations due to chaos and external perturbations. The linear response can also be quantified by the bit error rate of a transmitted binary message which perturbs the synchronized system. The bit error rate is given by an integral over the distribution of distances and is calculated analytically and numerically. It displays a complex nonmonotonic behavior in the region of synchronization. For special cases the distribution of distances has a fractal structure leading to a devil's staircase for the bit error rate as a function of coupling strength. The response to small harmonic perturbations shows resonances related to coupling and feedback delay times. A bidirectionally coupled chain of three units can completely filter out the perturbation. Thus the second moment and the bit error rate become zero.

  18. Genome mining expands the chemical diversity of the cyanobactin family to include highly modified linear peptides.

    PubMed

    Leikoski, Niina; Liu, Liwei; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Gugger, Muriel; Calteau, Alexandra; Permi, Perttu; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2013-08-22

    Ribosomal peptides are produced through the posttranslational modification of short precursor peptides. Cyanobactins are a growing family of cyclic ribosomal peptides produced by cyanobacteria. However, a broad systematic survey of the genetic capacity to produce cyanobactins is lacking. Here we report the identification of 31 cyanobactin gene clusters from 126 genomes of cyanobacteria. Genome mining suggested a complex evolutionary history defined by horizontal gene transfer and rapid diversification of precursor genes. Extensive chemical analyses demonstrated that some cyanobacteria produce short linear cyanobactins with a chain length ranging from three to five amino acids. The linear peptides were N-prenylated and O-methylated on the N and C termini, respectively, and named aeruginosamide and viridisamide. These findings broaden the structural diversity of the cyanobactin family to include highly modified linear peptides with rare posttranslational modifications.

  19. Using host response modifiers in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Novak, M John; Donley, Timothy G

    2002-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the result of a complex interaction between microbial plaque, the host's inflammatory response to the plaque, and host modifying factors (e.g., smoking, diabetes, genetics) that may have an impact on the disease process. It is known that plaque initiates periodontal disease but that the host response is responsible for the destruction of periodontal tissues. This article describes why host response modifiers may be used to help control inflammation and tissue destruction as part of the initial phase of periodontal therapy in selected patient groups.

  20. Thermodynamic formalism and linear response theory for nonequilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Speck, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study the linear response in systems driven away from thermal equilibrium into a nonequilibrium steady state with nonvanishing entropy production rate. A simple derivation of a general response formula is presented under the condition that the generating function describes a transformation that (to lowest order) preserves normalization and thus describes a physical stochastic process. For Markov processes we explicitly construct the conjugate quantities and discuss their relation with known response formulas. Emphasis is put on the formal analogy with thermodynamic potentials and some consequences are discussed.

  1. A linear chromatic mechanism drives the pupillary response.

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimura, S.; Wolffsohn, J. S.; Gilmartin, B.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a chromatic mechanism can drive pupil responses. The aim of this research was to clarify whether a linear or nonlinear chromatic mechanism drives pupillary responses by using test stimuli of various colours that are defined in cone contrast space. The pupil and accommodation responses evoked by these test stimuli were continuously and simultaneously objectively measured by photorefraction. The results with isochromatic and isoluminant stimuli showed that the accommodative level remained approximately constant (< 0.25 D change in mean level) even when the concurrent pupillary response was large (ca. 0.30 mm). The pupillary response to an isoluminant grating was sustained, delayed (by ca. 60 ms) and larger in amplitude than that for a isochromatic uniform stimulus, which supports previous work suggesting that the chromatic mechanism contributes to the pupillary response. In a second experiment, selected chromatic test gratings were used and isoresponse contours in cone contrast space were obtained. The results showed that the isoresponse contour in cone contrast space is well described (r(2) = 0.99) by a straight line with a positive slope. The results indicate that a /L - M/ linear chromatic mechanism, whereby a signal from the long wavelength cone is subtracted from that of the middle wavelength cone and vice versa, drives pupillary responses. PMID:11674867

  2. Layer-by-layer assembly of ferrocene-modified linear polyethylenimine redox polymer films.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Jared L; Hickey, David P; Bamper, Daniel A; Glatzhofer, Daniel T; Johnson, Matthew B; Schmidtke, David W

    2013-07-22

    Herein, both electrostatic and covalent layer-by-layer assembly were used for the construction of multicomposite thin films using a ferrocene-modified linear poly(ethylenimine) redox polymer (Fc-C6-LPEI) as the cationic polyelectrolye, and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(glutamic acid) (PGA), or glucose oxidase (GOX) as the negative polyelectrolyte. The assembly of the multilayer films was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), UV/Vis spectroscopy, and ellipsometry with the enzymatic response of the films containing GOX being characterized via constant potential amperometry. CV measurements suggested that the successful buildup of multilayer films was dependent upon the nature of the anionic polyelectrolyte used. Electrostatic assembly of films composed of Fc-C6-LPEI and either PAA or PGA produced large oxidation peak current densities of 630 and 670 μA cm(-2), respectively, during cyclic voltammetry. Increased measured absorbance by UV/Vis spectroscopy and increased measured film thicknesses (400-600 nm) by ellipsometry provided additional evidence of successful film formation. In contrast, the films incorporating GOX that were electrostatically assembled surprisingly produced significantly lower electrochemical responses (12 μA cm(-2)), low absorbance values, and reduced film thicknesses (~15 nm), and glucose electro-oxidation current densities less than 1 μA cm(-2), which all suggested unstable or minimal film formation. Subsequently, we developed a covalent layer-by-layer approach to fabricate films of Fc-C6-LPEI/GOX by covalently linking the amine groups of Fc-C6-LPEI to the aldehyde groups of periodate-oxidized glucose oxidase. Covalent assembly of the Fc-C6-LPEI/GOX films produced oxidation peak current densities during cyclic voltammetry of 40 μA cm(-2) and glucose electro-oxidation current densities of 220 μA cm(-2). These films also showed an increase in their thicknesses (~140 nm) relative to the electrostatic GOX films. For the films containing

  3. Linearity in the response of photopolymers as optical recording media.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Sergi; Marquez, Andrés; Guardiola, Francisco J; Riquelme, Marina; Fernández, Roberto; Pascual, Inmaculada; Beléndez, Augusto

    2013-05-06

    Photopolymer are appealing materials for diffractive elements recording. Two of their properties when they are illuminated are useful for this goal: the relief surface changes and the refractive index modifications. To this goal the linearity in the material response is crucial to design the optimum irradiance for each element. In this paper we measured directly some parameters to know how linear is the material response, in terms of the refractive index modulation versus exposure, then we can predict the refractive index distributions during recording. We have analyzed at different recording intensities the evolution of monomer diffusion during recording for photopolymers based on PVA/Acrylamide. This model has been successfully applied to PVA/Acrylamide photopolymers to predict the transmitted diffracted orders and the agreement with experimental values has been increased.

  4. Near-LTE linear response calculations with a collisional-radiative model for He-like Al ions. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.; Kato, T.

    1998-04-06

    We investigate non-equilibrium atomic kinetics using a collisional- radiative model modified to include line absorption. Steady-state emission is calculated for He-like aluminum immersed in a specified radiation field having fixed deviations from a Planck spectrum. The calculated net emission is presented as a NLTE response matrix. In agreement with a rigorous general rule of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the linear response is symmetric. We compute the response matrix for 1% and {+-} 50% changes in the photon temperature and find linear response over a surprisingly large range.

  5. Modified hyperspheres algorithm to trace homotopy curves of nonlinear circuits composed by piecewise linear modelled devices.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Leal, H; Jimenez-Fernandez, V M; Benhammouda, B; Filobello-Nino, U; Sarmiento-Reyes, A; Ramirez-Pinero, A; Marin-Hernandez, A; Huerta-Chua, J

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation.

  6. Modified Cholesky factorizations in interior-point algorithms for linear programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    1999-01-01

    We investigate a modified Cholesky algorithm typical of those used in most interior-point codes for linear programming. Cholesky-based interior-point codes are popular for three reasons: their implementation requires only minimal changes to standard sparse Cholesky algorithms (allowing us to take full advantage of software written by specialists in that area); they tend to be more efficient than competing approaches that use alternative factorizations; and they perform robustly on most practical problems, yielding good interior-point steps even when the coefficient matrix of the main linear system to be solved for the step components is ill conditioned. We investigate this surprisingly robust performance by using analytical tools from matrix perturbation theory and error analysis, illustrating our results with computational experiments. Finally, we point out the potential limitations of this approach.

  7. Modified Hyperspheres Algorithm to Trace Homotopy Curves of Nonlinear Circuits Composed by Piecewise Linear Modelled Devices

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Leal, H.; Jimenez-Fernandez, V. M.; Benhammouda, B.; Filobello-Nino, U.; Sarmiento-Reyes, A.; Ramirez-Pinero, A.; Marin-Hernandez, A.; Huerta-Chua, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation. PMID:25184157

  8. Linear response of tripartite entanglement to infinitesimal noise

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fu-Lin; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2014-10-15

    Recent experimental progress in prolonging the coherence time of a quantum system prompts us to explore the behavior of quantum entanglement at the beginning of the decoherence process. The response of the entanglement under an infinitesimal noise can serve as a signature of the robustness of entangled states. A crucial problem of this topic in multipartite systems is to compute the degree of entanglement in a mixed state. We find a family of global noise in three-qubit systems, which is composed of four W states. Under its influence, the linear response of the tripartite entanglement of a symmetrical three-qubit pure state is studied. A lower bound of the linear response is found to depend completely on the initial tripartite and bipartite entanglement. This result shows that the decay of tripartite entanglement is hastened by the bipartite one. - Highlights: • We study a set of W-type noise and its linear effect on symmetric pure states. • Its effect on two-qubit entanglement depends only on the initial concurrence. • A lower bound of the effect on 3-tangle is found in terms of initial entanglements. • We obtain the time of three-tangle sudden death for two families of typical states. • These reveal that the bipartite entanglement speeds up the decay of the tripartite one.

  9. Improved control using PFC and modified linear quadratic regulator for a kind of nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ridong; Lu, Renquan; Wang, Shuqing

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the combination design of predictive functional control (PFC) and optimal linear quadratic (LQ) method for a kind of nonlinear process with output feedback coupling. In many existing control methods for this kind of nonlinear systems, the nonlinear part is either ignored or represented as a rough linear one when corresponding predictive control methods are designed. However, by assuming that the nonlinearity can be ignored or simplified to a linear time-varying part may not lead to the good control performance of subsequent linear control designs. The paper is a further investigation on this kind of systems, in which a procedure of PFC plus a modified optimal LQ control is developed. With respect to the proposed control strategy and the corresponding processes, the closed-loop performance is improved concerning tracking ability and disturbance rejection compared with previous predictive control methods. In addition, the proposed control is easy to implement as it selects a simple structure and a modification of the classical control scheme.

  10. Biologic response modifiers in gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed Central

    Dutcher, J. P.; Wadler, S.; Wiernik, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Biological therapy is currently being investigated in the treatment of a number of malignancies. The hypothesis for the use of this therapeutic modality involves an attempt to stimulate an already existent but perhaps suboptimal immune response to foreign protein, including tumor. Immunologic therapy appears to work best against small-volume disease, as indicated from animal studies. This condition is potentially achievable in advanced ovarian cancer, where surgery is capable of producing multi-log reduction in tumor mass, and thus immunotherapy may be an option in this disease. The attraction of biologic therapy in patients with ovarian cancer is the potential to treat relatively localized but often chemotherapy-resistant disease. In cervical cancer, the rationale for the use of interferon is somewhat different in that this disease may be a manifestation of a virally induced proliferative lesion. Thus, the antiviral properties of interferon are being investigated in both limited and advanced cervical cancer. Both of these hypothesis have pre-clinical data to support them. This paper presents the pre-clinical and clinical work currently available for consideration of future use. PMID:2461003

  11. Photopheresis: a clinically relevant immunobiologic response modifier.

    PubMed

    Edelson, R L

    1991-12-30

    pathogenic clone(s), the return of these cells to an immunocompetent individual, the removal of the photo-damaged cells from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system and the preferential induction of an immune response against cells of the pathologically expanded clone(s).

  12. High-power high-linearity flip-chip bonded modified uni-traveling carrier photodiode.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Fu, Yang; Piels, Molly; Pan, Huapu; Beling, Andreas; Bowers, John E; Campbell, Joe C

    2011-12-12

    We demonstrate a flip-chip bonded modified uni-traveling carrier (MUTC) photodiode with an RF output power of 0.75 W (28.8 dBm) at 15 GHz and OIP3 as high as 59 dBm. The photodiode has a responsivity of 0.7 A/W, 3-dB bandwidth > 15 GHz, and saturation photocurrent > 180 mA at 11 V reverse bias.

  13. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory in the linear response formalism.

    PubMed

    Zuehlsdorff, T J; Hine, N D M; Spencer, J S; Harrison, N M; Riley, D J; Haynes, P D

    2013-08-14

    We present an implementation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) in the linear response formalism enabling the calculation of low energy optical absorption spectra for large molecules and nanostructures. The method avoids any explicit reference to canonical representations of either occupied or virtual Kohn-Sham states and thus achieves linear-scaling computational effort with system size. In contrast to conventional localised orbital formulations, where a single set of localised functions is used to span the occupied and unoccupied state manifold, we make use of two sets of in situ optimised localised orbitals, one for the occupied and one for the unoccupied space. This double representation approach avoids known problems of spanning the space of unoccupied Kohn-Sham states with a minimal set of localised orbitals optimised for the occupied space, while the in situ optimisation procedure allows for efficient calculations with a minimal number of functions. The method is applied to a number of medium sized organic molecules and a good agreement with traditional TDDFT methods is observed. Furthermore, linear scaling of computational cost with system size is demonstrated on (10,0) carbon nanotubes of different lengths.

  14. Thermoelectric effects in quantum Hall systems beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Rosa; Hwang, Sun-Yong; Sánchez, David

    2014-12-01

    We consider a quantum Hall system with an antidot acting as a energy dependent scatterer. In the purely charge case, we find deviations from the Wiedemann-Franz law that take place in the nonlinear regime of transport. We also discuss Peltier effects beyond linear response and describe both effects using magnetic-field asymmetric transport coefficients. For the spin case such as that arising along the helical edge states of a two-dimensional topological insulator, we investigate the generation of spin currents as a result of applied voltage and temperature differences in samples attached to ferromagnetic leads. We find that in the parallel configuration the spin current can be tuned with the leads' polarization even in the linear regime of transport. In contrast, for antiparallel magnetizations the spin currents has a strict nonlinear dependence on the the applied fields.

  15. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Salil; Evans, Katherine J.; Hack, James J.; Truesdale, John

    2013-04-19

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $W^{-1}m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $ PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  16. Estimating the strength of bone using linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2002-12-01

    Accurate diagnostic tools are required for effective management of osteoporosis; one method to identify additional diagnostics is to search for observable consequences of bone loss. An analysis of a model system is used to show that weakening of a bone is accompanied by a reduction of the fraction of the bone that participates in load transmission. On the basis of this observation, it is argued that the ratio Γ of linear responses of a network to dc and high-frequency ac driving can be used as a surrogate for their strength. Protocols needed to obtain Γ for bone samples are discussed.

  17. Linear control of neuronal spike timing using phase response curves.

    PubMed

    Stigen, Tyler; Danzl, Per; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple, robust, linear method to control the spike timing of a periodically firing neuron. The control scheme uses the neuron's phase response curve to identify an area of optimal sensitivity for the chosen stimulation parameters. The spike advance as a function of current pulse amplitude is characterized at the optimal phase and a linear least-squares regression is fit to the data. The inverted regression is used as the control function for this method. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated through numerical simulations of a Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model as well as in real neurons from rat hippocampal slice preparations. The study shows a proof of concept for the application of a linear control scheme to control neuron spike timing in-vitro. This study was done on an individual cell level, but translation to a tissue or network level is possible. Control schemes of this type could be implemented in a closed loop implantable device to treat neuromotor disorders involving pathologically neuronal activity such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease.

  18. Linear response theory for magnon transport in ferromagnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Ryo

    2012-02-01

    We study transverse response of magnons in ferromagnetic insulators within linear response theory. In analogy with the corresponding theory for electrons [1], magnon transverse response is described, including the Hall effect, Nernst effect, and thermal Hall effect. As is also the case for electrons [1], the response functions for magnons consist of the Kubo-formula term, and the term corresponding to the orbital angular momentum. We can rewrite the response functions in terms of the Berry curvature in momentum space [2]. We apply this theory to the (quantum-mechanical) magnons and to the classical magnetostatic waves. For the magnetostatic waves, the eigenmodes are given by a generalized eigenvalue problem, giving rise to the special form of the Berry curvature [2]. We explain various properties of this Berry curvature for the generalized eigenvalue problem, and discuss its implications for the physical properties of magnetostatic modes. [1] L. Smrcka and P. Streda, J. Phys. C, 10, 2153 (1977); H. Oji, P. Streda, Phys. Rev. B 31, 7291 (1985); [2] R. Matsumoto and S. Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 197202 (2011); Phys. Rev. B 84, 184406 (2011).

  19. Efficient calculation of optical linear response of large silicon clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gefei; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2005-03-01

    Nanoscale silicon clusters have potential applications as light-emitting devices and bio-sensors. Ab initio calculations of the optical linear response of small-size nanoparticles have been performed via time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT)^1 and by solving many-body Bethe-Salpeter equations (MBSE)^2,3. We show that the ab initio calculations can be made much more efficient when the nanocluster possess high point group symmetry and symmetrized basis functions are used. This allows us to extend the ab initio calculation to much larger Si clusters (up to a few hundred Si atoms) on a personal computer. The optical linear response of Si nanocluster (passivated with hydrogen) as a function of cluster size is examined. The effect of phosphorus doping of Si nanocluster on its optical properties is also studied.1. Ogũt,S., J. R. Chelikowsky, and S. G. Louie, PRL 80, 3162(1998); Marques, M., A. Castro, and A. Rubio, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 3006(2001). 2. Rohlfing, M., and S. G. Louie, PRL 80, 3320(1998);PRB 62, 4927(2000). 3. Grossman, J. C., M. Rohlfing, L. Mitas, S. G. Louie, and M. L. Cohen,PRL 86, 472(2001).

  20. Modified linear predictive coding approach for moving target tracking by Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yipeng; Lin, Xiaoyi; Sun, Ke-Hui; Xu, Xue-Mei; Liu, Xi-Yao

    2016-07-01

    Doppler radar is a cost-effective tool for moving target tracking, which can support a large range of civilian and military applications. A modified linear predictive coding (LPC) approach is proposed to increase the target localization accuracy of the Doppler radar. Based on the time-frequency analysis of the received echo, the proposed approach first real-time estimates the noise statistical parameters and constructs an adaptive filter to intelligently suppress the noise interference. Then, a linear predictive model is applied to extend the available data, which can help improve the resolution of the target localization result. Compared with the traditional LPC method, which empirically decides the extension data length, the proposed approach develops an error array to evaluate the prediction accuracy and thus, adjust the optimum extension data length intelligently. Finally, the prediction error array is superimposed with the predictor output to correct the prediction error. A series of experiments are conducted to illustrate the validity and performance of the proposed techniques.

  1. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  2. Predators modify the evolutionary response of prey to temperature change.

    PubMed

    Tseng, M; O'Connor, M I

    2015-12-01

    As climate regimes shift in many ecosystems worldwide, evolution may be a critical process allowing persistence in rapidly changing environments. Organisms regularly interact with other species, yet whether climate-mediated evolution can occur in the context of species interactions is not well understood. We tested whether a species interaction could modify evolutionary responses to temperature. We demonstrate that predation pressure by Dipteran larvae (Chaoborus americanus) modified the evolutionary response of a freshwater crustacean (Daphnia pulex) to its thermal environment over approximately seven generations in laboratory conditions. Daphnia kept at 21°C evolved higher population growth rates than those kept at 18°C, but only in those populations that were also reared with predators. Furthermore, predator-mediated selection resulted in the evolution of elevated Daphnia thermal plasticity. This laboratory natural selection experiment demonstrates that biotic interactions can modify evolutionary adaptation to temperature. Understanding the interplay between multiple selective forces can improve predictions of ecological and evolutionary responses of organisms to rapid environmental change.

  3. Near-LTE linear response calculations with a collisional-radiative model for He-like Al ions

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.; Kato, T.

    1998-01-06

    We investigate the non-equilibrium atomic kinetics using a collisional-radiative (CR) model modified to include line absorption. Steady-state emission is calculated for He-like aluminum ions immersed in a specified radiation field having fixed deviations from a Planck spectrum. The net emission is interpreted in terms of NLTE population changes. The calculation provides an NLTE response matrix, and in agreement with a general relation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the response matrix is symmetric. We compute the response matrix for 1% and 50% changes in the photon temperature and find linear response over a surprisingly large range.

  4. Quantum optimal control theory in the linear response formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Alberto; Tokatly, I. V.

    2011-09-15

    Quantum optimal control theory (QOCT) aims at finding an external field that drives a quantum system in such a way that optimally achieves some predefined target. In practice, this normally means optimizing the value of some observable, a so-called merit function. In consequence, a key part of the theory is a set of equations, which provides the gradient of the merit function with respect to parameters that control the shape of the driving field. We show that these equations can be straightforwardly derived using the standard linear response theory, only requiring a minor generalization: the unperturbed Hamiltonian is allowed to be time dependent. As a result, the aforementioned gradients are identified with certain response functions. This identification leads to a natural reformulation of QOCT in terms of the Keldysh contour formalism of the quantum many-body theory. In particular, the gradients of the merit function can be calculated using the diagrammatic technique for nonequilibrium Green's functions, which should be helpful in the application of QOCT to computationally difficult many-electron problems.

  5. Magnetoelectric Effect in Topological Insulator Films Beyond Linear Response Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Baasanjav, Dashdeleg; Nomura, Kentaro

    2014-03-01

    We study the response of topological insulator films to strong magnetic and electric fields beyond the linear response theory. As a model, we use three-dimensional lattice Wilson-Dirac Hamiltonian where we simultaneously introduce both magnetic field as Aharonov Bohm phase and electric field as potential energy depending on lattice coordinate. We compute the energy spectrum by numerically diagonalizing this Hamiltonian for electrons and obtain the quantized magnetoelectric polarizability. In addition, we find that the magnetoelectric effect vanishes as width of the film decreases, due to the hybridization of surface wavefunctions. Furthermore, by applying a gate voltage between the surfaces, we observe multiple quantized plateaus of θ-term. We explain that the multiple quantization rule of θ is mainly determined by the physics of Landau level structures on the top and bottom surfaces of topological insulator, whereas the small deviations from the exact quantization are coming from the asymmetry of the surface wavefunctions in the bulk. We also show that the magnetoelectric effect persists even for strong bulk interactions with magnetic field or magnetic impurities. We acknowledge support by the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 24740211, No. 25800184, and No. 25247056) from the MEXT, Japan.

  6. Secure binary arithmetic coding based on digitalized modified logistic map and linear feedback shift register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yushu; Xiao, Di; Wen, Wenying; Nan, Hai; Su, Moting

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel secure arithmetic coding based on digitalized modified logistic map (DMLM) and linear feedback shift register (LFSR). An input binary sequence is first mapped into a table, which is then scrambled by two cyclic shift steps driven by the keys resulting from DMLM-LFSR. Next, each column is encoded using traditional arithmetic coding (TAC) and randomized arithmetic coding (RAC). During the RAC process, the exchange of two intervals is controlled by the keystream generated from the DMLM. At the same time, a few bits of the present column sequence are extracted to interfere the generation of new keystream used for the next column. The final ciphertext sequence is obtained by XORing the compressed sequence and the keystream generated by the LFSR. Results show the compression ratio of our scheme is slightly higher than that of TAC, but the security is improved due to the architecture of shift-perturbance. DMLM and LFSR theories also ensure high sensitivity and strong randomness. The appended complexity is only O (N) , where N is the number of the input symbols.

  7. Nonlocal density functionals and the linear response of the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, I. I.; Singh, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    The known and usable truly nonlocal functionals for exchange-correlation energy of the inhomogeneous electron gas are the ADA (average density approximation) and the WDA (weighted density approximation). ADA, by design, yields the correct linear response function of the uniform electron gas. The WDA is constructed so that it is exact in the opposite limit of one-electron systems, and it was conjectured that the WDA is also accurate in the uniform gas limit. To test this conjecture, we derive an expression for the linear response of the uniform gas in the WDA, and calculate it for several flavors of the WDA. We then compare the results with the Monte Carlo data on the exchange-correlation local-field correction, and identify the weak points of conventional WDA in the homogeneous limit. We suggest how the WDA can be modified to improve the response function. The resulting approximation is a good one in both opposite limits. Future testing should show whether it will also be better than conventional WDA and ADA for practical nonlocal density-functional calculations.

  8. Nonlocal density functionals and the linear response of the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, I. I.; Singh, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    The known and usable truly nonlocal exchange-correlation density functionals are the ADA (average density approximation) and the WDA (weighted density approximation). The ADA, by design, yields the correct linear response of the uniform electron gas. WDA is constructed so that it is exact for one-electron systems, and was shown to yield good results for solids, too. While the WDA has correct one-electron behavior, it is important to access the accuracy of the method in the opposite limit of the nearly homogeneous electron gas. To do so, we derive an expression for the linear response of the uniform gas in the WDA, and calculate it for several flavors of WDA. We compare our results with Monte-Carlo data on the exchange-correlation local field correction, and identify the weak points of the conventional WDA in this limit. The WDA can be modified to improve the response function in the short wavelength regime. The exchange-correlation local field correction includes a term derived from the correlation part of the kinetic energy, which does not decay at qarrow ∞. This can be reproduced by adding a delta-function part to the WDA weight function. The resulting approximation is good in both limits, and may be useful for practical density functional calculations. (More at this URL.)

  9. Process Setting through General Linear Model and Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senjuntichai, Angsumalin

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study is to improve the efficiency of the flow-wrap packaging process in soap industry through the reduction of defectives. At the 95% confidence level, with the regression analysis, the sealing temperature, temperatures of upper and lower crimper are found to be the significant factors for the flow-wrap process with respect to the number/percentage of defectives. Twenty seven experiments have been designed and performed according to three levels of each controllable factor. With the general linear model (GLM), the suggested values for the sealing temperature, temperatures of upper and lower crimpers are 185, 85 and 85° C, respectively while the response surface method (RSM) provides the optimal process conditions at 186, 89 and 88° C. Due to different assumptions between percentage of defective and all three temperature parameters, the suggested conditions from the two methods are then slightly different. Fortunately, the estimated percentage of defectives at 5.51% under GLM process condition and the predicted percentage of defectives at 4.62% under RSM process condition are not significant different. But at 95% confidence level, the percentage of defectives under RSM condition can be much lower approximately 2.16% than those under GLM condition in accordance with wider variation. Lastly, the percentages of defectives under the conditions suggested by GLM and RSM are reduced by 55.81% and 62.95%, respectively.

  10. Linear response formula for piecewise expanding unimodal maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, Viviane; Smania, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    The average R(t)=\\int \\varphi\\,\\rmd \\mu_t of a smooth function phiv with respect to the SRB measure μt of a smooth one-parameter family ft of piecewise expanding interval maps is not always Lipschitz (Baladi 2007 Commun. Math. Phys. 275 839-59, Mazzolena 2007 Master's Thesis Rome 2, Tor Vergata). We prove that if ft is tangent to the topological class of f, and if ∂t ft|t = 0 = X circle f, then R(t) is differentiable at zero, and R'(0) coincides with the resummation proposed (Baladi 2007) of the (a priori divergent) series \\sum_{n=0}^\\infty \\int X(y) \\partial_y (\\varphi \\circ f^n)(y)\\,\\rmd \\mu_0(y) given by Ruelle's conjecture. In fact, we show that t map μt is differentiable within Radon measures. Linear response is violated if and only if ft is transversal to the topological class of f.

  11. A noble refractive optical scanner with linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, Yair J.; Lai, Zhenhua; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-03-01

    Many applications in various fields of science and engineering use steered optical beam systems. Currently, many methods utilize mirrors in order to steer the beam. However, this approach is an off-axis solution, which normally increases the total size of the system as well as its error and complexity. Other methods use a "Risely Prisms" based solution, which is on-axis solution, however it poses some difficulties from an engineering standpoint, and therefore isn't widely used. We present here a novel technique for steering a beam on its optical axis with a linear deflection response. We derived the formulation for the profile required of the refractive optical component necessary for preforming the beam steering. The functionality of the device was simulated analytically using Matlab, as well as using a ray-tracing software, Zemax, and showed agreement with the analytical model. An optical element was manufactured based on the proposed design and the device was tested. The results show agreement with our hypothesis. We also present some proposed geometries of the several other devices, all based on the same concept, which can be used for higher performance applications such as two-dimensional scanner, video rate scanner etc.

  12. Linear Discrete-time State Space Realization of a Modified Quadruple Tank System with State Estimation using Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Sazuan N. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we used the modified quadruple tank system that represents a multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) system as an example to present the realization of a linear discrete-time state space model and to obtain the state estimation using Kalman filter in a methodical mannered. First, an existing dynamics of the system of stochastic differential equations is linearized to produce the deterministic-stochastic linear transfer function. Then the linear transfer function is discretized to produce a linear discrete-time state space model that has a deterministic and a stochastic component. The filtered part of the Kalman filter is used to estimates the current state, based on the model and the measurements. The static and dynamic Kalman filter is compared and all results is demonstrated through simulations.

  13. Responses of squirrel monkeys to their experimentally modified mobbing calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtel, Claudia; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2003-05-01

    Previous acoustic analyses suggested emotion-correlated changes in the acoustic structure of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) vocalizations. Specifically, calls given in aversive contexts were characterized by an upward shift in frequencies, often accompanied by an increase in amplitude. In order to test whether changes in frequencies or amplitude are indeed relevant for conspecific listeners, playback experiments were conducted in which either frequencies or amplitude of mobbing calls were modified. Latency and first orienting response were measured in playback experiments with six adult squirrel monkeys. After broadcasting yaps with increased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a longer orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding control stimuli. Furthermore, after broadcasting yaps with decreased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a shorter orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding manipulated calls with higher frequencies or amplitude. These results suggest that changes in frequencies or amplitude were perceived by squirrel monkeys, indicating that the relationship between call structure and the underlying affective state of the caller agreed with the listener's assessment of the calls. However, a simultaneous increase in frequencies and amplitude did not lead to an enhanced response, compared to each single parameter. Thus, from the receiver's perspective, both call parameters may mutually replace each other.

  14. Predicting nonlinear properties of metamaterials from the linear response.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kevin; Suchowski, Haim; Rho, Junsuk; Salandrino, Alessandro; Kante, Boubacar; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of optical second harmonic generation in 1961 started modern nonlinear optics. Soon after, R. C. Miller found empirically that the nonlinear susceptibility could be predicted from the linear susceptibilities. This important relation, known as Miller's Rule, allows a rapid determination of nonlinear susceptibilities from linear properties. In recent years, metamaterials, artificial materials that exhibit intriguing linear optical properties not found in natural materials, have shown novel nonlinear properties such as phase-mismatch-free nonlinear generation, new quasi-phase matching capabilities and large nonlinear susceptibilities. However, the understanding of nonlinear metamaterials is still in its infancy, with no general conclusion on the relationship between linear and nonlinear properties. The key question is then whether one can determine the nonlinear behaviour of these artificial materials from their exotic linear behaviour. Here, we show that the nonlinear oscillator model does not apply in general to nonlinear metamaterials. We show, instead, that it is possible to predict the relative nonlinear susceptibility of large classes of metamaterials using a more comprehensive nonlinear scattering theory, which allows efficient design of metamaterials with strong nonlinearity for important applications such as coherent Raman sensing, entangled photon generation and frequency conversion.

  15. Engineering Synthetically Modified Insulin for Glucose-Responsive Diabetes Therapy.

    PubMed

    Webber, Matthew J; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert

    Though a suite of different insulin variants have been used clinically to provide greater control over pharmacokinetics, no clinically used insulin can tune its potency and/or bioavailability in a glucose-dependent manner. In order to improve therapy for diabetic patients, a vision has been the development of autonomous closed-loop approaches. Toward this goal, insulin has been synthetically modified with glucose-sensing groups or groups that can compete with free glucose for binding to glucose-binding proteins and evaluated in pre-clinical models. Specifically, it was demonstrated that site-specific modification of insulin with phenylboronic acid can result in glucose-responsive activity, leading to faster recovery in diabetic mice following a glucose challenge but with less observed hypoglycemia in healthy mice. This strategy, along with several others being pursued, holds promise to improve the fidelity in glycemic control with routine insulin therapy.

  16. Engineering Synthetically Modified Insulin for Glucose-Responsive Diabetes Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Matthew J.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Summary Though a suite of different insulin variants have been used clinically to provide greater control over pharmacokinetics, no clinically used insulin can tune its potency and/or bioavailability in a glucose-dependent manner. In order to improve therapy for diabetic patients, a vision has been the development of autonomous closed-loop approaches. Toward this goal, insulin has been synthetically modified with glucose-sensing groups or groups that can compete with free glucose for binding to glucose-binding proteins and evaluated in pre-clinical models. Specifically, it was demonstrated that site-specific modification of insulin with phenylboronic acid can result in glucose-responsive activity, leading to faster recovery in diabetic mice following a glucose challenge but with less observed hypoglycemia in healthy mice. This strategy, along with several others being pursued, holds promise to improve the fidelity in glycemic control with routine insulin therapy. PMID:27570535

  17. Indoor calibration of Sky Quality Meters: Linearity, spectral responsivity and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravettoni, M.; Strepparava, D.; Cereghetti, N.; Klett, S.; Andretta, M.; Steiger, M.

    2016-09-01

    The indoor calibration of brightness sensors requires extremely low values of irradiance in the most accurate and reproducible way. In this work the testing equipment of an ISO 17025 accredited laboratory for electrical testing, qualification and type approval of solar photovoltaic modules was modified in order to test the linearity of the instruments from few mW/cm2 down to fractions of nW/cm2, corresponding to levels of simulated brightness from 6 to 19 mag/arcsec2. Sixteen Sky Quality Meter (SQM) produced by Unihedron, a Canadian manufacturer, were tested, also assessing the impact of the ageing of their protective glasses on the calibration coefficients and the drift of the instruments. The instruments are in operation on measurement points and observatories at different sites and altitudes in Southern Switzerland, within the framework of OASI, the Environmental Observatory of Southern Switzerland. The authors present the results of the calibration campaign: linearity; brightness calibration, with and without protective glasses; transmittance measurement of the glasses; and spectral responsivity of the devices. A detailed uncertainty analysis is also provided, according to the ISO 17025 standard.

  18. Linear and non-linear dose-response functions reveal a hormetic relationship between stress and learning.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Diamond, David M

    2008-10-16

    Over a century of behavioral research has shown that stress can enhance or impair learning and memory. In the present review, we have explored the complex effects of stress on cognition and propose that they are characterized by linear and non-linear dose-response functions, which together reveal a hormetic relationship between stress and learning. We suggest that stress initially enhances hippocampal function, resulting from amygdala-induced excitation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, as well as the excitatory effects of several neuromodulators, including corticosteroids, norepinephrine, corticotropin-releasing hormone, acetylcholine and dopamine. We propose that this rapid activation of the amygdala-hippocampus brain memory system results in a linear dose-response relation between emotional strength and memory formation. More prolonged stress, however, leads to an inhibition of hippocampal function, which can be attributed to compensatory cellular responses that protect hippocampal neurons from excitotoxicity. This inhibition of hippocampal functioning in response to prolonged stress is potentially relevant to the well-described curvilinear dose-response relationship between arousal and memory. Our emphasis on the temporal features of stress-brain interactions addresses how stress can activate, as well as impair, hippocampal functioning to produce a hormetic relationship between stress and learning.

  19. Modified 2CLJDQP model and the second virial coefficients for linear molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Sheng; He, Mao-Gang

    2014-12-01

    A modified form of 2CLJDQP potential model is proposed to calculate the second virial coefficients of two-center Lennard-Jones molecules. In the presented potential model, the potential parameters σ and ɛ are considered as the temperature-dependent parameters in the form of hyperbolical temperature function based on the theory of temperature-dependent potential parameters. With this modified model, the second virial coefficients of some homonuclear molecules (such as O2, Cl2, CH3CH3, and CF3CF3) and heteronuclear molecules (such as CO, NO, CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3CF3, CH3CHF2, and CF3CH2F) are calculated. Then the Lorentz—Berthelot mixing rule is modified with a temperature-dependent expression, and the second virial coefficients of the heteronuclear molecules (such as CH3F, CH3Cl, and CH3CF3) are calculated. Moreover, CO2 and N2O are also studied with the modified 3CLJDQP model. The calculated results from the modified 2CLJDQP model accord better with the experimental data than those from the original model. It is shown that the presented model improves the positive deviation in low temperature range and negative deviation in high temperature range. So the modified 2CLJDQP potential model with the temperature-dependent parameters can be employed satisfactorily in large temperature range.

  20. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  1. The linear and non-linear magnetic response of a tri-uranium single molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaram, B. S.; Colineau, E.; Griveau, J.; Kumar, P.; Celli, V.

    2017-03-01

    We report here low temperature magnetization isotherms for the single molecule magnet, (UO2-L)3. By analyzing the low temperature magnetization in terms of M  =  χ 1 B  +  χ 3 B 3 we extract the linear susceptibility χ 1 and the leading order nonlinear susceptibility χ 3. We find that χ 1 exhibits a peak at a temperature of T 1  =  10.4 K with χ 3 also exhibiting a peak but at a reduced temperature T 3  =  5 K. At the lowest temperatures the isotherms exhibit a critical field B c  =  11.5 T marked by a clear point of inflection. A minimal Hamiltonian employing S  =  1 (pseudo) spins with only a single energy scale (successfully used to model the behavior of bulk f-electron metamagnets) is shown to provide a good description of the observed linear scaling between T 1, T 3 and B c. We further show that a Heisenberg Hamiltonian previously employed by Carretta et al (2013 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 25 486001) to model this single molecule magnet gives formulas for the angle averaged susceptibilities (in the Ising limit) very similar to those of the minimal model.

  2. Simulation of triaxial response of granular materials by modified DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoLiang; Li, JiaChun

    2014-12-01

    A modified discrete element method (DEM) with rolling effect taken into consideration is developed to examine macroscopic behavior of granular materials in this study. Dimensional analysis is firstly performed to establish the relationship between macroscopic mechanical behavior, mesoscale contact parameters at particle level and external loading rate. It is found that only four dimensionless parameters may govern the macroscopic mechanical behavior in bulk. The numerical triaxial apparatus was used to study their influence on the mechanical behavior of granular materials. The parametric study indicates that Poisson's ratio only varies with stiffness ratio, while Young's modulus is proportional to contact modulus and grows with stiffness ratio, both of which agree with the micromechanical model. The peak friction angle is dependent on both inter-particle friction angle and rolling resistance. The dilatancy angle relies on inter-particle friction angle if rolling stiffness coefficient is sufficiently large. Finally, we have recommended a calibration procedure for cohesionless soil, which was at once applied to the simulation of Chende sand using a series of triaxial compression tests. The responses of DEM model are shown in quantitative agreement with experiments. In addition, stress-strain response of triaxial extension was also obtained by numerical triaxial extension tests.

  3. Response of silicon-Based Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aman, A.; Bman, B.; Badhwar, G. D.; ONeill, P. M. O.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon-based linear energy transfer (LET) telescope,(e. g., DOSTEL and RRMD) have recently been flown in space. LET spectra measured using tissue equivalent proportional counters show differences that need to be fully understood. A Monte Carlo technique based on: 1. radiation transport cluster intra-cascade model. 2. Landau-Vavilov distribution, 3. telescope geometry and detector coincidence & discriminator settings, 4. spacecraft shielding geometry, and 5. the external free space radiation environment, including recent albedo measurements, was developed.

  4. Phase Response Design of Recursive All-Pass Digital Filters Using a Modified PSO Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Der

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a new design scheme for the phase response of an all-pass recursive digital filter. A variant of particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm will be utilized for solving this kind of filter design problem. It is here called the modified PSO (MPSO) algorithm in which another adjusting factor is more introduced in the velocity updating formula of the algorithm in order to improve the searching ability. In the proposed method, all of the designed filter coefficients are firstly collected to be a parameter vector and this vector is regarded as a particle of the algorithm. The MPSO with a modified velocity formula will force all particles into moving toward the optimal or near optimal solution by minimizing some defined objective function of the optimization problem. To show the effectiveness of the proposed method, two different kinds of linear phase response design examples are illustrated and the general PSO algorithm is compared as well. The obtained results show that the MPSO is superior to the general PSO for the phase response design of digital recursive all-pass filter.

  5. Phase Response Design of Recursive All-Pass Digital Filters Using a Modified PSO Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Der

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a new design scheme for the phase response of an all-pass recursive digital filter. A variant of particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm will be utilized for solving this kind of filter design problem. It is here called the modified PSO (MPSO) algorithm in which another adjusting factor is more introduced in the velocity updating formula of the algorithm in order to improve the searching ability. In the proposed method, all of the designed filter coefficients are firstly collected to be a parameter vector and this vector is regarded as a particle of the algorithm. The MPSO with a modified velocity formula will force all particles into moving toward the optimal or near optimal solution by minimizing some defined objective function of the optimization problem. To show the effectiveness of the proposed method, two different kinds of linear phase response design examples are illustrated and the general PSO algorithm is compared as well. The obtained results show that the MPSO is superior to the general PSO for the phase response design of digital recursive all-pass filter. PMID:26366168

  6. The Simplest Complete Model of Choice Response Time: Linear Ballistic Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    We propose a linear ballistic accumulator (LBA) model of decision making and reaction time. The LBA is simpler than other models of choice response time, with independent accumulators that race towards a common response threshold. Activity in the accumulators increases in a linear and deterministic manner. The simplicity of the model allows…

  7. Using crosscorrelation techniques to determine the impulse response of linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallabetta, Michael J.; Li, Harry W.; Demuth, Howard B.

    1993-01-01

    A crosscorrelation method of measuring the impulse response of linear systems is presented. The technique, implementation, and limitations of this method are discussed. A simple system is designed and built using discrete components and the impulse response of a linear circuit is measured. Theoretical and software simulation results are presented.

  8. Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The purpose of the conference was to attract researchers from diverse backgrounds who are working in the common area of non-linear dose - response relationships...This unique interdisciplinary conference represents an important step in furthering the understanding of the occurrence, origin, mechanisms, significance and practical applications of non-linear dose - response relationships.

  9. Linear ubiquitination by LUBEL has a role in Drosophila heat stress response.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Tomoko; Almagro, Jorge; Ehrhardt, Christine; Tsai, Isabella; Schleiffer, Alexander; Deszcz, Luiza; Junttila, Sini; Ringrose, Leonie; Mechtler, Karl; Kavirayani, Anoop; Gyenesei, Attila; Hofmann, Kay; Duchek, Peter; Rittinger, Katrin; Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2016-11-01

    The HOIP ubiquitin E3 ligase generates linear ubiquitin chains by forming a complex with HOIL-1L and SHARPIN in mammals. Here, we provide the first evidence of linear ubiquitination induced by a HOIP orthologue in Drosophila We identify Drosophila CG11321, which we named Linear Ubiquitin E3 ligase (LUBEL), and find that it catalyzes linear ubiquitination in vitro We detect endogenous linear ubiquitin chain-derived peptides by mass spectrometry in Drosophila Schneider 2 cells and adult flies. Furthermore, using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we establish linear ubiquitination-defective flies by mutating residues essential for the catalytic activity of LUBEL Linear ubiquitination signals accumulate upon heat shock in flies. Interestingly, flies with LUBEL mutations display reduced survival and climbing defects upon heat shock, which is also observed upon specific LUBEL depletion in muscle. Thus, LUBEL is involved in the heat response by controlling linear ubiquitination in flies.

  10. A Modified Approach to Team-Based Learning in Linear Algebra Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanes, Kalman M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper documents the author's adaptation of team-based learning (TBL), an active learning pedagogy developed by Larry Michaelsen and others, in the linear algebra classroom. The paper discusses the standard components of TBL and the necessary changes to those components for the needs of the course in question. There is also an empirically…

  11. Item Response Theory Using Hierarchical Generalized Linear Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravand, Hamdollah

    2015-01-01

    Multilevel models (MLMs) are flexible in that they can be employed to obtain item and person parameters, test for differential item functioning (DIF) and capture both local item and person dependence. Papers on the MLM analysis of item response data have focused mostly on theoretical issues where applications have been add-ons to simulation…

  12. Linear response of homogeneous nuclear matter with energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, A.; Davesne, D.; Navarro, J.

    2015-03-01

    Response functions of infinite nuclear matter with arbitrary isospin asymmetry are studied in the framework of the random phase approximation. The residual interaction is derived from a general nuclear Skyrme energy density functional. Besides the usual central, spin-orbit and tensor terms it could also include other components as new density-dependent terms or three-body terms. Algebraic expressions for the response functions are obtained from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the particle-hole propagator. Applications to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter and asymmetric nuclear matter are presented and discussed. Spin-isospin strength functions are analyzed for varying conditions of density, momentum transfer, isospin asymmetry, and temperature for some representative Skyrme functionals. Particular attention is paid to the discussion of instabilities, either real or unphysical, which could manifest in finite nuclei.

  13. The linearity and selectivity of neuronal responses in awake visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Anand, Sanjiv; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Macknik, Stephen L.; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Swadlow, Harvey A.; Alonso, Jose-Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are frequently classified based on their response linearity: the extent in which their visual responses to drifting gratings resemble a linear replica of the stimulus. This classification is supported by the finding that response linearity is bimodally distributed across neurons in area V1 of anesthetized animals. However, recent studies suggest that such bimodal distribution may not reflect two neuronal types but a nonlinear relationship between the membrane potential and the spike output. A main limitation of these previous studies is that they measured response linearity in anesthetized animals, where the distance between the neuronal membrane potential and spike threshold is artificially increased by anesthesia. Here, we measured V1 response linearity in the awake brain and its correlation with the neuronal spontaneous firing rate, which is related to the distance between membrane potential and threshold. Our results demonstrate that response linearity is bimodally distributed in awake V1 but that it is poorly correlated with spontaneous firing rate. In contrast, the spontaneous firing rate is best correlated to the response selectivity and response latency to stimuli. PMID:19761345

  14. Thermal shifts and intermittent linear response of aging systems.

    PubMed

    Sibani, Paolo; Christiansen, Simon

    2008-04-01

    At time t after an initial quench, an aging system responds to a perturbation turned on at time twresponse on the ratio t/tw . Further insight is obtained imposing small temperature steps, so-called T shifts. The average response as a function of t/tw,eff , where tw,eff is the effective age, is similar to the response of a system aged isothermally at the final temperature. Using an Ising model with plaquette interactions, the applicability of analytic formulas for the average isothermal magnetization is confirmed. The T -shifted aging behavior of the model is approximately described using effective ages. Large positive shifts nearly reset the effective age. Negative T shifts offer a more detailed probe of the dynamics. Assuming the marginal stability of the "current" attractor against thermal noise fluctuations, the scaling form tw,eff=tw x and the dependence of the exponent x on the aging temperatures before and after the shift are theoretically available. The predicted form of x has no adjustable parameters. Both the algebraic scaling of the effective age and the form of the exponent reasonably agree with the data. The present simulations thus confirm the crucial role of marginal stability in glassy relaxation.

  15. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  16. [Modeling and simulation of responses from ultrasonic linear phased array].

    PubMed

    He, Wenjing; Zhu, Yuanzhong; Wang, Yufeng; He, Lingli; Lai, Siyu

    2012-10-01

    Phased array transducers are very attractive because the beam generated by the arrays can be electronically focused and steered. The present work characterizes far-field 2D properties of phased array system by functions that are deduced from rectangle source, rectangle line array and phased array based on point source. Results are presented for the distribution of ultrasound intensity on plane xoz and on x-axis by simulation using numerical calculation. It is shown that the shape of response of rectangle line array is modulated by the single array element. It is also demonstrated that the delay time of phased array is the key to steer the beam, sacrificing the value of main lobe and increasing the number of side lobes.

  17. Electrocatalytic response of poly(cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes-Nafion modified electrode toward sulfadiazine in urine.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiao-ping; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yan-zhen

    2012-06-01

    A highly sensitive amperometric sulfadiazine sensor fabricated by electrochemical deposition of poly(cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine) (poly(Co(II)TAPc)) on the surface of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes-Nafion (MWCNTs-Nafion) modified electrode is described. This electrode showed a very attractive performance by combining the advantages of Co(II)TAPc, MWCNTs, and Nafion. Compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and the MWCNTs-Nafion modified electrode, the electrocatalytic activity of poly(Co(II)TAPc)-coated MWCNTs-Nafion GCE generated greatly improved electrochemical detections toward sulfadiazine including low oxidation potential, high current responses, and good anti-fouling performance. The oxidation peak currents of sulfadiazine obtained on the new modified electrode increased linearly while increasing the concentration of sulfadiazine from 0.5 to 43.5 μmol/L with the detection limit of 0.17 μmol/L.

  18. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended.

  19. A non-linear camera calibration with modified teaching-learning-based optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Buyang; Yang, Hua; Yang, Shuo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we put forward a novel approach based on hierarchical teaching-and-learning-based optimization (HTLBO) algorithm for nonlinear camera calibration. This algorithm simulates the teaching-learning ability of teachers and learners of a classroom. Different from traditional calibration approach, the proposed technique can find the nearoptimal solution without the need of accurate initial parameters estimation (with only very loose parameter bounds). With the introduction of cascade of teaching, the convergence speed is rapid and the global search ability is improved. Results from our study demonstrate the excellent performance of the proposed technique in terms of convergence, accuracy, and robustness. The HTLBO can also be used to solve many other complex non-linear calibration optimization problems for its good portability.

  20. Linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and the variation of constants method. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  1. Prediction of Nociceptive Responses during Sedation by Linear and Non-Linear Measures of EEG Signals in High Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Melia, Umberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Borrat, Xavier; Valencia, Jose Fernando; Jospin, Mathieu; Jensen, Erik Weber; Gambus, Pedro; Caminal, Pere

    2015-01-01

    The level of sedation in patients undergoing medical procedures evolves continuously, affected by the interaction between the effect of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and the pain stimuli. The monitors of depth of anesthesia, based on the analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG), have been progressively introduced into the daily practice to provide additional information about the state of the patient. However, the quantification of analgesia still remains an open problem. The purpose of this work is to improve the prediction of nociceptive responses with linear and non-linear measures calculated from EEG signal filtered in frequency bands higher than the traditional bands. Power spectral density and auto-mutual information function was applied in order to predict the presence or absence of the nociceptive responses to different stimuli during sedation in endoscopy procedure. The proposed measures exhibit better performances than the bispectral index (BIS). Values of prediction probability of Pk above 0.75 and percentages of sensitivity and specificity above 70% were achieved combining EEG measures from the traditional frequency bands and higher frequency bands. PMID:25901571

  2. Prediction of Nociceptive Responses during Sedation by Linear and Non-Linear Measures of EEG Signals in High Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Melia, Umberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Borrat, Xavier; Valencia, Jose Fernando; Jospin, Mathieu; Jensen, Erik Weber; Gambus, Pedro; Caminal, Pere

    2015-01-01

    The level of sedation in patients undergoing medical procedures evolves continuously, affected by the interaction between the effect of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and the pain stimuli. The monitors of depth of anesthesia, based on the analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG), have been progressively introduced into the daily practice to provide additional information about the state of the patient. However, the quantification of analgesia still remains an open problem. The purpose of this work is to improve the prediction of nociceptive responses with linear and non-linear measures calculated from EEG signal filtered in frequency bands higher than the traditional bands. Power spectral density and auto-mutual information function was applied in order to predict the presence or absence of the nociceptive responses to different stimuli during sedation in endoscopy procedure. The proposed measures exhibit better performances than the bispectral index (BIS). Values of prediction probability of Pk above 0.75 and percentages of sensitivity and specificity above 70% were achieved combining EEG measures from the traditional frequency bands and higher frequency bands.

  3. Evolution of linear cosmological perturbations and its observational implications in Galileon-type modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Daichi; Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2010-03-15

    A scalar-tensor theory of gravity can be made not only to account for the current cosmic acceleration, but also to satisfy solar-system and laboratory constraints, by introducing a nonlinear derivative interaction for the scalar field. Such an additional scalar degree of freedom is called 'Galileon'. The basic idea is inspired by the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld, but one can construct a ghost-free model that admits a self-accelerating solution. We perform a fully relativistic analysis of linear perturbations in Galileon cosmology. Although the Galileon model can mimic the background evolution of standard {Lambda}CDM cosmology, the behavior of perturbation is quite different. It is shown that there exists a superhorizon growing mode in the metric and Galileon perturbations at early times, suggesting that the background is unstable. A fine-tuning of the initial condition for the Galileon fluctuation is thus required in order to promote a desirable evolution of perturbations at early times. Assuming the safe initial condition, we then compute the late-time evolution of perturbations and discuss observational implications in Galileon cosmology. In particular, we find anticorrelations in the cross correlation of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect and large scale structure, similar to the normal branch of the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model.

  4. Ligand-Induced Protein Responses and Mechanical Signal Propagation Described by Linear Response Theories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lee-Wei; Kitao, Akio; Huang, Bang-Chieh; Gō, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a general linear response theory (LRT) is formulated to describe time-dependent and -independent protein conformational changes upon CO binding with myoglobin. Using the theory, we are able to monitor protein relaxation in two stages. The slower relaxation is found to occur from 4.4 to 81.2 picoseconds and the time constants characterized for a couple of aromatic residues agree with those observed by UV Resonance Raman (UVRR) spectrometry and time resolved x-ray crystallography. The faster “early responses”, triggered as early as 400 femtoseconds, can be best described by the theory when impulse forces are used. The newly formulated theory describes the mechanical propagation following ligand-binding as a function of time, space and types of the perturbation forces. The “disseminators”, defined as the residues that propagate signals throughout the molecule the fastest among all the residues in protein when perturbed, are found evolutionarily conserved and the mutations of which have been shown to largely change the CO rebinding kinetics in myoglobin. PMID:25229149

  5. Activation of Bone Remodeling after Fatigue: Differential Response to Linear Microcracks and Diffuse Damage

    PubMed Central

    Herman, B.C.; Cardoso, L.; Majeska, R.J.; Jepsen, K.J.; Schaffler, M.B

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments point to two predominant forms of fatigue microdamage in bone: linear microcracks (tens to a few hundreds microns in length) and “diffuse damage” (patches of diffuse stain uptake in fatigued bone comprised of clusters of sublamellar-sized cracks). The physiological relevance of diffuse damage in activating bone remodeling is not known. In this study microdamage amount and type were varied to assess whether linear or diffuse microdamage have similar effects on the activation of intracortical resorption. Activation of resorption was correlated to the number of linear microcracks (Cr.Dn) in the bone (R2=0.60, p<0.01). In contrast, there was no activation of resorption in response to diffuse microdamage alone. Furthermore, there was no significant change in osteocyte viability in response to diffuse microdamage, suggesting that osteocyte apoptosis, which is know to activate remodeling at typical linear microcracks in bone, does not result from sublamellar damage. These findings indicate that inability of diffuse microdamage to activate resorption may be due to lack of a focal injury response. Finally, we found that duration of loading does not affect the remodeling response. In conclusion, our data indicate that osteocytes activate resorption in response to linear microcracks but not diffuse microdamage, perhaps due to lack of a focal injury-induced apoptotic response. PMID:20633708

  6. Explicit solvent simulations of the aqueous oxidation potential and reorganization energy for neutral molecules: gas phase, linear solvent response, and non-linear response contributions.

    PubMed

    Guerard, Jennifer J; Tentscher, Peter R; Seijo, Marianne; Samuel Arey, J

    2015-06-14

    First principles simulations were used to predict aqueous one-electron oxidation potentials (Eox) and associated half-cell reorganization energies (λaq) for aniline, phenol, methoxybenzene, imidazole, and dimethylsulfide. We employed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the oxidized and reduced species in an explicit aqueous solvent, followed by EOM-IP-CCSD computations with effective fragment potentials for diabatic energy gaps of solvated clusters, and finally thermodynamic integration of the non-linear solvent response contribution using classical MD. A priori predicted Eox and λaq values exhibit mean absolute errors of 0.17 V and 0.06 eV, respectively, compared to experiment. We also disaggregate Eox into several well-defined free energy properties, including the gas phase adiabatic free energy of ionization (7.73 to 8.82 eV), the solvent-induced shift in the free energy of ionization due to linear solvent response (-2.01 to -2.73 eV), and the contribution from non-linear solvent response (-0.07 to -0.14 eV). The linear solvent response component is further apportioned into contributions from the solvent-induced shift in vertical ionization energy of the reduced species (ΔVIEaq) and the solvent-induced shift in negative vertical electron affinity of the ionized species (ΔNVEAaq). The simulated ΔVIEaq and ΔNVEAaq are found to contribute the principal sources of uncertainty in computational estimates of Eox and λaq. Trends in the magnitudes of disaggregated solvation properties are found to correlate with trends in structural and electronic features of the solute. Finally, conflicting approaches for evaluating the aqueous reorganization energy are contrasted and discussed, and concluding recommendations are given.

  7. The spin polarized linear response from density functional theory: Theory and application to atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fias, Stijn Boisdenghien, Zino; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2014-11-14

    Within the context of spin polarized conceptual density functional theory, the spin polarized linear response functions are introduced both in the [N, N{sub s}] and [N{sub α}, N{sub β}] representations. The mathematical relations between the spin polarized linear response functions in both representations are examined and an analytical expression for the spin polarized linear response functions in the [N{sub α}, N{sub β}] representation is derived. The spin polarized linear response functions were calculated for all atoms up to and including argon. To simplify the plotting of our results, we integrated χ(r, r′) to a quantity χ(r, r{sup ′}), circumventing the θ and ϕ dependence. This allows us to plot and to investigate the periodicity throughout the first three rows in the periodic table within the two different representations. For the first time, χ{sub αβ}(r, r{sup ′}), χ{sub βα}(r, r{sup ′}), and χ{sub SS}(r, r{sup ′}) plots have been calculated and discussed. By integration of the spin polarized linear response functions, different components to the polarisability, α{sub αα}, α{sub αβ}, α{sub βα}, and α{sub ββ} have been calculated.

  8. Quasilaminar regime in the linear response of a turbulent flow to wall waviness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchini, Paolo; Charru, François

    2017-01-01

    The linear response of the wall-shear stress of a turbulent flow to wall waviness is analyzed in the context of a comparison between existing experiments, direct numerical simulations, and analytical approximations. The spectral region where the response is largest is found to be amenable to a simplified quasilaminar analysis. The end result is a parameterless description of this phenomenon that completely captures its physics in a single analytical formula, a Padé approximation of the response function.

  9. Linear-response calculation in the time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Inakura, Tsunenori; Avogadro, Paolo; Ebata, Shuichiro; Sato, Koichi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2012-11-12

    Linear response calculations based on the time-dependent density-functional theory are presented. Especially, we report results of the finite amplitude method which we have recently proposed as an alternative and feasible approach to the (quasiparticle-)random-phase approximation. Calculated properties of the giant resonances and low-energy E1 modes are discussed. We found a universal linear correlation between the low-energy E1 strength and the neutron skin thickness.

  10. The Cu-MOF-199/single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrode for simultaneous determination of hydroquinone and catechol with extended linear ranges and lower detection limits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Xi; Yang, Linlin; Yan, Songlin; Wang, Mengmeng; Cheng, Dan; Chen, Qi; Dong, Yulin; Liu, Peng; Cai, Weiquan; Zhang, Chaocan

    2015-10-29

    A novel electrochemical sensor based on Cu-MOF-199 [Cu-MOF-199 = Cu3(BTC)2 (BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylicacid)] and SWCNTs (single-walled carbon nanotubes) was fabricated for the simultaneous determination of hydroquinone (HQ) and catechol (CT). The modification procedure was carried out through casting SWCNTs on the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and followed by the electrodeposition of Cu-MOF-199 on the SWCNTs modified electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to characterize the electrochemical performance and surface characteristics of the as-prepared sensor. The composite electrode exhibited an excellent electrocatalytic activity with increased electrochemical signals towards the oxidation of HQ and CT, owing to the synergistic effect of SWCNTs and Cu-MOF-199. Under the optimized condition, the linear response range were from 0.1 to 1453 μmol L(-1) (RHQ = 0.9999) for HQ and 0.1-1150 μmol L(-1) (RCT = 0.9990) for CT. The detection limits for HQ and CT were as low as 0.08 and 0.1 μmol L(-1), respectively. Moreover, the modified electrode presented the good reproducibility and the excellent anti-interference performance. The analytical performance of the developed sensor for the simultaneous detection of HQ and CT had been evaluated in practical samples with satisfying results.

  11. Linear response theory for symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O (N ) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry-improved two-particle irreducible effective action (SI-2PIEA) formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are overdetermined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the overdetermining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O (N ) covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear response approximation and possible ways forward.

  12. Determining the continuous family of quantum Fisher information from linear-response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitara, Tomohiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2016-12-01

    The quantum Fisher information represents a continuous family of metrics on the space of quantum states and places the fundamental limit on the accuracy of quantum state estimation. We show that the entire family of quantum Fisher information can be determined from linear-response theory through generalized covariances. We derive the generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates linear-response functions to generalized covariances and hence allows us to determine the quantum Fisher information from linear-response functions, which are experimentally measurable quantities. As an application, we examine the skew information, which is a quantum Fisher information, of a harmonic oscillator in thermal equilibrium, and show that the equality of the skew-information-based uncertainty relation holds.

  13. Dielectric function beyond the random-phase approximation: kinetic theory versus linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Reinholz, H; Röpke, G

    2012-03-01

    Calculating the frequency-dependent dielectric function for strongly coupled plasmas, the relations within kinetic theory and linear response theory are derived and discussed in comparison. In this context, we give a proof that the Kohler variational principle can be extended to arbitrary frequencies. It is shown to be a special case of the Zubarev method for the construction of a nonequilibrium statistical operator from the principle of the extremum of entropy production. Within kinetic theory, the commonly used energy-dependent relaxation time approach is strictly valid only for the Lorentz plasma in the static case. It is compared with the result from linear response theory that includes electron-electron interactions and applies for arbitrary frequencies, including bremsstrahlung emission. It is shown how a general approach to linear response encompasses the different approximations and opens options for systematic improvements.

  14. Cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei mirror cortical force-related-BOLD responses: Beyond all (linear) expectations.

    PubMed

    Alahmadi, Adnan A S; Pardini, Matteo; Samson, Rebecca S; Friston, Karl J; Toosy, Ahmed T; D'Angelo, Egidio; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M

    2017-02-27

    The relationship between the BOLD response and an applied force was quantified in the cerebellum using a power grip task. To investigate whether the cerebellum responds in an on/off way to motor demands or contributes to motor responses in a parametric fashion, similarly to the cortex, five grip force levels were investigated under visual feedback. Functional MRI data were acquired in 13 healthy volunteers and their responses were analyzed using a cerebellum-optimized pipeline. This allowed us to evaluate, within the cerebellum, voxelwise linear and non-linear associations between cerebellar activations and forces. We showed extensive non-linear activations (with a parametric design), covering the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum with a BOLD-force relationship that is region-dependent. Linear responses were mainly located in the anterior lobe, similarly to the cortex, where linear responses are localized in M1. Complex responses were localized in the posterior lobe, reflecting its key role in attention and executive processing, required during visually guided movement. Given the highly organized responses in the cerebellar cortex, a key question is whether deep cerebellar nuclei show similar parametric effects. We found positive correlations with force in the ipsilateral dentate nucleus and negative correlations on the contralateral side, suggesting a somatotopic organization of the dentate nucleus in line with cerebellar and cortical areas. Our results confirm that there is cerebellar organization involving all grey matter structures that reflect functional segregation in the cortex, where cerebellar lobules and dentate nuclei contribute to complex motor tasks with different BOLD response profiles in relation to the forces. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Modifying action sounds influences people's emotional responses and bodily sensations

    PubMed Central

    Tonetto, Leandro Miletto; Klanovicz, Cristiano Porto; Spence, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We report an experiment designed to investigate the effect of modifying the sound of high-heeled shoes on women's self-reported valence, arousal, and dominance scores, as well as any changes to a variety of measures of bodily sensation. We also assessed whether self-evaluated personality traits and the enjoyment associated with wearing heels were correlated with these effects. Forty-eight women walked down a “virtual runway” while listening to four interaction sounds (leather- and polypropylene-soled high-heeled shoes contacting ceramic flooring or carpet). Analysis of the questionnaires that the participants completed indicated that the type of sonic interaction impacted valence, arousal, and dominance scores, as well as the evaluated bodily sensations. There were also correlations between these scores and both self-evaluated personality traits and the reported enjoyment associated with wearing high heels. These results demonstrate the effect that the sound of a woman's physical interaction with the environment can have, especially when her contact with the ground while walking makes a louder sound. More generally, these results demonstrate that the manipulation of product extrinsic sounds can modify people's evaluation of their emotional outcomes (valence, arousal, and dominance), as well as their bodily sensations. PMID:25469221

  16. Homologous recombination with linear DNA to insert antigenic protein in the flagellin: improvement of the Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Le Moigne, Vincent; Robreau, Georges; Mahana, Wahib

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin is a surface protein with numerous advantages for the presentation of exogenous peptides. However, the production of recombinant bacteria and the expression of fusion proteins is laborious and time consuming. Here, we present a simple way to produce modified bacteria. Partially deleted, non-functional, chromosomal flagellin gene (fliC ) was changed using homologous recombination by a functional linear fliC gene in which we introduced an exogenous oligonucleotide encoding for the peptide of interest. The modified fliC gene was produced by polymerase chain amplification. Linear amplicons were introduced into the non-motile E. coli by electroporation. The formation of functional flagellar filaments allowed the discrimination of motile transformants from non-motile, non-transformed cells. Thus antibiotic selection and gene expression inductors are not required since transformed bacteria can be easily isolated and used as a vector and adjuvant for immunization. To validate this hypothesis, we studied the immune response against the N-terminal peptide of Clostridium tyrobutyricum flagellin fragment. BALB/c mice were immunized either with the protein displayed as flagellin fusion protein on the surface of E. coli, with the recombinant protein in Freund's adjuvant (FA), or with the pcDNA3 vector bearing the DNA fragment encoding this protein. Immunization with the flagellin recombinant bacteria induced a strong Th1 response as measured by high level of IFN-gamma production and the lack of IL-4 production. The results indicate that the flagellar filament protein carrying a specific epitope can be a potent inducer of the Th1 cellular response.

  17. Application of linear response theory to magnetotransport properties of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J. R.; Redmer, R.; Reinholz, H.

    2010-03-15

    Linear response theory, as developed within the Zubarev formalism, is a quantum statistical approach for describing systems out of but close to equilibrium, which has been successfully applied to a wide variety of plasmas in an external electric field and/or containing a temperature gradient. We present here an extension of linear response theory to include the effects of an external magnetic field. General expressions for the complete set of relevant transport properties are given. In particular, the Hall effect and the influence of a magnetic field on the dc electrical conductivity are discussed. Low-density limits including electron-electron scattering are presented as well as results for arbitrary degeneracy.

  18. Modifying Fear Responses to Mass Media in Preschool and Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Joanne; Wilson, Barbara J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study comparing the way cognitive manipulations affected the emotional responses of preschool and elementary school children to a frightening film, i.e., telling children the presentation is not real, and role-taking. Emotional responses of 9- to 11-year-olds were modified by instructional sets while 3- to 5-year-olds' responses were…

  19. Arabidopsis seed germination responses to osmotic stress involve the chromatin modifier PICKLE.

    PubMed

    Belin, Christophe; Lopez-Molina, Luis

    2008-07-01

    pkl mutant seed germination is hypersensitive to ABA treatment due to abnormally high and persistent ABI3 and ABI5 expression. PKL, a putative chromatin modifier, is instrumental to associate ABI3 and ABI5 with silent chromatin in response to ABA. Thus, PKL prevents exaggerated germination arrest responses by shutting off ABI3 and ABI5 expression in response to mild stresses.

  20. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings.

    PubMed

    Boos, William R; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-02-09

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a "tipping point." Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation's ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo.

  1. Difficulty modifying a sustained motor response in prodromal Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Mickes, Laura; Wixted, John T; Peavy, Guerry M; Jacobson, Mark W; Goldstein, Jody L; Corey-Bloom, Jody

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the nature of motor symptoms in the preclinical stage of Huntington's disease. Individuals with the CAG expanded repeat of Huntington's disease (prHD) and two control groups were tested on a task requiring a releasing movement (releasing a depressed button) followed by a ballistic movement (pressing a different button). Movement times were measured separately for releasing and ballistic movements. The mean reaction time of the prHD group was significantly longer when releasing a movement than that of the other groups. The groups, however, did not differ significantly on movement time for ballistic movements. Our results show that motor slowing is evident prior to the clinical diagnosis of Huntington's disease and may reflect difficulty in modifying a sustained motor program.

  2. Using Modified Mercalli Intensities to estimate acceleration response spectra for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Bundock, H.; Seekins, L.C.

    2006-01-01

    We derive and test relations between the Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) and the pseudo-acceleration response spectra at 1.0 and 0.3 s - SA(1.0 s) and SA(0.3 s) - in order to map response spectral ordinates for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Recent analyses of intensity have shown that MMI ??? 6 correlates both with peak ground velocity and with response spectra for periods from 0.5 to 3.0 s. We use these recent results to derive a linear relation between MMI and log SA(1.0 s), and we refine this relation by comparing the SA(1.0 s) estimated from Boatwright and Bundock's (2005) MMI map for the 1906 earthquake to the SA(1.0 s) calculated from recordings of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. South of San Jose, the intensity distributions for the 1906 and 1989 earthquakes are remarkably similar, despite the difference in magnitude and rupture extent between the two events. We use recent strong motion regressions to derive a relation between SA(1.0 s) and SA(0.3 s) for a M7.8 strike-slip earthquake that depends on soil type, acceleration level, and source distance. We test this relation by comparing SA(0.3 s) estimated for the 1906 earthquake to SA(0.3 s) calculated from recordings of both the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge earthquakes, as functions of distance from the fault. ?? 2006, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  3. A theoretical and experimental investigation of the linear and nonlinear impulse responses from a magnetoplasma column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grody, N. C.

    1973-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear responses of a magnetoplasma resulting from inhomogeneity in the background plasma density are studied. The plasma response to an impulse electric field was measured and the results are compared with the theory of an inhomogeneous cold plasma. Impulse responses were recorded for the different plasma densities, static magnetic fields, and neutral pressures and generally appeared as modulated, damped oscillations. The frequency spectra of the waveforms consisted of two separated resonance peaks. For weak excitation, the results correlate with the linear theory of a cold, inhomogeneous, cylindrical magnetoplasma. The damping mechanism is identified with that of phase mixing due to inhomogeneity in plasma density. With increasing excitation voltage, the nonlinear impulse responses display stronger damping and a small increase in the frequency of oscillation.

  4. Flutter and Forced Response Analyses of Cascades using a Two-Dimensional Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.; Mehmed, O.

    1999-01-01

    Flutter and forced response analyses for a cascade of blades in subsonic and transonic flow is presented. The structural model for each blade is a typical section with bending and torsion degrees of freedom. The unsteady aerodynamic forces due to bending and torsion motions. and due to a vortical gust disturbance are obtained by solving unsteady linearized Euler equations. The unsteady linearized equations are obtained by linearizing the unsteady nonlinear equations about the steady flow. The predicted unsteady aerodynamic forces include the effect of steady aerodynamic loading due to airfoil shape, thickness and angle of attack. The aeroelastic equations are solved in the frequency domain by coupling the un- steady aerodynamic forces to the aeroelastic solver MISER. The present unsteady aerodynamic solver showed good correlation with published results for both flutter and forced response predictions. Further improvements are required to use the unsteady aerodynamic solver in a design cycle.

  5. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  6. Interaction with epithelial cells modifies airway macrophage response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rebecca N; Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E; Duncan, Kelly E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-03-01

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (O3) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived signals affect Mac response to O3. Macs from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of healthy volunteers were cocultured with the human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) or alveolar (A549) epithelial cell lines. Cocultures, Mac monocultures, and epithelial cell monocultures were exposed to O3 or air, and Mac immunophenotype, phagocytosis, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Quantities of hyaluronic acid (HA) and IL-8 were compared across cultures and in BAL fluid from healthy volunteers exposed to O3 or air for in vivo confirmation. We show that Macs in coculture had increased markers of alternative activation, enhanced cytotoxicity, and reduced phagocytosis compared with Macs in monoculture that differed based on coculture with A549 or 16HBE. Production of HA by epithelial cell monocultures was not affected by O3, but quantities of HA in the in vitro coculture and BAL fluid from volunteers exposed in vivo were increased with O3 exposure, indicating that O3 exposure impairs Mac regulation of HA. Together, we show epithelial cell-Mac coculture models that have many similarities to the in vivo responses to O3, and demonstrate that epithelial cell-derived signals are important determinants of Mac immunophenotype and response to O3.

  7. On the Linear Relation between the Mean and the Standard Deviation of a Response Time Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Brown, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that the spread of a response time (RT) distribution increases with the mean, the precise nature of this relation remains relatively unexplored. The authors show that in several descriptive RT distributions, the standard deviation increases linearly with the mean. Results from a wide range of tasks from different…

  8. Determining polarizable force fields with electrostatic potentials from quantum mechanical linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2016-06-01

    We developed a new method to calculate the atomic polarizabilities by fitting to the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) obtained from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations within the linear response theory. This parallels the conventional approach of fitting atomic charges based on electrostatic potentials from the electron density. Our ESP fitting is combined with the induced dipole model under the perturbation of uniform external electric fields of all orientations. QM calculations for the linear response to the external electric fields are used as input, fully consistent with the induced dipole model, which itself is a linear response model. The orientation of the uniform external electric fields is integrated in all directions. The integration of orientation and QM linear response calculations together makes the fitting results independent of the orientations and magnitudes of the uniform external electric fields applied. Another advantage of our method is that QM calculation is only needed once, in contrast to the conventional approach, where many QM calculations are needed for many different applied electric fields. The molecular polarizabilities obtained from our method show comparable accuracy with those from fitting directly to the experimental or theoretical molecular polarizabilities. Since ESP is directly fitted, atomic polarizabilities obtained from our method are expected to reproduce the electrostatic interactions better. Our method was used to calculate both transferable atomic polarizabilities for polarizable molecular mechanics' force fields and nontransferable molecule-specific atomic polarizabilities.

  9. IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    IS THE DOSE-RESPONSE LINEAR OR NONLINEAR FOR GENOTOXIC EFFECTS?
    Preston, RJ. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    For considerations of cancer risk assessment from exposure to environmenta...

  10. Determining polarizable force fields with electrostatic potentials from quantum mechanical linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2016-06-14

    We developed a new method to calculate the atomic polarizabilities by fitting to the electrostatic potentials (ESPs) obtained from quantum mechanical (QM) calculations within the linear response theory. This parallels the conventional approach of fitting atomic charges based on electrostatic potentials from the electron density. Our ESP fitting is combined with the induced dipole model under the perturbation of uniform external electric fields of all orientations. QM calculations for the linear response to the external electric fields are used as input, fully consistent with the induced dipole model, which itself is a linear response model. The orientation of the uniform external electric fields is integrated in all directions. The integration of orientation and QM linear response calculations together makes the fitting results independent of the orientations and magnitudes of the uniform external electric fields applied. Another advantage of our method is that QM calculation is only needed once, in contrast to the conventional approach, where many QM calculations are needed for many different applied electric fields. The molecular polarizabilities obtained from our method show comparable accuracy with those from fitting directly to the experimental or theoretical molecular polarizabilities. Since ESP is directly fitted, atomic polarizabilities obtained from our method are expected to reproduce the electrostatic interactions better. Our method was used to calculate both transferable atomic polarizabilities for polarizable molecular mechanics' force fields and nontransferable molecule-specific atomic polarizabilities.

  11. A modified WKB formulation for linear eigenmodes of a collisionless self-gravitating disc in the epicyclic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, Mamta; Saini, Tarun Deep

    2016-07-01

    The short-wave asymptotics (WKB) of spiral density waves in self-gravitating stellar discs is well suited for the study of the dynamics of tightly-wound wavepackets. But the textbook WKB theory is not well adapted to the study of the linear eigenmodes in a collisionless self-gravitating disc because of the transcendental nature of the dispersion relation. We present a modified WKB theory of spiral density waves, for collisionless discs in the epicyclic limit, in which the perturbed gravitational potential is related to the perturbed surface density by the Poisson integral in Kalnaj's logarithmic spiral form. An integral equation is obtained for the surface density perturbation, which is seen to also reduce to the standard WKB dispersion relation. Although our formulation is general and applies to all discs, we present our analysis only for nearly Keplerian, low-mass, self-gravitating discs revolving around massive central objects, and derive an integral equation governing the slow precessional modes of such discs. For a prograde disc, the integral kernel turns out be real and symmetric, implying that all slow modes are stable. We apply the slow mode integral equation to two unperturbed disc profiles, the Jalali-Tremaine annular discs, and the Kuzmin disc. We determine eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for both m = 1 and m = 2 slow modes for these profiles and discuss their properties. Our results compare well with those of Jalali-Tremaine.

  12. Temporomandibular disorder modifies cortical response to tactile stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Mary Beth; Folger, Stephen; Tommerdahl, Mark; Hollins, Mark; McGlone, Francis; Essick, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) suffer from persistent facial pain and exhibit abnormal sensitivity to tactile stimulation. To better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying TMD, we investigated cortical correlates of this abnormal sensitivity to touch. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recorded cortical responses evoked by low frequency vibration of the index finger in subjects with TMD and in healthy controls (HC). Distinct subregions of contralateral SI, SII, and insular cortex responded maximally for each group. Although the stimulus was inaudible, primary auditory cortex was activated in TMDs. TMDs also showed greater activation bilaterally in anterior cingulate cortex and contralaterally in the amygdala. Differences between TMDs and HCs in responses evoked by innocuous vibrotactile stimulation within SI, SII, and the insula paralleled previously reported differences in responses evoked by noxious and innocuous stimulation, respectively, in healthy individuals. This unexpected result may reflect a disruption of the normal balance between central resources dedicated to processing innocuous and noxious input, manifesting itself as increased readiness of the pain matrix for activation by even innocuous input. Activation of the amygdala in our TMD group could reflect the establishment of aversive associations with tactile stimulation due to the persistence of pain. Perspective This article presents evidence that central processing of innocuous tactile stimulation is abnormal in TMD. Understanding the complexity of sensory disruption in chronic pain could lead to improved methods for assessing cerebral cortical function in these patients. PMID:20462805

  13. Disentangling linear and nonlinear brain responses to evoked deep tissue pain

    PubMed Central

    Loggia, Marco L.; Edwards, Robert R.; Kim, Jieun; Vangel, Mark G.; Wasan, Ajay; Gollub, Randy L.; Harris, Richard E.; Park, Kyungmo; Napadow, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Pain stimuli evoke widespread responses in the brain. However, our understanding of the physiological significance underlying heterogeneous response within different pain-activated and -deactivated regions is still limited. Using functional MRI, we evaluated brain responses to a wide range of stimulus intensity levels (1 innocuous, 7 painful) in order to estimate region-specific stimulus-response functions, which we hypothesized could illuminate that region’s functional relationship to pain. Linear and nonlinear brain responses to pain were estimated through independent Legendre polynomial transformations of pain ratings within a general linear model. This approach identified at least five different, regionally-specific activity profiles in the brain. Linearly increasing (e.g., primary somatosensory/motor cortex, insulae) and intensity-independent (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex) activation was noted in traditional pain processing areas, potentially reflecting sensory encoding and all-or-none salience responses, respectively. Multiple activity profiles were seen in areas of the default mode network (DMN): intensity-independent deactivation (e.g., posterior cingulate cortex), linearly decreasing (e.g., contralateral inferior parietal lobule), and quadratic (U-shaped; e.g., medial prefrontal cortex). The latter observation suggests that: 1) different DMN subregions exhibit functional heterogeneity and 2) some DMN subregions respond in a percept-related manner to pain, suggesting closer linkage between the DMN and pain processing than previously thought. Future studies should apply a similar approach using innocuous stimuli of multiple intensities in order to evaluate whether the response profiles reported here can also be generalized to nonpainful somatosensory processing. PMID:22883925

  14. Linear response theory for annealing of radiation damage in semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, Vitaly

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical study of the radiation/annealing response of MOS ICs is described. Although many experiments have been performed in this field, no comprehensive theory dealing with radiation/annealing response has been proposed. Many attempts have been made to apply linear response theory, but no theoretical foundation has been presented. The linear response theory outlined here is capable of describing a broad area of radiation/annealing response phenomena in MOS ICs, in particular, both simultaneous irradiation and annealing, as well as short- and long-term annealing, including the case when annealing is nearing completion. For the first time, a simple procedure is devised to determine the response function from experimental radiation/annealing data. In addition, this procedure enables us to study the effect of variable temperature and dose rate, effects which are of interest in spaceflight. In the past, the shift in threshold potential due to radiation/annealing has usually been assumed to depend on one variable: the time lapse between an impulse dose and the time of observation. While such a suggestion of uniformity in time is certainly true for a broad range of radiation annealing phenomena, it may not hold for some ranges of the variables of interest (temperature, dose rate, etc.). A response function is projected which is dependent on two variables: the time of observation and the time of the impulse dose. This dependence on two variables allows us to extend the theory to the treatment of a variable dose rate. Finally, the linear theory is generalized to the case in which the response is nonlinear with impulse dose, but is proportional to some impulse function of dose. A method to determine both the impulse and response functions is presented.

  15. Vortex creep and the internal temperature of neutron stars - Linear and nonlinear response to a glitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpar, M. A.; Cheng, K. S.; Pines, D.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of pinned superfluid in neutron stars is determined by the thermal 'creep' of vortices. Vortex creep can respond to changes in the rotation rate of the neutron star crust and provide the observed types of dynamical relaxation following pulsar glitches. It also gives rise to energy dissipation, which determines the thermal evolution of pulsars once the initial heat content has been radiated away. The different possible regimes of vortex creep are explored, and it is shown that the nature of the dynamical response of the pinned superfluid evolves with a pulsar's age. Younger pulsars display a linear regime, where the response is linear in the initial perturbation and is a simple exponential relaxation as a function of time. A nonliner response, with a characteristic nonlinear dependence on the initial perturbation, is responsible for energy dissipation and becomes the predominant mode of response as the pulsar ages. The transition from the linear to the nonlinear regime depends sensitively on the temperature of the neutron star interior. A preliminary review of existing postglitch observations is given within this general evolutionary framework.

  16. Efficacy of a biological response modifier in preventing Staphylococcus aureus intramammary infections after calving.

    PubMed

    Zecconi, A; Bronzo, V; Casula, A; Luzzago, C; Moroni, P; Piccinini, R; Spreafico, G

    1999-10-01

    A change in the epidemiology of mastitis in recent years has emphasized the role of the udder immune system in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus. Therefore, if the bovine or udder immune capability could be enhanced, susceptibility to Staph. aureus could be reduced and antibiotic efficacy could be increased. Immune system defense mechanisms could be enhanced by vaccination and by biological response modifiers. Within this latter group, a biological response modifier obtained from Parapox ovis that was attenuated over 200 tissue culture passages was recently developed and commercialized in some European countries. This study reports the results of a field trial on the efficacy of this biological response modifier in reducing Staph. aureus intramammary infection (IMI) after calving in primiparous and pluriparous cows. The trial included 106 cows sampled six times (55 cows from herd A and 51 from herd B) for a total of 2544 quarter milk samples. The analysis of IMI prevalence showed that 25.09% of samples were bacteriologically positive in the placebo group, and 23.17% of the positive samples were observed in the biological response modifier group. Staphylococcus aureus IMI had a frequency of 11.44% in the placebo group and 6.00% in the biological response modifier group. The dynamic of the hazards showed significantly lower rates in the biological response modifier group than in the placebo group (risk ratio = 0.47). Treatment with the parapox-containing biological response modifier showed significant reduction of Staph. aureus IMI around calving, and this reduction was attributed to an increase in immune defenses.

  17. Improving T cell responses to modified peptides in tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-03-01

    Immune recognition and elimination of cancerous cells is the primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. However, obstacles including immune tolerance and tumor-induced immunosuppression often limit beneficial immune responses. Vaccination is one proposed intervention that may help to overcome these issues and is an active area of study in cancer immunotherapy. Immunizing with tumor antigenic peptides is a promising, straight-forward vaccine strategy hypothesized to boost preexisting antitumor immunity. However, tumor antigens are often weak T cell agonists, attributable to several mechanisms, including immune self-tolerance and poor immunogenicity of self-derived tumor peptides. One strategy for overcoming these mechanisms is vaccination with mimotopes, or peptide mimics of tumor antigens, which alter the antigen presentation and/or T cell activation to increase the expansion of tumor-specific T cells. Evaluation of mimotope vaccine strategies has revealed that even subtle alterations in peptide sequence can dramatically alter antigen presentation and T cell receptor recognition. Most of this research has been performed using T cell clones, which may not be accurate representations of the naturally occurring antitumor response. The relationship between clones generated after mimotope vaccination and the polyclonal T cell repertoire is unclear. Our work with mimotopes in a mouse model of colon carcinoma has revealed important insights into these issues. We propose that the identification of mimotopes based on stimulation of the naturally responding T cell repertoire will dramatically improve the efficacy of mimotope vaccination.

  18. Binge ethanol drinking during adolescence modifies cocaine responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Arenys, Anna; Gracia-Rubio, Irene; Cantacorps, Lídia; Pozo, Oscar J; Marcos, Josep; Rodríguez-Árias, Marta; Miñarro, José; Valverde, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Binge ethanol drinking is an emerging pattern of excessive consumption among adolescents and young adults. Repeated ethanol intoxication has negative consequences during critical periods of brain development. Therefore, binge ethanol intake represents a vulnerability factor that promotes subsequent manifestations of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, we investigated the effects of oral binge ethanol intake during adolescence on the subsequent effects of cocaine in C57BL/6 mice. Firstly, we evaluated the oral ethanol intake of two binge ethanol procedures with different ethanol concentrations (20% v/v versus 30%, v/v). The highest ethanol intake was found in mice exposed to the lower ethanol concentration (20% v/v). In a second experiment, mice exposed to binge ethanol procedure were evaluated to study the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity, behavioural sensitization, and the reinforcing effects of cocaine in the self-administration paradigm. Mice exposed to ethanol binging showed discrete detrimental effects in responses to cocaine in the different experiments evaluated. Our findings revealed that the pattern of binge ethanol consumption in adolescent mice here evaluated produced a weak facilitation of cocaine responses. The present study highlights the importance of interventions to limit the deleterious effects of binge ethanol drinking during adolescence.

  19. Biological response modifiers: interferons, interleukins, recombinant products, liposomal products.

    PubMed

    Kruth, S A

    1998-03-01

    The concept of enhancing the normal immune response against infections and neoplasms has been considered for decades. The administration of various natural and synthetic products to simulate systemic infections has largely given over to the idea that specific cytokines can be used effectively when administered systemically. Interferons, interleukins, and hematopoietic growth factors may offer substantial clinical benefit in chronic viral infections, and cancers such as osteosarcoma, melanoma, and lymphosarcoma. Erythropoietin has been shown to have great utility in the management of chronic renal failure. At this point in time, only recombinant products derived from humans are commercially available, and they are expensive and not licensed for use in companion animals. Nevertheless, these products may have significant clinical impact on several highly fatal disorders of dogs and cats. When administered systemically, cytokines perturb complex regulatory pathways, and serious side effects may occur. Innovative delivery methods, such as liposomes, gene therapy, and even oral administration may increase the therapeutic index of these molecules. Biological response modification, cytokine biology, and associated delivery systems are rapidly changing fields, and the small animal veterinarian will need to watch for significant advances in these areas over the next several years.

  20. Vestibular afferent responses to linear accelerations in the alert squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somps, Christopher J.; Schor, Robert H.; Tomko, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The spontaneous activity of 40 otolith afferents and 44 canal afferents was recorded in 4 alert, intact squirrel monkeys. Polarization vectors and response properties of otolith afferents were determined during static re-orientations relative to gravity and during Earth-horizontal, sinusoidal, linear oscillations. Canal afferents were tested for sensitivity to linear accelerations. For regular otolith afferents, a significant correlation between upright discharge rate and sensitivity to dynamic acceleration in the horizontal plane was observed. This correlation was not present in irregular units. The sensitivity of otolith afferents to both static tilts and dynamic linear acceleration was much greater in irregularly discharging units than in regularly discharging units. The spontaneous activity and static and dynamic response properties of regularly discharging otolith afferents were similar to those reported in barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Irregular afferents also had similar dynamic response properties when compared to anesthetized monkeys. However, this sample of irregular afferents in alert animals had higher resting discharge rates and greater sensitivity to static tilts. The majority of otolith polarization vectors were oriented near the horizontal in the plane of the utricular maculae; however, directions of maximum sensitivity were different during dynamic and static testing. Canal afferents were not sensitive to static tilts or linear oscillations of the head.

  1. Cell surface adrenergic receptor stimulation modifies the endothelial response to SIRS. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tighe, D; Moss, R; Bennett, D

    1996-11-01

    The complex pathway seen in patients with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) does not readily respond to mediator blockade. All such trials conducted in SIRS patients have shown no benefit in reducing mortality. We have shown experimentally that in sepsis, the administration of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists reduces hepatic cellular injury, whereas administration of an alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist increases hepatic cellular injury. Inflammatory mediators can cause a dose-related reversible change in target endothelial cells (ECs). There is a substantial body of literature describing the anti-inflammatory effects of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. They reduce both the increased permeability and the production of inflammatory mediators from ECs. Cellular transduction processes are involved when adrenergic receptor agonists modify either the anti-inflammatory or proinflammatory response to sepsis in ECs. Inflammatory mediators and alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists stimulate their trimeric G protein-linked receptors to produce diacylglycerol (DAG) and increase the intracellular concentration of calcium. DAG is involved in the production of both inflammatory proteins and lipids. In addition, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is activated which is also involved in the production of inflammatory proteins and lipids. beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists activate their trimeric G protein-linked receptors to produce the stimulatory G protein (Gs). Gs stimulates adenyl cyclase to form cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and activate protein kinase A (PKA). PKA is involved in activating gene transcription agents to produce anti-inflammatory proteins such as interleukin-10. PKA also inhibits phospholipase C and MAPK. Although promising, the use of beta-adrenoceptor agonists or agonists that increase cellular cAMP to activate the cells' endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway requires further study.

  2. Seismic response of structures: from non-stationary to non-linear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco; Mucciarelli, Marco; Smith, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    The need for an effective seismic protection of buildings, and all the problems related to their management and maintenance over time, have led to a growing interest associated to develop of new integrated techniques for structural health monitoring and for damage detection and location during both ambient vibration and seismic events. It is well known that the occurrence of damage on any kind of structure is able to modify its dynamic characteristics. Indeed, the main parameters affected by the changes in stiffness characteristics are: periods of vibration, mode shapes and all the related equivalent viscous damping factors. With the aim to evaluate structural dynamic characteristics, their variation over time and after earthquakes, several Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods have been proposed in the last years. Most of these are based on simplified relationship that provide the maximum inter-story drift evaluated combining structural variations in terms of: peak ground acceleration and/or structural eigenfrequencies and/or equivalent viscous damping factors related the main modes of the monitored structure. The NDE methods can be classified into four different levels. The progress of the level increases the quality and the number of the information. The most popular are certainly Level I methods being simple in implementation and economic in management. These kinds of methods are mainly based on the fast variation (less than 1 minute) of the structural fundamental frequency and the related variation of the equivalent viscous damping factor. Generally, it is possible to distinguish two types of variations: the long term variations, which may also be linked to external factors (temperature change, water content in the foundation soils, etc.) and short period variations (for example, due to seismic events), where apparent frequencies variations could occurred due to non-stationary phenomena (particular combination of input and structural response). In these

  3. 30 CFR 254.51 - Modifying an existing OCS response plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modifying an existing OCS response plan. 254.51 Section 254.51 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill...

  4. Calcein-modified multinanochannels on PET films for calcium-responsive nanogating.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zheyi; Jiang, Chendi; Li, Xiulin; Zhai, Jin

    2014-03-26

    Calcein-modified multiporous films with conical channels are introduced in a nanofluid device to enhance the calcium-responsive intensity and stability of ionic currents. Calcein with more carboxyls enhances the response of channels to calcium ions, and the capability of immobilized calcein for Ca(2+)-binding could be regulated by the deprotonation of these carboxyls.

  5. Pretreatment with nitrogen dioxide modifies plant response to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runeckles, V. C.; Palmer, K.

    Plant growth inhibition by ozone is significantly affected by previous exposure to nitrogen dioxide. Experiments on the early growth of four crop species showed that daily pretreatment with NO 2 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 3 h) immediately prior to exposure to O 3 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 6 h) increased the inhibition of radish and wheat growth, decreased the inhibition of bush bean growth, but had no effect on the growth of mint. The magnitudes of the interactive effects indicate that in regions where relatively high concentrations of O 3 are produced by photochemical processes, for example, downwind from urban centres, assessments of the impact of O 3 on vegetation based on knowledge of response to O 3 alone may be seriously flawed.

  6. Application of linear response theory to experimental data of simultaneous radiation and annealing response of a CMOS device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, V.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the application of linear response theory are compared to experimental data from simultaneous radiation and annealing response of a CMOS device. In particular, a method is applied which was developed earlier to determine the characteristic time, t(0), as well as the parameters A and C in the 1n(t) dependence of the linear response function R(t) = -C + A1n(1-t/t(0)). The method is based on a study of the linear response for t being much less than t(0), when R(t) can be expanded in a power series of t: R(t) = R(0) + R'(0)t + 1/2R''(0)t-squared + 1/3R'''(0)t-cubed + ..., where R'(0) and R''(0) are, respectively, the first and second derivatives of R with respect to t. To find the linear response, R(t-t') is substituted in the form of this power series equation into a general equation for the shift of the threshold potential. To test the method, irradiation experiments were conducted on RCA 10(6) rad-hard CMOS IC's. A dose rate of approximately 130 rads/min was used. An IC was irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays for several hours, taking measurements of the threshold potential for one n-channel and one p-channel transistor every ten minutes. For the p-channel transistor, t(0) was found to be approximately 110 min and for the n-channel, t(0) was approximately 70 min. For the p-channel, the theoretical curve deviates from the experimental points only after 70 min; for the n-channel, the deviation takes place after 45 min. Additional findings are discussed and the application of the method to pure annealing is described.

  7. Encoding of head acceleration in vestibular neurons. I. Spatiotemporal response properties to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, G. A.; Perachio, A. A.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    1. Extracellular recordings were made in and around the medial vestibular nuclei in decerebrated rats. Neurons were functionally identified according to their semicircular canal input on the basis of their responses to angular head rotations around the yaw, pitch, and roll head axes. Those cells responding to angular acceleration were classified as either horizontal semicircular canal-related (HC) or vertical semicircular canal-related (VC) neurons. The HC neurons were further characterized as either type I or type II, depending on the direction of rotation producing excitation. Cells that lacked a response to angular head acceleration, but exhibited sensitivity to a change in head position, were classified as purely otolith organ-related (OTO) neurons. All vestibular neurons were then tested for their response to sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. 2. Convergence of macular and canal inputs onto central vestibular nuclei neurons occurred in 73% of the type I HC, 79% of the type II HC, and 86% of the VC neurons. Out of the 223 neurons identified as receiving macular input, 94 neurons were further studied, and their spatiotemporal response properties to sinusoidal stimulation with pure linear acceleration were quantified. Data were obtained from 33 type I HC, 22 type II HC, 22 VC, and 17 OTO neurons. 3. For each neuron the angle of the translational stimulus vector was varied by 15, 30, or 45 degrees increments in the horizontal head plane. In all tested neurons, a direction of maximum sensitivity was identified. An interesting difference among neurons was their response to translation along the direction perpendicular to that that produced the maximum response ("null" direction). For the majority of neurons tested, it was possible to evoke a nonzero response during stimulation along the null direction always had response phases that varied as a function of stimulus direction. 4. These spatiotemporal response properties were quantified in two

  8. Procedure for preventing response strain on random interval schedules with a linear feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Reed, Phil

    2016-03-01

    An experiment examined the impact of a procedure designed to prevent response or extinction strain occurring on random interval schedules with a linear feedback loop (i.e., an RI+ schedule). Rats lever-pressed for food reinforcement on either a RI+ or a random interval (RI) schedule that was matched to the RI+ schedule in terms of reinforcement rate. Two groups of rats responded on an RI+ and two on an RI schedule matched for rate of reinforcement. One group on each schedule also received response-independent food if there had been no response for 60 s, and response-independent food continued to be delivered on an RT-60 schedule until a response was made. Rats on the RI and RI+ obtained similar rates of reinforcement and had similar reinforced inter-response times to one another. On the schedules without response-independent food, rats had similar rates of response to one another. However, while the delivery of response-independent food reduced rates of response on an RI schedule, they enhanced response rates on an RI+ schedule. These results suggest that rats can display sensitivity to the molar aspects of the free-operant contingency, when procedures are implemented to reduce the impact of factors such as extinction-strain.

  9. Olfactory experience modifies semiochemical responses in a bark beetle predator.

    PubMed

    Costa, Arnaud; Reeve, John D

    2011-11-01

    A typical feature of forest insect pests is their tendency to undergo large fluctuations in abundance, which can jeopardize the persistence of their predaceous natural enemies. One strategy that these predators may adopt to cope with these fluctuations would be to respond to sensory cues for multiple prey species. Another possible adaptation to temporal variation in the prey community could involve the learning of prey cues and switching behavior. We conducted three experiments to investigate the ability of the generalist bark beetle predator Thanasimus dubius (F.) (Coleoptera: Cleridae) to respond to different prey signals and to investigate the effect of olfactory experience. We first conducted a field choice test and a wind tunnel experiment to examine the kairomonal response of individual predators toward prey pheromone components (frontalin, ipsenol, ipsdienol, sulcatol) along with the pine monoterpene α-pinene, which is a volatile compound from the host of the prey. We also presented semiochemically naive predators with two prey pheromone components, frontalin and ipsenol, alone or associated with a reward. Our results showed that T. dubius populations are composed of generalists that can respond to a broad range of kairomonal signals. Naive T. dubius also were more attracted to ipsenol following its association with a reward. This work constitutes the first evidence that the behavior of a predatory insect involved in bark beetle population dynamics is influenced by previous olfactory experience, and provides a potential explanation for the pattern of prey switching observed in field studies.

  10. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings

    PubMed Central

    Boos, William R.; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a “tipping point.” Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation’s ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo. PMID:26811462

  11. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real-time electronic event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-09-01

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations. PACS

  12. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real- time electronic event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-09-08

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations.

  13. The adequate stimulus for avian short latency vestibular responses to linear translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.; Colbert, S.

    1998-01-01

    Transient linear acceleration stimuli have been shown to elicit eighth nerve vestibular compound action potentials in birds and mammals. The present study was undertaken to better define the nature of the adequate stimulus for neurons generating the response in the chicken (Gallus domesticus). In particular, the study evaluated the question of whether the neurons studied are most sensitive to the maximum level of linear acceleration achieved or to the rate of change in acceleration (da/dt, or jerk). To do this, vestibular response thresholds were measured as a function of stimulus onset slope. Traditional computer signal averaging was used to record responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli. Stimulus onset slope was systematically varied. Acceleration thresholds decreased with increasing stimulus onset slope (decreasing stimulus rise time). When stimuli were expressed in units of jerk (g/ms), thresholds were virtually constant for all stimulus rise times. Moreover, stimuli having identical jerk magnitudes but widely varying peak acceleration levels produced virtually identical responses. Vestibular response thresholds, latencies and amplitudes appear to be determined strictly by stimulus jerk magnitudes. Stimulus attributes such as peak acceleration or rise time alone do not provide sufficient information to predict response parameter quantities. Indeed, the major response parameters were shown to be virtually independent of peak acceleration levels or rise time when these stimulus features were isolated and considered separately. It is concluded that the neurons generating short latency vestibular evoked potentials do so as "jerk encoders" in the chicken. Primary afferents classified as "irregular", and which traditionally fall into the broad category of "dynamic" or "phasic" neurons, would seem to be the most likely candidates for the neural generators of short latency vestibular compound action potentials.

  14. Ozone-induced dissociation on a modified tandem linear ion-trap: observations of different reactivity for isomeric lipids.

    PubMed

    Poad, Berwyck L J; Pham, Huong T; Thomas, Michael C; Nealon, Jessica R; Campbell, J Larry; Mitchell, Todd W; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2010-12-01

    Ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) exploits the gas-phase reaction between mass-selected lipid ions and ozone vapor to determine the position(s) of unsaturation. In this contribution, we describe the modification of a tandem linear ion-trap mass spectrometer specifically for OzID analyses wherein ozone vapor is supplied to the collision cell. This instrumental configuration provides spatial separation between mass-selection, the ozonolysis reaction, and mass-analysis steps in the OzID process and thus delivers significant enhancements in speed and sensitivity (ca. 30-fold). These improvements allow spectra revealing the double-bond position(s) within unsaturated lipids to be acquired within 1 s: significantly enhancing the utility of OzID in high-throughput lipidomic protocols. The stable ozone concentration afforded by this modified instrument also allows direct comparison of relative reactivity of isomeric lipids and reveals reactivity trends related to (1) double-bond position, (2) substitution position on the glycerol backbone, and (3) stereochemistry. For cis- and trans-isomers, differences were also observed in the branching ratio of product ions arising from the gas-phase ozonolysis reaction, suggesting that relative ion abundances could be exploited as markers for double-bond geometry. Additional activation energy applied to mass-selected lipid ions during injection into the collision cell (with ozone present) was found to yield spectra containing both OzID and classical-CID fragment ions. This combination CID-OzID acquisition on an ostensibly simple monounsaturated phosphatidylcholine within a cow brain lipid extract provided evidence for up to four structurally distinct phospholipids differing in both double-bond position and sn-substitution.

  15. Nonrigid, Resistive Linear Plasma Response Models Based on Perturbed Equilibria for Axisymmetric Tokamak Control Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Leuer, J. A.; Walker, M. L.; Welander, A. S.

    2003-10-01

    Linear, perturbed equilibrium plasma response models can accurately represent the experimental response of tokamak plasmas to applied fields [A. Coutlis, et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 663 (1999)]. However, agreement between experiment and model is much better when average flux over the plasma, rather than at each fluid element, is conserved [P. Vyas, et al., Nucl. Fusion 38, 1043 (1998)]. The close experimental agreement of average flux-conserving models is consistent with approximating field penetration effects produced by finite plasma resistivity, particularly in the edge region. We report on the development of nonrigid linear plasma response models which include finite local plasma resistivity in order to more accurately represent the dynamic response due to this field penetration. Such response models are expected to be important for designing profile control algorithms in advanced tokamaks. Accounting for finite plasma resistivity is also important in designing multivariable integrated controllers which must simultaneously regulate plasma shape and plasma current. Consequences of including resisitivity will be illustrated and comparisons with DIII-D experimental plasma responses will be made.

  16. Linear response to leadership, effective temperature and decision making in flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Daniel; Giomi, Luca

    The Vicsek model is the prototypical system for studying collective behavior of interacting self propelled particles (SPPs). It has formed the basis for models explaining the collective behavior of many active systems including flocks of birds and swarms of insects. To the standard Vicsek model we introduce a small angular torque to a subset of the particles and observe how this effects the direction of polarisation of the entire swarm. This is analogous to a few informed birds trying to lead the rest of a large flock by initiating a turn. We find a linear response to this perturbation and fluctuations that are in agreement with fluctuation dissipation theorem. This allows the identification of an effective temperature for the Vicsek model that follows a power law with the noise amplitude. The linear response can also be extended to the process of decision-making, wherein flocks must decide between the behaviors of two competing subgroups of individuals.

  17. Linear response to leadership, effective temperature, and decision making in flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Daniel J. G.; Giomi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Large collections of autonomously moving agents, such as animals or micro-organisms, are able to flock coherently in space even in the absence of a central control mechanism. While the direction of the flock resulting from this critical behavior is random, this can be controlled by a small subset of informed individuals acting as leaders of the group. In this article we use the Vicsek model to investigate how flocks respond to leadership and make decisions. Using a combination of numerical simulations and continuous modeling we demonstrate that flocks display a linear response to leadership that can be cast in the framework of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, identifying an effective temperature reflecting how promptly the flock reacts to the initiative of the leaders. The linear response to leadership also holds in the presence of two groups of informed individuals with competing interests, indicating that the flock's behavioral decision is determined by both the number of leaders and their degree of influence.

  18. Challenges within the linear response approximation when studying enzyme catalysis and effects of mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharir-Ivry, Avital; Varatharaj, Rajapandian; Shurki, Avital

    2015-01-13

    Various aspects of the linear response approximation (LRA) approach were examined when calculating reaction barriers within an enzyme and its different mutants. Scaling the electrostatic interactions is shown to slightly affect the absolute values of the barriers but not the overall trend when comparing wild-type and mutants. Convergence of the overall energetics was shown to depend on the sampling. Finally, the contribution of particular residues was shown to be significant, despite its small value.

  19. Excited states with internally contracted multireference coupled-cluster linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Pradipta Kumar; Mukherjee, Debashis; Hanauer, Matthias; Köhn, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the linear response (LR) theory for the variant of internally contracted multireference coupled cluster (ic-MRCC) theory described by Hanauer and Köhn [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204211 (2011)] has been formulated and implemented for the computation of the excitation energies relative to a ground state of pronounced multireference character. We find that straightforward application of the linear-response formalism to the time-averaged ic-MRCC Lagrangian leads to unphysical second-order poles. However, the coupling matrix elements that cause this behavior are shown to be negligible whenever the internally contracted approximation as such is justified. Hence, for the numerical implementation of the method, we adopt a Tamm-Dancoff-type approximation and neglect these couplings. This approximation is also consistent with an equation-of-motion based derivation, which neglects these couplings right from the start. We have implemented the linear-response approach in the ic-MRCC singles-and-doubles framework and applied our method to calculate excitation energies for a number of molecules ranging from CH2 to p-benzyne and conjugated polyenes (up to octatetraene). The computed excitation energies are found to be very accurate, even for the notoriously difficult case of doubly excited states. The ic-MRCC-LR theory is also applicable to systems with open-shell ground-state wavefunctions and is by construction not biased towards a particular reference determinant. We have also compared the linear-response approach to the computation of energy differences by direct state-specific ic-MRCC calculations. We finally compare to Mk-MRCC-LR theory for which spurious roots have been reported [T.-C. Jagau and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044116 (2012)], being due to the use of sufficiency conditions to solve the Mk-MRCC equations. No such problem is present in ic-MRCC-LR theory.

  20. Excited states with internally contracted multireference coupled-cluster linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Pradipta Kumar; Mukherjee, Debashis; Hanauer, Matthias; Köhn, Andreas

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, the linear response (LR) theory for the variant of internally contracted multireference coupled cluster (ic-MRCC) theory described by Hanauer and Köhn [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204211 (2011)] has been formulated and implemented for the computation of the excitation energies relative to a ground state of pronounced multireference character. We find that straightforward application of the linear-response formalism to the time-averaged ic-MRCC Lagrangian leads to unphysical second-order poles. However, the coupling matrix elements that cause this behavior are shown to be negligible whenever the internally contracted approximation as such is justified. Hence, for the numerical implementation of the method, we adopt a Tamm-Dancoff-type approximation and neglect these couplings. This approximation is also consistent with an equation-of-motion based derivation, which neglects these couplings right from the start. We have implemented the linear-response approach in the ic-MRCC singles-and-doubles framework and applied our method to calculate excitation energies for a number of molecules ranging from CH2 to p-benzyne and conjugated polyenes (up to octatetraene). The computed excitation energies are found to be very accurate, even for the notoriously difficult case of doubly excited states. The ic-MRCC-LR theory is also applicable to systems with open-shell ground-state wavefunctions and is by construction not biased towards a particular reference determinant. We have also compared the linear-response approach to the computation of energy differences by direct state-specific ic-MRCC calculations. We finally compare to Mk-MRCC-LR theory for which spurious roots have been reported [T.-C. Jagau and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044116 (2012)], being due to the use of sufficiency conditions to solve the Mk-MRCC equations. No such problem is present in ic-MRCC-LR theory.

  1. Thermodynamics of the mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine beyond the linear-response regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Hatano, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    Mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine is much anticipated as a device that allows us to utilize with high efficiency wasted heat inaccessible by conventional heat engines. However, the derivation of the heat current in this engine seems to be either not general or described too briefly, even inappropriately in some cases. In this paper, we give a clear-cut derivation of the heat current of the engine with suitable assumptions beyond the linear-response regime. It resolves the confusion in the definition of the heat current in the linear-response regime. After verifying that we can construct the same formalism as that of the cyclic engine, we find the following two interesting results within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism: the efficiency of the mesoscopic thermoelectric engine reaches the Carnot efficiency if and only if the transmission probability is finite at a specific energy and zero otherwise; the unitarity of the transmission probability guarantees the second law of thermodynamics, invalidating Benenti et al.'s argument in the linear-response regime that one could obtain a finite power with the Carnot efficiency under a broken time-reversal symmetry [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230602 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.230602]. These results demonstrate how quantum mechanics constrains thermodynamics.

  2. Thermodynamics of the mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine beyond the linear-response regime.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Hatano, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    Mesoscopic thermoelectric heat engine is much anticipated as a device that allows us to utilize with high efficiency wasted heat inaccessible by conventional heat engines. However, the derivation of the heat current in this engine seems to be either not general or described too briefly, even inappropriately in some cases. In this paper, we give a clear-cut derivation of the heat current of the engine with suitable assumptions beyond the linear-response regime. It resolves the confusion in the definition of the heat current in the linear-response regime. After verifying that we can construct the same formalism as that of the cyclic engine, we find the following two interesting results within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism: the efficiency of the mesoscopic thermoelectric engine reaches the Carnot efficiency if and only if the transmission probability is finite at a specific energy and zero otherwise; the unitarity of the transmission probability guarantees the second law of thermodynamics, invalidating Benenti et al.'s argument in the linear-response regime that one could obtain a finite power with the Carnot efficiency under a broken time-reversal symmetry [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230602 (2011)]. These results demonstrate how quantum mechanics constrains thermodynamics.

  3. Linear and nonlinear optical response of bismuth and antimony implanted fused silica: annealing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Morgan, S. H.; Henderson, D. O.; Park, S. Y.; Weeks, R. A.; Magruder, R. H.; Zuhr, R. A.

    1995-10-01

    We report the linear and nonlinear optical response of bismuth and antimony implanted fused silica with doses of 6 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. The nonlinear refractive index, n2, was measured using a Z-scan technique with a mode locked Ti:sapphire laser operating in 140 fs pulse duration at 770 nm wavelength. It is found that the nonlinear refractive index n2 of as-implanted samples is large, in the order of 10 -10 cm 2/W and the n2 value of Bi as-implanted sample is about 2.4 times lager than that of Sb as-implanted sample. The large n2 response is attributed to the presence of nanosized metal particles in the implanted layer observed by transmission electron microscopy. We also report the changes of linear and nonlinear optical response when implanted samples were subsequently annealed at temperatures from 500 to 1000 C in argon and oxygen atmospheres. The annealing effect on optical properties is found to be strongly dependent on the annealing atmospheres. Our results indicate that annealing treatment in O 2 affects the local environment of the implanted metal ions and hence the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the metal-dielectric composite. We suggest that a new phase of metal-oxygen-silicate was formed during annealing in O 2 atmosphere.

  4. Development of a linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis for cascade gust response predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1990-01-01

    A method for predicting the unsteady aerodynamic response of a cascade of airfoils to entropic, vortical, and acoustic gust excitations is being developed. Here, the unsteady flow is regarded as a small perturbation of a nonuniform isentropic and irrotational steady background flow. A splitting technique is used to decompose the linearized unsteady velocity into rotational and irrotational parts leading to equations for the complex amplitudes of the linearized unsteady entropy, rotational velocity, and velocity potential that are coupled only sequentially. The entropic and rotational velocity fluctuations are described by transport equations for which closed-form solutions in terms of the mean-flow drift and stream functions can be determined. The potential fluctuation is described by an inhomogeneous convected wave equation in which the source term depends on the rotational velocity field, and is determined using finite-difference procedures. The analytical and numerical techniques used to determine the linearized unsteady flow are outlined. Results are presented to indicate the status of the solution procedure and to demonstrate the impact of blade geometry and mean blade loading on the aerodynamic response of cascades to vortical gust excitations. The analysis described herein leads to very efficient predictions of cascade unsteady aerodynamic response phenomena making it useful for turbomachinery aeroelastic and aeroacoustic design applications.

  5. Computed Linear/Nonlinear Acoustic Response of a Cascade for Single/Multi Frequency Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Hixon, R.; Sawyer, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines mode generation and propagation characteristics of a 2-D cascade due to incident vortical disturbances using a time domain approach. Full nonlinear Euler equations are solved employing high order accurate spatial differencing and time marching techniques. The solutions show the generation and propagation of mode orders that are expected from theory. Single frequency excitations show linear response over a wide range of amplitudes. The response for multi-frequency excitations tend to become nonlinear due to interaction between frequencies and self interaction.

  6. Dynamic response analysis of linear stochastic truss structures under stationary random excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Jianjun; Cui, Mingtao; Cheng, Yi

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for the dynamic response analysis of linear stochastic truss structures under stationary random excitation. Considering the randomness of the structural physical parameters and geometric dimensions, the computational expressions of the mean value, variance and variation coefficient of the mean square value of the structural displacement and stress response under the stationary random excitation are developed by means of the random variable's functional moment method and the algebra synthesis method from the expressions of structural stationary random response of the frequency domain. The influences of the randomness of the structural physical parameters and geometric dimensions on the randomness of the mean square value of the structural displacement and stress response are inspected by the engineering examples.

  7. Non-linear resonances in the forced responses of plates. I - Symmetric responses of circular plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, S.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamic analogue of the von Karman equations is used to study the symmetric response of a circular plate to a harmonic excitation when the frequency of the excitation is near one of the natural frequencies. It is shown that, in general, when there is no internal resonance (i.e., the natural frequencies are not commensurable), only the mode having a frequency near that of the excitation is strongly excited (i.e., is needed to represent the response in the first approximation). A clamped, circular plate is used as a numerical example to show that, when there is an internal resonance, more than one of the modes involved in this resonance can be strongly excited; moreover, when more than one mode is strongly excited, the lower modes can dominate the response, even when the frequency of the excitation is near that of the highest mode. This possibility was not revealed by any of the earlier studies which were based on the same governing equations.

  8. Properties of a novel linear sulfur response mode in a multiple flame photometric detector.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian G; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2014-01-24

    A new linear sulfur response mode was established in the multiple flame photometric detector (mFPD) by monitoring HSO* emission in the red spectral region above 600nm. Optimal conditions for this mode were found by using a 750nm interference filter and oxygen flows to the worker flames of this device that were about 10mL/min larger than those used for monitoring quadratic S2* emission. By employing these parameters, this mode provided a linear response over about 4 orders of magnitude, with a detection limit near 5.8×10(-11)gS/s and a selectivity of sulfur over carbon of about 3.5×10(3). Specifically, the minimum detectable masses for 10 different sulfur analytes investigated ranged from 0.4 to 3.6ng for peak half-widths spanning 4-6s. The response toward ten different sulfur compounds was examined and produced an average reproducibility of 1.7% RSD (n=10) and an average equimolarity value of 1.0±0.1. In contrast to this, a conventional single flame S2* mode comparatively yielded respective values of 6.7% RSD (n=10) and 1.1±0.4. HSO* emission in the mFPD was also found to be relatively much less affected by response quenching due to hydrocarbons compared to a conventional single flame S2* emission mode. Results indicate that this new alternative linear mFPD response mode could be beneficial for sulfur monitoring applications.

  9. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F.; Lewis, Dave

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Methods: Functional form [{zeta}= (-1){center_dot}netOD{sup (2/3)}/ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Results: Obtained R{sup 2} values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign EBT3 film model are well within {+-}2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also

  10. Glycemic Response to Corn Starch Modified with Cyclodextrin Glycosyltransferase and its Relationship to Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    Dura, A; Yokoyama, W; Rosell, C M

    2016-09-01

    Corn starch was modified with cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) below the gelatinization temperature. The porous granules with or without CGTase hydrolysis products may be used as an alternative to modified corn starches in foods applications. The amount and type of hydrolysis products were determined, containing mainly β-cyclodextrin (CD), which will influence pasting behavior and glycemic response in mice. Irregular surface and small holes were observed by microscopic analysis and differences in pasting properties were observed in the presence of hydrolysis products. Postprandial blood glucose in mice fed gelatinized enzymatically modified starch peaked earlier than their ungelatinized counterparts. However, in ungelatinized enzymatically modified starches, the presence of β- CD may inhibit the orientation of amylases slowing hydrolysis, which may help to maintain lower blood glucose levels. Significant correlations were found between glycemic curves and viscosity pattern of starches.

  11. Environmentally responsive surface-modified silica nanoparticles for enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadi, Abed; Mohammadi, Aliasghar

    2016-09-01

    Environmentally responsive surface-modified nanoparticles are colloidal nanoparticles coated with, at least, two physicochemically distinct surface groups. Recent advances in the synthesis and production of nanoparticles have enabled the production of environmentally responsive surface-modified nanoparticles with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface groups. These nanoparticles act like colloidal surfactants. In this paper, environmentally responsive surface-modified silica nanoparticles are synthesized and used for enhancement of oil recovery. For this purpose, silica nanoparticles are coated with polyethylene glycol chains as hydrophilic agent and propyl chains as hydrophobic agent at various quantities, and their ability to modulate oil-water interface properties and oil recovery is examined. Oil-water interfacial tension and water surface tension are decreased by 50 % in the presence of silica nanoparticles coated with both agents. Measuring oil-drop contact angle on oil-wetted glass slides and carbonate rock sections, after aging in various surface-modified silica nanofluids, indicates that the wettability of various oil-wetted surfaces is modified from strongly oil-wet to water-wet. Flooding nanofluids to glass micro-models and pore-level investigations demonstrate that surface modification of silica nanoparticles, specially, with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic agents improves considerably their performance in increasing oil recovery and wettability alteration.

  12. Spatiotemporal processing of linear acceleration: primary afferent and central vestibular neuron responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Dickman, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Spatiotemporal convergence and two-dimensional (2-D) neural tuning have been proposed as a major neural mechanism in the signal processing of linear acceleration. To examine this hypothesis, we studied the firing properties of primary otolith afferents and central otolith neurons that respond exclusively to horizontal linear accelerations of the head (0.16-10 Hz) in alert rhesus monkeys. Unlike primary afferents, the majority of central otolith neurons exhibited 2-D spatial tuning to linear acceleration. As a result, central otolith dynamics vary as a function of movement direction. During movement along the maximum sensitivity direction, the dynamics of all central otolith neurons differed significantly from those observed for the primary afferent population. Specifically at low frequencies (linear velocity, in contrast to primary afferents that peaked in phase with linear acceleration. At least three different groups of central response dynamics were described according to the properties observed for motion along the maximum sensitivity direction. "High-pass" neurons exhibited increasing gains and phase values as a function of frequency. "Flat" neurons were characterized by relatively flat gains and constant phase lags (approximately 20-55 degrees ). A few neurons ("low-pass") were characterized by decreasing gain and phase as a function of frequency. The response dynamics of central otolith neurons suggest that the approximately 90 degrees phase lags observed at low frequencies are not the result of a neural integration but rather the effect of nonminimum phase behavior, which could arise at least partly through spatiotemporal convergence. Neither afferent nor central otolith neurons discriminated between gravitational and inertial components of linear acceleration. Thus response sensitivity was indistinguishable during 0.5-Hz pitch oscillations and fore-aft movements

  13. Discrete-time linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses for efficient CFD analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Walter Arturo

    This dissertation discusses the mathematical existence and the numerical identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Theodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This will establish the aerodynamic discrete-time impulse response function as the most fundamental and computationally efficient aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this dissertation help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modern three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. Nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses are identified using the Volterra theory of nonlinear systems. The theory is described and a discrete-time kernel identification technique is presented. The kernel identification technique is applied to a simple nonlinear circuit for illustrative purposes. The method is then applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example of an application to a simple CFD model. Finally, the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear

  14. Relevance of sampling schemes in light of Ruelle's linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Kuna, Tobias; Wouters, Jeroen; Faranda, Davide

    2012-05-01

    We reconsider the theory of the linear response of non-equilibrium steady states to perturbations. We first show that using a general functional decomposition for space-time dependent forcings, we can define elementary susceptibilities that allow us to construct the linear response of the system to general perturbations. Starting from the definition of SRB measure, we then study the consequence of taking different sampling schemes for analysing the response of the system. We show that only a specific choice of the time horizon for evaluating the response of the system to a general time-dependent perturbation allows us to obtain the formula first presented by Ruelle. We also discuss the special case of periodic perturbations, showing that when they are taken into consideration the sampling can be fine-tuned to make the definition of the correct time horizon immaterial. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results in terms of strategies for analysing the outputs of numerical experiments by providing a critical review of a formula proposed by Reick.

  15. Titanium dioxide nanoparticle based optical fiber humidity sensor with linear response and enhanced sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Aneesh, R; Khijwania, Sunil K

    2012-04-20

    An optical fiber humidity sensor employing an in-house scaled TiO2-nanoparticle doped nanostructured thin film as the fiber sensing cladding and evanescent wave absorption is reported. The main objective of the present work is to achieve a throughout-linear sensor response with high sensitivity, possibly over a wide dynamic range using the simplest possible sensor geometry. In order to realize this, first, the nanostructured sensing film is synthesized over a short length of a centrally decladded straight and uniform optical fiber and then a comprehensive experimental investigation is carried out to optimize the design configuration/parameters of the nanostructured sensing film and to achieve the best possible sensor response. Much improved sensitivity of 27.1 mV/%RH is observed for the optimized sensor along with a throughout-linear sensor response over a dynamic range as wide as 24% to 95%RH with an average response time of 0.01 s for humidification and 0.06 s for desiccation. In addition, the sensor exhibits a very good degree of reversibility and repeatability.

  16. Non-Markovian linear response theory for quantum open systems and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. Z.; Li, D. X.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-01-01

    The Kubo formula is an equation that expresses the linear response of an observable due to a time-dependent perturbation. It has been extended from closed systems to open systems in recent years under the Markovian approximation, but is barely explored for open systems in non-Markovian regimes. In this paper, we derive a formula for the linear response of an open system to a time-independent external field. This response formula is available for both Markovian and non-Markovian dynamics depending on parameters in the spectral density of the environment. As an illustration of the theory, the Hall conductance of a two-band system subjected to environments is derived and discussed. With the tight-binding model, we point out the Hall conductance changes from Markovian to non-Markovian dynamics by modulating the spectral density of the environment. Our results suggest a way to the controlling of the system response, which has potential applications for quantum statistical mechanics and condensed matter physics.

  17. Non-Markovian linear response theory for quantum open systems and its applications.

    PubMed

    Shen, H Z; Li, D X; Yi, X X

    2017-01-01

    The Kubo formula is an equation that expresses the linear response of an observable due to a time-dependent perturbation. It has been extended from closed systems to open systems in recent years under the Markovian approximation, but is barely explored for open systems in non-Markovian regimes. In this paper, we derive a formula for the linear response of an open system to a time-independent external field. This response formula is available for both Markovian and non-Markovian dynamics depending on parameters in the spectral density of the environment. As an illustration of the theory, the Hall conductance of a two-band system subjected to environments is derived and discussed. With the tight-binding model, we point out the Hall conductance changes from Markovian to non-Markovian dynamics by modulating the spectral density of the environment. Our results suggest a way to the controlling of the system response, which has potential applications for quantum statistical mechanics and condensed matter physics.

  18. Geometry optimization based on linear response free energy with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method: applications to Menshutkin-type and Claisen rearrangement reactions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Masahiro; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Kato, Shigeki

    2007-04-14

    The authors present a method based on a linear response theory that allows one to optimize the geometries of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) systems on the free energy surfaces. Two different forms of linear response free energy functionals are introduced, and electronic wave functions of the QM region, as well as the responses of electrostatic and Lennard-Jones potentials between QM and MM regions, are self-consistently determined. The covariant matrix relating the QM charge distribution to the MM response is evaluated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the MM system. The free energy gradients with respect to the QM atomic coordinates are also calculated using the MD trajectory results. They apply the present method to calculate the free energy profiles of Menshutkin-type reaction of NH3 with CH3Cl and Claisen rearrangement of allyl vinyl ether in aqueous solution. For the Menshutkin reaction, the free energy profile calculated with the modified linear response free energy functional is in good agreement with that by the free energy perturbation calculations. They examine the nonequilibrium solvation effect on the transmission coefficient and the kinetic isotope effect for the Claisen rearrangement.

  19. On the subsystem formulation of linear-response time-dependent DFT.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Michele

    2013-05-28

    A new and thorough derivation of linear-response subsystem time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is presented and analyzed in detail. Two equivalent derivations are presented and naturally yield self-consistent subsystem TD-DFT equations. One reduces to the subsystem TD-DFT formalism of Neugebauer [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 134116 (2007)]. The other yields Dyson type equations involving three types of subsystem response functions: coupled, uncoupled, and Kohn-Sham. The Dyson type equations for subsystem TD-DFT are derived here for the first time. The response function formalism reveals previously hidden qualities and complications of subsystem TD-DFT compared with the regular TD-DFT of the supersystem. For example, analysis of the pole structure of the subsystem response functions shows that each function contains information about the electronic spectrum of the entire supersystem. In addition, comparison of the subsystem and supersystem response functions shows that, while the correlated response is subsystem additive, the Kohn-Sham response is not. Comparison with the non-subjective partition DFT theory shows that this non-additivity is largely an artifact introduced by the subjective nature of the density partitioning in subsystem DFT.

  20. Modeling and Simulation of the Impact Response of Maraging Steel Linear Cellular Alloys for Structural Energetic Material Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, Anthony; McCoy, Tammy; Cochran, Joe; Thadhani, Naresh

    2009-06-01

    A refined Johnson-Cook material strength model is developed for predicting the dynamic strain and fracture response of Maraging 250 steel at high-strain rates. Finite element simulations of rod-on-anvil impacts are carried out at velocities exceeding 100m/s and compared with experimental impact tests performed on a 7.62mm gas gun. The transient and final dimensions of the simulated and experimentally impacted rods are compared and Johnson-Cook strength parameters are modified accordingly. The newly developed Maraging 250 steel Johnson-cook strength model is then applied to simulate the impact response of multiple, 25% dense linear cellular alloys (LCA) of various geometries at velocities exceeding 100m/s. Analyses of the deformation, fragmentation, and stress transfer behavior of the simulated LCAs are performed and validated through comparison of corresponding impact experiments performed on the LCAs produced via an extrusion and reduction process. Stress transfer to the interior walls varies as a function of LCA geometry, which also influences the outward fragmentation and energy retention at the cross-section of impact.

  1. Allelic Variation on Murine Chromosome 11 Modifies Host Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Allelic Variation on Murine Chromosome 11 Modifies Host Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis Jill K. Terra1, Bryan France1...of America Abstract Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by...Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis. PLoS Pathog 7(12): e1002469. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002469 Editor: Theresa M. Koehler, The

  2. An Experimental Study in the Mechanical Response of Polymer Modified Geopolymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    8217C:,.~""·eoow•PKI . . 1258842541 :c;;~~~"".:"’’ ANGELICA CUBILLOS, 1st Lt, USAF Work Unit Manager RHODES.ALBERT ~""~;~.’:.’T.NIU...strength decreased. polymers, geopolymers, fly ash, hydrophilic polymers, viscoelastic response, polymer-modified geopolymer U U U UU 31 Angelica

  3. Transient response of multidegree-of-freedom linear systems to forcing functions with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to analyze the transient response of discrete linear systems to forcing functions with unknown time dependence but having known bounds. Particular attention is given to forcing functions which include: (1) maximum displacement of any given mass element, (2) maximum relative displacement of any two adjacent masses, and (3) maximum acceleration of a given mass. Linear mechanical systems with an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom and only one forcing function acting are considered. In the general case, the desired forcing function is found to be a function that switches from the upper-to-lower bound and vice-versa at certain moments of time. A general procedure for finding such switching times is set forth.

  4. Measurement of the spatial frequency response (SFR) of digital still-picture cameras using a modified slanted-edge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Feng; Hsu, Yun C.; Chuang, Kai W.

    2000-06-01

    Spatial resolution is one of the main characteristics of electronic imaging devices such as the digital still-picture camera. It describes the capability of a device to resolve the spatial details of an image formed by the incoming optical information. The overall resolving capability is of great interest although there are various factors, contributed by camera components and signal processing algorithms, affecting the spatial resolution. The spatial frequency response (SFR), analogous to the MTF of an optical imaging system, is one of the four measurements for analysis of spatial resolution defined in ISO/FDIS 12233, and it provides a complete profile of the spatial response of digital still-picture cameras. In that document, a test chart is employed to estimate the spatial resolving capability. The calculations of SFR were conducted by using the slanted edge method in which a scene with a black-to- white or white-to-black edge tilted at a specified angle is captured. An algorithm is used to find the line spread function as well as the SFR. We will present a modified algorithm in which no prior information of the angle of the tilted black-to-white edge is needed. The tilted angle was estimated by assuming that a region around the center of the transition between black and white regions is linear. At a tilted angle of 8 degree the minimum estimation error is about 3%. The advantages of the modified slanted edge method are high accuracy, flexible use, and low cost.

  5. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Theodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modern three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  6. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Tbeodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modem three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  7. Vestibular short latency responses to pulsed linear acceleration in unanesthetized animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Linear acceleration transients were used to elicit vestibular compound action potentials in non-invasively prepared, unanesthetized animals for the first time (chicks, Gallus domesticus, n = 33). Responses were composed of a series of up to 8 dominant peaks occurring within 8 msec of the stimulus. Response amplitudes for 1.0 g stimulus ranged from 1 to 10 microV. A late, slow, triphasic, anesthesia-labile component was identified as a dominant response feature in unanesthetized animals. Amplitudes increased and latencies decreased as stimulus intensity was increased (MANOVA P less than 0.05). Linear regression slope ranges were: amplitudes = 1.0-5.0 microV/g; latencies = -300 to -1100 microseconds/g. Thresholds for single polarity stimuli (0.035 +/- 0.022 g, n = 11) were significantly lower than those of alternating polarity (0.074 +/- 0.028 g, n = 18, P less than 0.001). Bilateral labyrinthectomy eliminated responses whereas bilateral extirpation of cochleae did not significantly change response thresholds. Intense acoustic masking (100/104 dB SL) produced no effect in 2 animals, but did produce small to moderate effects on response amplitudes in 7 others. Changes were attributed to effects on vestibular end organs. Results of unilateral labyrinth blockade (tetrodotoxin) suggest that P1 and N1 preferentially reflect ipsilateral eighth nerve compound action potentials whereas components beyond approximately 2 msec reflect activity from vestibular neurons that depend on both labyrinths. The results demonstrate that short latency vestibular compound action potentials can be measured in unanesthetized, non-invasively prepared animals.

  8. Linear Modeling and Evaluation of Controls on Flow Response in Western Post-Fire Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxe, S.; Hogue, T. S.; Hay, L.

    2015-12-01

    This research investigates the impact of wildfires on watershed flow regimes throughout the western United States, specifically focusing on evaluation of fire events within specified subregions and determination of the impact of climate and geophysical variables in post-fire flow response. Fire events were collected through federal and state-level databases and streamflow data were collected from U.S. Geological Survey stream gages. 263 watersheds were identified with at least 10 years of continuous pre-fire daily streamflow records and 5 years of continuous post-fire daily flow records. For each watershed, percent changes in runoff ratio (RO), annual seven day low-flows (7Q2) and annual seven day high-flows (7Q10) were calculated from pre- to post-fire. Numerous independent variables were identified for each watershed and fire event, including topographic, land cover, climate, burn severity, and soils data. The national watersheds were divided into five regions through K-clustering and a lasso linear regression model, applying the Leave-One-Out calibration method, was calculated for each region. Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) was used to determine the accuracy of the resulting models. The regions encompassing the United States along and west of the Rocky Mountains, excluding the coastal watersheds, produced the most accurate linear models. The Pacific coast region models produced poor and inconsistent results, indicating that the regions need to be further subdivided. Presently, RO and HF response variables appear to be more easily modeled than LF. Results of linear regression modeling showed varying importance of watershed and fire event variables, with conflicting correlation between land cover types and soil types by region. The addition of further independent variables and constriction of current variables based on correlation indicators is ongoing and should allow for more accurate linear regression modeling.

  9. Correlation spectroscopy based on non-linear response of silver colloids (including SEHRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, G.; Sauer, G.; Fritz, N.; Schneider, S.; Zaitsev, S.

    2005-02-01

    The non-linear response (second harmonic generation, SHG, hyper-Rayleigh scattering, HRS, surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering, SEHRS, and continuum generation) of two different types of silver colloids is compared by stationary and correlation spectroscopy. Employing a poly-disperse colloid prepared after the protocol of Lee and Meisel we found that the efficiency of all types of non-linear response is greatly enhanced if the colloid is 'activated' by addition of chloride ions. This activation is also necessary to observe SEHRS with both the Lee-Meisel and the mono-disperse colloid prepared by hydrazine reduction. The correlation curves of both types of colloid show one step (τ1/2∼10 ms) which can be associated with lateral diffusion of the individual particles. Its τ1/2-value is larger for the poly-disperse colloid, which contains larger particles. In addition, we find a second step, its relative amplitude being dependent on experimental parameters, whose τ1/2-value is, however, essentially the same for all samples investigated (τ‧1/2∼50 μs). We assign this correlation time to processes that lead to a restructuring of the surface and the formation and destruction of so-called 'hot spots'. Under optimum condition, the efficiency for all non-linear processes connected with one such 'hot spot' is extremely high. 'Hot particles' contain at least one hot spot and can therefore dominate the non-linear signal without the need of aggregation (field enhancement in the gap between particles).

  10. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  11. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Gázquez, José L. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Vela, Alberto E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  12. Thermodynamic bounds and general properties of optimal efficiency and power in linear responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2014-10-01

    We study the optimal exergy efficiency and power for thermodynamic systems with an Onsager-type "current-force" relationship describing the linear response to external influences. We derive, in analytic forms, the maximum efficiency and optimal efficiency for maximum power for a thermodynamic machine described by a N ×N symmetric Onsager matrix with arbitrary integer N. The figure of merit is expressed in terms of the largest eigenvalue of the "coupling matrix" which is solely determined by the Onsager matrix. Some simple but general relationships between the power and efficiency at the conditions for (i) maximum efficiency and (ii) optimal efficiency for maximum power are obtained. We show how the second law of thermodynamics bounds the optimal efficiency and the Onsager matrix and relate those bounds together. The maximum power theorem (Jacobi's Law) is generalized to all thermodynamic machines with a symmetric Onsager matrix in the linear-response regime. We also discuss systems with an asymmetric Onsager matrix (such as systems under magnetic field) for a particular situation and we show that the reversible limit of efficiency can be reached at finite output power. Cooperative effects are found to improve the figure of merit significantly in systems with multiply cross-correlated responses. Application to example systems demonstrates that the theory is helpful in guiding the search for high performance materials and structures in energy researches.

  13. Linear and fractional response for the SRB measure of smooth hyperbolic attractors and discontinuous observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, Viviane; Kuna, Tobias; Lucarini, Valerio

    2017-03-01

    We consider a smooth one-parameter family t\\mapsto ≤ft( {{f}t}:M\\to M\\right) of diffeomorphisms with compact transitive Axiom A attractors {{ Λ }t} , denoting by \\text{d}{ρt} the SRB measure of {{f}t}{{|}{{ Λ t}}} . Our first result is that for any function θ in the Sobolev space Hpr(M) , with 1 and 0  <  r  <  1/p, the map t\\mapsto {\\int}θ \\text{d}{ρt} is α-Hölder continuous for all α . This applies to θ (x)=h(x) \\Theta ≤ft(g(x)-a\\right) (for all α <1 ) for h and g smooth and \\Theta the Heaviside function, if a is not a critical value of g. Our second result says that for any such function θ (x)=h(x) \\Theta ≤ft(g(x)-a\\right) so that in addition the intersection of ≤ft\\{x|g(x)=a\\right\\} with the support of h is foliated by ‘admissible stable leaves’ of f t , the map t\\mapsto {\\int}θ \\text{d}{ρt} is differentiable. (We provide distributional linear response and fluctuation-dissipation formulas for the derivative.) Obtaining linear response or fractional response for such observables θ is motivated by extreme-value theory.

  14. Cystic fibrosis gene modifier SLC26A9 modulates airway response to CFTR-directed therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Strug, Lisa J; Gonska, Tanja; He, Gengming; Keenan, Katherine; Ip, Wan; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Lin, Fan; Panjwani, Naim; Gong, Jiafen; Li, Weili; Soave, David; Xiao, Bowei; Tullis, Elizabeth; Rabin, Harvey; Parkins, Michael D; Price, April; Zuberbuhler, Peter C; Corvol, Harriet; Ratjen, Felix; Sun, Lei; Bear, Christine E; Rommens, Johanna M

    2016-08-29

    Cystic fibrosis is realizing the promise of personalized medicine. Recent advances in drug development that target the causal CFTR directly result in lung function improvement, but variability in response is demanding better prediction of outcomes to improve management decisions. The genetic modifier SLC26A9 contributes to disease severity in the CF pancreas and intestine at birth and here we assess its relationship with disease severity and therapeutic response in the airways. SLC26A9 association with lung disease was assessed in individuals from the Canadian and French CF Gene Modifier consortia with CFTR-gating mutations and in those homozygous for the common Phe508del mutation. Variability in response to a CFTR-directed therapy attributed to SLC26A9 genotype was assessed in Canadian patients with gating mutations. A primary airway model system determined if SLC26A9 shows modification of Phe508del CFTR function upon treatment with a CFTR corrector.In those with gating mutations that retain cell surface-localized CFTR we show that SLC26A9 modifies lung function while this is not the case in individuals homozygous for Phe508del where cell surface expression is lacking. Treatment response to ivacaftor, which aims to improve CFTR-channel opening probability in patients with gating mutations, shows substantial variability in response, 28% of which can be explained by rs7512462 in SLC26A9 (P = 0.0006). When homozygous Phe508del primary bronchial cells are treated to restore surface CFTR, SLC26A9 likewise modifies treatment response (P = 0.02). Our findings indicate that SLC26A9 airway modification requires CFTR at the cell surface, and that a common variant in SLC26A9 may predict response to CFTR-directed therapeutics.

  15. Linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory with pairing fields.

    PubMed

    Peng, Degao; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    Recent development in particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) broadens the perspective on ground state correlation energies [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013), Y. Yang, H. van Aggelen, S. N. Steinmann, D. Peng, and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174110 (2013); D. Peng, S. N. Steinmann, H. van Aggelen, and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 104112 (2013)] and N ± 2 excitation energies [Y. Yang, H. van Aggelen, and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 224105 (2013)]. So far Hartree-Fock and approximated density-functional orbitals have been utilized to evaluate the pp-RPA equation. In this paper, to further explore the fundamentals and the potential use of pairing matrix dependent functionals, we present the linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory with pairing fields with both adiabatic and frequency-dependent kernels. This theory is related to the density-functional theory and time-dependent density-functional theory for superconductors, but is applied to normal non-superconducting systems for our purpose. Due to the lack of the proof of the one-to-one mapping between the pairing matrix and the pairing field for time-dependent systems, the linear-response theory is established based on the representability assumption of the pairing matrix. The linear response theory justifies the use of approximated density-functionals in the pp-RPA equation. This work sets the fundamentals for future density-functional development to enhance the description of ground state correlation energies and N ± 2 excitation energies.

  16. Long-term prediction test procedure for most ICs, based on linear response theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litovchenko, V.; Ivakhnenko, I.

    1991-01-01

    Experimentally, thermal annealing is known to be a factor which enables a number of different integrated circuits (IC's) to recover their operating characteristics after suffering radiation damage in the space radiation environment; thus, decreasing and limiting long term cumulative total-dose effects. This annealing is also known to be accelerated at elevated temperatures both during and after irradiation. Linear response theory (LRT) was applied, and a linear response function (LRF) to predict the radiation/annealing response of sensitive parameters of IC's for long term (several months or years) exposure to the space radiation environment were constructed. Compressing the annealing process from several years in orbit to just a few hours or days in the laboratory is achieved by subjecting the IC to elevated temperatures or by increasing the typical spaceflight dose rate by several orders of magnitude for simultaneous radiation/annealing only. The accomplishments are as follows: (1) the test procedure to make predictions of the radiation response was developed; (2) the calculation of the shift in the threshold potential due to the charge distribution in the oxide was written; (3) electron tunneling processes from the bulk Si to the oxide region in an MOS IC were estimated; (4) in order to connect the experimental annealing data to the theoretical model, constants of the model of the basic annealing process were established; (5) experimental data obtained at elevated temperatures were analyzed; (6) time compression and reliability of predictions for the long term region were shown; (7) a method to compress test time and to make predictions of response for the nonlinear region was proposed; and (8) nonlinearity of the LRF with respect to log(t) was calculated theoretically from a model.

  17. A Revolute Joint With Linear Load-Displacement Response for Precision Deployable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Warren, Peter A.; Peterson, Lee D.

    1996-01-01

    NASA Langley Research center is developing key structures and mechanisms technologies for micron-accuracy, in-space deployment of future space instruments. Achieving micron-accuracy deployment requires significant advancements in deployment mechanism design such as the revolute joint presented herein. The joint presented herein exhibits a load-cycling response that is essentially linear with less than two percent hysteresis, and the joint rotates with less than one in.-oz. of resistance. A prototype reflector metering truss incorporating the joint exhibits only a few microns of kinematic error under repeated deployment and impulse loading. No other mechanically deployable structure found in literature has been demonstrated to be this kinematically accurate.

  18. Reduced Order Models Based on Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for the identification and application of reduced-order models based on linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems and an appropriate kernel identification technique are described. Insight into the nature of kernels is provided by applying the method to the nonlinear Riccati equation in a non-aerodynamic application. The method is then applied to a nonlinear aerodynamic model of an RAE 2822 supercritical airfoil undergoing plunge motions using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes flow solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Results demonstrate the computational efficiency of the technique.

  19. Constructing quasi-linear V̇O2 responses from nonlinear parameters.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Samuel L; Broxterman, Ryan M; Barstow, Thomas J

    2016-01-15

    Oxygen uptake (V̇O2) kinetics have been shown to be governed by a nonlinear control system across a range of work rates. However, the linearity of the V̇O2 response to ramp incremental exercise would appear to be the result of a linear control system. This apparent contradiction could represent a balancing of changing V̇O2 kinetics parameter values across a range of work rates. To test this, six healthy men completed bouts of ramp incremental exercise at 15, 30, and 60 W/min (15R, 30R, 60R, respectively) and four bouts of an extended-step incremental exercise. V̇O2 parameter values were derived from the step exercise using two monoexponential models: one starting at time zero and encompassing the entire stage (MONO), and the other truncated to the first 5 min and allowing a time delay (5TD). The resulting parameter values were applied to an integrative model to estimate the ramp responses. As work rate increased, gain values increased (P < 0.001 for MONO and 5TD), as did mean response time (or time constant) values (MONO: P < 0.001; 5TD: P = 0.003). Up to maximal V̇O2 (V̇O(2 max)), the gains of the estimated ramp responses from both models were not different from the gains of the actual observed V̇O2 responses for 15R and 30R (15R: 11.3 ± 1.2, 11.7 ± 0.7, 10.9 ± 0.3; 30R: 10.5 ± 0.8, 11.0 ± 0.5, 10.7 ± 0.3 ml O2·min(-1)·W(-1), for actual, MONO, 5TD, respectively) but were significantly greater for 60R (8.7 ± 1.0, 9.9 ± 0.4, 10.3 ± 0.3 ml O2·min(-1)·W(-1) for actual, MONO, 5TD, respectively). Up to 80%V̇O(2 max) gain values were not significantly different for any ramp rate (P > 0.05 for all). We conclude that the apparent linearity of the V̇O2 response to ramp incremental exercise is consequent to a balancing of increasing time constant and gain parameter values.

  20. The neuronal response at extended timescales: a linearized spiking input–output relation

    PubMed Central

    Soudry, Daniel; Meir, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Many biological systems are modulated by unknown slow processes. This can severely hinder analysis – especially in excitable neurons, which are highly non-linear and stochastic systems. We show the analysis simplifies considerably if the input matches the sparse “spiky” nature of the output. In this case, a linearized spiking Input–Output (I/O) relation can be derived semi-analytically, relating input spike trains to output spikes based on known biophysical properties. Using this I/O relation we obtain closed-form expressions for all second order statistics (input – internal state – output correlations and spectra), construct optimal linear estimators for the neuronal response and internal state and perform parameter identification. These results are guaranteed to hold, for a general stochastic biophysical neuron model, with only a few assumptions (mainly, timescale separation). We numerically test the resulting expressions for various models, and show that they hold well, even in cases where our assumptions fail to hold. In a companion paper we demonstrate how this approach enables us to fit a biophysical neuron model so it reproduces experimentally observed temporal firing statistics on days-long experiments. PMID:24765073

  1. Linearization of EBT3 film dose response and virtual film dosimetry for SBRT quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.; Archibald-Heeren, B.; Wang, Y.; Metcalfe, P.

    2017-01-01

    EBT3 film offers high spatial resolution and low energy dependence, making it a suitable choice for quality assurance where high dose gradients are present, such as the case for SBRT. This work presents a simple method to adjust scanner settings so that dose response becomes linear. This linearity eliminates the need to obtain a calibration curve and associated uncertainties in curve fitting. Relative dosimetry can be performed after dose normalization to a reference point. Linearity is also a more robust condition than calibration curve with respect to scanner warm-up conditions, resulting in reduced uncertainty in dose measurement. An in-house developed program reads the film scan and a 2D dose map then constructs both to virtual films using grayscale values. Film intensity value was normalized to dose at reference point. Relative dosimetry was performed by comparing the two resulting images. Patient specific quality assurance was conducted for two SBRT cases. In both plans more than 95% gamma function points passed the gamma criteria of 2%/3mm.

  2. Scaling the Non-linear Impact Response of Flat and Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Feraboli, Paolo; Jackson, Wade C.

    2005-01-01

    The application of scaling laws to thin flat and curved composite panels exhibiting nonlinear response when subjected to low-velocity transverse impact is investigated. Previous research has shown that the elastic impact response of structural configurations exhibiting geometrically linear response can be effectively scaled. In the present paper, a preliminary experimental study is presented to assess the applicability of the scaling laws to structural configurations exhibiting geometrically nonlinear deformations. The effect of damage on the scalability of the structural response characteristics, and the effect of scale on damage development are also investigated. Damage is evaluated using conventional methods including C-scan, specimen de-plying and visual inspection of the impacted panels. Coefficient of restitution and normalized contact duration are also used to assess the extent of damage. The results confirm the validity of the scaling parameters for elastic impacts. However, for the panels considered in the study, the extent and manifestation of damage do not scale according to the scaling laws. Furthermore, the results indicate that even though the damage does not scale, the overall panel response characteristics, as indicated by contact force profiles, do scale for some levels of damage.

  3. Multiple linear and principal component regressions for modelling ecotoxicity bioassay response.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana I; Pires, José C M; Figueiredo, Sónia A; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2014-01-01

    The ecotoxicological response of the living organisms in an aquatic system depends on the physical, chemical and bacteriological variables, as well as the interactions between them. An important challenge to scientists is to understand the interaction and behaviour of factors involved in a multidimensional process such as the ecotoxicological response. With this aim, multiple linear regression (MLR) and principal component regression were applied to the ecotoxicity bioassay response of Chlorella vulgaris and Vibrio fischeri in water collected at seven sites of Leça river during five monitoring campaigns (February, May, June, August and September of 2006). The river water characterization included the analysis of 22 physicochemical and 3 microbiological parameters. The model that best fitted the data was MLR, which shows: (i) a negative correlation with dissolved organic carbon, zinc and manganese, and a positive one with turbidity and arsenic, regarding C. vulgaris toxic response; (ii) a negative correlation with conductivity and turbidity and a positive one with phosphorus, hardness, iron, mercury, arsenic and faecal coliforms, concerning V. fischeri toxic response. This integrated assessment may allow the evaluation of the effect of future pollution abatement measures over the water quality of Leça River.

  4. Linearized Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of the Acoustic Response to Wake/Blade-Row Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Huff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional, linearized Euler analysis, LINFLUX, is being developed to provide a comprehensive and efficient unsteady aerodynamic scheme for predicting the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic responses of axial-flow turbomachinery blading. LINFLUX couples a near-field, implicit, wave-split, finite-volume solution to far-field acoustic eigensolutions, to predict the aerodynamic responses of a blade row to prescribed structural and aerodynamic excitations. It is applied herein to predict the acoustic responses of a fan exit guide vane (FEGV) to rotor wake excitations. The intent is to demonstrate and assess the LINFLUX analysis via application to realistic wake/blade-row interactions. Numerical results are given for the unsteady pressure responses of the FEGV, including the modal pressure responses at inlet and exit. In addition, predictions for the modal and total acoustic power levels at the FEGV exit are compared with measurements. The present results indicate that the LINFLUX analysis should be useful in the aeroacoustic design process, and for understanding the three-dimensional flow physics relevant to blade-row noise generation and propagation.

  5. DNA microarray mediated transcriptional profiling of Nitrosomonas europaea in response to linear alkylbenzene sulfonates.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Junpei; Inaba, Kazuho; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2008-05-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) constitute, quantitatively, the most important group of synthetic surfactants used today. We studied the gene expression of Nitrosomonas europaea in response to LAS using a DNA microarray because ammonia-oxidizers are thought to be more sensitive to LAS than other microorganisms. Our objective was to elucidate which genes are expressed for N. europaea in response to LAS exposure. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR assay revealed that c. 30 genes were significantly expressed after LAS exposure, in particular genes associated with energy production and conversion. Our findings demonstrate that physical disruption of membrane structures, which contain enzymes associated with energy production and conversion, might be an important explanation for the high sensitivity of N. europaea to LAS exposure.

  6. Dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of maraging steel linear cellular alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam E.; Fredenberg, David A.; McCoy, Tammy; Thadhani, Naresh; Cochran, Joe K.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of unaged 250 maraging steel, fabricated using a direct reduction and extrusion technique, is investigated. Explicit finite element simulations were implemented using AUTODYN finite element code. The maraging steel properties were defined using a Johnson-Cook strength model with previously validated parameters. Rod-on-anvil impact tests were performed using the 7.6mm helium gas gun and the transient deformation and fragmentation response was recorded with highspeed imaging. Analysis of observed deformation states of specimens and finite element simulations reveal that in the case of the 9-cell LCA, dissipation of stress and strain occurs along the interior cell wells resulting in significant and ubiquitous buckling prior to confined fragmentation.

  7. Linear response of hydrodynamically-coupled particles under a nonequilibrium reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolcu, Cem; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-03-01

    A recent experiment driving colloids electromagnetically, by Bérut et al 2014 Europhys. Lett. 107 60004, is an ideal paradigm for illustrating a linear response theory for nonequilibrium overdamped systems including hydrodynamic interactions and, unusually, a reservoir itself out of equilibrium. Indeed, in this setup one finds a nonequilibrium environment in which the mobility and diffusivity of free particles are not simply proportional to each other. We derive both the response to a mechanical forcing and to temperature variations in terms of correlations between an observable and a path-weight action. The time-antisymmetric component of the latter turns out not to be simply proportional to the heat flowing into the environment. These results are visualized with simulations resembling conditions and protocols easily realizable in the experiment, thereby tracing a path for experimental verifications of the theory.

  8. Non-linear modeling of the plasma response to RMPs in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orain, F.; Hölzl, M.; Viezzer, E.; Dunne, M.; Bécoulet, M.; Cahyna, P.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Morales, J.; Willensdorfer, M.; Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Pamela, S.; Günter, S.; Lackner, K.; Strumberger, E.; Lessig, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-02-01

    The plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in ASDEX Upgrade is modeled with the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, using input profiles that match those of the experiments as closely as possible. The RMP configuration for which edge localized modes are best mitigated in experiments is related to the largest edge kink response observed near the X-point in modeling. On the edge resonant surfaces q  =  m/n, the coupling between the kink component (m  >  nq) and the m resonant component is found to induce the amplification of the resonant magnetic perturbation. The ergodicity and the 3D-displacement near the X-point induced by the resonant amplification can only partly explain the density pumpout observed in experiments.

  9. General linear response formula for non integrable systems obeying the Vlasov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patelli, Aurelio; Ruffo, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    Long-range interacting N-particle systems get trapped into long-living out-of-equilibrium stationary states called quasi-stationary states (QSS). We study here the response to a small external perturbation when such systems are settled into a QSS. In the N → ∞ limit the system is described by the Vlasov equation and QSS are mapped into stable stationary solutions of such equation. We consider this problem in the context of a model that has recently attracted considerable attention, the Hamiltonian mean field (HMF) model. For such a model, stationary inhomogeneous and homogeneous states determine an integrable dynamics in the mean-field effective potential and an action-angle transformation allows one to derive an exact linear response formula. However, such a result would be of limited interest if restricted to the integrable case. In this paper, we show how to derive a general linear response formula which does not use integrability as a requirement. The presence of conservation laws (mass, energy, momentum, etc.) and of further Casimir invariants can be imposed a posteriori. We perform an analysis of the infinite time asymptotics of the response formula for a specific observable, the magnetization in the HMF model, as a result of the application of an external magnetic field, for two stationary stable distributions: the Boltzmann-Gibbs equilibrium distribution and the Fermi-Dirac one. When compared with numerical simulations the predictions of the theory are very good away from the transition energy from inhomogeneous to homogeneous states. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Vlasov Equation", edited by Francesco Pegoraro, Francesco Califano, Giovanni Manfredi and Philip J. Morrison.

  10. Plants having modified response to ethylene by transformation with an ETR nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2001-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  11. Linear, Star, and Comb Oxidation-Responsive Polymers: Effect of Branching Degree and Topology on Aggregation and Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    d'Arcy, Richard; Gennari, Arianna; Donno, Roberto; Tirelli, Nicola

    2016-12-01

    Families of amphiphilic oxidation-responsive polymers (poly(ethylene glycol)-polysulfides) with different architectures (linear, 4, 6, and 8-armed stars and 10, 15, and 20-armed combs) and compositions (variable ethylene sulfide/propylene sulfide ratio) are prepared. In water, all the polymers assemble in spherical micelles, with critical micellar concentrations <0.01 mg mL(-1) for all the branched polymers. Triple-detection gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and asymmetric field flow fractionation (AFFF) with dynamic and static light scattering detection, respectively, show an increasing compaction of the polymeric coil and a strong reduction of the aggregation number with increasing degree of branching. The key finding of this study is that the kinetics of the oxidative response sharply depend on the branching; in particular, it is highlighted that the degree of branching influences the lag time before a response can be observed rather than the speed of the response itself, a phenomenon that is attributed to a branching-dependent solubility of the oxidant in the polysulfide matrix.

  12. Linear response, fluctuation-dissipation, and finite-system-size effects in superdiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-07-01

    Lévy walks (LWs) are a popular stochastic tool to model anomalous diffusion and have recently been used to describe a variety of phenomena. We study the linear response behavior of this generic model of superdiffusive LWs in finite systems to an external force field under both stationary and nonstationary conditions. These finite-size LWs are based on power-law waiting time distributions with a finite-time regularization at τc, such that the physical requirements are met to apply linear response theory and derive the power spectrum with the correct short frequency limit, without the introduction of artificial cutoffs. We obtain the generalized Einstein relation for both ensemble and time averages over the entire process time and determine the turnover to normal Brownian motion when the full system is explored. In particular, we obtain an exact expression for the long time diffusion constant as a function of the scaling exponent of the waiting time density and the characteristic time scale τc.

  13. Linear density response function in the projector augmented wave method: Applications to solids, surfaces, and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Mortensen, Jens. J.; Jacobsen, Karsten W.; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2011-06-01

    We present an implementation of the linear density response function within the projector-augmented wave method with applications to the linear optical and dielectric properties of both solids, surfaces, and interfaces. The response function is represented in plane waves while the single-particle eigenstates can be expanded on a real space grid or in atomic-orbital basis for increased efficiency. The exchange-correlation kernel is treated at the level of the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) and crystal local field effects are included. The calculated static and dynamical dielectric functions of Si, C, SiC, AlP, and GaAs compare well with previous calculations. While optical properties of semiconductors, in particular excitonic effects, are generally not well described by ALDA, we obtain excellent agreement with experiments for the surface loss function of graphene and the Mg(0001) surface with plasmon energies deviating by less than 0.2 eV. Finally, the method is applied to study the influence of substrates on the plasmon excitations in graphene.

  14. Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group: efficient algorithms for strongly correlated excited states.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Naoki; Wouters, Sebastian; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-14

    Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG-LRT) was first presented in terms of the DMRG renormalization projectors [J. J. Dorando, J. Hachmann, and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 184111 (2009)]. Later, with an understanding of the manifold structure of the matrix product state (MPS) ansatz, which lies at the basis of the DMRG algorithm, a way was found to construct the linear response space for general choices of the MPS gauge in terms of the tangent space vectors [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 070601 (2011)]. These two developments led to the formulation of the Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations (TDA and RPA) for MPS. This work describes how these LRTs may be efficiently implemented through minor modifications of the DMRG sweep algorithm, at a computational cost which scales the same as the ground-state DMRG algorithm. In fact, the mixed canonical MPS form implicit to the DMRG sweep is essential for efficient implementation of the RPA, due to the structure of the second-order tangent space. We present ab initio DMRG-TDA results for excited states of polyenes, the water molecule, and a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster.

  15. Lead-lag relationships between stock and market risk within linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysov, Stanislav; Balatsky, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We study historical correlations and lead-lag relationships between individual stock risks (standard deviation of daily stock returns) and market risk (standard deviation of daily returns of a market-representative portfolio) in the US stock market. We consider the cross-correlation functions averaged over stocks, using historical stock prices from the Standard & Poor's 500 index for 1994-2013. The observed historical dynamics suggests that the dependence between the risks was almost linear during the US stock market downturn of 2002 and after the US housing bubble in 2007, remaining at that level until 2013. Moreover, the averaged cross-correlation function often had an asymmetric shape with respect to zero lag in the periods of high correlation. We develop the analysis by the application of the linear response formalism to study underlying causal relations. The calculated response functions suggest the presence of characteristic regimes near financial crashes, when individual stock risks affect market risk and vice versa. This work was supported by VR 621-2012-2983.

  16. Recent developments in time-dependent density-functional theory within and beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, E. K. U.

    2013-03-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a popular and rather successful method in the description of photo-absorption spectra of atoms and molecules in the linear response regime. In extended solids, however, a satisfactory description of excitonic effects has become possible only recently with the advent of advanced approximations for the exchange-correlation kernel fxc. One of these advanced approximations is the so-called bootstrap kernel [S. Sharma et al, PRL 107, 186401 (2011)]. We shall explore the performance of this kernel in the long-wavelength limit and for finite values of q, looking at electron-loss as well as photo-absorption spectra. We find, in particular, that excitonic effects in LiF and Ar are enhanced for values of q away from the Γ-point [S. Sharma et al, New J Phys 14, 053052 (2012)]. Then we present two recent developments in TDDFT beyond the linear-response regime: (i) By using a geometrical partitioning, we calculate the angle and energy resolved photo-electron spectra of finite systems including multi-photon effects [De Giovannini, et al, A. Rubio, PRA 86, 062515 (2012)]. (ii) Finally we show how the dynamics of many-electron systems can be controlled with lasers by marrying TDDFT with optimal control theory [A. Castro et al, PRL 109, 153603 (2012)].

  17. Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group: Efficient algorithms for strongly correlated excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Naoki; Wouters, Sebastian; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-01

    Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG-LRT) was first presented in terms of the DMRG renormalization projectors [J. J. Dorando, J. Hachmann, and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 184111 (2009)]. Later, with an understanding of the manifold structure of the matrix product state (MPS) ansatz, which lies at the basis of the DMRG algorithm, a way was found to construct the linear response space for general choices of the MPS gauge in terms of the tangent space vectors [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 070601 (2011)]. These two developments led to the formulation of the Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations (TDA and RPA) for MPS. This work describes how these LRTs may be efficiently implemented through minor modifications of the DMRG sweep algorithm, at a computational cost which scales the same as the ground-state DMRG algorithm. In fact, the mixed canonical MPS form implicit to the DMRG sweep is essential for efficient implementation of the RPA, due to the structure of the second-order tangent space. We present ab initio DMRG-TDA results for excited states of polyenes, the water molecule, and a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster.

  18. Functional imaging of kinetic parameters from the time dependent linear response function by dynamic scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Stritzke, P.; Knop, J.; Spielmann, R.P.; Montz, R.; Schneider, C.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is proposed to determine the locally differing time dependent linear response function h(r,t) of a radioactive tracer injected into a patients blood pool B(t) by mathematical analysis of a dynamic scintigraphic study A(r,t). Transit times, uptake rates and clearance rates of different tracers are calculated from the linear response function at every matrix point by one computer program. The parameters are presented in functional images on a standard computer display. Thus the whole information from a dynamic study can be condensed within a few images. The integral equation A=h+B +c(r)*B (+ means convolution, c(r)*B(t)=nontarget activity) derived from tracer theory is deconvoluted by mathematical methods, which are unsensitive against noise contamination of the input data. The numerical technique is successfully applied in Iodide-123-Hippuran and Tc-99m-DMSA kidney studies, in Tc-99m-MDP and -DPD bone studies, in Tl-201 myocardial studies and in Iodide-123 thyroid studies. Because the regional blood pool-or nontarget activity is calculated and subtracted, the kinetic parameters are considered to be free from nontarget contributions in all dynamic scintigraphic studies. Examples are demonstrated and the usefulness for clinical application is discussed.

  19. Practical methods for dealing with 'not applicable' item responses in the AMC Linear Disability Score project

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Rebecca; Glas, Cees AW; Lindeboom, Robert; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; de Haan, Rob J

    2004-01-01

    Background Whenever questionnaires are used to collect data on constructs, such as functional status or health related quality of life, it is unlikely that all respondents will respond to all items. This paper examines ways of dealing with responses in a 'not applicable' category to items included in the AMC Linear Disability Score (ALDS) project item bank. Methods The data examined in this paper come from the responses of 392 respondents to 32 items and form part of the calibration sample for the ALDS item bank. The data are analysed using the one-parameter logistic item response theory model. The four practical strategies for dealing with this type of response are: cold deck imputation; hot deck imputation; treating the missing responses as if these items had never been offered to those individual patients; and using a model which takes account of the 'tendency to respond to items'. Results The item and respondent population parameter estimates were very similar for the strategies involving hot deck imputation; treating the missing responses as if these items had never been offered to those individual patients; and using a model which takes account of the 'tendency to respond to items'. The estimates obtained using the cold deck imputation method were substantially different. Conclusions The cold deck imputation method was not considered suitable for use in the ALDS item bank. The other three methods described can be usefully implemented in the ALDS item bank, depending on the purpose of the data analysis to be carried out. These three methods may be useful for other data sets examining similar constructs, when item response theory based methods are used. PMID:15200681

  20. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  1. Exchange Energy Density Functionals that reproduce the Linear Response Function of the Free Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2009-03-01

    We present several nonlocal exchange energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the free electron gas. These nonlocal functionals are constructed following a similar procedure used previously for nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals by Chac'on-Alvarellos-Tarazona, Garc'ia-Gonz'alez et al., Wang-Govind-Carter and Garc'ia-Aldea-Alvarellos. The exchange response function is not known but we have used the approximate response function developed by Utsumi and Ichimaru, even we must remark that the same ansatz can be used to reproduce any other response function with the same scaling properties. We have developed two families of new nonlocal functionals: one is constructed with a mathematical structure based on the LDA approximation -- the Dirac functional for the exchange - and for the second one the structure of the second order gradient expansion approximation is took as a model. The functionals are constructed is such a way that they can be used in localized systems (using real space calculations) and in extended systems (using the momentum space, and achieving a quasilinear scaling with the system size if a constant reference electron density is defined).

  2. Fully relativistic description of spin-orbit torques by means of linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, S.; Chadova, K.; Seemann, M.; Ködderitzsch, D.; Ebert, H.

    2016-08-01

    Symmetry and magnitude of spin-orbit torques (SOT), i.e., current-induced torques on the magnetization of systems lacking inversion symmetry, are investigated in a fully relativistic linear response framework based on the Kubo formalism. By applying all space-time symmetry operations contained in the magnetic point group of a solid to the relevant response coefficient, the torkance expressed as torque-current correlation function, restrictions to the shape of the direct and inverse response tensors are obtained. These are shown to apply to the corresponding thermal analogs as well, namely the direct and inverse thermal SOT in response to a temperature gradient or heat current. Using an implementation of the Kubo-Bastin formula for the torkance into a first-principles multiple-scattering Green function framework and accounting for disorder effects via the so-called coherent potential approximation, all contributions to the SOT in pure systems, dilute as well as concentrated alloys can be treated on equal footing. This way, material specific values for all torkance tensor elements in the fcc (111) trilayer alloy system Pt| FexCo1 -x|Cu are obtained over a wide concentration range and discussed in comparison to results for electrical and spin conductivity, as well as to previous work—in particular concerning symmetry with respect to magnetization reversal and the nature of the various contributions.

  3. THE RESPONSE OF DRUG EXPENDITURE TO NON-LINEAR CONTRACT DESIGN: EVIDENCE FROM MEDICARE PART D.

    PubMed

    Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy; Schrimpf, Paul

    2015-05-01

    We study the demand response to non-linear price schedules using data on insurance contracts and prescription drug purchases in Medicare Part D. We exploit the kink in individuals' budget set created by the famous "donut hole," where insurance becomes discontinuously much less generous on the margin, to provide descriptive evidence of the drug purchase response to a price increase. We then specify and estimate a simple dynamic model of drug use that allows us to quantify the spending response along the entire non-linear budget set. We use the model for counterfactual analysis of the increase in spending from "filling" the donut hole, as will be required by 2020 under the Affordable Care Act. In our baseline model, which considers spending decisions within a single year, we estimate that "filling" the donut hole will increase annual drug spending by about $150, or about 8 percent. About one-quarter of this spending increase reflects "anticipatory" behavior, coming from beneficiaries whose spending prior to the policy change would leave them short of reaching the donut hole. We also present descriptive evidence of cross-year substitution of spending by individuals who reach the kink, which motivates a simple extension to our baseline model that allows - in a highly stylized way - for individuals to engage in such cross year substitution. Our estimates from this extension suggest that a large share of the $150 drug spending increase could be attributed to cross-year substitution, and the net increase could be as little as $45 per year.

  4. THE RESPONSE OF DRUG EXPENDITURE TO NON-LINEAR CONTRACT DESIGN: EVIDENCE FROM MEDICARE PART D*

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy; Schrimpf, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We study the demand response to non-linear price schedules using data on insurance contracts and prescription drug purchases in Medicare Part D. We exploit the kink in individuals’ budget set created by the famous “donut hole,” where insurance becomes discontinuously much less generous on the margin, to provide descriptive evidence of the drug purchase response to a price increase. We then specify and estimate a simple dynamic model of drug use that allows us to quantify the spending response along the entire non-linear budget set. We use the model for counterfactual analysis of the increase in spending from “filling” the donut hole, as will be required by 2020 under the Affordable Care Act. In our baseline model, which considers spending decisions within a single year, we estimate that “filling” the donut hole will increase annual drug spending by about $150, or about 8 percent. About one-quarter of this spending increase reflects “anticipatory” behavior, coming from beneficiaries whose spending prior to the policy change would leave them short of reaching the donut hole. We also present descriptive evidence of cross-year substitution of spending by individuals who reach the kink, which motivates a simple extension to our baseline model that allows – in a highly stylized way – for individuals to engage in such cross year substitution. Our estimates from this extension suggest that a large share of the $150 drug spending increase could be attributed to cross-year substitution, and the net increase could be as little as $45 per year. PMID:26769984

  5. MCP PMT with high time response and linear output current for neutron time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolotov, A. S.; Konovalov, P. I.; Nurtdinov, R. I.

    2016-09-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a subnanosecond time response and a high linear output current has been developed. PMT is designed for detection of weak pulses of radiation in UV-, visible and nearer-IR ranges and can be used in neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors in experiments on laser compression of thermonuclear fuel. The results of measurements of MCP PMT main parameters are presented: photocathode spectral sensitivity, gain, maximum linear output current, and time response.

  6. Efficacy and Mode of Action of Immune Response Modifying Compounds against Alphaviruses and Flaviviruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    UTJC RE F mnpv Lfl AD _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 0 N Efficacy and Node of A-tion of Imune Response Modifying Compounds Against Alphaviruses and Flaviviruses...Against Alphaviruses and Flaviviruses 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Page S. Morahan, Margo Brinton, Angelo J. Pinto 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14...prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatment with immunomodulators alone and in combination with antiviral drugs against alphavirus , flavivirus, bunyavirus and

  7. Carbon Availability Modifies Temperature Responses of Heterotrophic Microbial Respiration, Carbon Uptake Affinity, and Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyungjin; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Billings, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformations of organic carbon (OC) generate a large flux of CO2 into the atmosphere and influence the C balance of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Yet, inherent heterogeneity in natural environments precludes direct quantification of multiple microbial C fluxes that underlie CO2 production. Here we used a continuous flow bioreactor coupled with a stable C isotope analyzer to determine the effects of temperature and C availability (cellobiose concentration) on C fluxes and 13C discrimination of a microbial population growing at steady-state in a homogeneous, well-mixed environment. We estimated C uptake affinity and C use efficiency (CUE) to characterize the physiological responses of microbes to changing environmental conditions. Temperature increased biomass-C specific respiration rate and C uptake affinity at lower C availability, but did not influence those parameters at higher C availability. CUE decreased non-linearly with increasing temperature. The non-linear, negative relationship between CUE and temperature was more pronounced under lower C availability than under relatively high C availability. We observed stable isotope fractionation between C substrate and microbial biomass C (7~12‰ depletion), and between microbial biomass and respired CO2 (4~10‰ depletion). Microbial discrimination against 13C-containing cellobiose during C uptake was influenced by temperature and C availability, while discrimination during respiration was only influenced by C availability. Shifts in C uptake affinity with temperature and C availability may have modified uptake-induced 13C fractionation. By stressing the importance of C availability on temperature responses of microbial C fluxes, C uptake affinity, CUE, and isotopic fractionation, this study contributes to a fundamental understanding of C flow through microbes. This will help guide parameterization of microbial responses to varying temperature and C availability within Earth-system models. PMID

  8. Carbon Availability Modifies Temperature Responses of Heterotrophic Microbial Respiration, Carbon Uptake Affinity, and Stable Carbon Isotope Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyungjin; Lehmeier, Christoph A; Iv, Ford Ballantyne; Billings, Sharon A

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformations of organic carbon (OC) generate a large flux of CO2 into the atmosphere and influence the C balance of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Yet, inherent heterogeneity in natural environments precludes direct quantification of multiple microbial C fluxes that underlie CO2 production. Here we used a continuous flow bioreactor coupled with a stable C isotope analyzer to determine the effects of temperature and C availability (cellobiose concentration) on C fluxes and (13)C discrimination of a microbial population growing at steady-state in a homogeneous, well-mixed environment. We estimated C uptake affinity and C use efficiency (CUE) to characterize the physiological responses of microbes to changing environmental conditions. Temperature increased biomass-C specific respiration rate and C uptake affinity at lower C availability, but did not influence those parameters at higher C availability. CUE decreased non-linearly with increasing temperature. The non-linear, negative relationship between CUE and temperature was more pronounced under lower C availability than under relatively high C availability. We observed stable isotope fractionation between C substrate and microbial biomass C (7~12‰ depletion), and between microbial biomass and respired CO2 (4~10‰ depletion). Microbial discrimination against (13)C-containing cellobiose during C uptake was influenced by temperature and C availability, while discrimination during respiration was only influenced by C availability. Shifts in C uptake affinity with temperature and C availability may have modified uptake-induced (13)C fractionation. By stressing the importance of C availability on temperature responses of microbial C fluxes, C uptake affinity, CUE, and isotopic fractionation, this study contributes to a fundamental understanding of C flow through microbes. This will help guide parameterization of microbial responses to varying temperature and C availability within Earth-system models.

  9. A fresh look at linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and variation of parameters. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  10. Quantum Kramers model: Corrections to the linear response theory for continuous bath spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rips, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Decay of the metastable state is analyzed within the quantum Kramers model in the weak-to-intermediate dissipation regime. The decay kinetics in this regime is determined by energy exchange between the unstable mode and the stable modes of thermal bath. In our previous paper [Phys. Rev. A 42, 4427 (1990), 10.1103/PhysRevA.42.4427], Grabert's perturbative approach to well dynamics in the case of the discrete bath [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1683 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.61.1683] has been extended to account for the second order terms in the classical equations of motion (EOM) for the stable modes. Account of the secular terms reduces EOM for the stable modes to those of the forced oscillator with the time-dependent frequency (TDF oscillator). Analytic expression for the characteristic function of energy loss of the unstable mode has been derived in terms of the generating function of the transition probabilities for the quantum forced TDF oscillator. In this paper, the approach is further developed and applied to the case of the continuous frequency spectrum of the bath. The spectral density functions of the bath of stable modes are expressed in terms of the dissipative properties (the friction function) of the original bath. They simplify considerably for the one-dimensional systems, when the density of phonon states is constant. Explicit expressions for the fourth order corrections to the linear response theory result for the characteristic function of the energy loss and its cumulants are obtained for the particular case of the cubic potential with Ohmic (Markovian) dissipation. The range of validity of the perturbative approach in this case is determined (γ /ωb<0.26 ), which includes the turnover region. The dominant correction to the linear response theory result is associated with the "work function" and leads to reduction of the average energy loss and its dispersion. This reduction increases with the increasing dissipation strength (up to ˜10 % ) within the

  11. Quantum Kramers model: Corrections to the linear response theory for continuous bath spectrum.

    PubMed

    Rips, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Decay of the metastable state is analyzed within the quantum Kramers model in the weak-to-intermediate dissipation regime. The decay kinetics in this regime is determined by energy exchange between the unstable mode and the stable modes of thermal bath. In our previous paper [Phys. Rev. A 42, 4427 (1990)PLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.42.4427], Grabert's perturbative approach to well dynamics in the case of the discrete bath [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1683 (1988)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.61.1683] has been extended to account for the second order terms in the classical equations of motion (EOM) for the stable modes. Account of the secular terms reduces EOM for the stable modes to those of the forced oscillator with the time-dependent frequency (TDF oscillator). Analytic expression for the characteristic function of energy loss of the unstable mode has been derived in terms of the generating function of the transition probabilities for the quantum forced TDF oscillator. In this paper, the approach is further developed and applied to the case of the continuous frequency spectrum of the bath. The spectral density functions of the bath of stable modes are expressed in terms of the dissipative properties (the friction function) of the original bath. They simplify considerably for the one-dimensional systems, when the density of phonon states is constant. Explicit expressions for the fourth order corrections to the linear response theory result for the characteristic function of the energy loss and its cumulants are obtained for the particular case of the cubic potential with Ohmic (Markovian) dissipation. The range of validity of the perturbative approach in this case is determined (γ/ω_{b}<0.26), which includes the turnover region. The dominant correction to the linear response theory result is associated with the "work function" and leads to reduction of the average energy loss and its dispersion. This reduction increases with the increasing dissipation strength

  12. Dynamic Deformation and Fragmentation Response of Maraging Steel Linear Cellular Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, D. A.; McCoy, T.; Thadhani, N. N.; Cochran, J.

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of unaged 250 maraging steel, fabricated using a direct reduction and extrusion technique, is investigated. Explicit finite element simulations were implemented using AUTODYN. The maraging steel properties were defined using a Johnson-Cook strength model with previously validated parameters. Rod-on-anvil impact tests were performed using the 7.6 mm helium gas gun and the transient deformation and fragmentation response was recorded with high-speed imaging. For purpose of comparison, the response of 25% dense hollow cylinders of same density as the 9-cell LCA was also studied. Analysis of observed states of specimens and finite element simulations reveal that in the case of the 9-cell LCA, dissipation of stress and strain occurs along the interior cell wells resulting in significant and ubiquitous buckling prior to confined fragmentation. In comparison, the simple hollow cylinder undergoes significant radial lipping, eventually producing larger sized, external fragments. DTRA Grant No. HDTRA1-07-1-0018 and NDSEG Fellowship Program.

  13. Tests of the linear, no-threshold dose-response relationship for high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1987-05-01

    It is pointed out that induction of lung cancer by exposure to Rn daughters, applied at high doses to miners and at low doses to exposures in homes, provides a very stringent and sensitive test of the linear, no-threshold dose-response relationship for high-LET radiation, because this relationship predicts that a substantial fraction of lung cancer among non-smokers is due to average Rn levels. Therefore, it predicts an easily observable elevation of lung cancer rates in areas where Rn levels are many times greater than the average, especially at times before cigarette smoking began to have important effects on lung cancer statistics. While more data are needed (and will be forthcoming), some of the early indications of these studies are reviewed here. Several cases are now known where average Rn levels are very high, and in all of these cases lung cancer rates are well below average. Methods for analyzing these data are discussed, and it is concluded that, based on current evidence, they indicate at least a factor of 4 disagreement with linear, no-threshold predictions.

  14. Linear sea-level response to abrupt ocean warming of major West Antarctic ice basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengel, M.; Feldmann, J.; Levermann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica's contribution to global sea-level rise has recently been increasing. Whether its ice discharge will become unstable and decouple from anthropogenic forcing or increase linearly with the warming of the surrounding ocean is of fundamental importance. Under unabated greenhouse-gas emissions, ocean models indicate an abrupt intrusion of warm circumpolar deep water into the cavity below West Antarctica's Filchner-Ronne ice shelf within the next two centuries. The ice basin's retrograde bed slope would allow for an unstable ice-sheet retreat, but the buttressing of the large ice shelf and the narrow glacier troughs tend to inhibit such instability. It is unclear whether future ice loss will be dominated by ice instability or anthropogenic forcing. Here we show in regional and continental-scale ice-sheet simulations, which are capable of resolving unstable grounding-line retreat, that the sea-level response of the Filchner-Ronne ice basin is not dominated by ice instability and follows the strength of the forcing quasi-linearly. We find that the ice loss reduces after each pulse of projected warm water intrusion. The long-term sea-level contribution is approximately proportional to the total shelf-ice melt. Although the local instabilities might dominate the ice loss for weak oceanic warming, we find that the upper limit of ice discharge from the region is determined by the forcing and not by the marine ice-sheet instability.

  15. Linear frequency response analysis of a high subsonic and a supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Oliver; Colonius, Tim; Brès, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    A linear frequency response, or resolvent analysis of two turbulent jet mean flows is conducted. The mean flows are obtained from two high-fidelity large eddy simulations of a Mach 0.9 and a Mach 1.5 turbulent jet at Reynolds numbers of 1 ×106 and 3 ×105 , respectively. For both cases, curves of the optimal and sub-optimal output gains are calculated as a function of frequency for different azimuthal wavenumbers. The gain curves bring to light pseudo-resonances associated with different linear instability mechanisms. The same mechanisms are recovered in global stability analyses, and the results are compared. In the case of the Mach 0.9 jet, the resolvent analysis allows for a detailed study of trapped acoustic modes inside the potential core that were subject to previous stability studies. The structure of the resolvent and global modes are compared to POD mode estimates of the LES data. Additionally, the projection of the LES data onto the modes allows for quantitative assessment of how well the modal structures represent the coherent structures in the jet.

  16. Non-Linear Dynamic Response of a Spur Gear Pair: Modelling and Experimental Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARKER, R. G.; VIJAYAKAR, S. M.; IMAJO, T.

    2000-10-01

    The dynamic response of a spur gear pair is investigated using a finite element/contact mechanics model that offers significant advantages for dynamic gear analyses. The gear pair is analyzed across a wide range of operating speeds and torques. Comparisons are made to other researchers' published experiments that reveal complex non-linear phenomena. The non-linearity source is contact loss of the meshing teeth, which, in contrast to the prevailing understanding, occurs even for large torques despite the use of high-precision gears. A primary feature of the modelling is that dynamic mesh forces are calculated using a detailed contact analysis at each time step as the gears roll through the mesh; there is no need to externally specify the excitation in the form of time-varying mesh stiffness, static transmission error input, or the like. A semi-analytical model near the tooth surface is matched to a finite element solution away from the tooth surface, and the computational efficiency that results permits dynamic analysis. Two-single-degree-of-freedom models are also studied. While one gives encouragingly good results, the other, which appears to have better mesh stiffness modelling, gives poor comparisons with experiments. The results indicate the sensitivity of such models to the Fourier spectrum of the changing mesh stiffness.

  17. The influence of the density ratio on the linear frequency response of low-density jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sevilla, Alejandro; Lesshafft, Lutz

    2013-11-01

    Low-density jets support global self-sustained oscillations when the jet-to-ambient density ratio is sufficiently small, a phenomenon that has been linked to the presence of a region of local absolute instability in the underlying parallel base flow. However, the use of local stability analysis requires introducing ad-hoc criteria to match the experimental observations (see). In this work we therefore use a global approach, where the wavepacket structures are temporal eigenmodes of the linearized equations of motion in a 2D domain. The resulting eigenvalue spectra show that, when the density ratio is decreased, a discrete eigenmode becomes increasingly dominant, eventually reaching a positive growth rate for a certain critical density ratio. For the particular case of a He/air jet, this critical density ratio, as well as the corresponding oscillation frequency, is in good quantitative agreement with the experiments of. The influence of the density ratio on the linear frequency response of the jet under globally stable conditions is also investigated. Supported by Spanish MINECO under project DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  18. Factors modifying the response of large animals to low-intensity radiation exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, N. P.; Still, E. T.

    1972-01-01

    In assessing the biological response to space radiation, two of the most important modifying factors are dose protraction and dose distribution to the body. Studies are reported in which sheep and swine were used to compare the hematology and lethality response resulting from radiation exposure encountered in a variety of forms, including acute (high dose-rate), chronic (low dose-rate), combinations of acute and chronic, and whether received as a continuous or as fractionated exposure. While sheep and swine are basically similar in response to acute radiation, their sensitivity to chronic irradiation is markedly different. Sheep remain relatively sensitive as the radiation exposure is protracted while swine are more resistant and capable of surviving extremely large doses of chronic irradiation. This response to chronic irradiation correlated well with changes in radiosensitivity and recovery following an acute, sublethal exposure.

  19. Measurement and modeling of high-linearity modified uni-traveling carrier photodiode with highly-doped absorber.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huapu; Li, Zhi; Beling, Andreas; Campbell, Joe C

    2009-10-26

    The third-order intermodulation distortions of InGaAs/InP modified uni-traveling carrier photodiodes with a highly-doped p-type absorber are characterized. The third-order local intercept point is 55 dBm at low frequency (< 3 GHz) and remains as high as 47.5 dBm up to 20 GHz. The frequency characteristics of the OIP3 are well explained by an equivalent circuit model.

  20. Acoustically determined linear piezoelectric response of lithium niobate up to 1100 V

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Branch, D. W.; Cular, S.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2014-04-21

    We present a method to measure high voltages using the piezoelectric crystal lithium niobate without using voltage dividers. A 36° Y-X cut lithium niobate crystal was coupled to two acoustic transducers, where direct current voltages were applied from 128–1100 V. The time-of-flight through the crystal was determined to be linearly dependent on the applied voltage. A model was developed to predict the time-delay in response to the applied voltage. The results show a sensitivity of 17 fs/V with a measurement error of 1 fs/V was achievable using this method. The sensitivity of this method can be increased by measuring the acoustic wave after multiple passes through the crystal. This method has many advantages over traditional techniques such as: favorable scalability for larger voltages, ease of use, cost effectiveness, and compactness.

  1. Linear-response theory for Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster method: excitation energies.

    PubMed

    Jagau, Thomas-C; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-28

    The recently presented linear-response function for Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster method (Mk-MRCC) [T.-C. Jagau and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044115 (2012)] is employed to determine vertical excitation energies within the singles and doubles approximation (Mk-MRCCSD-LR) for ozone as well as for o-benzyne, m-benzyne, and p-benzyne, which display increasing multireference character in their ground states. In order to assess the impact of a multireference ground-state wavefunction on excitation energies, we compare all our results to those obtained at the single-reference coupled-cluster level of theory within the singles and doubles as well as within the singles, doubles, and triples approximation. Special attention is paid to the artificial splitting of certain excited states which arises from the redundancy intrinsic to Mk-MRCC theory and hinders the straightforward application of the Mk-MRCC-LR method.

  2. Ab initio calculation of the Gilbert damping parameter via the linear response formalism.

    PubMed

    Ebert, H; Mankovsky, S; Ködderitzsch, D; Kelly, P J

    2011-08-05

    A Kubo-Greenwood-like equation for the Gilbert damping parameter α is presented that is based on the linear response formalism. Its implementation using the fully relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker band structure method in combination with coherent potential approximation alloy theory allows it to be applied to a wide range of situations. This is demonstrated with results obtained for the bcc alloy system Fe(1-x)Co(x) as well as for a series of alloys of Permalloy with 5d transition metals. To account for the thermal displacements of atoms as a scattering mechanism, an alloy-analogy model is introduced. The corresponding calculations for Ni correctly describe the rapid change of α when small amounts of substitutional Cu are introduced.

  3. Response of discrete linear systems to forcing functions with inequality constraints.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, C. D.; Riley, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is made of the maximum response of discrete, linear mechanical systems to arbitrary forcing functions which lie within specified bounds. Primary attention is focused on the complete determination of the forcing function which will engender maximum displacement to any particular mass element of a multi-degree-of-freedom system. In general, the desired forcing function is found to be a bang-bang type function, i.e., a function which switches from the maximum to the minimum bound and vice-versa at certain instants of time. Examples of two-degree-of-freedom systems, with and without damping, are presented in detail. Conclusions are drawn concerning the effect of damping on the switching times and the general procedure for finding these times is discussed.

  4. Comparison of Behaviour in Different Liquids and in Cells of Gold Nanorods and Spherical Nanoparticles Modified by Linear Polyethyleneimine and Bovine Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Pyshnaya, Inna A.; Razum, Kristina V.; Poletaeva, Julia E.; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V.; Zenkova, Marina A.; Ryabchikova, Elena I.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) are considered one of the most promising forms of nanoparticles for nanobiotechnology; however, the problem of their toxicity is currently not resolved. We synthesised GNRs, modified with linear polyethyleneimine (PEI-GNRs), and examined their physicochemical and some biological properties in comparison with GNRs modified with BSA and spherical gold nanoparticles (sGNPs) modified with the same agents. The influence of the buffer, cell culture media, and serum on hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential of all GNPs was studied. Simultaneously, the size, shape, and formation of a corona were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PEI-GNRs and GNPs were nontoxic for BHK-21 and HeLa cells (MTT test). Penetration of all GNPs into BHK-21, melanoma B16, and HeLa cells was examined after 30 min, 3 h, and 24 h of incubation using TEM ultrathin sections. PEI-GNRs and PEI-sGNPs demonstrated fast and active penetration into cells by caveolin-dependent and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis and accumulated in endosomes and lysosomes. BSA-modified GNPs showed prolonged flotation and a significant delay in cell penetration. The results show that the charge of initial NPs determines penetration into cells. Thus, the designed PEI-GNRs were nontoxic and stable in cell culture media and could efficiently penetrate cells. PMID:25093190

  5. Effects of Initial Geometric Imperfections On the Non-Linear Response of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight Liquid-Oxygen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Young, Richard D.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the elastic buckling and nonlinear behavior of the liquid-oxygen tank for the new Space Shuttle superlightweight external fuel tank are presented. Selected results that illustrate three distinctly different types of non-linear response phenomena for thin-walled shells which are subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads are presented. These response phenomena consist of a bifurcation-type buckling response, a short-wavelength non-linear bending response and a non-linear collapse or "snap-through" response associated with a limit point. The effects of initial geometric imperfections on the response characteristics are emphasized. The results illustrate that the buckling and non-linear response of a geometrically imperfect shell structure subjected to complex loading conditions may not be adequately characterized by an elastic linear bifurcation buckling analysis, and that the traditional industry practice of applying a buckling-load knock-down factor can result in an ultraconservative design. Results are also presented that show that a fluid-filled shell can be highly sensitive to initial geometric imperfections, and that the use a buckling-load knock-down factor is needed for this case.

  6. Dynamic elastic moduli in magnetic gels: Normal modes and linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessot, Giorgio; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-09-01

    In the perspective of developing smart hybrid materials with customized features, ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers allow a synergy of elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between elastic and magnetic properties gives rise to a unique reversible control of the material behavior by applying an external magnetic field. Albeit few works have been performed on the time-dependent properties so far, understanding the dynamic behavior is the key to model many practical situations, e.g., applications as vibration absorbers. Here we present a way to calculate the frequency-dependent elastic moduli based on the decomposition of the linear response to an external stress in normal modes. We use a minimal three-dimensional dipole-spring model to theoretically describe the magnetic and elastic interactions on the mesoscopic level. Specifically, the magnetic particles carry permanent magnetic dipole moments and are spatially arranged in a prescribed way, before they are linked by elastic springs. An external magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments. On the one hand, we study regular lattice-like particle arrangements to compare with previous results in the literature. On the other hand, we calculate the dynamic elastic moduli for irregular, more realistic particle distributions. Our approach measures the tunability of the linear dynamic response as a function of the particle arrangement, the system orientation with respect to the external magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the magnetic interaction between the particles. The strength of the present approach is that it explicitly connects the relaxational modes of the system with the rheological properties as well as with the internal rearrangement of the particles in the sample, providing new insight into the dynamics of these remarkable materials.

  7. Linear response of the hydrogen atom in Stark states to a harmonic uniform electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, T.A.

    1989-04-15

    The influence of a weak harmonic uniform electric field, switched on adiabatically, on a nonrelativistic hydrogenlike atom is examined. Each of the phi- and A-gauge first-order corrections to the wave function of a stationary state chemically bondN> is determined by a vector function that we denote v/sub N/ and w/sub N/, respectively. The absolute starting point of our calculations is Schwinger's formula for the Coulomb Green's function in momentum space. In the case of a bound state with definite angular momentum, we report a compact integral representation and also an explicit expression of the phi-gauge vector v/sub n//sub l//sub m/, which are analogous to those of the corresponding A-gauge vector w/sub n//sub l//sub m/ studied previously. We have derived compact analytic expressions of the linear-response vectors v/sub n//sub >//sub xi/n/sub eta/m$ and w/sub n//sub >//sub xi/n/sub eta/m$ associated to an arbitrary Stark state. These are written first as contour integrals, and then explicitly in terms of a new generalized hypergeometric function with five variables, /sub 2/phi/sub H/, which is a finite sum of Humbert functions phi/sub 1/. We have calculated the static limit of the regular part of the vector v/sub n//sub >//sub xi/n/sub eta/m$. Also discussed are the Sturmian-function expansions of the linear-response vectors for angular momentum states.

  8. Linear β-1,3 Glucans Are Elicitors of Defense Responses in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Klarzynski, Olivier; Plesse, Bertrand; Joubert, Jean-Marie; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Kopp, Marguerite; Kloareg, Bernard; Fritig, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    Laminarin, a linear β-1,3 glucan (mean degree of polymerization of 33) was extracted and purified from the brown alga Laminaria digitata. Its elicitor activity on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was compared to that of oligogalacturonides with a mean degree of polymerization of 10. The two oligosaccharides were perceived by suspension-cultured cells as distinct chemical stimuli but triggered a similar and broad spectrum of defense responses. A dose of 200 μg mL−1 laminarin or oligogalacturonides induced within a few minutes a 1.9-pH-units alkalinization of the extracellular medium and a transient release of H2O2. After a few hours, a strong stimulation of Phe ammonia-lyase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, and lipoxygenase activities occurred, as well as accumulation of salicylic acid. Neither of the two oligosaccharides induced tissue damage or cell death nor did they induce accumulation of the typical tobacco phytoalexin capsidiol, in contrast with the effects of the proteinaceous elicitor β-megaspermin. Structure activity studies with laminarin, laminarin oligomers, high molecular weight β-1,3–1,6 glucans from fungal cell walls, and the β-1,6–1,3 heptaglucan showed that the elicitor effects observed in tobacco with β-glucans are specific to linear β-1,3 linkages, with laminaripentaose being the smallest elicitor-active structure. In accordance with its strong stimulating effect on defense responses in tobacco cells, infiltration of 200 μg mL−1 laminarin in tobacco leaves triggered accumulation within 48 h of the four families of antimicrobial pathogenesis-related proteins investigated. Challenge of the laminarin-infiltrated leaves 5 d after treatment with the soft rot pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora resulted in a strong reduction of the infection when compared with water-treated leaves. PMID:11080280

  9. Enhanced osteoblast responses to poly ether ether ketone surface modified by water plasma immersion ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heying; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) offers a set of characteristics superior for human implants; however, its application is limited by the bio-inert surface property. In this work, PEEK surface was modified using single step plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment with a gas mixture of water vapor as a plasma resource and argon as an ionization assistant. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the microstructure and composition of the modified PEEK surface. The water contact angle and zeta-potential of the surfaces were also measured. Osteoblast precursor cells MC3T3-E1 and rat bone mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on the PEEK samples to evaluate their cytocompatibility. The obtained results show that the hydroxyl groups as well as a "ravined structure" are constructed on water PIII modified PEEK. Compared with pristine PEEK, the water PIII treated PEEK is more favorable for osteoblast adhesion, spreading and proliferation, besides, early osteogenic differentiation indicated by the alkaline phosphatase activity is also up-regulated. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblast responses to the PEEK surface modified by water PIII, which gives positive information in terms of future biomedical applications.

  10. Wetting Properties of Polysiloxane Networks Modified in Situ with Fluoroalkyl-Substituted Linear and POSS Cage Structures (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-17

    currently valid OMB control number . PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) July 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Briefing...fluoroalkyl- substituted linear and POSS cage structures (Briefing Charts) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Raymond Campos, Sean Ramirez, Joseph Mabry 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER Q0BG 7. PERFORMING

  11. Modifiers of exposure--response estimates for lung cancer among miners exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R.W.; Deddens, J.; Roscoe, R.

    1995-03-01

    The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Metal substrate effects on pH response of tetracyanoquinodimenthane modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Inzelt, G.; Chambers, J.Q.; Kinstle, J.F.; Day, R.W.; Lange, M.A.

    1984-02-01

    In recent work the voltammetric and spectral response of tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) modified electrodes have been described. The effect of pH of the cyclic voltammetry of these modified electrodes can be understood on the basis of the classical 3 x 3 nine-membered square scheme characteristic of quinone-hydroquinone couples. As for other compounds with quinoid structures, TCNQ exhibits quasi-reversible behavior in protic solvents with an apparent direct 2e/sup -/, 2H/sup +/ exchange in acidic pH region. This scheme is complicated further by dimer formation, disproportionation of the anion radical in strongly acidic solutions, and the apparent reduction of neutral TCNQ by hydroxide ions in very basic media (pH > 12). In basic solution the formation of TCNQ/sup -/ is clearly signaled by its electron spin resonance and visible absorption spectra. While quinone-hydroquinone couples do exhibit subtle electrochemical behavior, they are the basis for a widely used and reliable redox pH electrode. Thus an attempt to utilize TCNQ modified electrodes as a pH sensor seemed to be a logical step based on the kinship between TCNQ and benzoquinone. However, the results support the idea that the electrode substrate plays an important role in determining the response to the pH of the bulk solution. 20 references, 1 figure.

  13. Differences in individual responsiveness of serum cholesterol to fat-modified diets in man.

    PubMed

    Katan, M B; van Gastel, A C; de Rover, C M; van Montfort, M A; Knuiman, J T

    1988-12-01

    In the period 1963-1974, 82 monks and 48 nuns from five Dutch and Belgian Trappist monasteries each participated in two or more out of nine different trials designed to test the effect of 58 different fat-modified diets on serum cholesterol. We analysed these data to quantify the extent to which healthy, normolipaemic subjects differ in the responsiveness of their serum cholesterol to a change in dietary fatty acid composition. Statistically significant between-person variance components (SD2p) were found in the serum cholesterol responses for the whole group (SD2p = [0.20 mmol l-1]2), for the men (SD2p = [0.24 mmol l-1]2) and for those women who participated in three or more trials (SD2p = [0.14 mmol l-1]2). The between-person variation (expressed as SD) was on average only half as large as the within-person variation in response when the same subject was challenged repeatedly. It is concluded that medically significant differences in responsiveness to fat-modified diets exist in both men and women. However, few subjects fail entirely to respond to a change in dietary fatty acid composition. In addition, the large within-subject variability makes it difficult to identify hypo- and hyperresponders.

  14. On spurious detection of linear response and misuse of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in finite time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Wormell, J. P.; Wouters, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    Using a sensitive statistical test we determine whether or not one can detect the breakdown of linear response given observations of deterministic dynamical systems. A goodness-of-fit statistics is developed for a linear statistical model of the observations, based on results for central limit theorems for deterministic dynamical systems, and used to detect linear response breakdown. We apply the method to discrete maps which do not obey linear response and show that the successful detection of breakdown depends on the length of the time series, the magnitude of the perturbation and on the choice of the observable. We find that in order to reliably reject the assumption of linear response for typical observables sufficiently large data sets are needed. Even for simple systems such as the logistic map, one needs of the order of 106 observations to reliably detect the breakdown with a confidence level of 95 %; if less observations are available one may be falsely led to conclude that linear response theory is valid. The amount of data required is larger the smaller the applied perturbation. For judiciously chosen observables the necessary amount of data can be drastically reduced, but requires detailed a priori knowledge about the invariant measure which is typically not available for complex dynamical systems. Furthermore we explore the use of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) in cases with limited data length or coarse-graining of observations. The FDT, if applied naively to a system without linear response, is shown to be very sensitive to the details of the sampling method, resulting in erroneous predictions of the response.

  15. Assessment of the setup dependence of detector response functions for mega-voltage linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Christopher; Simon, Tom; Simon, Bill; Dempsey, James F.; Kahler, Darren; Palta, Jatinder R.; Liu Chihray; Yan Guanghua

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of beam profiles is important for precise treatment planning dosimetry. Calculated beam profiles need to precisely replicate profiles measured during machine commissioning. Finite detector size introduces perturbations into the measured profiles, which, in turn, impact the resulting modeled profiles. The authors investigate a method for extracting the unperturbed beam profiles from those measured during linear accelerator commissioning. Methods: In-plane and cross-plane data were collected for an Elekta Synergy linac at 6 MV using ionization chambers of volume 0.01, 0.04, 0.13, and 0.65 cm{sup 3} and a diode of surface area 0.64 mm{sup 2}. The detectors were orientated with the stem perpendicular to the beam and pointing away from the gantry. Profiles were measured for a 10x10 cm{sup 2} field at depths ranging from 0.8 to 25.0 cm and SSDs from 90 to 110 cm. Shaping parameters of a Gaussian response function were obtained relative to the Edge detector. The Gaussian function was deconvolved from the measured ionization chamber data. The Edge detector profile was taken as an approximation to the true profile, to which deconvolved data were compared. Data were also collected with CC13 and Edge detectors for additional fields and energies on an Elekta Synergy, Varian Trilogy, and Siemens Oncor linear accelerator and response functions obtained. Response functions were compared as a function of depth, SSD, and detector scan direction. Variations in the shaping parameter were introduced and the effect on the resulting deconvolution profiles assessed. Results: Up to 10% setup dependence in the Gaussian shaping parameter occurred, for each detector for a particular plane. This translated to less than a {+-}0.7 mm variation in the 80%-20% penumbral width. For large volume ionization chambers such as the FC65 Farmer type, where the cavity length to diameter ratio is far from 1, the scan direction produced up to a 40% difference in the shaping

  16. The Effect of Training Structure on the Latency of Responses to a Five-Term Linear Chain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Thomas; Whelan, Robert; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2005-01-01

    The current experiment investigated the effect of differential training histories on responses to a 5-term linear chain of nonsense syllables (described here with sequential, alphabetical characters; A [is less than] B [is less than] C [is less than] D [is less than] E) across unreinforced probe trials. Participants' responses to nonarbitrary…

  17. Response of Non-Linear Shock Absorbers-Boundary Value Problem Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Ahmed, U.; Uddin, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    A nonlinear boundary value problem of two degrees-of-freedom (DOF) untuned vibration damper systems using nonlinear springs and dampers has been numerically studied. As far as untuned damper is concerned, sixteen different combinations of linear and nonlinear springs and dampers have been comprehensively analyzed taking into account transient terms. For different cases, a comparative study is made for response versus time for different spring and damper types at three important frequency ratios: one at r = 1, one at r > 1 and one at r <1. The response of the system is changed because of the spring and damper nonlinearities; the change is different for different cases. Accordingly, an initially stable absorber may become unstable with time and vice versa. The analysis also shows that higher nonlinearity terms make the system more unstable. Numerical simulation includes transient vibrations. Although problems are much more complicated compared to those for a tuned absorber, a comparison of the results generated by the present numerical scheme with the exact one shows quite a reasonable agreement

  18. Polarizable embedding with a multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory linear response method

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Knecht, Stefan; Kongsted, Jacob Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2015-03-21

    We present here the coupling of a polarizable embedding (PE) model to the recently developed multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory method (MC-srDFT), which can treat multiconfigurational systems with a simultaneous account for dynamical and static correlation effects. PE-MC-srDFT is designed to combine efficient treatment of complicated electronic structures with inclusion of effects from the surrounding environment. The environmental effects encompass classical electrostatic interactions as well as polarization of both the quantum region and the environment. Using response theory, molecular properties such as excitation energies and oscillator strengths can be obtained. The PE-MC-srDFT method and the additional terms required for linear response have been implemented in a development version of DALTON. To benchmark the PE-MC-srDFT approach against the literature data, we have investigated the low-lying electronic excitations of acetone and uracil, both immersed in water solution. The PE-MC-srDFT results are consistent and accurate, both in terms of the calculated solvent shift and, unlike regular PE-MCSCF, also with respect to the individual absolute excitation energies. To demonstrate the capabilities of PE-MC-srDFT, we also investigated the retinylidene Schiff base chromophore embedded in the channelrhodopsin protein. While using a much more compact reference wave function in terms of active space, our PE-MC-srDFT approach yields excitation energies comparable in quality to CASSCF/CASPT2 benchmarks.

  19. Polarizable embedding with a multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory linear response method.

    PubMed

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Knecht, Stefan; Kongsted, Jacob; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2015-03-21

    We present here the coupling of a polarizable embedding (PE) model to the recently developed multiconfiguration short-range density functional theory method (MC-srDFT), which can treat multiconfigurational systems with a simultaneous account for dynamical and static correlation effects. PE-MC-srDFT is designed to combine efficient treatment of complicated electronic structures with inclusion of effects from the surrounding environment. The environmental effects encompass classical electrostatic interactions as well as polarization of both the quantum region and the environment. Using response theory, molecular properties such as excitation energies and oscillator strengths can be obtained. The PE-MC-srDFT method and the additional terms required for linear response have been implemented in a development version of Dalton. To benchmark the PE-MC-srDFT approach against the literature data, we have investigated the low-lying electronic excitations of acetone and uracil, both immersed in water solution. The PE-MC-srDFT results are consistent and accurate, both in terms of the calculated solvent shift and, unlike regular PE-MCSCF, also with respect to the individual absolute excitation energies. To demonstrate the capabilities of PE-MC-srDFT, we also investigated the retinylidene Schiff base chromophore embedded in the channelrhodopsin protein. While using a much more compact reference wave function in terms of active space, our PE-MC-srDFT approach yields excitation energies comparable in quality to CASSCF/CASPT2 benchmarks.

  20. Responses to a modified visual cliff by pre-walking infants born preterm and at term.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Shan; Reilly, Marie; Mercer, Vicki S

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, using a modified visual cliff apparatus, possible perceptual differences at crawling age between infants born preterm and infants born at term without documented visual or motor impairments. Sixteen infants born at term and 16 born preterm were encouraged to crawl to their caregivers on a modified visual cliff. Successful trials, crossing time, duration of visual attention, duration of tactile exploration, motor strategies, and avoidance behaviors were analyzed. A significant surface effect was found, with longer crossing times and longer durations of visual attention and tactile exploration in the condition with the visual appearance of a deep cliff. Although the two groups of infants did not differ on any of the timed measures, infants born at term demonstrated a larger number of motor strategies and avoidance behaviors by simple tally. This study indicates that infants born at term and those born preterm can perceive a visual cliff and adapt their responses accordingly.

  1. Genetically modified enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines induce mucosal immune responses without inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Alexandra; Randall, Roger; Darsley, Michael; Choudhry, Naheed; Thomas, Nicola; Sanderson, Ian R; Croft, Nick M; Kelly, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Objective Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of acute diarrhoea in children in the developing world, in travellers and in the military. Safe, effective vaccines could reduce morbidity and mortality. As immunity to ETEC is strain specific, the ability to create vaccines in vitro which express multiple antigens would be desirable. It was hypothesised that three genetically attenuated ETEC strains, one with a genetic addition, would be immunogenic and safe, and they were evaluated in the first licensed UK release of genetically modified oral vaccines. Methods Phase 1 studies of safety and immunogenicity were carried out at a Teaching Hospital in London. Varying oral doses of any of three oral vaccines, or placebo, were administered to volunteers of both sexes (n = 98). Peripheral blood responses were measured as serum antibodies (IgG or IgA) by ELISA, antibody‐secreting cell (ASC) responses by enzyme‐linked immunospot (ELISPOT), and antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS) by ELISA. Mucosal antibody secretion was measured by ELISA for specific IgG and IgA in whole gut lavage fluids (WGLFs). Results Significant mucosal IgA responses were obtained to colonisation factors CFA/I, CS1, CS2 and CS3, both when naturally expressed and when genetically inserted. Dose–response relationships were most clearly evident in the mucosal IgA in WGLF. Vaccines were well tolerated and did not elicit interleukin (IL) 8 or IL6 secretion in WGLF. Conclusions Genetically modified ETEC vaccines are safe and induce significant mucosal IgA responses to important colonisation factors. Mucosal IgA responses were clearly seen in WGLF, which is useful for evaluating oral vaccines. PMID:17566016

  2. Time-dependent current-density-functional theory for the linear response of weakly disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, C. A.; Vignale, G.

    2002-05-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDFT) provides a way of calculating, in principle exactly, the linear response of interacting many-electron systems, and thus allows one to obtain their excitation energies. For extended systems, there exist excitations of a collective nature, such as bulk and surface plasmons in metals or intersubband plasmons in doped semiconductor quantum wells. This paper develops a quantitatively accurate first-principles description for the frequency and the linewidth of such excitations in inhomogeneous weakly disordered systems. A finite linewidth in general has intrinsic and extrinsic sources. At low temperatures and outside the region where electron-phonon interaction occurs, the only intrinsic damping mechanism is provided by electron-electron interaction. This kind of intrinsic damping can be described within TDFT, but one needs to go beyond the adiabatic approximation and include retardation effects. It has been shown [G. Vignale, C. A. Ullrich, and S. Conti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4878 (1997)] that a density-functional response theory that is local in space but nonlocal in time has to be constructed in terms of the currents, rather than the density. This theory will be reviewed in the first part of this paper. For quantitatively accurate linewidths, extrinsic dissipation mechanisms, such as impurities or disorder, have to be included in the response theory. In the second part of this paper, we discuss how extrinsic dissipation can be described within the so-called memory-function formalism. This formalism will first be introduced and reviewed for homogeneous systems. We will then present a synthesis of TDFT with the memory function formalism for inhomogeneous systems, which allows one to simultaneously account for intrinsic and extrinsic damping of collective excitations. As an example where both sources of dissipation are important and where high-quality experimental data are available for comparison, we discuss intersubband

  3. Scalability of the LEU-Modified Cintichem Process: 3-MeV Van de Graaff and 35-MeV Electron Linear Accelerator Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rotsch, David A.; Brossard, Tom; Roussin, Ethan; Quigley, Kevin; Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, Roman; Jonah, Charles; Hafenrichter, Lohman; Tkac, Peter; Krebs, John; Vandegrift, George F.

    2016-10-31

    Molybdenum-99, the mother of Tc-99m, can be produced from fission of U-235 in nuclear reactors and purified from fission products by the Cintichem process, later modified for low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets. The key step in this process is the precipitation of Mo with α-benzoin oxime (ABO). The stability of this complex to radiation has been examined. Molybdenum-ABO was irradiated with 3 MeV electrons produced by a Van de Graaff generator and 35 MeV electrons produced by a 50 MeV/25 kW electron linear accelerator. Dose equivalents of 1.7–31.2 kCi of Mo-99 were administered to freshly prepared Mo-ABO. Irradiated samples of Mo-ABO were processed according to the LEU Modified-Cintichem process. The Van de Graaff data indicated good radiation stability of the Mo-ABO complex up to ~15 kCi dose equivalents of Mo-99 and nearly complete destruction at doses >24 kCi Mo-99. The linear accelerator data indicate that even at 6.2 kCi of Mo-99 equivalence of dose, the sample lost ~20% of Mo-99. The 20% loss of Mo-99 at this low dose may be attributed to thermal decomposition of the product from the heat deposited in the sample during irradiation.

  4. Influence of Cutting Time on Brush Response: Implications for Herbivory in Linear (Transportation) Corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Roy V.; Child, Kenneth N.; Spata, David P.; MacDonald, Douglas

    2007-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the influence the time of brush-cutting can have on plant regrowth and attractiveness to herbivores that browse in linear corridors. The influence of cutting time on leaf flush and senescence, shoot morphometry, and biomass was measured for 3 consecutive years after initial brush-cutting. Results indicate that morphological and phenological attributes of three woody deciduous plants were influenced by the timing of brush-cutting for up to 3 years after initial cutting. Brush-cutting generally stimulated plants to produce larger than normal shoots and delay leaf senescence. The degree to which plants were affected, however, varied with the timing of initial cutting and the species in question. Generally, plants cut later in the year resprouted more vigorously and were taller in the third year after cutting but produced less overall biomass than when cut earlier. In the years following brush-cutting, plants cut earlier flushed leaves earlier in the spring but delayed leaf senescence in the fall when compared to uncut controls. Results of these trials suggest that brush-cutting time influences plant response and several plant attributes known to influence plant attractiveness to moose and other herbivores. We therefore recommend that roadside and railside vegetation management plans consider the influence of cutting time on plant regrowth. Such considerations can ensure that brush is cut to reduce the attractiveness of plant regrowth in these linear corridors, reduce the utilization of such brush by herbivores, and, as such, mitigate collision risk between motorists and herbivores such as moose.

  5. Factors limiting the linearity of response of tissue equivalent proportional counters used in micro- and nano-dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, T. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Proportional counters filled with tissue equivalent gas mixtures are extremely useful instruments and are being used extensively as sensitive detectors for all types of radiations to measure the energy transferred to small tissue volumes. The linearity of their response is of primary importance. So the investigation and clarification of the physical phenomena taking place in the counter and of the limits within which useful results may be obtained would contribute to a more efficient use and a wider application of these counters. The linearity of response in the dose and in the gas gain has been determined. Linearity in the dose is limited by the total count rate effect, while linearity in the gas gain is limited by secondary processes occurring in the electron avalanche and by the self-induced space charge effect.

  6. Temperature and humidity modify airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Amirav, I; Plit, M

    1989-11-01

    The airway response to inhaled histamine is known to be influenced by various stimuli (e.g., infection, ozone). Temperature (T) has been shown to affect it in vitro. We studied whether T and humidity (H) modify airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects. Twelve normal subjects 21 to 46 yr of age (mean age, 29 yr) performed two similar histamine inhalation tests, the only difference being the conditions of the inspired air. One test was done while breathing cold dry air (mean T +/- SEM, -17.3 +/- 1.8 degrees C; relative H, 0%), and the other while breathing warm humid air (mean T +/- SEM, 33.9 +/- 0.5 degrees C; relative H, 100%). Whereas the geometric mean histamine concentration required to produce a 15% fall in FEV1 in the warm humid tests was 22.7 mg/ml, it was 11.9 mg/ml in the cold dry test (p less than 0.01). It is concluded that the T and H of inspired air modify the airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects.

  7. Fracture prediction using modified mohr coulomb theory for non-linear strain paths using AA3104-H19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Robert; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2016-08-01

    Experiment results from uniaxial tensile tests, bi-axial bulge tests, and disk compression tests for a beverage can AA3104-H19 material are presented. The results from the experimental tests are used to determine material coefficients for both Yld2000 and Yld2004 models. Finite element simulations are developed to study the influence of materials model on the predicted earing profile. It is shown that only the YLD2004 model is capable of accurately predicting the earing profile as the YLD2000 model only predicts 4 ears. Excellent agreement with the experimental data for earing is achieved using the AA3104-H19 material data and the Yld2004 constitutive model. Mechanical tests are also conducted on the AA3104-H19 to generate fracture data under different stress triaxiality conditions. Tensile tests are performed on specimens with a central hole and notched specimens. Torsion of a double bridge specimen is conducted to generate points near pure shear conditions. The Nakajima test is utilized to produce points in bi-axial tension. The data from the experiments is used to develop the fracture locus in the principal strain space. Mapping from principal strain space to stress triaxiality space, principal stress space, and polar effective plastic strain space is accomplished using a generalized mapping technique. Finite element modeling is used to validate the Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) fracture model in the polar space. Models of a hole expansion during cup drawing and a cup draw/reverse redraw/expand forming sequence demonstrate the robustness of the modified PEPS fracture theory for the condition with nonlinear forming paths and accurately predicts the onset of failure. The proposed methods can be widely used for predicting failure for the examples which undergo nonlinear strain path including rigid-packaging and automotive forming.

  8. Continuous multi-modality brain imaging reveals modified neurovascular seizure response after intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ringuette, Dene; Jeffrey, Melanie A.; Dufour, Suzie; Carlen, Peter L.; Levi, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    We developed a multi-modal brain imaging system to investigate the relationship between blood flow, blood oxygenation/volume, intracellular calcium and electrographic activity during acute seizure-like events (SLEs), both before and after pharmacological intervention. Rising blood volume was highly specific to SLE-onset whereas blood flow was more correlated with all eletrographic activity. Intracellular calcium spiked between SLEs and at SLE-onset with oscillation during SLEs. Modified neurovascular and ionic SLE responses were observed after intervention and the interval between SLEs became shorter and more inconsistent. Comparison of artery and vein pulsatile flow suggest proximal interference and greater vascular leakage prior to intervention. PMID:28270990

  9. Europium- and lithium-doped yttrium oxide nanocrystals that provide a linear emissive response with X-ray radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Ian N; Belley, Matthew D; Nguyen, Giao; Rodrigues, Anna; Li, Yifan; Kirsch, David G; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Therien, Michael J

    2014-05-21

    Eu- and Li-doped yttrium oxide nanocrystals [Y2-xO3; Eux, Liy], in which Eu and Li dopant ion concentrations were systematically varied, were developed and characterized (TEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopic, UV-excited lifetime, and ICP-AES data) in order to define the most emissive compositions under specific X-ray excitation conditions. These optimized [Y2-xO3; Eux, Liy] compositions display scintillation responses that: (i) correlate linearly with incident radiation exposure at X-ray energies spanning from 40-220 kVp, and (ii) manifest no evidence of scintillation intensity saturation at the highest evaluated radiation exposures [up to 4 Roentgen per second]. For the most emissive nanoscale scintillator composition, [Y1.9O3; Eu0.1, Li0.16], excitation energies of 40, 120, and 220 kVp were chosen to probe the dependence of the integrated emission intensity upon X-ray exposure-rate in energy regimes having different mass-attenuation coefficients and where either the photoelectric or the Compton effect governs the scintillation mechanism. These experiments demonstrate for the first time for that for comparable radiation exposures, when the scintillation mechanism is governed by the photoelectric effect and a comparably larger mass-attenuation coefficient (120 kVp excitation), greater integrated emission intensities are recorded relative to excitation energies where the Compton effect regulates scintillation (220 kVp) in nanoscale [Y2-xO3; Eux] crystals. Nanoscale [Y1.9O3; Eu0.1, Li0.16] (70 ± 20 nm) was further exploited as a detector material in a prototype fiber-optic radiation sensor. The scintillation intensity from the [Y1.9O3; Eu0.1, Li0.16]-modified, 400 μm sized optical fiber tip, recorded using a CCD-photodetector and integrated over the 605-617 nm wavelength domain, was correlated with radiation exposure using a Precision XRAD 225Cx small-animal image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. For both 80 and 225 kVp energies, this radiotransparent device

  10. Cells responsible for tumor surveillance in man: effects of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and biologic response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Reizenstein, P.; Ogier, C.; Blomgren, H.; Petrini, B.; Wasserman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Currently, the most probable theory of tumor surveillance is neither the existence of any tumor-specific, antigen-dependent, T-cell-mediated cytotoxic effect that could eliminate spontaneous tumors in man and that could be used for some kind of vaccination against tumors, nor the complete absence of any surveillance or defense systems against tumors. What is probable is the cooperation of a number of antigen-independent, relatively weakly cytotoxic or possibly only cytostatic humoral and cellular effects, including nutritional immunity, tumor necrosis factor, certain cytokines, and the cytotoxic effects mediated by macrophages, NK cells, NK-like cells, and certain stimulated T-cells. One question remaining to be solved is why these antigen-independent effects do not attack normal cells. A number of plausible hypotheses are discussed. The hypothetical surveillance system is modulated both by traditional cancer treatment and by attempts at immunomodulation. Radiotherapy reduced the T-helper cell function for almost a decade, but not those of macrophages or NK cells. T-cell changes have no prognostic implication, supporting, perhaps, the suggestion of a major role for macrophages and NK cells. Cyclic adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the peripheral lymphocyte population and several lymphocyte functions but not NK activity. Most of the parameters were normalized some years following treatment, but NK activity remained elevated and Th/Ts cell ratio was still decreased. This might possibly be taken to support the surveillance role of NK cells. Bestatin increases the frequency of lymphocytes forming rosettes with sheep red blood cells (but not their mitogenic responses), enhances NK activity, and augments the phagocytic capacity of granulocytes and monocytes (but not their cytotoxic activity). 154 references.

  11. Gain in stochastic resonance: precise numerics versus linear response theory beyond the two-mode approximation.

    PubMed

    Casado-Pascual, Jesús; Denk, Claus; Gómez-Ordóñez, José; Morillo, Manuel; Hänggi, Peter

    2003-03-01

    In the context of the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), we study the correlation function, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the ratio of output over input SNR, i.e., the gain, which is associated to the nonlinear response of a bistable system driven by time-periodic forces and white Gaussian noise. These quantifiers for SR are evaluated using the techniques of linear response theory (LRT) beyond the usually employed two-mode approximation scheme. We analytically demonstrate within such an extended LRT description that the gain can indeed not exceed unity. We implement an efficient algorithm, based on work by Greenside and Helfand (detailed in the Appendix), to integrate the driven Langevin equation over a wide range of parameter values. The predictions of LRT are carefully tested against the results obtained from numerical solutions of the corresponding Langevin equation over a wide range of parameter values. We further present an accurate procedure to evaluate the distinct contributions of the coherent and incoherent parts of the correlation function to the SNR and the gain. As a main result we show for subthreshold driving that both the correlation function and the SNR can deviate substantially from the predictions of LRT and yet the gain can be either larger or smaller than unity. In particular, we find that the gain can exceed unity in the strongly nonlinear regime which is characterized by weak noise and very slow multifrequency subthreshold input signals with a small duty cycle. This latter result is in agreement with recent analog simulation results by Gingl et al. [ICNF 2001, edited by G. Bosman (World Scientific, Singapore, 2002), pp. 545-548; Fluct. Noise Lett. 1, L181 (2001)].

  12. Design and sample size for evaluating combinations of drugs of linear and loglinear dose-response curves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hong-Bin; Tian, Guo-Liang; Li, Wei; Tan, Ming

    2009-07-01

    The study of drug combinations has become important in drug development due to its potential for efficacy at lower, less toxic doses and the need to move new therapies rapidly into clinical trials. The goal is to identify which combinations are additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Although there exists statistical framework for finding doses and sample sizes needed to detect departure from additivity, e.g., the power maximized F-test, different classes of drugs of different does-response shapes require different derivation for calculating sample size and finding doses. Motivated by two anticancer combination studies that we are involved with, this article proposes dose-finding and sample size method for detecting departures from additivity of two drugs with linear and log-linear single dose-response curves. The first study involves combination of two drugs, where one single drug dose-response curve is linear and the other is log-linear. The second study involves combinations of drugs whose single drug dose-response curves are linear. The experiment had been planned with the common fixed ratio design before we were consulted, but the resulting data missed the synergistic combinations. However, the experiment based on the proposed design was able to identify the synergistic combinations as anticipated. Thus we shall summarize the analysis of the data collected according to the proposed design and discuss why the commonly used fixed ratio method failed and the implications of the proposed method for other combination studies.

  13. A Bayesian approach for inducing sparsity in generalized linear models with multi-category response

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The dimension and complexity of high-throughput gene expression data create many challenges for downstream analysis. Several approaches exist to reduce the number of variables with respect to small sample sizes. In this study, we utilized the Generalized Double Pareto (GDP) prior to induce sparsity in a Bayesian Generalized Linear Model (GLM) setting. The approach was evaluated using a publicly available microarray dataset containing 99 samples corresponding to four different prostate cancer subtypes. Results A hierarchical Sparse Bayesian GLM using GDP prior (SBGG) was developed to take into account the progressive nature of the response variable. We obtained an average overall classification accuracy between 82.5% and 94%, which was higher than Support Vector Machine, Random Forest or a Sparse Bayesian GLM using double exponential priors. Additionally, SBGG outperforms the other 3 methods in correctly identifying pre-metastatic stages of cancer progression, which can prove extremely valuable for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Importantly, using Geneset Cohesion Analysis Tool, we found that the top 100 genes produced by SBGG had an average functional cohesion p-value of 2.0E-4 compared to 0.007 to 0.131 produced by the other methods. Conclusions Using GDP in a Bayesian GLM model applied to cancer progression data results in better subclass prediction. In particular, the method identifies pre-metastatic stages of prostate cancer with substantially better accuracy and produces more functionally relevant gene sets. PMID:26423345

  14. Path-following analysis of the dynamical response of a piecewise-linear capsule system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez Chávez, Joseph; Liu, Yang; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina; Wiercigroch, Marian

    2016-08-01

    The dynamical response of a piecewise-linear capsule system is studied by means of path-following techniques in this paper. As the capsule model belongs to the class of piecewise-smooth dynamical systems involving impact and friction, a special care is taken in order to divide the trajectory of the system into a smooth vector field in each disjoint subregion. Specifically we study a two-sided drifting system focusing on directional control and energy consumption. We aim to address two practical problems which are maximizing the rate of progression and directional control of the system by following a typical period-1 trajectory. The one-parameter analysis shows that two types of bifurcations, grazing bifurcation and boundary-intersection crossing bifurcation are found, and the maximal rate of progression is achieved when the capsule performs the oscillations without sticking phases. In our two-parameter study, the control parameters for which the rate of progression is maximal are identified using fixed value of power consumption, and the curves which divide the motion of the capsule between forward and backward progression are obtained.

  15. Non-Linear Optical Response Simulations for Strongly Corellated Hybrid Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliksetyan, Areg; Bondarev, Igor; Gelin, Maxim

    2013-03-01

    Hybrid carbon nanotube systems, nanotubes containing extrinsic atomic type species (dopants) such as semiconductor quantum dots, extrinsic atoms, or ions, are promising candidates for the development of the new generation of tunable nanooptoelectronic devices - both application oriented, e.g., photovoltaic devices of improved light-harvesting efficiency, and devices for use in fundamental research. Here, we simulate non-linear optical response signals for a pair of spatially separated two-level dipole emitters (to model the dopants above) in the regime where they are coupled strongly to a low-energy surface plasmon resonance of a metallic carbon nanotube. Such a coupling makes them entangled, and we show that the cross-peaks in 2D photon-echo spectra are indicative of the bipartite entanglement being present in the system. We simulate various experimental conditions and formulate practical recommendations for the reliable experimental observation of this unique quantum phenomenon of relevance to the solid-state quantum information science. ARO-W911NF-11-1-0189 (AM), DOE-DE-SC0007117 (IB), DFG-MAP (MG)

  16. Linear ground-water flow, flood-wave response program for programmable calculators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kernodle, John Michael

    1978-01-01

    Two programs are documented which solve a discretized analytical equation derived to determine head changes at a point in a one-dimensional ground-water flow system. The programs, written for programmable calculators, are in widely divergent but commonly encountered languages and serve to illustrate the adaptability of the linear model to use in situations where access to true computers is not possible or economical. The analytical method assumes a semi-infinite aquifer which is uniform in thickness and hydrologic characteristics, bounded on one side by an impermeable barrier and on the other parallel side by a fully penetrating stream in complete hydraulic connection with the aquifer. Ground-water heads may be calculated for points along a line which is perpendicular to the impermeable barrie and the fully penetrating stream. Head changes at the observation point are dependent on (1) the distance between that point and the impermeable barrier, (2) the distance between the line of stress (the stream) and the impermeable barrier, (3) aquifer diffusivity, (4) time, and (5) head changes along the line of stress. The primary application of the programs is to determine aquifer diffusivity by the flood-wave response technique. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Calculation of excitation energies from the CC2 linear response theory using Cholesky decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Baudin, Pablo; Marín, José Sánchez; Cuesta, Inmaculada García; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M. J.

    2014-03-14

    A new implementation of the approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles CC2 linear response model is reported. It employs a Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals that significantly reduces the computational cost and the storage requirements of the method compared to standard implementations. Our algorithm also exploits a partitioning form of the CC2 equations which reduces the dimension of the problem and avoids the storage of doubles amplitudes. We present calculation of excitation energies of benzene using a hierarchy of basis sets and compare the results with conventional CC2 calculations. The reduction of the scaling is evaluated as well as the effect of the Cholesky decomposition parameter on the quality of the results. The new algorithm is used to perform an extrapolation to complete basis set investigation on the spectroscopically interesting benzylallene conformers. A set of calculations on medium-sized molecules is carried out to check the dependence of the accuracy of the results on the decomposition thresholds. Moreover, CC2 singlet excitation energies of the free base porphin are also presented.

  18. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A.; Cahyna, P.

    2013-10-15

    The interaction of static Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) with the plasma flows is modeled in toroidal geometry, using the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, which includes the X-point and the scrape-off-layer. Two-fluid diamagnetic effects, the neoclassical poloidal friction and a source of toroidal rotation are introduced in the model to describe realistic plasma flows. RMP penetration is studied taking self-consistently into account the effects of these flows and the radial electric field evolution. JET-like, MAST, and ITER parameters are used in modeling. For JET-like parameters, three regimes of plasma response are found depending on the plasma resistivity and the diamagnetic rotation: at high resistivity and slow rotation, the islands generated by the RMPs at the edge resonant surfaces rotate in the ion diamagnetic direction and their size oscillates. At faster rotation, the generated islands are static and are more screened by the plasma. An intermediate regime with static islands which slightly oscillate is found at lower resistivity. In ITER simulations, the RMPs generate static islands, which forms an ergodic layer at the very edge (ψ≥0.96) characterized by lobe structures near the X-point and results in a small strike point splitting on the divertor targets. In MAST Double Null Divertor geometry, lobes are also found near the X-point and the 3D-deformation of the density and temperature profiles is observed.

  19. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT.

    PubMed

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; Govind, Niranjan; Yang, Chao; Saad, Yousef; Ng, Esmond G

    2015-11-10

    We present a special symmetric Lanczos algorithm and a kernel polynomial method (KPM) for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within the linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework in the product form. In contrast to existing algorithms, the new algorithms are based on reformulating the original non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem as a product eigenvalue problem and the observation that the product eigenvalue problem is self-adjoint with respect to an appropriately chosen inner product. This allows a simple symmetric Lanczos algorithm to be used to compute the desired absorption spectrum. The use of a symmetric Lanczos algorithm only requires half of the memory compared with the nonsymmetric variant of the Lanczos algorithm. The symmetric Lanczos algorithm is also numerically more stable than the nonsymmetric version. The KPM algorithm is also presented as a low-memory alternative to the Lanczos approach, but the algorithm may require more matrix-vector multiplications in practice. We discuss the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost. Applications to a set of small and medium-sized molecules are also presented.

  20. Energy loss of ions in a magnetized plasma: conformity between linear response and binary collision treatments.

    PubMed

    Nersisyan, H B; Zwicknagel, G; Toepffer, C

    2003-02-01

    The energy loss of a heavy ion moving in a magnetized electron plasma is considered within the linear response (LR) and binary collision (BC) treatments with the purpose to look for a connection between these two models. These two complementary approaches yield close results if no magnetic field is present, but there develop discrepancies with growing magnetic field at ion velocities that are lower than, or comparable with, the thermal velocity of the electrons. We show that this is a peculiarity of the Coulomb interaction which requires cutoff procedures to account for its singularity at the origin and its infinite range. The cutoff procedures in the LR and BC treatments are different as the order of integrations in velocity and in ordinary (Fourier) spaces is reversed in both treatments. While BC involves a velocity average of Coulomb logarithms, there appear in LR Coulomb logarithms of velocity averaged cutoffs. The discrepancies between LR and BC vanish, except for small contributions of collective modes, for smoothened potentials that require no cutoffs. This is shown explicitly with the help of an improved BC in which the velocity transfer is treated up to second order in the interaction in Fourier space.

  1. Adding salt to a surfactant solution: Linear rheological response of the resulting morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudino, Danila; Pasquino, Rossana Grizzuti, Nino

    2015-11-15

    The micellar system composed of Cetylpyridinium Chloride-Sodium Salicylate (CPyCl-NaSal) in brine aqueous solutions has been studied by systematically changing the salt concentration, in order to investigate the rheology of the arising morphologies. In particular, the zero-shear viscosity and the linear viscoelastic response have been measured as a function of the NaSal concentration (with [CPyCl] = 100 mM). The Newtonian viscosity shows a nonmonotonic dependence upon concentration, passing through a maximum at NaSal/CPyCl ≈ 0.6, and eventually dropping at higher salt concentrations. The progressive addition of salt determines first a transition from a Newtonian to a purely Maxwell-like behavior as the length of the micelles significantly increases. Beyond the peak viscosity, the viscoelastic data show two distinct features. On the one hand, the main relaxation time of the system strongly decreases, while the plateau modulus remains essentially constant. Calculations based on the rheological data show that, as the binding salt concentration increases, there is a decrease in micelles breaking rate and a decrease in their average length. On the other hand, in the same concentration region, a low-frequency elastic plateau is measured. Such a plateau is considered as the signature of a tenuous, but persistent branched network, whose existence is confirmed by cryo-transmission electron microscopy images.

  2. Linear-response reflection coefficient of the recorder air-jet amplifier.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Johnston, William A; McKinnon, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    In a duct-flute such as the recorder, steady-state oscillations are controlled by two parameters, the blowing pressure and the frequency of the acoustic resonator. As in most feedback oscillators, the oscillation amplitude is determined by gain-saturation of the amplifier, and thus it cannot be controlled independently of blowing pressure and frequency unless the feedback loop is opened. In this work, the loop is opened by replacing the recorder body with a waveguide reflectometer: a section of transmission line with microphones, a signal source, and an absorbing termination. When the mean flow from the air-jet into the transmission line is not blocked, the air-jet amplifier is unstable to edge-tone oscillations through a feedback path that does not involve the acoustic resonator. When it is blocked, the air-jet is deflected somewhat outward and the system becomes stable. It is then possible to measure the reflection coefficient of the air-jet amplifier versus blowing pressure and acoustic frequency under linear response conditions, avoiding the complication of gain-saturation. The results provide a revealing test of flute drive models under the simplest conditions and with few unknown parameters. The strengths and weaknesses of flute drive models are discussed.

  3. Materials and noncoplanar mesh designs for integrated circuits with linear elastic responses to extreme mechanical deformations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Song, Jizhou; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Hoon-Sik; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Liu, Zhuangjian; Huang, Yonggang Y.; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Zhang, Yong-wei; Rogers, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems that offer elastic mechanical responses to high-strain deformations are of growing interest because of their ability to enable new biomedical devices and other applications whose requirements are impossible to satisfy with conventional wafer-based technologies or even with those that offer simple bendability. This article introduces materials and mechanical design strategies for classes of electronic circuits that offer extremely high stretchability, enabling them to accommodate even demanding configurations such as corkscrew twists with tight pitch (e.g., 90° in ≈1 cm) and linear stretching to “rubber-band” levels of strain (e.g., up to ≈140%). The use of single crystalline silicon nanomaterials for the semiconductor provides performance in stretchable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits approaching that of conventional devices with comparable feature sizes formed on silicon wafers. Comprehensive theoretical studies of the mechanics reveal the way in which the structural designs enable these extreme mechanical properties without fracturing the intrinsically brittle active materials or even inducing significant changes in their electrical properties. The results, as demonstrated through electrical measurements of arrays of transistors, CMOS inverters, ring oscillators, and differential amplifiers, suggest a valuable route to high-performance stretchable electronics. PMID:19015528

  4. Linear-response reflection coefficient of the recorder air-jet amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, John C.; Johnston, William A.; McKinnon, Daniel D.

    2015-11-01

    In a duct-flute such as the recorder, steady-state oscillations are controlled by two parameters, the blowing pressure and the frequency of the acoustic resonator. As in most feedback oscillators, the oscillation amplitude is determined by gain-saturation of the amplifier, and thus it cannot be controlled independently of blowing pressure and frequency unless the feedback loop is opened. In this work, the loop is opened by replacing the recorder body with a waveguide reflectometer: a section of transmission line with microphones, a signal source, and an absorbing termination. When the mean flow from the air-jet into the transmission line is not blocked, the air-jet amplifier is unstable to edge-tone oscillations through a feedback path that does not involve the acoustic resonator. When it is blocked, the air-jet is deflected somewhat outward and the system becomes stable. It is then possible to measure the reflection coefficient of the air-jet amplifier versus blowing pressure and acoustic frequency under linear response conditions, avoiding the complication of gain-saturation. The results provide a revealing test of flute drive models under the simplest conditions and with few unknown parameters. The strengths and weaknesses of flute drive models are discussed.

  5. Stimulus experience modifies auditory neuromagnetic responses in young and older listeners

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Bernhard; Tremblay, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    Experiencing repeatedly presented auditory stimuli during magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recording may affect how the sound is processed in the listener’s brain and may modify auditory evoked responses over the time course of the experiment. Amplitudes of N1 and P2 responses have been proposed as indicators for the outcome of training and learning studies. In this context the effect of merely sound experience on N1 and P2 responses was studied during two experimental sessions on different days with young, middle-aged, and older participants passively listening to speech stimuli and a noise sound. N1 and P2 were characterized as functionally distinct responses with P2 sources located more anterior than N1 in auditory cortices. N1 amplitudes decreased continuously during each recording session, but completely recovered between sessions. In contrast, P2 amplitudes were fairly constant within a session but increased from the first to the second day of MEG recording. Whereas N1 decrease was independent of age, the amount of P2 amplitude increase diminished with age. Temporal dynamics of N1 and P2 amplitudes were interpreted as reflecting neuroplastic changes along different time scales. The long lasting increase in P2 amplitude indicates that the auditory P2 response is potentially an important physiological correlate of perceptual learning, memory, and training. PMID:19110047

  6. Accounting for uncertainty in confounder and effect modifier selection when estimating average causal effects in generalized linear models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi; Dominici, Francesca; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Zigler, Corwin Matthew

    2015-09-01

    Confounder selection and adjustment are essential elements of assessing the causal effect of an exposure or treatment in observational studies. Building upon work by Wang et al. (2012, Biometrics 68, 661-671) and Lefebvre et al. (2014, Statistics in Medicine 33, 2797-2813), we propose and evaluate a Bayesian method to estimate average causal effects in studies with a large number of potential confounders, relatively few observations, likely interactions between confounders and the exposure of interest, and uncertainty on which confounders and interaction terms should be included. Our method is applicable across all exposures and outcomes that can be handled through generalized linear models. In this general setting, estimation of the average causal effect is different from estimation of the exposure coefficient in the outcome model due to noncollapsibility. We implement a Bayesian bootstrap procedure to integrate over the distribution of potential confounders and to estimate the causal effect. Our method permits estimation of both the overall population causal effect and effects in specified subpopulations, providing clear characterization of heterogeneous exposure effects that may vary considerably across different covariate profiles. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed method performs well in small sample size situations with 100-150 observations and 50 covariates. The method is applied to data on 15,060 US Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor between 2000 and 2009 to evaluate whether surgery reduces hospital readmissions within 30 days of diagnosis.

  7. Time dependent viscoelastic rheological response of pure, modified and synthetic bituminous binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airey, G. D.; Grenfell, J. R. A.; Apeagyei, A.; Subhy, A.; Lo Presti, D.

    2016-08-01

    Bitumen is a viscoelastic material that exhibits both elastic and viscous components of response and displays both a temperature and time dependent relationship between applied stresses and resultant strains. In addition, as bitumen is responsible for the viscoelastic behaviour of all bituminous materials, it plays a dominant role in defining many of the aspects of asphalt road performance, such as strength and stiffness, permanent deformation and cracking. Although conventional bituminous materials perform satisfactorily in most highway pavement applications, there are situations that require the modification of the binder to enhance the properties of existing asphalt material. The best known form of modification is by means of polymer modification, traditionally used to improve the temperature and time susceptibility of bitumen. Tyre rubber modification is another form using recycled crumb tyre rubber to alter the properties of conventional bitumen. In addition, alternative binders (synthetic polymeric binders as well as renewable, environmental-friendly bio-binders) have entered the bitumen market over the last few years due to concerns over the continued availability of bitumen from current crudes and refinery processes. This paper provides a detailed rheological assessment, under both temperature and time regimes, of a range of conventional, modified and alternative binders in terms of the materials dynamic (oscillatory) viscoelastic response. The rheological results show the improved viscoelastic properties of polymer- and rubber-modified binders in terms of increased complex shear modulus and elastic response, particularly at high temperatures and low frequencies. The synthetic binders were found to demonstrate complex rheological behaviour relative to that seen for conventional bituminous binders.

  8. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications.

  9. Platelets: versatile modifiers of innate and adaptive immune responses to transplants

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, William M; Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Morrell, Craig N

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the last decade, there has been mounting experimental data demonstrating that platelets contribute to acute vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on recent findings that link platelets to inflammatory responses of relevance to transplants. Recent findings Although it has been known that platelets modify vascular inflammation by secretion of soluble mediators and release of microparticles, new aspects of these mechanisms are being defined. For example, platelet-derived RANTES (CCL5) not only functions in homomers, but also forms more potent heteromers with Platelet Factor 4 (CXCL4). This heteromer formation can be inhibited with small molecules. New findings also demonstrate heterologous interactions of platelet microparticles with leukocytes that may increase their range of impact. By attaching to neutrophils, platelet microparticles appear to migrate out of blood vessels and into other compartments where they stimulate secretion of cytokines. Contact of platelets with extracellular matrix also can result in cleavage of hyaluronan into fragments that serve as an endogenous danger signal. Summary Recent findings have expanded the range of interactions by which platelets can modify innate and adaptive immune responses to transplants. PMID:21157344

  10. Effects of Modified Multistage Field Test on Performance and Physiological Responses in Wheelchair Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Weissland, Thierry; Faupin, Arnaud; Borel, Benoit; Berthoin, Serge; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    A bioenergetical analysis of manoeuvrability and agility performance for wheelchair players is inexistent. It was aimed at comparing the physiological responses and performance obtained from the octagon multistage field test (MFT) and the modified condition in “8 form” (MFT-8). Sixteen trained wheelchair basketball players performed both tests in randomized condition. The levels performed (end-test score), peak values of oxygen uptake (VO2peak), minute ventilation (VEpeak), heart rate (HRpeak), peak and relative blood lactate (Δ[Lact−] = peak – rest values), and the perceived rating exertion (RPE) were measured. MFT-8 induced higher VO2peak and VEpeak values compared to MFT (VO2peak: 2.5 ± 0.6 versus 2.3 ± 0.6 L·min−1 and VEpeak: 96.3 ± 29.1 versus 86.6 ± 23.4 L·min−1; P < 0.05) with no difference in other parameters. Significant relations between VEpeak and end-test score were correlated for both field tests (P < 0.05). At exhaustion, MFT attained incompletely VO2peak and VEpeak. Among experienced wheelchair players, MFT-8 had no effect on test performance but generates higher physiological responses than MFT. It could be explained by demands of wheelchair skills occurring in 8 form during the modified condition. PMID:25802841

  11. Development of an ultrasound-responsive and mannose-modified gene carrier for DNA vaccine therapy.

    PubMed

    Un, Keita; Kawakami, Shigeru; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2010-10-01

    Development of a gene delivery system to transfer the gene of interest selectively and efficiently into targeted cells is essential for achievement of sufficient therapeutic effects by gene therapy. Here, we succeeded in developing the gene transfection method using ultrasound (US)-responsive and mannose-modified gene carriers, named Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes. Compared with the conventional lipofection method using mannose-modified carriers, this transfection method using Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes and US exposure enabled approximately 500-800-fold higher gene expressions in the antigen presenting cells (APCs) selectively in vivo. This enhanced gene expression was contributed by the improvement of delivering efficiency of nucleic acids to the targeted organs, and by the increase of introducing efficiency of nucleic acids into the cytoplasm followed by US exposure. Moreover, high anti-tumor effects were demonstrated by applying this method to DNA vaccine therapy using ovalbumin (OVA)-expressing plasmid DNA (pDNA). This US-responsive and cell-specific gene delivery system can be widely applied to medical treatments such as vaccine therapy and anti-inflammation therapy, which its targeted cells are APCs, and our findings may help in establishing innovative methods for in-vivo gene delivery to overcome the poor introducing efficiency of carriers into cytoplasm which the major obstacle associated with gene delivery by non-viral carriers.

  12. The effect of field modifier blocks on the fast photoneutron dose equivalent from two high-energy medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Hashemi-Malayeri, Bijan; Raisali, Gholamreza; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Sharafi, Ali Akbar; Jafarizadeh, Mansour

    2008-01-01

    High-energy linear accelerators (linacs) have several advantages, including low skin doses and high dose rates at deep-seated tumours. But, at energies more than 8 MeV, photonuclear reactions produce neutron contamination around the therapeutic beam, which may induce secondary malignancies. In spite of improvements achieved in medical linac designs, many countries still use conventional (non-intensity-modulated radiotherapy) linacs. Hence, in these conventional machines, fitting the beam over the treatment volume may require using blocks. Therefore, the effect of these devices on neutron production of linacs needs to be studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of field shaping blocks on photoneutron dose in the treatment plane for two high-energy medical linacs. Two medical linacs, a Saturn 43 (25 MeV) and an Elekta SL 75/25 (18 MeV), were studied. Polycarbonate (PC) films were used to measure the fluence of photoneutrons produced by these linacs. After electrochemical etching of the PC films, the neutron dose equivalent was calculated at the isocentre and 50 cm away from the isocentre. It was noted that by increasing the distance from the centre of the X-ray beam towards the periphery, the photoneutron dose equivalent decreases rapidly for both the open and blocked fields. Increasing the energy of the photons causes an increase in the amount of photoneutron dose equivalent. At 25 MeV photon energy, the lead blocks cause a meaningful increase in the dose equivalent of photoneutrons. In this research, a 30% increase was seen in neutron dose contribution to central axis dose at the isocentre of a 25 MeV irregular field shaped by lead blocks. It is concluded that lead blocks must be considered as a source of photoneutron production when treating irregular fields with high-energy photons.

  13. Evolution of Channels Draining Mount St. Helens: Linking Non-Linear and Rapid, Threshold Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.

    2010-12-01

    The catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens buried the valley of the North Fork Toutle River (NFT) to a depth of up to 140 m. Initial integration of a new drainage network took place episodically by the “filling and spilling” (from precipitation and seepage) of depressions formed during emplacement of the debris avalanche deposit. Channel incision to depths of 20-30 m occurred in the debris avalanche and extensive pyroclastic flow deposits, and headward migration of the channel network followed, with complete integration taking place within 2.5 years. Downstream reaches were converted from gravel-cobble streams with step-pool sequences to smoothed, infilled channels dominated by sand-sized materials. Subsequent channel evolution was dominated by channel widening with the ratio of changes in channel width to changes in channel depth ranging from about 60 to 100. Widening resulted in significant adjustment of hydraulic variables that control sediment-transport rates. For a given discharge over time, flow depths were reduced, relative roughness increased and flow velocity and boundary shear stress decreased non-linearly. These changes, in combination with coarsening of the channel bed with time resulted in systematically reduced rates of degradation (in upstream reaches), aggradation (in downstream reaches) and sediment-transport rates through much of the 1990s. Vertical adjustments were, therefore, easy to characterize with non-linear decay functions with bed-elevation attenuating with time. An empirical model of bed-level response was then created by plotting the total dimensionless change in elevation against river kilometer for both initial and secondary vertical adjustments. High magnitude events generated from the generated from upper part of the mountain, however, can cause rapid (threshold) morphologic changes. For example, a rain-on-snow event in November 2006 caused up to 9 m of incision along a 6.5 km reach of Loowit Creek and the upper NFT. The event

  14. Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLG) microparticles modify the immune response to DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Helson, Rebecca; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Singh, Manmohan; Megede, Jan Zur; Melero, Jose A; O'Hagan, Derek; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2008-02-06

    Priming with the major surface glycoprotein G of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) expressed by recombinant vaccinia leads to strong Th2 responses and lung eosinophilia during viral challenge. We now show that DNA vaccination in BALB/c mice with plasmids encoding G attenuated RSV replication but also enhanced disease with lung eosinophilia and increased IL-4/5 production. However, formulating the DNA with PLG microparticles reduced the severity of disease during RSV challenge without significantly lessening protection against viral replication. PLG formulation greatly reduced lung eosinophilia and prevented the induction of IL-4 and IL-5 during challenge, accompanied by a less marked CD4+ T cell response and a restoration of the CD8+ T cell recruitment seen during infection of non-vaccinated animals. After RSV challenge, lung eosinophilia was enhanced and prolonged in mice vaccinated with DNA encoding a secreted form of G; this effect was virtually prevented by PLG formulation. Therefore, PLG microparticulate formulation modifies the pattern of immune responses induced by DNA vaccination boosts CD8+ T cell priming and attenuates Th2 responses. We speculate that PLG microparticles affect antigen uptake and processing, thereby influencing the outcome of DNA vaccination.

  15. Functions Represented as Linear Sequential Data: Relationships between Presentation and Student Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayalon, Michal; Watson, Anne; Lerman, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates students' ways of attending to linear sequential data in two tasks, and conjectures possible relationships between those ways and elements of the task design. Drawing on the substantial literature about such situations, we focus for this paper on linear rate of change, and on covariation and correspondence approaches to…

  16. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency (F[subscript 0]) during anterior-posterior stretching. Method: Three materially linear and 3 materially nonlinear models were…

  17. Mild dehydration modifies the cerebrovascular response to the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Perry, Blake G; Bear, Tracey L K; Lucas, Samuel J E; Mündel, Toby

    2016-01-01

    The cold pressor test (CPT) is widely used in clinical practice and physiological research. It is characterized by a robust autonomic response, with associated increases in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and mean middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv(mean)). Hydration status is not commonly reported when conducting this test, yet blood viscosity alone can modulate MCAv(mean), potentially modifying the MCAv(mean) response to the CPT. We investigated the effect of mild dehydration on the physiological response to the CPT in 10 healthy men (mean ± SD: age 28 ± 5 years; body mass 83 ± 5 kg). All participants completed two CPTs, cold water (0°C) immersion of both feet for 90 s, with the order of the euhydration and dehydration trials counterbalanced. Beat-to-beat MCAv, MAP, HR and breath-by-breath partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (P(ET,CO2)) were measured continuously. Participants' pain perception was measured 1 min into the CPT using a visual analog scale (no pain = 0; maximal pain = 10). Dehydration significantly elevated plasma osmolality and urine specific gravity and reduced body mass (all P < 0.01). The MAP and HR responses were not different between treatments (both P > 0.05). After 90 s of immersion, the change in MCAv(mean) from baseline was less in the dehydration compared with the euhydration trial (change 0 ± 5 versus 7 ± 7 cm s(-1), P = 0.01), as was P(ET,CO2) (change -3 ± 2 versus 0 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.02). Dehydration was associated with greater relative pain sensation during the CPT (7.0 ± 1.3 vs 5.8 ± 1.8, P = 0.02). Our results demonstrate that mild dehydration can modify the cerebrovascular response to the CPT, with dehydration increasing perceived pain, lowering P ET ,CO2 and, ultimately, blunting the MCAv(mean) response.

  18. The role of retardation in the structure and linear response of finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Crecca, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional random phase approximation (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) calculations of nuclear structure and the linear response employ interactions between nucleons that are instantaneous. However, N-N interactions derived from the exchange of mesons between nucleons must depend on the space-time separation of the nucleons since the mesons travel at finite speeds. Furthermore, a quantum field theory that contains interacting meson and nucleon degrees of freedom employ the Feynman propagator, i{Delta}{sub F}(x - x{prime}), to connect the nucleon-meson vertices of Feynman diagrams. This raises the question of whether calculations done with space-time dependent interactions differ significantly from the conventional calculations that employ instantaneous forces, and what are the qualitative features of the difference. The inquiry into this question begins by generalizing the traditional RPA and TDA equations into the domain of retarded (space-time dependant) interactions. This entails establishing an integral equation (the Bethe-Salpeter equation) for the polarization propagator with the appropriate RPA or TDA kernel such that the integral equation reduces to the usual RPA or TDA matrix equation for the polarization propagator as the interaction becomes instantaneous. After establishing this generalization of the RPA and TDA, a TDA calculation is performed for an interaction arising from the exchange of a scalar meson. The results are compared with those obtained from the conventional instantaneous reduction of the scalar meson exchange interaction, the Yukawa potential. Upon comparing these results one finds that in general the nuclear structure obtained from scalar meson exchange differ little less than 10%.

  19. Self-consistent linear response for the spin-orbit interaction related properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyev, I. V.

    2014-07-01

    In many cases, the relativistic spin-orbit (SO) interaction can be regarded as a small perturbation to the electronic structure of solids and treated using regular perturbation theory. The major obstacle on this route comes from the fact that the SO interaction can also polarize the electron system and produce some additional contributions to the perturbation theory expansion, which arise from the electron-electron interactions in the same order of the SO coupling. In electronic structure calculations, it may even lead to the necessity of abandoning the perturbation theory and returning to the original self-consistent solution of Kohn-Sham-like equations with the effective potential v̂, incorporating simultaneously the effects of the electron-electron interactions and the SO coupling, even though the latter is small. In this work, we present the theory of self-consistent linear response (SCLR), which allows us to get rid of numerical self-consistency and formulate the last step fully analytically in the first order of the SO coupling. This strategy is applied to the unrestricted Hartree-Fock solution of an effective Hubbard-type model, derived from the first-principles electronic structure calculations in the basis of Wannier functions for the magnetically active states. We show that by using v̂, obtained in SCLR, one can successfully reproduce results of ordinary self-consistent calculations for the orbital magnetization and other properties, which emerge in the first order of the SO coupling. Particularly, SCLR appears to be an extremely useful approach for calculations of antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interactions based on the magnetic force theorem, where only by using the total perturbation one can make a reliable estimate for the DM parameters. Furthermore, due to the powerful 2n+1 theorem, the SCLR theory allows us to obtain the total energy change up to the third order of the SO coupling, which can be used in calculations of magnetic anisotropy

  20. Investigation of linear coupling between single-event blood flow responses and interictal discharges in a model of experimental epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vanzetta, Ivo; Flynn, Corey; Ivanov, Anton I; Bernard, Christophe; Bénar, Christian G

    2010-06-01

    A successful outcome of epilepsy neurosurgery relies on an accurate delineation of the epileptogenic region to be resected. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) would allow doing this noninvasively at high spatial resolution. However, a clear, quantitative description of the relationship between hemodynamic changes and the underlying epileptiform neuronal activity is still missing, thereby preventing the systematic use of fMRI for routine epilepsy surgery planning. To this aim, we used a local epilepsy model to record simultaneously cerebral blood flow (CBF) with laser Doppler (LD) and local field potentials (LFP) in rat frontal cortex. CBF responses to individual interictal-like spikes were large and robust. Their amplitude correlated linearly with spike amplitude. Moreover, the CBF response added linearly in time over a large range of spiking rates. CBF responses could thus be predicted by a linear model of the kind currently used for the interpretation of fMRI data, but including also the spikes' amplitudes as additional information. Predicted and measured CBF responses matched accurately. For high spiking frequencies (above approximately 0.2 Hz), the responses saturated but could eventually recover, indicating the presence of multiple neurovascular coupling mechanisms, which might act at different spatiotemporal scales. Spatially, CBF responses peaked at the center of epileptic activity and displayed a spatial specificity at least as good as the millimeter. These results suggest that simultaneous electroencephalographic and blood flow-based fMRI recordings should be suitable for the noninvasive precise localization of hyperexcitable regions in epileptic patients candidate for neurosurgery.

  1. Linear interference and the northern annular mode response to El Niño and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Christopher G.; Minokhin, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    The northern annular mode (NAM) characterizes a significant fraction of wintertime climate variability in the Northern Hemisphere. Understanding the processes governing changes in the NAM on interannual and longer timescales is therefore of critical importance. Previous work reveals a consensus around the negative NAM response to El Niño events (ELN), but considerable disagreement among model projections of the NAM response to climate change (CC), despite the tropical oceans warming in both cases. This work presents numerical simulations with two atmospheric GCMs that reveal robust opposite-signed NAM responses to prescribed sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies representing ELN (negative NAM) and CC (positive NAM). The primary driver of the sign and amplitude of the NAM response is the linear interference between the planetary waves generated in response to the SST perturbations, and the climatological stationary waves. However, the linear interference framework breaks down in the case involving CC, because the total wave driving of the NAM involves a balance between a strong negative contribution from the eddies related to linear interference, and a strong positive contribution from nonlinear and higher frequency eddies. In addition, the response to CC is less robust in the two models, which may be related to the models' parameterizations causing differences in the sensitivity to imposed SST anomalies.

  2. Predicting the nonlinear optical response in the resonant region from the linear characterization: a self-consistent theory for the first-, second-, and third-order (non)linear optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Moreno, Javier; Clays, Koen; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a self-consistent theory for the description of the optical linear and nonlinear response of molecules that is based strictly on the results of the experimental characterization. We show how the Thomas-Kuhn sum-rules can be used to eliminate the dependence of the nonlinear response on parameters that are not directly measurable. Our approach leads to the successful modeling of the dispersion of the nonlinear response of complex molecular structures with different geometries (dipolar and octupolar), and can be used as a guide towards the modeling in terms of fundamental physical parameters.

  3. Analytic study of developing flows in a tube laden with non-evaporating and evaporating drops via a modified linearization of the two-phase momentum equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosid, S.; Tambour, Y.

    A novel modification of the classical Langhaar linearization of the mutually coupled momentum equations for developing two-phase flows in circular ducts is presented. This modification enables us to treat: (i) flows developing from spatially periodic initial velocity distributions without the presence of droplets, and (ii) two-phase flows in which monosize, non-evaporating and evaporating droplets suspended in a developing gas flow of an initially uniform velocity distribution exchange momentum with the host-gas flow. New solutions are presented for the downstream evolution in the velocity profiles which develop from spatially periodic initial velocity distributions that eventually reach the fully developed Poiseuille velocity profile. These solutions are validated by employing known numerical procedures, providing strong support for the physical underpinnings of the present modified linearization. New solutions are also presented for the evolution in drop velocities and vapour spatial distributions for evaporating droplets suspended in an initially uniform velocity profile of the host gas. Asymptotic solutions are presented for the flow region which lies very close to the inlet of the tube, where the relative velocity between the droplets and the host gas is high, and thus the velocity fields of the two phases are mutually coupled. These solutions provide new explicit formulae for the droplet velocity field as a function of the initial conditions and droplet diameter (relative to the tube diameter) for non-evaporating drops, and also as a function of evaporation rate for evaporating drops.

  4. Embryo Microinjection of Selenomethionine Reduces Hatchability and Modifies Oxidant Responsive Gene Expression in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J. K.; Janz, D. M.

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies we demonstrated that exposure to selenomethionine (SeMet) causes developmental toxicities in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The objectives of this study were to establish a dose-response relationship for developmental toxicities in zebrafish after embryo microinjection of Se (8, 16 or 32 μg/g dry mass of eggs) in the form of SeMet, and to investigate potential underlying mechanism(s) of SeMet-induced developmental toxicities. A dose-dependent increase in frequencies of mortality and total deformities, and reduced hatchability were observed in zebrafish exposed to excess Se via embryo microinjection. The egg Se concentration causing 20% mortality was then used to investigate transcript abundance of proteins involved in antioxidant protection and methylation. Excess Se exposure modified gene expression of oxidant-responsive transcription factors (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor nrf2a and nrf2b), and enzymes involved in cellular methylation (methionine adenosyltransferase mat1a and mat2ab) in zebrafish larvae. Notably, excess Se exposure up-regulated transcript abundance of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (ahr2), a signalling pathway involved in the toxicity of dioxin-related compounds. Our findings suggest that oxidative stress or modification of methylation, or a combination of these mechanisms, might be responsible for Se-induced developmental toxicities in fishes. PMID:27210033

  5. Embryo Microinjection of Selenomethionine Reduces Hatchability and Modifies Oxidant Responsive Gene Expression in Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. K.; Janz, D. M.

    2016-05-01

    In previous studies we demonstrated that exposure to selenomethionine (SeMet) causes developmental toxicities in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The objectives of this study were to establish a dose-response relationship for developmental toxicities in zebrafish after embryo microinjection of Se (8, 16 or 32 μg/g dry mass of eggs) in the form of SeMet, and to investigate potential underlying mechanism(s) of SeMet-induced developmental toxicities. A dose-dependent increase in frequencies of mortality and total deformities, and reduced hatchability were observed in zebrafish exposed to excess Se via embryo microinjection. The egg Se concentration causing 20% mortality was then used to investigate transcript abundance of proteins involved in antioxidant protection and methylation. Excess Se exposure modified gene expression of oxidant-responsive transcription factors (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor nrf2a and nrf2b), and enzymes involved in cellular methylation (methionine adenosyltransferase mat1a and mat2ab) in zebrafish larvae. Notably, excess Se exposure up-regulated transcript abundance of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (ahr2), a signalling pathway involved in the toxicity of dioxin-related compounds. Our findings suggest that oxidative stress or modification of methylation, or a combination of these mechanisms, might be responsible for Se-induced developmental toxicities in fishes.

  6. In vitro mesenchymal stem cell response to a CO2 laser modified polymeric material.

    PubMed

    Waugh, D G; Hussain, I; Lawrence, J; Smith, G C; Cosgrove, D; Toccaceli, C

    2016-10-01

    With an ageing world population it is becoming significantly apparent that there is a need to produce implants and platforms to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. This is needed to meet the socio-economic demands of many countries worldwide. This paper details one of the first ever studies in to the manipulation of stem cell growth on CO2 laser surface treated nylon 6,6 highlighting its potential as an inexpensive platform to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. Through CO2 laser surface treatment discrete changes to the surfaces were made. That is, the surface roughness of the nylon 6,6 was increased by up to 4.3μm, the contact angle was modulated by up to 5° and the surface oxygen content increased by up to 1atom %. Following mesenchymal stem cell growth on the laser treated samples, it was identified that CO2 laser surface treatment gave rise to an enhanced response with an increase in viable cell count of up to 60,000cells/ml when compared to the as-received sample. The effect of surface parameters modified by the CO2 laser surface treatment on the mesenchymal stem cell response is also discussed along with potential trends that could be identified to govern the mesenchymal stem cell response.

  7. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  8. The use of CD47-modified biomaterials to mitigate the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Tengood, Jillian E; Levy, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Addressing the aberrant interactions between immune cells and biomaterials represents an unmet need in biomaterial research. Although progress has been made in the development of bioinert coatings, identifying and targeting relevant cellular and molecular pathways can provide additional therapeutic strategies to address this major healthcare concern. To that end, we describe the immune inhibitory motif, receptor–ligand pairing of signal regulatory protein alpha and its cognate ligand CD47 as a potential signaling pathway to enhance biocompatibility. The goals of this article are to detail the known roles of CD47–signal regulatory protein alpha signal transduction pathway and to describe how immobilized CD47 can be used to mitigate the immune response to biomaterials. Current applications of CD47-modified biomaterials will also be discussed herein. PMID:27190273

  9. Changes in blood-brain barrier function modify the neuroendocrine response to circulating substances.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Johansson, B B; Oprsalová, Z; Vigas, M

    1989-04-01

    It is known that various experimental, pathological and even physiological situations may be accompanied by transient increases in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. The hypothesis that under such conditions the blood-borne substances can reach the active sites in the brain in concentrations high enough to influence central control of hormone release was verified in these studies. A suitable experimental model of BBB opening by protamine sulfate administration in conscious rats was introduced. Using this model it was shown that the dopaminergic blocker domperidone inhibited apomorphine-induced ACTH release if permeability of the BBB was increased, but not under normal conditions. It is suggested that the changes in BBB function can modify the neuroendocrine response also to other circulating substances and this may be an important, until now unconsidered phenomenon in neuroendocrine research.

  10. A single charge in the actin binding domain of fascin can independently tune the linear and non-linear response of an actin bundle network.

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Müller, K W; Heussinger, C; Köhler, S; Wall, W A; Bausch, A R; Lieleg, O

    2015-05-01

    Actin binding proteins (ABPs) not only set the structure of actin filament assemblies but also mediate the frequency-dependent viscoelastic moduli of cross-linked and bundled actin networks. Point mutations in the actin binding domain of those ABPs can tune the association and dissociation dynamics of the actin/ABP bond and thus modulate the network mechanics both in the linear and non-linear response regime. We here demonstrate how the exchange of a single charged amino acid in the actin binding domain of the ABP fascin triggers such a modulation of the network rheology. Whereas the overall structure of the bundle networks is conserved, the transition point from strain-hardening to strain-weakening sensitively depends on the cross-linker off-rate and the applied shear rate. Our experimental results are consistent both with numerical simulations of a cross-linked bundle network and a theoretical description of the bundle network mechanics which is based on non-affine bending deformations and force-dependent cross-link dynamics.

  11. Comparison of Nonlinear Random Response Using Equivalent Linearization and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Muravyov, Alexander A.

    2000-01-01

    A recently developed finite-element-based equivalent linearization approach for the analysis of random vibrations of geometrically nonlinear multiple degree-of-freedom structures is validated. The validation is based on comparisons with results from a finite element based numerical simulation analysis using a numerical integration technique in physical coordinates. In particular, results for the case of a clamped-clamped beam are considered for an extensive load range to establish the limits of validity of the equivalent linearization approach.

  12. Step-response of a torsional device with multiple discontinuous non-linearities: Formulation of a vibratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krak, Michael D.; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-03-01

    A vehicle clutch damper is intentionally designed to contain multiple discontinuous non-linearities, such as multi-staged springs, clearances, pre-loads, and multi-staged friction elements. The main purpose of this practical torsional device is to transmit a wide range of torque while isolating torsional vibration between an engine and transmission. Improved understanding of the dynamic behavior of the device could be facilitated by laboratory measurement, and thus a refined vibratory experiment is proposed. The experiment is conceptually described as a single degree of freedom non-linear torsional system that is excited by an external step torque. The single torsional inertia (consisting of a shaft and torsion arm) is coupled to ground through parallel production clutch dampers, which are characterized by quasi-static measurements provided by the manufacturer. Other experimental objectives address physical dimensions, system actuation, flexural modes, instrumentation, and signal processing issues. Typical measurements show that the step response of the device is characterized by three distinct non-linear regimes (double-sided impact, single-sided impact, and no-impact). Each regime is directly related to the non-linear features of the device and can be described by peak angular acceleration values. Predictions of a simplified single degree of freedom non-linear model verify that the experiment performs well and as designed. Accordingly, the benchmark measurements could be utilized to validate non-linear models and simulation codes, as well as characterize dynamic parameters of the device including its dissipative properties.

  13. A Fast Method to Calculate the Spatial Impulse Response for 1-D Linear Ultrasonic Phased Array Transducers.

    PubMed

    Zou, Cheng; Sun, Zhenguo; Cai, Dong; Muhammad, Salman; Zhang, Wenzeng; Chen, Qiang

    2016-11-08

    A method is developed to accurately determine the spatial impulse response at the specifically discretized observation points in the radiated field of 1-D linear ultrasonic phased array transducers with great efficiency. In contrast, the previously adopted solutions only optimize the calculation procedure for a single rectangular transducer and required approximation considerations or nonlinear calculation. In this research, an algorithm that follows an alternative approach to expedite the calculation of the spatial impulse response of a rectangular linear array is presented. The key assumption for this algorithm is that the transducer apertures are identical and linearly distributed on an infinite rigid plane baffled with the same pitch. Two points in the observation field, which have the same position relative to two transducer apertures, share the same spatial impulse response that contributed from corresponding transducer, respectively. The observation field is discretized specifically to meet the relationship of equality. The analytical expressions of the proposed algorithm, based on the specific selection of the observation points, are derived to remove redundant calculations. In order to measure the proposed methodology, the simulation results obtained from the proposed method and the classical summation method are compared. The outcomes demonstrate that the proposed strategy can speed up the calculation procedure since it accelerates the speed-up ratio which relies upon the number of discrete points and the number of the array transducers. This development will be valuable in the development of advanced and faster linear ultrasonic phased array systems.

  14. A Fast Method to Calculate the Spatial Impulse Response for 1-D Linear Ultrasonic Phased Array Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Cheng; Sun, Zhenguo; Cai, Dong; Muhammad, Salman; Zhang, Wenzeng; Chen, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A method is developed to accurately determine the spatial impulse response at the specifically discretized observation points in the radiated field of 1-D linear ultrasonic phased array transducers with great efficiency. In contrast, the previously adopted solutions only optimize the calculation procedure for a single rectangular transducer and required approximation considerations or nonlinear calculation. In this research, an algorithm that follows an alternative approach to expedite the calculation of the spatial impulse response of a rectangular linear array is presented. The key assumption for this algorithm is that the transducer apertures are identical and linearly distributed on an infinite rigid plane baffled with the same pitch. Two points in the observation field, which have the same position relative to two transducer apertures, share the same spatial impulse response that contributed from corresponding transducer, respectively. The observation field is discretized specifically to meet the relationship of equality. The analytical expressions of the proposed algorithm, based on the specific selection of the observation points, are derived to remove redundant calculations. In order to measure the proposed methodology, the simulation results obtained from the proposed method and the classical summation method are compared. The outcomes demonstrate that the proposed strategy can speed up the calculation procedure since it accelerates the speed-up ratio which relies upon the number of discrete points and the number of the array transducers. This development will be valuable in the development of advanced and faster linear ultrasonic phased array systems. PMID:27834799

  15. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2015-05-01

    Transient sensory, motor or cognitive event elicit not only phase-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) in the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG), but also induce non-phase-locked modulations of ongoing EEG oscillations. These modulations can be detected when single-trial waveforms are analysed in the time-frequency domain, and consist in stimulus-induced decreases (event-related desynchronization, ERD) or increases (event-related synchronization, ERS) of synchrony in the activity of the underlying neuronal populations. ERD and ERS reflect changes in the parameters that control oscillations in neuronal networks and, depending on the frequency at which they occur, represent neuronal mechanisms involved in cortical activation, inhibition and binding. ERD and ERS are commonly estimated by averaging the time-frequency decomposition of single trials. However, their trial-to-trial variability that can reflect physiologically-important information is lost by across-trial averaging. Here, we aim to (1) develop novel approaches to explore single-trial parameters (including latency, frequency and magnitude) of ERP/ERD/ERS; (2) disclose the relationship between estimated single-trial parameters and other experimental factors (e.g., perceived intensity). We found that (1) stimulus-elicited ERP/ERD/ERS can be correctly separated using principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition with Varimax rotation on the single-trial time-frequency distributions; (2) time-frequency multiple linear regression with dispersion term (TF-MLRd) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of ERP/ERD/ERS in single trials, and provides an unbiased estimation of their latency, frequency, and magnitude at single-trial level; (3) these estimates can be meaningfully correlated with each other and with other experimental factors at single-trial level (e.g., perceived stimulus intensity and ERP magnitude). The methods described in this article allow exploring fully non-phase-locked stimulus-induced cortical

  16. Dry eye modifies the thermal and menthol responses in rat corneal primary afferent cool cells.

    PubMed

    Kurose, Masayuki; Meng, Ian D

    2013-07-01

    Dry eye syndrome is a painful condition caused by inadequate or altered tear film on the ocular surface. Primary afferent cool cells innervating the cornea regulate the ocular fluid status by increasing reflex tearing in response to evaporative cooling and hyperosmicity. It has been proposed that activation of corneal cool cells via a transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel agonist may represent a potential therapeutic intervention to treat dry eye. This study examined the effect of dry eye on the response properties of corneal cool cells and the ability of the TRPM8 agonist menthol to modify these properties. A unilateral dry eye condition was created in rats by removing the left lacrimal gland. Lacrimal gland removal reduced tears in the dry eye to 35% compared with the contralateral eye and increased the number of spontaneous blinks in the dry eye by over 300%. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed 8-10 wk following surgery in the trigeminal ganglion of dry eye animals and age-matched controls. Responses of corneal cool cells to cooling were examined after the application of menthol (10 μM-1.0 mM) to the ocular surface. The peak frequency of discharge to cooling was higher and the cooling threshold was warmer in dry eye animals compared with controls. The dry condition also altered the neuronal sensitivity to menthol, causing desensitization to cold-evoked responses at concentrations that produced facilitation in control animals. The menthol-induced desensitization of corneal cool cells would likely result in reduced tearing, a deleterious effect in individuals with dry eye.

  17. Glycemic response to corn starch modified with cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase and its relationship to physical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn starch was modified with cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) below the gelatinization temperature. The porous, partially hydrolyzed, granules with or without CGTase hydrolysis products, cyclodextrins (CDs) and short chain maltodextrins, may be used as an alternative to modified corn starc...

  18. Comparison of various assays to quantitate macrophage activation by biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.M.; Nanda, S.; Altom, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Macrophages treated with various compounds that enhance host antitumor resistance exhibit measurable changes in metabolism, function, and surface antigens. In this study, murine peptone-induced peritoneal macrophages were stimulated in vitro by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), muramyl dipeptide (MDP), and poly I.poly C. They were subsequently compared in their ability to release superoxide and act as tumoristatic and tumoricidal effector cells. Superoxide generation was assayed by the reduction of ferricytochrome C. All three compounds failed to induce significant O/sub 2/- release, unless the cells were also treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). MDP was most active in potentiating the PMA response. In the tumor growth inhibition assay, cytostatic activity was comparable for all three compounds and did not exceed 32 percent. The combination of subthreshold levels of these compounds and hybridoma-derived MAF acted synergistically to induce potent cytostatic activity. In the chromium release assay, LPS and poly I.poly C rendered macrophages cytolytic for P815 target cells at concentrations greater than or equal to 1 microgram/ml. In contrast, significant cytolysis was observed with MDP only at 100 micrograms/ml. Defining precisely the effect of various biological response modifiers on several parameters of macrophage function may facilitate use of these agents in cancer therapy.

  19. MoS2-modified ZnO quantum dots nanocomposite: Synthesis and ultrafast humidity response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ze, Lu; Yueqiu, Gong; Xujun, Li; Yong, Zhang

    2017-03-01

    In this work, ZnO quantum dots (QDs), layered MoS2 and MoS2-modified ZnO QDs (MoS2@ZnO QDs) nanocomposite were synthesized and then applied as humidity sensor. The crystal structure, morphology and element distribution of ZnO QDs, MoS2 and MoS2@ZnO QDs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, respectively. The humidity sensing characteristics of the MoS2 and MoS2@ZnO QDs against various relative humidity were measured at room temperature. The results show that the MoS2@ZnO QDs sensor exhibits high sensitivity with an impedance variation of three or four orders of magnitude to relative humidity range of 11-95% and it exhibits a short response-recovery time (1 s for adsorption and 20 s for desorption) and excellent repeatability. The mechanisms of the excellent performance for humidity sensing of MoS2@ZnO QDs sensor were discussed based on its impedance properties. Our work could offer guidelines to design higher performance especially ultrafast humidity response sensor utilizing the nanocomposite structure with two dimensional material and QDs.

  20. Modeling the Non-Linear Response of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Using a Combined Damage/Plasticity Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuecker, Clara; Davila, Carlos G.; Pettermann, Heinz E.

    2008-01-01

    The present work is concerned with modeling the non-linear response of fiber reinforced polymer laminates. Recent experimental data suggests that the non-linearity is not only caused by matrix cracking but also by matrix plasticity due to shear stresses. To capture the effects of those two mechanisms, a model combining a plasticity formulation with continuum damage has been developed to simulate the non-linear response of laminates under plane stress states. The model is used to compare the predicted behavior of various laminate lay-ups to experimental data from the literature by looking at the degradation of axial modulus and Poisson s ratio of the laminates. The influence of residual curing stresses and in-situ effect on the predicted response is also investigated. It is shown that predictions of the combined damage/plasticity model, in general, correlate well with the experimental data. The test data shows that there are two different mechanisms that can have opposite effects on the degradation of the laminate Poisson s ratio which is captured correctly by the damage/plasticity model. Residual curing stresses are found to have a minor influence on the predicted response for the cases considered here. Some open questions remain regarding the prediction of damage onset.

  1. Linearized blade row compression component model. Stability and frequency response analysis of a J85-3 compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, W. A.; Moszee, R. H.; Steenken, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    NASA developed stability and frequency response analysis techniques were applied to a dynamic blade row compression component stability model to provide a more economic approach to surge line and frequency response determination than that provided by time-dependent methods. This blade row model was linearized and the Jacobian matrix was formed. The clean-inlet-flow stability characteristics of the compressors of two J85-13 engines were predicted by applying the alternate Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion to the Jacobian matrix. The predicted surge line agreed with the clean-inlet-flow surge line predicted by the time-dependent method to a high degree except for one engine at 94% corrected speed. No satisfactory explanation of this discrepancy was found. The frequency response of the linearized system was determined by evaluating its Laplace transfer function. The results of the linearized-frequency-response analysis agree with the time-dependent results when the time-dependent inlet total-pressure and exit-flow function amplitude boundary conditions are less than 1 percent and 3 percent, respectively. The stability analysis technique was extended to a two-sector parallel compressor model with and without interstage crossflow and predictions were carried out for total-pressure distortion extents of 180 deg, 90 deg, 60 deg, and 30 deg.

  2. Linear and third-order nonlinear optical responses of multilayered Ag:Si3N4 nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Toudert, J; Fernandez, H; Babonneau, D; Camelio, S; Girardeau, T; Solis, J

    2009-11-25

    The linear and third-order nonlinear responses of tailored Si3N4/Ag/Si3N4 trilayers and (Si3N4/Ag)n/Si3N4 multilayers grown by alternating ion-beam sputtering have been studied by combining complementary characterization techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and degenerate four-wave mixing. The linear optical response dominated by the surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles has been measured over the whole visible range while the third-order nonlinear susceptibility has been probed at the surface plasmon resonance wavelength. Due to the weak in-plane interaction between Ag nanoparticles, the linear and nonlinear optical responses of the Si3N4/Ag/Si3N4 trilayers are mainly influenced by the size and shape of the nanoparticles. A maximum value of 1.1 x 10(-7) esu has been found at 635 nm for the effective third-order nonlinear susceptibility of the trilayer with the highest amount of silver. The linear optical response of the (Si3N4/Ag)n/Si3N4 multilayers is shown to be dominated by the surface plasmon resonance of isolated layers of weakly interacting nanoparticles at wavelengths shorter than 600 nm whereas a contribution due to vertical interactions has been shown for higher wavelengths. Below the vertical percolation threshold, their nonlinear optical response at the surface plasmon resonance wavelength is similar to the one of an isolated assembly of nanoparticles, and the effective third-order nonlinear susceptibility is slightly increased by decreasing the thickness of the Si3N4 spacer.

  3. Statistical linearization based estimation of the peak response of nonlinear systems subject to the EC8 design spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, Pol D.; Giaralis, Agathoklis

    2008-07-08

    A stochastic approach is proposed to obtain reliable estimates of the peak response of nonlinear systems to excitations specified via a response/design seismic spectrum. This is achieved without resorting to numerical integration of the governing nonlinear equations of motion. First, a numerical scheme is utilized to derive a power spectrum which is compatible in a stochastic sense to a given elastic design spectrum. This spectrum is then treated as the excitation spectrum in the context of the statistical linearization method to determine effective parameters, damping and stiffness, corresponding to an equivalent linear system (ELS). The obtained parameters are used in conjunction with the linear design spectrum, for various values of damping, to estimate the response of certain nonlinear systems. The case of single-degree-of-freedom systems with cubic stiffness nonlinearity and hysteretic systems whose restoring force traces a bilinear law are considered in conjunction with the elastic design spectrum prescribed by the European aseismic code provisions (EC8). Monte Carlo simulations pertaining to an ensemble of non-stationary EC 8 design spectrum compatible accelerograms are conducted to confirm that the average peak response of the nonlinear systems compare reasonably well with that of the ELS. This is true, even in cases where the response of the nonlinear oscillators deviates significantly from the linear one. In this manner, the proposed approach yields ELS which can reliably replace the original nonlinear systems in carrying out computationally efficient analyses in the initial stages of the aseismic design of structures under severe seismic excitations. Furthermore, the potential of this approach for developing inelastic design spectra from a given elastic design spectrum is established.

  4. A potentially robust plasma profile control approach for ITER using real-time estimation of linearized profile response models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Lister, J. B.

    2012-07-01

    An active plasma profile control approach for ITER, which is potentially robust by being tolerant to changing and uncertain physics, has been explored in this work, using a technique based on real-time estimation of linearized profile response models. The linearized models approximate static responses of the plasma profiles to power changes in auxiliary heating and current drive systems. These models are updated in real-time, differing from the model-based technique which deduces a dynamic model from identification experiments. The underlying physics is simplified with several assumptions to allow real-time update of the profile response models; however, without significant loss of information necessary for feedback control of the plasma profiles. The response of the electron temperature profile is modelled by simplifying the electron heat transport equation. The response of the safety factor profile is computed by directly relating it to the changes in source current density profiles. The required actuator power changes are directly computed by inverting the response matrix using the singular value decomposition technique. The saturation of the actuator powers is taken into account and the capability of using quantized auxiliary powers is provided. The potential of our active control approach has been tested by applying it to simulations of the ITER hybrid mode operation using CRONOS. In these simulations, either a global transport model or a theory-based local transport model has been used and the electron temperature and safety factor profiles were well controlled either independently or simultaneously.

  5. Modified Linear Theory Aircraft Design Tools and Sonic Boom Minimization Strategy Applied to Signature Freezing via F-function Lobe Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Timothy Paul

    Commercial supersonic travel has strong business potential; however, in order for the Federal Aviation Administration to lift its ban on supersonic flight overland, designers must reduce aircraft sonic boom strength to an acceptable level. An efficient methodology and associated tools for designing aircraft for minimized sonic booms are presented. The computer-based preliminary design tool, RapidF, based on modified linear theory, enables quick assessment of an aircraft's sonic boom with run times less than 30 seconds on a desktop computer. A unique feature of RapidF is that it tracks where on the aircraft each segment of the of the sonic boom came from, enabling precise modifications, speeding the design process. Sonic booms from RapidF are compared to flight test data, showing that it is capability of predicting a sonic boom duration, overpressure, and interior shock locations. After the preliminary design is complete, scaled flight tests should be conducted to validate the low boom design. When conducting such tests, it is insufficient to just scale the length; thus, equations to scale the weight and propagation distance are derived. Using RapidF, a conceptual supersonic business jet design is presented that uses F-function lobe balancing to create a frozen sonic boom using lifting surfaces. The leading shock is reduced from 1.4 to 0.83 psf, and the trailing shock from 1.2 to 0.87 psf, 41% and 28% reductions respectfully. By changing the incidence angle of the surfaces, different sonic boom shapes can be created, and allowing the lobes to be re-balanced for new flight conditions. Computational fluid dynamics is conducted to validate the sonic boom predictions. Off-design analysis is presented that varies weight, altitude, Mach number, and propagation angle, demonstrating that lobe-balance is robust. Finally, the Perceived Level of Loudness metric is analyzed, resulting in a modified design that incorporates other boom minimization techniques to further reduce

  6. Bone Response to Surface-Modified Titanium Implants: Studies on the Early Tissue Response to Implants with Different Surface Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Larsson Wexell, C.; Thomsen, P.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Tengvall, P.; Rodahl, M.; Lausmaa, J.; Kasemo, B.; Ericson, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of experimental studies, the bone formation around systematically modified titanium implants is analyzed. In the present study, three different surface modifications were prepared and evaluated. Glow-discharge cleaning and oxidizing resulted in a highly stoichiometric TiO2 surface, while a glow-discharge treatment in nitrogen gas resulted in implants with essentially a surface of titanium nitride, covered with a very thin titanium oxide. Finally, hydrogen peroxide treatment of implants resulted in an almost stoichiometric TiO2, rich in hydroxyl groups on the surface. Machined commercially pure titanium implants served as controls. Scanning Auger Electron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed no significant differences in oxide thickness or surface roughness parameters, but differences in the surface chemical composition and apparent topography were observed. After surface preparation, the implants were inserted in cortical bone of rabbits and evaluated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. Light microscopic evaluation of the tissue response showed that all implants were in contact with bone and had a large proportion of newly formed bone within the threads after 6 weeks. There were no morphological differences between the four groups. Our study shows that a high degree of bone contact and bone formation can be achieved with titanium implants of different surface composition and topography. PMID:24174936

  7. Higher-order sinusoidal input describing functions for the analysis of non-linear systems with harmonic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuij, P. W. J. M.; Bosgra, O. H.; Steinbuch, M.

    2006-11-01

    For high-precision motion systems, modelling and control design specifically oriented at friction effects is instrumental. The sinusoidal input describing function theory represents an approximative mathematical framework for analysing non-linear system behaviour. This theory, however, limits the description of the non-linear system behaviour to a quasi-linear amplitude-dependent relation between sinusoidal excitation and sinusoidal response. In this paper, an extension to higher-order describing functions is realised by introducing the concept of the harmonics generator. The resulting higher-order sinusoidal input describing functions (HOSIDFs) relate the magnitude and phase of the higher harmonics of the periodic response of the system to the magnitude and phase of a sinusoidal excitation. Based on this extension two techniques to measure HOSIDFs are presented. The first technique is FFT based. The second technique is based on IQ (in-phase/quadrature-phase) demodulation. In a simulation, the measurement techniques have been tested by comparing the simulation results to analytically derived results from a known (backlash) non-linearity. In a subsequent practical case study both techniques are used to measure the changes in dynamic behaviour as a function of drive level due to friction in an electric motor. Both methods prove successful for measuring HOSIDFs.

  8. Slope aspect modifies community responses to clear-cutting in boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Aström, Marcus; Dynesius, Mats; Hylander, Kristoffer; Nilsson, Christer

    2007-03-01

    Slope aspect modifies microclimate and influences ecological processes and spatial distribution of species across forest landscapes, but the impact of slope aspect on community responses to disturbance is poorly understood. Such insight is necessary to understand landscape community dynamics and resilience. We compared bryophyte (liverworts and mosses) communities in matched 0.02-ha plots of four boreal stand types in central Sweden: recently clear-felled and mature stands dominated by Norway spruce in south-facing and north-facing slopes. Differences between forests and clear-cuts were interpreted as effects of clear-cutting, and differences between south- and north-facing slopes as effects of aspect. In response to clear-cutting, bryophyte cover and composition changed more in south-facing slopes. Only one out of ten significantly declining species in south-facing slopes also declined significantly in north-facing slopes. North-facing slopes lost fewer bryophyte species, and among those, fewer forest species and fewer species associated with wood and bark. In north-facing slopes, the average proportions of mosses and liverworts shared between the forest and the clear-cut plot were 88% and 74%, respectively. Corresponding numbers for south-facing slopes were 79% and 33%. In addition, more bryophyte species were added in north- than south-facing slopes after clear-cutting, somewhat reducing the difference in compositional change between aspects. South- and north-facing mature forests differed in species composition, mostly due to higher richness of mosses in south-facing slopes. The smaller changes in bryophyte communities on north-facing slopes in response to clear-cutting have implications for ecosystem dynamics and management as high local survival may enhance landscape-level resilience.

  9. Antibody response of cattle to vaccination with commercial modified live rabies vaccines in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Amy; Greenberg, Lauren; Moran, David; Alvarez, Danilo; Alvarado, Marlon; Garcia, Daniel L; Peruski, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Vampire bat rabies is a public and animal health concern throughout Latin America. As part of an ecological study of vampire bat depredation on cattle in southern Guatemala, we conducted a vaccine seroconversion study among three dairy farms. The main objectives of this cross sectional and cohort study were to understand factors associated with bat bites among cattle, to determine whether unvaccinated cattle had evidence of rabies virus exposure and evaluate whether exposure was related to bat bite prevalence, and to assess whether cattle demonstrate adequate seroconversion to two commercial vaccines used in Guatemala. In 2012, baseline blood samples were collected immediately prior to intramuscular inoculation of cattle with one of two modified live rabies vaccines. Post vaccination blood samples were collected 13 and 393 days later. Sera were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNA) by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Across two years of study, 36% (254/702) of inspected cattle presented gross evidence of vampire bat bites. Individual cattle with a bat bite in 2012 were more likely have a bat bite in 2013. Prior to vaccination, 12% (42/350) of cattle sera demonstrated rVNA, but bite status in 2012 was not associated with presence of rVNA. Vaccine brand was the only factor associated with adequate rVNA response of cattle by day 13. However, vaccine brand and rVNA status at day 13 were associated with an adequate rVNA titer on day 393, with animals demonstrating an adequate titer at day 13 more likely to have an adequate titer at day 393. Our findings support stable levels of vampire bat depredation and evidence of rVNA in unvaccinated cattle. Brand of vaccine may be an important consideration impacting adequate rVNA response and long-term maintenance of rVNA in cattle. Further, the results demonstrate that initial response to vaccination is associated with rVNA status over one year following vaccination.

  10. Analytical expression for position sensitivity of linear response beam position monitor having inter-electrode cross talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Ojha, A.; Garg, A. D.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Senecha, V. K.

    2017-02-01

    According to the quasi electrostatic model of linear response capacitive beam position monitor (BPM), the position sensitivity of the device depends only on the aperture of the device and it is independent of processing frequency and load impedance. In practice, however, due to the inter-electrode capacitive coupling (cross talk), the actual position sensitivity of the device decreases with increasing frequency and load impedance. We have taken into account the inter-electrode capacitance to derive and propose a new analytical expression for the position sensitivity as a function of frequency and load impedance. The sensitivity of a linear response shoe-box type BPM has been obtained through simulation using CST Studio Suite to verify and confirm the validity of the new analytical equation. Good agreement between the simulation results and the new analytical expression suggest that this method can be exploited for proper designing of BPM.

  11. Comparison of Damage Models for Predicting the Non-Linear Response of Laminates Under Matrix Dominated Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuecker, Clara; Davila, Carlos G.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Five models for matrix damage in fiber reinforced laminates are evaluated for matrix-dominated loading conditions under plane stress and are compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. The emphasis of this study is on a comparison of the response of embedded plies subjected to a homogeneous stress state. Three of the models are specifically designed for modeling the non-linear response due to distributed matrix cracking under homogeneous loading, and also account for non-linear (shear) behavior prior to the onset of cracking. The remaining two models are localized damage models intended for predicting local failure at stress concentrations. The modeling approaches of distributed vs. localized cracking as well as the different formulations of damage initiation and damage progression are compared and discussed.

  12. Vestibular responses to linear acceleration are absent in otoconia-deficient C57BL/6JEi-het mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Erway, L. C.; Bergstrom, R. A.; Schimenti, J. C.; Jones, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) were measured in normal mice and in mice homozygous for the head tilt mutation (het/het, abbr. het). The het mice lack otoconia, the inertial mass critical for natural stimulation of inner ear gravity receptors. Our findings demonstrate that vestibular neural responses to pulsed linear acceleration are absent in het mice. The results: (1) confirm that adequate sensory stimuli fail to activate gravity receptors in the het model; and (2) serve as definitive evidence that far-field vestibular responses to pulsed linear acceleration depend critically on otolith end organs. The C57BL/6JEi-het mouse may be an excellent model of gravity receptor sensory deprivation.

  13. Linear and nonlinear optical response of one-dimensional semiconductors: finite-size and Franz–Keldysh effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonabi, Farzad; Pedersen, Thomas G.

    2017-04-01

    The dipole moment formalism for the optical response of finite electronic structures breaks down in infinite ones, for which a momentum-based method is better suited. Focusing on simple chain structures, we compare the linear and nonlinear optical response of finite and infinite one-dimensional semiconductors. This comparison is then extended to cases including strong electro-static fields breaking translational invariance. For large electro-static fields, highly non-perturbative Franz–Keldysh (FK) features are observed in both linear and nonlinear spectra. It is demonstrated that dipole and momentum formalisms agree in the limit of large structures provided the intraband momentum contributions are carefully treated. This convergence is established even in the presence of non-perturbative electro-static fields.

  14. Linear and nonlinear interpretation of the direct strike lightning response of the NASA F106B thunderstorm research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, T. H.; Perala, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the work reported here is to develop a methodology by which electromagnetic measurements of inflight lightning strike data can be understood and extended to other aircraft. A linear and time invariant approach based on a combination of Fourier transform and three dimensional finite difference techniques is demonstrated. This approach can obtain the lightning channel current in the absence of the aircraft for given channel characteristic impedance and resistive loading. The model is applied to several measurements from the NASA F106B lightning research program. A non-linear three dimensional finite difference code has also been developed to study the response of the F106B to a lightning leader attachment. This model includes three species air chemistry and fluid continuity equations and can incorporate an experimentally based streamer formulation. Calculated responses are presented for various attachment locations and leader parameters. The results are compared qualitatively with measured inflight data.

  15. The stability of a predator-prey system with linear mass-action functional response perturbed by white noise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiumei; Wen, Xiangdan; Jiang, Daqing; Liu, Zhenwen

    The present paper deals with the problem of an ecoepidemiological model with linear mass-action functional response perturbed by white noise. The essential mathematical features are analyzed with the help of the stochastic stability, its long time behavior around the equilibrium of deterministic ecoepidemiological model, and the stochastic asymptotic stability by Lyapunov analysis methods. Numerical simulations for a hypothetical set of parameter values are presented to illustrate the analytical findings.

  16. Numerical tailoring of linear response from plasmonic nano-resonators grown on a layer of polystyrene spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, A. Belardini, A.; Veroli, A.; Centini, M.; Sibilia, C.

    2014-10-28

    We developed a geometrical method to reproduce the morphology of hybrid structures composed by self-ordered dielectric nanospheres covered by anisotropic plasmonic structures. Numerical analysis allowed to investigate the optical response of the considered system, and to identify the relevant parameters to achieve efficient and versatile light manipulation. In particular, we show that the overall structure, acting as a hybrid plasmonic-photonics meta-surface, can be engineered in order to maximize its linear and circular dichroic behavior at optical frequencies.

  17. Density and spin linear response of atomic Fermi superfluids with population imbalance in the BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao; Li, Yang; He, Yan; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2014-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the density and spin (representing the two components) linear response of Fermi superfluids with tunable attractive interactions and population imbalance. In both linear response theories, we find that the fluctuations of the order parameter must be treated on equal footing with the gauge transformations associated with the symmetries of the Hamiltonian so that important constraints including various sum rules can be satisfied. Both theories can be applied to the whole BCS-Bose-Einstein condensation crossover. The spin linear responses are qualitatively different with and without population imbalance because collective-mode effects from the fluctuations of the order parameter survive in the presence of population imbalance, even though the associated symmetry is not broken by the order parameter. Since a polarized superfluid becomes unstable at low temperatures in the weak and intermediate coupling regimes, we found that the density and spin susceptibilities diverge as the system approaches the unstable regime, but the emergence of phase separation preempts the divergence.

  18. Precision Interval Estimation of the Response Surface by Means of an Integrated Algorithm of Neural Network and Linear Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1999-01-01

    The integration of Radial Basis Function Networks and Back Propagation Neural Networks with the Multiple Linear Regression has been accomplished to map nonlinear response surfaces over a wide range of independent variables in the process of the Modem Design of Experiments. The integrated method is capable to estimate the precision intervals including confidence and predicted intervals. The power of the innovative method has been demonstrated by applying to a set of wind tunnel test data in construction of response surface and estimation of precision interval.

  19. Ecological versus case-control studies for testing a linear-no threshold dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B L

    1990-09-01

    The two basic problems with ecological studies are (A) individuals studied are not necessarily the individuals who are at risk, and (B) they are very vulnerable to confounding factors. It is shown that where the study is designed to test a linear-no threshold dose-response theory, (A) does not apply. Where the ecological study deals with the average dose and response in a large number of US counties, the available data and computer capability for reducing effects of confounders are so powerful that (B) may be no more important for the ecological than for a case-control study. The migration problem is treated and found to be relatively unimportant.

  20. The use of linear expressions of solute boiling point versus retention to indicate special interactions with the molecular rings of modified cyclodextrin phases in gas chromatography

    PubMed

    Betts

    2000-08-01

    The boiling points (degrees C, 1 x 10) of diverse C10 polar solutes from volatile oils are set against their relative retention times versus n-undecane to calculate linear equations for 12 commercial modified cyclodextrin (CD) capillary phases. Ten data points are considered for each CD, then solutes are rejected until 5 or more remain that give an expression with a correlation coefficient of at least 0.990 and a standard deviation of less than 5.5. Three phases give almost perfect correlation, and 3 other CDs have difficulty complying. Solutes involved in the equations (most frequently cuminal, linalol, and carvone) are presumed to have a 'standard' polar transient interaction with the molecular rings of the CDs concerned. Several remaining solutes (mostly citral, fenchone, and menthol) exhibit extra retention over the calculated standard (up to 772%), which is believed to indicate a firm 'host' CD or 'guest' solute molecular fit in some cases. Other solutes show less retention than calculated (mostly citronellal, citronellol, estragole, and pulegone). This suggests rejection by the CD, which behaves merely as a conventional stationary phase to them. The intercept constant in the equation for each phase is suggested to be a numerical relative polarity indicator. These b values indicate that 3 hydroxypropyl CDs show the most polarity with values from 28 to 43; and CDs that are fully substituted with inert groups fall in the range of 15 to 20.

  1. No Evidence for a Low Linear Energy Transfer Adaptive Response in Irradiated RKO Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Goetz, Wilfried; Baulch, Janet E.; Lewis, Adam J.; Morgan, William F.

    2011-01-06

    It has become increasingly evident from reports in the literature that there are many confounding factors that are capable of modulating radiation induced non-targeted responses such as the bystander effect and the adaptive response. In this paper we examine recent data that suggest that the observation of non-targeted responses may not be universally observable for differing radiation qualities. We have conducted a study of the adaptive response following low LET exposures for human colon carcinoma cells and failed to observe adaption for the endpoints of clonogenic survival or micronucleus formation.

  2. Comparison of several methods for obtaining the time response of linear systems to either a unit impulse or arbitrary input from frequency-response data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donegan, James J; Huss, Carl R

    1957-01-01

    Several methods of obtaining the time response of Linear systems to either a unit impulse or an arbitrary input from frequency-response data are described and compared. Comparisons indicate that all the methods give good accuracy when applied to a second-order system; the main difference is the required computing time. The methods generally classified as inverse Laplace transform methods were found to be most effective in determining the response to a unit impulse from frequency-response data of higher order systems. Some discussion and examples are given of the use of such methods as flight-data-analysis techniques in predicting loads and motions of a flexible aircraft on the basis of simple calculations when the aircraft frequency response is known.

  3. Effect of stride length on overarm throwing delivery: A linear momentum response.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Dan K; Crotin, Ryan L; White, Scott

    2014-12-01

    Changing stride length during overhand throwing delivery is thought to alter total body and throwing arm linear momentums, thereby altering the proportion of throwing arm momentum relative to the total body. Using a randomized cross-over design, nineteen pitchers (15 collegiate and 4 high school) were assigned to pitch two simulated 80-pitch games at ±25% of their desired stride length. An 8-camera motion capture system (240Hz) integrated with two force plates (960Hz) and radar gun tracked each throw. Segmental linear momentums in each plane of motion were summed yielding throwing arm and total body momentums, from which compensation ratio's (relative contribution between the two) were derived. Pairwise comparisons at hallmark events and phases identified significantly different linear momentum profiles, in particular, anteriorly directed total body, throwing arm, and momentum compensation ratios (P⩽.05) as a result of manipulating stride length. Pitchers with shorter strides generated lower forward (anterior) momentum before stride foot contact, whereas greater upward and lateral momentum (toward third base) were evident during the acceleration phase. The evidence suggests insufficient total body momentum in the intended throwing direction may potentially influence performance (velocity and accuracy) and perhaps precipitate throwing arm injuries.

  4. Linear time delay methods and stability analyses of the human spine. Effects of neuromuscular reflex response.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Timothy C; Granata, Kevin P; Madigan, Michael L; Hendricks, Scott L

    2008-08-01

    Linear stability methods were applied to a biomechanical model of the human musculoskeletal spine to investigate effects of reflex gain and reflex delay on stability. Equations of motion represented a dynamic 18 degrees-of-freedom rigid-body model with time-delayed reflexes. Optimal muscle activation levels were identified by minimizing metabolic power with the constraints of equilibrium and stability with zero reflex time delay. Muscle activation levels and associated muscle forces were used to find the delay margin, i.e., the maximum reflex delay for which the system was stable. Results demonstrated that stiffness due to antagonistic co-contraction necessary for stability declined with increased proportional reflex gain. Reflex delay limited the maximum acceptable proportional reflex gain, i.e., long reflex delay required smaller maximum reflex gain to avoid instability. As differential reflex gain increased, there was a small increase in acceptable reflex delay. However, differential reflex gain with values near intrinsic damping caused the delay margin to approach zero. Forward-dynamic simulations of the fully nonlinear time-delayed system verified the linear results. The linear methods accurately found the delay margin below which the nonlinear system was asymptotically stable. These methods may aid future investigations in the role of reflexes in musculoskeletal stability.

  5. A dose-response curve for biodosimetry from a 6 MV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Pinto, M M P; Cadena, M; Santos, N; Fernandes, T S; Borges, E; Amaral, A

    2015-05-26

    Biological dosimetry (biodosimetry) is based on the investigation of radiation-induced biological effects (biomarkers), mainly dicentric chromosomes, in order to correlate them with radiation dose. To interpret the dicentric score in terms of absorbed dose, a calibration curve is needed. Each curve should be constructed with respect to basic physical parameters, such as the type of ionizing radiation characterized by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and dose rate. This study was designed to obtain dose calibration curves by scoring of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with a 6 MV electron linear accelerator (Mevatron M, Siemens, USA). Two software programs, CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software) and Dose Estimate, were used to generate the curve. The two software programs are discussed; the results obtained were compared with each other and with other published low LET radiation curves. Both software programs resulted in identical linear and quadratic terms for the curve presented here, which was in good agreement with published curves for similar radiation quality and dose rates.

  6. A dose-response curve for biodosimetry from a 6 MV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Pinto, M M P; Cadena, M; Santos, N; Fernandes, T S; Borges, E; Amaral, A

    2015-10-01

    Biological dosimetry (biodosimetry) is based on the investigation of radiation-induced biological effects (biomarkers), mainly dicentric chromosomes, in order to correlate them with radiation dose. To interpret the dicentric score in terms of absorbed dose, a calibration curve is needed. Each curve should be constructed with respect to basic physical parameters, such as the type of ionizing radiation characterized by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and dose rate. This study was designed to obtain dose calibration curves by scoring of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with a 6 MV electron linear accelerator (Mevatron M, Siemens, USA). Two software programs, CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software) and Dose Estimate, were used to generate the curve. The two software programs are discussed; the results obtained were compared with each other and with other published low LET radiation curves. Both software programs resulted in identical linear and quadratic terms for the curve presented here, which was in good agreement with published curves for similar radiation quality and dose rates.

  7. Maternal separation modifies behavioural and neuroendocrine responses to stress in CCR7 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Emma L; Jaehne, Emily J; Jawahar, M Catharine; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2014-04-15

    Alterations in immune function of various humoral and cellular factors, including chemokines, secondary to early stress may play a role in the enhanced vulnerability to psychiatric conditions in those with a history of childhood adversity. C57BL/6 (WT) mice and mice deficient for the chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7(-/-)) were used to determine the effects of maternal separation on a range of behaviours and the biological stress response. Unpredictable maternal separation (MS) was conducted for 3h daily from postnatal day 1 to 14, with subsequent behavioural testing at 10 weeks of age. Corticosterone was quantified in 11-week-old mice. Maternally separated (MS) CCR7(-/-), but not WT mice, displayed reduced interest in social novelty compared to CCR7(-/-) naïve mice. Separated CCR7(-/-) mice also exhibited significantly lower serum corticosterone concentrations compared to non-separated mice. CCR7(-/-) mice spent less time in the centre during an open field test and more time in the closed arm of the elevated zero maze compared to their wild-type (WT) controls suggesting they were more anxious, however, no difference was observed between MS and control mice in either strain or test. Together these findings suggest that CCR7 is involved in mediating social behaviour and stress response following maternal separation, whereas other behaviours such as anxiety appear to be modified by CCR7 independent of maternal separation. The observed altered cell-mediated immune function possibly underlying the behavioural and neuroendocrine differences in CCR7(-/-) mice following maternal separation requires further investigation.

  8. Optimizing adsorption of Pb(II) by modified litchi pericarp using the response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shujuan; Yang, Jili; Li, Yan; Wang, Kai; Li, Xiaochen

    2014-10-01

    Litchi pericarp was chemically modified as a novel bioadsorbent (MLP) for Pb(II) adsorption in this study. Operating parameters such as contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial pH of solution were investigated using batch assays and further optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that the MLP exhibited a high adsorption efficiency of 99.97% for Pb(II), which was optimal at a contact time of 71.56min, a initial pH of 6.81, and an adsorbent dose of 3.80g/L. Adsorption processes of Pb(II) by MLP could be well described with Langmuir or Freundlich isotherms and a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Pb(II) by MLP was determined as 163.93mg/g, suggesting a highly promising potential for MLP to be used as a new bioadsorbent. Additionally, the thermodynamic study indicated that the adsorption process of Pb(II) by MLP was spontaneously and exothermic.

  9. Molecular responses of genetically modified maize to abiotic stresses as determined through proteomic and metabolomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Benevenuto, Rafael Fonseca; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Zanon; Vilperte, Vinicius; Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; van Rensburg, Peet Jansen; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-01-01

    Some genetically modified (GM) plants have transgenes that confer tolerance to abiotic stressors. Meanwhile, other transgenes may interact with abiotic stressors, causing pleiotropic effects that will affect the plant physiology. Thus, physiological alteration might have an impact on the product safety. However, routine risk assessment (RA) analyses do not evaluate the response of GM plants exposed to different environmental conditions. Therefore, we here present a proteome profile of herbicide-tolerant maize, including the levels of phytohormones and related compounds, compared to its near-isogenic non-GM variety under drought and herbicide stresses. Twenty differentially abundant proteins were detected between GM and non-GM hybrids under different water deficiency conditions and herbicide sprays. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that most of these proteins are assigned to energetic/carbohydrate metabolic processes. Among phytohormones and related compounds, different levels of ABA, CA, JA, MeJA and SA were detected in the maize varieties and stress conditions analysed. In pathway and proteome analyses, environment was found to be the major source of variation followed by the genetic transformation factor. Nonetheless, differences were detected in the levels of JA, MeJA and CA and in the abundance of 11 proteins when comparing the GM plant and its non-GM near-isogenic variety under the same environmental conditions. Thus, these findings do support molecular studies in GM plants Risk Assessment analyses.

  10. Modifying rainfall patterns in a Mediterranean shrubland: system design, plant responses, and experimental burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Antonio; Ramírez, David A.; Resco, Víctor; Velasco, Ángel; Moreno, José M.

    2012-11-01

    Global warming is projected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the Mediterranean region, as well as the occurrence of large fires. Understanding the interactions between drought, fire and plant responses is therefore important. In this study, we present an experiment in which rainfall patterns were modified to simulate various levels of drought in a Mediterranean shrubland of central Spain dominated by Cistus ladanifer, Erica arborea and Phillyrea angustifolia. A system composed of automatic rainout shelters with an irrigation facility was used. It was designed to be applied in vegetation 2 m tall, treat relatively large areas (36 m2), and be quickly dismantled to perform experimental burning and reassembled back again. Twenty plots were subjected to four rainfall treatments from early spring: natural rainfall, long-term average rainfall (2 months drought), moderate drought (25% reduction from long-term rainfall, 5 months drought) and severe drought (45% reduction, 7 months drought). The plots were burned in late summer, without interfering with rainfall manipulations. Results indicated that rainfall manipulations caused differences in soil moisture among treatments, leading to reduced water availability and growth of C. ladanifer and E. arborea in the drought treatments. However, P. angustifolia was not affected by the manipulations. Rainout shelters had a negligible impact on plot microenvironment. Experimental burns were of high fire intensity, without differences among treatments. Our system provides a tool to study the combined effects of drought and fire on vegetation, which is important to assess the threats posed by climate change in Mediterranean environments.

  11. Stoichiometric Responses to an Agricultural Pesticide Are Modified by Predator Cues.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Lizanne; Op de Beeck, Lin; Stoks, Robby

    2017-01-03

    Current ecological risk assessment of pesticides fails to protect aquatic ecosystem health. To get better insight in how pesticides may affect aquatic ecosystems, we tested how sublethal pesticide concentrations modify body stoichiometry. Moreover, as interactions with natural stressors may cause underestimates of the impact of pesticides, we also tested whether this pathway depended on the presence of predator cues. Therefore, we exposed damselfly larvae to chlorpyrifos and cues from predatory dragonflies and focused on body stoichiometry and associated explanatory variables (growth rate, RNA:DNA, and energy storage molecules). The way the predator cues modulated the pesticide effects strongly differed between endpoints. Exposure to chlorpyrifos affected the key body stoichiometric ratios: chlorpyrifos consistently increased N:P, while its effects on C:N (decrease with predator cues) and C:P (increase without predator cues) strongly depended upon the presence of the natural stressor. These stoichiometric responses could be explained by associated changes in growth, RNA:DNA, and in C-rich fat and sugars and N-rich proteins. The observed changes in body stoichiometry may affect the damselflies' food quality and have the potential to cascade through the food web and shape nutrient cycling.

  12. FocusALL: Focal Stacking of Microscopic Images Using Modified Harris Corner Response Measure.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Madhu S; Sigdel, Madhav; Dinç, Semih; Dinç, Imren; Pusey, Marc L; Aygün, Ramazan S

    2016-01-01

    Automated image analysis of microscopic images such as protein crystallization images and cellular images is one of the important research areas. If objects in a scene appear at different depths with respect to the camera's focal point, objects outside the depth of field usually appear blurred. Therefore, scientists capture a collection of images with different depths of field. Focal stacking is a technique of creating a single focused image from a stack of images collected with different depths of field. In this paper, we introduce a novel focal stacking technique, FocusALL, which is based on our modified Harris Corner Response Measure. We also propose enhanced FocusALL for application on images collected under high resolution and varying illumination. FocusALL resolves problems related to the assumption that focus regions have high contrast and high intensity. Especially, FocusALL generates sharper boundaries around protein crystal regions and good in focus images for high resolution images in reasonable time. FocusALL outperforms other methods on protein crystallization images and performs comparably well on other datasets such as retinal epithelial images and simulated datasets.

  13. Optimizing the lanthanum adsorption process onto chemically modified biomaterials using factorial and response surface design.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Andreea; Davidescu, Corneliu Mircea; Negrea, Adina; Ciopec, Mihaela; Grozav, Ion; Negrea, Petru; Duteanu, Narcis

    2017-01-29

    The rare metals' potential to pollute air, water, soil, and especially groundwater has received lot of attention recently. One of the most common rare earth group elements, lanthanum, is used in many industrial branches, and due to its toxicity, it needs to be eliminated from all residual aqueous solutions. The goal of this study was to evaluate the control of the adsorption process for lanthanum removal from aqueous solutions, using cellulose, a known biomaterial with high adsorbent properties, cheap, and environment friendly. The cellulose was chemically modified by functionalization with sodium β-glycerophosphate. The experimental results obtained after factorial design indicate optimum adsorption parameters as pH 6, contact time 60 min, and temperature 298 K, when the equilibrium concentration of lanthanum was 250 mg L(-1), and the experimental adsorption capacity obtained was 31.58 mg g(-1). Further refinement of the optimization of the adsorption process by response surface design indicates that at pH 6 and the initial concentration of 256 mg L(-1), the adsorption capacity has maximum values between 30.87 and 36.73 mg g(-1).

  14. Molecular responses of genetically modified maize to abiotic stresses as determined through proteomic and metabolomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Benevenuto, Rafael Fonseca; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Zanon; Vilperte, Vinicius; Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; van Rensburg, Peet Jansen; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-01-01

    Some genetically modified (GM) plants have transgenes that confer tolerance to abiotic stressors. Meanwhile, other transgenes may interact with abiotic stressors, causing pleiotropic effects that will affect the plant physiology. Thus, physiological alteration might have an impact on the product safety. However, routine risk assessment (RA) analyses do not evaluate the response of GM plants exposed to different environmental conditions. Therefore, we here present a proteome profile of herbicide-tolerant maize, including the levels of phytohormones and related compounds, compared to its near-isogenic non-GM variety under drought and herbicide stresses. Twenty differentially abundant proteins were detected between GM and non-GM hybrids under different water deficiency conditions and herbicide sprays. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that most of these proteins are assigned to energetic/carbohydrate metabolic processes. Among phytohormones and related compounds, different levels of ABA, CA, JA, MeJA and SA were detected in the maize varieties and stress conditions analysed. In pathway and proteome analyses, environment was found to be the major source of variation followed by the genetic transformation factor. Nonetheless, differences were detected in the levels of JA, MeJA and CA and in the abundance of 11 proteins when comparing the GM plant and its non-GM near-isogenic variety under the same environmental conditions. Thus, these findings do support molecular studies in GM plants Risk Assessment analyses. PMID:28245233

  15. FocusALL: Focal Stacking of Microscopic Images Using Modified Harris Corner Response Measure

    PubMed Central

    Sigdel, Madhu S.; Sigdel, Madhav; Dinç, Semih; Dinç, Imren; Pusey, Marc L.; Aygün, Ramazan S.

    2016-01-01

    Automated image analysis of microscopic images such as protein crystallization images and cellular images is one of the important research areas. If objects in a scene appear at different depths with respect to the camera's focal point, objects outside the depth of field usually appear blurred. Therefore, scientists capture a collection of images with different depths of field. Focal stacking is a technique of creating a single focused image from a stack of images collected with different depths of field. In this paper, we introduce a novel focal stacking technique, FocusALL, which is based on our modified Harris Corner Response Measure. We also propose enhanced FocusALL for application on images collected under high resolution and varying illumination. FocusALL resolves problems related to the assumption that in focus regions have high contrast and high intensity. Especially, FocusALL generates sharper boundaries around protein crystal regions and good in focus images for high resolution images in reasonable time. FocusALL outperforms other methods on protein crystallization images and performs comparably well on other datasets such as retinal epithelial images and simulated datasets. PMID:27045831

  16. The elucidation of gene transferring mechanism by ultrasound-responsive unmodified and mannose-modified lipoplexes.

    PubMed

    Un, Keita; Kawakami, Shigeru; Yoshida, Mitsuru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2011-07-01

    The development of gene transfection methods enhancing the level of gene expression under simple and low-toxic condition is required for gene therapy in clinical. Our group has developed the ultrasound (US)-mediated gene transfection method using Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes, which are US-responsive and mannose-modified gene carriers, and succeeded in obtaining the enhanced gene expression in mannose receptor-expressing cells selectively by the gene transfer using Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes with US exposure in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated pDNA transferring mechanism followed by US exposure to unmodified and Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes, in particular, focused on US exposure timing. Following investigation of intracellular transferring characteristics, a large amount of pDNA was transferred into the cytoplasm followed by US-mediated destruction of bubble lipoplexes in the gene transfer using both bubble lipoplexes with US exposure. Moreover, the effective gene expression was obtained without TNF-α production when US was exposed until 5 min after the addition of bubble lipoplexes. These findings suggest that the gene transfer using unmodified and Man-PEG(2000) bubble lipoplexes with US exposure enables to transfer pDNA into the cytoplasm, and optimized US exposure timing is important to achieve the high level of gene expression and the low level of pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

  17. Implications of Rheumatic Disease and Biological Response-Modifying Agents in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David M; Borah, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    The preoperative evaluation for any reconstructive or aesthetic procedure requires a detailed history of existing medical conditions and current home medications. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and psoriasis is high, but the impact of these chronic illnesses on surgical outcome and the side effects of the powerful medications used for treatment are often underappreciated. In this review, the authors highlight key perioperative considerations specific to rheumatologic diseases and their associated pharmacologic therapies. In particular, the authors discuss the perioperative management of biological response-modifying agents, which have largely become the new standard of therapy for many rheumatic diseases. The literature reveals three key perioperative concerns with biological therapy for rheumatic disease: infection, wound healing delays, and disease flare. However, data on specific perioperative complications are lacking, and it remains controversial whether withholding biological therapy before surgery is of benefit. The risk of these adverse events is influenced by several factors: age, sex, class of biological agent, duration of exposure, dosage, onset and severity of disease, and type of surgical procedure. Overall, it remains best to develop an individualized plan. In younger patients with recent onset of biological therapy, it is reasonable to withhold therapy based on 3 to 5 half-lives of the specific agent. In older patients with a substantial history of rheumatic disease, the decision to discontinue therapy must be weighed and decided carefully in conjunction with the rheumatologist.

  18. Optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to modify abiotic stress responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Watanabe, Takahito; Sugano, Shigeo S; Ueta, Risa; Ishihara, Ryosuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Osakabe, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to modify plant genomes, however, improvements in specificity and applicability are still needed in order for the editing technique to be useful in various plant species. Here, using genome editing mediated by a truncated gRNA (tru-gRNA)/Cas9 combination, we generated new alleles for OST2, a proton pump in Arabidopsis, with no off-target effects. By following expression of Cas9 and the tru-gRNAs, newly generated mutations in CRIPSR/Cas9 transgenic plants were detected with high average mutation rates of up to 32.8% and no off-target effects using constitutive promoter. Reducing nuclear localization signals in Cas9 decreased the mutation rate. In contrast, tru-gRNA Cas9 cassettes driven by meristematic- and reproductive-tissue-specific promoters increased the heritable mutation rate in Arabidopsis, showing that high expression in the germ line can produce bi-allelic mutations. Finally, the new mutant alleles obtained for OST2 exhibited altered stomatal closing in response to environmental conditions. These results suggest further applications in molecular breeding to improve plant function using optimized plant CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:27226176

  19. Thermo-responsive and compression properties of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber-modified PNIPAm hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinguang; Chen, Yufei; Liu, Hongzhi; Du, Chungui; Yu, Huilong; Zhou, Zhongxi

    2016-08-20

    In this study, TEMPO-oxidized bamboo cellulose nanofibers (TO-CNF) with anionic carboxylate groups on the surfaces were in-situ incorporated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) matrix to improve its thermo-responsive and mechanical properties during the polymerization. The microstructure, swelling behaviors, and compressive strength of resultant PNIPAm composite hydrogels with varying contents of TO-CNFs (0-10wt%) were then examined, respectively. Modified hydrogels exhibited the similar light transparency to pure PNIPAm one due to the formation of semi-IPN structure between PNIPAm and TO-CNF. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the presence of TO-CNF did not alter the position of characteristic peaks associated with PNIPAm. SEM observation suggested that the pore size of PNIPAm hydrogels was markedly increased after the incorporation of TO-CNF. Also, the composite hydrogels showed superior swelling behavior and much improved compression properties with respect to pure PNIPAm one. Thus, TO-CNF appeared to be a "green" nanofiller that can simultaneously improve swelling and mechanical properties of PNIPAm hydrogel.

  20. The effectiveness of different approaches to media literacy in modifying adolescents' responses to alcohol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chun Yvonnes

    2013-01-01

    Fearing the negative effect that alcohol advertising might have on adolescents' receptiveness to the consumption of alcohol, health educators have used media literacy as an effective strategy to mitigate the effect of these messages in the media. The present study applied parental mediation to the design and evaluations of a media literacy curriculum that targets alcohol decision-making processes illustrated in the message interpretation process model. The authors conducted a pretest-posttest quasi-experiment of 171 adolescents to examine the effect of a negative evaluative approach and a balanced evaluative approach (a combination of negative and positive evaluative strategies) to media literacy on modifying adolescents' responses to alcohol messages. Results showed that different media literacy approaches had varying degrees of effectiveness on adolescent boys and girls. After receiving a negative media literacy lesson, adolescent boys regarded television characters as less realistic and believed that drinking alcohol had negative consequences. In contrast, adolescent girls benefited more from a balanced evaluative approach as their media skepticism attitude was enhanced. Results suggest that health educators should choose tailored pedagogical approaches that are based on gender to improve decision making regarding alcohol consumption.

  1. Modifying rainfall patterns in a Mediterranean shrubland: system design, plant responses, and experimental burning.

    PubMed

    Parra, Antonio; Ramírez, David A; Resco, Víctor; Velasco, Ángel; Moreno, José M

    2012-11-01

    Global warming is projected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the Mediterranean region, as well as the occurrence of large fires. Understanding the interactions between drought, fire and plant responses is therefore important. In this study, we present an experiment in which rainfall patterns were modified to simulate various levels of drought in a Mediterranean shrubland of central Spain dominated by Cistus ladanifer, Erica arborea and Phillyrea angustifolia. A system composed of automatic rainout shelters with an irrigation facility was used. It was designed to be applied in vegetation 2 m tall, treat relatively large areas (36 m2), and be quickly dismantled to perform experimental burning and reassembled back again. Twenty plots were subjected to four rainfall treatments from early spring: natural rainfall, long-term average rainfall (2 months drought), moderate drought (25% reduction from long-term rainfall, 5 months drought) and severe drought (45% reduction, 7 months drought). The plots were burned in late summer, without interfering with rainfall manipulations. Results indicated that rainfall manipulations caused differences in soil moisture among treatments, leading to reduced water availability and growth of C. ladanifer and E. arborea in the drought treatments. However, P. angustifolia was not affected by the manipulations. Rainout shelters had a negligible impact on plot microenvironment. Experimental burns were of high fire intensity, without differences among treatments. Our system provides a tool to study the combined effects of drought and fire on vegetation, which is important to assess the threats posed by climate change in Mediterranean environments.

  2. Linearity and uniformity response as an indicator of performance for Agfa ADC-MD10 computed radiography plates.

    PubMed

    Zullo, John R; Bloch, Charles; Chi, Pai-Chun; Kudchadker, Rajat

    2004-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) plates are currently used in radiation therapy clinics to acquire digital radiographic images for the purpose of verifying the treatment field size, shape, and location. Each CR plate may be used numerous times, and the use of these digital images allows for easy storage and retrieval of patient data. Over prolonged repeat exposures of the CR plates, however, the image quality begins to degrade, making it increasingly more difficult for the therapists and physicians to determine where one anatomical structure begins, and the other ends. The purpose of this project was to analyze and compare the linearity and uniformity responses of new CR plates, versus CR plates that have been used clinically for a period of 2 years, and determine whether linearity or uniformity response may be used as an indicator of image quality degradation. To determine this, 44 old Agfa MD10 CR plates and 56 new Agfa MD10 CR plates were tested. When comparing the results of the uniformity test, we found both the old and the new plates varied from approximately 0.5% to 3.2%. When comparing the results of the linearity test, we found that the correlation coefficient, R(2), for both the old and the new plates varied from approximately 0.996 to 0.998, with the mean values being 0.9972 and 0.9979, respectively. We concluded that linearity and uniformity response cannot be used as an effective method for the evaluation of CR plate performance. Additional research is currently underway to evaluate various other methods of assessing CR plate performance.

  3. Head kinematics in mini-sled tests of foam padding: relevance of linear responses from free motion headform (FMH) testing to head angular responses.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, J; Viano, D C; Lövsund, P; Parnaik, Y

    2003-08-01

    The revised Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 201 specifies that the safety performance of vehicle upper interiors is determined from the resultant linear acceleration response of a free motion headform (FMH) impacting the interior at 6.7 m/s. This study addresses whether linear output data from the FMH test can be used to select an upper interior padding that decreases the likelihood of rotationally induced brain injuries. Using an experimental setup consisting of a Hybrid III head-neck structure mounted on a mini-sled platform, sagittal plane linear and angular head accelerations were measured in frontal head impacts into foam samples of various stiffness and density with a constant thickness (51 mm) at low (approximately 5.0 m/s), intermediate (approximately 7.0 m/s), and high (approximately 9.6 m/s) impact speeds. Provided that the foam samples did not bottom out, recorded peak values of angular acceleration and change in angular velocity increased approximately linearly with increasing peak resultant linear acceleration and value of the Head Injury Criterion (HIC36). The results indicate that the padding that produces the lowest possible peak angular acceleration and peak change in angular velocity without causing high peak forces is the one that produces the lowest possible HIC36 without bottoming out in the FMH test.

  4. Modified Maxium Likelihood Estimation Method for Completely Separated and Quasi-Completely Separated Data for a Dose-Response Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    MODIFIED MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION METHOD FOR COMPLETELY SEPARATED AND QUASI-COMPLETELY SEPARATED DATA...Likelihood Estimation Method for Completely Separated and Quasi-Completely Separated Data for a Dose-Response Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...quasi-completely separated , the traditional maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method generates infinite estimates. The bias-reduction (BR) method

  5. Modified live virus vaccine induces a distinct immune response profile compared to inactivated influenza A virus vaccines in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and antigenic diversity within H1 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes circulating in swine is increasing. The need for cross-protective influenza vaccines in swine is necessary as the virus becomes more diverse. This study compared the humoral and cell-mediated immune response of modified live ...

  6. Non-linear analysis of body responses to functional electrical stimulation on hemiplegic subjects.

    PubMed

    Yu, W W; Acharya, U R; Lim, T C; Low, H W

    2009-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a method of applying low-level electrical currents to restore or improve body functions lost through nervous system impairment. FES is applied to peripheral nerves that control specific muscles or muscle groups. Application of advanced signal computing techniques to the medical field has helped to achieve practical solutions to the health care problems accurately. The physiological signals are essentially non-stationary and may contain indicators of current disease, or even warnings about impending diseases. These indicators may be present at all times or may occur at random on the timescale. However, to study and pinpoint these subtle changes in the voluminous data collected over several hours is tedious. These signals, e.g. walking-related accelerometer signals, are not simply linear and involve non-linear contributions. Hence, non-linear signal-processing methods may be useful to extract the hidden complexities of the signal and to aid physicians in their diagnosis. In this work, a young female subject with major neuromuscular dysfunction of the left lower limb, which resulted in an asymmetric hemiplegic gait, participated in a series of FES-assisted walking experiments. Two three-axis accelerometers were attached to her left and right ankles and their corresponding signals were recorded during FES-assisted walking. The accelerometer signals were studied in three directions using the Hurst exponent H, the fractal dimension (FD), the phase space plot, and recurrence plots (RPs). The results showed that the H and FD values increase with increasing FES, indicating more synchronized variability due to FES for the left leg (paralysed leg). However, the variation in the normal right leg is more chaotic on FES.

  7. Visual conflict and cognitive load modify postural responses to vibrotactile noise

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Underlying the increased incidence of falls during multitasking is a reduced ability to detect or attend to the sensory information signaling postural instability. Adding noise to a biological system has been shown to enhance the detection and transmission of weakened or sub-threshold cutaneous signals. If stochastic resonance is to become an effective adjunct to rehabilitation, we need to determine whether vibrotactile noise can be effective when added to an environment presenting with other sensory noise. Methods Sub-threshold vibration noise was applied for 30 sec at the soles of the feet in 21 healthy adults (20–29 yrs) between two 30-sec periods of no vibration. During the trials, subjects stood quietly with eyes closed or while viewing a visual scene that rotated in continuous upward pitch at 30 deg/sec. Subjects were also tested with these two visual conditions while performing a mental calculation task. It was hypothesized that sub-threshold vibration would increase regularity of postural sway, thereby improving postural stabilization during an attention demanding task but exerting less effect with multiple sensory demands. An ellipse fit to the covariance matrix revealed excursion of center of pressure (COP) and center of mass (COM) responses in the anterior-posterior and lateral planes. RMS values and approximate entropy of the COP and COM were calculated and statistically compared. Results The addition of vibrotactile noise to the plantar surface during quiet stance with eyes closed reduced the area of the COM and COP responses, which then returned to pre-vibration levels after vibration was removed. Postural sway was generally increased with both visual field rotations and mental calculation compared to the eyes closed condition. The effect of sub-threshold vibratory noise on postural behavior was modified when visual field rotations and mental calculation was combined. It was shown that the measure of approximate entropy reflected

  8. Atypical response to treatment in linear IgA bullous dermatosis of childhood: Revision of literature.

    PubMed

    Moleiro, Susana; Santos, Vera; Calha, Manuela; Pessoa, Graça

    2011-06-15

    A three-year-old boy presented with 2 months of worsening skin lesions characterized by multiple clear vesicles and bullae. The histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations revealed changes consistent with linear IgA bullous dermatosis of childhood. Treatment with dapsone and prednisolone resulted in gradual clinical improvement. However, within a week of therapy he presented with diabetic ketoacidosis, the onset of type I diabetes mellitus. Since then, keeping this child asymptomatic has been a challenge. This case emphasizes the importance of close monitoring of patients taking systemic corticosteroids; the coexistence of other immune mediated conditions may influence the success of treatment.

  9. Perception of tilt (somatogravic illusion) in response to sustained linear acceleration during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, G.; Moore, S. T.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During the 1998 Neurolab mission (STS-90), four astronauts were exposed to interaural and head vertical (dorsoventral) linear accelerations of 0.5 g and 1 g during constant velocity rotation on a centrifuge, both on Earth and during orbital space flight. Subjects were oriented either left-ear-out or right-ear-out (Gy centrifugation), or lay supine along the centrifuge arm with their head off-axis (Gz centrifugation). Pre-flight centrifugation, producing linear accelerations of 0.5 g and 1 g along the Gy (interaural) axis, induced illusions of roll-tilt of 20 degrees and 34 degrees for gravito-inertial acceleration (GIA) vector tilts of 27 degrees and 45 degrees , respectively. Pre-flight 0.5 g and 1 g Gz (head dorsoventral) centrifugation generated perceptions of backward pitch of 5 degrees and 15 degrees , respectively. In the absence of gravity during space flight, the same centrifugation generated a GIA that was equivalent to the centripetal acceleration and aligned with the Gy or Gz axes. Perception of tilt was underestimated relative to this new GIA orientation during early in-flight Gy centrifugation, but was close to the GIA after 16 days in orbit, when subjects reported that they felt as if they were 'lying on side'. During the course of the mission, inflight roll-tilt perception during Gy centrifugation increased from 45 degrees to 83 degrees at 1 g and from 42 degrees to 48 degrees at 0.5 g. Subjects felt 'upside-down' during in-flight Gz centrifugation from the first in-flight test session, which reflected the new GIA orientation along the head dorsoventral axis. The different levels of in-flight tilt perception during 0.5 g and 1 g Gy centrifugation suggests that other non-vestibular inputs, including an internal estimate of the body vertical and somatic sensation, were utilized in generating tilt perception. Interpretation of data by a weighted sum of body vertical and somatic vectors, with an estimate of the GIA from the otoliths, suggests that

  10. Importance of the spatial heterogeneity in the non-linear response of a small Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Pérez, Guiomar; Medici, Chiara; Latron, Jérôme; Llorens, Pilar; Gallart, Francesc; Francés, Félix

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that Mediterranean catchments are characterized by a complex hydrological behavior and strong non-linearities (Ye et al., 1998, Piñol et al., 1999). Therefore, modeling hydrology of a small Mediterranean catchment still represents a great challenge for modelers. To this end, the practical superiority of distributed or semi-distributed approaches over lumped ones remains an open question (see e.g. Loague and Freeze, 1985; Michaud and Sorooshian, 1994; Refsgaard and Knudsen, 1996; Loumagne et al., 1999; Zhang et al., 2003). In fact, a variety of earlier studies have inter-compared distributed versus lumped model simulations reaching opposite conclusions. With the present work, we tried to answer the following research question: Are observed non-linearities due to spatial heterogeneity or to non-linear mechanisms that should be taken into account in a model conceptual scheme? To address these issues the hydrological modeling of the Can Vila catchment (Vallcebre, Eastern Pyrenees, Spain) was carried out. Three hydrological models were considered: two lumped models called LU3 and LU4 (Medici et al., 2008), and a fully distributed model called TETIS (Francés et al., 2007). The TETIS model has the same conceptual schema as the LU3 model at cell-scale and the LU4 model's structure is based on the LU3 model, but it splits the aquifer storage in two tanks: shallow aquifer and deep aquifer. Percolation to the deep aquifer occurs only when soil water content exceeds a threshold value. So, the difference between the LU3 model and the TETIS model is the incorporation of the spatial heterogeneity and the difference between the LU3 model and the LU4 model is an additional strong non-linearity with the threshold which actives the deep percolation. The graphical comparison with the observations and the goodness of fit indexes employed showed that: (1) the LU3 model could not reproduce reasonably well the wet and dry period with the same set of parameters while (2

  11. Non-linearity dynamics in ecosystem response to climate change: Case studies and policy implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkett, V.R.; Wilcox, D.A.; Stottlemyer, R.; Barrow, W.; Fagre, D.; Baron, J.; Nielsen, J.L.; Allen, C.D.; Peterson, D.L.; Ruggerone, G.; Doyle, T.

    2005-01-01

    Many biological, hydrological, and geological processes are interactively linked in ecosystems. These ecological phenomena normally vary within bounded ranges, but rapid, nonlinear changes to markedly different conditions can be triggered by even small differences if threshold values are exceeded. Intrinsic and extrinsic ecological thresholds can lead to effects that cascade among systems, precluding accurate modeling and prediction of system response to climate change. Ten case studies from North America illustrate how changes in climate cna lead to rapid, threshold-type responses within ecological communities; the case studies also highlight the role of human activities that alter the rate or direction of system response to climate change. Understanding and anticipating nonlinear dynamics are important aspects of adaptation planning since responses of biological resources to changes in the physical climate system are not necessarily proportional and sometimes, as in the case of complex ecological systems, inherently nonlinear.

  12. A study of thermal response of concrete towers employing linear regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, Mehdi; Zarbaf, Seyed Ehsan Haji Agha Mohammad; Dalvi, Aditi; Hunt, Victor; Helmicki, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown that the variations of structural properties due to changing environmental conditions such as temperature can be as significant as those caused by structural damage and even liveload. Therefore, tracking changes that are correlated with environmental variations is a necessary step in order to detect and assess structural damage in addition to the normal structural response to traffic. In this paper, daily measurement data that is collected from the concrete towers of the Ironton-Russell Bridge will be presented and correlation of the collected measurement data and temperature will be overviewed. Variation of the daily thermal response of tower concrete walls will be compared with the daily thermal responses of the steel box within the tower and finally, thermal coefficient for compensating the thermal induced responses will be estimated.

  13. Linear Response of One-Dimensional Liquid ^4{He} to External Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, M.; Bertaina, G.; Vitali, E.; Galli, D. E.; Rossi, M.

    2016-11-01

    We study the response of one-dimensional liquid ^4{He} to weak perturbations relying on the dynamical structure factor, S(q,ω ) , recently obtained via ab-initio techniques (Bertaina et al. in Phys Rev Lett 116:135302, 2016). We evaluate the drag force, F_v , experienced by an impurity moving along the system with velocity v and the static response function, χ (q) , describing the density modulations induced by a periodic perturbation with wave vector q.

  14. Responses to a Modified Visual Cliff by Pre-Walking Infants Born Preterm and at Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yuan-Shan; Reilly, Marie; Mercer, Vicki S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, using a modified visual cliff apparatus, possible perceptual differences at crawling age between infants born preterm and infants born at term without documented visual or motor impairments. Sixteen infants born at term and 16 born preterm were encouraged to crawl to their caregivers on a modified visual…

  15. Linear and nonlinear auditory response properties of interneurons in a high-order avian vocal motor nucleus during wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Raksin, Jonathan N; Glaze, Christopher M; Smith, Sarah; Schmidt, Marc F

    2012-04-01

    Motor-related forebrain areas in higher vertebrates also show responses to passively presented sensory stimuli. However, sensory tuning properties in these areas, especially during wakefulness, and their relation to perception, are poorly understood. In the avian song system, HVC (proper name) is a vocal-motor structure with auditory responses well defined under anesthesia but poorly characterized during wakefulness. We used a large set of stimuli including the bird's own song (BOS) and many conspecific songs (CON) to characterize auditory tuning properties in putative interneurons (HVC(IN)) during wakefulness. Our findings suggest that HVC contains a diversity of responses that vary in overall excitability to auditory stimuli, as well as bias in spike rate increases to BOS over CON. We used statistical tests to classify cells in order to further probe auditory responses, yielding one-third of neurons that were either unresponsive or suppressed and two-thirds with excitatory responses to one or more stimuli. A subset of excitatory neurons were tuned exclusively to BOS and showed very low linearity as measured by spectrotemporal receptive field analysis (STRF). The remaining excitatory neurons responded well to CON stimuli, although many cells still expressed a bias toward BOS. These findings suggest the concurrent presence of a nonlinear and a linear component to responses in HVC, even within the same neuron. These characteristics are consistent with perceptual deficits in distinguishing BOS from CON stimuli following lesions of HVC and other song nuclei and suggest mirror neuronlike qualities in which "self" (here BOS) is used as a referent to judge "other" (here CON).

  16. Do Responses to Different Anthropogenic Forcings Add Linearly in Climate Models?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvel, Kate; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Shindell, Drew; Bonfils, Celine; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Nazarenko, Larissa; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    Many detection and attribution and pattern scaling studies assume that the global climate response to multiple forcings is additive: that the response over the historical period is statistically indistinguishable from the sum of the responses to individual forcings. Here, we use the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model (CCSM) simulations from the CMIP5 archive to test this assumption for multi-year trends in global-average, annual-average temperature and precipitation at multiple timescales. We find that responses in models forced by pre-computed aerosol and ozone concentrations are generally additive across forcings; however, we demonstrate that there are significant nonlinearities in precipitation responses to di?erent forcings in a configuration of the GISS model that interactively computes these concentrations from precursor emissions. We attribute these to di?erences in ozone forcing arising from interactions between forcing agents. Our results suggest that attribution to specific forcings may be complicated in a model with fully interactive chemistry and may provide motivation for other modeling groups to conduct further single-forcing experiments.

  17. Do responses to different anthropogenic forcings add linearly in climate models?

    SciTech Connect

    Marvel, Kate; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Shindell, Drew; Bonfils, Celine; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Nazarenko, Larissa; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2015-10-14

    Many detection and attribution and pattern scaling studies assume that the global climate response to multiple forcings is additive: that the response over the historical period is statistically indistinguishable from the sum of the responses to individual forcings. Here, we use the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) simulations from the CMIP5 archive to test this assumption for multi-year trends in global-average, annual-average temperature and precipitation at multiple timescales. We find that responses in models forced by pre-computed aerosol and ozone concentrations are generally additive across forcings. However, we demonstrate that there are significant nonlinearities in precipitation responses to different forcings in a configuration of the GISS model that interactively computes these concentrations from precursor emissions. We attribute these to differences in ozone forcing arising from interactions between forcing agents. Lastly, our results suggest that attribution to specific forcings may be complicated in a model with fully interactive chemistry and may provide motivation for other modeling groups to conduct further single-forcing experiments.

  18. Do responses to different anthropogenic forcings add linearly in climate models?

    DOE PAGES

    Marvel, Kate; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Shindell, Drew; ...

    2015-10-14

    Many detection and attribution and pattern scaling studies assume that the global climate response to multiple forcings is additive: that the response over the historical period is statistically indistinguishable from the sum of the responses to individual forcings. Here, we use the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) simulations from the CMIP5 archive to test this assumption for multi-year trends in global-average, annual-average temperature and precipitation at multiple timescales. We find that responses in models forced by pre-computed aerosol and ozone concentrations are generally additive across forcings. However,more » we demonstrate that there are significant nonlinearities in precipitation responses to different forcings in a configuration of the GISS model that interactively computes these concentrations from precursor emissions. We attribute these to differences in ozone forcing arising from interactions between forcing agents. Lastly, our results suggest that attribution to specific forcings may be complicated in a model with fully interactive chemistry and may provide motivation for other modeling groups to conduct further single-forcing experiments.« less

  19. Fetal Responses during Placental Malaria Modify the Risk of Low Birth Weight▿

    PubMed Central

    Kabyemela, Edward R.; Fried, Michal; Kurtis, Jonathan D.; Mutabingwa, Theonest K.; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation during placental malaria (PM) is associated with low birth weight (LBW), especially during the first pregnancy, but the relative contribution of maternal or fetal factors that mediate this effect remains unclear and the role of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) has been controversial. We examined the relationship of maternal and cord plasma levels of IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-10, ferritin, and leptin to birth weight for Tanzanian women delivering in an area where there is a high rate of malaria transmission. The placental levels of inflammatory cytokines, including IFN-γ, increased significantly during PM in primigravid and multigravid women but not in secundigravid women. PM also increased maternal peripheral levels of all inflammatory markers except IFN-γ but had strikingly little effect on cord levels of these proteins. In a multivariate analysis, placental IFN-γ was negatively associated (P = 0.01) and cord ferritin was positively associated (P < 0.0001) with birth weight in infected (PM-positive [PM+]) first-time mothers. This relationship was not observed in other mothers, consistent with the epidemiology of PM and disease. Cord leptin had a strong positive relationship with birth weight in offspring of PM-negative women (P = 0.02 to P < 0.0001) but not in offspring of PM+ women (all differences were not significant) in the three gravidity groups. The results confirmed that placental IFN-γ is related to LBW due to PM during first pregnancies and suggest that fetal ferritin plays a protective role. Because fetal cells are a source of placental IFN-γ and cord ferritin, the fetal response to PM may modify the risk of LBW. PMID:18212078

  20. Characterization of Photon-Counting Detector Responsivity for Non-Linear Two-Photon Absorption Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sburlan, S. E.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-band absorption at 1550 nm has been demonstrated and characterized on silicon Geiger mode detectors which normally would be expected to have no response at this wavelength. We compare responsivity measurements to singlephoton absorption for wavelengths slightly above the bandgap wavelength of silicon (approx. 1100 microns). One application for this low efficiency sub-band absorption is in deep space optical communication systems where it is desirable to track a 1030 nm uplink beacon on the same flight terminal detector array that monitors a 1550 nm downlink signal for pointingcontrol. The currently observed absorption at 1550 nm provides 60-70 dB of isolation compared to the response at 1064 nm, which is desirable to avoid saturation of the detector by scattered light from the downlink laser.

  1. A Step Response Based Mixed-Signal BIST Approach for Continuous-time Linear Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Alvernon; Lala, P. K.

    2001-01-01

    A new Mixed-Signal Built-in self-test approach that is based upon the step response of a reconfigurable (or multifunction) analog block is presented in this paper. The technique requires the overlapping step response of the Circuit Under Test (CUT) for two circuit configurations. Each configuration can be realized by changing the topology of the CUT or by sampling two CUT nodes with differing step responses. The technique can effectively detect both soft and hard faults and does not require an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and/or digital-to-analog converter(DAC). It also does not require any precision voltage sources or comparators. This approach does not require any additional analog circuits to realize the test signal generator and sample circuits. The paper is concluded with the application of the proposed approach to a circuit found in the work of Epstein et al and two ITC 97 analog benchmark circuits.

  2. Aging and linear response in the Hébraud–Lequeux model for amorphous rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollich, Peter; Olivier, Julien; Bresch, Didier

    2017-04-01

    We analyse the aging dynamics of the Hébraud–Lequeux model, a self-consistent stochastic model for the evolution of local stress in an amorphous material. We show that the model exhibits initial-condition dependent freezing: the stress diffusion constant decays with time as D∼ 1/{{t}2} during aging so that the cumulative amount of memory that can be erased, which is given by the time integral of D(t), is finite. Accordingly the shear stress relaxation function, which we determine in the long-time regime, only decays to a plateau and becomes progressively elastic as the system ages. The frequency-dependent shear modulus exhibits a corresponding overall decay of the dissipative part with system age, while the characteristic relaxation times scale linearly with age as expected.

  3. Analog Techniques for Measuring the Frequency Response of Linear Physical Systems Excited by Frequency-Sweep Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Wilmer H., III; Hall, Albert W.; Barker, Lawrence E., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Data-reduction methods using general-purpose analog computer equipment and compatible testing techniques for determining the frequency response of linear physical systems are examined. The techniques considered may be classed as steady state or transient depending on the method of excitation. The relative merits of periodic, slow sweep, and transient (rapid sweep) forcing functions are discussed and applications are given that relate to dynamic-response tests of aeroelastic systems. Two frequency-sweep-input methods are considered in detail. one case the sweep rate is sufficiently slow that the response is approximately the same as that for steady-state conditions. With this input the frequency response can be evaluated and displayed in real time while the test is in progress. Errors due to treating sweep data as steady state can be eliminated, when desired, by reanalyzing tape-recorded time histories of the input and output as transient rather than as periodic data. In the second method the frequency-response function is deter- mined from the system's transient response to a very rapid sweep input. The purpose of frequency sweep in this case is to provide sufficient harmonic content in the input to overcome noise while keeping the test time as short as possible. tests and limited flight-test data presented herein, it appears that a transient-type rapid-sweep forcing function offers a considerable saving in test time while preserving the accuracy possible with steady-state sinusoidal inputs.

  4. Linear-scaling implementation of molecular response theory in self-consistent field electronic-structure theory.

    PubMed

    Coriani, Sonia; Høst, Stinne; Jansík, Branislav; Thøgersen, Lea; Olsen, Jeppe; Jørgensen, Poul; Reine, Simen; Pawłowski, Filip; Helgaker, Trygve; Sałek, Paweł

    2007-04-21

    A linear-scaling implementation of Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham self-consistent field theories for the calculation of frequency-dependent molecular response properties and excitation energies is presented, based on a nonredundant exponential parametrization of the one-electron density matrix in the atomic-orbital basis, avoiding the use of canonical orbitals. The response equations are solved iteratively, by an atomic-orbital subspace method equivalent to that of molecular-orbital theory. Important features of the subspace method are the use of paired trial vectors (to preserve the algebraic structure of the response equations), a nondiagonal preconditioner (for rapid convergence), and the generation of good initial guesses (for robust solution). As a result, the performance of the iterative method is the same as in canonical molecular-orbital theory, with five to ten iterations needed for convergence. As in traditional direct Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham theories, the calculations are dominated by the construction of the effective Fock/Kohn-Sham matrix, once in each iteration. Linear complexity is achieved by using sparse-matrix algebra, as illustrated in calculations of excitation energies and frequency-dependent polarizabilities of polyalanine peptides containing up to 1400 atoms.

  5. Serotonergic chemosensory neurons modify the C. elegans immune response by regulating G-protein signaling in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alexandra; Laurenson-Schafer, Henry; Partridge, Frederick A; Hodgkin, Jonathan; McMullan, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems influence each other, allowing animals to rapidly protect themselves from changes in their internal and external environment. However, the complex nature of these systems in mammals makes it difficult to determine how neuronal signaling influences the immune response. Here we show that serotonin, synthesized in Caenorhabditis elegans chemosensory neurons, modulates the immune response. Serotonin released from these cells acts, directly or indirectly, to regulate G-protein signaling in epithelial cells. Signaling in these cells is required for the immune response to infection by the natural pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum. Here we show that serotonin signaling suppresses the innate immune response and limits the rate of pathogen clearance. We show that C. elegans uses classical neurotransmitters to alter the immune response. Serotonin released from sensory neurons may function to modify the immune system in response to changes in the animal's external environment such as the availability, or quality, of food.

  6. Silicon Deprivation Does Not Significantly Modify the Acute White Blood Cell Response but Does Modify Tissue Mineral Distribution Response to an Endotoxin Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experiment with rats was conducted to determine whether silicon deprivation affects the acute-phase immune response to an endotoxin challenge. Weanling female rats were assigned to two weight-matched groups of 24; one group was fed a basal diet containing about 1.9 µg Si/kg, the other group was f...

  7. Polymorphism of the dopamine transporter type 1 gene modifies the treatment response in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Caroline; Meguig, Sayah; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Labreuche, Julien; Vasseur, Francis; Duhamel, Alain; Delval, Arnaud; Bardyn, Thomas; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Rouaix, Nathalie; Petyt, Gregory; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Guehl, Dominique; Eusebio, Alexandre; Fraix, Valérie; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaid; Durif, Frank; Faighel, Mirela; Giordana, Caroline; Drapier, Sophie; Maltête, David; Tranchant, Christine; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Debû, Bettina; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Tison, François; Destée, Alain; Vidailhet, Marie; Rascol, Olivier; Dujardin, Kathy; Defebvre, Luc; Bordet, Régis; Sablonnière, Bernard; Devos, David

    2015-05-01

    variants were significantly associated with greater efficacy of l-DOPA for motor symptoms. The SLC6A3 variants were also associated with greater efficacy of methylphenidate for motor symptoms and gait disorders in the ON l-DOPA condition. The difference between motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores for patients with different SLC6A3 genotypes was statistically significant in a multivariate analysis that took account of other disease-related, treatment-related and pharmacogenetic parameters. Our preliminary results suggest that variants of SLC6A3 are genetic modifiers of the treatment response to l-DOPA and methylphenidate in Parkinson's disease. Further studies are required to assess the possible value of these genotypes for (i) guiding l-DOPA dose adaptations over the long term; and (ii) establishing the risk/benefit balance associated with methylphenidate treatment for gait disorders.

  8. Response analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, M.; Schuller, T.; Sipp, D.; Schmid, P. J.

    2015-04-15

    The response of a laminar premixed methane-air flame subjected to flow perturbations around a steady state is examined experimentally and using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver with a one-step chemistry mechanism to describe combustion. The unperturbed flame takes an M-shape stabilized both by a central bluff body and by the external rim of a cylindrical nozzle. This base flow is computed by a nonlinear direct simulation of the steady reacting flow, and the flame topology is shown to qualitatively correspond to experiments conducted under comparable conditions. The flame is then subjected to acoustic disturbances produced at different locations in the numerical domain, and its response is examined using the linearized solver. This linear numerical model then allows the componentwise investigation of the effects of flow disturbances on unsteady combustion and the feedback from the flame on the unsteady flow field. It is shown that a wrinkled reaction layer produces hydrodynamic disturbances in the fresh reactant flow field that superimpose on the acoustic field. This phenomenon, observed in several experiments, is fully interpreted here. The additional perturbations convected by the mean flow stem from the feedback of the perturbed flame sheet dynamics onto the flow field by a mechanism similar to that of a perturbed vortex sheet. The different regimes where this mechanism prevails are investigated by examining the phase and group velocities of flow disturbances along an axis oriented along the main direction of the flow in the fresh reactant flow field. It is shown that this mechanism dominates the low-frequency response of the wrinkled shape taken by the flame and, in particular, that it fully determines the dynamics of the flame tip from where the bulk of noise is radiated.

  9. LINEAR STRUCTURAL MODELS FOR RESPONSE AND LATENCY PERFORMANCE IN ARITHMETIC. PSYCHOLOGY SERIES, TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 100.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUPPES, PATRICK; AND OTHERS

    A LEARNING MODEL TO IDENTIFY FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO THE DIFFICULTY OF A PROBLEM ITEM WAS SUPPORTED EMPIRICALLY, AND INDICATED THAT THE NUMBER OF STEPS REQUIRED TO SOLVE A PROBLEM WAS THE MOST IMPORTANT VARIABLE IN PREDICTING BOTH ERROR PROBABILITY AND RESPONSE LATENCY. THE MODEL, IN ORDER TO ESTABLISH DIFFERENTIAL PREDICTIONS OF DIFFICULTY IN…

  10. Local control theory using trajectory surface hopping and linear-response time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Curchod, Basile F E; Penfold, Thomas J; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of local control theory using nonadiabatic molecular dynamics within the framework of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory is discussed. The method is applied to study the photoexcitation of lithium fluoride, for which we demonstrate that this approach can efficiently generate a pulse, on-the-fly, able to control the population transfer between two selected electronic states. Analysis of the computed control pulse yields insights into the photophysics of the process identifying the relevant frequencies associated to the curvature of the initial and final state potential energy curves and their energy differences. The limitations inherent to the use of the trajectory surface hopping approach are also discussed.

  11. Unsteady Aerodynamic Response of a Linear Cascade of Airfoils in Separated Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capece, Vincent R.; Ford, Christopher; Bone, Christopher; Li, Rui

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to investigate methods to modify the leading edge separation region, which could lead to an improvement in aeroelastic stability of advanced airfoil designs. The airfoil section used is representative of current low aspect ratio fan blade tip sections. The experimental potion of this study investigated separated zone boundary layer from removal through suction slots. Suction applied to a cavity in the vicinity of the separation onset point was found to be the most effective location. The computational study looked into the influence of front camber on flutter stability. To assess the influence of the change in airfoil shape on stability the work-per-cycle was evaluated for torsion mode oscillations. It was shown that the front camberline shape can be an important factor for stabilizing the predicted work-per-cycle and reducing the predicted extent of the separation zone. In addition, data analysis procedures are discussed for reducing data acquired in experiments that involve periodic unsteady data. This work was conducted in support of experiments being conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Flutter Cascade. The spectral block averaging method is presented. This method is shown to be able to account for variations in airfoil oscillation frequency that can occur in experiments that force oscillate the airfoils to simulate flutter.

  12. Extreme responses of non-linear dynamic systems using constrained simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Harland, L.A.; Vugts, J.H.; Jonathan, P.; Taylor, P.H.

    1996-12-31

    The dynamic behavior of structures in the offshore environment is complex, especially in extreme storm conditions. The most accurate methods for estimating structural behavior are based on extensive random time domain simulations of the ocean surface to obtain statistics of the extreme response in (typically) a 3 hour period of a severe storm. However, random time domain simulation is time-consuming and expensive for both the computer and the engineer. In this work the authors use a method to determine the distribution of the extreme structural response in a robust, faster and cheaper way than with full random simulations. This method, which is based on constrained random simulations, has been successfully developed using a grossly simplified model of a jack-up. The aim of this study is now to include more realistic modelling parameters in order to demonstrate that the method can be successfully applied to real problems and that accurate results can be obtained with relatively little effort.

  13. Non-linear lattice response of Sm oxypnictides to hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liarokapis, E.; Calamiotou, M.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Karpinski, J.

    2013-10-01

    Hydrostatic pressure Raman measurements at room temperature have been carried out on the SmFeAsO (Sm1111) series of oxypnictides with various substitutions (F for O and Co for Fe) and transition temperature in order to investigate lattice modifications and their connection to doping and superconductivity. Synchrotron XRD data on some of these compounds indicated that at low doping the lattice constants vary smoothly with pressure, but with further increasing of the carrier concentration there is a deviation from the normal equation of state and these effects are related with modifications in the superconducting FeAs4 tetrahedra. The hydrostatic pressure Raman measurements indicate that the A1g mode of the rare earth atom for the superconducting compounds deviates from the linear pressure dependence at the same pressures where the XRD results show pressure-induced lattice anomalies. A similar anomaly is found for the As phonon of the same symmetry. As in cuprates, the effect is diminished in the non-superconducting compounds and it is not related with the F substitution being present in the Sm(Fe1-xCox)AsO as well. The calculated Grüneisen parameters indicate a more anharmonic phonon for the Fe atom compared with the Sm and As atoms.

  14. Miniature amperometric self-powered continuous glucose sensor with linear response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zenghe; Cho, Brian; Ouyang, Tianmei; Feldman, Ben

    2012-04-03

    Continuous glucose measurement has improved the treatment of type 1 diabetes and is typically provided by externally powered transcutaneous amperometric sensors. Self-powered glucose sensors (SPGSs) could provide an improvement over these conventionally powered devices, especially for fully implanted long-term applications where implanted power sources are problematic. Toward this end, we describe a robust SPGS that may be built from four simple components: (1) a low-potential, wired glucose oxidase anode; (2) a Pt/C cathode; (3) an overlying glucose flux-limiting membrane; and (4) a resistor bridging the anode and cathode. In vitro evaluation showed that the sensor output is linear over physiologic glucose concentrations (2-30 mM), even at low O(2) concentrations. Output was independent of the connecting resistor values over the range from 0 to 10 MΩ. The output was also stable over 60 days of continuous in vitro operation at 37 °C in 30 mM glucose. A 5-day trial in a volunteer demonstrated that the performance of the device was virtually identical to that of a conventional amperometric sensor. Thus, this SPGS is an attractive alternative to conventionally powered devices, especially for fully implanted long-term applications.

  15. Impact of observed North Atlantic multidecadal variations to European summer climate: a linear baroclinic response to surface heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Rohit; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Baehr, Johanna; Bader, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    The observed prominent multidecadal variations in the central to eastern (C-E) European summer temperature are closely related to the Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV). Using the Twentieth Century Reanalysis project version 2 data for the period of 1930-2012, we present a mechanism by which the multidecadal variations in the C-E European summer temperature are associated to a linear baroclinic atmospheric response to the AMV-related surface heat flux. Our results suggest that over the north-western Atlantic, the positive heat flux anomaly triggers a surface baroclinic pressure response to diabatic heating with a negative surface pressure anomaly to the east of the heat source. Further downstream, this response induces an east-west wave-like pressure anomaly. The east-west wave-like response in the sea level pressure structure, to which we refer as North-Atlantic-European East West (NEW) mode, is independent of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation and is the principal mode of variations during summer over the Euro-Atlantic region at multidecadal time scales. The NEW mode causes warming of the C-E European region by creating an atmospheric blocking-like situation. Our findings also suggest that this NEW mode is responsible for the multidecadal variations in precipitation over the British Isles and north-western Europe.

  16. A bias in the "mass-normalized" DTT response - An effect of non-linear concentration-response curves for copper and manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, Jessica G.; McFall, Alexander S.; Vu, Kennedy K.-T.; Baroi, James; Olea, Catalina; Hasson, Alam; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-11-01

    The dithiothreitol (DTT) assay is widely used to measure the oxidative potential of particulate matter. Results are typically presented in mass-normalized units (e.g., pmols DTT lost per minute per microgram PM) to allow for comparison among samples. Use of this unit assumes that the mass-normalized DTT response is constant and independent of the mass concentration of PM added to the DTT assay. However, based on previous work that identified non-linear DTT responses for copper and manganese, this basic assumption (that the mass-normalized DTT response is independent of the concentration of PM added to the assay) should not be true for samples where Cu and Mn contribute significantly to the DTT signal. To test this we measured the DTT response at multiple PM concentrations for eight ambient particulate samples collected at two locations in California. The results confirm that for samples with significant contributions from Cu and Mn, the mass-normalized DTT response can strongly depend on the concentration of PM added to the assay, varying by up to an order of magnitude for PM concentrations between 2 and 34 μg mL-1. This mass dependence confounds useful interpretation of DTT assay data in samples with significant contributions from Cu and Mn, requiring additional quality control steps to check for this bias. To minimize this problem, we discuss two methods to correct the mass-normalized DTT result and we apply those methods to our samples. We find that it is possible to correct the mass-normalized DTT result, although the correction methods have some drawbacks and add uncertainty to DTT analyses. More broadly, other DTT-active species might also have non-linear concentration-responses in the assay and cause a bias. In addition, the same problem of Cu- and Mn-mediated bias in mass-normalized DTT results might affect other measures of acellular redox activity in PM and needs to be addressed.

  17. Response analysis of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongge; Xu, Wei; Yang, Guidong; Jia, Wantao

    2016-08-01

    The Poisson white noise, as a typical non-Gaussian excitation, has attracted much attention recently. However, little work was referred to the study of stochastic systems with fractional derivative under Poisson white noise excitation. This paper investigates the stationary response of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise. The equivalent stochastic system of the original stochastic system is obtained. Then, approximate stationary solutions are obtained with the help of the perturbation method. Finally, two typical examples are discussed in detail to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis also shows that the fractional order and the fractional coefficient significantly affect the responses of the stochastic systems with fractional derivative.

  18. The Academic Medical Center Linear Disability Score (ALDS) item bank: item response theory analysis in a mixed patient population

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Rebecca; Weisscher, Nadine; Glas, Cees AW; Dijkgraaf, Marcel GW; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob J; Lindeboom, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a lot of interest in the flexible framework offered by item banks for measuring patient relevant outcomes. However, there are few item banks, which have been developed to quantify functional status, as expressed by the ability to perform activities of daily life. This paper examines the measurement properties of the Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank in a mixed population. Methods This paper uses item response theory to analyse data on 115 of 170 items from a total of 1002 respondents. These were: 551 (55%) residents of supported housing, residential care or nursing homes; 235 (23%) patients with chronic pain; 127 (13%) inpatients on a neurology ward following a stroke; and 89 (9%) patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Results Of the 170 items, 115 were judged to be clinically relevant. Of these 115 items, 77 were retained in the item bank following the item response theory analysis. Of the 38 items that were excluded from the item bank, 24 had either been presented to fewer than 200 respondents or had fewer than 10% or more than 90% of responses in the category 'can carry out'. A further 11 items had different measurement properties for younger and older or for male and female respondents. Finally, 3 items were excluded because the item response theory model did not fit the data. Conclusion The Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank has promising measurement characteristics for the mixed patient population described in this paper. Further studies will be needed to examine the measurement properties of the item bank in other populations. PMID:16381611

  19. Swelling and shrinking properties of thermo-responsive polymeric ionic liquid hydrogels with embedded linear pNIPAAM.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Simon; Florea, Larisa; Fraser, Kevin J; Diamond, Dermot

    2014-03-27

    In this study, varying concentrations of linear pNIPAAM have been incorporated for the first time into a thermo-responsive polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) hydrogel, namely tributyl-hexyl phosphonium 3-sulfopropylacrylate (P-SPA), to produce semi-interpenetrating polymer networks. The thermal properties of the resulting hydrogels have been investigated along with their thermo-induced shrinking and reswelling capabilities. The semi-interpenetrating networks (IPN) hydrogels were found to have improved shrinking and reswelling properties compared with their PIL counterpart. At elevated temperatures (50-80 °C), it was found that the semi-IPN with the highest concentration of hydrophobic pNIPAAM exhibited the highest shrinking percentage of ~40% compared to the conventional P-SPA, (27%). This trend was also found to occur for the reswelling measurements, with semi-IPN hydrogels producing the highest reswelling percentage of ~67%, with respect to its contracted state. This was attributed to an increase in water affinity due to the presence of hydrophilic pNIPAAM. Moreover, the presence of linear pNIPAAM in the polymer matrix leads to improved shrinking and reswelling response compared to the equivalent PIL.

  20. Swelling and Shrinking Properties of Thermo-Responsive Polymeric Ionic Liquid Hydrogels with Embedded Linear pNIPAAM

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Simon; Florea, Larisa; Fraser, Kevin J.; Diamond, Dermot

    2014-01-01

    In this study, varying concentrations of linear pNIPAAM have been incorporated for the first time into a thermo-responsive polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) hydrogel, namely tributyl-hexyl phosphonium 3-sulfopropylacrylate (P-SPA), to produce semi-interpenetrating polymer networks. The thermal properties of the resulting hydrogels have been investigated along with their thermo-induced shrinking and reswelling capabilities. The semi-interpenetrating networks (IPN) hydrogels were found to have improved shrinking and reswelling properties compared with their PIL counterpart. At elevated temperatures (50–80 °C), it was found that the semi-IPN with the highest concentration of hydrophobic pNIPAAM exhibited the highest shrinking percentage of ~40% compared to the conventional P-SPA, (27%). This trend was also found to occur for the reswelling measurements, with semi-IPN hydrogels producing the highest reswelling percentage of ~67%, with respect to its contracted state. This was attributed to an increase in water affinity due to the presence of hydrophilic pNIPAAM. Moreover, the presence of linear pNIPAAM in the polymer matrix leads to improved shrinking and reswelling response compared to the equivalent PIL. PMID:24681582

  1. Identification of linear and threshold responses in streams along a gradient of urbanization in Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ourso, R.T.; Frenzel, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    We examined biotic and physiochemical responses in urbanized Anchorage, Alaska, to the percent of impervious area within stream basins, as determined by high-resolution IKONOS satellite imagery and aerial photography. Eighteen of the 86 variables examined, including riparian and instream habitat, macroinvertebrate communities, and water/sediment chemistry, were significantly correlated with percent impervious area. Variables related to channel condition, instream substrate, water chemistry, and residential and transportation right-of-way land uses were identified by principal components analysis as significant factors separating site groups. Detrended canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the macroinvertebrate communities responded to an urbanization gradient closely paralleling the percent of impervious area within the subbasin. A sliding regression analysis of variables significantly correlated with percent impervious area revealed 8 variables exhibiting threshold responses that correspond to a mean of 4.4-5.8% impervious area, much lower than mean values reported in other, similar investigations. As contributing factors to a subbasin's impervious area, storm drains and roads appeared to be important elements influencing the degradation of water quality with respect to the biota.

  2. Glycemic Response and Fermentation of Crystalline Short Linear α-Glucans from Debranched Waxy Maize Starch.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Lauren R; Weber, Casey; Haub, Mark; Cai, Liming; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2015-11-04

    The glycemic index (GI) is used to rank foods based on postprandial blood glucose response. GI test requires that 50 g of available carbohydrate be used. Available carbohydrate is often calculated as total carbohydrate minus dietary fiber; yet, AOAC fiber methods do not always include resistant starch (RS). The objective of this study was to examine GI response and fermentation properties of crystalline short-chain α-glucan (CSCA), which has high RS content, but no total dietary fiber (TDF) content as measured by AOAC method 991.43. Using the standard GI method, 10 adults were fed 50 g of waxy maize starch and CSCA, consumed alone and in mixed formulation. Breath hydrogen was also determined over 6 h. Fifty grams of CSCA was not entirely available in vivo, and breath hydrogen testing indicated that CSCA was as likely to ferment. Products high in RS, but with no TDF, would yield reduced GI values, and this calls for the need of a method to define available carbohydrate.

  3. NMDA-dependent mechanisms only affect the BOLD response in the rat dentate gyrus by modifying local signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Tiede, Regina; Krautwald, Karla; Fincke, Anja; Angenstein, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The role of N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated mechanisms in the formation of a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was studied using electrical stimulation of the right perforant pathway. Stimulation of this fiber bundle triggered BOLD responses in the right hippocampal formation and in the left entorhinal cortex. The perforant pathway projects to and activates the dentate gyrus monosynaptically, activation in the contralateral entorhinal cortex is multisynaptic and requires forwarding and processing of signals. Application of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 during stimulation had no effect on BOLD responses in the right dentate gyrus, but reduced the BOLD responses in the left entorhinal cortex. In contrast, application of MK801 before the first stimulation train reduced the BOLD response in both regions. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that the initial stimulation trains changed the local processing of the incoming signals in the dentate gyrus. This altered electrophysiological response was not further changed by a subsequent application of MK801, which is in agreement with an unchanged BOLD response. When MK801 was present during the first stimulation train, a dissimilar electrophysiological response pattern was observed and corresponds to an altered BOLD response, indicating that NMDA-dependent mechanisms indirectly affect the BOLD response, mainly via modifying local signal processing and subsequent propagation. PMID:22167232

  4. Non-linear buffeting response analysis of long-span suspension bridges with central buckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Li, Aiqun; Zhao, Gengwen; Li, Jian

    2010-06-01

    The rigid central buckle employed in the Runyang Suspension Bridge (RSB) was the first time it was used in a suspension bridge in China. By using a spectral representation method and FFT technique combined with measured data, a 3D fluctuating wind field considering the tower wind effect is simulated. A novel FE model for buffeting analysis is then presented, in which a specific user-defined Matrix27 element in ANSYS is employed to simulate the aeroelastic forces and its stiffness or damping matrices are parameterized by wind velocity and vibration frequency. A nonlinear time history analysis is carried out to study the influence of the rigid central buckle on the wind-induced buffeting response of a long-span suspension bridge. The results can be used as a reference for wind resistance design of long-span suspension bridges with a rigid central buckle in the future.

  5. Non-linear Electrical Characteristics of ZnO Modified by Trioxides Sb2O3, Bi2O3, Fe2O3, Al2O3 and La2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekap, Anita; Das, Piyush R.; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2016-08-01

    The non-linear behavior of polycrystalline-ZnO-based voltage-dependent resistors is considered in the present study. A high-temperature solid-state reaction route was used to synthesize polycrystalline samples of ZnO modified by small amounts of the trioxides Sb2O3, Bi2O3, Fe2O3, etc. in various proportions. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to study the structural and microstructural characteristics of modified ZnO. Detailed studies of non-linear phenomena of the I-V characteristics, dielectric permittivity ( ɛ r), impedance ( Z), etc. of the samples have provided many interesting results. All the samples exhibited dielectric anomaly. Non-linear variation in polarization with electric field for all the samples was observed. Moreover, significant non-linearity in the I-V characteristics was observed in the breakdown region of all the samples at room temperature. The non-linear coefficient ( α) in different cases, i.e. for I- V, ɛ r- f, ɛ r- T, and ɛ r- Z, was calculated and found to be appreciable. The frequency dependence of ac conductivity suggests that the material obeys Jonscher's universal power law.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of the non-linear dynamic viscoplastic response of 2-d structures with respect to material parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Makarand; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the viscoplastic response of structures subjected to dynamic loading. A state of plane stress is assumed to exist in the structure, a velocity strain-Cauchy stress formulation is used, and the geometric non-linearities arising from large strains are incorporated. The Jaumann rate is used as a frame indifferent stress rate. The material model is chosen to be isothermal viscoplasticity, and an associated flow rule is used with a von Mises effective stress. The equations of motion emanating from a finite element semi-discretization are integrated using an explicit central difference scheme with an implicit stress update. The sensitivity coefficients are evaluated using a direct differentiation approach. Since the domain of integration is the current configuration, the sensitivity coefficients of the spatial derivatives of the shape functions must be included. Numerical results are presented for a thin plate with a central cutout subjected to an in-plane compressive loading. The sensitivity coefficients are generated by evaluating the derivatives of the response quantities with respect to Young's modulus, and two of the material parameters characterizing the viscoplastic response. Time histories of the response and sensitivity coefficients, and spatial distributions at selected times are presented.

  7. Towards obtaining spatiotemporally precise responses to continuous sensory stimuli in humans: a general linear modeling approach to EEG.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Nuno R; Whelan, Robert; Foxe, John J; Lalor, Edmund C

    2014-08-15

    Noninvasive investigation of human sensory processing with high temporal resolution typically involves repeatedly presenting discrete stimuli and extracting an average event-related response from scalp recorded neuroelectric or neuromagnetic signals. While this approach is and has been extremely useful, it suffers from two drawbacks: a lack of naturalness in terms of the stimulus and a lack of precision in terms of the cortical response generators. Here we show that a linear modeling approach that exploits functional specialization in sensory systems can be used to rapidly obtain spatiotemporally precise responses to complex sensory stimuli using electroencephalography (EEG). We demonstrate the method by example through the controlled modulation of the contrast and coherent motion of visual stimuli. Regressing the data against these modulation signals produces spatially focal, highly temporally resolved response measures that are suggestive of specific activation of visual areas V1 and V6, respectively, based on their onset latency, their topographic distribution and the estimated location of their sources. We discuss our approach by comparing it with fMRI/MRI informed source analysis methods and, in doing so, we provide novel information on the timing of coherent motion processing in human V6. Generalizing such an approach has the potential to facilitate the rapid, inexpensive spatiotemporal localization of higher perceptual functions in behaving humans.

  8. Developing a modified SEBAL algorithm that is responsive to advection by using limited weather data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhwanazi, Mcebisi

    The use of Remote Sensing ET algorithms in water management, especially for agricultural purposes is increasing, and there are more models being introduced. The Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) and its variant, Mapping Evapotranspiration with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) are some of the models that are being widely used. While SEBAL has several advantages over other RS models, including that it does not require prior knowledge of soil, crop and other ground details, it has the downside of underestimating evapotranspiration (ET) on days when there is advection, which may be in most cases in arid and semi-arid areas. METRIC, however has been modified to be able to account for advection, but in doing so it requires hourly weather data. In most developing countries, while accurate estimates of ET are required, the weather data necessary to use METRIC may not be available. This research therefore was meant to develop a modified version of SEBAL that would require minimal weather data that may be available in these areas, and still estimate ET accurately. The data that were used to develop this model were minimum and maximum temperatures, wind data, preferably the run of wind in the afternoon, and wet bulb temperature. These were used to quantify the advected energy that would increase ET in the field. This was a two-step process; the first was developing the model for standard conditions, which was described as a healthy cover of alfalfa, 40-60 cm tall and not short of water. Under standard conditions, when estimated ET using modified SEBAL was compared with lysimeter-measured ET, the modified SEBAL model had a Mean Bias Error (MBE) of 2.2 % compared to -17.1 % from the original SEBAL. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) was lower for the modified SEBAL model at 10.9 % compared to 25.1 % for the original SEBAL. The modified SEBAL model, developed on an alfalfa field in Rocky Ford, was then tested on other crops; beans and wheat. It was also tested on

  9. An investigation into linearity with cumulative emissions of the climate and carbon cycle response in HadCM3LC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, S. K.; Booth, B. B. B.; Joshi, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the extent to which global mean temperature, precipitation, and the carbon cycle are constrained by cumulative carbon emissions throughout four experiments with a fully coupled climate-carbon cycle model. The paired experiments adopt contrasting, idealised approaches to climate change mitigation at different action points this century, with total emissions rising to more than two trillion tonnes of carbon (TtC). For each pair, the contrasting mitigation approaches—capping emissions early versus reducing them to zero a few decades later—cause their cumulative emissions trajectories to diverge initially, then converge, cross, and diverge again. We find that global mean temperature is linear with cumulative emissions across all experiments, although differences of up to 1.5 K exist regionally when the trajectories of total carbon emitted during the course of the two scenarios coincide, for both pairs of experiments. Interestingly, although the oceanic precipitation response scales with cumulative emissions, the global precipitation response does not, due to a decrease in precipitation over land above emissions of around one TtC. Most carbon fluxes are less well constrained by cumulative emissions as they reach two trillion tonnes. The opposing mitigation approaches have different consequences for the Amazon rainforest, which affects the linearity with which the carbon cycle responds to cumulative emissions. The average Transient Climate Response to cumulative carbon Emissions (TCRE) is 1.95 K TtC-1, at the upper end of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s range of 0.8-2.5 K TtC-1.

  10. Origins of Total-Dose Response Variability in Linear Bipolar Microcircuits

    SciTech Connect

    BARNABY,H.J.; CIRBA,C.R.; SCHRIMPF,R.D.; FLEETWOOD,D.M.; PEASE,R.L.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.; TURFLINGER,T.; KRIEG,J.F.; MAHER,M.C.

    2000-11-15

    LM1ll voltage comparators exhibit a wide range of total-dose-induced degradation. Simulations show this variability may be a natural consequence of the low base doping of the substrate PNP (SPNP) input transistors. Low base doping increases the SPNP's collector to base breakdown voltage, current gain, and sensitivity to small fluctuations in the radiation-induced oxide defect densities. The build-up of oxide trapped charge (N{sub ot}) and interface traps (N{sub it}) is shown to be a function of pre-irradiation bakes. Experimental data indicate that, despite its structural similarities to the LM111, irradiated input transistors of the LM124 operational amplifier do not exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in pre-irradiation thermal cycles. Further disparities in LM111 and LM124 responses may result from a difference in the oxide defect build-up in the two part types. Variations in processing, packaging, and circuit effects are suggested as potential explanations.

  11. Non-linear responses of glaciated prairie wetlands to climate warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, W. Carter; Werner, Brett; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    The response of ecosystems to climate warming is likely to include threshold events when small changes in key environmental drivers produce large changes in an ecosystem. Wetlands of the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) are especially sensitive to climate variability, yet the possibility that functional changes may occur more rapidly with warming than expected has not been examined or modeled. The productivity and biodiversity of these wetlands are strongly controlled by the speed and completeness of a vegetation cover cycle driven by the wet and dry extremes of climate. Two thresholds involving duration and depth of standing water must be exceeded every few decades or so to complete the cycle and to produce highly functional wetlands. Model experiments at 19 weather stations employing incremental warming scenarios determined that wetland function across most of the PPR would be diminished beyond a climate warming of about 1.5–2.0 °C, a critical temperature threshold range identified in other climate change studies.

  12. Protective and disease-enhancing immune responses induced by recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing respiratory syncytial virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Wieslawa; Suezer, Yasemin; Sutter, Gerd; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2004-11-25

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) recombinants expressing single or multiple RSV surface proteins (F or G) are promising potential vaccines. We studied humoral and cellular responses induced by MVA-F and MVA-G in mice, comparing them to a formalin inactivated RSV preparation (FI-RSV) known to increase disease severity. MVA-F or MVA-G vaccination enhanced weight loss during RSV challenge, but did not show the lung eosinophilia seen after FI-RSV vaccination. FI-RSV induced a stronger total RSV IgG response than the MVA recombinants, but very little IgG2a. MVA recombinants induced cytokine responses biased towards IFNgamma and IL-12, while FI-RSV induced strong IL-4/5 responses in the lungs during RSV challenge. Thus, MVA vaccines induce a favourable immune profile in RSV disease but retain the potential to enhance disease.

  13. Peculiarities of the dielectric response of the silver-modified-zeolite porous microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyatova, U.; Ozturk Koc, S.; Orbukh, V. I.; Eyvazova, G. M.; Agamaliev, Z. A.; Lebedeva, N. N.; Koçum, İ. C.; Salamov, B. G.; Ozer, M.

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize electrical conductivity and dielectrical properties of the silver-exchanged zeolite - natural clinoptilolite from Western part of Turkey and Azerbaijan in the range of frequencies from 200 Hz to 1 MHz and at room temperature. For a better understanding the effect of concentration and content of silver in the nanoporous zeolite volume on the conductivity, a study of the dielectric properties of an un-modified and silver-modified zeolite plates with different amounts of Ag ions and Ag nanoparticles is performed. Un-modified and three different types of the silver ion-exchanged modified clinoptilolite plates were prepared. It was found, that with increasing silver concentration, resistance of zeolite plate monotonically decreases at the same time a capacitance is increases. It is suggested an explanation of the observed frequency dependence of the capacitance and resistance of zeolite plates on the silver concentrations may be explain on the basis of an electrode-dielectric interface gap model. At the same time, the observed phenomenon can be explained by considering the fact that with increasing content of silver the conductivity increases. These results show that Ag nanoparticles play significant role for performance improvement in plasma electronic devices with zeolite cathode.

  14. Examination of the Korean Modified Checklist of Autism in Toddlers: Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seung, HyeKyeung; Ji, Juye; Kim, Soo-Jin; Sung, Inkyung; Youn, Young-Ah; Hong, Gyunghun; Lee, Hyeonjin; Lee, Young Hwan; Lee, Hyunsuk; Youm, Hyun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the clinical utility and psychometric properties of the Korean Modified Checklist of Autism in Toddlers (K-M-CHAT)-2. A sample of 2300 parents of 16- to 36-month-old children was recruited across South Korea. A phone interview was utilized to follow up with participants who initially screened positive for autism spectrum…

  15. 30 CFR 254.51 - Modifying an existing OCS response plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters Seaward of the Coast Line §...

  16. 30 CFR 254.51 - Modifying an existing OCS response plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters Seaward of the Coast Line §...

  17. 30 CFR 254.51 - Modifying an existing OCS response plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters Seaward of the Coast Line §...

  18. 30 CFR 254.51 - Modifying an existing OCS response plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters Seaward of the...

  19. Non-linear finite element analysis for prediction of seismic response of buildings considering soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelebi, E.; Göktepe, F.; Karahan, N.

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this paper focuses primarily on the numerical approach based on two-dimensional (2-D) finite element method for analysis of the seismic response of infinite soil-structure interaction (SSI) system. This study is performed by a series of different scenarios that involved comprehensive parametric analyses including the effects of realistic material properties of the underlying soil on the structural response quantities. Viscous artificial boundaries, simulating the process of wave transmission along the truncated interface of the semi-infinite space, are adopted in the non-linear finite element formulation in the time domain along with Newmark's integration. The slenderness ratio of the superstructure and the local soil conditions as well as the characteristics of input excitations are important parameters for the numerical simulation in this research. The mechanical behavior of the underlying soil medium considered in this prediction model is simulated by an undrained elasto-plastic Mohr-Coulomb model under plane-strain conditions. To emphasize the important findings of this type of problems to civil engineers, systematic calculations with different controlling parameters are accomplished to evaluate directly the structural response of the vibrating soil-structure system. When the underlying soil becomes stiffer, the frequency content of the seismic motion has a major role in altering the seismic response. The sudden increase of the dynamic response is more pronounced for resonance case, when the frequency content of the seismic ground motion is close to that of the SSI system. The SSI effects under different seismic inputs are different for all considered soil conditions and structural types.

  20. Modeling and Simulation of the Impact Response of Filled and Unfilled Linear Cellular Alloys for Structural Energetic Material Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Adam; Fredenburg, Anthony; Thadhani, Naresh

    2008-04-01

    We are investigating the mechanics of impact-induced stress transfer between a linear cellular alloy (LCA) and a reactive filler to determine the effect of cell geometry on deformation and fragmentation. LCAs are honeycomb structures made of maraging steel, and provide structural integrity for the reactive filler such as a powder mixture of Ta+Fe2O3. 3-D computations are used to determine stress and strain distributions in both filled and unfilled LCAs during impact. The strength and failure models used for maraging steel and the response of Ta+Fe2O3 are validated through experiment. The failure response of three different geometries: 9-cell, pie, and reinforced pie, are compared with the response of a hollow cylinder, for impact velocities of 100, 200, and 300 m/s. Unfilled, the cylindrical geometry provides the least resistance to deformation and fragmentation, while the reinforced pie LCA provides the most resistance. Understanding of the mechanics of deformation and failure is used to determine the most effective geometry for stress transfer to the filler.

  1. Dose-Volume Response Relationship for Brain Metastases Treated with Frameless Single-Fraction Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianmin; Yusuf, Mehran B; Dragun, Anthony; Dunlap, Neal; Guan, Timothy; Boling, Warren; Rai, Shesh; Woo, Shiao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to identify a dose-volume response relationship for brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: We reviewed patients who underwent frameless single-fraction linear accelerator SRS for brain metastases between 2007 and 2013 from an institutional database. Proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of outcome. A ratio of maximum lesion dose per mm-diameter (Gy/mm) was constructed to establish a dose-volume relationship. Results: There were 316 metastases evaluated in 121 patients (2 - 33 mm in the largest diameter). The median peripheral dose was 18.0 Gy (range: 10.0 – 24.0 Gy). Local control was 84.8% for all lesions and was affected by location, peripheral dose, maximum dose, and lesion size (p values < 0.050). A dose-volume response relationship was constructed using the maximum dose and lesion size. A unit increase in Gy/mm was associated with decreased local failure (p = 0.005). Local control of 80%, 85%, and 90% corresponded to maximum doses per millimeter of 1.67 Gy/mm, 2.86 Gy/mm, and 4.4 Gy/mm, respectively. Toxicity was uncommon and only 1.0% of lesions developed radionecrosis requiring surgery. Conclusions: For brain metastases less than 3 cm, a dose-volume response relationship exists between maximum radiosurgical dose and lesion size, which is predictive of local control. PMID:27284495

  2. Lower Rydberg series of methane: a combined coupled cluster linear response and molecular quantum defect orbital calculation.

    PubMed

    Velasco, A M; Pitarch-Ruiz, J; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M J; Sánchez-Marín, J; Martin, I

    2006-03-28

    Vertical excitation energies as well as related absolute photoabsorption oscillator strength data are very scarce in the literature for methane. In this study, we have characterized the three existing series of low-lying Rydberg states of CH4 by computing coupled cluster linear response (CCLR) vertical excitation energies together with oscillator strengths in the molecular-adapted quantum defect orbital formalism from a distorted Cs geometry selected on the basis of outer valence green function calculations. The present work provides a wide range of data of excitation energies and absolute oscillator strengths which correspond to the Rydberg series converging to the three lower ionization potential values of the distorted methane molecule, in energy regions for which experimentally measured data appear to be unavailable.

  3. Surface chemistry of grafted expanded poly(tetrafluoroethylene) membranes modifies the in vitro proinflammatory response in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chandler-Temple, Adrienne; Kingshott, Peter; Wentrup-Byrne, Edeline; Cassady, A Ian; Grøndahl, Lisbeth

    2013-04-01

    A series of surface-modified expanded poly(tetrafluoroethylene) membranes showed varied levels of in vitro macrophage proinflammatory response. Membranes containing a mixture of phosphate and hydroxyl groups (as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis) stimulate greater macrophage activation than samples containing a mixture of phosphate and carboxylic acid segments. The types of proteins that adsorbed irreversibly from serum onto the two samples with the highest and lowest cellular response were investigated using surface-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Distinct differences in the number and type of proteins that adsorbed were observed between these samples. A correlation was found between the main protein components adsorbed onto the surfaces and the resulting in vitro proinflammatory response. This study strongly supports the hypothesis that the cellular response is not controlled directly by surface properties but is mediated by specific protein adsorption events. This in turn highlights the importance of better understanding and controlling the properties of intelligent surface-modified biomaterials.

  4. Does chronic physical activity level modify the airway inflammatory response to an acute bout of exercise in the postprandial period?

    PubMed

    Kurti, Stephanie P; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Chapes, Stephen K; Teeman, Colby S; Cull, Brooke J; Emerson, Sam R; Levitt, Morton H; Smith, Joshua R; Harms, Craig A

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have confirmed that a single high-fat meal (HFM) leads to increased airway inflammation. However, exercise is a natural anti-inflammatory and may modify postprandial airway inflammation. The postprandial airway inflammatory response is likely to be modified by chronic physical activity (PA) level. This study investigated whether chronic PA modifies the airway inflammatory response to an acute bout of exercise in the postprandial period in both insufficiently active and active subjects. Thirty-nine nonasthmatic subjects (20 active, 13 males/7 females) who exceeded PA guidelines (≥150 min moderate-vigorous PA/week) and 19 insufficiently active (6 males/13 females) underwent an incremental treadmill test to exhaustion to determine peak oxygen uptake. Subjects were then randomized to a condition (COND), either remaining sedentary (CON) or exercising (EX) post-HFM. Exercise was performed at the heart rate corresponding to 60% peak oxygen uptake on a treadmill for 1 h post-HFM (63% fat, 10 kcal/kg body weight). Blood lipids and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO: marker of airway inflammation) were measured at baseline and 2 h and 4 h post-HFM. Sputum differential cell counts were performed at baseline and 4 h post-HFM. The mean eNO response for all groups increased at 2 h post-HFM (∼6%) and returned to baseline by 4 h (p = 0.03). There was a time × COND interaction (p = 0.04), where EX had a greater eNO response at 4 h compared with CON. Sputum neutrophils increased at 4 h post-HFM (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that airway inflammation occurs after an HFM when exercise is performed in the postprandial period, regardless of habitual activity level.

  5. Linear Versus Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship Between Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Meconium Concentration of Nine Different Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J.Y.; Kwak, H.S.; Choi, J.S.; Ahn, H.K.; Oh, Y.J.; Velázquez-Armenta, E.Y.; Nava-Ocampo, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Presence of individual fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium is considered to be a reliable biomarker of prenatal alcohol exposure, and their concentration has been found to be linearly associated with poor postnatal development, supporting the widely extended idea that ethanol is a non-threshold teratogen. However, a growing number of epidemiological studies have consistently found a lack of adverse short- and long-term fetal outcomes at low exposure levels. We therefore aimed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of individual FAEEs and prenatal alcohol exposure in meconium samples collected within the first 6 to 12?h after birth from 182 babies born to abstainer mothers and from 54 babies born to women who self-reported either light or moderate alcohol ingestion in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. In most cases, the individual FAEE concentrations were negligible and not significantly different (P >0.05) between exposed and control babies. The concentrations appeared to increase linearly with the dose only in the few babies born to mothers who reported >3 drinks/week. These results provide evidence that the correlation between prenatal alcohol exposure and individual FAEE concentrations in meconium is non-linear shape, with a threshold probably at 3 drinks/week. PMID:26691866

  6. Linearized formulation for fluid-structure interaction: Application to the linear dynamic response of a pressurized elastic structure containing a fluid with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schotté, J.-S.; Ohayon, R.

    2013-05-01

    To control the linear vibrations of structures partially filled with liquids is of prime importance in various industries such as aerospace, naval, civil and nuclear engineering. It is proposed here to investigate a linearized formulation adapted to a rational computation of the vibrations of such coupled systems. Its particularity is to be fully Lagrangian since it considers the fluid displacement field with respect to a static equilibrium configuration as the natural variable describing the fluid motion, as classically done in structural dynamics. As the coupled system considered here is weakly damped in the low frequency domain (low modal density), the analysis of the vibrations of the associated undamped conservative system constitutes the main objective of this paper. One originality of the present formulation is to take into account the effect of the pressurization of the tank on the dynamics of the system, particularly in the case of a compressible liquid. We propose here a new way of deriving the linearized equations of the coupled problem involving a deformable structure and an inner inviscid liquid with a free surface. A review of the classical case considering a heavy incompressible liquid is followed by an application to the new case involving a light compressible liquid. A solution procedure in the frequency domain is proposed and a numerical discretization using the finite element method is discussed. In order to reduce the computational costs, an appropriate reduced order matrix model using modal synthesis approach is also presented.

  7. Direct forecasting of subsurface flow response from non-linear dynamic data by linear least-squares in canonical functional principal component space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satija, Aaditya; Caers, Jef

    2015-03-01

    Inverse modeling is widely used to assist with forecasting problems in the subsurface. However, full inverse modeling can be time-consuming requiring iteration over a high dimensional parameter space with computationally expensive forward models and complex spatial priors. In this paper, we investigate a prediction-focused approach (PFA) that aims at building a statistical relationship between data variables and forecast variables, avoiding the inversion of model parameters altogether. The statistical relationship is built by first applying the forward model related to the data variables and the forward model related to the prediction variables on a limited set of spatial prior models realizations, typically generated through geostatistical methods. The relationship observed between data and prediction is highly non-linear for many forecasting problems in the subsurface. In this paper we propose a Canonical Functional Component Analysis (CFCA) to map the data and forecast variables into a low-dimensional space where, if successful, the relationship is linear. CFCA consists of (1) functional principal component analysis (FPCA) for dimension reduction of time-series data and (2) canonical correlation analysis (CCA); the latter aiming to establish a linear relationship between data and forecast components. If such mapping is successful, then we illustrate with several cases that (1) simple regression techniques with a multi-Gaussian framework can be used to directly quantify uncertainty on the forecast without any model inversion and that (2) such uncertainty is a good approximation of uncertainty obtained from full posterior sampling with rejection sampling.

  8. Assessment of in vitro cellular responses of monocytes and keratinocytes to tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Piotr; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata; Zdanowski, Robert; Winnicka, Anna; Nowakowska, Julita; Stankiewicz, Wanda; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw

    2013-09-01

    Hydrolyzable tannins are known to exhibit diverse biological effects, which can be used in combination with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). In this study, we tested toxic and inflammatory properties of tannic-acid modified 13, 33, 46 nm and unmodified 10-65 nm AgNPs using murine 291.03C keratinocyte and RAW 264.7 monocyte cell lines. Both cell lines exposed for 24h to 1-10 μg/ml of 13 nm, 33 nm, 46 nm and unmodified AgNPs showed dose-dependent toxicity and decreased cell proliferation. Only small-sized AgNPs induced production of ROS by monocytes, but not keratinocytes. Monocytes internalized large aggregates of 33, 46 nm and 10-65 nm AgNPs in cytoplasmic vacuoles, whereas keratinocytes accumulated less particles. AgNPs of 13 nm were localized ubiquitously within both cell types. The tested AgNPs strongly down-regulated production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by monocytes, whereas keratinocytes exposed to AgNPs showed an opposite effect. Unmodified but not tannic acid-modified AgNPs increased production of the pro-inflammatory MCP-1 by monocytes and keratinocytes. In summary, low inflammatory potential and lack of ROS production by tannic-acid modified AgNPs sized above 30 nm suggests that tannic acid modification of large silver nanoparticles may help to increase AgNPs biosafety.

  9. Optimization of headspace solid-phase microextraction for the analysis of specific flavors in enzyme modified and natural Cheddar cheese using factorial design and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Julien; Sabik, Hassan; Azarnia, Sorayya; Lee, Byong

    2008-06-27

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method was developed using experimental designs to quantify the flavor of commercial Cheddar cheese and enzyme-modified Cheddar cheese (EMCC). Seven target compounds (dimethyl disulfide, hexanal, hexanol, 2-heptanone, ethyl hexanoate, heptanoic acid, delta-decalactone) representative of different chemical families frequently present in Cheddar cheese were selected for this study. Three types of SPME fibres were tested: Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS), polyacrylate (PA) and Carbowax/divinylbenzene (CW/DVB). NaCl concentration and temperature, as well as extraction time were tested for their effect on the HS-SPME process. Two series of two-level full factorial designs were carried out for each fibre to determine the factors which best support the extraction of target flavors. Therefore, central composite designs (CCDs) were performed and response surface models were derived. Optimal extraction conditions for all selected compounds, including internal standards, were: 50 min at 55 degrees C in 3M NaCl for CAR/PDMS, 64 min at 62 degrees C in 6M NaCl for PA, and 37 min at 67 degrees C in 6M NaCl for CW/DVB. Given its superior sensitivity, CAR/PDMS fibre was selected to evaluate the target analytes in commercial Cheddar cheese and EMCC. With this fibre, calibration curves were linear for all targeted compounds (from 0.5 to 6 microg g(-1)), except for heptanoic acid which only showed a linear response with PA fibres. Detection limits ranged from 0.3 to 1.6 microg g(-1) and quantification limits from 0.8 to 3.6 microg g(-1). The mean repeatability value for all flavor compounds was 8.8%. The method accuracy is satisfactory with recoveries ranging from 97 to 109%. Six of the targeted flavors were detected in commercial Cheddar cheese and EMCC.

  10. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Terra, Jill K; France, Bryan; Cote, Christopher K; Jenkins, Amy; Bozue, Joel A; Welkos, Susan L; Bhargava, Ragini; Ho, Chi-Lee; Mehrabian, Margarete; Pan, Calvin; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C; LeVine, Steven M; Bradley, Kenneth A

    2011-12-01

    Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT), as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6) background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  11. Myristoylation increases the CD8+T-cell response to a GFP prototype antigen delivered by modified vaccinia virus Ankara.

    PubMed

    Marr, Lisa; Lülf, Anna-Theresa; Freudenstein, Astrid; Sutter, Gerd; Volz, Asisa

    2016-04-01

    Activation of CD8(+)T-cells is an essential part of immune responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). Strategies to enhance T-cell responses to antigens may be particularly necessary for broadly protective immunization against influenza A virus infections or for candidate vaccines targeting chronic infections and cancer. Here, we tested recombinant MVAs that targeted a model antigen, GFP, to different localizations in infected cells. In vitro characterization demonstrated that GFP accumulated in the nucleus (MVA-nls-GFP), associated with cellular membranes (MVA-myr-GFP) or was equally distributed throughout the cell (MVA-GFP). On vaccination, we found significantly higher levels of GFP-specific CD8(+)T-cells in MVA-myr-GFP-vaccinated BALB/c mice than in those immunized with MVA-GFP or MVA-nls-GFP. Thus, myristoyl modification may be a useful strategy to enhance CD8(+)T-cell responses to MVA-delivered target antigens.

  12. One dimensional equivalent linear ground response analysis - A case study of collapsed Margalla Tower in Islamabad during 2005 Muzaffarabad Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Rehman, Zia-ur-; Farooq, Khalid; Memon, Shazim Ali

    2016-07-01

    One dimensional equivalent linear ground response analysis was conducted in the Margalla Tower building in Islamabad, which collapsed during 2005 Muzaffarabad Earthquake. The analyses were conducted in DEEPSOIL software, without considering the effect of ground water table. The input subsoil data were selected from laboratory and field tests conducted for the site with bedrock at a depth of 21 m as per site condition. The field and laboratory testing data showed that the subsoil beneath the Tower site was silty clay to lean clay according to the unified soil classification system. Four different accelerograms with PGA values of 0.17 g, 0.15 g, 0.22 g and 0.21 g, compatible with the earthquake in the target area were applied at the bedrock. The surface response spectra showed that, except the Accelerogram-1 all other three were amplified near the fundamental period of the site. The analyses showed that different PGA values (0.26 g, 0.21 g, 0.36 g and 0.21 g) were produced at the surface which can be explained due to the difference in the Fourier amplitude of input accelerograms. Furthermore, the different input accelerograms produced a different shear strain and thus mobilized different shear strengths along the soil profile depth. Finally, the calculated response spectra of accelerograms were compared with the response spectra of Islamabad. The calculated spectral acceleration values were found to be higher than reported by the Building Code of Pakistan (0.16 g to 0.24 g).

  13. Does the flushing response modify the relationship between alcohol intake and hypertension in the Japanese population? NIPPON DATA2010.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Mana; Tsuchiya, Naho; Hozawa, Atsushi; Nakaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Miyamatsu, Naomi; Tanaka, Hideo; Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Higashiyama, Aya; Okuda, Nagako; Takashima, Naoyuki; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Kadota, Aya; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Okayama, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki

    2016-09-01

    The influence of alcohol intake on hypertension may vary depending on the flushing response, but this relationship has not been confirmed. The relationship between alcohol intake and hypertension was examined according to the flushing response in a representative sample of the Japanese population. Participants in the National Health and Nutrition Survey in 2010 were asked to participate in the baseline survey of NIPPON DATA2010. Here, we investigated the relationship between alcohol intake and hypertension according to the flushing response. Statistical analyses were performed in a cross-sectional manner using multiple logistic regression models after adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking status, present illness of diabetes mellitus and present illness of dyslipidemia. Of the 1139 men and 1263 women, 659 and 463, respectively, had hypertension. Among the men, alcohol intake was positively associated with hypertension, regardless of the flushing response (P for linear trend both <0.05). This positive relationship was observed for both users and non-users of antihypertensive drugs. No interaction with the flushing response was observed (P for interaction=0.360). In women, although the direction differed between flushers and non-flushers, the association between alcohol intake and hypertension was not significant, regardless of flushing response. In conclusion, In Japanese men, alcohol intake was positively associated with hypertension in a manner that was not influenced by the flushing response.

  14. Changing the Risk Paradigms Can be Good for Our Health: J-Shaped, Linear and Threshold Dose-Response Models.

    PubMed

    Ricci, P F; Straja, S R; Cox, A L

    2012-01-01

    Both the linear (at low doses)-no-threshold (LNT) and the threshold models (S-shapes) dose-response lead to no benefit from low exposure. We propose three new models that allow and include, but do not require - unlike LNT and S-shaped models - this strong assumption. We also provide the means to calculate benefits associated with bi-phasic biological behaviors, when they occur and propose:THREE HORMETIC (PHASIC) MODELS: the J-shaped, inverse J-shaped, the min-max, andMethod for calculating the direct benefits associated with the J and inverse J-shaped models.The J-shaped and min-max models for mutagens and carcinogenic agents include an experimentally justified repair stage for toxic and carcinogenic damage. We link these to stochastic transition models for cancer and show how abrupt transitions in cancer hazard rates, as functions of exposure concentrations and durations, can emerge naturally in large cell populations even when the rates of cell-level events increase smoothly (e.g., proportionally) with concentration. In this very general family of models, J-shaped dose-response curves emerge. These results are universal, i.e., independent of specific biological details represented by the stochastic transition networks. Thus, using them suggests a more complete and realistic way to assess risks at low doses or dose-rates.

  15. Improved leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from lepromatous leprosy patients with hapten modified M. leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Fotedar, A; Mustafa, A S; Narang, B S; Talwar, G P

    1982-01-01

    Two acetoacetylated derivatives of Mycobacterium leprae with variable hapten groups and a conjugate with tetanus toxoid were prepared. These were tested as antigens along with unmodified M. leprae in the leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from clinically, bacteriologically and histopathologically confirmed cases of lepromatous leprosy. LMI response was poor with M. leprae, but was significantly enhanced with acetoacetylated M. leprae. PMID:6751637

  16. [The CRISPR system can correct or modify the expression of genes responsible for hereditary diseases].

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Jacques P

    2015-11-01

    A new technology, called CRISPR, derived from the immune system of bacteria, uses a Cas9 nuclease and a guided RNA complementary to a 20 nucleotides sequence of a gene to induce double strand DNA breaks. This permits to modify specifically the targeted gene in plant, animal and human cells. Variants of the technique also permit to reduce or increase the expression of a selected gene. This technology may thus be used not only to understand the role of a gene but also to develop therapies for hereditary and acquired diseases.

  17. Responses to rotating linear acceleration vectors considered in relation to a model of the otolith organs. [human oculomotor response to transverse acceleration stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, A. J.; Barnes, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Human subjects were exposed to a linear acceleration vector that rotated in the transverse plane of the skull without angular counterrotation. Lateral eye movements showed a sinusoidal change in slow phase velocity and an asymmetry or bias in the same direction as vector rotation. A model is developed that attributes the oculomotor response to otolithic mechanisms. It is suggested that the bias component is the manifestation of torsion of the statoconial plaque relative to the base of the utricular macula and that the sinusoidal component represents the translational oscillation of the statoconia. The model subsumes a hypothetical neural mechanism which allows x- and y-axis accelerations to be resolved. Derivation of equations of motion for the statoconial plaque in torsion and translation, which take into account forces acting in shear and normal to the macula, yield estimates of bias and sinusoidal components that are in qualitative agreement with the diverse experimental findings.

  18. Evaluating Potential Response-Modifying Factors for Associations between Ozone and Health Outcomes: A Weight-of-Evidence Approach

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Elizabeth O.; Nichols, Jennifer L.; Ross, Mary; Brown, James S.; Sacks, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic and experimental studies have reported a variety of health effects in response to ozone (O3) exposure, and some have indicated that certain populations may be at increased or decreased risk of O3-related health effects. Objectives: We sought to identify potential response-modifying factors to determine whether specific groups of the population or life stages are at increased or decreased risk of O3-related health effects using a weight-of-evidence approach. Methods: Epidemiologic, experimental, and exposure science studies of potential factors that may modify the relationship between O3 and health effects were identified in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2013 Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants. Scientific evidence from studies that examined factors that may influence risk were integrated across disciplines to evaluate consistency, coherence, and biological plausibility of effects. The factors identified were then classified using a weight-of-evidence approach to conclude whether a specific factor modified the response of a population or life stage, resulting in an increased or decreased risk of O3-related health effects. Discussion: We found “adequate” evidence that populations with certain genotypes, preexisting asthma, or reduced intake of certain nutrients, as well as different life stages or outdoor workers, are at increased risk of O3-related health effects. In addition, we identified other factors (i.e., sex, socioeconomic status, and obesity) for which there was “suggestive” evidence that they may increase the risk of O3-related health effects. Conclusions: Using a weight-of-evidence approach, we identified a diverse group of factors that should be considered when characterizing the overall risk of health effects associated with exposures to ambient O3. Citation: Vinikoor-Imler LC, Owens EO, Nichols JL, Ross M, Brown JS, Sacks JD. 2014. Evaluating potential response-modifying

  19. Experience with Sugar Modifies Behavioral but not Taste-Evoked Medullary Responses to Sweeteners in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dietary exposure to sugars increases the preference for and intake of sugar solutions in mice. We used brief-access lick tests and multiunit electrophysiological recordings from the nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) to investigate the role of taste in diet-induced changes in sucrose responsiveness. We exposed C57BL/6J (B6) and 129X1/SvJ (129) mice to either a sucrose diet (chow, water, and a 500mM sucrose solution) or a control diet (chow and water) for 3 days. In B6 mice, exposure to the sucrose diet decreased the appetitive response (i.e., number of trials initiated) but had no effect on the consummatory response (i.e., rate of licking) to 500mM sucrose and 20mM saccharin. In 129 mice, exposure to the sucrose diet increased the appetitive response but had no effect on the consummatory response to the sweetener solutions. In the NST recordings, the B6 mice exhibited larger multiunit responses to sweeteners than 129 mice, but there was no effect of the sucrose diet in either strain. Our results indicate that sucrose exposure alters the appetitive response of B6 and 129 mice to sweeteners in diametrically opposed ways and that these changes are mediated by structures in the gustatory neuraxis above the NST (e.g., ventral forebrain). PMID:24084168

  20. Predation risk modifies behaviour by shaping the response of identified brain neurons.

    PubMed

    Magani, Fiorella; Luppi, Tomas; Nuñez, Jesus; Tomsic, Daniel

    2016-04-15

    Interpopulation comparisons in species that show behavioural variations associated with particular ecological disparities offer good opportunities for assessing how environmental factors may foster specific functional adaptations in the brain. Yet, studies on the neural substrate that can account for interpopulation behavioural adaptations are scarce. Predation is one of the strongest driving forces for behavioural evolvability and, consequently, for shaping structural and functional brain adaptations. We analysed the escape response of crabs ITALIC! Neohelice granulatafrom two isolated populations exposed to different risks of avian predation. Individuals from the high-risk area proved to be more reactive to visual danger stimuli (VDS) than those from an area where predators are rare. Control experiments indicate that the response difference was specific for impending visual threats. Subsequently, we analysed the response to VDS of a group of giant brain neurons that are thought to play a main role in the visually guided escape response of the crab. Neurons from animals of the population with the stronger escape response were more responsive to VDS than neurons from animals of the less reactive population. Our results suggest a robust linkage between the pressure imposed by the predation risk, the response of identified neurons and the behavioural outcome.

  1. Antimicrobial activities and cellular responses to natural silicate clays and derivatives modified by cationic alkylamine salts.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shan-Hui; Tseng, Hsiang-Jung; Hung, Huey-Shan; Wang, Ming-Chien; Hung, Chiung-Hui; Li, Pei-Ru; Lin, Jiang-Jen

    2009-11-01

    Nanometer-scale silicate platelet (NSP) materials were previously developed by increasing the interlayer space and exfoliation of layered silicate clays such as montmorillonite and synthetic fluorinated mica by the process of polyamine exfoliation. In this study, the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of these nanometer-scale silicate clays were evaluated. The derivatives of NSP (NSP-S) which were modified by C18-fatty amine salts via ionic exchange association exhibited the highest antibacterial activity in the aqueous state among all clays. The high antibacterial activity, however, was accompanied by elevated cytotoxicity. The variations of cell surface markers (CD29 and CD44) and type I collagen expression of fibroblasts treated with the clays were measured to clarify the mechanism of the silicate-induced cytotoxicity. The signal transduction pathway involved the downregulation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which appeared to participate in silicate-induced cytotoxicity. This study helped to understand the antibacterial potential of NSP and the interaction of natural and modified clays with cellular activities.

  2. [Levetiracetam modifies the pattern of audiogenic locomotive response in Wistar and Krushinsky-Molodkina strain rats].

    PubMed

    Malikova, L A; Fedotova, I B; Surina, N M; Poletaeva, I I; Raevskiĭ, K S

    2010-07-01

    The novel antiepileptic drug levetiracetam (keppra, 80 mg/kg, i.p.) produces a pronounced anticonvulsant effect on all parameters of the audiogenic locomotion response in Wistar rats, leading to the prevention of acoustic seizures approximately in 50% animals. Keppra injection also led to a decrease in the intensity of single audiogenic convulsive episode, a twofold prolongation of the latency of motor reaction, and a change in the pattern of seizure reaction toward increasing number of rats with "one-wave" response. In contrast, a lack of sound resistant animals and the change from one- to two-wave audiogenic response were observed in Krushinsky-Molodkina strain rats.

  3. Non-linear relationships between aflatoxin B₁ levels and the biological response of monkey kidney vero cells.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-08-14

    Aflatoxin-producing fungi contaminate food and feed during pre-harvest, storage and processing periods. Once consumed, aflatoxins (AFs) accumulate in tissues, causing illnesses in animals and humans. Most human exposure to AF seems to be a result of consumption of contaminated plant and animal products. The policy of blending and dilution of grain containing higher levels of aflatoxins with uncontaminated grains for use in animal feed implicitly assumes that the deleterious effects of low levels of the toxins are linearly correlated to concentration. This assumption may not be justified, since it involves extrapolation of these nontoxic levels in feed, which are not of further concern. To develop a better understanding of the significance of low dose effects, in the present study, we developed quantitative methods for the detection of biologically active aflatoxin B₁ (AFB1) in Vero cells by two independent assays: the green fluorescent protein (GFP) assay, as a measure of protein synthesis by the cells, and the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay, as a measure of cell viability. The results demonstrate a non-linear dose-response relationship at the cellular level. AFB1 at low concentrations has an opposite biological effect to higher doses that inhibit protein synthesis. Additional studies showed that heat does not affect the stability of AFB1 in milk and that the Vero cell model can be used to determine the presence of bioactive AFB1 in spiked beef, lamb and turkey meat. The implication of the results for the cumulative effects of low amounts of AFB1 in numerous foods is discussed.

  4. Non-Linear Relationships between Aflatoxin B1 Levels and the Biological Response of Monkey Kidney Vero Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxin-producing fungi contaminate food and feed during pre-harvest, storage and processing periods. Once consumed, aflatoxins (AFs) accumulate in tissues, causing illnesses in animals and humans. Most human exposure to AF seems to be a result of consumption of contaminated plant and animal products. The policy of blending and dilution of grain containing higher levels of aflatoxins with uncontaminated grains for use in animal feed implicitly assumes that the deleterious effects of low levels of the toxins are linearly correlated to concentration. This assumption may not be justified, since it involves extrapolation of these nontoxic levels in feed, which are not of further concern. To develop a better understanding of the significance of low dose effects, in the present study, we developed quantitative methods for the detection of biologically active aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in Vero cells by two independent assays: the green fluorescent protein (GFP) assay, as a measure of protein synthesis by the cells, and the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay, as a measure of cell viability. The results demonstrate a non-linear dose-response relationship at the cellular level. AFB1 at low concentrations has an opposite biological effect to higher doses that inhibit protein synthesis. Additional studies showed that heat does not affect the stability of AFB1 in milk and that the Vero cell model can be used to determine the presence of bioactive AFB1 in spiked beef, lamb and turkey meat. The implication of the results for the cumulative effects of low amounts of AFB1 in numerous foods is discussed. PMID:23949006

  5. Transient Earth system responses to cumulative carbon dioxide emissions: linearities, uncertainties, and probabilities in an observation-constrained model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.

    2016-02-01

    Information on the relationship between cumulative fossil CO2 emissions and multiple climate targets is essential to design emission mitigation and climate adaptation strategies. In this study, the transient response of a climate or environmental variable per trillion tonnes of CO2 emissions, termed TRE, is quantified for a set of impact-relevant climate variables and from a large set of multi-forcing scenarios extended to year 2300 towards stabilization. An ˜ 1000-member ensemble of the Bern3D-LPJ carbon-climate model is applied and model outcomes are constrained by 26 physical and biogeochemical observational data sets in a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-type framework. Uncertainties in TRE estimates include both scenario uncertainty and model response uncertainty. Cumulative fossil emissions of 1000 Gt C result in a global mean surface air temperature change of 1.9 °C (68 % confidence interval (c.i.): 1.3 to 2.7 °C), a decrease in surface ocean pH of 0.19 (0.18 to 0.22), and a steric sea level rise of 20 cm (13 to 27 cm until 2300). Linearity between cumulative emissions and transient response is high for pH and reasonably high for surface air and sea surface temperatures, but less pronounced for changes in Atlantic meridional overturning, Southern Ocean and tropical surface water saturation with respect to biogenic structures of calcium carbonate, and carbon stocks in soils. The constrained model ensemble is also applied to determine the response to a pulse-like emission and in idealized CO2-only simulations. The transient climate response is constrained, primarily by long-term ocean heat observations, to 1.7 °C (68 % c.i.: 1.3 to 2.2 °C) and the equilibrium climate sensitivity to 2.9 °C (2.0 to 4.2 °C). This is consistent with results by CMIP5 models but inconsistent with recent studies that relied on short-term air temperature data affected by natural climate variability.

  6. Altering the sex determination pathway in Drosophila fat body modifies sex-specific stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Neckameyer, Wendi S.

    2014-01-01

    The stress response in Drosophila melanogaster reveals sex differences in behavior, similar to what has been observed in mammals. However, unlike mammals, the sex determination pathway in Drosophila is well established, making this an ideal system to identify factors involved in the modulation of sex-specific responses to stress. In this study, we show that the Drosophila fat body, which has been shown to be important for energy homeostasis and sex determination, is a dynamic tissue that is altered in response to stress in a sex and time-dependent manner. We manipulated the sex determination pathway in the fat body via targeted expression of transformer and transformer-2 and analyzed these animals for changes in their response to stress. In the majority of cases, manipulation of transformer or transformer-2 was able to change the physiological output in response to starvation and oxidative stress to that of the opposite sex. Our data also uncover the possibility of additional downstream targets for transformer and transformer-2 that are separate from the sex determination pathway and can influence behavioral and physiological responses. PMID:24789992

  7. Nonlinear and linear site response and basin effects in Seattle for the M 6.8 Nisqually, Washington, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.D.; Carver, D.L.; Williams, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    We used recordings of the M 6.8 Nisqually earthquake and its ML 3.4 aftershock to study site response and basin effects for 35 locations in Seattle, Washington. We determined site amplification from Fourier spectral ratios of the recorded horizontal ground motions, referenced to a soft-rock site. Soft-soil sites (generally National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program [NEHRP] class E) on artificial fill and young alluvium have the largest 1-Hz amplifications (factors of 3-7) for both the mainshock and aftershock. These amplifications are correlated with areas of higher damage from the mainshock to major buildings and liquefaction. There are several indications of nonlinear response at the soft-soil sites for the mainshock ground motions, despite relatively modest peak accelerations in the S waves of 15%-22%g. First, the mainshock spectral ratios do not show amplification at 2-8 Hz as do the aftershock spectral ratios. Spectral peaks at frequencies below 2 Hz generally occur at lower frequencies for the mainshock spectral ratios than for the aftershock ratios. At one soft-soil site, there is a clear shift of the resonant frequency to a lower frequency for the mainshock compared with the aftershock. The frequency of this resonance increases in the coda of the mainshock record, indicating that the site response during the weaker motions of the coda is more linear than that of the initial S wave. Three of the soft-soil sites display cusped, one-sided mainshock accelerograms after the S wave. These soft-soil sites also show amplification at 10-20 Hz in the S wave, relative to the rock site, that is not observed for the aftershock. The cusped waveforms and 10-20-Hz amplification are symptomatic of nonlinear response at the soft-soil sites. These sites had nearby liquefaction. The largest amplifications for 0.5 Hz occur at soft-soil sites on the southern portion of the Seattle Basin. Stiff-soil sites (NEHRP classes D and C) on Pleistocene-age glacial deposits display

  8. Impedance spectroscopy for monosaccharides detection using responsive hydrogel modified paper-based electrodes.

    PubMed

    Daikuzono, C M; Delaney, C; Tesfay, H; Florea, L; Oliveira, O N; Morrin, A; Diamond, D

    2017-03-27

    Herein we present a novel sensor for the detection of monosaccharides (e.g. glucose, fructose) in solution, using electrical impedance spectroscopy. The sensor is based on carbon interdigitated electrodes, printed on paper using screen printing. The surface of the electrodes was modified with a thin layer of hydrogel containing acrylamide copolymerised with 20 mol% 3-(Acrylamido)phenylboronic acid (PBA). It was observed that the hydrogel layers containing 20 mol% PBA swell considerably in the presence of glucose and fructose. This in turn changes the measured impedance across the electrodes, making it a suitable sensor for the quantitative detection of saccharides. We investigated the impedance and capacitance variations with different concentrations of glucose and fructose (0-5 mM) in aqueous phosphate buffer solutions. Variations in impedance were attributed to changes in the dielectric properties of the hydrogel under an applied electric field, due to swelling of the hydrogel layer induced by uptake and binding of sugar molecules to the boronate species within the gel. Impedance measurements at 1 kHz demonstrated that hydrogel swelling leads to an increased mobility of ions within the swollen hydrogel layer. The impedance decreased with increasing sugar concentration and the relative capacitance curves are markedly different for fructose and glucose, as the hydrogel exhibits greater swelling in the presence of fructose than glucose over the same concentration range. As the proposed sensor was shown to be suitable for the detection of glucose at concentration levels found in human sweat, future work will focus on the incorporation of these modified paper-based electrodes into wearable skin patches for non-invasive sugar monitoring in sweat.

  9. Threshold and other departures from linear-quadratic curvature in the non-cancer mortality dose-response curve in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P

    2004-07-01

    Recently released data on non-cancer mortality in Japanese atomic bomb survivors are analysed using a variety of generalised relative risk models that take account of errors in estimates of dose to assess the dose-response at low doses. If linear-threshold, quadratic-threshold or linear-quadratic-threshold relative risk models (the dose-response is assumed to be linear, quadratic or linear-quadratic above the threshold, respectively) are fitted to the non-cancer data there are no statistically significant ( p>0.10) indications of threshold departures from linearity, quadratic curvature or linear-quadratic curvature. These findings are true irrespective of the assumed magnitude of dosimetric error, between 25%-45% geometric standard deviations. In general, increasing the assumed magnitude of dosimetric error had little effect on the central estimates of the threshold, but somewhat widened the associated confidence intervals. If a power of dose model is fitted, there is little evidence ( p>0.10) that the power of dose in the dose-response is statistically significantly different from 1, again irrespective of the assumed magnitude of dosimetric errors in the range 25%-45%. Again, increasing the size of the errors resulted in wider confidence intervals on the power of dose, without marked effect on the central estimates. In general these findings remain true for various non-cancer disease subtypes.

  10. Genomic Modifiers of Natural Killer Cells, Immune Responsiveness and Lymphoid Tissue Remodeling Together Increase Host Resistance to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heather; Prince, Jessica; Stadnisky, Michael D.; Anderson, Monique; Nash, William; Rival, Claudia; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Farber, Charles R.; Tung, Kenneth; Brown, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    The MHC class I Dk molecule supplies vital host resistance during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells expressing the Ly49G2 inhibitory receptor, which specifically binds Dk, are required to control viral spread. The extent of Dk-dependent host resistance, however, differs significantly amongst related strains of mice, C57L and MA/My. As a result, we predicted that relatively small-effect modifier genetic loci might together shape immune cell features, NK cell reactivity, and the host immune response to MCMV. A robust Dk-dependent genetic effect, however, has so far hindered attempts to identify additional host resistance factors. Thus, we applied genomic mapping strategies and multicolor flow cytometric analysis of immune cells in naive and virus-infected hosts to identify genetic modifiers of the host immune response to MCMV. We discovered and validated many quantitative trait loci (QTL); these were mapped to at least 19 positions on 16 chromosomes. Intriguingly, one newly discovered non-MHC locus (Cmv5) controlled splenic NK cell accrual, secondary lymphoid organ structure, and lymphoid follicle development during MCMV infection. We infer that Cmv5 aids host resistance to MCMV infection by expanding NK cells needed to preserve and protect essential tissue structural elements, to enhance lymphoid remodeling and to increase viral clearance in spleen. PMID:26845690

  11. MiRNAs and miRNA Polymorphisms Modify Drug Response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu-Peng; Hu, Yao-Dong; Hu, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Yang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Chun; Tang, Jie; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Differences in expression of drug response-related genes contribute to inter-individual variation in drugs’ biological effects. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs emerging as new players in epigenetic regulation of gene expression at post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs regulate the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism, drug transportation, drug targets and downstream signal molecules directly or indirectly. MiRNA polymorphisms, the genetic variations affecting miRNA expression and/or miRNA-mRNA interaction, provide a new insight into the understanding of inter-individual difference in drug response. Here, we provide an overview of the recent progress in miRNAs mediated regulation of biotransformation enzymes, drug transporters, and nuclear receptors. We also describe the implications of miRNA polymorphisms in cancer chemotherapy response. PMID:27834829

  12. Protein and fat modify the glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to a mashed potato-based meal.

    PubMed

    Hätönen, Katja A; Virtamo, Jarmo; Eriksson, Johan G; Sinkko, Harri K; Sundvall, Jouko E; Valsta, Liisa M

    2011-07-01

    Potatoes, especially mashed potatoes, are known to result in high glycaemic and insulinaemic responses. However, in most meals, potatoes are accompanied by other foods. The objective of the present study was to investigate how glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to a mashed potato meal changed when a high-fat food (rapeseed oil), a high-protein food (chicken breast) and/or salad were added to the meal. Healthy subjects (n 11) ingested the test meals once and the reference food (glucose solution) twice in a random order at 1-week intervals. Capillary blood samples were then drawn for 2 h, and glucose and insulin were analysed. The 2 h glycaemic responses to six mashed potato-containing meals varied more than twofold. The glycaemic index (GI) of pure mashed potato was 108, whereas combined with chicken breast, rapeseed oil and salad, it was only 54. The latter GI also differed considerably from its predicted value of 103, which was based on the individual GI of the components of the meal. The insulinaemic indices of the mashed potato-based meals varied between 94 and 148. Chicken breast in the meal increased the insulinaemic response, and rapeseed oil diminished it. However, the insulinaemic response to mashed potato with chicken breast and rapeseed oil was lower than that to mashed potato alone. In conclusion, the protein, fat and salad contents of a meal exert considerable influence on the glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to mashed potatoes. Furthermore, the estimation of the GI of a mixed meal by calculation is imprecise.

  13. Non-linear optical response of an impurity in a cylindrical quantum dot under the action of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portacio, Alfonso A.; Rodríguez, Boris A.; Villamil, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    The linear and nonlinear optical response in a cylindrical quantum dot (CQD) of GaAs / Ga0.6Al0.4 As with a donor impurity in a uniform magnetic field applied in the axial direction of the cylinder is studied theoretically. The calculations were carried out in approximations of effective mass and two-level quantum systems. Using the variational method, the binding energies and the wave functions of the 1s-like y 2pz-like states for different positions of the impurity inside the CQD were found. It was found that the binding energy is greatest in the center of the CQD and diminishes as the impurity moves radially and/or axially. The optical rectification, the change in the refractive index, and the optical absorption were studied as functions of the energy of a photon incident on the CQD and different intensities of the magnetic field, with an impurity located at various positions. It was found that in a CDQ with an impurity inside, the effect of the variation of the intensity of the magnetic field on the optical response is much less than the effect produced by the variation of the position of the impurity. The physical reason for this behavior is that in nanostructures with impurities the Coulomb confinement is stronger than the magnetic confinement. It was also found that when the impurity is in the center of the quantum dot, the optical rectification coefficient is zero, due to the symmetry that the wave function of the impurity exhibits at this geometric point. When the impurity moves in the axial direction, the symmetry is broken and the optical rectification coefficient is different from zero, and its value increases as the impurity moves away from the center of the CQD.

  14. Investigating the sources of variability in the dynamic response of built-up structures through a linear analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolfathi, Ali; O'Boy, Dan J.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Fisher, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that the dynamic response of a number of nominally identical built-up structures are often different and the variability increases with increasing complexity of the structure. Furthermore, the effects of the different parameters, for example the variation in joint locations or the range of the Young's modulus, on the dynamic response of the system are not the same. In this paper, the effects of different material and geometric parameters on the variability of a vibration transfer function are compared using an analytical model of a simple linear built-up structure that consist of two plates connected by a single mount. Similar results can be obtained if multiple mounts are used. The scope of this paper is limited to a low and medium frequency range where usually deterministic models are used for vibrational analysis. The effect of the mount position and also the global variation in the properties of the plate, such as modulus of elasticity or thickness, is higher on the variability of vibration transfer function than the effect of the mount properties. It is shown that the vibration transfer function between the plates is independent of the mount property if a stiff enough mount with a small mass is implemented. For a soft mount, there is a direct relationship between the mount impedance and the variation in the vibration transfer function. Furthermore, there are a range of mount stiffnesses between these two extreme cases at which the vibration transfer function is more sensitive to changes in the stiffness of the mount than when compared to a soft mount. It is found that the effect of variation in the mount damping and the mount mass on the variability is negligible. Similarly, the effect of the plate damping on the variability is not significant.

  15. Linear Superposition of Retinal Action Potentials to Predict Electrical Flicker Responses from the Eye of the Wolf Spider, Lycosa baltimoriana (Keyserling)

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Robert D.

    1962-01-01

    Retinal action potentials were elicited from light-adapted posterior median ocelli of the wolf spider Lycosa baltimoriana (Keyserling) by rectangular shaped photic stimuli representing 8 per cent increments or decrements of the background illumination. Responses to trains of recurrent incremental or decremental flashes were successfully predicted by graphical linear superposition of a single flash response, which was repeatedly drawn and added to itself at intervals equal to the period of the intermittent stimulus. Incremental stimuli inverted to form decremental stimuli elicited responses which were also inverted. Responses to single incremental flashes were successfully predicted by linear superposition of the response to one incremental step stimulus, which was inverted and added to itself at an interval equal to the duration of the flash. PMID:13884591

  16. Linear response of heat conductivity of normal-superfluid interface of a polarized Fermi gas to orbital magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, N.; Mehrafarin, M.; Afzali, R.

    2012-01-01

    Using perturbed Bogoliubov equations, we study the linear response to a weak orbital magnetic field of the heat conductivity of the normal-superfluid interface of a polarized Fermi gas at sufficiently low temperature. We consider the various scattering regions of the BCS regime and analytically obtain the transmission coefficients and the heat conductivity across the interface in an arbitrary weak orbital field. For a definite choice of the field, we consider various values of the scattering length in the BCS range and numerically obtain the allowed values of the average and species-imbalance chemical potentials. Thus, taking Andreev reflection into account, we describe how the heat conductivity is affected by the field and the species imbalance. In particular, we show that the additional heat conductivity due to the orbital field increases with the species imbalance, which is more noticeable at higher temperatures. Our results indicate how the heat conductivity may be controlled, which is relevant to sensitive magnetic field sensors/regulators at the interface.

  17. Optimizing the general linear model for functional near-infrared spectroscopy: an adaptive hemodynamic response function approach

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Minako; Dan, Ippeita; Sano, Toshifumi; Dan, Haruka; Watanabe, Eiju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. An increasing number of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies utilize a general linear model (GLM) approach, which serves as a standard statistical method for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analysis. While fMRI solely measures the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal, fNIRS measures the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxy-hemoglobin (deoxy-Hb) signals at a temporal resolution severalfold higher. This suggests the necessity of adjusting the temporal parameters of a GLM for fNIRS signals. Thus, we devised a GLM-based method utilizing an adaptive hemodynamic response function (HRF). We sought the optimum temporal parameters to best explain the observed time series data during verbal fluency and naming tasks. The peak delay of the HRF was systematically changed to achieve the best-fit model for the observed oxy- and deoxy-Hb time series data. The optimized peak delay showed different values for each Hb signal and task. When the optimized peak delays were adopted, the deoxy-Hb data yielded comparable activations with similar statistical power and spatial patterns to oxy-Hb data. The adaptive HRF method could suitably explain the behaviors of both Hb parameters during tasks with the different cognitive loads during a time course, and thus would serve as an objective method to fully utilize the temporal structures of all fNIRS data. PMID:26157973

  18. Linear oxygen-sensing response from a rhenium complex induced by heavy atom: synthesis, characterization, photophysical study and sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pu; Zhao, Lun; Wang, Lisha; Xu, Guangyang

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we synthesized a Br-containing ligand of 2-(4-bromophenyl)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole and its corresponding Re(I) complex. Their synthesis, characterization, single crystal structure, electronic transitions and photophysical property were presented and discussed in detail. This Re(I) complex was found to be a yellow emitter with slim π→π* radiative decay contribution, and its emission was also found to be sensitive towards O2. By doping this Re(I) complex into a polymer matrix, the oxygen-sensing performance of the resulted composite nanofibers was also investigated. Owing to the porous structure of the supporting matrix, the optimal sample gave the highest sensitivity of 3.91 with short response time of only 9 s. In addition, the linearity of the Stern-Volmer plots was greatly improved due to the highly pure emissive center triggered by heavy-atom turbulence effect from Br atom, as indicted by theoretical calculation result.

  19. Linear Response Equilibrium versus echo-planar encoding for fast high-spatial resolution 3D chemical shift imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rudolf Fritz; Baltes, Christof; Weiss, Kilian; Pazhenkottil, Aju; Rudin, Markus; Boesiger, Peter; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2011-07-01

    In this work Linear Response Equilibrium (LRE) and Echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) are compared in terms of sensitivity per unit time and power deposition. In addition an extended dual repetition time scheme to generate broad stopbands for improved inherent water suppression in LRE is presented. The feasibility of LRE and EPSI for assessing cholesterol esters in human carotid plaques with high spatial resolution of 1.95 × 1.15 × 1.15 mm 3 on a clinical 3T MR system is demonstrated. In simulations and phantom experiments it is shown that LRE has comparable but lower sensitivity per unit time relative to EPSI despite stronger signal generated. This relates to the lower sampling efficiency in LRE relative to EPSI as a result of limited gradient performance on clinical MR systems. At the same time, power deposition of LRE is significantly reduced compared to EPSI making it an interesting niche application for in vivo high field spectroscopic imaging of metabolites within a limited bandwidth.

  20. Reappraisal of nuclear quadrupole moments of atomic halogens via relativistic coupled cluster linear response theory for the ionization process.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rajat K; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Mahapatra, Uttam Sinha

    2013-11-27

    The coupled cluster based linear response theory (CCLRT) with four-component relativistic spinors is employed to compute the electric field gradients (EFG) of (35)Cl, (79)Br, and (127)I nuclei. The EFGs resulting from these calculations are combined with experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCC) to determine the nuclear quadrupole moments (NQM), Q of the halide nuclei. Our estimated NQMs [(35)Cl = -81.12 mb, (79)Br = 307.98 mb, and (127)I = -688.22 mb] agree well with the new atomic values [(35)Cl = -81.1(1.2), (79)Br = 302(5), and (127)I = -680(10) mb] obtained via Fock space multireference coupled cluster method with the Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian. Although our estimated Q((79)Br) value deviates from the accepted reference value of 313(3) mb, it agrees well with the recently recommended value, Q((79)Br) = 308.7(20) mb. Good agreement with current reference data indicates the accuracy of the proposed value for these halogen nuclei and lends credence to the results obtained via CCLRT approach. The electron affinities yielded by this method with no extra cost are also in good agreement with experimental values, which bolster our belief that the NQMs values for halogen nuclei derived here are reliable.

  1. Linear oxygen-sensing response from a rhenium complex induced by heavy atom: Synthesis, characterization, photophysical study and sensing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Wan; Lun, Zhao; Lisha, Wang; Guangyang, Xu

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we synthesized a Br-containing ligand of 2-(4-bromophenyl)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole and its corresponding Re(I) complex. Their synthesis, characterization, single crystal structure, electronic transitions and photophysical property were presented and discussed in detail. This Re(I) complex was found to be a yellow emitter with slim π → π* radiative decay contribution, and its emission was also found to be sensitive towards O2. By doping this Re(I) complex into a polymer matrix, the oxygen-sensing performance of the resulted composite nanofibers was also investigated. Owing to the porous structure of the supporting matrix, the optimal sample gave the highest sensitivity of 3.91 with short response time of only 9 s. In addition, the linearity of the Stern-Volmer plots was greatly improved due to the highly pure emissive center triggered by heavy-atom turbulence effect from Br atom, as indicted by theoretical calculation result.

  2. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical/continuum style solvation model: Linear response theory, variational treatment, and nuclear gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui

    2009-11-01

    Linear response and variational treatment are formulated for Hartree-Fock (HF) and Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) methods and combined discrete-continuum solvation models that incorporate self-consistently induced dipoles and charges. Due to the variational treatment, analytic nuclear gradients can be evaluated efficiently for these discrete and continuum solvation models. The forces and torques on the induced point dipoles and point charges can be evaluated using simple electrostatic formulas as for permanent point dipoles and point charges, in accordance with the electrostatic nature of these methods. Implementation and tests using the effective fragment potential (EFP, a polarizable force field) method and the conductorlike polarizable continuum model (CPCM) show that the nuclear gradients are as accurate as those in the gas phase HF and DFT methods. Using B3LYP/EFP/CPCM and time-dependent-B3LYP/EFP/CPCM methods, acetone S0→S1 excitation in aqueous solution is studied. The results are close to those from full B3LYP/CPCM calculations.

  3. Apolipoprotein B genetic variants modify the response to fenofibrate: a GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypertriglyceridemia, defined as a triglyceride measurement > 150 mg/dl, occurs in up to 34% of adults. Fenofibrate is a commonly used drug to treat hypertriglyceridemia, but response to fenofibrate varies considerably among individuals. We sought to determine if genetic variation in apolipoprotein...

  4. Janus Suprabead Displays Derived from the Modified Photonic Crystals toward Temperature Magnetism and Optics Multiple Responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhuan; Yang, Shengyang; Yin, Su-Na; Chen, Li; Chen, Su

    2015-04-29

    The design and development of Janus suprabeads (JSs) with multiple responses are highly desirable in the fabrication of functional nanomaterials. In this work, we report a triphase microfluidic strategy for the construction of JSs with temperature-magnetism-optics triple responses. Initially, macromonomer poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) obtained via catalytic chain transfer polymerization (CCTP) was grafted onto the polystyrene (PS) colloidal photonic crystals (CPCs) surface. Because abundant carboxylic acid groups in PMAA could coordinate cadmium ions for in situ production of fluorescent CdS quantum dots (QDs) after introducing sulfur ions, the as-prepared JSs were endowed with favorable optical properties. Meanwhile, the as-prepared Cd(2+)/PS CPCs were employed as a template to build JSs with temperature-magnetism sensitivity via the introduction of magnetic Fe3O4 and hydrogels. Finally, the fluorescence pattern was easily performed by using chalcogenides as "ink" to write on the pad, in which in situ reaction mechanism was involved in the response. The multiple responsive JSs show promising applications in sensor, display, and anticounterfeit fields.

  5. Modified field enhancement and extinction by plasmonic nanowire dimers due to nonlocal response.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, Søren; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Mortensen, N Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2012-02-13

    We study the effect of nonlocal optical response on the optical properties of metallic nanowires, by numerically implementing the hydrodynamical Drude model for arbitrary nanowire geometries. We first demonstrate the accuracy of our frequency-domain finite-element implementation by benchmarking it in a wide frequency range against analytical results for the extinction cross section of a cylindrical plasmonic nanowire. Our main results concern more complex geometries, namely cylindrical and bow-tie nanowire dimers that can strongly enhance optical fields. For both types of dimers we find that nonlocal response can strongly affect both the field enhancement in between the dimers and their respective extinction cross sections. In particular, we give examples of blueshifted maximal field enhancements near hybridized plasmonic dimer resonances that are still large but nearly two times smaller than in the usual local-response description. For the same geometry at a fixed frequency, the field enhancement and cross section can also be significantly more enhanced in the nonlocal-response model.

  6. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response1

    PubMed Central

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation. PMID:26084921

  7. The effect of modifying response and performance feedback parameters on the CNV in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, D. A.; Leifer, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect on the CNV of sustained and delayed motor response with the dominant and nondominant hand in the presence and absence of visual performance feedback, was studied in 15 male adults. Monopolar scalp recordings were obtained at Fz, Cz, Pz, and bilaterally over the motor hand area. Results indicated that the magnitude of the CNV was greater in the delayed than sustained response task, greater in the presence than absence of feedback, and greater over the motor hand area contralateral to movement. Frontal CNV habituated in the sustained, but not the delayed response task, suggested that frontal negative variations in the former case signify an orienting response to novelty or uncertainty. The absence of habituation in the delay condition was interpreted in terms of the motor inhibitory function of frontal association cortex. Performance feedback appeared to enhance CNV indirectly by increasing the motivation of subjects. A multiprocess conception of CNV was proposed in which vortex-negative slow potentials reflect a multiplicity of psychophysiological processes occurring at a variety of cortical and subcortical locations in the brain preparatory to a motor or mental action.

  8. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response.

    PubMed

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-09-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation.

  9. Modifying the Response Labels of an ADHD Teacher Rating Scale: Psychometric and Epidemiologic Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Andrew S.; Umbach, David M.; Bohlig, E. Michael; Stallone, Lil; Sandler, Dale P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of changing the response labels of a teacher rating scale in a population-based study of ADHD. Method: For parents, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, which asks whether each of 18 symptoms occurred "often" in the past year, was used. For teachers, most scales use a 4-point scale, with…

  10. Development of a modified lymphocyte transformation test for diagnosing drug-induced liver injury associated with an adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Whritenour, Jessica; Ko, Mira; Zong, Qing; Wang, Jianying; Tartaro, Karrie; Schneider, Patricia; Olson, Ellen; Van Volkenburg, Maria; Serrano, Jose; Hayashi, Paul; Fontana, Robert; Chalasani, Naga; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2017-12-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a growing problem. Diagnostic methods to differentiate DILI caused by an adaptive immune response from liver injury of other causes or to identify the responsible drug in patients receiving multiple drugs, herbals and/or dietary supplements (polypharmacy) have not yet been established. The lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) has been proposed as a diagnostic method to determine if a subject with an apparent hypersensitivity reaction has become sensitized to a specific drug. In this test, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) collected from a subject are incubated with drug(s) suspected of causing the reaction. Cell proliferation, measured by the incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine into new DNA, is considered evidence of a drug-specific immune response. The objectives of the current studies were to: (1) develop and optimize a modified version of the LTT (mLTT) and (2) investigate the feasibility of using the mLTT for diagnosing DILI associated with an adaptive immune response and identifying the responsible drug. PBMC collected from donors with a history of drug hypersensitivity reactions to specific drugs (manifested as skin rash) were used as positive controls for assay optimization. Following optimization, samples collected from 24 subjects enrolled in the U.S. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN) were tested in the mLTT. Using cytokine and granzyme B production as the primary endpoints to demonstrate lymphocyte sensitization to a specific drug, most samples from the DILIN subjects failed to respond. However, robust positive mLTT responses were observed for two of four samples from three DILIN subjects with hepatitis due to isoniazid (INH). We conclude that the mLTT, as performed here on frozen and thawed PBMC, is not a reliable test for diagnosing DILI caused by all drugs, but that it may be useful for confirming the role of the adaptive immune response in DILI ascribed to INH.

  11. In vitro response of hFOB cells to pamidronate modified sodium silicate coated cellulose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ponader, Sabine; Brandt, Heike; Vairaktaris, Eleftherios; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Nkenke, Emeka; Schlegel, Karl A; Neukam, Friedrich W; Holst, Stefan; Müller, Frank A; Greil, Peter

    2008-07-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of cellulose-based scaffolds coated with pure sodium silicate gel and sodium silicate gels accumulated with different concentrations of the bisphosphonate pamidronate as scaffolds for attachment, proliferation and differentiation of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19). Human osteoblasts were cultured in vitro for a period up to 14 days on different cellulose scaffolds. Unmodified and sodium silicate coated cellulose scaffolds were used as control. Two surface-coated modifications of cellulose were applied. The scaffolds were coated in a modified two-step dip coating process with pure sodium silicate gel and pamidronate enriched sodium silicate gel, respectively. In order to investigate the influence of the pamidronate, concentrations of 0.667 mg Na-pamidronate/ml sodium silicate solution, 0.333 mg Na-pamidronate/ml sodium silicate solution and 3.33 x 10(-3) mg Na-pamidronate/ml sodium silicate solution were used for the coating process. Cell proliferation, vitality and attachment were examined by means of cell counting, WST-1 test, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The relative grade of differentiation of hFOB cells was examined by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis for the gene expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Proliferation and differentiation of human osteoblasts was enhanced by the sodium silicate coatings accumulated with pamidronate compared to pure sodium silicate coatings. There was a reciprocal correlation of vitality with the concentration of pamidronate. The highest vitality was found on surfaces with the lowest pamidronate accumulation. Alkaline phosphatase, an early differentiation marker, was overexpressed after 7 days in cells on all pamidronate-containing surfaces (up to 350% compared to untreated cellulose). Osteocalcin, a late differentiation marker, was overexpressed after 14 days in cells on all coated surfaces (up

  12. Toxic secondary metabolite production in genetically modified potatoes in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Derek; Jones, Huw; Gans, Paul; Coates, Steven; Smith, Lydia M J

    2005-10-05

    Potatoes produce a number of toxic secondary metabolites, which are divided into two groups: the sesquiterpenes and the glycoalkaloids (PGAs): whereas PGAs are largely preformed and present in toxic quantities in both the foliage and "green" potatoes, it is well documented that the levels of PGAs and sesquiterpenes are effected by many biotic an abiotic stresses. The development of genetically modified potato varieties has made it prudent to ascertain whether there may be changes in the amounts or types of these secondary metabolites either as a direct effect of the transgene or due to its interactions with environmental variables. Transgenic potato lines were exposed, along with nontransgenic lines, to a range of biotic and abiotic stresses and a range of environmental conditions in the field and store. Following stressing, a comparison was made of levels of potato glycoalkaloid and sesquiterpene levels between the two groups. Significant differences were observed in the levels of both glycoalkaloid and sesquiterpene levels between transgenic and control material and between infected and noninfected material.

  13. Photo-response behavior of electrospun nanofibers based on spiropyran-cyclodextrin modified polymer†

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Frederico B.; Guerreiro, João D. T.; Ma, Minglin; Anderson, Daniel G.; Drum, Chester L.; Sinisterra, Rubén D.; Langer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Tunable and durable photochromic materials are a rapidly expanding area of interest, with applications ranging from biomedical devices to industrial-fields. Here we examine electrospun poly (methacrylic acid) PMAA nanofibers covalently modified with the highly photochromic molecule, spiropyran (SP) or a derivate SP which is firstly coupled to a cyclodextrin molecule (βCDSP). The photochromic properties of the starting materials and of the nanofibers were investigated. βCDSP, PMAASP and PMAA-βCDSP polymers exhibited a reverse photochromism. The kinetic results revealed a faster isomerization process for the βCDSP molecule, than that for the PMAA-βCDSP and for the PMAASP, the slowest one. The fastest isomerization is attributed to the presence of a large number of hydroxyl groups of the βCD which stabilizes the merocyanine form via hydrogen bonding, and the slowest isomerization is related to the PMAA chain structure that stabilizes the spiropyran form. Thus, combining the PMAA and βCD properties the photo-isomerization can be modulated. The photoreversibility of this material was verified by UV-visible measurements cycling visible and UV light. Infrared spectroscopy and water contact angle were used for the nanofiber surface characterization, demonstrating the presence of the spiropyran on the mats surface and also showing a minimal effect on nanofiber size and shape when compared to PMAA fiber. PMID:28210069

  14. CC-122, a pleiotropic pathway modifier, mimics an interferon response and has antitumor activity in DLBCL.

    PubMed

    Hagner, Patrick R; Man, Hon-Wah; Fontanillo, Celia; Wang, Maria; Couto, Suzana; Breider, Mike; Bjorklund, Chad; Havens, Courtney G; Lu, Gang; Rychak, Emily; Raymon, Heather; Narla, Rama Krishna; Barnes, Leo; Khambatta, Gody; Chiu, Hsiling; Kosek, Jolanta; Kang, Jian; Amantangelo, Michael D; Waldman, Michelle; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Cai, Ti; Pourdehnad, Michael; Trotter, Matthew; Daniel, Thomas O; Schafer, Peter H; Klippel, Anke; Thakurta, Anjan; Chopra, Rajesh; Gandhi, Anita K

    2015-08-06

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the Cullin 4 RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, is the target of the immunomodulatory drugs lenalidomide and pomalidomide. Recently, it was demonstrated that binding of these drugs to CRBN promotes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of 2 common substrates, transcription factors Aiolos and Ikaros. Here we report that CC-122, a new chemical entity termed pleiotropic pathway modifier, binds CRBN and promotes degradation of Aiolos and Ikaros in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and T cells in vitro, in vivo, and in patients, resulting in both cell autonomous as well as immunostimulatory effects. In DLBCL cell lines, CC-122-induced degradation or short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of Aiolos and Ikaros correlates with increased transcription of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes independent of IFN-α, -β, and -γ production and/or secretion and results in apoptosis in both activated B-cell (ABC) and germinal center B-cell DLBCL cell lines. Our results provide mechanistic insight into the cell-of-origin independent antilymphoma activity of CC-122, in contrast to the ABC subtype selective activity of lenalidomide.

  15. CC-122, a pleiotropic pathway modifier, mimics an interferon response and has antitumor activity in DLBCL

    PubMed Central

    Hagner, Patrick R.; Man, Hon-Wah; Fontanillo, Celia; Wang, Maria; Couto, Suzana; Breider, Mike; Bjorklund, Chad; Havens, Courtney G.; Lu, Gang; Rychak, Emily; Raymon, Heather; Narla, Rama Krishna; Barnes, Leo; Khambatta, Gody; Chiu, Hsiling; Kosek, Jolanta; Kang, Jian; Amantangelo, Michael D.; Waldman, Michelle; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Cai, Ti; Pourdehnad, Michael; Trotter, Matthew; Daniel, Thomas O.; Schafer, Peter H.; Klippel, Anke; Thakurta, Anjan; Gandhi, Anita K.

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the Cullin 4 RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, is the target of the immunomodulatory drugs lenalidomide and pomalidomide. Recently, it was demonstrated that binding of these drugs to CRBN promotes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of 2 common substrates, transcription factors Aiolos and Ikaros. Here we report that CC-122, a new chemical entity termed pleiotropic pathway modifier, binds CRBN and promotes degradation of Aiolos and Ikaros in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and T cells in vitro, in vivo, and in patients, resulting in both cell autonomous as well as immunostimulatory effects. In DLBCL cell lines, CC-122-induced degradation or short hairpin RNA–mediated knockdown of Aiolos and Ikaros correlates with increased transcription of interferon (IFN)–stimulated genes independent of IFN-α, -β, and -γ production and/or secretion and results in apoptosis in both activated B-cell (ABC) and germinal center B-cell DLBCL cell lines. Our results provide mechanistic insight into the cell-of-origin independent antilymphoma activity of CC-122, in contrast to the ABC subtype selective activity of lenalidomide. PMID:26002965

  16. Dispersal capacity and diet breadth modify the response of wild bees to habitat loss.

    PubMed

    Bommarco, Riccardo; Biesmeijer, Jacobus C; Meyer, Birgit; Potts, Simon G; Pöyry, Juha; Roberts, Stuart P M; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Ockinger, Erik

    2010-07-07

    Habitat loss poses a major threat to biodiversity, and species-specific extinction risks are inextricably linked to life-history characteristics. This relationship is still poorly documented for many functionally important taxa, and at larger continental scales. With data from five replicated field studies from three countries, we examined how species richness of wild bees varies with habitat patch size. We hypothesized that the form of this relationship is affected by body size, degree of host plant specialization and sociality. Across all species, we found a positive species-area slope (z = 0.19), and species traits modified this relationship. Large-bodied generalists had a lower z value than small generalists. Contrary to predictions, small specialists had similar or slightly lower z value compared with large specialists, and small generalists also tended to be more strongly affected by habitat loss as compared with small specialists. Social bees were negatively affected by habitat loss (z = 0.11) irrespective of body size. We conclude that habitat loss leads to clear shifts in the species composition of wild bee communities.

  17. Glider observations of the biological response to Modified Circumpolar Deep Water Variability in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.; Kaufman, D.; Friedrichs, M. A.; Smith, W.

    2011-12-01

    The Ross Sea is the most productive area within the Southern Ocean, and is believed to play a significant role in the global marine carbon cycle. This region is also characterized by strong spatial and temporal variability in both physical and biogeochemical conditions; however this variability occurs on spatial and temporal scales that are difficult to resolve with traditional data sources. In order to better understand this variability, two gliders were deployed in the Ross Sea in late November 2010 during the early stages of the summer plankton bloom. Together, the two gliders made over 1500 dives and collected data (salinity, temperature, fluorescence and oxygen) throughout the water column for roughly two months. The data from these gliders were used to identify the presence of the relatively high-nutrient Modified Circumpolar Deep Water (MCDW), which has been hypothesized to be a significant factor affecting the spatial and temporal extent of the summer plankton blooms. Preliminary data analyses indicate a positive correlation between areas of MCDW and high chlorophyll concentrations. The glider data were also compared to contemporaneous cruise data and satellite data and were found to fit well with these other data, yet were better able to resolve the high temporal and spatial variability of this region. Specifically, the lower resolution of the cruise data, as compared to the glider data, made it difficult to resolve the correlation of MCDW to high chlorophyll from the cruise data alone.

  18. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals.

  19. Methods to actively modify the dynamic response of cm-scale FWMAV designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, H. J.; Goosen, J. F. L.; van Keulen, F.

    2016-05-01

    Lightweight vibrating structures (such as flapping wing micro air vehicle (FWMAV) designs) often require some form of control. To achieve controllability, local structural property changes (e.g., damping and stiffness changes) might be induced in an active manner. The stroke-averaged lift force production of a FWMAV wing can be modified by changing the structural properties of that wing at carefully selected places (e.g., changing the properties of the elastic hinge at the wing root as studied in this work). To actively change the structural properties, we investigate three different methods which are based on: (1) piezoelectric polymers, (2) electrorheological fluids, and (3) electrostatic softening. This work aims to gain simple yet insightful ways to determine the potential of these methods without focusing on the precise modeling. Analytical models of FWMAV wing designs that include control approaches based on these three methods are used to calculate the achievable lift force modifications after activating these methods. The lift force production as a result of a wing flapping motion is determined using a quasi-steady aerodynamic model. Both piezoelectric polymers and electrostatic softening are found to be promising in changing the structural properties and, hence, the lift force production of FWMAV wings. For the control of lightweight FWMAV designs, numerical simulations reveal a promising roll maneuverability due to the induced lift force difference between a pair of opposite wings. Although applied to a specific FWMAV design, this work is relevant for control of small, lightweight, possible compliant, vibrating structures in general.

  20. Stimuli-responsive cellulose modified by epoxy-functionalized polymer nanoparticles with photochromic and solvatochromic properties.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Amin; Rad, Jaber Keyvan; Mahdavian, Ali Reza

    2016-10-05

    Photoresponsive papers are among the fast and simple tools for detection of polarity by solvatochromic and photochromic behaviors upon UV irradiation. Here, a new, green and facile modification strategy was employed to prepare novel stimuli-responsive cellulose materials containing spiropyran by mixing microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), as a model compound, with epoxy-functionalized photochromic latex. FTIR analysis, thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were used to confirm the microstructral properties. Crystallographic analysis revealed a decrease in crystallinity of cellulose matrix and approved the incorporation of photochromic copolymer. Then stimuli-responsive papers were prepared by using pulp paper as the cellulosic matrix and their smart characteristics were studied under UV irradiation while dried or immersed into some polar and non-polar solvents. Different color changes were observed and investigated by solid-state UV-vis spectroscopy. These significant results were attributed to the efficient chemical modification and confirmed by SEM, EDX and nitrogen mapping analyses.

  1. Developments on drug discovery and on new therapeutics: highly diluted tinctures act as biological response modifiers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the search for new therapies novel drugs and medications are being discovered, developed and tested in laboratories. Highly diluted substances are intended to enhance immune system responses resulting in reduced frequency of various diseases, and often present no risk of serious side-effects due to its low toxicity. Over the past years our research group has been investigating the action of highly diluted substances and tinctures on cells from the immune system. Methods We have developed and tested several highly diluted tinctures and here we describe the biological activity of M1, M2, and M8 both in vitro in immune cells from mice and human, and in vivo in mice. Cytotoxicity, cytokines released and NF-κB activation were determined after in vitro treatment. Cell viability, oxidative response, lipid peroxidation, bone marrow and lymph node cells immunophenotyping were accessed after mice in vivo treatment. Results None of the highly diluted tinctures tested were cytotoxic to macrophages or K562. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages treated with all highly diluted tinctures decreased tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release and M1, and M8 decreased IFN-γ production. M1 has decreased NF-κB activity on TNF-α stimulated reporter cell line. In vivo treatment lead to a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) production was increased by M1, and M8, and lipid peroxidation was induced by M1, and M2. All compounds enhanced the innate immunity, but M1 also augmented acquired immunity and M2 diminished B lymphocytes, responsible to acquired immunity. Conclusions Based on the results presented here, these highly diluted tinctures were shown to modulate immune responses. Even though further investigation is needed there is an indication that these highly diluted tinctures could be used as therapeutic interventions in disorders where the immune system is compromised. PMID:22029602

  2. Lack of CB1 cannabinoid receptors modifies nicotine behavioural responses, but not nicotine abstinence.

    PubMed

    Castañé, A; Valjent, E; Ledent, C; Parmentier, M; Maldonado, R; Valverde, O

    2002-10-01

    Cannabis is the most widely consumed illicit drug and its consumption is currently associated with tobacco, which contains another psychoactive compound, namely nicotine. Interactions between cannabinoids and other drugs of abuse, such as opioids, have been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible role of CB1 cannabinoid receptor in responses induced by acute and repeated nicotine administration by using knockout mice lacking the CB1 cannabinoid receptor and their wild-type littermates. Acute nicotine (0.5, 1, 3 and 6 mg/kg, sc) administration decreased locomotor activity and induced antinociceptive responses in the tail-immersion and the hot-plate test, in wild-type animals. The antinociceptive effects in the tail-immersion test were significantly enhanced in CB1 knockout mice. In wild-type mice nicotine (0.5 mg/kg, sc) produced a significant rewarding effect, as measured by a conditioned place preference paradigm. This response was absent in CB1 knockout mice. Finally, a model of mecamylamine-induced abstinence in chronic nicotine-treated mice (10 mg/kg/day, sc) was developed. Mecamylamine (1 and 2 mg/kg, sc) precipitated several somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal in wild-type dependent mice. However, no difference in the severity of nicotine withdrawal was observed in CB1 knockout mice. These results demonstrate that some acute effects and motivational responses elicited by nicotine can be modulated by the endogenous cannabinoid system and support the existence of a physiological interaction between these two systems.

  3. Modified ventilatory response characteristics to exercise in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Kai; Metzger, Jule; Scholz, Tobias; Tetzlaff, Kay; Sorichter, Stephan; Walterspacher, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Specific adjustments to repeated extreme apnea are not fully known and understood. While a blunted ventilatory chemosensitivity to CO2 is described for elite breath-hold divers (BHDs) at rest, it is unclear whether specific adaptations affect their response to dynamic exercise. Eight elite BHDs with a previously validated decrease in CO2 chemosensitivity, 8 scuba divers (SCDs), and 8 matched control subjects were included in a study where markers of ventilatory response, Fowler's dead space, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), and blood lactate concentrations during cycle exercise were measured. Maximal power output did not differ between the groups, but lactate threshold (θL) appeared at a significantly lowered respiratory compensation point (RCP) and at a higher VO2 for the BHDs. End-tidal (petCO2) and estimated arterial pCO2 (paCO2) were significantly higher in BHDs at θL, the RCP, and maximum exhaustion. BHDs showed a significantly (P < .01) slower breathing pattern in relation to a given tidal volume at a specific work rate. In summary, BHDs presented signs of a metabolic shift from aerobic to anaerobic energy supply, decreased chemosensitivity during exercise, and a distinct ventilatory-response pattern during cycle exercise that differs from SCDs and controls.

  4. Embryonic exposure to corticosterone modifies the juvenile stress response, oxidative stress and telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Haussmann, Mark F.; Longenecker, Andrew S.; Marchetto, Nicole M.; Juliano, Steven A.; Bowden, Rachel M.

    2012-01-01

    Early embryonic exposure to maternal glucocorticoids can broadly impact physiology and behaviour across phylogenetically diverse taxa. The transfer of maternal glucocorticoids to offspring may be an inevitable cost associated with poor environmental conditions, or serve as a maternal effect that alters offspring phenotype in preparation for a stressful environment. Regardless, maternal glucocorticoids are likely to have both costs and benefits that are paid and collected over different developmental time periods. We manipulated yolk corticosterone (cort) in domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus) to examine the potential impacts of embryonic exposure to maternal stress on the juvenile stress response and cellular ageing. Here, we report that juveniles exposed to experimentally increased cort in ovo had a protracted decline in cort during the recovery phase of the stress response. All birds, regardless of treatment group, shifted to oxidative stress during an acute stress response. In addition, embryonic exposure to cort resulted in higher levels of reactive oxygen metabolites and an over-representation of short telomeres compared with the control birds. In many species, individuals with higher levels of oxidative stress and shorter telomeres have the poorest survival prospects. Given this, long-term costs of glucocorticoid-induced phenotypes may include accelerated ageing and increased mortality. PMID:22072607

  5. Redox-Responsive Viologen-Mediated Self-Assembly of CB[7]-Modified Patchy Particles.

    PubMed

    Benyettou, Farah; Zheng, Xiaolong; Elacqua, Elizabeth; Wang, Yu; Dalvand, Parastoo; Asfari, Zouhair; Olsen, John-Carl; Han, Dong Suk; Saleh, Na'il; Elhabiri, Mourad; Weck, Marcus; Trabolsi, Ali

    2016-07-19

    Sulfonated surface patches of poly(styrene)-based colloidal particles (CPs) were functionalized with cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]). The macrocycles served as recognition units for diphenyl viologen (DPV(2+)), a rigid bridging ligand. The addition of DPV(2+) to aqueous suspensions of the particles triggered the self-assembly of short linear and branched chainlike structures. The self-assembly mechanism is based on hydrophobic/ion-charge interactions that are established between DPV(2+) and surface-adsorbed CB[7]. DPV(2+) guides the self-assembly of the CPs by forming a ternary DPV(2+)⊂(CB[7])2 complex in which the two CB[7] macrocycles are attached to two different particles. Viologen-driven particle assembly was found to be both directional and reversible. Whereas sodium chloride triggers irreversible particle disassembly, the one-electron reduction of DPV(2+) with sodium dithionite causes disassembly that can be reversed via air oxidation. Thus, this bottom-up synthetic supramolecular approach allowed for the reversible formation and directional alignment of a 2D colloidal material.

  6. Size-dependent dynamic pull-in analysis of geometric non-linear micro-plates based on the modified couple stress theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, Amir R.; Tahani, Masoud

    2017-02-01

    This paper focuses on the size-dependent dynamic pull-in instability in rectangular micro-plates actuated by step-input DC voltage. The present model accounts for the effects of in-plane displacements and their non-classical higher-order boundary conditions, von Kármán geometric non-linearity, non-classical couple stress components and the inherent non-linearity of distributed electrostatic pressure on the micro-plate motion. The governing equations of motion, which are clearly derived using Hamilton's principle, are solved through a novel computationally very efficient Galerkin-based reduced order model (ROM) in which all higher-order non-classical boundary conditions are completely satisfied. The present findings are compared and successfully validated by available results in the literature as well as those obtained by three-dimensional finite element simulations carried out using COMSOL Multyphysics. A detailed parametric study is also conducted to illustrate the effects of in-plane displacements, plate aspect ratio, couple stress components and geometric non-linearity on the dynamic instability threshold of the system.

  7. Species effects on ecosystem processes are modified by faunal responses to habitat composition.

    PubMed

    Bulling, Mark T; Solan, Martin; Dyson, Kirstie E; Hernandez-Milian, Gema; Luque, Patricia; Pierce, Graham J; Raffaelli, Dave; Paterson, David M; White, Piran C L

    2008-12-01

    Heterogeneity is a well-recognized feature of natural environments, and the spatial distribution and movement of individual species is primarily driven by resource requirements. In laboratory experiments designed to explore how different species drive ecosystem processes, such as nutrient release, habitat heterogeneity is often seen as something which must be rigorously controlled for. Most small experimental systems are therefore spatially homogeneous, and the link between environmental heterogeneity and its effects on the redistribution of individuals and species, and on ecosystem processes, has not been fully explored. In this paper, we used a mesocosm system to investigate the relationship between habitat composition, species movement and sediment nutrient release for each of four functionally contrasting species of marine benthic invertebrate macrofauna. For each species, various habitat configurations were generated by selectively enriching patches of sediment with macroalgae, a natural source of spatial variability in intertidal mudflats. We found that the direction and extent of faunal movement between patches differs with species identity, density and habitat composition. Combinations of these factors lead to concomitant changes in nutrient release, such that habitat composition effects are modified by species identity (in the case of NH4-N) and by species density (in the case of PO4-P). It is clear that failure to accommodate natural patterns of spatial heterogeneity in such studies may result in an incomplete understanding of system behaviour. This will be particularly important for future experiments designed to explore the effects of species richness on ecosystem processes, where the complex interactions reported here for single species may be compounded when species are brought together in multi-species combinations.

  8. Modifying the acute phase response of Jersey calves by supplementing milk replacer with omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil.

    PubMed

    Ballou, M A; Cruz, G D; Pittroff, W; Keisler, D H; DePeters, E J

    2008-09-01

    Fifty-one Jersey bull calves (5 +/- 1 d old) were assigned to 1 of 3 milk replacers to determine the effects of increasing doses of n-3 fatty acids from fish oil on the acute phase response after an endotoxin challenge. All calves were fed a 22.5% crude protein and 18% lipid milk replacer (Calva Products, Acampo, CA) supplemented with an additional 2% fatty acids. Treatments differed only in the supplemental lipid source and included a 3:1 mix of corn and canola oils, a 1:1 blend of fish oil (Omega Proteins, Houston, TX) and the 3:1 mix of corn and canola oils, and fish oil only. On d 23, each calf was injected subcutaneously with 4 microg/kg of body weight of Salmonella Typhimurium endotoxin. Clinical, hematological, and biochemical parameters were measured at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 24, and 72 h post endotoxin challenge. Endotoxin caused a dramatic rise in respiratory rate; feeding fish oil significantly attenuated the increase. Heart rate and rectal temperature were not affected by treatment. Feeding fish oil attenuated the change in serum iron concentration over time. Endotoxin caused severe hypoglycemia, reaching a nadir at 4 h. Calves supplemented with fish oil had reduced concentrations of serum glucose for 8 to 24 h. Furthermore, calves supplemented with fish oil alone had reduced serum insulin at 12, 28, and 24 h. In contrast, endotoxin caused an acute increase in blood urea nitrogen and nonesterified fatty acids; there were significant linear effects of fish oil on both blood urea nitrogen and nonesterified fatty acids. Serum triglycerides were elevated beginning at 12 h after the endotoxin challenge and returned to baseline values within 72 h. Fish oil suppressed the rise in triglycerides during this period, and the effect was linear with increasing fish oil. Serum concentrations of leptin decreased after the endotoxin challenge; however, the treatment did not influence the response. There was no treatment effect on serum aspartate

  9. Interplay Between Histone H3 Lysine 56 Deacetylation and Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Antoine; Delgoshaie, Neda; Celic, Ivana; Dai, Junbiao; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Costantino, Santiago; Thibault, Pierre; Boeke, Jef D.; Verreault, Alain; Wurtele, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56Ac) is present in newly synthesized histones deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. The sirtuins Hst3 and Hst4 deacetylate H3K56 after S phase, and virtually all histone H3 molecules are K56 acetylated throughout the cell cycle in hst3∆ hst4∆ mutants. Failure to deacetylate H3K56 causes thermosensitivity, spontaneous DNA damage, and sensitivity to replicative stress via molecular mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that unlike wild-type cells, hst3∆ hst4∆ cells are unable to complete genome duplication and accumulate persistent foci containing the homologous recombination protein Rad52 after exposure to genotoxic drugs during S phase. In response to replicative stress, cells lacking Hst3 and Hst4 also displayed intense foci containing the Rfa1 subunit of the single-stranded DNA binding protein complex RPA, as well as persistent activation of DNA damage–induced kinases. To investigate the basis of these phenotypes, we identified histone point mutations that modulate the temperature and genotoxic drug sensitivity of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. We found that reducing the levels of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation or H3 lysine 79 methylation partially suppresses these sensitivities and reduces spontaneous and genotoxin-induced activation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Our data further suggest that elevated DNA damage–induced signaling significantly contributes to the phenotypes of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Overall, these results outline a novel interplay between H3K56Ac, H3K79 methylation, and H4K16 acetylation in the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:25786853

  10. Interplay between histone H3 lysine 56 deacetylation and chromatin modifiers in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Antoine; Delgoshaie, Neda; Celic, Ivana; Dai, Junbiao; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Costantino, Santiago; Thibault, Pierre; Boeke, Jef D; Verreault, Alain; Wurtele, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56Ac) is present in newly synthesized histones deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. The sirtuins Hst3 and Hst4 deacetylate H3K56 after S phase, and virtually all histone H3 molecules are K56 acetylated throughout the cell cycle in hst3∆ hst4∆ mutants. Failure to deacetylate H3K56 causes thermosensitivity, spontaneous DNA damage, and sensitivity to replicative stress via molecular mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that unlike wild-type cells, hst3∆ hst4∆ cells are unable to complete genome duplication and accumulate persistent foci containing the homologous recombination protein Rad52 after exposure to genotoxic drugs during S phase. In response to replicative stress, cells lacking Hst3 and Hst4 also displayed intense foci containing the Rfa1 subunit of the single-stranded DNA binding protein complex RPA, as well as persistent activation of DNA damage-induced kinases. To investigate the basis of these phenotypes, we identified histone point mutations that modulate the temperature and genotoxic drug sensitivity of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. We found that reducing the levels of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation or H3 lysine 79 methylation partially suppresses these sensitivities and reduces spontaneous and genotoxin-induced activation of the DNA damag