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Sample records for modified mortar adhesion

  1. Quantitative microstructure analysis of polymer-modified mortars.

    PubMed

    Jenni, A; Herwegh, M; Zurbriggen, R; Aberle, T; Holzer, L

    2003-11-01

    Digital light, fluorescence and electron microscopy in combination with wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy were used to visualize individual polymers, air voids, cement phases and filler minerals in a polymer-modified cementitious tile adhesive. In order to investigate the evolution and processes involved in formation of the mortar microstructure, quantifications of the phase distribution in the mortar were performed including phase-specific imaging and digital image analysis. The required sample preparation techniques and imaging related topics are discussed. As a form of case study, the different techniques were applied to obtain a quantitative characterization of a specific mortar mixture. The results indicate that the mortar fractionates during different stages ranging from the early fresh mortar until the final hardened mortar stage. This induces process-dependent enrichments of the phases at specific locations in the mortar. The approach presented provides important information for a comprehensive understanding of the functionality of polymer-modified mortars.

  2. Research on Waste FRP Fiber Reinforced Adhesive Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. C.; Zhao, F. Q.

    2017-01-01

    The use of FRP in industry results in large amount of waste FRP. If not treated properly, it will pollute the environment. In our study, waste FRP powder was used in mortar to substitute part of sand in mortar. The use of short waste FRP fibre can further increase the mechanical strength. The Waste FRP fibre reinforced adhesive mortar was prepared with the material proportioning: cement-sand ratio 1:2, polymer 8% (cement based ), waste FRP fibre 3% (based on the total solids ). The performance of the mortar conforms to JCT 547-2005 with excellent adhesive characteristics.

  3. Thermal and electrical behavior of nano-modified cement mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exarchos, D. A.; Dalla, P. T.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Alafogianni, P.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Paipetis, A. S.; Dassios, K. G.; Matikas, T. E.

    2014-04-01

    This research aims in characterizing modified cement mortar with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that act as nanoreinforcements leading to the development of innovative materials possessing multi-functionality and smartness. Such multifunctional properties include enhanced mechanical behavior, electrical and thermal conductivity, and piezo-electric characteristics. The effective thermal properties of the modified nano-composites were evaluated using IR Thermography. The electrical resistivity was measured with a contact test method using a custom made apparatus and applying a known D.C. voltage. To eliminate any polarization effects the specimens were dried in an oven before testing. In this work, the thermal and electrical properties of the nano-modified materials were studied by nondestructively monitoring their structural integrity in real time using the intrinsic multi-functional properties of the material as damage sensors.

  4. Solid state NMR and LVSEM studies on the hardening of latex modified tile mortar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rottstegge, J.; Arnold, M.; Herschke, L.; Glasser, G.; Wilhelm, M.; Spiess, H.W. . E-mail: spiess@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hergeth, W.D.

    2005-12-15

    Construction mortars contain a broad variety of both inorganic and organic additives beside the cement powder. Here we present a study of tile mortar systems based on portland cement, quartz, methyl cellulose and different latex additives. As known, the methyl cellulose stabilizes the freshly prepared cement paste, the latex additive enhances final hydrophobicity, flexibility and adhesion. Measurements were performed by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) to probe the influence of the latex additives on the hydration, hardening and the final tile mortar properties. While solid state NMR enables monitoring of the bulk composition, scanning electron microscopy affords visualization of particles and textures with respect to their shape and the distribution of the different phases. Within the alkaline cement paste, the poly(vinyl acetate) (VAc)-based latex dispersions stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were found to be relatively stable against hydrolysis. The influence of the combined organic additives methyl cellulose, poly(vinyl alcohol) and latexes stabilized by poly(vinyl alcohol) on the final silicate structure of the cement hydration products is small. But even small amounts of additives result in an increased ratio of ettringite to monosulfate within the final hydrated tile mortar as monitored by {sup 27}Al NMR. The latex was found to be adsorbed to the inorganic surfaces, acting as glue to the inorganic components. For similar latex water interfaces built up by poly(vinyl alcohol), a variation in the latex polymer composition results in modified organic textures. In addition to the networks of the inorganic cement and of the latex, there is a weak network build up by thin polymer fibers, most probably originating from poly(vinyl alcohol). Besides the weak network, polymer fibers form well-ordered textures covering inorganic crystals such as portlandite.

  5. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  6. Effect of the pre-treatment and the aggregate content on the adhesion strength of repair mortars on Miocene porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szemerey-Kiss, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2016-04-01

    The adhesion between porous limestone and newly prepared repair mortars are crucial in the preservation of historic stone structures. Besides mechanical compatibility other matches such as chemical composition and porosity are also essential, but the current research focuses on the adhesion strength of repair mortars that are used in the restoration of Hungarian porous limestone. 8 mortars (4 commercial and 4 specially prepared) were selected for the tests. Mortars with different amount of aggregate were prepared and caste to stone surface. The stone substrate was highly porous Miocene limestone. The strength was tested by standardized pull-out tests which method is commonly used for concrete testing. The limestone surfaces were either used in their natural conditions or were pre-treated (pre-wetting). The strength of the stone/mortar bond was tested. The failure mechanism was documented and various failure modes were identified. Strength test results suggest that especially pre-treatment influences strongly the pull-out strength at mortar/stone interface. Increasing aggregate content also reduces pull out strength of tested repair mortars, but at various rates depending on the mortar type. The financial support of OTKA post-doctoral grant to BSZK (reference number is: PD 112-955) and National Research, Development and Innovation (NKFI) Fund to ÁT (ref. no. K 116532) are appreciated.

  7. The effect of different surfactants/plastisizers on the electrical behavior of CNT nano-modified cement mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, P. T.; Alafogianni, P.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Exarchos, D. A.; Dassios, K.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Cement-based materials have in general low electrical conductivity. Electrical conductivity is the measure of the ability of the material to resist the passage of electrical current. The addition of a conductive admixture such as Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a cement-based material increases the conductivity of the structure. This research aims to characterize nano-modified cement mortars with MWCNT reinforcements. Such nano-composites would possess smartness and multi-functionality. Multifunctional properties include electrical, thermal and piezo-electric characteristics. One of these properties, the electrical conductivity, was measured using a custom made apparatus that allows application of known D.C. voltage on the nano-composite. In this study, the influence of different surfactants/plasticizers on CNT nano-modified cement mortar specimens with various concentrations of CNTs (0.2% wt. cement CNTs - 0.8% wt. cement CNTs) on the electrical conductivity is assessed.

  8. Doxycycline-encapsulated nanotube-modified dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, S A; Palasuk, J; Kamocki, K; Geraldeli, S; Gregory, R L; Platt, J A; Windsor, L J; Bottino, M C

    2014-12-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti-matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)-encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)-modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives-but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels-we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of encapsulated MMP

  9. Urea modified cottonseed protein adhesive for wood composite products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed protein has the potential to be used as renewable and environmentally friendly adhesives in wood products industry. However, the industry application was limited by its low mechanical properties, low water resistance and viscosity. In this work, urea modified cottonseed protein adhesive w...

  10. Investigation of modified cottonseed protein adhesives for wood composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several modified cottonseed protein isolates were studied and compared to corresponding soy protein isolates for their adhesive properties when bonded to wood composites. Modifications included treatments with alkali, guanidine hydrochloride, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and urea. Wood composites...

  11. Doxycycline-Encapsulated Nanotube-Modified Dentin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, S.A.; Palasuk, J.; Kamocki, K.; Geraldeli, S.; Gregory, R.L.; Platt, J.A.; Windsor, L.J.; Bottino, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti–matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)–encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)–modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives—but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels—we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of

  12. New processable modified polyimide resins for adhesive and matrix applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A broad product line of bismaleimide modified epoxy adhesives which are cured by conventional addition curing methods is described. These products fill a market need for 232 C (450 F) service adhesives which are cured in a manner similar to conventional 177 C (350 F) epoxy adhesives. The products described include film adhesives, pastes, and a primer. Subsequent development work has resulted in a new bismaleimide modified epoxy resin which uses a unique addition curing mechanism. This has resulted in products with improved thermomechanical properties compared to conventional bismaleimide epoxy resins. A film adhesive, paste, and matrix resin for composites using this new technology are described. In all cases, the products developed are heat cured by using typical epoxy cure cycles i.e., 1 hour at 177 C (350 F) followed by 2 hours postcure at 246 C (475 F).

  13. Adhesive and morphological characteristics of surface chemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Kresz, N.; Kokavecz, J.; Smausz, T.; Schieferdecker, H.; Döring, A.; Marti, O.; Bor, Z.

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, we report an experimental determination of adhesive and topographic characteristics of chemically modified surface of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) films. The surface chemistry was modified by ArF excimer laser irradiation in presence of triethylene-tetramine photoreagent. The applied laser fluence was varied in the range of 0.4-9 mJ/cm 2, and the number of laser pulses incident on the same area was 1500. To detect the changes in the adhesive features of the treated Teflon samples, we measured receding contact angle for distilled water and adhesion strength, respectively. It was found that the receding contact angle decreased from 96° to 30-37° and the adhesion strength of two-component epoxy glue to the treated sample surface increased from 0.03 to 9 MPa in the applied laser fluence range. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the adhesion of human cells to the modified Teflon samples is far better than to the untreated ones. The contact mode and pulsed force mode atomic force microscopic investigations of the treated samples demonstrated that the measured effective contact area of the irradiated films does not differ significantly from that of the original films, but the derived adhesion force is stronger on the modified samples than on the untreated ones. Hence, the increased adhesion of the treated Teflon films is caused by the higher surface energy.

  14. Modified Surface Having Low Adhesion Properties to Mitigate Insect Residue Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J., Jr. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Penner, Ronald K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A process to modify a surface to provide reduced adhesion surface properties to mitigate insect residue adhesion. The surface may include the surface of an article including an aircraft, an automobile, a marine vessel, all-terrain vehicle, wind turbine, helmet, etc. The process includes topographically and chemically modifying the surface by applying a coating comprising a particulate matter, or by applying a coating and also topographically modifying the surface by various methods, including but not limited to, lithographic patterning, laser ablation and chemical etching, physical vapor phase deposition, chemical vapor phase deposition, crystal growth, electrochemical deposition, spin casting, and film casting.

  15. Adhesion Molecule-Modified Biomaterials for Neural Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shreyas S.; Winter, Jessica O.

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion molecules (AMs) represent one class of biomolecules that promote central nervous system regeneration. These tethered molecules provide cues to regenerating neurons that recapitulate the native brain environment. Improving cell adhesive potential of non-adhesive biomaterials is therefore a common goal in neural tissue engineering. This review discusses common AMs used in neural biomaterials and the mechanism of cell attachment to these AMs. Methods to modify materials with AMs are discussed and compared. Additionally, patterning of AMs for achieving specific neuronal responses is explored. PMID:19668707

  16. RGD modified polymers: biomaterials for stimulated cell adhesion and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hersel, Ulrich; Dahmen, Claudia; Kessler, Horst

    2003-11-01

    Since RGD peptides (R: arginine; G: glycine; D: aspartic acid) have been found to promote cell adhesion in 1984 (Cell attachment activity of fibronectin can be duplicated by small synthetic fragments of the molecule, Nature 309 (1984) 30), numerous materials have been RGD functionalized for academic studies or medical applications. This review gives an overview of RGD modified polymers, that have been used for cell adhesion, and provides information about technical aspects of RGD immobilization on polymers. The impacts of RGD peptide surface density, spatial arrangement as well as integrin affinity and selectivity on cell responses like adhesion and migration are discussed.

  17. Polyimide adhesives - Modified with ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Ezzell, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    A series of studies evaluating the effects of added elastomers on the properties of a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive is reviewed. First, thermoset polyimides containing various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicone elastomers were synthesized either as physical polybends or by chemically reacting the elastomers directly onto the polymer backbone. The modified adhesive resins were characterized for thermomechanical properties, fracture toughness and adhesive strength. A second series of elastomer-containing polyimides was also prepared in order to study the effects of the elastomer chain length on polymer properties. Aromatic amine-terminated silicone rubbers with repeat units varying from n = 10 to 105 were reacted onto the polyimide backbone, and the resulting polymers were characterized for their adhesive properties.

  18. Modifying Matrix Materials to Increase Wetting and Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Katie

    2011-01-01

    In an alternative approach to increasing the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fiber and matrix components of organic-fiber/polymer matrix composite materials, the matrix resins are modified. Heretofore, it has been common practice to modify the fibers rather than the matrices: The fibers are modified by chemical and/or physical surface treatments prior to combining the fibers with matrix resins - an approach that entails considerable expense and usually results in degradation (typically, weakening) of fibers. The alternative approach of modifying the matrix resins does not entail degradation of fibers, and affords opportunities for improving the mechanical properties of the fiber composites. The alternative approach is more cost-effective, not only because it eliminates expensive fiber-surface treatments but also because it does not entail changes in procedures for manufacturing conventional composite-material structures. The alternative approach is best described by citing an example of its application to a composite of ultra-high-molecular- weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers in an epoxy matrix. The epoxy matrix was modified to a chemically reactive, polarized epoxy nano-matrix to increase the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fibers and the matrix. The modification was effected by incorporating a small proportion (0.3 weight percent) of reactive graphitic nanofibers produced from functionalized nanofibers into the epoxy matrix resin prior to combining the resin with the UHMWPE fibers. The resulting increase in fiber/matrix adhesion manifested itself in several test results, notably including an increase of 25 percent in the maximum fiber pullout force and an increase of 60-65 percent in fiber pullout energy. In addition, it was conjectured that the functionalized nanofibers became involved in the cross linking reaction of the epoxy resin, with resultant enhancement of the mechanical properties and lower viscosity of the matrix.

  19. Endothelial cell migration on surfaces modified with immobilized adhesive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kouvroukoglou, S; Dee, K C; Bizios, R; McIntire, L V; Zygourakis, K

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) migration has been studied on aminophase surfaces with covalently bound RGDS and YIGSRG cell adhesion peptides. The fluorescent marker dansyl chloride was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the peptides on the modified surfaces. Peptides appeared to be distributed in uniformly dispersed large clusters separated by areas of lower peptide concentrations. We employed digital time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis to monitor EC migration on the modified surfaces and to reconstruct the cell trajectories. The persistent random walk model was then applied to analyze the cell displacement data and compute the mean root square speed, the persistence time, and the random motility coefficient of EC. We also calculated the time-averaged speed of cell locomotion. No differences in the speed of cell locomotion on the various substrates were noted. Immobilization of the cell adhesion peptides (RGDS and YIGSRG), however, significantly increased the persistence of cell movement and, thus, the random motility coefficient. These results suggest that immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on the surface of implantable biomaterials may lead to enhanced endothelization rates.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  5. Copolyimide Surface Modifying Agents for Particle Adhesion Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Marine biofouling, insect adhesion on aircraft surfaces, microbial contamination of sterile environments, and particle contamination all present unique challenges for which researchers have adopted an array of mitigation strategies. Particulate contamination is of interest to NASA regarding exploration of the Moon, Mars, asteroids, etc.1 Lunar dust compromised seals, clogged filters, abraded visors and space suit surfaces, and was a significant health concern during the Apollo missions.2 Consequently, NASA has instituted a multi-faceted approach to address dust including use of sacrificial surfaces, active mitigation requiring the use of an external energy source, and passive mitigation utilizing materials with an intrinsic resistance to surface contamination. One passive mitigation strategy is modification of a material s surface energy either chemically or topographically. The focus of this paper is the synthesis and evaluation of novel copolyimide materials with surface modifying agents (SMA, oxetanes) enabling controlled variation of surface chemical composition.

  6. Antibacterial Adhesion of Polymethyl Methacrylate Modified by Borneol Acrylate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xueli; Qian, Zhiyong; Luo, Lingqiong; Yuan, Qipeng; Guo, Ximin; Tao, Lei; Wei, Yen; Wang, Xing

    2016-10-07

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is a widely used biomaterial. But there is still a challenge facing its unwanted bacterial adhesion, because the subsequent biofilm formation usually leads to failure of related implants. Herein, we present a borneol-modified PMMA based on a facile and effective stereochemical strategy, generating antibacterial copolymer named as P(MMA-co-BA). It was synthesized by free radical polymerization and studied with different ratio between methyl methacrylate (MMA) and borneol acrylate (BA) monomers. NMR, GPC and EA etc. were used to confirm their chemical features. Their films were challenged with Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive), showing a BA content-dependent antibacterial performance. The minimum effective dose should be 10%. Then in vivo subcutaneous implantations in mice demonstrated their biocompatibilities through routine histotomy and HE staining. Therefore, P(MMA-co-BA)s not only exhibited their unique antibacterial character, but also suggested a potential for the safe usage of borneol-modified PMMA frame and devices for further implantation.

  7. Bacterial adhesion to polyvinylamine-modified nanocellulose films.

    PubMed

    Henschen, Jonatan; Larsson, Per A; Illergård, Josefin; Ek, Monica; Wågberg, Lars

    2017-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibril (CNF) materials have been widely studied in recent years and are suggested for a wide range of applications, e.g., medical and hygiene products. One property not very well studied is the interaction between bacteria and these materials and how this can be controlled. The current work studies how bacteria adhere to different CNF materials modified with polyelectrolyte multilayers. The tested materials were TEMPO-oxidized to have different surface charges, periodate-oxidized to vary the water interaction and hot-pressed to alter the surface structure. Then, multilayers were constructed using polyvinylamine (PVAm) and polyacrylic acid. Both the material surface charge and water interaction affect the amount of polymer adsorbed to the surfaces. Increasing the surface charge decreases the adsorption after the first PVAm layer, possibly due to conformational changes. Periodate-oxidized and crosslinked films have low initial polymer adsorptions; the decreased swelling prevents polymer diffusion into the CNF micropore structure. Microscopic analysis after incubating the samples with bacterial suspensions show that only the materials with the lowest surface charge enable bacteria to adhere to the surface because, when adsorbing up to 5 layers PVAm/PAA, the increased anionic surface charge appears to decrease the net surface charge. Both the amounts of PVAm and PAA influence the net surface charge and thus the bacterial adhesion. The structure generated by the hot-pressing of the films also strongly increases the number of bacteria adhering to the surfaces. These results indicate that the bacterial adhesion to CNF materials can be tailored using polyelectrolyte multilayers on different CNF substrates.

  8. Bacterial adhesion to orthopaedic implant materials and a novel oxygen plasma modified PEEK surface.

    PubMed

    Rochford, E T J; Poulsson, A H C; Salavarrieta Varela, J; Lezuo, P; Richards, R G; Moriarty, T F

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive use of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) in biomedical applications, information about bacterial adhesion to this biomaterial is limited. This study investigated Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to injection moulded and machined PEEK OPTIMA(®) using a custom-built adhesion chamber with medical grade titanium and Thermanox for comparison. Additionally, bacterial adhesion to a novel oxygen plasma modified PEEK was also investigated in both a pre-operative model in physiological saline, and additionally in a post-operative model in human blood plasma. In the pre-operative model, the rougher machined PEEK had a significantly greater number of adherent bacteria compared to injection moulded PEEK. Bacterial adhesion to titanium and Thermanox was similar. Oxygen plasma surface modification of PEEK did not lead to a significant change in bacterial adhesion in the pre-operative contamination model, despite observed changes in surface characteristics. In the post-operative contamination model, S. aureus adhesion was increased from 5×10(5) CFU cm(-2) to approximately 1.3×10(7) CFU cm(-2) on the modified surfaces due to differential protein adhesion during the conditioning period. However, S. epidermidis adhesion to modified PEEK was less than to unmodified PEEK in the post-operative model. These results illustrate the importance of testing bacterial adhesion of several strains in both a pre-operative and post-operative, clinically relevant bacterial contamination model.

  9. ELEVATED TEMPERATURE RESISTANT MODIFIED EPOXIDE RESIN ADHESIVES FOR METALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    composed of Epon 1001 resin, Plyophen 5023, and dicyandiamide as the curing agent. Al dust was used as the reinforcing filler. The adhesive was cured at...to the development of the following formula (parts by weight): 33 Epon 1001 + 67 Polyophen 5023 + 100 Al dust + 6 dicyandiamide . Higher Epon 1001...or curing without dicyandiamide reduced adhesive shear strength, especially at room temperature.

  10. Preparation and characterization of phenol-formaldehyde adhesives modified with enzymatic hydrolysis lignin.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yanqiao; Cheng, Xiansu; Zheng, Zuanbin

    2010-03-01

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) adhesives modified with enzymatic hydrolysis lignin (EHL) were synthesized by a one-step process. The phenol component of the PF adhesives was partially substituted by EHL extracted from the residues of cornstalks used to produce bio-ethanol. The EHL-PF adhesives were used to prepare plywoods by hot-pressing. The pH value, viscosity, solid content, free phenol content, free formaldehyde content and brominable substance content of EHL-PF resins were investigated. The bonding strengths of the plywoods were determined, and the influences of the replacement percentage of phenol by EHL (a) and the NaOH content (b) on the properties of the adhesives were investigated. The results showed that the performance of the modified adhesives and the plywoods glued with them almost met the Chinese National Standard (GB/T 14732-2006) for first grade plywood when 20 wt% of the phenol was replaced by EHL.

  11. An Investigation of the Oxide Adhesion and Growth Characteristics on Platinum Modified Aluminide Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    AD-A75 35 N INVESTIGTION OF THE OXIDE DESION AUD GROWTH 1/1CHARRCTERISTICS ON PLATINUM MODIFIED ALUMINIDE COATINGS (U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL...ADHESION AND GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS ON PLATINUM M1ODIFIED ALUMINIDE COATINGS ’"PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Farrell, M.1argaret Shannon 𔃽j TYP/ OF REPORT 3b TIME...SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identfy by block number) GROUP SUB-GROUP Turbine Blade Coatings ; Platinum Aluminides ;Oxide Adhesion

  12. Chitosan scaffold modified with D-(+) raffinose and enriched with thiol-modified gelatin for improved osteoblast adhesion.

    PubMed

    Galli, C; Parisi, L; Elviri, L; Bianchera, A; Smerieri, A; Lagonegro, P; Lumetti, S; Manfredi, E; Bettini, R; Macaluso, G M

    2016-02-02

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether chitosan-based scaffolds modified with D-(+) raffinose and enriched with thiol-modified gelatin could selectively improve osteoblast adhesion and proliferation. 2, 3 and 4.5% chitosan films were prepared. Chitosan suitability for tissue engineering was confirmed by protein adsorption assay. Scaffolds were incubated with a 2.5 mg ml(-1) BSA solution and the decrease of protein content in the supernatants was measured by spectrophotometry. Chitosan films were then enriched with thiol-modified gelatin and their ability to bind BSA was also measured. Then, 2% chitosan discs with or without thiol-modified gelatin were used as culture substrates for MC3T3-E1 cells. After 72 h cells were stained with trypan blue or with calcein AM and propidium iodide for morphology, viability and proliferation assays. Moreover, cell viability was measured at 48, 72, 96 and 168 h to obtain a growth curve. Chitosan films efficiently bound and retained BSA proportionally to the concentration of chitosan discs. The amount of protein retained was higher on chitosan enriched with thiol-modified gelatin. Moreover, chitosan discs allowed the adhesion and the viability of cells, but inhibited their proliferation. The functionalization of chitosan with thiol-modified gelatin enhanced cell spreading and proliferation. Our data confirm that chitosan is a suitable material for tissue engineering. Moreover, our data show that the enrichment of chitosan with thiol-modified gelatin enhances its biological properties.

  13. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  14. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines, adhesions can cause partial or complete bowel obstruction . Adhesions inside the uterine cavity, called Asherman syndrome , ... 1. Read More Appendicitis Asherman syndrome Glaucoma Infertility Intestinal obstruction Review Date 4/5/2016 Updated by: Irina ...

  15. Modified Phenylethynyl Containing Imides for Secondary Bonding: Non-Autoclave, Low Temperature Processable Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, James F. (Technical Monitor); Chang, Alice C.

    1999-01-01

    As part of a program to develop structural adhesives for high performance aerospace applications, research continued on the development of modified phenylethynyl containing imides, LaRC(trademark)MPEIs. In previous reports, the polymer properties were controlled by varying the molecular weight, the amount of branching, and the phenylethynyl content and by blending with low molecular weight materials. This research involves changing the flexibility in the copolyimide backbone of the branched, phenylethynyl terminated adhesives. These adhesives exhibit excellent processability at pressures as low as 15 psi and temperatures as low as 288 C. The Ti/Ti lap shear specimens are processable in an autoclave or a temperature programmable oven under a vacuum bag at 288-300 C without external pressure. The cured polymers exhibit high mechanical properties and excellent solvent resistance. The chemistry and properties of these adhesives are presented.

  16. In vitro evaluation of tissue adhesives composed of hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Miyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2012-12-01

    The effect of the hydrophobic group content in gelatin on the bonding strength of novel tissue-penetrating tissue adhesives was evaluated. The hydrophobic groups introduced into gelatin were the saturated hexanoyl, palmitoyl, and stearoyl groups, and the unsaturated oleoyl group. A collagen casing was employed as an adherend to model soft tissue for the in vitro determination of bonding strength of tissue adhesives composed of various hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate. The adhesive composed of stearoyl-modified gelatin (7.4% stearoyl; 10Ste) and disuccinimidyl tartrate showed the highest bonding strength. The bonding strength of the adhesives decreased as the degree of substitution of the hydrophobic groups increased. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled 10Ste was integrated onto the surface of smooth muscle cells and showed no cytotoxicity. These results suggest that 10Ste interacted with the hydrophobic domains of collagen casings, such as hydrophobic amino acid residues and cell membranes. Therefore, 10Ste-disuccinimidyl tartrate is a promising adhesive for use in aortic dissection.

  17. Increased endothelial cell adhesion on plasma modified nanostructured polymeric and metallic surfaces for vascular stent applications.

    PubMed

    Pareta, Rajesh A; Reising, Alexander B; Miller, Tiffany; Storey, Dan; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-06-15

    Techniques to regenerate the vasculature have risen considerably over the last few decades due to the increased clinical diagnosis of artery narrowing and blood vessel blockage. Although initially re-establishing blood flow, current small diameter vascular regenerative materials often eventually cause thrombosis and restenosis due to a lack of initial endothelial cell coverage on such materials. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate commonly used vascular materials (specifically, polyethylene terephthalate, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyurethane, nylon, commercially pure titanium, and a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V)) modified using an ionic plasma deposition (IPD) process and a nitrogen ion implantation plasma deposition (NIIPD) process. Such surface modifications have been previously shown to create nanostructured surface features which mimic the natural nanostructured surface features of blood vessels. The modified and unmodified surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and surface energy measurements. Furthermore, in vitro endothelial cell adhesion tests (a key first step for vascular material endothelialization) demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on many modified (with IPD and NIIPD + IPD) compared to unmodified samples. In general, endothelial cell adhesion increased with nanoroughness and surface energy but demonstrated a decreased endothelial cell adhesion trend after an optimal coating surface energy value was reached. Thus, results from this study provided materials and a versatile surface modification process that can potentially increase endothelialization faster than current unmodified (conventional) polymer and metallic vascular materials.

  18. The effect of elastomer chain length on properties of silicone-modified polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.; Ezzell, S.

    1981-01-01

    A series of polyimides containing silicone elastomers was synthesized in order to study the effects of the elastomer chain length on polymer properties. The elastomer with repeat units varying from n=10 to 105 was chemically reacted into the backbone of an addition polyimide oligomer via reactive aromatic amine groups. Glass transition temperatures of the elastomer and polyimide phases were observed by torsional braid analysis. The elastomer-modified polyimides were tested as adhesives for bonding titanium in order to determine their potential for aerospace applications. Adhesive lap shear tests were performed before and after aging bonded specimens at elevated temperatures.

  19. An in vitro bacterial adhesion assessment of surface-modified medical-grade PVC.

    PubMed

    Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Novák, Igor; Lehocký, Marián; Sedlarík, Vladimir; Vesel, Alenka; Junkar, Ita; Sáha, Petr; Chodák, Ivan

    2010-06-01

    Medical-grade polyvinyl chloride was surface modified by a multistep physicochemical approach to improve bacterial adhesion prevention properties. This was fulfilled via surface activation by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge plasma followed by radical graft copolymerization of acrylic acid through surface-initiated pathway to render a structured high density brush. Three known antibacterial agents, bronopol, benzalkonium chloride, and chlorhexidine, were then individually coated onto functionalized surface to induce biological properties. Various modern surface probe techniques were employed to explore the effects of the modification steps. In vitro bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation assay was performed. Escherichia coli strain was found to be more susceptible to modifications rather than Staphylococcus aureus as up to 85% reduction in adherence degree of the former was observed upon treating with above antibacterial agents, while only chlorhexidine could retard the adhesion of the latter by 50%. Also, plasma treated and graft copolymerized samples were remarkably effective to diminish the adherence of E. coli.

  20. Bio-active molecules modified surfaces enhanced mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mobasseri, Rezvan; Tian, Lingling; Soleimani, Masoud; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2017-01-29

    Surface modification of the substrate as a component of in vitro cell culture and tissue engineering, using bio-active molecules including extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins or peptides derived ECM proteins can modulate the surface properties and thereby induce the desired signaling pathways in cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) on glass substrates modified with fibronectin (Fn), collagen (Coll), RGD peptides (RGD) and designed peptide (R-pept) as bio-active molecules. The glass coverslips were coated with fibronectin, collagen, RGD peptide and R-peptide. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on different substrates and the adhesion behavior in early incubation times was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. The MTT assay was performed to evaluate the effect of different bio-active molecules on MSCs proliferation rate during 24 and 72 h. Formation of filopodia and focal adhesion (FA) complexes, two steps of cell adhesion process, were observed in MSCs cultured on bio-active molecules modified coverslips, specifically in Fn coated and R-pept coated groups. SEM image showed well adhesion pattern for MSCs cultured on Fn and R-pept after 2 h incubation, while the shape of cells cultured on Coll and RGD substrates indicated that they might experience stress condition in early hours of culture. Investigation of adhesion behavior, as well as proliferation pattern, suggests R-peptide as a promising bio-active molecule to be used for surface modification of substrate in supporting and inducing cell adhesion and proliferation.

  1. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-07

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall.

  2. Effects of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic resin modified glass ionomer adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Danielle Wiggins

    This study examined the effect of varying delayed polymerization times in combination with bracket manipulation on shear bond strength (SBS), degree of conversion (DC), and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score when using a resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) adhesive. Specimens were divided into three groups of clinically relevant delay times (0.5, 2, and 4-min) to simulate the delay that frequently occurs between bracket placement and manipulation and subsequent light curing. Based on an analysis of variance (alpha=.05), the SBS was not significantly different between the three groups. While one of the goals of this study was to be the first study to quantify DC of RMGI using Raman microspectroscopy, several challenges, including weak peak signal with and without fluorescence, were encountered and as a result, DC could not be determined. A significant difference (p<0.05) in ARI score was detected between the 0.5-min and 4.0-min delay groups with more adhesive remaining on the bracket with increasing delay time. A Spearman correlation between SBS and ARI indicated no positive association between SBS and ARI measures across delay times. The results of this study suggest that clinically relevant delay times of 0.5, 2, and 4-min do not negatively impact the SBS of a RMGI adhesive. However, with increasing delay time, the results suggest that more adhesive might remain on the bracket during debonding. With more adhesive remaining on the bracket, this could be beneficial in that less adhesive needs to be removed from enamel by grinding at the time of bracket removal when orthodontic treatment is completed.

  3. Hydrophobic and high adhesive polyaniline layer of rectangular microtubes fabricated by a modified interfacial polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanqiang; Gong, Xiangxiang; Qu, Yun; Han, Jie

    2016-08-01

    A modified interfacial polymerization of aniline is developed to fabricate hydrophobic and adhesive polyaniline (PANI) layer of rectangular microtubes on the glass substrate. The modified method uses pentanol as an organic medium to dissolve aniline monomer, with the water film of oxidant and surfactant on the glass substrate as water phase. The effects of some synthetic parameters (such as monomer concentration, alcohol molecular structure and surfactant type) on the morphology of PANI layer are studied for better understanding the fabrication of PANI nanostructures on the film. The alcohol molecular structure plays key role for the supermolecular assembly of PANI chains into nanostructures, while the surfactant may direct the array and deposition of these nanostructures on the glass substrate. The formation reason of PANI rectangular sub-microtubes is roughly interpreted according to our previous works. Wettability experiment indicates that the as-prepared PANI layer exhibits excellent hydrophobicity and high adhesive properties to water drop.

  4. Research of Adhesion Bonds Between Gas-Thermal Coating and Pre-Modified Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Z.; Zaitsev, K.; Klimenov, V.

    2016-08-01

    Nature of adhesive bonds between gas-thermal nickel alloy coating and carbon steel base was examined using laser profilometry, optical metallography, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The steel surface was plastically pre-deformed by an ultrasonic tool. Proved that ultrasound pre-treatment modifies the steel surface. Increase of dislocation density and formation of sub micro-structure are base elements of surface modification. While using high-speed gas-flame, plasma and detonation modes of coatings, surface activation occurs and durable adhesion is formed. Ultrasonic pre-treatment of base material is effective when sprayed particles and base material interact through physical-chemical bond formation. Before applying high-speed gas flame and plasma sprayed coatings, authors recommend ultrasonic pretreatment, which creates periodic wavy topography with a stroke of 250 microns on the steel surface. Before applying detonation sprayed coatings, authors recommend ultrasound pretreatment that create modified surface with a uniform micro-topography.

  5. Bacterial adhesion measurements on soft contact lenses using a Modified Vortex Device and a Modified Robbins Device.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C L; Pezzutti, M R; Silor, D; White, R

    1995-09-01

    S. marcescens 8100 and P. aeruginosa 15442 were used to study bacterial adhesion to hydrogel contact lenses which had not been worn. Bacterial removal from unworn lens materials was assessed with a calibrated vortex device modified with a digital rpm readout and fitted with a test tube attachment (MVD). The MVD, which relies on a whirlpool-like force to remove the bacteria, showed that bacteria adhered to the same degree to etafilcon A, vifilcon A and polymacon lenses under standardized conditions. Tracking the isoenzyme patterns of these bacterial species over time showed instability of S. marcescens upon repeated passage. This instability was not evident with P. aeruginosa. Bacterial adhesion of P. aeruginosa 15442, to human worn and unworn etafilcon A materials was determined with a Modified Robbins Device. The MRD was closed off at both ends stopping medium and bacterial movement after 1 h of fluid flow over the lens surface. The results show that immediately following this 1-h period more bacteria adhere to unworn contact lenses than to worn lenses. However, bacterial counts were equivalent on worn and unworn lenses following 5 h of static incubation.

  6. A modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay to account for the presence of hydrocarbon droplets.

    PubMed

    Zoueki, Caroline Warne; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2010-04-15

    The microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay has been used widely to characterize microbial cell hydrophobicity and/or the extent of cell adhesion to hydrophobic liquids. The classical MATH assay involves spectrophotometric absorbance measurements of the initial and final cell concentrations in an aqueous cell suspension that has been contacted with a hydrocarbon liquid. In this study, microscopic examination of the aqueous cell suspension after contact with hexadecane or a hexadecane/toluene mixture revealed the presence of hydrocarbon droplets. The hydrocarbon droplets contributed to the absorbance values during spectrophotometric measurements and caused erroneous estimates of cell concentrations and extents of microbial adhesion. A modified MATH assay that avoids such artefacts is proposed here. In this modified assay, microscopic examination of the aqueous suspension and direct cell counts provides cell concentrations that are free of interference from hydrocarbon droplets. The presence of hydrocarbon droplets was noted in MATH assays performed with three bacterial strains, and two different hydrocarbons, at ionic strengths of 0.2 mM and 20 mM and pH 6. In these experiments, the formation of quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets cannot be attributed to the presence of biosurfactants, or stabilization by biocolloids. The presence of surface potential at the hydrocarbon-water interface that was characterized by electrophoretic mobility of up to -1 and -2 microm cm/Vs, likely caused the formation of the quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets that provided erroneous results using the classical MATH assay.

  7. Adhesion and proliferation of human endothelial cells on photochemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Gumpenberger, T; Heitz, J; Bäuerle, D; Kahr, H; Graz, I; Romanin, C; Svorcik, V; Leisch, F

    2003-12-01

    We studied the adhesion and proliferation of human endothelial cells on photochemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene samples. The polymer surfaces were modified by exposure to the ultraviolet light of a Xe(2)(*)-excimer lamp at a wavelength of 172 nm in an ammonia atmosphere. Treatment times were between 10 and 20 min. The endothelial cell density was determined 1, 3 and 8 days after seeding by image analysis. Surface modification of the samples resulted in a significant increase in the number of adhering cells and in the formation of a confluent cell layer after 3-8 days. The results were comparable than those obtained on polystyrene Petri dishes, which are used as standard substrates in cell cultivation. Thus modified PTFE appears to be a promising material for the fabrication of artificial vascular prostheses coated with endothelial cells.

  8. Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Sulfonated and Non-Modified Chitosan Films.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Civantos, Ana; Redondo, Juan Alfonso; Guzmán, Rodrigo; Pérez-Perrino, Mónica; Gallardo, Alberto; Ramos, Viviana; Aranaz, Inmaculada

    2016-09-15

    Three types of chitosan-based films have been prepared and evaluated: a non-modified chitosan film bearing cationizable aliphatic amines and two films made of N-sulfopropyl chitosan derivatives bearing both aliphatic amines and negative sulfonate groups at different ratios. Cell adhesion and proliferation on chitosan films of C2C12 pre-myoblastic cells and B16 cells as tumoral model have been tested. A differential cell behavior has been observed on chitosan films due to their different surface modification. B16 cells have shown lower vinculin expression when cultured on sulfonated chitosan films. This study shows how the interaction among cells and material surface can be modulated by physicochemical characteristics of the biomaterial surface, altering tumoral cell adhesion and proliferation processes.

  9. Cell adhesion on polytetrafluoroethylene modified by UV-irradiation in an ammonia atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Heitz, J; Svorcík, V; Bacáková, L; Rocková, K; Ratajová, E; Gumpenberger, T; Bäuerle, D; Dvoránková, B; Kahr, H; Graz, I; Romanin, C

    2003-10-01

    We report on the modification of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) light of a Xe(2)*-excimer lamp at a wavelength of 172 nm in an ammonia atmosphere. Typical treatment times were up to 30 min. Subsequently, the samples were grafted with the amino acid alanine from an aqueous solution. The samples were characterized by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, laser-induced fluorescence and contact-angle measurements. We studied the adhesion of rat aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and mouse fibroblasts (3T3 cells) to the modified polymer samples using an in vitro technique, where the population density and spread of adhering cells is determined 24 h after seeding by image analysis. For both cell types the exposure of PTFE to UV-light in an ammonia atmosphere resulted in a significant increase in the number of adhering cells and in the size of their spreading area. The grafting with alanine enhanced this effect. Additional experiments with human endothelial cells (HEC) also demonstrated improved adhesion to modified PTFE. Thus, PTFE modified by our method appears to be a promising material for fabrication of artificial vascular prostheses and implants or for cultivation of skin substitutes.

  10. Parachute mortar design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleasants, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Mortars are used as one method for ejecting parachutes into the airstream to decelerate spacecraft and aircraft pilot escape modules and to effect spin recovery of the aircraft. An approach to design of mortars in the class that can accommodate parachutes in the 20- to 55-foot-diameter size is presented. Parachute deployment considerations are discussed. Comments are made on the design of a power unit, mortar tube, cover, and sabot. Propellant selection and breech characteristics and size are discussed. A method of estimating hardware weights and reaction load is presented. In addition, some aspects of erodible orifices are given as well as comments concerning ambient effects on performance. This paper collates data and experience from design and flight qualification of four mortar systems, and provides pertinent estimations that should be of interest on programs considering parachute deployment.

  11. Delamination Damage Analyses of FRP Composite Spar Wingskin Joints with Modified Elliptical Adhesive Load Coupler Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, S. K.; Pradhan, B.

    2008-11-01

    Three-dimensional non-linear finite element analyses (FEA) for delamination damage onset and its growth in Graphite Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) composite Spar Wingskin Joints (SWJ) with modified elliptical adhesive load coupler profile for varied ratios of base width to height of the spar have been presented in this paper. Both in-plane and out-of-plane normal and shear stress variations on the interfacial surface of the wingskin between the spar and the wingskin have been evaluated. Coupled stress failure criterion has been used to predict the locations of initiation of failures due to delamination induced damages. Based on the stress and delamination damage analyses, suitable geometry of the modified elliptical adhesive load coupler profile of the SWJ has been recommended. The delamination damage has been observed to be initiated from the toe-end of the interfacial surface of the spar and the wingskin of the SWJ. Subsequently, the delamination propagations have also been studied by calculating the individual and the total Mode of Strain Energy Release Rate (SERR) along the delamination front using Modified Crack Closure Integral (MCCI) technique based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) approach. It is seen that SERR variations along the delamination front i.e. across the width of the SWJ are not uniform. Therefore, a straight delamination front may grow into a curved delamination front as the delamination propagates. Also, it is found that Mode I SERR ( G I) governs the delamination propagation predominantly for the SWJ. Accordingly, suitable delamination arresting mechanism has been suggested.

  12. Adhesion-dependent negative friction coefficient on chemically modified graphite at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhao; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Li, Qunyang; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cannara, Rachel J

    2012-12-01

    From the early tribological studies of Leonardo da Vinci to Amontons' law, friction has been shown to increase with increasing normal load. This trend continues to hold at the nanoscale, where friction can vary nonlinearly with normal load. Here we present nanoscale friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments for a nanoscale probe tip sliding on a chemically modified graphite surface in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Our results demonstrate that, when adhesion between the AFM tip and surface is enhanced relative to the exfoliation energy of graphite, friction can increase as the load decreases under tip retraction. This leads to the emergence of an effectively negative coefficient of friction in the low-load regime. We show that the magnitude of this coefficient depends on the ratio of tip-sample adhesion to the exfoliation energy of graphite. Through both atomistic- and continuum-based simulations, we attribute this unusual phenomenon to a reversible partial delamination of the topmost atomic layers, which then mimic few- to single-layer graphene. Lifting of these layers with the AFM tip leads to greater deformability of the surface with decreasing applied load. This discovery suggests that the lamellar nature of graphite yields nanoscale tribological properties outside the predictive capacity of existing continuum mechanical models.

  13. Adhesion-dependent negative friction coefficient on chemically modified graphite at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhao; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Li, Qunyang; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2012-12-01

    From the early tribological studies of Leonardo da Vinci to Amontons’ law, friction has been shown to increase with increasing normal load. This trend continues to hold at the nanoscale, where friction can vary nonlinearly with normal load. Here we present nanoscale friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments for a nanoscale probe tip sliding on a chemically modified graphite surface in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Our results demonstrate that, when adhesion between the AFM tip and surface is enhanced relative to the exfoliation energy of graphite, friction can increase as the load decreases under tip retraction. This leads to the emergence of an effectively negative coefficient of friction in the low-load regime. We show that the magnitude of this coefficient depends on the ratio of tip-sample adhesion to the exfoliation energy of graphite. Through both atomistic- and continuum-based simulations, we attribute this unusual phenomenon to a reversible partial delamination of the topmost atomic layers, which then mimic few- to single-layer graphene. Lifting of these layers with the AFM tip leads to greater deformability of the surface with decreasing applied load. This discovery suggests that the lamellar nature of graphite yields nanoscale tribological properties outside the predictive capacity of existing continuum mechanical models.

  14. Void-free wafer-level adhesive bonding utilizing modified poly (diallyl phthalate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Fang; Dong, Tao; Yong, He; Yan, Su; Wang, Kaiying

    2013-12-01

    A new thermosetting polymer, modified poly (diallyl phthalate) (PDAP), is used as intermediate layer to realize a void-free wafer-level transfer bonding, in which the bonding interface contains patterned metal. Through glass-silicon bonding experiments, bonding defects are easily recognized with light microscopy. Three typical defect types are identified as: uneven flow defect, particle defect and bubble defect. The processing parameters, such as bonding pressure, pre-baking temperature, polymer thickness and coating conditions, have been optimized based on analysis of the defect formation. The optimized conditions have yielded a void-free wafer-level adhesive bonding. Then, the die shearing test indicates a good bonding strength. Additionally, the transfer bonding process is applied in SOI-silicon bonding as a practical example of MEMS fabrication.

  15. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  16. Adhesion and removal kinetics of Bacillus cereus biofilms on Ni-PTFE modified stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; McLandsborough, Lynne A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm control remains a challenge to food safety. A well-studied non-fouling coating involves codeposition of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) during electroless plating. This coating has been reported to reduce foulant build-up during pasteurization, but opportunities remain in demonstrating its efficacy in inhibiting biofilm formation. Herein, the initial adhesion, biofilm formation, and removal kinetics of Bacillus cereus on Ni-PTFE-modified stainless steel (SS) are characterized. Coatings lowered the surface energy of SS and reduced biofilm formation by > 2 log CFU cm(-2). Characterization of the kinetics of biofilm removal during cleaning demonstrated improved cleanability on the Ni-PTFE coated steel. There was no evidence of biofilm after cleaning by either solution on the Ni-PTFE coated steel, whereas more than 3 log and 1 log CFU cm(-2) of bacteria remained on the native steel after cleaning with water and an alkaline cleaner, respectively. This work demonstrates the potential application of Ni-PTFE non-fouling coatings on SS to improve food safety by reducing biofilm formation and improving the cleaning efficiency of food processing equipment.

  17. Adhesion of Poly(phenylene sulfide) Resin with Polymeric Film of Triazine Thiol on Aluminum Surface Modified by Anodic Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun Hyuk; Jang, Eun Kyung; Hong, Tae Eun; Kim, Jong Pil; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Jin, Jong Sung; Hyun, Myung Ho; Shin, Dong Su; Bae, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Euh Duck

    2015-01-01

    Various surface modifications have been applied to improve the adhesion properties of aluminum for the cap plate and sealing quality of electrolyte on Li ion batteries. In this study, we have tried to find the effective condition for the polymerization of triazine thiols (TT) on modified aluminum surfaces by anodic aluminum oxide. Characterization of polymerized films on aluminum was explored by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis. Scanning electron microscopy results reveal that meaningful roughness was formed on aluminum surfaces by anodic oxidation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis results represent that the peel strength was found to depend on film thickness and the composition of the adhesion layer. As a result, Al/PPS (polyphenylene sulfide) resin assemblies developed in this study have superior adhesive property. Therefore, these assemblies might be a viable candidate for a sealing technique for Li ion batteries.

  18. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl2 accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores. PMID:22783062

  19. Testing of Mortar Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-11

    Measure chamber pressure through the use of external piezoelectric or copper- crusher gauges. The use of such gauges requires a mortar cannon/barrel...tube tapped to receive the gauges. If such a tube cannot be obtained, use other methods, such as strain gages or internal copper- crusher gauges to...measure chamber pressure. Refer to ITOP 3-2-810. Note: When employing external crusher gauges, it is important not to replace used gauges with new

  20. Effect of surface wettability and topography on the adhesion of osteosarcoma cells on plasma-modified polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Denis P; Miller, Ian S; Ardhaoui, Malika; Gallagher, William M

    2011-09-01

    Biomaterials interact with the biological environment at their surface, making accurate biophysical characterization of the surface crucially important for understanding subsequent biological effects. In this study, the surface of polystyrene (PS) was systematically altered in order to determine the effect of plasma treatment and surface roughness on cell adhesion and spreading. Surfaces with water contact angle from hydrophilic (12°) to superhydrophobic (155°) were obtained through a combination of modifying surface roughness (R (a)), the deposition of siloxane coatings and the fluorination of the PS surface. R (a) values in the range of 19-2365 nm were obtained by grinding the PS surface. The nanometer-thick siloxane coatings were deposited using an atmospheric pressure plasma system, while the fluorination of the PS was carried out using a low-pressure radio frequency (RF) plasma. The siloxane coatings were obtained using a liquid poly(dimethylsiloxane) precursor that was nebulized into helium or helium/oxygen plasmas. Water contact angles in the range of 12-122° were obtained with these coatings. Cell adhesion studies were carried out using human MG63 osteosarcoma cells. It was observed that higher polymer surface roughness enhanced cell adhesion, but had a negative effect on cell spreading. Optimum cell adhesion was observed at ∼64° for the siloxane coatings, with a decrease in adhesion observed for the more hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings. This decrease in cell adhesion with an increase in hydrophobicity was also observed for the fluorinated PS surfaces with water contact angles in the range of 110-155°.

  1. Surface characterization and adhesion of oxygen plasma-modified LARC-TPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, J. W.; Wightman, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    LARC-TPI, an aromatic thermoplastic polyimide, was exposed to an oxygen plasma as a surface pretreatment for adhesive bonding. Chemical and physical changes which occurred in the polyimide surface as a result of the plasma treatment were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IR-RAS), contact-angle analysis, ellipsometry, and high resolution SEM. A 180-deg peel test with an acrylate-based pressure sensitive adhesive as a flexible adherent was utilized to study the interactions of the plasma-treated polyimide surface with other polymeric materials. The surface characterization and adhesion testing results showed that the oxygen plasma treatment, while creating a more hydrophilic, polar surface, also caused chain scission, resulting in the formation of a weak boundary layer which inhibited adhesion.

  2. Rapidly in situ forming adhesive hydrogel based on a PEG-maleimide modified polypeptide through Michael addition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yalin; Nie, Wei; Zhao, Jin; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2013-10-01

    Polyethylene glycol-maleimide modified ε-polylysine (EPL-PEG-MAL) with a unique comb-shaped structure was designed and used as a novel crosslinker for thiolated chitosan (CSS). Novel polysaccharide/polypeptide bionic hydrogels based on CSS and EPL-PEG-MAL could form rapidly in situ within 1 min via Michael addition under physiological conditions. Rheological studies showed that introduction of PEG can dramatically improve the storage modulus (G') of the hydrogels and the optimal hydrogel system showed superior G' of 1,614 Pa. The maximum adhesion strength reached 148 kPa, six times higher than that of fibrin glue. Cytotoxicity test indicated that the hydrogel is nontoxic toward growth of L929 cells. Gelation time, swelling ratio, storage modulus and adhesion strength of the hydrogels can be modulated by the content of PEG-maleimide, CSS concentration and molar ratio of maleimide group to thiol group. Benefiting from the fast gelation behaviors, desirable mechanical properties, relatively high adhesive performance and no cytotoxicity, these hydrogels have the potential applications as promising biomaterials for tissue adhesion and sealing.

  3. Modified alginate and gelatin cross-linked hydrogels for soft tissue adhesive.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liu; Wu, Yu; Fang, Jun; Wei, Xiaojuan; Gu, Qisheng; El-Hamshary, Hany; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Morsi, Yosry; Mo, Xiumei

    2017-02-01

    Soft tissue adhesives made from natural hydrogel are attractive in clinical applications due to their excellent properties, such as high water content, good biocompatibility, low immune, good biodegradability. Hydrogels derived from natural polysaccharides and proteins are ideal components for soft tissue adhesive since they resemble the extracellular matrices of the tissue composed of various sugar and amino acids-based macromolecules. In this paper, a series of novel tissue adhesives mixed by aldehyde sodium alginate (ASA) with amino gelatin (AG) were developed and characterized. The effect of aldehyde content in ASA and amino group content in AG on the properties of ASA/AG cross-linked hydrogel was measured. The results showed the gelling time, swelling behavior and the bonding strength of the hydrogel can be tuned by varying the content of aldehyde groups in ASA and the content of amino groups in AG. The gelation time could be controlled within 4-18 min. When the aldehyde content of ASA is 75.24% and the amino content of AG is 0.61 mmol/g, the hydrogel almost has the adhesive strength equal to the commercially available adhesive fibrin glue. So, this tunable ASA/AG hydrogels in this study could be a promising candidate as soft tissue adhesive and have a wide range of biomedical applications.

  4. Polymer films with surfaces unmodified and modified by non-thermal plasma as new substrates for cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Borges, A M G; Benetoli, L O; Licínio, M A; Zoldan, V C; Santos-Silva, M C; Assreuy, J; Pasa, A A; Debacher, N A; Soldi, V

    2013-04-01

    The surface properties of biomaterials, such as wettability, polar group distribution, and topography, play important roles in the behavior of cell adhesion and proliferation. Gaseous plasma discharges are among the most common means to modify the surface of a polymer without affecting its properties. Herein, we describe the surface modification of poly(styrene) (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films using atmospheric pressure plasma processing through exposure to a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). After treatment the film surface showed significant changes from hydrophobic to hydrophilic as the water contact angle decreasing from 95° to 37°. All plasma-treated films developed more hydrophilic surfaces compared to untreated films, although the reasons for the change in the surface properties of PS and PMMA differed, that is, the PS showed chemical changes and in the case of PMMA they were topographical. Excellent adhesion and cell proliferation were observed in all films. In vitro studies employing flow cytometry showed that the proliferation of L929 cells was higher in the film formed by a 1:1 mixture of PS/PMMA, which is consistent with the results of a previous study. These findings suggest better adhesion of L929 onto the 1:1 PS/PMMA modified film, indicating that this system is a new candidate biomaterial for tissue engineering.

  5. Novel epoxy-silicone thermolytic transparent packaging adhesives chemical modified by ZnO nanowires for HB LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ying; Wang, Jun-An; Pei, Chang-Long; Song, Ji-Zhong; Zhu, Di; Chen, Jie

    2010-10-01

    A novel high transparent thermolytic epoxy-silicone for high-brightness light-emitting diode (HB-LED) is introduced, which was synthesized by polymerization using silicone matrix via diglycidyl ether bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) as reinforcing agent, and filling ZnO nanowires to modify thermal conductivity and control refractive index of the hybrid material. The interactions of ZnO nanowires with polymers are mediated by the ligands attached to the nanoparticles. Thus, the ligands markedly influence the properties of ZnO nanowires/epoxy-silicone composites. The refractive indices of the prepared hybrid adhesives can be tuned by the ZnO nanowires from 1.4711 to 1.5605. Light transmittance can be increased by 20% from 80 to 95%. The thermal conductivity of the transparent packaging adhesives is 0.89-0.90 W/mK.

  6. Moessbauer and adhesion study of ion beam-modified Fe-PTFE interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingemarsson, P. Anders; Ericsson, Tore; Wappling, Roger; Possnert, Goran

    Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study ion beam-induced effects at Fe-PTFE thin film interfaces and to relate these effects to accompanying modifications in adhesion. Irradiation with 16 MeV S-32(3+) ions to doses in the range between 5 x 10 to the 11th and 2 x 10 to the 14th ions/sq cm was carried out before or after deposition of thin Fe-57 layers. For both pre- and post-bombardment, a substantial adhesion enhancement was observed. Associated with this were significant changes in the Moessbauer spectra indicating the formation of Fe-C and Fe-F compounds. This compound formation can be associated with the observed improvement in thin film adhesion.

  7. Microtopography of metal surfaces influence fibroblast growth by modifying cell shape, cytoskeleton, and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Meredith, David O; Eschbach, Lukas; Riehle, Mathis O; Curtis, Adam S G; Richards, Robert G

    2007-11-01

    Stainless Steel (SS), titanium (cpTi), and Ti-6Al-7Nb (TAN) are frequently used metals in fracture fixation, which contact not only bone, but also soft tissue. In previous soft tissue cytocompatibility studies, TAN was demonstrated to inhibit cell growth in its "standard" micro-roughened state. To elucidate a possible mechanism for this inhibition, cell area, shape, adhesion, and cytoskeletal integrity was studied. Only minor changes in spreading were observed for cells on electropolished SS, cpTi, and TAN. Cells on "standard" cpTi were similarly spread in comparison with electropolished cpTi and TAN, although the topography influenced the cell periphery and also resulted in lower numbers and shorter length of focal adhesions. On "standard" microrough TAN, cell spreading was significantly lower than all other surfaces, and cell morphology differed by being more elongated. In addition, focal adhesion numbers and mean length were significantly lower on standard TAN than on all other surfaces, with 80% of the measured adhesions below a 2-microm threshold. Focal adhesion site location and maturation and microtubule integrity were compromised by the presence of protruding beta-phase microspikes found solely on the surface of standard TAN. This led us to propose that the impairment of focal adhesion numbers, maturation (length), and cell spreading to a possibly sufficient threshold observed on standard TAN blocks cell cycle progress and eventually cell growth on the surface. We believe, as demonstrated with standard cpTi and TAN, that a difference in surface morphology is influential for controlling cell behavior on implant surfaces.

  8. Epithelial cell morphology and adhesion on diamond films deposited and chemically modified by plasma processes.

    PubMed

    Rezek, Bohuslav; Ukraintsev, Egor; Krátká, Marie; Taylor, Andrew; Fendrych, Frantisek; Mandys, Vaclav

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition apparatus with a linear antenna delivery system are well compatible with epithelial cells (5637 human bladder carcinoma) and significantly improve the cell adhesion compared to reference glass substrates. This is attributed to better adhesion of adsorbed layers to diamond as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) beneath the cells. Moreover, the cell morphology can be adjusted by appropriate surface treatment of diamond by using hydrogen and oxygen plasma. Cell bodies, cytoplasmic rims, and filopodia were characterized by Peakforce AFM. Oxidized NCD films perform better than other substrates under all conditions (96% of cells adhered well). A thin adsorbed layer formed from culture medium and supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) covered the diamond surface and played an important role in the cell adhesion. Nevertheless, 50-100 nm large aggregates formed from the RPMI medium without FBS facilitated cell adhesion also on hydrophobic hydrogenated NCD (increase from 23% to 61%). The authors discuss applicability for biomedical uses.

  9. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  10. In vitro investigation of antioxidant, anti-Inflammatory, and antiplatelet adhesion properties of genistein-modified poly(ethersulfone)/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) hemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Teng; DeFine, Linda; Alexander, Thomas; Kyu, Thein

    2015-04-01

    Hemocompatibility of genistein-modified poly(ethersulfone)/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PES/PVP) hemodialysis (HD) membranes has been investigated in vitro with emphasis on evaluation of cell viability, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet adhesion properties. Genistein modified PES/PVP membranes reveal significant reduction of the reactive oxygen species and also considerable suppression of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in whole blood, but to a lesser extent ininterleukin-6. The incorporation of PVP into the HD membrane reduces platelet adhesion by virtue of its hydrophilicity. Of particular importance is that platelet adhesion of the genistein modified membranes declines noticeably at low concentrations of genistein for about 5-10%, beyond which it raises the number of adhered platelets. The initial decline in the platelet adhesion is attributable to genistein's ability to inhibit intercellular and/or vascular cell adhesion, whereas the reversal of this adhesion trend with further increase of genistein loading is ascribed to the inherent hydrophobicity of the genistein modified HD membrane.

  11. Ionically cross-linked hyaluronic acid: wetting, lubrication, and viscoelasticity of a modified adhesion barrier gel

    PubMed Central

    Vorvolakos, Katherine; Isayeva, Irada S; Luu, Hoan-My Do; Patwardhan, Dinesh V; Pollack, Steven K

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), in linear or cross-linked form, is a common component of cosmetics, personal care products, combination medical products, and medical devices. In all cases, the ability of the HA solution or gel to wet surfaces and/or disrupt and lubricate interfaces is a limiting feature of its mechanism of action. We synthesized ferric ion–cross-linked networks of HA based on an adhesion barrier, varied the degree of cross-linking, and performed wetting goniometry, viscometry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. As cross-linking increases, so do contact angle, viscosity, storage modulus, and loss modulus; thus, wetting and lubrication are compromised. These findings have implications in medical device materials, such as adhesion barriers and mucosal drug delivery vehicles. PMID:22915924

  12. Improvement of metal and tissue adhesion on surface-modified parylene C.

    PubMed

    Wahjudi, Paulin N; Oh, Jin H; Salman, Salam O; Seabold, Jason A; Rodger, Damien C; Tai, Yu-Chong; Thompson, Mark E

    2009-04-01

    A general method for chemical surface functionalization of parylene C [PC, (para-CH2-C6H3Cl-CH2-)n] films is reported. Friedel-Crafts acylation is used to activate the surface of the PC film, and the resulting carbonyl groups are then used to form a range of different organic functional groups to the surface of the parylene film, including alcohol, imine, thiol, phthalimide, amine, and maleimide. The presence of these functional groups on the parylene surface was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Static water drop contact angle measurements were also used to demonstrate the changes in hydrophilicity of the PC film surface, consistent with each of the surface modifications. Enhanced metal (gold) adhesion was achieved by anchoring a thiol group onto the acylated surface of PC film. Acylation of parylene with 2-chloropropionyl chloride gave a surface bound chloropropionyl group. Grafting of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (pNIPAM) onto the chloropropionyl substituted PC film via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was carried out. The grafted pNIPAM on the parylene surface leads to temperature-dependent cellular tissue adhesion on the PC film.

  13. Rapid and efficient assembly of functional silicone surfaces protected by PEG: cell adhesion to peptide-modified PDMS.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Andrew S; Ranger, Jill J; Liu, Lihua; Longenecker, Ryan; Thompson, David B; Sheardown, Heather D; Brook, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    While silicone elastomers generally have excellent biomaterials properties, their hydrophobicity can elicit undesired local biological responses through adsorption and denaturation of proteins. Surface-bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can ameliorate the situation by preventing contact between the external biology and the silicone elastomer. It is further possible to manipulate the biocompatibility of the surface by linking peptides, proteins or other biological entities to the PEG. Previous synthetic approaches to PEG-protected surfaces are compromised by issues of reproducibility. We describe two rapid and efficient approaches to silicone surface modification by PEG-linked adhesion peptides that overcome this problem: SiH groups are introduced throughout a silicone elastomer during elastomer synthesis or only at the surface after cure; then, in either case, protein-repellent PEG brushes at the surface are introduced by hydrosilylation to give surfaces that can be stored for extensive periods of time without degradation. Activation of the free alcohol with an NSC group followed by immediate conjugation to relevant biological molecules occurs in high yields, as shown for RGDS and GYRGDS. High surface grafting density of the peptides was demonstrated using radiolabeling techniques. Biological activity was demonstrated by a 5-fold increase in cell adhesion on the peptide-modified surfaces when compared to unmodified PDMS control surfaces.

  14. Cell adhesion and growth on surfaces modified by plasma and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, W. W. R.; Teixeira, F. S.; da Silva, G. N.; Salvadori, D. M. F.; Salvadori, M. C.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we show and discuss the results of the interaction of living CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary) cells, in terms of adhesion and growth on glass, SU-8 (epoxi photoresist), PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and DLC (hydrogen free diamond-like carbon) surfaces. Glass, SU-8, and DLC but not PDMS showed to be good surfaces for cell growth. DLC surfaces were treated by oxygen plasma (DLC-O) and sulfur hexafluoride plasma (DLC-F). After 24 h of cell culture, the number of cells on DLC-O was higher than on DLC-F surface. SU-8 with silver implanted, creating nanoparticles 12 nm below the surface, increased significantly the number of cells per unit area.

  15. Assessment of tolerance to multistresses and in vitro cell adhesion in genetically modified Lactobacillus plantarum 590.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Tian, Hongtao; Wang, Hongxin; Guo, Xing; Yuan, Yanfang; Huang, Kunlun

    2011-03-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp) is a lactic acid bacterium that has many excellent traits that meet the needs of industrial production. Genetically modified (GM) Lp590 was obtained from Lp that was modified by the insertion of the gene nisI, which can confer resistance to nisin and play a role as a bio-preservative. Here, explorations were made to assess the safety of GM Lp590 and establish an in vitro evaluation model. The ability of Lp590 to tolerate both environmental stresses (such as temperatures ranging from 52 to 4 °C, or exposure to ethanol, oxygen, and osmotic stresses) and gastrointestinal transit was assessed. Lp590 showed a tolerance to 4 °C and ethanol (20%) within a period of 240 min that was similar to Lp. Notably, Lp590 can tolerate higher temperature (52 °C) and higher levels of H(2)O(2) (2%) and NaCl (4.0 M) than Lp. In contrast, Lp590 has the same gastrointestinal transit tolerance as Lp. In addition, Lp590 can adhere to Caco-2 cells, and it has no adverse effect on the cell membrane in vitro. These results indicate that GM Lp590 has many desirable biological characteristics and has good prospects for industrial applications. A useful and comprehensive exploration has been undertaken to establish a new in vitro evaluation model for genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs).

  16. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies

    PubMed Central

    Daood, Umer; Swee Heng, Chan; Neo Chiew Lian, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2015-01-01

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite–resin, and sectioned into resin–dentin slabs and beams to be stored for 24 h or 9 months in artificial saliva. Micro-tensile bond testing was performed with scanning electron microscopy to analyse the failure of debonded beams. The degree of conversion was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at different time points along with micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis. Data was analyzed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's for pair-wise comparison. Modification with 1% and 3% riboflavin increased the micro-tensile bond strength compared to the control at 24 h and 9-month storage with no significant differences in degree of conversion (P<0.05). The most predominant failure mode was the mixed fracture among all specimens except 10% riboflavin-modified adhesive specimens where cohesive failure was predominant. Raman analysis revealed that 1% and 3% riboflavin adhesives specimens showed relatively higher resin infiltration. The incorporation of riboflavin in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 3% (m/m) improved the immediate bond strengths and bond durability after 9-month storage in artificial saliva without adversely affecting the degree of conversion of the adhesive monomers and resin infiltration. PMID:25257880

  17. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies.

    PubMed

    Daood, Umer; Swee Heng, Chan; Neo Chiew Lian, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2015-06-26

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite-resin, and sectioned into resin-dentin slabs and beams to be stored for 24 h or 9 months in artificial saliva. Micro-tensile bond testing was performed with scanning electron microscopy to analyse the failure of debonded beams. The degree of conversion was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at different time points along with micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis. Data was analyzed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's for pair-wise comparison. Modification with 1% and 3% riboflavin increased the micro-tensile bond strength compared to the control at 24 h and 9-month storage with no significant differences in degree of conversion (P<0.05). The most predominant failure mode was the mixed fracture among all specimens except 10% riboflavin-modified adhesive specimens where cohesive failure was predominant. Raman analysis revealed that 1% and 3% riboflavin adhesives specimens showed relatively higher resin infiltration. The incorporation of riboflavin in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 3% (m/m) improved the immediate bond strengths and bond durability after 9-month storage in artificial saliva without adversely affecting the degree of conversion of the adhesive monomers and resin infiltration.

  18. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness for polyurethane modified by microwave plasma radiation.

    PubMed

    Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Azhdadi, S Neda Kh; Asefnejad, Azadeh; Asefnezhad, Azadeh; Sadraeian, Mohammad; Montazeri, Mohamad; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    Surface modification of medical polymers is carried out to improve biocompatibility. In this study, conventional polyurethane was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30 seconds and 60 seconds. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscope images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated the nanometric topography of the sample surfaces. Samples irradiated by oxygen plasma indicated high roughness compared with those irradiated by inert plasma for the different lengths of time. In addition, surface roughness increased with time, which can be due to a reduction of contact angle of samples irradiated by oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis indicated a reduction in samples irradiated with both types of plasma. However, samples irradiated with oxygen plasma indicated lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma. Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation among samples radiated by oxygen plasma for longer than for normal samples.

  19. Adhesion, Proliferation and Migration of NIH/3T3 Cells on Modified Polyaniline Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rejmontová, Petra; Capáková, Zdenka; Mikušová, Nikola; Maráková, Nela; Kašpárková, Věra; Lehocký, Marián; Humpolíček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline shows great potential and promises wide application in the biomedical field thanks to its intrinsic conductivity and material properties, which closely resemble natural tissues. Surface properties are crucial, as these predetermine any interaction with biological fluids, proteins and cells. An advantage of polyaniline is the simple modification of its surface, e.g., by using various dopant acids. An investigation was made into the adhesion, proliferation and migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts on pristine polyaniline films and films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids. In addition, polyaniline films supplemented with poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid at various ratios were tested. Results showed that the NIH/3T3 cell line was able to adhere, proliferate and migrate on the pristine polyaniline films as well as those films doped with sulfamic and phosphotungstic acids; thus, utilization of said forms in biomedicine appears promising. Nevertheless, incorporating poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic) acid altered the surface properties of the polyaniline films and significantly affected cell behavior. In order to reveal the crucial factor influencing the surface/cell interaction, cell behavior is discussed in the context of the surface energy of individual samples. It was clearly demonstrated that the lesser the difference between the surface energy of the sample and cell, the more cyto-compatible the surface is. PMID:27649159

  20. Medium-density particleboards from modified rice husks and soybean protein concentrate-based adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ciannamea, Emiliano M; Stefani, Pablo M; Ruseckaite, Roxana A

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the technical feasibility of using rice husk (RH) as wood substitute in the production of environmentally sound medium-density particleboards using adhesives from soybean protein concentrate (SPC). Chemical modification of rice husk with sodium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide followed by hydrogen peroxide (bleaching) were undertaken to evaluate the effect of such treatments on the composition and topology of rice husk and the performance of produced panels. Both treatments were efficient in partially eliminating hemicelluloses, lignin and silica from RH, as evidenced by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy observations suggested that alkaline treatment resulted in a more damaged RH substrate than bleaching. The dependence of mechanical properties (modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and internal bond) and the physical properties (water absorption and thickness swelling) on chemical treatments performed on both, rice husk and SPC was studied. Bleached-rice husk particleboards bonded with alkaline-treated soybean protein concentrate displayed the best set of final properties. Particleboards with this formulation met the minimum requirements of internal bond, modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture recommended by the US Standard ANSI/A208.1 specifications for M1, MS and M2-grade medium-density particleboards, but failed to achieve the thickness swelling value recommended for general use panels. This limitation of soybean protein concentrate-bonded rice husk particleboards was counterbalanced by the advantage of being formaldehyde-free which makes them a suitable alternative for indoor applications.

  1. Investigation of the oxide adhesion and growth characteristics on platinum-modified aluminide coatings. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, M.S.

    1986-09-01

    The operating environment for superalloy blades and vanes in gas turbine engines has necessitated the developed of alloy coatings to achieve satisfactory resistance of the metal to oxidation and hot corrosion. Aluminide coatings were initially developed to meet this need. Recently it was shown that platinum additions significantly improve the oxidation resistance of these aluminide coatings. The effects of pre-aluminizing surface smoothness and coating structure for both platinum modified and unmodified aluminide coatings on IN-738 in a cyclic oxidation environment at 1100 C were examined. Weight change measurements were used to determine the coating oxide scale adherence characteristics and to quantify the cyclic oxidation behavior of the various coating structures.

  2. Water transfer properties and shrinkage in lime-based rendering mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizzi, A.; Cultrone, G.

    2012-04-01

    Rendering is the practice of covering a wall or a building façade with one or more layers of mortar, with the main aim to protect the masonry structure against weathering. The render applied must show high flexibility, good adhesion and compatibility with the support (i.e. stone, brick) and, overall, it should be characterised by low water absorption and high water vapour permeability. Water (in the solid, liquid and vapour state) is one of the main factors that drive construction materials to deterioration. Therefore, to evaluate the quality and durability of a rendering mortar, thus ensuring its protective function in the masonry structure, it is fundamental to assess the behaviour of this mortar towards water. Mortars were elaborated with a calcitic dry hydrated lime, a calcareous aggregate, a pozzolan, a lightweight aggregate, a water-retaining agent and a plasticiser. Four types of lime mortars were prepared, in which the binder-to-aggregate ratios were 1:3, 1:4, 1:6 and 1:9 by weight, whilst the pozzolan was kept at 10% of the lime (by mass) and the total admixtures proportion was less than 2% of the total mass. The influence of the characteristics of mortars pore system on the amount of water absorbed and the kinetics of absorption was investigated by means of: free water absorption and drying; capillary uptake; water permeability; water vapour permeability. Interesting deductions can be made from the values of water and water vapour permeability found for mortars: the former increases exponentially with the sand volume of the mortar, whilst the latter increases almost exponentially with the initial water content added to the mortar mixes during their elaboration. However, the relationship obtained between porosity of mortars and permeability values is not really clear. This finding suggests that the permeability of a material cannot be estimated on the basis of its porosity as it can be made for the capillary uptake and free water absorption. Another

  3. Evaluation of the bond strength of different adhesive agents to a resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC).

    PubMed

    Karadas, Muhammed; Cantekin, Kenan; Gumus, Husniye; Ateş, Sabit Melih; Duymuş, Zeynep Yesil

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of different adhesive agents to TheraCal LC and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and examined the morphologic changes of these materials with different surface treatments. A total of 120 specimens, 60 of MTA Angelus (AMTA), and 60 of TheraCal LC, were prepared and divided into six subgroups according to the adhesive agent used; these agents included Scotchbond Multipurpose, Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond, Clearfil S(3) Bond, OptiBond All-in-One, and G-aenial Bond. After application of adhesive agents, Filtek Z250 composite resin was placed onto the specimens. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, followed by examination of the fractured surfaces. The surface changes of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance. Although no significant differences were found among the bond strengths of different adhesives to AMTA (p = 0.69), a significant difference was found in terms of bond strengths of different adhesives to the TheraCal LC surface (p < 0.001). The total-etch adhesive system more strongly bonded to TheraCal LC compared to the bond with other adhesives. TheraCal LC bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA regardless of the adhesive agents tested. Resin-modified calcium silicate showed higher bond strength than AMTA in terms of the composite bond to these materials with different bonding systems. On the other hand, the highest shear bond-strength values were found for composite bonds with the combination of TheraCal LC and the total-etch adhesive system. SCANNING 38:403-411, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Novel silsesquioxane mixture-modified high elongation polyurethane with reduced platelet adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, William; Zhou, Hongyang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Gang

    2008-02-01

    We have successfully synthesized a kind of novel silsesquioxane mixture that can be used to modify the surface of biomaterial polyurethane (PU) for the purpose of making silsesquioxane/PU as low-price and high-quality biomaterial. HPLC, FTIR and 29Si NMR are used to characterize as-synthesized silsesquioxane mixture. XPS figure and SEM images show the silsesquioxane particles really self-assemble on the PU surface. Contact angle measurements verify that there is a large hysteresis loop, which relates to low- and high-surface free energy component on the surface. Platelet adsorption at 90 min of PU/silsesquioxane mixture is lower than that of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and PU (two-way ANOVA, p < 0.05). Furthermore, SEM images show "island" morphologic pattern with Cooper grades I platelet adsorption morphology on the smooth PU/silsesquioxane surface, and mechanic test shows that the samples with silsesquioxane mixture can increase mechanic property of PU. On the basis of these results, we conclude that this kind of nanocomposite has promise for application in biomaterials.

  5. Enhanced angiogenesis of growth factor-free porous biodegradable adhesive made with hexanoyl group-modified gelatin.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Keiko; Mizuta, Ryo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2015-09-01

    The bonding behavior of hexanoyl (Hx: C6) group-modified alkaline-treated gelatin (HxAlGltn) porous films ((P)HxAlGltn) on the porcine intestine was evaluated. (P)HxAlGltns with various porosities were prepared by the salt-leaching method for various solid-liquid ratios. (P)HxAlGltns bonded more strongly to porcine intestine surfaces than did porous AlGltn films ((P)AlGltns). L929 cells cultured on (P)HxAlGltns showed adhesivity than cells cultured on (P)AlGltns. Faster tissue infiltration and a shorter degradation time of highly porous (P)HxAlGltns were observed after implantation in rat subcutaneous tissues. The angiogenic markers CD34 and α-SMA were highly expressed around (P)HxAlGltns that had high porosity. These results indicated that highly porous (P)HxAlGltns have advantages with respect to not only bonding strength on wet soft tissues, but also angiogenesis.

  6. rFN/Cad-11-Modified Collagen Type II Biomimetic Interface Promotes the Adhesion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zhengsheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Kang, Xia; Wen, Can; Yan, Yanfei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Yujiang

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the cell-material interface are determining factors in the successful function of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Currently, cell adhesion is commonly promoted through the use of polypeptides; however, due to their lack of complementary or modulatory domains, polypeptides must be modified to improve their ability to promote adhesion. In this study, we utilized the principle of matrix-based biomimetic modification and a recombinant protein, which spans fragments 7–10 of fibronectin module III (heterophilic motif ) and extracellular domains 1–2 of cadherin-11 (rFN/Cad-11) (homophilic motif ), to modify the interface of collagen type II (Col II) sponges. We showed that the designed material was able to stimulate cell proliferation and promote better chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro than both the FN modified surfaces and the negative control. Further, the Col II/rFN/Cad-11-MSCs composite stimulated cartilage formation in vivo; the chondrogenic effect of Col II alone was much less significant. These results suggested that the rFN/Cad-11-modified collagen type II biomimetic interface has dual biological functions of promoting adhesion and stimulating chondrogenic differentiation. This substance, thus, may serve as an ideal scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing repair of injured cartilage in vivo. PMID:23919505

  7. Five-year clinical evaluation of 300 teeth restored with porcelain laminate veneers using total-etch and a modified self-etch adhesive system.

    PubMed

    Aykor, Arzu; Ozel, Emre

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term clinical performance of porcelain laminate veneers luted with hybrid composite in combination with total-etch and self-etch adhesive systems. The study was performed on 30 patients ranging in age between 28 and 54 years. Ten veneers were performed per patient in the maxillary arch. In Group 1, 150 teeth were treated with porcelain veneers, using a total-etch adhesive system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE). In Group 2, 150 teeth were bonded with a self-etch adhesive system (AdheSE, Ivoclar-Vivadent). All the veneers were luted with a light-cured hybrid composite (Z100, 3M ESPE). The patients were recalled after 1, 2 and 5 years. Modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria were utilized to evaluate the porcelain laminate veneers in terms of marginal adaptation, cavo-surface marginal discoloration, secondary caries, postoperative sensitivity, satisfaction with restoration shade and gingival tissue response. Data were analyzed using the Chi-Square test (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the total-etch and self-etch groups in terms of USPHS criteria (p > 0.05). Porcelain veneers exhibited successful clinical performance with both total-etch and two-step self-etch adhesives at the end of five-years.

  8. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  9. Systems toxicology-based assessment of the candidate modified risk tobacco product THS2.2 for the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Poussin, Carine; Laurent, Alexandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2016-01-02

    Alterations of endothelial adhesive properties by cigarette smoke (CS) can progressively favor the development of atherosclerosis which may cause cardiovascular disorders. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) are tobacco products developed to reduce smoking-related risks. A systems biology/toxicology approach combined with a functional in vitro adhesion assay was used to assess the impact of a candidate heat-not-burn technology-based MRTP, Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, on the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) compared with a reference cigarette (3R4F). HCAECs were treated for 4h with conditioned media of human monocytic Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells preincubated with low or high concentrations of aqueous extracts from THS2.2 aerosol or 3R4F smoke for 2h (indirect treatment), unconditioned media (direct treatment), or fresh aqueous aerosol/smoke extracts (fresh direct treatment). Functional and molecular investigations revealed that aqueous 3R4F smoke extract promoted the adhesion of MM6 cells to HCAECs via distinct direct and indirect concentration-dependent mechanisms. Using the same approach, we identified significantly reduced effects of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract on MM6 cell-HCAEC adhesion, and reduced molecular changes in endothelial and monocytic cells. Ten- and 20-fold increased concentrations of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract were necessary to elicit similar effects to those measured with 3R4F in both fresh direct and indirect exposure modalities, respectively. Our systems toxicology study demonstrated reduced effects of an aqueous aerosol extract from the candidate MRTP, THS2.2, using the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary endothelial cells as a surrogate pathophysiologically relevant event in atherogenesis.

  10. Enhancing the versatility of alternate current biosusceptometry (ACB) through the synthesis of a dextrose-modified tracer and a magnetic muco-adhesive cellulose gel.

    PubMed

    Martins, Murillo L; Calabresi, Marcos F; Quini, Caio; Matos, Juliana F; Miranda, José R A; Saeki, Margarida J; Bordallo, Heloisa N

    2015-03-01

    Alternate Current Biosusceptometry (ACB) is a promising bio-magnetic method, radiation free and easily performed used for gastric emptying exams. Due to development on its sensitivity level, interesting nature, noninvasiveness and low cost it has attracted a lot of attention. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles of Mn-Zn ferrite as well as dextrose-modified nanoparticles were synthesized to be used as possible tracers in ACB gastric emptying exams. In addition, a magnetic muco-adhesive gel was obtained by modifying the ferrite nanoparticles with cellulose. Based on in-vivo tests in rats, we show that the pure ferrite nanoparticles, whose isoelectric point was found to be at pH=3.2, present a great sensitivity to pH variations along the gastrointestinal tract, while the reduction of the isoelectric point by the dextrose modification leads to suitable nanoparticles for rapid gastric emptying examinations. On the other hand, the in-vivo tests show that the muco-adhesive cellulose gel presents substantial stomach adhesion and is a potential drug delivery system easily traceable by the ACB system.

  11. Modeling and numerical simulation of interior ballistic processes in a 120mm mortar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ragini

    by using a high-resolution Godunov-type shock-capturing approach was used where the discretization is done directly on the integral formulation of the conservation laws. A linearized approximate Riemann Solver was modified in this work for the two-phase flows to compute fully non-linear wave interactions and to directly provide upwinding properties in the scheme. An entropy fix based on Harten-Heyman method was used with van Leer flux limiter for total variation diminishing. The three dimensional effects were simulated by incorporating an unsplit multi-dimensional wave propagation method, which accounted for discontinuities traveling in both normal and oblique coordinate directions. For each component, the predicted pressure-time traces showed significant pressure wave phenomena, which closely simulated the measured pressure-time traces obtained at PSU. The pressure-time traces at the breech-end of the mortar tube were obtained at Aberdeen Test Center with 0, 2, and 4 charge increments. The 3D-MIB code was also used to simulate the effect of flash tube vent-hole pattern on the pressure-wave phenomenon in the ignition cartridge. A comparison of the pressure difference between primer-end and projectile-end locations of the original and modified ignition cartridges with each other showed that the early-phase pressure-wave phenomenon can be significantly reduced with the modified pattern. The flow property distributions predicted by the 3D-MIB for 0, 2, and 4 charge increment cases as well the projectile dynamics predictions provided adequate validation of theory by experiments.

  12. Extended interaction of β1 integrin subunit-deficient cells (GD25) with surfaces modified with fibronectin-derived peptides: culture optimization, adhesion and cytokine panel studies

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck, Heather; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2008-01-01

    The modification of biomaterials with extracellular matrix-mimicking factors to influence the cellular response through mainly integrin-mediated signaling is a common technique. The inherent limitations of antibody-inhibition studies necessitate the use of complementary methods to block integrin function to confirm cell–surface interaction. In this study, we employed a β1 integrin-deficient cell line, GD25, to investigate the role of β1 subunit in cell adhesion and subsequent cytokine (granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor -1, regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed, and secreted, tumor necrosis factor-α) release kinetics in the presence of tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) and semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (sIPN) modified with fibronectin (FN)-mimic peptides (RGD, PHSRN). Culture conditions (i.e. seeding density, medium, serum supplementation) were optimized for long-term observation. Differences in cell adhesion, cell viability and cytokine release behavior were dependent on the presence of the β1 integrin subunit, FN, sIPN cast method and peptide identity. By comparing two complementary techniques for assaying integrin function, we observed both similarities (i.e. decreased adhesion to FN-absorbed TCPS and increased IL-1β release at 96 h) and differences (i.e. no difference in adhesion or IL-1β release in the presence of sIPN surfaces) when the function of the β1 subunit was blocked in cell adhesion and signaling in the presence of biomaterials. PMID:18514047

  13. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenu, Luigi; Forni, Daniele; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF) was finally evaluated.

  14. Use of cactus in mortars and concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Eklund, L.; Villarreal, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    Natural polymers have been used in ancient times to improve the durability of lime-based mortars and concretes. The natural polymers used were locally available. In this work, cactus extract from Mexico has been tested in a Portland cement mortar. It is seen that cactus extract increases the plasticity of the mortar and improves water absorption and freeze-salt resistance. Calcium hydroxide produced by Portland cement hydration interacts with the components of cactus extract, polysaccharides or proteins, and forms complexes. It affects the crystallization process. Painting of the concrete with this extract has also shown improved water resistance.

  15. Use of polypropylene fibers coated with nano-silica particles into a cementitious mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, B.; Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L.

    2015-12-01

    Fiber reinforced cementitious composite (FRCC) materials have been widely used during last decades in order to overcome some of traditional cementitious materials issues: brittle behaviour, fire resistance, cover spalling, impact strength. For composite materials, fiber/matrix bond plays an important role because by increasing fiber/matrix interactions is possible to increase the behaviour of the entire material. In this study, in order to improve fiber to matrix adhesion, two chemical treatments of polypropylene fibers were investigated: alkaline hydrolysis and nano-silica sol-gel particles deposition. Treatmtents effect on fibers morphology and mechanical properties was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile tests. SEM investigations report the presence of spherical nano-silica particles on fiber surface, in the case of sol-gel process, while alkaline hydrolysis leads to an increase of fibers roughness. Both treatments have negligible influence on fibers mechanical properties confirming the possibility of their use in a cementitious mortar. Pullout tests were carried out considering three embedded length of fibers in mortar samples (10, 20 and 30 mm, respectively) showing an increase of pullout energy for treated fibers. The influence on fiber reinforced mortar mechanical properties was investigated by three-point flexural tests on prismatic specimens considering two fibers length (15 and 30 mm) and two fibers volume fractions (0.50 and 1.00 %). A general increase of flexural strength over the reference mix was achieved and an overall better behaviour is recognizable for mortars containing treated fibers.

  16. Use of polypropylene fibers coated with nano-silica particles into a cementitious mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, B. Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L.

    2015-12-17

    Fiber reinforced cementitious composite (FRCC) materials have been widely used during last decades in order to overcome some of traditional cementitious materials issues: brittle behaviour, fire resistance, cover spalling, impact strength. For composite materials, fiber/matrix bond plays an important role because by increasing fiber/matrix interactions is possible to increase the behaviour of the entire material. In this study, in order to improve fiber to matrix adhesion, two chemical treatments of polypropylene fibers were investigated: alkaline hydrolysis and nano-silica sol-gel particles deposition. Treatmtents effect on fibers morphology and mechanical properties was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile tests. SEM investigations report the presence of spherical nano-silica particles on fiber surface, in the case of sol-gel process, while alkaline hydrolysis leads to an increase of fibers roughness. Both treatments have negligible influence on fibers mechanical properties confirming the possibility of their use in a cementitious mortar. Pullout tests were carried out considering three embedded length of fibers in mortar samples (10, 20 and 30 mm, respectively) showing an increase of pullout energy for treated fibers. The influence on fiber reinforced mortar mechanical properties was investigated by three-point flexural tests on prismatic specimens considering two fibers length (15 and 30 mm) and two fibers volume fractions (0.50 and 1.00 %). A general increase of flexural strength over the reference mix was achieved and an overall better behaviour is recognizable for mortars containing treated fibers.

  17. Recycled sand in lime-based mortars.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, M; Anastasiou, E; Georgiadis Filikas, K

    2014-12-01

    The increasing awareness of the society about safe guarding heritage buildings and at the same time protecting the environment promotes strategies of combining principles of restoration with environmentally friendly materials and techniques. Along these lines, an experimental program was carried out in order to investigate the possibility of producing repair, lime-based mortars used in historic buildings incorporating secondary materials. The alternative material tested was recycled fine aggregates originating from mixed construction and demolition waste. Extensive tests on the raw materials have been performed and mortar mixtures were produced using different binding systems with natural, standard and recycled sand in order to compare their mechanical, physical and microstructure properties. The study reveals the improved behavior of lime mortars, even at early ages, due to the reaction of lime with the Al and Si constituents of the fine recycled sand. The role of the recycled sand was more beneficial in lime mortars rather than the lime-pozzolan or lime-pozzolan-cement mortars as a decrease in their performance was recorded in the latter cases due to the mortars' structure.

  18. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements

    PubMed Central

    Shashibhushan, KK; Poornima, P; Reddy, VV Subba

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess and compare the retentive strength of two dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE & SmartCem2, Dentsply Caulk) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; RelyX Luting 2, 3M ESPE) on stainless steel crown (SSC). Materials and methods Thirty extracted teeth were mounted on cold cured acrylic resin blocks exposing the crown till the cemento-enamel junction. Pretrimmed, precontoured SSC was selected for a particular tooth. Standardized tooth preparation for SSC was performed by single operator. The crowns were then luted with either RelyX U200 or SmartCem2 or RelyX Luting 2 cement. Retentive strength was tested using Instron universal testing machine. The retentive strength values were recorded and calculated by the formula: Load/Area. Statistical analysis One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple comparisons followed by post hoc Tukey’s test for groupwise comparisons. Unpaired t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. Results RelyX U200 showed significantly higher retentive strength than rest of the two cements (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found between the retentive strength of SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2 (p > 0.05). Conclusion The retentive strength of dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements was better than RMGIC, and RelyX U200 significantly improved crown retention when compared with SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2. How to cite this article Pathak S, Shashibhushan KK, Poornima P, Reddy VVS. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):197-200. PMID:27843249

  19. Use of Modified Polysaccharide 4DryField® PH for Adhesion Prevention and Hemostasis in Gynecological Surgery: A Two-Center Observational Study by Second-Look Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korell, Matthias; Ziegler, Nicole; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study evaluates both scopes of 4DryField PH, certified for adhesion prevention and hemostasis, in patients undergoing surgery for various and severe gynecological disorders. Methods. This is a two-institutional study. Adhesion prevention efficacy was evaluated using video documentation of first-look laparoscopies (FLL) and second-look laparoscopies (SLL); other patient data were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty patients with various disorders were evaluated, 4 assigned to a uterus pathology, 10 to endometriosis, and 6 to an adhesion disease group. Nine patients received 4DryField primarily for hemostasis and 11 solely for adhesion prevention. Nineteen patients had SLL after 5 to 12 weeks and one after 13 months. Results. At FLL with 4DryField, immediate hemostasis could be achieved in diffuse bleeding. At SLL, effective adhesion prevention was observed in 18 of all 20 women, with only 2 revealing major adhesions. In particular, only 1 of the 6 women with adhesion disease as predominant disorder showed major adhesions at SLL. Conclusions. Modified polysaccharide 4DryField is not only effective in diffuse bleeding. In this cohort with extensive surgery for various gynecological pathologies, 4DryField showed effective adhesion prevention as confirmed at SLL, too. Its use as premixed gel is a convenient variant for treatment of large peritoneal wounds. PMID:26904672

  20. Characterization of historical mortars in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Heras, M.; Arce, I.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the petrographic and mineralogical characterization of mortars from different archaeological sites in Jordan which encompass Nabatean, Late-Antique and Early Islamic (Umayyad) sites, in some cases offering a sequence of different period mortars from the same building. These sites include the Nabataean city of Petra, the Late Antique town of Umm al Jimal and the castle of Qasr Al Hallabat. These mortars were produced with different raw materials and manufacturing technologies, which are reflected on distinctive variations of mineralogy, texture and crystal size and aggregates composition (including volcanic ashes, ceramic fragments, burnt organic material) size and their puzzolanic properties. As a consequence these mortars present different physical properties and reveal nowadays very different states of conservation. There is a dramatic change in mortar properties between those manufactured in pre-Islamic period and those from early Islamic - Ummayad times with a general trend in which these last ones present coarser crystal and aggregate sizes with less puzzolanic aggregates that result in less durable mortars. All of this reflects changes in the different stages of production of the mortar, from the use of either hydraulic, lime putty or slaked lime and the selection of aggregates to the application techniques (polishing). This reflects the evolution of building technology that took place in this area during early Islamic period and how petrological information can shed light on historical interpretation of building technologies. Research funded by AECID (PCI A/032184/10), GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-16) and MCU (Analisis y Documentación de tipología arquitectónica y técnicas constructivas en el periodo de transición Bizantino-Omeya en Jordania)

  1. Mortar characterization study of unreinforced hollow clay tile masonry

    SciTech Connect

    Butala, M.B.

    1992-09-14

    This report presents the results of an investigation of mortar removed from existing hollow clay tile masonry walls in buildings located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Primary purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the properties of existing mortar and provide a similar specification for the mortar to be used in construction of test specimens and test walls for the Hollow Clay Tile Wall Test Program. A mortar characterization study of mortar samples removed from walls in four buildings, 9207, 9206, 9204-2 and 9212 was performed by Testwell Craig Materials Consultants (TCMC) under subcontract to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc (MMES). The mortar samples were collected by MMES and analyzed by TCMC in accordance with applicable ASTM standards. Petrographical and chemical analyses were performed. From the results of this investigation a mortar mix was prepared to resemble the properties of existing mortar.

  2. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes produced by the fuel cycles of Integral Fast Reactors (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal alloy fuels. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500/degree/C. This cell has a liquid cadmium anode in which the fuels are dissolved and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a mixture of either lithium, potassium, and sodium chlorides or lithium, calcium, barium, and sodium chlorides. One method being considered for immobilizing the treated nontransuranic salt waste is to disperse the salt in a portland cement-base mortar that will be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canister-molds where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material. The set times must be longer than a few hours to allow sufficient time for processing, and the mortar must reach a reasonable compressive strength (/approximately/7 MPa) within three days to permit handling. Because fission product heating will be high, about 0.6 W/kg for a mortar containing 10% waste salt, the effects of elevated temperatures during curing and storage on mortar properties must be considered.

  3. Congeneric bio-adhesive mussel foot proteins designed by modified prolines revealed a chiral bias in unnatural translation.

    PubMed

    Larregola, Maud; Moore, Shannon; Budisa, Nediljko

    2012-05-18

    Chiral bias in the unnatural translation and 'sticky' mussel proteins. The residue-specific in vivo incorporation of hydroxylated amino acids as well as other synthetic analogs, such as fluoroprolines, emerges as the method of choice for recombinant synthesis of Pro-rich mussel adhesive protein congeners. Chemical diversifications introduced in this way provide a general route towards bio-adhesive congeners endowed with properties not developed by natural evolution. Most importantly, we have found that the co-translational incorporation of (4R)-, and (4S)-hyroxylated and fluorinated analogs into mussel proteins presented a chiral bias: the expressed protein was only detectable in samples incubated with analogs with (4R)-substituents. Possible relationship of these stereochemical preferences for (4R)-stereoisomers in the translation to intracellular tRNA concentrations, ribosomal editing and proofreading or structural effects such as preorganization remains to be addressed in future studies. These studies will generally provide a mechanistic framework for the flexibility of the translational machinery and establish the boundaries of the unnatural translation.

  4. 46. DETAIL VIEW OF THE MORTAR BOXES, STAMP BATTERIES AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. DETAIL VIEW OF THE MORTAR BOXES, STAMP BATTERIES AND AMALGAMATION TABLES. NOTE FULTON IRON WORKS, SAM FRANCISCO 1908 STAMPED INTO THE MORTAR BOX. ALSO NOTE THE DIES RESTING ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE MORTAR BOX BY THE SECOND STAMP BATTERY FROM THE CAMERA POSITION. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  5. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

    PubMed Central

    AZEVEDO, Larissa Marinho; CASAS-APAYCO, Leslie Carol; VILLAVICENCIO ESPINOZA, Carlos Andres; WANG, Linda; NAVARRO, Maria Fidela de Lima; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control) – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond) + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond) + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE) dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B) to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher’s test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05). CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations. PMID:26221927

  6. Enhanced In Vitro Biocompatibility of Chemically Modified Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Surfaces for Stable Adhesion and Long-term Investigation of Brain Cerebral Cortex Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuddannaya, Shreyas; Bao, Jingnan; Zhang, Yilei

    2015-11-18

    Studies on the mammalian brain cerebral cortex have gained increasing importance due to the relevance of the region in controlling critical higher brain functions. Interactions between the cortical cells and surface extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins play a pivotal role in promoting stable cell adhesion, growth, and function. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) based platforms have been increasingly used for on-chip in vitro cellular system analysis. However, the inherent hydrophobicity of the PDMS surface has been unfavorable for any long-term cell system investigations due to transitory physical adsorption of ECM proteins on PDMS surfaces followed by eventual cell dislodgement due to poor anchorage and viability. To address this critical issue, we employed the (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) based cross-linking strategy to stabilize ECM protein immobilization on PDMS. The efficiency of surface modification in supporting adhesion and long-term viability of neuronal and glial cells was analyzed. The chemically modified surfaces showed a relatively higher cell survival with an increased neurite length and neurite branching. These changes were understood in terms of an increase in surface hydrophilicity, protein stability, and cell-ECM protein interactions. The modification strategy could be successfully applied for stable cortical cell culture on the PDMS microchip for up to 3 weeks in vitro.

  7. CAD/CAM monolithic restorations and full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation to restore a patient with a past history of bulimia: the modified three-step technique.

    PubMed

    Vailati, Francesca; Carciofo, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Due to an increasing awareness about dental erosion, many clinicians would like to propose treatments even at the initial stages of the disease. However, when the loss of tooth structure is visible only to the professional eye, and it has not affected the esthetics of the smile, affected patients do not usually accept a full-mouth rehabilitation. Reducing the cost of the therapy, simplifying the clinical steps, and proposing noninvasive adhesive techniques may promote patient acceptance. In this article, the treatment of an ex-bulimic patient is illustrated. A modified approach of the three-step technique was followed. The patient completed the therapy in five short visits, including the initial one. No tooth preparation was required, no anesthesia was delivered, and the overall (clinical and laboratory) costs were kept low. At the end of the treatment, the patient was very satisfied from a biologic and functional point of view.

  8. Tissue-engineered endothelial cell layers on surface-modified Ti for inhibiting in vitro platelet adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiupeng; He, Fupo; Li, Xia; Ito, Atsuo; Sogo, Yu; Maruyama, Osamu; Kosaka, Ryo; Ye, Jiandong

    2013-06-01

    A tissue-engineered endothelial layer was prepared by culturing endothelial cells on a fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-l-ascorbic acid phosphate magnesium salt n-hydrate (AsMg)-apatite (Ap) coated titanium plate. The FGF-2-AsMg-Ap coated Ti plate was prepared by immersing a Ti plate in supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions supplemented with FGF-2 and AsMg. The FGF-2-AsMg-Ap layer on the Ti plate accelerated proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and showed slightly higher, but not statistically significant, nitric oxide release from HUVECs than on as-prepared Ti. The endothelial layer maintained proper function of the endothelial cells and markedly inhibited in vitro platelet adhesion. The tissue-engineered endothelial layer formed on the FGF-2-AsMg-Ap layer is promising for ameliorating platelet activation and thrombus formation on cardiovascular implants.

  9. The Viking mortar - Design, development, and flight qualification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecht, J. P.; Pleasants, J. E.; Mehring, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Approximately 25,400 ft above the local surface of Mars, a radar height sensor fires the Viking mortar, which ejects a 53-ft D sub o disk-gap-band (DGB) parachute. The parachute decelerates and stabilizes the Viking lander sufficiently for the terminal engine system to take over and effect a soft landing. The general design and environmental requirements for the mortar system are presented; various illustrations of the mortar components and how the mortar system functions also are presented. Primary emphasis is placed on manufacturing, developing, and qualification testing of the mortar system.

  10. ASR potential of quartz based on expansion values and microscopic characteristics of mortar bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stastna, Aneta; Sachlova, Sarka; Kuchynova, Marketa; Pertold, Zdenek; Prikryl, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most damaging factors for concrete structures. Different analytical techniques are used to quantify ASR potential of aggregates. The accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) in combination with the petrographic examination of aggregates by microscopic techniques belongs to the frequently employed methods. Such a methodical approach enables quantification of the ASR potential, based on the expansion values of accelerated mortar bars; and also to identify deleterious components in aggregates. In this study, the accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) was modified and combined with the scanning electron microscopy of polished sections prepared from mortar bars. The standard 14-day test period of mortar bars was prolonged to 1-year. ASR potential of aggregates was assessed based on expansion values (both 14-day and 1-year) of mortar bars and microscopic analysis of ASR products (alkali silica gels, microcracks, dissolution gaps) detected in the sections. Different varieties of quartz-rich rocks including chert, quartz meta-greywacke, three types of quartzite and pegmatite were used as aggregate. Only quartz from pegmatite was assessed to be non reactive (14-day expansion of 0.08%, 1-year expansion of 1.25%). Aggregate sections exhibited minor ASR products even after 1-year of mortar bar immersion in 1 M NaOH. Expansion values of the rest of samples exceeded the limit of 0.10% after 14-day test period indicating aggregates as reactive. The highest ASR potential was detected in mortar bars containing chert (14-day expansion of 0.55%, 1-year expansion of 2.70%) and quartz meta-greywacke (14-day expansion of 0.46%, 1-year expansion of 2.41%). The high ASR potential was explained by presence of cryptocrystalline matrix in significant volumes (24 - 65 vol%). Influence of the lengths of the immersion in the alkaline solution was observed mainly in the microstructure of the cement paste and on the extension of ASR products. The

  11. Measuring the colour of rendering mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Yves; Meulebroeck, Wendy; Verdonck, Ann; de Bouw, Michael

    2014-05-01

    When restoring decorative mortar layers on historic façades, professionals need to determine the colour of these finishes in order to select an appropriate repair mortar. Currently, the appearance of these renders is only assessed from a subjective point of view. To match with the aesthetic aspects of the façade, contractors must constantly adjust their repair mortar composition to avoid a patchwork of different colours, which is detrimental for heritage. This time-consuming (trial-and-error) methodology can be excluded by evaluating `colour' with an objective numerical approach. The challenge of the research was to define and evaluate optimal material dependent boundary conditions for measuring the colour of nonhomogeneous mortars. Four samples with different scale of heterogeneity were measured by two spectrocolorimeters, both with a diffuse illumination geometry. The results were plotted in CIE-L*a*b* colour space. By calculating the colour difference (ΔE*), the influence of measuring with or without specular component was evaluated. We discovered the minimal number of measuring points depends on the scale of heterogeneity and the aperture area. The less homogeneous the mortar sample is and the smaller the aperture area, the more unique measuring points are required. Therefore, it is recommended to choose an aperture head of 25 mm or more to reduce the number of measurements, making your work time-efficient. However, in order to obtain accurate measurements on site, a portable optical spectrum analyser can be used with a 6 mm-diameter aperture, a viewing angle of 10°, SCI mode, illumination source D65, considering a minimum of 15 unique measuring points.

  12. Quick chip assay using locked nucleic acid modified epithelial cell adhesion molecule and nucleolin aptamers for the capture of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Maremanda, Nihal G.; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K.; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2015-01-01

    The role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in disease diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy, and clinical decision making is immense and has attracted tremendous focus in the last decade. We designed and fabricated simple, flat channel microfluidic devices polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS based) functionalized with locked nucleic acid (LNA) modified aptamers (targeting epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and nucleolin expression) for quick and efficient capture of CTCs and cancer cells. With optimized flow rates (10 μl/min), it was revealed that the aptamer modified devices offered reusability for up to six times while retaining optimal capture efficiency (>90%) and specificity. High capture sensitivity (92%) and specificity (100%) was observed in whole blood samples spiked with Caco-2 cells (10–100 cells/ml). Analysis of blood samples obtained from 25 head and neck cancer patients on the EpCAM LNA aptamer functionalized chip revealed that an average count of 5 ± 3 CTCs/ml of blood were captured from 22/25 samples (88%). EpCAM intracellular domain (EpICD) immunohistochemistry on 9 oral squamous cell carcinomas showed the EpICD positivity in the tumor cells, confirming the EpCAM expression in CTCs from head and neck cancers. These microfluidic devices also maintained viability for in vitro culture and characterization. Use of LNA modified aptamers provided added benefits in terms of cost effectiveness due to increased reusability and sustainability of the devices. Our results present a robust, quick, and efficient CTC capture platform with the use of simple PDMS based devices that are easy to fabricate at low cost and have an immense potential in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic planning. PMID:26487896

  13. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable cationic poly(propylene fumarate-co-ethylene glycol) copolymer hydrogels modified with agmatine for enhanced cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Kazuhiro; Jo, Seongbong; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-01-01

    We synthesized positively charged biodegradable hydrogels by cross-linking of agmatine-modified poly(ethylene glycol)-tethered fumarate (Agm-PEGF) and poly(propylene fumarate-co-ethylene glycol) (P(PF-co-EG)) to investigate the effect of the guanidino groups of the agmatine on hydrogel swelling behavior and smooth muscle cell adhesion to the hydrogels. The weight swelling ratio of these hydrogels at pH 7.0 increased from 279 +/- 4 to 306 +/- 7% as the initial Agm-PEGF content increased from 0 to 200 mg/g of P(PF-co-EG), respectively. The diffusional exponents, n, during the initial phase of water uptake were independent of the initial Agm-PEGF content and were determined to be 0.66 +/- 0.08, 0.71 +/- 0.07, and 0.60 +/- 0.05 for respective initial Agm-PEGF contents of 0, 100, and 200 mg/g. The heat of fusion of water present in the hydrogels increased from 214 +/- 11 to 254 +/- 4 J/g as the initial Agm-PEGF content increased from 0 to 200 mg/g. The number of adherent smooth muscle cells increased dose-dependently from 15 +/- 6 to 75 +/- 7% of the initial seeding density as the initial Agm-PEGF content increased from 0 to 200 mg/g. These results suggest that the incorporation of the guanidino groups of agmatine into P(PF-co-EG) hydrogels increases the hydrogel free water content and the total water content of the hydrogels and also enhances cell adhesion to the hydrogels.

  14. Biocompatible Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    pressure sensitive elastomer, polyisobutylene. with water soluble adhesives such as carboxy methyl ceiiulose, pectin and gelatin for adhesion to... cellulose and nylon films, were most often used in 180 peel adhesion tests on the adhesives. Films were cast on one substrate and the other was moistened...irritation. 4. Peel adhesion to hydrated cellulose , nylon and cotton cloth substrates was satisfactory. So too was the peel adhesion as a function of

  15. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule independent capture of non-small lung carcinoma cells with peptide modified microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Pu, Kefeng; Li, Chunlin; Zhang, Nengpan; Wang, Hui; Shen, Wenjiang; Zhu, Yimin

    2017-03-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) present in the blood of patients with non-hematological cancers are accessible sources for diagnosis and monitoring of cancers. By the aid of the ability of the anti-EpCAM antibody to recognize the epithelial cells, microsystem-based technologies provide robust means for effectively detecting CTCs in vitro. Considering the EpCAM expression is down-regulated during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, the amount of CTCs detected based on anti-EpCAM antibody is underestimated. In our study, the A549 cells targeting peptide (A-1 peptide), as the substitute of anti-EpCAM antibody, was introduced to microfluidic chip to capture A549 cells. Our results showed that both epithelial-like and mesenchymal-like A549 cells could efficiently be captured by the A-1 peptide modified microfluidic chip, and the capture efficiency for epithelial-like cells is comparable to that captured by the EpCAM antibody. Thus, we concluded that the peptide could be a better supplement to the EpCAM antibody for capturing CTCs in microfluidic system with broader spectrum.

  16. Development of low weight self-levelling mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, A.; Panama, I.; Toledo, A.; Flores, A.

    2015-01-01

    This work shows the development of self levelling mortars, using micro bubbles based on aluminium silicate with a density of 0.25 g/cm3. Mortars formulations are composed by 8 different components in order to achieve properties balance between fresh and solid state. The mean objective is development light weight mortars with high fluidity and compression strength using micro bubbles and some additives. Formulations were designed employing Taguchi DOE of 8 variables and 3 states. Result analysis according to Taguchi method lets indentify the preponderant effect of each variable on the cited properties. Several formulations reached fluidity higher than 250%, with compression strength around 100 kg/cm2 and a low volumetric weigh. Obtained volumetric weights are 20% less than commercial self levelling mortars weight. Finally some relations are presented such: as relation water/cement with fluidity, and micro bubble content versus mortars volumetric weight, and finally compression strength versus the volumetric weight of mortars.

  17. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Aleksiejunaite, Monika; Sidlauskas, Antanas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n = 10). Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT) in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC) in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers' instructions (experiment I) and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II) and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III). Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p < 0.05). LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI) provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted. PMID:28386279

  18. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-06-30

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

  19. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  20. Reliability Estimates for Flawed Mortar Projectile Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate reliability. Measured distributions of wall thickness, defect rate, material strength, and applied loads...element analysis Case study Monte Carlo simulation a b s t r a c t The Army routinely screens mortar projectiles for defects in safety-critical parts. In...of a safety-critical failure. Limit state functions and Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate reliability. Measured distributions of wall

  1. Laboratory Characterization of Type N Mortar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    All of these velocity determinations were made under atmospheric conditions, i.e., no prestress of any kind was applied to the specimens. The tests...Cell Instrumentation Stand Concrete Sample To perform a RTE test, a static high-pressure triaxial test (HPTX) device (Figure 2) was used. This device...satura- tion. Materials such as concrete and mortar can continue to gain strength with increasing pressure until all of the air porosity in the

  2. Smart multifunctional cement mortar containing graphite nanoplatelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hongjian; Quek, Ser Tong; Pang, Sze Dai

    2013-04-01

    The piezoresistivity-based strain sensing ability of cementitious composites containing graphite nanoplatelet (GNP) is investigated in this paper. GNP offers the advantages of ease of processing, excellent mechanical and electrical properties at a very low cost compared to carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-fibers. Cement mortar with 0%, 1.2%, 2.4%, 3.6% and 4.8% of GNP (by volume of composite) were cast. The electrical resistance of the specimens was measured by both the two- and four-probe methods using direct current (DC). The effect of polarization was characterized and the percolation threshold was experimentally found to be between 2.4% and 3.6% of GNP based on both accelerated and normal drying specimens. The assumption of Ohmic material was tested with varying current and found to be valid for current < 0.01mA and 0.5mA for four- and two-probe methods respectively. The piezoresistive effect was demonstrated by comparing the gage factors of mortars with GNP vs plain mortar under cyclic loading in compression at 3 strain levels. At low strains, the high gage factor is believed to stem from both the effect of the imperfect interfaces around the GNP and the piezoresistivity of the GNP; at higher strains, the gage factor is likely to be attributed to the piezoresistivity of the GNP and it is still 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than the gage factor arising from geometric changes.

  3. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive. PMID:27099425

  4. Modulation of marrow stromal osteoblast adhesion on biomimetic oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] hydrogels modified with Arg-Gly-Asp peptides and a poly(ethyleneglycol) spacer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heungsoo; Jo, Seongbong; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-08-01

    Novel oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF) hydrogels functionalized with cell adhesion peptides were prepared, and the effects of incorporated peptide density and macromolecular structure of hydrogels on attachment and morphology of marrow stromal cells (MSCs) were evaluated. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG; number average molecular weight of 930, 2860, and 6090) was used to synthesize OPF. A model peptide, Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD), was incorporated into OPF hydrogels after being coupled to acrylated PEG of molecular weight 3400. The increase of incorporated peptide concentration enhanced MSC attachment to OPF hydrogels of PEG of molecular weight of 930 and 2860. However, the number of attached MSCs to OPF hydrogels of PEG (molecular weight 6090) remained constant regardless of the peptide density. The length of PEG in OPF also influenced cell attachment. When 1 micromole peptide/g hydrogel was incorporated into the OPF hydrogels, the degree of cell attachment at 12 h relative to the initial seeding density was 93.9 +/- 5.9%, 64.7 +/- 8.2%, and 9.3 +/- 6.6% for OPF hydrogels prepared with PEG of molecular weights of 930, 2860, and 6090, respectively. However, the crosslinking density of hydrogels did not significantly affect cell attachment. The interaction was sequence specific, in that MSC attachment to GRGD-modified hydrogels was competitively inhibited when cells were incubated in the presence of 0.5 mM soluble GRGD before cell seeding. These results suggest that we can modulate MSC attachment to OPF hydrogels by altering the peptide density and the molecular structure of OPF hydrogels.

  5. Cast adhesive polyelectrolyte complex particle films of unmodified or maltose-modified poly(ethyleneimine) and cellulose sulphate: fabrication, film stability and retarded release of zoledronate.

    PubMed

    Torger, Bernhard; Vehlow, David; Urban, Birgit; Salem, Samaa; Appelhans, Dietmar; Müller, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The bone therapeutic drug zoledronate (ZOL) was loaded at and released by polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) particle films composed of either pure poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) or maltose-modified poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI-M) and oppositely charged cellulose sulfate attached to model germanium (Ge) substrates by solution casting. Dispersions of colloidally stable polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) particles in the size range 11-141 nm were obtained by mixing PEI or PEI-M, CS and ZOL in defined stoichiometric ratios. TRANS-FTIR spectroscopy was used to determine the stability of the PEC films against detachment, in-situ-ATR-FTIR spectroscopy for the ZOL loss in the PEC film and UV-VIS spectroscopy for the ZOL enrichment of the release medium. Films of casted ZOL/CS/PEI-M or ZOL/CS/PEI particles were stable in contact to water, while films of the pure drug (ZOL) and of the binary systems ZOL/PEI-M or ZOL/PEI were not stable against detachment. Retarded releases of ZOL from various PEC films compared to the pure drug film were observed. The molecular weight of PEI showed a considerable effect on the initial burst (IB) of ZOL. No significant effect of the maltose modification of PEI-25 K on IB could be found. Generally, after one day the ZOL release process was finished for all measured ZOL/PEC samples and residual amounts of 0-30% were obtained. Surface adhesive drug loaded PEC particles are promising drug delivery systems to supply and release a defined amount of bone therapeutics and to functionalize bone substitution materials.

  6. Intrauterine Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion formation are infections of the uterine lining (endometritis), removal of fibroids in the cavity of the ... to prevent adhesions from reforming. Hormonal treatment with estrogen and NSAIDs are frequently prescribed after surgery to ...

  7. Luminescence quartz dating of lime mortars. A first research approach.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, N; Mauz, B; Michael, C T

    2002-01-01

    Lime mortars mixed with sand are well suited for connecting structural materials, like stones and bricks, due to the mechanical properties this material exhibits. Their extensive use in architectural and decorative works during the last 4000 years motivated the introduction of the 'Luminescence clock' for age determination of mortars. The same principles as for quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of sediments were applied for age estimation of a mortar fragment removed from a Byzantine church monument dated by archaeological means to 1050-1100 years ago (the first half of the 10th century). The OSL from the quartz was monitored under blue light stimulation and UV detection, using a single-aliquot-regenerative-dose protocol. The quartz-OSL dating of the mortar resulted in 870 +/- 230 a. TL polymineral fine grain dating was also performed on a brick fragment which was connected to the mortar, resulting in a TL age of 1095 +/- 190 a.

  8. Anti-adhesive characteristics of CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} plasma-modified silicon molds for nanoimprint lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Junmyung; Lee, Hyun Woo; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2015-09-15

    The anti-adhesive characteristics of a plasma-modified silicon mold surface for nanoimprint lithography are presented. Both CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} plasma were used to form an anti-adhesive layer on silicon mold surfaces. The gas mixing ratios of CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} were experimentally changed between 0% and 80% to optimize the plasma conditions to obtain a low surface energy of the silicon mold. The plasma characteristics were examined by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In order to investigate the changes in surface energy and surface chemistry of the anti-adhesive layer during repeated demolding cycles, contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on the plasma-modified silicon mold surface. Simultaneously, the surface morphology of the demolded resists was evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) in order to examine the effect of the anti-adhesive layers on the duplicated patterns of the resists. It was observed that the anti-adhesive layer formed by CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} plasma treatment was worn out more easily during repeated demolding cycles than the film formed by C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} plasma treatment, because CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} gas plasma formed a thinner plasma-polymerized film over the same plasma treatment time.

  9. 120MM Mortar MIL-STD-1660 Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    AD-A285 065 FINAL REPORT JULY 1994 REPORT NO. 91-18 120MM MORTAR MIL- STD - 1660 TESTS 94-309 󈧷 Prepared for: Dist.iviiior Unlimited I I U.S. Army...Inidude Securt Ciassificz ion) 120MM Mortar MIL- STD - i660 Tests 12- PERSONAL AUTHOR IS) William R. Meyer ~13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TINE COVERED 14...Armnament Re- earch, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), SMCAR-AEP, to conduct MIL- STD - 1660 tests on 120M,\\M mortar rounds on wooden p~allets

  10. Use of microorganism to improve the strength of cement mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, P.; Mandal, S. . E-mail: sarojmandal2001@yahoo.co.in; Chattopadhyay, B.D.; Pal, S.

    2005-10-01

    This study describes a method of strength improvement of cement-sand mortar by the microbiologically induced mineral precipitation. A thermophilic anaerobic microorganism is incorporated at different cell concentrations with the mixing water. The study showed that a 25% increase in 28 day compressive strength of cement mortar was achieved with the addition of about 10{sup 5} cell/ml of mixing water. The strength improvement is due to growth of filler material within the pores of the cement-sand matrix as shown by the scanning electron microscopy. The modification in pore size distribution and total pore volume of cement-sand mortar due to such growth is also noted. E. coli microorganisms were also used in the cement mortar for comparison, but no improvement in strength was observed.

  11. Development of spraying agent for reducing drying shrinkage of mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiromi; Maruoka, Masanori; Liu, Lingling

    2017-02-01

    Mortar used to repair is sometimes exposed to drying state in early ages after construction and a few days later water is sprayed frequently on the surface of the mortar in order to prevent cracks. This research studied on shrinkage characteristic of mortar subjected to drying conditions like this. The result showed that the water spraying on the mortar after initial drying did not have any effect to prevent shrinkage, but increased. And it also showed when various chemical agents are mixed and used in watersprayingit had the prevention effect on shrinkage. This report was to understand this kind of phenomenon and clarify the mechanism. In addition, based on the results, the new spraying agent was developed to reduce drying shrinkage.

  12. 9. DETAIL OF DECORATIVE MORTAR AND COBBLESTONE WORK ON TYPICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF DECORATIVE MORTAR AND COBBLESTONE WORK ON TYPICAL POST ON UPSTREAM PARAPET WALL OF UPPER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  13. New System of Shrinkage Measurement through Cement Mortars Drying

    PubMed Central

    Morón, Carlos; Saiz, Pablo; Ferrández, Daniel; García-Fuentevilla, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Cement mortar is used as a conglomerate in the majority of construction work. There are multiple variants of cement according to the type of aggregate used in its fabrication. One of the major problems that occurs while working with this type of material is the excessive loss of moisture during cement hydration (setting and hardening), known as shrinkage, which provokes a great number of construction pathologies that are difficult to repair. In this way, the design of a new sensor able to measure the moisture loss of mortars at different age levels is useful to establish long-term predictions concerning mortar mass volume loss. The purpose of this research is the design and fabrication of a new capacitive sensor able to measure the moisture of mortars and to relate it with the shrinkage. PMID:28272297

  14. A chemometric approach to the characterisation of historical mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Rampazzi, L. . E-mail: laura.rampazzi@uninsubria.it; Pozzi, A.; Sansonetti, A.; Toniolo, L.; Giussani, B.

    2006-06-15

    The compositional knowledge of historical mortars is of great concern in case of provenance and dating investigations and of conservation works since the nature of the raw materials suggests the most compatible conservation products. The classic characterisation usually goes through various analytical determinations, while conservation laboratories call for simple and quick analyses able to enlighten the nature of mortars, usually in terms of the binder fraction. A chemometric approach to the matter is here undertaken. Specimens of mortars were prepared with calcitic and dolomitic binders and analysed by Atomic Spectroscopy. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate the features of specimens and samples. A Partial Least Square (PLS1) regression was done in order to predict the binder/aggregate ratio. The model was applied to historical mortars from the churches of St. Lorenzo (Milan) and St. Abbondio (Como). The accordance between the predictive model and the real samples is discussed.

  15. 7. Detail, beaded mortar joint, stepped wingwall coping at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail, beaded mortar joint, stepped wingwall coping at the east portal of Tunnel 18, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel No. 18, Milepost 410, Dorris, Siskiyou County, CA

  16. 63. BUILDING NO. 1301, ORDNANCE FACILITY (MORTAR POWDER BUILDING), INTERIOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. BUILDING NO. 1301, ORDNANCE FACILITY (MORTAR POWDER BUILDING), INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST DOWN SCREENED WALKWAY ON NORTHWEST SIDE. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  17. Flight qualification of mortar-actuated parachute deployment systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleasants, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief discussion outlines background of mortar use in parachute deployment systems. A description of the system operation is presented. Effects of the environment on performance are discussed as well as the instrumentation needed to assess this performance. Power unit qualification and lot qualification for shear pins and cartridges is delineated. Functional mortar system tests are described. Finally, bridle deployment and parachute deployment are discussed.

  18. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  19. Properties of wastepaper sludge in geopolymer mortars for masonry applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shiqin; Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi

    2012-12-15

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the use of wastepaper sludge in geopolymer mortar systems for manufacturing construction products. The investigation was driven by the increasing demand for reuse options in paper-recycling industry. Both fresh and hardened geopolymer mortar properties are evaluated for samples incorporating dry wastepaper sludge, and the results indicate potential end-use benefits in building product manufacture. Addition of wastepaper sludge to geopolymer mortar reduces flow properties, primarily due to dry sludge absorbing water from the binder mix. The average 91-day compressive strength of mortar samples incorporating 2.5 wt% and 10 wt% wastepaper sludge respectively retained 92% and 52% of the reference mortar strength. However, contrary to the normal trend of increasing drying shrinkage with increasing paper sludge addition to Portland cement matrices, the corresponding geopolymer drying shrinkage decreased by 34% and 64%. Equally important, the water absorption of hardened geopolymer mortar decreased with increasing paper sludge content at ambient temperatures, providing good prospects of overall potential for wastepaper sludge incorporation in the production of building and masonry elements. The results indicate that, despite its high moisture absorbance due to the organic matter and residual cellulose fibre content, wastepaper sludge appears compatible with geopolymer chemistry, and hence serves as a potential supplementary additive to geopolymer cementitious masonry products.

  20. Micro- and meso-scale pore structure in mortar in relation to aggregate content

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yun; De Schutter, Geert; Ye, Guang

    2013-10-15

    Mortar is often viewed as a three-phase composite consisting of aggregate, bulk paste, and an interfacial transition zone (ITZ). However, this description is inconsistent with experimental findings because of the basic assumption that larger pores are only present within the ITZ. In this paper, we use backscattered electron (BSE) imaging to investigate the micro- and meso-scale structure of mortar with varying aggregate content. The results indicate that larger pores are present not only within the ITZ but also within areas far from aggregates. This phenomenon is discussed in detail based on a series of analytical calculations, such as the effective water binder ratio and the inter-aggregate spacing. We developed a modified computer model that includes a two-phase structure for bulk paste. This model interprets previous mercury intrusion porosimetry data very well. -- Highlights: •Based on BSE, we examine the HCSS model. •We develop the HCSS-DBLB model. •We use the modified model to interpret the MIP data.

  1. Properties of microcement mortar with nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimeneti, Narasimha Reddy

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and Carbon nanofibers (CNF) are one of the toughest and stiffest materials in the world presently with extreme properties yet to be discovered in terms of elastic modulus and tensile strength. Due to the advanced properties of these materials they are being used in almost all fields of science at nanolevel and are being used in construction industry recently for improvement of material properties. Microcement is fine ground cement which as half the particle size of ordinary Portland cement. In this research the behavior of cement mortar of micro cement with the addition of nanoparticles is studied. Due to high aspect ratio and strong van der Waal forces between the particles of CNT and CNF, they agglomerate and form bundles when mixed with water, sonication method is used to mix nanoparticles with few drops of surfactant and super plasticizer. Mechanical properties such as compressive strength and flexural strength with CNT and CNF composites are examined and compared with control samples. 0.1% and 0.05 % of nanoparticles (both CNT and CNF) by the weight of cement are used in this research and 0.8% of super plasticizer by weight of cement was also used along with 0.4, 0.45 and 0.50 water cement ratios for making specimens for compression test. The compressive strength results are not satisfactory as there was no constant increase in strength with all the composites, however strength of few nanocomposites increased by a good percentage. 0.5 water cement ratio cement mortar had compressive strength of 7.15 ksi (49.3 MPa), whereas sample with 0.1% CNT showed 8.38 ksi (57.8 MPa) with 17% increase in strength after 28 days. Same trend was followed by 0.4 water cement ratio as the compressive strength of control sample was 8.89 ksi (61.3 MPa), with 0.05% of CNT strength increased to 10.90 ksi (75.2 MPa) with 23% increase in strength. 0.4 water cement ratio was used for flexural tests including 0.1%, 0.05% of CNT and 0.1%, 0.05% of CNF with 0

  2. Study of sticky rice-lime mortar technology for the restoration of historical masonry construction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuwei; Zhang, Bingjian; Ma, Qinglin

    2010-06-15

    Replacing or repairing masonry mortar is usually necessary in the restoration of historical constructions, but the selection of a proper mortar is often problematic. An inappropriate choice can lead to failure of the restoration work, and perhaps even further damage. Thus, a thorough understanding of the original mortar technology and the fabrication of appropriate replacement materials are important research goals. Many kinds of materials have been used over the years in masonry mortars, and the technology has gradually evolved from the single-component mortar of ancient times to hybrid versions containing several ingredients. Beginning in 2450 BCE, lime was used as masonry mortar in Europe. In the Roman era, ground volcanic ash, brick powder, and ceramic chip were added to lime mortar, greatly improving performance. Because of its superior properties, the use of this hydraulic (that is, capable of setting underwater) mortar spread, and it was adopted throughout Europe and western Asia. Perhaps because of the absence of natural materials such as volcanic ash, hydraulic mortar technology was not developed in ancient China. However, a special inorganic-organic composite building material, sticky rice-lime mortar, was developed. This technology was extensively used in important buildings, such as tombs, in urban constructions, and even in water conservancy facilities. It may be the first widespread inorganic-organic composite mortar technology in China, or even in the world. In this Account, we discuss the origins, analysis, performance, and utility in historic preservation of sticky rice-lime mortar. Mortar samples from ancient constructions were analyzed by both chemical methods (including the iodine starch test and the acid attack experiment) and instrumental methods (including thermogravimetric differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy). These analytical results show that the ancient masonry

  3. Mortar radiocarbon dating: preliminary accuracy evaluation of a novel methodology.

    PubMed

    Marzaioli, Fabio; Lubritto, Carmine; Nonni, Sara; Passariello, Isabella; Capano, Manuela; Terrasi, Filippo

    2011-03-15

    Mortars represent a class of building and art materials that are widespread at archeological sites from the Neolithic period on. After about 50 years of experimentation, the possibility to evaluate their absolute chronology by means of radiocarbon ((14)C) remains still uncertain. With the use of a simplified mortar production process in the laboratory environment, this study shows the overall feasibility of a novel physical pretreatment for the isolation of the atmospheric (14)CO(2) (i.e., binder) signal absorbed by the mortars during their setting. This methodology is based on the assumption that an ultrasonic attack in liquid phase isolates a suspension of binder carbonates from bulk mortars. Isotopic ((13)C and (14)C), % C, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed to characterize the proposed methodology. The applied protocol allows suppression of the fossil carbon (C) contamination originating from the incomplete burning of the limestone during the quick lime production, providing unbiased dating for "laboratory" mortars produced operating at historically adopted burning temperatures.

  4. Use of rubble from building demolition in mortars.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, V; Giuggiolini, M; Moriconi, G

    2002-01-01

    Because of increasing waste production and public concerns about the environment, it is desirable to recycle materials from building demolition. If suitably selected, ground, cleaned and sieved in appropriate industrial crushing plants, these materials can be profitably used in concrete. Nevertheless, the presence of masonry instead of concrete rubble is particularly detrimental to the mechanical performance and durability of recycled-aggregate concrete and the same negative effect is detectable when natural sand is replaced by fine recycled aggregate fraction. An alternative use of both masonry rubble and fine recycled material fraction could be in mortars. These could contain either recycled instead of natural sand or powder obtained by bricks crushing as partial cement substitution. In particular, attention is focused on the modification that takes place when either polypropylene or stainless steel fibers are added to these mortars. Polypropylene fibers are added in order to reduce shrinkage of mortars, stainless steel fibers for improving their flexural strength. The combined use of polypropylene fibers and fine recycled material from building demolition could allow the preparation of mortars showing good performance, in particular when coupled with bricks. Furthermore, the combined use of stainless steel fibers and mortars containing brick powder seems to be an effective way to guarantee a high flexural strength.

  5. Oyster shell as substitute for aggregate in mortar.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyunsuk; Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Kiho; Park, Junboum

    2004-06-01

    Enormous amounts of oyster shell waste have been illegally disposed of at oyster farm sites along the southern coast of Korea. In this study to evaluate the possibility of recycling this waste for use as a construction material, the mechanical characteristics of pulverized oyster shell were investigated in terms of its potential utilization as a substitute for the aggregates used in mortar. The unconfined compressive strengths of various soil mortar specimens, with varying blending ratios of cement, water and oyster shell, were evaluated by performing unconfined compression tests, and the results were compared with the strengths of normal cement mortar made with sand. In addition, the effect of organic chemicals on the hardening of concrete was evaluated by preparing ethyl-benzene-mixed mortar specimens. The long-term strength improvement resulting from the addition of fly ash was also examined by performing unconfined compression tests on specimens with fly-ash content. There was no significant reduction in the compressive strength of the mortars containing small oyster shell particles instead of sand. From these test data, the possible application of oyster shells in construction materials could be verified, and the change in the strength parameters according to the presence of organic compounds was also evaluated.

  6. Sulfur-free lignins from alkaline pulping tested in mortar for use as mortar additives.

    PubMed

    Nadif, A; Hunkeler, D; Käuper, P

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur-free lignin, obtained through the acid precipitation of black liquor from the soda pulping process, has been tested as water reducer in mortar. It has also been compared to existing commercial additives such as naphthalene sulfonates and lignosulfonates. The ash content and sugar content of these lignins are low in comparison to lignosulfonates, conferring on them higher purity. A procedure for small scale testing derived from the industrial norms SN-EN196 and ASTM (Designation C230-90) is presented. Specifically, all the sulfur-free lignins tested improved the flow of the mortar. Selected flax lignins performed better than lignosulfonates though still less than naphthalene sulfonates. Furthermore, certain hemp lignins gave comparable results to the lignosulfonates. Overall, the straw lignin prepared herein is comparable in performance to commercially available lignins, such as Organocell, Alcell and Curan 100. The plant from which the lignin was isolated, and the process of the pulp mill are the primary influences on the performance of the lignin.

  7. Natural Underwater Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Russell J; Ransom, Todd C; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)(3) coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  8. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  9. Adhesion of nitrile rubber to UV-assisted surface chemical modified PET fabric, part II: Interfacial characterization of MDI grafted PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud

    2016-08-01

    Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber industry. It is well known that surface treatment (i.e. physical, mechanical and chemical) is an effective method to improve interfacial bonding of fibers and/or fabrics to rubbers. UV irradiation is an effective method which has been used to increase fabric-rubber interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabrics was used to increase PET to nitrile rubber (NBR) adhesion. Nitrile rubber is a perfect selection as fuel and oil resistant rubber. However it has weak bonding to PET fabric. For this purpose PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was grafted on carboxylated PET. The chemical composition of the fabric before and after surface treatment was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sectional morphology of the experimental PET fibers and the interface between rubber compound and PET fabric was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The morphology and structure of the product were analyzed by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). FTIR-ATR and H NMR analysis were used to assess surface modifications on the PET irradiated fabrics.

  10. Durability of Waste Glass Flax Fiber Reinforced Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.

    2011-01-01

    The main concern for natural fibre reinforced mortar composites is the durability of the fibres in the alkaline environment of cement. The composites may undergo a reduction in strength as a result of weakening of the fibres by a combination of alkali attack and fibre mineralisation. In order to enhance the durability of natural fiber reinforced cement composites several approaches have been studied including fiber impregnation, sealing of the matrix pore system and reduction of matrix alkalinity through the use of pozzolanic materials. In this study waste glass powder was used as a pozzolanic additive to improve the durability performance of flax fiber reinforced mortar (FFRM). The durability of the FFRM was studied by determining the effects of ageing in water and exposure to wetting and drying cycles; on the microstructures and flexural behaviour of the composites. The mortar tests demonstrated that the waste glass powder has significant effect on improving the durability of FFRM.

  11. Durability of waste glass flax fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.

    2011-01-17

    The main concern for natural fibre reinforced mortar composites is the durability of the fibres in the alkaline environment of cement. The composites may undergo a reduction in strength as a result of weakening of the fibres by a combination of alkali attack and fibre mineralisation. In order to enhance the durability of natural fiber reinforced cement composites several approaches have been studied including fiber impregnation, sealing of the matrix pore system and reduction of matrix alkalinity through the use of pozzolanic materials. In this study waste glass powder was used as a pozzolanic additive to improve the durability performance of flax fiber reinforced mortar (FFRM). The durability of the FFRM was studied by determining the effects of ageing in water and exposure to wetting and drying cycles; on the microstructures and flexural behaviour of the composites. The mortar tests demonstrated that the waste glass powder has significant effect on improving the durability of FFRM.

  12. Influence of Pore Structure on Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure. PMID:24757414

  13. Effects of moisture on ultrasound propagation in cement mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Taeho; Li, Shuaili; Achenbach, Jan; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    In concrete structures, moisture is often a major cause of chemically related degradations such as alkaline-silica reaction. To develop ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques for monitoring such chemical degradations, it is necessary to understand how moisture affects the propagation of ultrasound in concrete. To this end, the objective of this paper is to experimentally determine the correlation between the moisture content in cement mortar and ultrasonic wave propagation. Specifically, effects of moisture on the ultrasonic phase velocity and attenuation are examined. It is found that, for the cement mortar samples considered in this study, moisture has negligible effect on the ultrasonic phase velocity. However, moisture can significantly increase the attenuation of ultrasound in cement mortar even in the sub-MHz frequency range.

  14. Adhesion of bile-adapted Bifidobacterium strains to the HT29-MTX cell line is modified after sequential gastrointestinal challenge simulated in vitro using human gastric and duodenal juices.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Suárez, Adolfo; Fernández-García, María; Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2011-06-01

    According to the FAO/WHO, in vitro criteria for selection of probiotics for food application consist of testing survival when confronted with gastrointestinal tract (GIT) challenge and the ability to colonize the colon. We used a model that simulated GIT transit using sequential immersion in gastric and duodenal juices of human origin to evaluate survival of bile-adapted Bifidobacterium strains. Bifidobacterium animalis tolerated gastric juice, whereas Bifidobacterium longum showed poor survival under these conditions. In contrast, B. animalis strains were more sensitive to duodenal juice than B. longum. The percentage of survival after GIT transit simulation (GITTS), determined both by plate counts and fluorescent probes, was significantly higher for bile-adapted strains than for corresponding parental ones. This suggests that use of bile-adapted strains is a suitable approach for increasing survival of bifidobacteria under the harsh conditions of the upper GIT. However, the bile resistance phenotype was not related to improvement of adhesion capacity, after GITTS, of the intestinal cell line HT29-MTX which constitutively produces mucus. This work shows that sequential GITTS with human juices modified the in vitro adhesion properties of the strains challenged with colonocyte-like cells.

  15. Ancient mortars from Cape Verde: mineralogical and physical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Fernando; Costa, Cristiana; Velosa, Ana; Quintela, Ana; Terroso, Denise; Marques, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Times and locations of different building constructions means different knowledge, habits, different construction methods and materials. The study and safeguarding of the architectural heritage takes nowadays a progressive importance as a vehicle for transmission of cultures and history of nations. The coatings are of great importance in the durability of a building due to the protective role of the masonry. The compatibility between the materials with which they are executed (masonry, mortar and grout settlement) promotes the proper functioning of the wall and a consequent increase in durability. Therefore, it becomes important to study and characterize the mortar coating of buildings to know its characteristics and to use compatible materials in the rehabilitation and maintenance of buildings. This study aims to characterize the chemical, physical, mechanical and mineralogical mortar samples collected in buildings in three islands of Cape Verde, for the conservation, rehabilitation and preservation of them. The collected samples belong to buildings constructed in the end of XIX century and in the beginning of XX century. In order to characterize the mortar samples some tests was made, such as X-Ray Diffraction, X- Ray Fluorescence, acid attack and mechanical strength. The samples were divided into three groups depending on origin; so we have a first group collected on the island of Santiago, the second on the island of Saint Vincent and the third on the island of Santo Antao. The samples are all carbonated, but Santiago samples have a lower carbonates content. In terms of insoluble residue (from the acid attack) it was concluded that the samples have similar value ranging from 9 to 26%. The compressive strength of the mortars have a range between 1.36 and 4.55 MPa, which is related to the presence of more binder in samples with higher resistance. The chemical and mineralogical analyzes showed that these consist of lime mortars (binder), natural pozzolan and

  16. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka; Miura, Yoko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2014-02-20

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  17. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka; Miura, Yoko; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2014-02-01

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  18. Do Schools Still Need Brick-and-Mortar Libraries?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug; Mastrion, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Do all schools need brick-and-mortar libraries? In this article, Johnson and Mastrion share their contradictory thoughts to the question. Johnson says some schools don't need library facilities or programs or librarians. These schools' teachers and administrators: (1) feel no need for a collaborative learning space; (2) feel the ability to process…

  19. Modeling the thermal characteristics of masonry mortar containing recycled materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laney, Morgan Gretchen

    As the building industry in the United States rapidly expands, the reuse of recycled demolition waste aggregates is becoming increasingly more important. Currently, the building industry is the largest consumer of natural resources. The constant use of raw virgin aggregate is resulting in depleting resources, lack of space for landfills, increasing costs, and heightened levels of pollution. The use of these recycled aggregates in building envelopes and the study of thermal properties are becoming a popular area of research in order to improve building energy usage. The construction of Zero Energy Buildings (ZEB) is encouraged by the United States government as a result of the unresolved finite resources and environmental pollution. The focus of this research is on the impact of using recycled demolition waste aggregates on thermal properties, including specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity, in masonry mortar applications. The new forms of aggregate were analyzed for efficiency and practical utilization in construction in seven locations across the United States by embedding the new material into the building envelope of a strip mall mercantile build model from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program (BESP). It was determined that the recycled aggregate mortar mixtures performed as well as or better than the traditional mortar mix. Opportunities for future research in recycled aggregate mortar mixtures exist in a regional analysis, a regional recycled aggregate cost analysis, and a life cycled cost analysis (LCCA).

  20. 62. BUILDING NO. 1301, ORDNANCE FACILITY (MORTAR POWDER BUILDING), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. BUILDING NO. 1301, ORDNANCE FACILITY (MORTAR POWDER BUILDING), LOOKING AT NORTHWEST FACADE. ACCESS TO ROOF ALLOWS MAINTENANCE OF VENTILATION EQUIPMENT WHICH IS PLACED OUTSIDE BUILDING TO MINIMIZE EXPLOSION HAZARD. NO. 2 VISIBLE ON WALL OF BUILDING STANDS FOR EXPLOSION HAZARD WITH FRAGMENTATION. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  1. Workability and strength of lignite bottom ash geopolymer mortar.

    PubMed

    Sathonsaowaphak, Apha; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, the waste lignite bottom ash from power station was used as a source material for making geopolymer. Sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were used as liquid for the mixture and heat curing was used to activate the geopolymerization. The fineness of bottom ash, the liquid alkaline/ash ratio, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratio and the NaOH concentration were studied. The effects of the additions of water, NaOH and napthalene-based superplasticizer on the workability and strength of the geopolymer mortar were also studied. Relatively high strength geopolymer mortars of 24.0-58.0 MPa were obtained with the use of ground bottom ash with 3% retained on sieve no. 325 and mean particle size of 15.7 microm, using liquid alkaline/ash ratios of 0.429-0.709, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratios of 0.67-1.5 and 7.5-12.5M NaOH. The incorporation of water improved the workability of geopolymer mortar more effectively than the use of napthalene-based superplasticizer with similar slight reduction in strengths. The addition of NaOH solution slightly improves the workability of the mix while maintaining the strength of the geopolymer mortars.

  2. 2. VIEW, LOOKING FROM THE NORTHEAST. THESE THREE CONCRETE MORTAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW, LOOKING FROM THE NORTHEAST. THESE THREE CONCRETE MORTAR BLOCKS WERE FOR THE MILL'S 3-STAMP BATTERIES ERECTED IN 1903, NORTH OF THE TWO 1901 BATTERIES WHICH WERE MOUNTED ON WOODEN TIMBERS - Wilbur-Womble Mill, Southern Edge Of Salt Spring Valley, Copperopolis, Calaveras County, CA

  3. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  4. Comparing the Environmental Impacts of Alkali Activated Mortar and Traditional Portland Cement Mortar using Life Cycle Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheu, P. S.; Ellis, K.; Varela, B.

    2015-11-01

    Since the year 1908 there has been research into the use alkali activated materials (AAM) in order to develop cementitious materials with similar properties to Ordinary Portland Cement. AAMs are considered green materials since their production and synthesis is not energy intensive. Even though AAMs have a high compressive strength, the average cost of production among other issues limits its feasibility. Previous research by the authors yielded a low cost AAM that uses mine tailings, wollastonite and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). This mortar has an average compressive strength of 50MPa after 28 days of curing. In this paper the software SimaPro was used to create a product base cradle to gate Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). This compared the environmental impact of the AAM mortar to an Ordinary Portland Cement mortar (PCHM) with similar compressive strength. The main motivation for this research is the environmental impact of producing Ordinary Portland Cement as compared to alkali activated slag materials. The results of this LCA show that the Alkali Activated Material has a lower environmental impact than traditional Portland cement hydraulic mortar, in 10 out of 12 categories including Global Warming Potential, Ecotoxicity, and Smog. Areas of improvement and possible future work were also discovered with this analysis.

  5. Avirulent K88 (F4)+ Escherichia coli strains constructed to express modified enterotoxins protect young piglets from challenge with a virulent enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain that expresses the same adhesion and enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Zhao, Mojun; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H

    2012-10-12

    Virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is associated with fimbrial adhesins and enterotoxins such as heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Previous studies using a cell culture model suggest that exclusion of ETEC from attachment to epithelial cells requires expression of both an adhesin such as K88 (F4) fimbriae, and LT. To test the ability of non-pathogenic E. coli constructs to exclude virulent ETEC sufficiently to prevent clinical disease, we utilized a piglet ETEC challenge model. Thirty-nine 5-day-old piglets were inoculated with a placebo (control), or with either of the three K88(+)E. coli strains isogenic with regard to modified LT expression: 8017 (pBR322 plasmid vector control), non-toxigenic mutant 8221 (LT(R192G)) in pBR322, or 8488, with the LT gene fused to the STb gene in pBR322 (LT(R192G)-STb). Piglets were challenged with virulent ETEC Strain 3030-2 (K88(+)/LT/STb) 24h post-inoculation. K88ac receptor-positive piglets in the control group developed diarrhea and became dehydrated 12-24h post-challenge. Piglets inoculated with 8221 or 8488 did not exhibit clinical signs of ETEC disease; most piglets inoculated with 8017 showed diarrhea. Control pigs exhibited significant weight loss, increased blood total protein, and higher numbers of colony-forming units of 3030-2 E. coli in washed ileum and jejunum than treated pigs. This study shows for the first time that pre-inoculation with an avirulent strain expressing adhesive fimbriae and a non-toxic form of LT provides significant short term protection from challenge with a virulent ETEC strain that expresses the same fimbrial adhesion and enterotoxin.

  6. Chemical composition influence of cement based mortars on algal biofouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estelle, Dalod; Alexandre, Govin; Philippe, Grosseau; Christine, Lors; René, Guyonnet; Denis, Damidot

    2013-04-01

    The main cause of building-facade biodegradation is the growth of microorganisms. This phenomenon depends on several parameters such as the geographical situation, the environmental conditions and the surface state of the substrate. Several researches have been devoted to the study of the effect of porosity and roughness on the biofouling of stones and mortars. However, none of them have addressed the influence of the mortar chemistry on the microorganism growth kinetic. The main objective of this study is to highlight the influence of the mortar chemistry in relationship with its physical properties on biological weathering. Earlier work showed a good resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cements to biodeterioration by acidogenic bacteria (Thiobacillus) and fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus Niger and Coniosporium uncinatum). In order to characterize the influence of the mortar chemistry on biofouling, two Portland cements and two alumina cements are used. Among micro-organisms able to grow, green algae are most involved in the aesthetic deterioration of facades. Indeed, they can colonize any type of media and can be a source of nutrients for other micro-organisms such as fungi. The green algae Klebsormidium flaccidum is chosen because of its representativeness. It is indeed the species the most frequently identified and isolated from samples taken on sites. The biofouling kinetic is followed on samples exposed outdoor and on samples tested in a laboratory bench which consists in spraying an algae culture on mortar specimens. The results obtained by in situ trials are compared with the results obtained on the laboratory bench. The microorganism growth kinetic is measured by image analysis. To improve the detection of algae on the surface of the cementitious samples, the raw image is converted in the YIQ color space. Y, I and Q correspond respectively to luminance, in-phase, and quadrature. On the Q channel, the areas covered by algae and the areas of clean mortar

  7. Strength, porosity, and chloride resistance of mortar using the combination of two kinds of pozzolanic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukzon, Sumrerng; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2013-08-01

    This article presents a study on the resistance to chloride penetration, corrosion, porosity, and strength of mortar containing fine fly ash (FA), ground rice husk-bark ash (RB), and ground bagasse ash (BA). Ordinary Portland cement (CT) was blended with a single pozzolan and two pozzolans. Strength, porosity, rapid chloride penetration, immersion, and corrosion tests were performed to characterize the mortar. Test results showed that the use of ternary blends of CT, FA, and RB or BA decreased the porosity of the mortar, as compared with binary blended mortar containing CT and RB or BA. The resistance to chloride penetration of the mortar improved substantially with partial replacement of CT with FA, RB, and BA. The use of ternary blends of CT, FA and RB or BA produced the mortar with good strength and resistance to chloride penetration. The resistance to chloride penetration was higher with an increase in the replacement level due to the reduced calcium hydroxide.

  8. Filler effect of fine particle sand on the compressive strength of mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Tangpagasit, Jatuphon; Songmue, Sawang; Kiattikomol, Kraiwood

    2011-04-01

    The river sand, which is a non-pozzolanic material, was ground into 3 different particle sizes. Portland cement type I was replaced by the ground river sands at 10wt%-40wt% of binder to cast mortar. Compressive strengths of mortar were investigated and the filler effect of different fine particles of sand on the compressive strength of mortar was evaluated. The results show that the compressive strength of mortar contributed from the filler effect of smaller particles is higher than that of the coarser ones. The difference in compressive strength of mortar tends to be greater as the difference in ground river sand fineness increases. The results also suggest that ASTM C618 specification is not practically suitable for specifying pozzolan in concrete since the strength activity index of mortar containing ground river sand (high crystalline phase) with 33.8wt% of particles retained on a 45-μm sieve can pass the strength requirement.

  9. Plastic shrinkage of mortars with shrinkage reducing admixture and lightweight aggregates studied by neutron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrzykowski, Mateusz; Trtik, Pavel; Münch, Beat; Weiss, Jason; Vontobel, Peter; Lura, Pietro

    2015-07-15

    Water transport in fresh, highly permeable concrete and rapid water evaporation from the concrete surface during the first few hours after placement are the key parameters influencing plastic shrinkage cracking. In this work, neutron tomography was used to determine both the water loss from the concrete surface due to evaporation and the redistribution of fluid that occurs in fresh mortars exposed to external drying. In addition to the reference mortar with a water to cement ratio (w/c) of 0.30, a mortar with the addition of pre-wetted lightweight aggregates (LWA) and a mortar with a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) were tested. The addition of SRA reduced the evaporation rate from the mortar at the initial stages of drying and reduced the total water loss. The pre-wetted LWA released a large part of the absorbed water as a consequence of capillary pressure developing in the fresh mortar due to evaporation.

  10. Effect of some biotic factors on microbially-induced calcite precipitation in cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Al-Salloum, Yousef; Abbas, H; Sheikh, Q I; Hadi, S; Alsayed, Saleh; Almusallam, Tarek

    2017-02-01

    Sporosarcina pasteurii, a common soil bacterium has been tested for microbial treatment of cement mortar. The present study also seeks to investigate the effects of growth medium, bacterial concentration and different buffers concerning the preparation of bacterial suspensions on the compressive strength of cement mortar. Two growth media, six different suspensions and two bacterial concentrations were used in the study. The influence of growth medium on calcification efficiency of S. pasteurii was insignificant. Significant improvement in the compressive as well as the tensile strength of cement mortar was observed. Microbial mineral precipitation visualized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) shows fibrous material that increased the strength of cement mortar. Formation of thin strands of fillers observed through SEM micrographs improves the pore structure, impermeability and thus the compressive as well as the tensile strengths of the cement mortar. The type of substrate and its molarity have a significant influence on the strength of cement mortar.

  11. Utilization of ground waste seashells in cement mortars for masonry and plastering.

    PubMed

    Lertwattanaruk, Pusit; Makul, Natt; Siripattarapravat, Chalothorn

    2012-11-30

    In this research, four types of waste seashells, including short-necked clam, green mussel, oyster, and cockle, were investigated experimentally to develop a cement product for masonry and plastering. The parameters studied included water demand, setting time, compressive strength, drying shrinkage and thermal conductivity of the mortars. These properties were compared with those of a control mortar that was made of a conventional Portland cement. The main parameter of this study was the proportion of ground seashells used as cement replacement (5%, 10%, 15%, or 20% by weight). Incorporation of ground seashells resulted in reduced water demand and extended setting times of the mortars, which are advantages for rendering and plastering in hot climates. All mortars containing ground seashells yielded adequate strength, less shrinkage with drying and lower thermal conductivity compared to the conventional cement. The results indicate that ground seashells can be applied as a cement replacement in mortar mixes and may improve the workability of rendering and plastering mortar.

  12. Adhesion and Cohesion

    PubMed Central

    von Fraunhofer, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed. PMID:22505913

  13. Dual-Mode Adhesive Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Tool helps worker grip and move along large, smooth structure with no handgrips or footholds. Adheres to surface but easily released by actuating simple mechanism. Includes handle and segmented contact-adhesive pad. Bulk of pad made of soft plastic foam conforming to surface of structure. Each segment reinforced with rib. In sticking mode, ribs braced by side catches. In peeling mode, side catches retracted, and segmented adhesive pad loses its stiffness. Modified versions useful in inspecting hulls of ships and scaling walls in rescue operations.

  14. Ancient gypsum mortars from Cyprus: characterization and reinvention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoridou, M.; Ioannou, I.

    2012-04-01

    Mortars with various binding materials have been used across different pre-historic and historic periods to meet several construction applications, such as jointing masonry blocks, finishing walls and isolating water bearing structures. In the framework of an ongoing research programme (NEA ΥΠOΔOMH/NEKΥΠ/0308/17) funded by the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation, the Republic of Cyprus and the European Union Regional Development Fund, 25 samples of gypsum mortars from different archaeological sites in Cyprus were collected and characterized following a systematic analytical approach. Petrographic observations of thin sections were carried out using polarizing optical microscope. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray microanalyser (SEM-EDX) was used to examine the microstructure and texture of the mortar samples and to determine semi-quantitatively the chemical composition and interface of their binders. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed to identify the main mineral crystalline phases of the specimens' binder and aggregates. Thermal analyses (TG/DTA) were used as a further confirmation of the material composition. The pore structure and volume of the ancient mortars were also determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) analysis. Last but not least, a portable drilling resistance measurement system (DRMS) was used for micro-destructive assessment of the mechanical state of the samples. The results confirmed the predominant presence of hydrous calcium sulphate in all samples. Calcite was also found both in the binder and aggregates. Small proportions of SiO2 were also detected. The common ratio of binder to aggregates was 1:2.5. MIP showed porosity values between 14-48% and real densities between 1-1.7 g/cm3. The average pore diameters were smaller in the case of mortars with lower porosity. The use of DRMS indicated lower resistance to drilling for the case of joint mortars (as opposed to analysed gypsum plasters). This

  15. A three-level BDDC algorithm for Mortar discretizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.; Tu, X.

    2007-12-09

    In this paper, a three-level BDDC algorithm is developed for the solutions of large sparse algebraic linear systems arising from the mortar discretization of elliptic boundary value problems. The mortar discretization is considered on geometrically non-conforming subdomain partitions. In two-level BDDC algorithms, the coarse problem needs to be solved exactly. However, its size will increase with the increase of the number of the subdomains. To overcome this limitation, the three-level algorithm solves the coarse problem inexactly while a good rate of convergence is maintained. This is an extension of previous work, the three-level BDDC algorithms for standard finite element discretization. Estimates of the condition numbers are provided for the three-level BDDC method and numerical experiments are also discussed.

  16. Leachability of regulated metals from cement-mortar linings

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Q.; Toomuluri, P.J.; Eckert, J.O. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to test the leachability of regulated metals from cement-mortar linings inside drinking water pipes. Faucet water of known quality was introduced in the test pipes and maintained in static, pressurized conditions for extended periods of time. Water samples were frequently drawn from the pipes and tested for metals and other water quality parameters during the test periods. Significant amounts of barium, cadmium, and chromium leached out from the cement-mortar linings in two of the three test pipes during the first 14 days of water stagnation. Barium and chromium continued to leach out at detectable levels as the pipes were subsequently refilled. The authors recommend that the water industry be selective in choosing cement for lining pipes.

  17. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  18. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  19. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  20. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  1. Nonconforming mortar element methods: Application to spectral discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maday, Yvon; Mavriplis, Cathy; Patera, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    Spectral element methods are p-type weighted residual techniques for partial differential equations that combine the generality of finite element methods with the accuracy of spectral methods. Presented here is a new nonconforming discretization which greatly improves the flexibility of the spectral element approach as regards automatic mesh generation and non-propagating local mesh refinement. The method is based on the introduction of an auxiliary mortar trace space, and constitutes a new approach to discretization-driven domain decomposition characterized by a clean decoupling of the local, structure-preserving residual evaluations and the transmission of boundary and continuity conditions. The flexibility of the mortar method is illustrated by several nonconforming adaptive Navier-Stokes calculations in complex geometry.

  2. Analysis of main parameters affecting substrate/mortar contact area through tridimensional laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Carina M; Masuero, Angela B

    2015-10-01

    This study assesses the influence of the granulometric composition of sand, application energy and the superficial tension of substrates on the contact area of rendering mortars. Three substrates with distinct wetting behaviors were selected and mortars were prepared with different sand compositions. Characterization tests were performed on fresh and hardened mortars, as well as the rheological characterization. Mortars were applied to substrates with two different energies. The interfacial area was then digitized with 3D scanner. Results show that variables are all of influence on the interfacial contact in the development area. Furthermore, 3D laser scanning proved to be a good method to contact area measurement.

  3. Characterization and restoration of historic Rosendale cement mortars for the purpose of restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Stephanie Anne

    Mortar was a very common building material in today's historic sites. Before Portland cement was manufactured at a global level, Rosendale cement was commonly used in these mortars. Over time, these mortars in historic sites have begun to break down and wear away. With Rosendale cement in production again, measures can be taken to restore and repair the historic mortars. However, little testing has been done to establish durability of modern Rosendale cement mortars. This presentation highlights the common mix techniques used at the time, and undergoes experiments to establish general properties and predict future durability. Six different mortar mixes were tested with varying cement content and using various lime additions. Properties observed include compressive strength, absorption, porosity, permeability, and bond strength. Ion chromatography was used on seawater-soaked samples to determine how the Rosendale cement mortar would react with the seawater. Relationships between these properties were also addressed. It was found that cement content played a large role in compressive strength, while lime content had an effect on bond strength. Ion chromatography was used on seawater-soaked samples to determine how the Rosendale cement mortar would react with the seawater. Magnesium sulfates, and chloride were taken up into the mortars, indicating that Rosendale would be venerable to salt attack.

  4. The Interfacial Transition Zone in Alkali-Activated Slag Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Provis, John

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is known to strongly influence the mechanical and transport properties of mortars and concretes. This paper studies the ITZ between siliceous (quartz) aggregates and alkali activated slag binders in the context of mortar specimens. Backscattered electron images (BSE) generated in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) are used to identify unreacted binder components, reaction products and porosity in the zone surrounding aggregate particles, by composition and density contrast. X-ray mapping is used to exclude the regions corresponding to the aggregates from the BSE image of the ITZ, thus enabling analysis of only the binder phases, which are segmented into binary images by grey level discrimination. A distinct yet dense ITZ region is present in the alkali-activated slag mortars, containing a reduced content of unreacted slag particles compared to the bulk binder. The elemental analysis of this region shows that it contains a (C,N)-A-S-H gel which seems to have a higher content of Na (potentially deposited through desiccation of the pore solution) and a lower content of Ca than the bulk inner and outer products forming in the main binding region. These differences are potentially important in terms of long-term concrete performance, as the absence of a highly porous interfacial transition zone region is expected to provide a positive influence on the mechanical and transport properties of alkali-activated slag concretes.

  5. Cement-mortar pipes as a source of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Berend, K.; Trouwborst, T.

    1999-07-01

    In 1996 in Curacao, acute aluminum (Al) intoxication sickened patients in a dialysis center that used tap water to prepare dialysate. The mortality rate was 32%. A new factory-lined cement-mortar water distribution pipe had recently been installed. It is known that substantial amounts of barium, cadmium, and chromium can leach from cement-mortar linings. This article shows that high concentrations of Al can leach from cement mortars for at least two years in soft, aggressive water. The newly installed pipe, cement containing four times as much Al as usual, corrosive water, the high pH and temperature of the water, long residence time, and perhaps the corrosion inhibitor polyphosphate may have promoted this leaching. Certification of cements used to line water pipes is warranted. Central water treatment plants must distribute noncorrosive water, especially plants that use membrane desalination or other reverse osmosis or nanofiltration processes. Dialysis units should be promptly informed of any impending change in water treatment that might increase the Al content of tap water and also of any accidental pollution of the water distributed. Dialysis centers should always practice extended purification of tap water used for dialysate. Although Al as a risk factor for Alzheimer`s disease in the general population is still debated, there is no doubt that Al causes dialysis encephalopathy.

  6. Fatigue behaviour analysis for the durability prequalification of strengthening mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocca, P.; Grazzini, A.; Masera, D.

    2011-07-01

    An innovative laboratory procedure used as a preliminary design stage for the pre-qualification of strengthening mortars applied to historical masonry buildings is described. In the analysis of the behaviour of masonry structures and their constituent materials, increasing importance has been assumed by the study of the long-term evolution of deformation and mechanical characteristics, which may be affected by both loading and environmental conditions. Through static and fatigue tests on mixed specimens historical brick-reinforced mortar it has been possible to investigate the durability of strengthening materials, in order to select, from a range of alternatives, the most suitable for the historical masonry. Cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of the historical brick-strengthening mortar system under static long-time loading. This methodology has proved useful in avoiding the errors associated with materials that are not mechanically compatible and guarantees the durability of strengthening work. The experimental procedure has been used effectively in the biggest restoration building site in Europe, the Royal Palace of Venaria, and it is in progress of carrying out at the Special Natural Reserve of the Sacro Monte di Varallo, in Piedmont (Italy).

  7. Properties of Cement Mortar Containing Rubber Ash as Sand Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syamir Senin, Mohamad; Shahidan, Shahiron; Syazani Leman, Alif; Izzati Raihan Ramzi Hannan, Nurul

    2016-11-01

    Discarded scrap tyres have become one of the major environmental problems nowadays. There has been increasing public worry about the mining of natural resources in recent years. In order to minimize the consumption of natural resources, rubber ash has been postulated as a potential material for partial replacement of sand in concrete materials especially for applications which are subjected to impact and vibration such as road and bridge construction. Thus, it contributes to the development of the construction industry in a sustainable way. This paper mainly emphasizes on the use of rubber ash from waste tyres in cement mortar. 100mm cubic specimens were produced by adding rubber ash volume ratios of 0%, 3%, 5% and 7% as sand replacement in M30 quality cement mortar. A compressive stress test and a density test were conducted at the end of 7, 14, and 28 days. The result shows that 5% is the optimum value for sand replacement in the cement mortar. Therefore, rubber ash is acceptable to be used as sand replacement.

  8. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Volchek, Konstantin; Miah, Muhammed Yusuf; Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack; Tezel, F Handan

    2011-10-30

    The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L(-1) and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive (137)Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L(-1) while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 μg cm(-2). Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol(-1) suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  9. Biomimetic adhesive materials containing cyanoacryl group for medical application.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sueng Hwan; Sohn, Jeong Sun

    2014-10-17

    For underwater adhesives with biocompatible and more flexible bonds using biomimetic adhesive groups, DOPA-like adhesive molecules were modified with cyanoacrylates to obtain different repeating units and chain length copolymers. The goal of this work is to copy the mechanisms of underwater bonding to create synthetic water-borne underwater medical adhesives through blending of the modified DOPA and a triblock copolymer (PEO-PPO-PEO) for practical application to repair wet living tissues and bones, and in turn, to use the synthetic adhesives to test mechanistic hypotheses about the natural adhesive. The highest values in stress and modulus of the biomimetic adhesives prepared in wet state were 165 kPa and 33 MPa, respectively.

  10. Supramolecular adhesives to hard surfaces: adhesion between host hydrogels and guest glass substrates through molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yoshinori; Sahara, Taiga; Sekine, Tomoko; Kakuta, Takahiro; Nakahata, Masaki; Otsubo, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Harada, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Supramolecular materials based on host-guest interactions should exhibit high selectivity and external stimuli-responsiveness. Among various stimuli, redox and photo stimuli are useful for its wide application. An external stimuli-responsive adhesive system between CD host-gels (CD gels) and guest molecules modified glass substrates (guest Sub) is focused. Here, the selective adhesion between host gels and guest substrates where adhesion depends on molecular complementarity is reported. Initially, it is thought that adhesion of a gel material onto a hard material might be difficult unless many guest molecules modified linear polymers immobilize on the surface of hard materials. However, reversible adhesion of the CD gels is observed by dissociating and re-forming inclusion complex in response to redox and photo stimuli.

  11. Alkali-silica reaction and pore solution composition in mortars in sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Mitsunori; Takeuchi, Katsunobu

    1996-12-01

    The promotion of expansion of mortars containing a reactive aggregate in 1N NaCl solution at 38 C was attributed to a rise of OH{sup {minus}} ion concentration in the pore solution in the mortars. However, it is ambiguous whether the promotion of expansion of mortars in sea water at a room temperature can be explained in the same way as in NaCl solution at an elevated temperature. This study aims at pursuing the expansion behavior of mortars containing a reactive aggregate relating it to their pore solution composition and the extent of alkali-silica reaction occurring within reactive grains. The alkali-silica reaction in mortars in sea water and 0.5 1N NaCl solution at 20 C appears to progress differently from that in mortars in 1N NaCl solution at an elevated temperature of 38 C. The promotion of expansion of mortars in sea water at 20 C was found to be responsible for an effect of Cl{sup {minus}} ions in the alkali-silica reaction at early stages of immersion. Only when OH{sup {minus}} ion concentration in the pore solution was relatively high, NaCl and sea water could accelerate the alkali-silica reaction in mortars at 20 C.

  12. [Study on the traditional lime mortar from the memorial archway in the southern Anhui province].

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Feng; Sun, Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Xing; Zhang, Bing-Jian; Chen, Xi-Min

    2013-07-01

    The traditional lime mortar was investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results show that the mortar from the memorial archway in the southern Anhui province was the organic-inorganic composite materials composed of lime with tung oil or sticky rice. It was found that the excellent performance of the tung oil-lime mortar can be explained by the compact lamellar organic-inorganic composite structure that was produced by carbonization reaction of lime, cross-linking reactions of tung oil and oxygen and complexing reaction of Ca2+ and -COO-. The compact micro-structure of sticky rice-lime mortar, which was produced due to carbonation process of lime controlled by amylopectin, should be the cause of the good performance of this kind of organic-inorganic mortar.

  13. Corrosion Sensor for Monitoring the Service Condition of Chloride-Contaminated Cement Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuang; Ba, Heng-Jing

    2010-01-01

    A corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of cover mortar was developed. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with and without the addition of chloride to simulate the adverse effects of chloride-contaminated environmental conditions on concrete structures. In brief, a linear polarization resistance method combined with an embeddable reference electrode was utilized to measure the polarization resistance (Rp) using built-in sensor electrodes. Subsequently, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range of 1 kHz to 50 kHz was used to obtain the cement mortar resistance (Rs). The results show that the polarization resistance is related to the chloride content and Rs; ln (Rp) is linearly related to the Rs values in mortar without added chloride. The relationships observed between the Rp of the steel anodes and the resistance of the surrounding cement mortar measured by the corrosion sensor confirms that Rs can indicate the corrosion state of concrete structures. PMID:22319347

  14. Corrosion sensor for monitoring the service condition of chloride-contaminated cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuang; Ba, Heng-Jing

    2010-01-01

    A corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of cover mortar was developed. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with and without the addition of chloride to simulate the adverse effects of chloride-contaminated environmental conditions on concrete structures. In brief, a linear polarization resistance method combined with an embeddable reference electrode was utilized to measure the polarization resistance (Rp) using built-in sensor electrodes. Subsequently, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range of 1 kHz to 50 kHz was used to obtain the cement mortar resistance (Rs). The results show that the polarization resistance is related to the chloride content and Rs; ln (Rp) is linearly related to the Rs values in mortar without added chloride. The relationships observed between the Rp of the steel anodes and the resistance of the surrounding cement mortar measured by the corrosion sensor confirms that Rs can indicate the corrosion state of concrete structures.

  15. Amination of black liquor and the application in the ready-mixed wet mortar.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dafeng; Zheng, Tao; Chen, Ran; Li, Xiaokang; Qiu, Xueqing

    2017-02-28

    In order to extend the application of black liquor (BL), amino group was introduced in lignin through Mannich reaction. The structure of the aminated black liquor (ABL) was characterized with FT-IR, elemental analysis, the zeta potential and the inherent viscosity. The foam generated by ABL was more stable, for the surface tension was lower. The results of the mortar test indicated that the water-retention rate of the fresh mortar incorporated with 0.3 wt% ABL was 89.1%; the consistency loss was about 39.7% after 4 h. When the dosage was less than 0.3 wt%, ABL could increase the bond strength of the hardened mortars. The results showed that ABL could be used as an effective ready-mixed wet mortar admixture. This study not only provided a new method to develop new mortar admixture, but also alleviated the pollution of BL.

  16. Inhibition of bacterial and leukocyte adhesion under shear stress conditions by material surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jasmine D; Ebert, Michael; Stokes, Ken; Ward, Robert; Anderson, James M

    2003-01-01

    Biomaterial-centered infections, initiated by bacterial adhesion, persist due to a compromised host immune response. Altering implant materials with surface modifying endgroups (SMEs) may enhance their biocompatibility by reducing bacterial and inflammatory cell adhesion. A rotating disc model, which generates shear stress within physiological ranges, was used to characterize adhesion of leukocytes and Staphylococcus epidermidis on polycarbonate-urethanes and polyetherurethanes modified with SMEs (polyethylene oxide, fluorocarbon and dimethylsiloxane) under dynamic flow conditions. Bacterial adhesion in the absence of serum was found to be mediated by shear stress and surface chemistry, with reduced adhesion exhibited on materials modified with polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene oxide SMEs. In contrast, bacterial adhesion was enhanced on materials modified with fluorocarbon SMEs. In the presence of serum, bacterial adhesion was primarily neither material nor shear dependent. However, bacterial adhesion in serum was significantly reduced to < or = 10% compared to adhesion in serum-free media. Leukocyte adhesion in serum exhibited a shear dependency with increased adhesion occurring in regions exposed to lower shear-stress levels of < or = 7 dyne/cm2. Additionally, polydimethylsiloxane and polyethylene oxide SMEs reduced leukocyte adhesion on polyether-urethanes. In conclusion, these results suggest that surface chemistry and shear stress can mediate bacterial and cellular adhesion. Furthermore, materials modified with polyethylene oxide SMEs are capable of inhibiting bacterial adhesion, consequently minimizing the probability of biomaterial-centered infections.

  17. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Marie D.; Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans -Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-12-15

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900 year old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.

  18. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, Marie D.; Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; ...

    2014-12-15

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈more » 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900 year old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.« less

  19. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Marie D; Landis, Eric N; Brune, Philip F; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J M; Ingraffea, Anthony R

    2014-12-30

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan's Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime-volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8-0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥ 90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45-0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.

  20. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale. PMID:25512521

  1. Microwave evaluation of accelerated chloride ingress in mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C.; Case, T.; Castle, M.; Zoughi, R.; Kurtis, K.

    2001-04-01

    Corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete structures can be induced by the presence of chloride ions near the steel/concrete interface. To show the potential of microwave nondestructive testing techniques for evaluating chloride ingress, 8″×8″×8″ mortar specimens with different mixture designs were prepared. To accelerate chloride ingress, they were exposed to cyclical wet/dry conditions, where the wet condition included exposure to salt bath. A complete discussion of the results will be presented in this paper.

  2. Neutron and gamma attenuation in polyethylene and PVC mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Majid, S.; Abulfaraj, W.H.; Othman, F. )

    1991-01-01

    Concrete is a basic building material widely used in radiation shielding. As water in ordinary concrete is only {approximately}6% by weight, fast neutrons undergo a medium to poor moderation process. Special types of mortar were developed in which polyethylene ((CH{sub 2})n) or PVC ((CH{sub 2}-CH-Cl)n) pellets were used instead of coarse aggregates in ordinary concrete. Both of these polymers are rich in hydrogen and carbon moderator atoms. Preparation methods and resulting material properties are discussed.

  3. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  4. Dentin-enamel adhesives in pediatric dentistry: an update.

    PubMed

    García-Godoy, Franklin; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Adhesives and composite technology have made composite resins and polyacid-modified resin-based composites (compomers) very popular as materials to restore primary and permanent anterior and posterior teeth. More conservative preparations can be performed that maintain more tooth structure due to the adhesive properties of the adhesives used with composites and compomers. Meticulous care in the placement of adhesives and, subsequently, resin-based composites and compomers is necessary to produce long-term satisfactory results. The purpose of this paper is to update the current status in regards to dentin-enamel adhesives in primary teeth.

  5. Effect of Copolymer Latexes on Physicomechanical Properties of Mortar Containing High Volume Fly Ash as a Replacement Material of Cement

    PubMed Central

    Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Gulzhakhan, Yeligbayeva; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume of fly ash (FA) as partial replacement of cement in presence of copolymer latexes. Portland cement (PC) was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30 50, and 60% FA. Copolymer latexes were used based on 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA) and 2-hydroxymethylacrylate (2-HEMA). Testing included workability, setting time, absorption, chemically combined water content, compressive strength, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of FA to mortar as replacement of PC affected the physicomechanical properties of mortar. As the content of FA in the concrete increased, the setting times (initial and final) were elongated. The results obtained at 28 days of curing indicate that the maximum properties of mortar occur at around 30% FA. Beyond 30% FA the properties of mortar reduce and at 60% FA the properties of mortar are lower than those of the reference mortar without FA. However, the addition of polymer latexes into mortar containing FA improved most of the physicomechanical properties of mortar at all curing times. Compressive strength, combined water, and workability of mortar containing FA premixed with latexes are higher than those of mortar containing FA without latexes. PMID:25254256

  6. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  7. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  8. Adhesive and Elastic Properties of DOPA-Containing Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Rebecca; Shull, Ken; Messersmith, Phillip; Madhav, Priti

    2001-03-01

    It was recently determined that L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is primarily responsible for both the adhesion and crosslinking that occurs in mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). In wet environments, MAPs form strong adhesive bonds to a large variety of substrates, making DOPA-modified polymers very interesting for adhesion studies. Polymer materials modified from or modeled after DOPA have large potential as biomedical adhesives and as adhesives in aqueous environments. The mechanical and adhesive properties of a DOPA-containing hydrogel were tested using an axisymmetric adhesion test modified from the method of Johnson, Kendall and Roberts. In accordance with this technique, a rigid, hemispherical indenter was brought into contact with hydrogel samples, generating load and displacement data. In addition, images were taken of the contact between the sample and indenter. Using the collected data and images, the adhesive properties of the material were calculated. Separate experiments were conducted in conditions of varying humidity and aqueous environments in order to determine any changes in the adhesive behavior of the hydrogel. Data resulting from experiments in each type of environment will be presented.

  9. Enzymatic degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces produced by mild self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) released by adhesive procedures may degrade collagen in the hybrid layer and so compromise the bonding effectiveness of etch-and-rinse adhesives. In this study, endogenous enzymatic degradation was evaluated for several simplified self-etch adhesives. In addition, primers were modified by adding two MMP inhibitors: chlorhexidine, a commonly used disinfectant, but also a non-specific MMP inhibitor; and SB-3CT, a specific inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Gelatin zymography of fresh human dentin powder was used to identify the enzymes released by the adhesives. Micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) testing was used to assess the mechanical properties of resin-dentin interfaces over time. In none of the experimental groups treated with the mild self-etch adhesives was MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 identified. Also, no difference in the μTBS was measured for the inhibitor-modified and the control inhibitor-free adhesives after 6 months of water storage. It is concluded that in contrast to etch-and-rinse adhesives, the involvement of endogenous MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the bond-degradation process is minimal for mild self-etch adhesives.

  10. Compatibility study and adaption of stone repair mortars for the Lede stone (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kock, T.; Vandevoorde, D.; Boone, M. A.; Dewanckele, J.; De Boever, W.; Lanzón, M.; De Schutter, G.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Jacobs, P.; Cnudde, V.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main historic building materials in northern Belgium is the Lede stone. This arenaceous limestone from Lutetian age was excavated in the region of Ghent and Brussels and was transported northwards by main rivers such as the Scheldt and Zenne. Thanks to this natural transport route, the stone in also found in many cities which lie abroad the excavation area, such as Antwerp (Belgium) and various cities in the Netherlands (Breda, Zierikzee, …). Due to its dominant occurrence in our cultural heritage, it is frequently subjected to restoration and renovation works. Depending on the degree of decay, most frequent stone operations are cleaning, healing with mortar or replacing it by (often exotic) fresh blocks. Originally, this limestone has a greenish-gray colour, but when being exposed to atmospheric conditions it acquires a yellowish to rusty coloured patina. The origin of the latter is most likely the oxidation of glauconite minerals which are present in a few percent in the stone. In addition, the stone often demonstrates black crust formation due to sulphation. Cleaning of the stone often results in an excess removal of this black gypsum crusts and patina, thus exposing deeper parts of the stone which appear more greenish-gray again. When the stone is subsequently healed by adding repair mortar to damaged parts, the question rises which mortar colour is more appropriate. The choice of repair mortar is greatly depending on commercial aspects. When handling entire facades on monuments, a mineral mortar based on ZnCl is most often applied in Belgium. The big advantage of this mortar is its fast curing. Three colour types have been developed for the Lede stone in specific. However, the hardness of this mortar is sometimes in conflict with reversibility. For the handling of individual sculptures some conservators choose for the application of (hydraulic) lime mortars. The advantage of using such mortars is their high compatibility and reversibility. The

  11. Carbonation and pH in mortars manufactured with supplementary cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    McPolin, D.O.; Basheer, P.A.M.; Long, A.E.

    2009-05-15

    An investigation of carbonation in mortars and methods of measuring the degree of carbonation and pH change is presented. The mortars were manufactured using ordinary portland cement, pulverized fuel ash, ground granulated blast-furnace slag, metakaolin, and microsilica. The mortars were exposed to a carbon dioxide-rich environment (5% CO{sub 2}) to accelerate carbonation. The resulting carbonation was measured using phenolphthalein indicator and thermogravimetric analysis. The pH of the pore fluid and a powdered sample, extracted from the mortar, was measured to give an accurate indication of the actual pH of the concrete. The pH of the extracted powder mortar sample was found to be similar to the pH of the pore fluid expressed from the mortars. The thermogravimetric analysis suggested two distinct regions of transport of CO{sub 2} within mortar, a surface region where convection was prevalent and a deeper region where diffusion was dominant. The use of microsilica has been shown to decrease the rate of carbonation, while pulverized fuel ash and ground granulated blast-furnace slag have a detrimental effect on carbonation. Metakaolin has little effect on carbonation.

  12. Use of limestone obtained from waste of the mussel cannery industry for the production of mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Paloma; Marmol, Isabel; Morales, Julian; Sanchez, Luis . E-mail: luis-sanchez@uco.es

    2007-04-15

    Various types of cement-SiO{sub 2}-CaCO{sub 3} mortar were prepared by replacing quarry limestone aggregate with limestone obtained as a by-product from waste of the mussel cannery industry. The CaCO{sub 3} aggregate consists mainly of elongated prismatic particles less than 4 {mu}m long rather than of the rounded particles of smaller size (2-6 {mu}m) obtained with quarry limestone. The mechanical and structural properties of the mortars were found to be influenced by aggregate morphology. Setting of the different types of mortar after variable curing times was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) techniques. Mortars with a high content in mussel shell limestone exhibited a more packed microstructure, which facilitates setting of cement and results in improved mortar strength. The enhanced mechanical properties of the new mortars allow the cement content in the final mortar composition to be decreased and production costs to be reduced as a result.

  13. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani, Sahar Isgor, O. Burkan Ormeci, Banu

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  14. Recycling red mud from the production of aluminium as a red cement-based mortar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Jianfeng; Li, Haoxin; Zhao, Piqi; Chen, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Current management for red mud is insufficient and a new method is needed. A series of experiments have been carried out to develop a new approach for effective management of red mud. Mortars without or with 3%, 6% and 9% red mud were prepared and their fresh and hardened properties were measured to access the possibility of recycling the red mud in the production of red cement-based mortar. The mechanisms corresponding to their mechanical performance variations were explored by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the fresh mortars with red mud present an increase of viscosity as compared with the control. However, little difference is found when the content of red mud is altered. It also can be seen that red mud increases flow time and reduces the slump flow of the mortar. Meanwhile, it is found that mortar with red mud is provided with higher air content. Red mud is eligible to adjust the decorative mortar colour. Compressive strength of mortar is improved when less than 6% red mud is added. However, overall it has a slightly negative effect on tensile bond strength. It decreases the Ca(OH)2 content and densifies the microstructure of hardened paste. The heavy metal concentrations in leachates of mortars with red mud are much lower than the values required in the standard, and it will not do harm to people's health and the environment. These results are important to recycle and effectively manage red mud via the production of red cement-based mortar.

  15. AMS radiocarbon dating of mortar: The case study of the medieval UNESCO site of Modena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmine, Lubritto; Caroselli, Marta; Lugli, Stefano; Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Marchetti Dori, S.; Terrasi, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    The carbon dioxide contributing to binder formation during the set of a lime mortar reflects the atmospheric 14C content at the time of construction of a building. For this reason, the 14C dating of mortars is used with increasing frequencies in archaeological and architectural research. Mortars, however, may also contain carbonaceous contaminants potentially affecting radiocarbon dating. The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of the Second University of Naples (SUN) has recently obtained some promising results in mortar radiocarbon dating thanks to the development of a procedure (i.e. CryoSoniC/Cryo2SoniC) aiming to eliminate exogenous C contamination that may occur in a mortar. The construction history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Modena (Italy) is still controversial and represents a challenging case study for the application of absolute dating methodologies for different reasons. From the point of view of 14C dating, for example, given the high percentage of carbonate aggregates composing these samples, Modena mortars represent an experimental test particularly indicative of exogenous carbon sources suppression ensuring methodology accuracy. In this paper several AMS Radiocarbon dates were carried out on lime lumps with the aim to: (i) verify procedure accuracy by a comparison of the results obtainable from lime lumps dated after different treatments (i.e. bulk lime lumps vs. CryoSoniC purified lime lumps); (ii) compare different building phases absolute chronology for the medieval UNESCO site of Modena, with that assumed by historical sources in order to assess preliminary the 14C dating feasibility for of the site. Historical temporal constraints and mortar clustering, based on petrography, have been applied to define a temporal framework of the analyzed structure. Moreover, a detailed petrographic characterization of mortars was used both as a preliminary tool for the choice of samples and to infer about the

  16. A pulsed field gradient and NMR imaging investigations of the water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Patural, Laetitia; Porion, Patrice; Van Damme, Henri; Govin, Alexandre; Grosseau, Philippe; Ruot, Bertrand; Deves, Olivier

    2010-09-15

    The study presented in this paper is devoted to improve the knowledge on the influence of cellulose ethers (CE) on the freshly-mixed mortars water retention. Indeed, this crucial property is the most important imparted by these polysaccharides. One of the assumptions proposed to explain this phenomenon is that CE acts as diffusion barrier to the water. To test this hypothesis, the CE effect on the self-diffusion coefficient of water in solution and on the water mobility between two fresh cement pastes was studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. CE does not significantly modify the water self-diffusion coefficient in CE solution or in admixed cement pastes. Moreover the interdiffusion imaging experiments demonstrated that the water diffusion at the paste/paste interface is not affected by the presence of cellulosic admixture.

  17. The increase of compressive strength of natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilorini, Rr. M. I. Retno; Santosa, Budi; Rejeki, V. G. Sri; Riangsari, M. F. Devita; Hananta, Yan's. Dianaga

    2017-03-01

    Polymer modified concrete is one of some concrete technology innovations to meet the need of strong and durable concrete. Previous research found that Moringa oleifera can be applied as natural polymer modifiers into mortars. Natural polymer modified mortar using Moringa oleifera is proven to increase their compressive strength significantly. In this resesearch, Moringa oleifera seeds have been grinded and added into concrete mix for natural polymer modified concrete, based on the optimum composition of previous research. The research investigated the increase of compressive strength of polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera as natural polymer modifiers. There were 3 compositions of natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera referred to previous research optimum compositions. Several cylinder of 10 cm x 20 cm specimens were produced and tested for compressive strength at age 7, 14, and, 28 days. The research meets conclusions: (1) Natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera, with and without skin, has higher compressive strength compared to natural polymer modified mortar with Moringa oleifera and also control specimens; (2) Natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera without skin is achieved by specimens contains Moringa oleifera that is 0.2% of cement weight; and (3) The compressive strength increase of natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera without skin is about 168.11-221.29% compared to control specimens

  18. Durability and Intelligent Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesive Composite Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    theories used for 195 data reduction, and whether they have to be modified to model the adhesive system properly. Computer modeling of the adhesive joint...analysis of single lap joints with unidirectional and cross-ply adherends 26 2. Modeling of single lap joints with unidirectional and cross-ply...part of the research were to develop a nonlinear finite element model for a cracked single-lap adhesive joint with laminated composite adherends and

  19. Rheological studies on pressure-sensitive silicone adhesives and drug-in-adhesive layers as a means to characterise adhesive performance.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kwong Yat; Dodou, Kalliopi

    2007-03-21

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives are viscoelastic polymers used in the formulation of transdermal patches that allow attachment of a patch onto the skin. Established criteria exist that correlate viscoelastic parameters with adhesive performance. In this study, fulfillment of the adhesive performance criteria was examined using two silicone adhesives with different tack properties. The viscoelastic parameters of high and low tack silicone adhesives (BIO-PSA High Tack 7-4302 and BIO-PSA Low Tack 7-4102) were determined and compared with the criteria described by Chu and Dahlquist. Drug-in-adhesive layers were prepared using the high tack adhesive combined with nortriptyline HCl or paracetamol. The effect of drug addition on the viscoelastic properties of the adhesive was examined. The high tack adhesive showed congruence with the established criteria although with a modified range of viscoelastic moduli to that described by Chu. Examination of the low tack adhesive showed that it did not possess the appropriate viscoelastic properties for bonding onto the skin. The addition of the drugs into the high tack adhesive caused a concentration-dependent increase in its cohesive strength. This effect was independent of the physicochemical properties of the drugs tested.

  20. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    ASTM 907-05. Standard Terminology of Adhesives. West Conshohocken, PA, May 2005. 4. 3M Scotch-Grip Nitrile High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to increase rubber to metal adhesion in Army materials using...1 Figure 2. Steel and rubber

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. Hybrid fiber-reinforcement in mortar and concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, John Steven

    Performance of concrete and mortar is improved through use of discontinuous fibers because of the resulting fundamental changes in the failure mechanism. The role a specific type of fiber plays in this process is governed by the material and geometry of the fibers, the fiber-matrix bond and the matrix properties. Blending fiber types exhibiting complementary and additive properties in the composite is a means for maximizing the potential of fibers for the reinforcement of concrete. The specific blend pursued in this investigation is a combination of steel or PVA microfibers, that interact with developing cracks, and steel macrofibers, which become crucial once cracks develop. The objective of this investigation is to explore the mechanisms by which fibers interact with the composite matrix and to provide a rigorous characterization of performance achievable with hybrid reinforced concrete. The role of micro- and macrofibers in the failure of mortar is examined using Subregion Scanning Computer Vision. The fracture process occurs in three stages: microcrack formation, microcrack coalescence and finally the formation of macrocracks. Closely spaced microfibers bridge coalesced microcracks. This increases performance up to and around the peak load by delaying the initiation of macrocracking. Once macrocracks develop, macrofibers are most effective at imparting ductility to the composite. Hybrid reinforcing fibers reduce the water permeability of cracked mortar, which has implications for durability, through the induction of multiple cracking. An innovative method for measuring cracked permeability in uniaxial tension under load is presented. The workability of macro- and microfiber hybrids in concrete is governed by the high surface area of the microfibers. A mix design procedure is presented to determine the optimum paste volume to efficiently achieve the best flow and cohesion properties. The relationships between workability, fiber dispersion, and mechanical

  3. Mineralogical and microstructural studies of mortars from the bath complex of the Roman villa rustica near Mosnje (Slovenia)

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, Sabina; Zalar, Vesna; Urosevic, Maja; Mauko, Alenka; Mirtic, Breda; Lux, Judita; Mladenovic, Ana

    2011-11-15

    This study deals with the characterization of mortars collected from bath complex of the Roman villa rustica from an archeological site near Mosnje (Slovenia). The mortar layers of the mosaics, wall paintings and mortar floors were investigated. A special aggregate consisting of brick fragments was present in the mortars studied. The mineralogical and petrographic compositions of the mortars were determined by means of optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Analysis of aggregate-binder interfaces using SEM-EDS revealed various types of reactivity rims. In order to assess the hydraulic characteristics of the mortars, the acid-soluble fractions were determined by ICP-OES. Furthermore, the results of Hg-porosimetry and gas sorption isotherms showed that mortars with a higher content of brick fragments particles exhibited a higher porosity and a greater BET surface area but a lower average pore diameter compared to mortars lacking this special aggregate. - Highlights: {yields} Mineral and microstructural characterizations of brick-lime mortars. {yields} Hydraulic character of mortars in Roman baths complex. {yields} Reaction rims were observed around brick fragments and dolomitic grains. {yields} Higher content of brick particles yielded a higher BET surface area. {yields} Addition of brick particles increased porosity and diminished pore size diameter.

  4. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  5. Techniques for application of tissue adhesive for corneal perforations.

    PubMed

    Erdey, R A; Lindahl, K J; Temnycky, G O; Aquavella, J V

    1991-06-01

    We describe a modified technique of using cyanoacrylate adhesive to seal corneal perforations. Easily performed at the slit lamp, its advantages over previously described methods include a smooth, contoured collagen surface overlying the adhesive, which is easily wet by the tear film. Even greater comfort and protection are provided by the addition of a hydrophilic bandage lens or collagen shield.

  6. Metal-Filled Adhesives Amenable To X-Ray Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermansen, Ralph D.; Sutherland, Thomas H.; Predmore, Roamer

    1994-01-01

    Adhesive joints between metal parts made amenable to nondestructive radiographic inspection by incorporating radiopaque fillers that increase x-ray contrasts of joints. Adhesives can be epoxies, urethanes, acrylics, phenolics, or silicones, with appropriate curing agents and with such modifiers as polysulfides, polyamides, or butadiene rubbers.

  7. Adhesion Control between Resist and Photomask Blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2009-06-01

    Most problems in photomask fabrication such as pattern collapse, haze, and cleaning damage are related to the behavior of surfaces and interfaces of resists, opaque layers, and quartz substrates. Therefore, it is important to control the corresponding surface and interface energies in photomask fabrication processes. In particular, adhesion analysis in microscopic regions is strongly desirable to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. We applied the direct peeling (DP) method with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and measured the adhesion of resist patterns on Cr and quartz surfaces for photomask process optimization. We also studied the effect of tip shape on the reproducibility of adhesion measurements and the dependence of collapse behavior on the resist profile. We measured lateral forces between the resulting collapsed resist pillar and the Cr or the quartz surface before and after the sliding and related these observed lateral forces to the static and kinetic frictional forces, respectively. We also studied the effect of surface modification of the Cr and quartz surfaces with silanization reagents on adhesion measured with the DP method. Resist adhesion could be controlled by surface modification using silanes. We also discuss the relationship between the adhesion observed with the DP method and the properties of the modified surfaces including water contact angles and local adhesive forces measured from force-distance curves with an SPM.

  8. Effects of Surfactants on the Properties of Mortar Containing Styrene/Methacrylate Superplasticizer

    PubMed Central

    Negim, El-Sayed; Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Khatib, Jamal; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of mortar containing synthetic cosurfactants as air entraining agent are investigated. The cosurfactants consist of a combination of 2% dodecyl benzene sodium sulfonate (DBSS) and either 1.5% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or 1.5% polyoxyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (POE). Also these cosurfactants were used to prepare copolymers latex: styrene/butyl methacrylate (St/BuMA), styrene/methyl methacrylate (St/MMA), and styrene/glycidyl methacrylate (St/GMA), in order to study their effects on the properties of mortar. The properties of mortar examined included flow table, W/C ratio, setting time, water absorption, compressive strength, and combined water. The results indicate that the latex causes improvement in mortar properties compared with cosurfactants. Also polymer latex containing DBSS/POE is more effective than that containing DBSS/PVA. PMID:24955426

  9. Effects of surfactants on the properties of mortar containing styrene/methacrylate superplasticizer.

    PubMed

    Negim, El-Sayed; Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Khatib, Jamal; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of mortar containing synthetic cosurfactants as air entraining agent are investigated. The cosurfactants consist of a combination of 2% dodecyl benzene sodium sulfonate (DBSS) and either 1.5% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or 1.5% polyoxyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (POE). Also these cosurfactants were used to prepare copolymers latex: styrene/butyl methacrylate (St/BuMA), styrene/methyl methacrylate (St/MMA), and styrene/glycidyl methacrylate (St/GMA), in order to study their effects on the properties of mortar. The properties of mortar examined included flow table, W/C ratio, setting time, water absorption, compressive strength, and combined water. The results indicate that the latex causes improvement in mortar properties compared with cosurfactants. Also polymer latex containing DBSS/POE is more effective than that containing DBSS/PVA.

  10. Comparing the use of sewage sludge ash and glass powder in cement mortars.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Poon, Chi Sun

    2016-09-23

    This study explored the suitability of using sewage sludge ash (SSA) and mixed-colored glass powder (MGP) as construction materials in cement mortars. Positive findings from this study may help promote the recycling of waste SSA and MGP in construction works. The results indicated that the SSA decreased while MGP improved the mortar workability. The SSA exhibited very low pozzolanic activity, but the cement mortar prepared with 20% SSA yielded strength values slightly superior to those of the glass mortars due to its water absorption ability. MGP can serve as a pozzolan and when 20% of cement was replaced by MGP, apparent compressive strength gains were found at later curing ages. The SSA could be used to mitigate ASR expansion while the MGP was superior in resisting drying shrinkage.

  11. Effects of mineral additions on durability and physico-mechanical properties of mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logbi, A.; Kriker, A.; Snisna, Z.

    2017-02-01

    This paper consists of an experimental study of the effect of some mineral admixtures on the properties of mortar. Blast furnace Slag of El-Hadjar, natural pozzolan of Beni saf and limestone of Ghardaia, all from Algeria, are crushed in high fineness and incorporated in the cement with different contents (15 % 20 % and 10%) respectively, in order to perform the physico-mechanical characteristics and durability of the mortar. The replacement of cement by 15% of natural pozzolan, or 20% of the Blast furnace Slag improves the mechanical performances of mortar in early and long ages than the mortar without additions, but 10% of limestone fillers have a positive effect only at early age. For durability the three additions have developed a beneficial effect on mechanical resistance under the free aquifers water, while their effects are different on capillary absorption.

  12. Mineralogical characterization of rendering mortars from decorative details of a baroque building in Kozuchow (SW Poland)

    SciTech Connect

    Bartz, W.; Filar, T.

    2010-01-15

    Optical microscopic observations, scanning electron microscopy and microprobe with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction and differential thermal/thermogravimetric analysis allowed detailed characterization of rendering mortars from decorative details (figures of Saints) of a baroque building in Kozuchow (Lubuskie Voivodship, Western Poland). Two separate coats of rendering mortars have been distinguished, differing in composition of their filler. The under coat mortar has filler composed of coarse-grained siliceous sand, whereas the finishing one has much finer grained filler, dominated by a mixture of charcoal and Fe-smelting slag, with minor amounts of quartz grains. Both mortars have air-hardening binder composed of gypsum and micritic calcite, exhibiting microcrystalline structure.

  13. Field and laboratory determination of a poly(vinyl/vinylidene chloride) additive in brick mortar.

    PubMed

    Law, S L; Newman, J H; Ptak, F L

    1990-02-01

    A polymerized vinyl/vinylidene chloride additive, used in brick mortar during the 60s and 70s, is detected at the building site by the field method, which employs a commercially available chloride test strip. The field test results can then be verified by the laboratory methods. In one method, total chlorine in the mortar is determined by an oxygen-bomb method and the additive chloride is determined by difference after water-soluble chlorides have been determined on a separate sample. In the second method, the polymerized additive is extracted directly from the mortar with tetrahydrofuran (THF). The difference in weight before and after extraction of the additive gives the weight of additive in the mortar. Evaporation of the THF from the extract leaves a thin film of the polymer, which gives an infrared "fingerprint" spectrum characteristic of the additive polymer.

  14. Thermo-mechanical properties of polyester mortar using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Craft, A.P.

    1997-07-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of polyester mortar (PM) using unsaturated polyester resins based on recycled PET are investigated in this paper (the recycled PET waste is mainly obtained from used plastic beverage bottles). The use of recycled PET in PM formulation is important because it helps produce good quality PM at a relatively low cost, save energy and alleviate an environmental problem posed by plastic wastes. PM construction applications include the repair of dams, piers, runways, bridges and other structures. Test results show that the effective use of PM overlays on portland cement concrete slabs is best achieved by utilizing flexible resins with low modulus and high elongation capacity at failure. The use of flexible resins in PM production is especially important in situations involving large thermal movements.

  15. Tracing formation and durability of calcite in a Punic-Roman cistern mortar (Pantelleria Island, Italy).

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Martin; Schön, Frerich; Heinrichs, Jens; Deditius, Artur P; Leis, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Ancient hydraulic lime mortar preserves chemical and isotopic signatures that provide important information about historical processing and its durability. The distribution and isotopic composition of calcite in a mortar of a well-preserved Punic-Roman cistern at Pantelleria Island (Italy) was used to trace the formation conditions, durability, and individual processing periods of the cistern mortar. The analyses of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes of calcite revealed four individual horizons, D, E, B-1 and B-2, of mortar from the top to the bottom of the cistern floor. Volcanic and ceramic aggregates were used for the production of the mortar of horizons E/D and B-1/B-2, respectively. All horizons comprise hydraulic lime mortar characterized by a mean cementation index of 1.5 ± 1, and a constant binder to aggregate ratio of 0.31 ± 0.01. This suggests standardized and highly effective processing of the cistern. The high durability of calcite formed during carbonation of slaked lime within the matrix of the ancient mortar, and thus the excellent resistance of the hydraulic lime mortar against water, was documented by (i) a distinct positive correlation of δ(18)Ocalcite and δ(13)Ccalcite; typical for carbonation through a mortar horizon, (ii) a characteristic evolution of δ(18)Ocalcite and δ(13)Ccalcite through each of the four mortar horizons; lighter follow heavier isotopic values from upper to lower part of the cistern floor, and (iii) δ(18)Ocalcite varying from -10 to -5 ‰ Vienna Pee Dee belemnite (VPDB). The range of δ(18)Ocalcite values rule out recrystallization and/or neoformation of calcite through chemical attack of water stored in cistern. The combined studies of the chemical composition of the binder and the isotopic composition of the calcite in an ancient mortar provide powerful tools for elucidating the ancient techniques and processing periods. This approach helps to evaluate the durability of primary calcite and demonstrates the

  16. Effect of dry deposition of pollutants on the degradation of lime mortars with sepiolite

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ramirez, S.; Thompson, G.E.; Puertas, F.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.

    1998-01-01

    The behavior of lime mortars containing sepiolite or sepiolite plus pentaclorophenol in atmospheric simulation chambers has been studied. The pollutant gases used in this study have been NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2}. The studies have been done in wet and dry conditions as well as with and without ozone. In the case of NO and NO{sub 2}, the aggressive agent would be HNO{sub 3}, which reacts with lime mortar binder CaCO{sub 3}, producing Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} formation. On this process, the influence of the presence of an oxidant as well as water has been studied. The catalyst effect of the oxidation is known to be accelerated by water presence, so mortars exposed to NO + O{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O and NO{sub 2} + O{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O environments undergo a greater salts formation than those exposed to the rest of he aggressive media. The three mortars` behaviors are similar and independent of their composition, producing small amount of salts in every case. When SO{sub 2} is the gas used, the aggressive agent of mortar will be H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} that reacts with mortar binder, CaCO{sub 3} to produce calcium sulfate in the form of gypsum. Oxidant and/or water influence has been studied, and the (SO{sub 2} + O{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O) chamber was found to be the one with greater aggressivity to mortars. However, in these conditions, sepiolite presence within the mortars delayed gypsum formation.

  17. Utilization of recycled glass derived from cathode ray tube glass as fine aggregate in cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-08-30

    Rapid advances in the electronic industry led to an excessive amount of early disposal of older electronic devices such as computer monitors and old televisions (TV) before the end of their useful life. The management of cathode ray tubes (CRT), which have been a key component in computer monitors and TV sets, has become a major environmental problem worldwide. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop sustainable alternative methods to manage hazardous CRT glass waste. This study assesses the feasibility of utilizing CRT glass as a substitute for natural aggregates in cement mortar. The CRT glass investigated was an acid-washed funnel glass of dismantled CRT from computer monitors and old TV sets. The mechanical properties of mortar mixes containing 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of CRT glass were investigated. The potential of the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and leachability of lead were also evaluated. The results confirmed that the properties of the mortar mixes prepared with CRT glass was similar to that of the control mortar using sand as fine aggregate, and displayed innocuous behaviour in the ASR expansion test. Incorporating CRT glass in cement mortar successfully prevented the leaching of lead. We conclude that it is feasible to utilize CRT glass in cement mortar production.

  18. Concretes and mortars with waste paper industry: Biomass ash and dregs.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lage, Isabel; Velay-Lizancos, Miriam; Vázquez-Burgo, Pablo; Rivas-Fernández, Marcos; Vázquez-Herrero, Cristina; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Antonio; Martín-Cano, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    This article describes a study on the viability of using waste from the paper industry: biomass boiler ash and green liquor dregs to fabricate mortars and concretes. Both types of ash were characterized by obtaining their chemical and mineralogical composition, their organic matter content, granulometry, adsorption and other common tests for construction materials. Seven different mortars were fabricated, one for reference made up of cement, sand, and water, three in which 10, 20, or 30% of the cement was replaced by biomass ash, and three others in which 10, 20, or 30% of the cement was replaced with dregs. Test specimens were fabricated with these mortars to conduct flexural and compression tests. Flexural strength is reduced for all the mortars studied. Compressive strength increases for the mortars fabricated with biomass ash and decreases for the mortar with dregs. Finally, 5 concretes were made, one of them as a reference (neither biomass ash nor dregs added), two of them with replacements of 10 and 20% of biomass ash instead of cement and another two with replacements of 10 and 20% of dregs instead of cement. The compressive and tensile splitting strength increase when a 10% of ash is replaced and decrease in all the other cases. The modulus of elasticity always decreases.

  19. A Study on the Properties of Carbon Black Mortar Using Granulated Blast Furnace Slag and Polymer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hong-Seok; Jeon, Ui-Hyeon; So, Seung-Young

    2015-11-01

    White Portland Cement (WPC) and inorganic pigment have been used in colored concrete, but there are some physical problems such as increases in efflorescence, and poor workability and low economics. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GBFS and polymer (methyl cellulose) on the physical properties of carbon black mortar. For this purpose, a flow test, compressive strength test and color evaluation and was carried out on cement mortar mixed with polymer by changing the proportion of cement and ratio of GBFS. The results show that the addition of polymer influences significantly the color value efficiency in colored mortar. This is due to the reduction of overall amount of micro pore. This polymer films prevent the transport of soluble calcium towards the surface, and decreases efflorescence. And the flow of colored mortar was increased in proportion to the addition rate of the GBFS. In addition the strength of colored mortars with GBFS at the long-term aged (after 28 days) was higher than that of the general WPC mortar, although its strength was developed slowly at the early ages.

  20. The Effect of Mortar Grade and Thickness on the Impact Resistance of Ferrocement Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Syamsir, Agusril; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Sulleman, Sorefan; Beddu, Salmia; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Ismail, Firas B.; Usman, Fathoni; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the thickness and mesh spacing on the impact of ferrocement for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at height of 150 mm, 350mm, and 500mm has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance of ferrocement against the mortar grade and slab thickness. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistance of ferrocement against the mortar grade and the thickness of ferrocement slab. The first and ultimate crack impact resistance of mortar grade 43 (for 40 mm thick slab with mesh reinforcement) are 1.60 times and 1.53 times respectively against the mortar grade 17 slab (of same thickness with mesh reinforcement). The first and ultimate crack impact resistance for 40 mm thick slab (mortar grade 43 with mesh reinforcement) are 3.55 times and 4.49 times respectively against the 20 mm thick slab (of same mortar grade with mesh reinforcement).

  1. Use of Artificial Neural Network for the Simulation of Radon Emission Concentration of Granulated Blast Furnace Slag Mortar.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hong-Seok; Xing, Shuli; Lee, Malrey; Lee, Young-Keun; So, Seung-Young

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an artificial neural networks study was carried out to predict the quantity of radon of Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GBFS) cement mortar. A data set of a laboratory work, in which a total of 3 mortars were produced, was utilized in the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) study. The mortar mixture parameters were three different GBFS ratios (0%, 20%, 40%). Measurement radon of moist cured specimens was measured at 3, 10, 30, 100, 365 days by sensing technology for continuous monitoring of indoor air quality (IAQ). ANN model is constructed, trained and tested using these data. The data used in the ANN model are arranged in a format of two input parameters that cover the cement, GBFS and age of samples and, an output parameter which is concentrations of radon emission of mortar. The results showed that ANN can be an alternative approach for the predicting the radon concentration of GBFS mortar using mortar ingredients as input parameters.

  2. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  3. Addition polyimide adhesives containing ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of added elastomers on the thermal stability, adhesive strength, and fracture toughness of LARC-13, a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive. Various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicon elastomers were incorporated into the polyimide resin either as physical polyblends, or by chemically reacting the elastomers with the polyimide backbone. Adhesive single lap-shear and T-peel strengths were measured before and after ageing at elevated temperature. A tapered double-cantilever beam specimen was used to determine the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified polyimide adhesives.

  4. Single-Phase Photo-Cross-Linkable Bioinspired Adhesive for Precise Control of Adhesion Strength.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tristan; Slegeris, Rimantas; Pramudya, Irawan; Chung, Hoyong

    2017-01-18

    obtained from a 1:1 weight ratio of polymer:solvent in water on a Mylar film surface. As a single-phase system, the synthesized terpolymer is very convenient to use, and its adhesion strength can be easily modified by UV light. Additionally, the terpolymer's high water compatibility makes it ideally suited for application in the biomedical field.

  5. Desmosomal adhesion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berika, Mohamed; Garrod, David

    2014-02-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that provide strong adhesion or hyper-adhesion in tissues. Here, we discuss the molecular and structural basis of this with particular reference to the desmosomal cadherins (DCs), their isoforms and evolution. We also assess the role of DCs as regulators of epithelial differentiation. New data on the role of desmosomes in development and human disease, especially wound healing and pemphigus, are briefly discussed, and the importance of regulation of the adhesiveness of desmosomes in tissue dynamics is considered.

  6. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  7. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  8. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  9. Cytotoxicity of Dental Adhesives In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth A.; Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, Maria; Palaghias, George; Karanika-Kouma, Artemis; Antoniades, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of six dental adhesives (Admira Bond, Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, ED Primer II, Fuji Bond LC, Gluma Comfort Bond, and NanoBond) applied to cell cultures. Methods The experiments were performed on two cell lines, rat pulp cells (RPC-C2A) and human lung fibroblasts (MRC5). Samples of the adhesives were light-cured and placed in culture medium for 24 hours. The extraction media was applied on the RPC-C2A and the MRC5 cells. Complete medium was used as a control. Cytotoxicity was evaluated with a modified sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay after 24 hours of exposure. Results The cell survival of RPC-C2A cells exposed to Fuji Bond LC, NanoBond, Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, ED Primer II, Admira Bond and Gluma Comfort Bond was 73%, 67%, 50%, 20%, 18% and 5% respectively, relative to the cell survival with the control medium. In the MRC5 cell line, the relative survival was 98%, 80%, 72%, 41%, 19% and 7% after exposure to NanoBond, Fuji Bond LC, Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, ED Primer II, Admira Bond and Gluma Comfort Bond, respectively. Conclusions Different types of dental adhesives showed different cytotoxic effects on cells in vitro. The self-etch adhesives were superior in terms of cytotoxicity. The different cytotoxic effects of dental adhesives should be considered when selecting an appropriate adhesive for operative restorations. PMID:19262725

  10. Material properties of hollow clay tile and existing mortar characterization study

    SciTech Connect

    Butala, M.B.; Jones, W.D.

    1993-10-01

    Several Buildings at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant were constructed (circa 1950) using unreinforced hollow clay tile (UHCT) masonry walls, which act as shear walls to resist lateral forces. A comprehensive test program, managed by the Center for Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE) of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), is under way to determine material properties of existing hollow clay tile walls that will be used to help determine the structural strength of those buildings. This paper presents the results of several types of material property tests of 4-in.- and 8-in.-thick hollow clay tiles. These tests include determination of weight, size, void area, net area and gross area, initial rate of absorption, absorption, modules of rupture, splitting tensile strength, and compressive strength. The tests were performed on old, reclaimed tiles and new tiles. A total of 336 tiles were tested. The stress-strain relationship for 40 specimens was also obtained. All testing was performed in accordance with ASTM standards and procedures developed by CNPE. This paper also presents the results of an investigation of mortar removed from the existing walls. The mortar characterization study was performed by Testwell Craig Materials Consultants (TCMC) under subcontract to MMES. Petrographic and chemical investigations were conducted on 18 mortar samples removed from four buildings at the plant. The primary purpose of the investigations was to evaluate the properties of existing mortar and provide a similar specification for the mortar to be used for construction of test specimens and test walls for the test program. The study showed variability in the mortars among buildings and among different locations within a building; it was concluded that an average mortar mix conforming to ASTM type N proportioned by volume of Portland cement, hydrated lime, and Tennessee river sand would be used to conduct further laboratory studies of masonry assemblages.

  11. Evaluation of sulfate resistance of cement mortars containing black rice husk ash.

    PubMed

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, black rice husk ashes (BRHAs), which are agrowastes from an electricity generating power plant and a rice mill, were ground and used as a partial cement replacement. The durability of mortars under sulfate attack including expansion and compressive strength loss were investigated. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 30%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55 and 0.65. For the durability of mortar exposed to sulfate attack, 5% sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) solutions were used. As a result, when increasing the percentage replacement of BRHA, the expansion and compressive strength loss of mortar decreased. At the replacement levels of 30% and 50% of BRHA, the expansion of the mortars was less than those mixed with sulfate-resistant cement. However, the expansion of the mortars exposed to Na2SO4 was more than those exposed to MgSO4. Increasing the replacement level of BRHA tends to reduce the compressive strength loss of mortars exposed to Na2SO4 attack. In contrary, under MgSO4 attack, when increasing the replacement level of BRHA, the compressive strength loss increases from 0% to 50% in comparison to Portland cement mortar. Results show that ground BRHA can be applied as a pozzolanic material to concrete and also improve resistance to sodium sulfate attack, but it can impair resistance to magnesium sulfate attack.

  12. Elastic-plastic analysis of crack in ductile adhesive joint

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Toru; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Yamashita, Akira; Munakata, Tsuyoshi

    1995-11-01

    The fracture of a crack in adhesive is important to the structural integrity of adhesive structures and composite materials. Though the fracture toughness of a material should be constant according to fracture mechanics, it is said that the fracture toughness of a crack in an adhesive joint depends on the bond thickness. In the present study, the elastic-plastic stress analyses of a crack in a thin adhesive layer are performed by the combination of the boundary element method and the finite element method. The effect of adhesive thickness on the J-integral, the Q`-factor which is a modified version of the Q-factor, and the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) are investigated. It is found from the analyses that the CTOD begins to decrease at very thin bond thickness, the Q`-factor being almost constant. The decrease of the fracture toughness at very thin adhesive layer is expected by the present analysis.

  13. Intrinsic adhesion force of lubricants to steel surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwi

    2004-09-01

    The intrinsic adhesion forces of lubricants and other pharmaceutical materials to a steel surface were quantitatively compared using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A steel sphere was attached to the tip of an AFM cantilever, and its adhesion forces to the substrate surfaces of magnesium stearate, sodium stearyl fumarate, lactose, 4-acetamidophenol, and naproxen were measured. Surface roughness varied by an order of magnitude among the materials. However, the results clearly showed that the two lubricants had about half the intrinsic adhesion force as lactose, 4-acetamidophenol, and naproxen. Differences in the intrinsic adhesion forces of the two lubricants were insignificant. The lubricant molecules were unable to cover the steel surface during AFM measurements. Intrinsic adhesion force can slightly be modified by surface treatment and compaction, and its tip-to-tip variation was not greater than its difference between lubricants and other pharmaceutical particles. This study provides a quantitative fundamental basis for understanding adhesion related issues.

  14. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  15. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Shiyun; Ni Kun; Li Jinmei

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum has suitable workability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strength of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is higher than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dry shrinkage of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is lower than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The leaching of sulfate ion of mortar is studied. - Abstract: A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg

  16. Evaluation of nitric and acetic acid resistance of cement mortars containing high-volume black rice husk ash.

    PubMed

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the performance of cement mortar containing black rice husk ash (BRHA) under nitric and acetic acid attacks. The BRHA, collected from an electrical generating power plant that uses rice husk as fuel, was ground using a grinding machine. The compressive strength loss, weight loss, and expansion of mortars under nitric and acetic acid attack were investigated. The test results of BRHA properties in accordance with the ASTM C 618 standard found that the optimal grinding time was 4 h as this achieved a Blaine fineness of 5370 cm(2)/g. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55, 0.60, and 0.65. From test results, when the percentage replacements of BRHA in cement increased, it was observed that the strength loss and weight loss of mortars containing BRHA under acetic acid attack were higher than those of the mortars against nitric acid attack. It was found that, of the various BHRA mortars, the strength loss and weight loss due to nitric and acetic acid attacks were the lowest in the mortar with 10% BRHA replacement. For 10%, 20% and 30% BRHA replacements, the rate of expansion of the BRHA mortar decreased when compared with the control mortar. For the mortars with other percentage replacements of BRHA, the rate of expansion increased. Furthermore, the effective water-to-binder ratios of control and BRHA mortars were the primary factor for determining the durability of mortar mixed with BRHA.

  17. A bioinspired wet/dry microfluidic adhesive for aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Sharma, Ashutosh; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2010-01-05

    A pressure-sensitive, nonreacting and nonfouling adhesive which can perform well both in air and underwater is very desirable because of its potential applications in various settings such as biomedical, marine, and automobile. Taking a clue from nature that many natural adhesive pads have complex structures underneath the outer adhesive layer, we have prepared thin elastic adhesive films with subsurface microstructures using PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) and investigated their performance underwater. The presence of embedded structure enhances the energy of adhesion considerably both in air and underwater. Furthermore, filling the channels with liquid of suitable surface tension modifies the internal stress profile, resulting into significant enhancement in adhesive performance. As this increase in adhesion is mediated by mechanics and not by surface chemistry, the presence of water does not alter its performance much. For the same reason, this adhesion mechanism works with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The adhesive can be reused because of its elastic surface. Moreover, unlike many other present-day adhesives, its performance does not decrease with time.

  18. Effects of the restoration mortar on chalk stone buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, R. M.; Teodorescu, S.; Ştirbescu, R. M.; Dulamă, I. D.; Şuică-Bunghez, I. R.; Bucurică, I. A.; Fierăscu, R. C.; Fierscu, I.; Ion, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    The monument buildings as components of cultural heritage are exposed to degradation of surfaces and chemical and mechanical degradation, often associated to soiling and irreversible deterioration of the building. In many conservative and restorative works, a cement-based mortar was used without knowing all the adverse effects of this material on the building. This paper deals with the study of the effects of natural cement used in restorative works in the particular case of the Basarabi-Murfatlar Churches Ensemble. Cement-based materials exposed to sulfate present in the chalk stone - gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), can induce signs of deterioration, due to ettringite ([Ca3Al (OH)612H2O]2(SO4)32H2O) or thaumasite (Ca3[Si(OH)612H2O](CO3)SO4) formation. These phases contribute to strain within the material, inducing expansion, strength loss, spalling and severe degradation. Several combined techniques (XRD, EDXRF, ICP-AES, SEM, EDS, sulphates content, FT-IR and Raman analysis were carried out to put into evidence the effects of them on the building walls.

  19. Instant acting adhesive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. R.; Haines, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Adhesive developes 80 percent of minimum bond strength of 250 psi less than 30 sec after activation is required. Adhesive is stable, handles easily, is a low toxic hazard, and is useful in industrial and domestic prototype bonding and clamping operations.

  20. Effects of magnesium sulfate concentration on the sulfate resistance of mortars with and without silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerker, F.; Akoez, F.; Koral, S.; Yuezer, N.

    1997-02-01

    An investigation was carried out on the resistance of mortars to magnesium sulfate attack. Experiments were carried out on portland cement (PC) and portland cement-silica fume (PC-SF) mortars. Mortars were immersed in magnesium sulfate solutions after 28 days of lime-saturated water curing. Concentrations were 1900, 13,000 and 52,000 mg/L as SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} solutions. A number of physical and mechanical properties were determined at different periods of exposure up to 300 days. For the first 28 days of exposure, some improvements of mortar properties in magnesium sulfate environment were observed. This is the early stage of sulfate attack. Thereafter, negative changes of the properties indicate a transition stage. Deterioration process of mortars was retarded by the presence of silica fume. After the transition stage, negative changes of physical properties accelerate, indicating the later stage. Compressive and flexural strength properties showed different response to magnesium sulfate attack at later stage. Only in 52,000 mg/L concentration, all the measured properties showed clear negative changes.

  1. Use of waste brick as a partial replacement of cement in mortar.

    PubMed

    Naceri, Abdelghani; Hamina, Makhloufi Chikouche

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of waste brick as a partial replacement for cement in the production of cement mortar. Clinker was replaced by waste brick in different proportions (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) by weight for cement. The physico-chemical properties of cement at anhydrous state and the hydrated state, thus the mechanical strengths (flexural and compressive strengths after 7, 28 and 90 days) for the mortar were studied. The microstructure of the mortar was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the mineralogical composition (mineral phases) of the artificial pozzolan was investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the particle size distributions was obtained from laser granulometry (LG) of cements powders used in this study. The results obtained show that the addition of artificial pozzolan improves the grinding time and setting times of the cement, thus the mechanical characteristics of mortar. A substitution of cement by 10% of waste brick increased mechanical strengths of mortar. The results of the investigation confirmed the potential use of this waste material to produce pozzolanic cement.

  2. Use of waste brick as a partial replacement of cement in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Naceri, Abdelghani Hamina, Makhloufi Chikouche

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of waste brick as a partial replacement for cement in the production of cement mortar. Clinker was replaced by waste brick in different proportions (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) by weight for cement. The physico-chemical properties of cement at anhydrous state and the hydrated state, thus the mechanical strengths (flexural and compressive strengths after 7, 28 and 90 days) for the mortar were studied. The microstructure of the mortar was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the mineralogical composition (mineral phases) of the artificial pozzolan was investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the particle size distributions was obtained from laser granulometry (LG) of cements powders used in this study. The results obtained show that the addition of artificial pozzolan improves the grinding time and setting times of the cement, thus the mechanical characteristics of mortar. A substitution of cement by 10% of waste brick increased mechanical strengths of mortar. The results of the investigation confirmed the potential use of this waste material to produce pozzolanic cement.

  3. Coupled Effect of Elevated Temperature and Cooling Conditions on the Properties of Ground Clay Brick Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Abd El Aziz, Magdy; Abdelaleem, Salh; Heikal, Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    When a concrete structure is exposed to fire and cooling, some deterioration in its chemical resistivity and mechanical properties takes place. This deterioration can reach a level at which the structure may have to be thoroughly renovated or completely replaced. In this investigation, four types of cement mortars, ground clay bricks (GCB)/sand namely 0/3, 1/2, 2/1 and 3/0, were used. Three different cement contents were used: 350, 400 and 450 kg/m3. All the mortars were prepared and cured in tap water for 3 months and then kept in laboratory atmospheric conditions up to 6 months. The specimens were subjected to elevated temperatures up to 700°C for 3h and then cooled by three different conditions: water, furnace, and air cooling. The results show that all the mortars subjected to fire, irrespective of cooling mode, suffered a significant reduction in compressive strength. However, the mortars cooled in air exhibited a relativity higher reduction in compressive strength rather than those water or furnace cooled. The mortars containing GCB/sand (3/0) and GCB/sand (1/2) exhibited a relatively higher thermal stability than the others.

  4. Neutron attenuation characteristics of polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and heavy aggregate concrete and mortars.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Majid, S; Othman, F

    1994-03-01

    Polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets were introduced into concrete to improve its neutron attenuation characteristics while several types of heavy coarse aggregates were used to improve its gamma ray attenuation properties. Neutron and gamma ray attenuation were studied in concrete samples containing coarse aggregates of barite, pyrite, basalt, hematite, and marble as well as polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets in narrow-beam geometry. The highest neutron attenuation was shown by polyethylene mortar, followed by polyvinyl chloride mortar; barite and pyrite concrete showed higher gamma ray attenuation than ordinary concrete. Broad-beam and continuous (infinite) medium geometries were used to study the neutron attenuation of samples containing polymers at different concentrations with and without heavy aggregates, the fitting equations were established, and from these the neutron removal coefficients were deduced. In a radiation field of neutrons and gamma rays, the appropriate concentration of polymer and heavy aggregate can be selected to give the optimum total dose attenuation depending on the relative intensities of each type of radiation. This would give much better design flexibility over ordinary concrete. The compressive strength tests performed on mortar and concrete samples showed that their value, in general, decreases as polymer concentration increases and that the polyvinyl chloride mortar showed higher values than the polyethylene mortar. For general construction purposes, the compression strength was considered acceptable in these samples.

  5. Lime-pozzolana mortars in Roman catacombs: composition, structures and restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Soler, Vicente; Garcia-Guinea, Javier

    2005-08-01

    Analyses of microsamples collected from Roman catacombs and samples of lime-pozzolana mortars hardened in the laboratory display higher contents in carbonated binder than other subaerial Roman monuments. The measured environmental data inside the Saint Callistus and Domitilla catacombs show a constant temperature of 15-17 deg C, a high CO{sub 2} content (1700 to 3500 ppm) and a relative humidity close to 100%. These conditions and particularly the high CO{sub 2} concentration speed-up the lime calcitization roughly by 500% and reduce the cationic diffusion to form hydrous calcium aluminosilicates. The structure of Roman catacomb mortars shows (i) coarser aggregates and thicker beds on the inside, (ii) thin, smoothed, light and fine-grained external surfaces with low content of aggregates and (iii) paintings and frescoes on the outside. The observed high porosity of the mortars can be attributed to cracking after drying linked with the high binder content. Hardened lime lumps inside the binder denote low water/mortar ratios for slaking. The aggregate tephra pyroclasts rich in aluminosilicate phases with accessorial amounts of Ba, Sr, Rb, Cu and Pb were analysed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and also by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) to identify the size and distribution of porosity. Results support procedures using local materials, special mortars and classic techniques for restoration purposes in hypogeal backgrounds.

  6. Quantitative sensing of corroded steel rebar embedded in cement mortar specimens using ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu Twumasi, Jones; Le, Viet; Tang, Qixiang; Yu, Tzuyang

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcing bars (rebars) is the primary cause for the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Traditional corrosion monitoring methods such as half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance can only detect the presence of corrosion but cannot quantify it. This study presents an experimental investigation of quantifying degree of corrosion of steel rebar inside cement mortar specimens using ultrasonic testing (UT). A UT device with two 54 kHz transducers was used to measure ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of cement mortar, uncorroded and corroded reinforced cement mortar specimens, utilizing the direct transmission method. The results obtained from the study show that UPV decreases linearly with increase in degree of corrosion and corrosion-induced cracks (surface cracks). With respect to quantifying the degree of corrosion, a model was developed by simultaneously fitting UPV and surface crack width measurements to a two-parameter linear model. The proposed model can be used for predicting the degree of corrosion of steel rebar embedded in cement mortar under similar conditions used in this study up to 3.03%. Furthermore, the modeling approach can be applied to corroded reinforced concrete specimens with additional modification. The findings from this study show that UT has the potential of quantifying the degree of corrosion inside reinforced cement mortar specimens.

  7. Immobilization in cement mortar of chromium removed from water using titania nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Husnain, Ahmed; Qazi, Ishtiaq Ahmed; Khaliq, Wasim; Arshad, Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    Because of the high toxicity of chromium, particularly as Cr (VI), it is removed from industrial effluents before their discharge into water bodies by a variety of techniques, including adsorption. Ultimate disposal of the sludge or the adsorbate, however, is a serious problem. While titania, in nanoparticle form, serves as a very good adsorbent for chromium, as an additive, it also helps to increase the compressive strength of mortar and concrete. Combining these two properties of the material, titania nanoparticles were used to adsorb chromium and then added to mortar up to a concentration of 20% by weight. The compressive strength of the resulting mortar specimens that replaced 15% of cement with chromium laden titania showed an improved strength than that without titania, thus confirming that this material had positive effect on the mortar strength. Leachate tests using the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) confirmed that the mortar sample chromium leachate was well within the permissible limits. The proposed technique thus offers a safe and viable method for the ultimate disposal of toxic metal wastes, in general, and those laden waste chromium, in particular.

  8. Strength and Density of Geopolymer Mortar Cured at Ambient Temperature for Use as Repair Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warid Wazien, A. Z.; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Abd. Razak, Rafiza; Mohd Remy Rozainy, M. A. Z.; Faheem Mohd Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    Geopolymers produced by synthesizing aluminosilicate source materials with an alkaline activator solution promised an excellent properties akin to the existing construction material. This study focused on the effect of various binder to sand ratio on geopolymer mortar properties. Mix design of geopolymer mortar was produced using NaOH concentration of 12 molars, ratio of fly ash/alkaline activator and ratio Na2SiO3/NaOH of 2.0 and 2.5 respectively. Samples subsequently ware cured at ambient temperature. The properties of geopolymer mortar were analysed in term of compressive strength and density at different period which are on the 3rd and 7th day of curing. Experimental results revealed that the addition of sand slightly increase the compressive strength of geopolymer. The optimum compressive strength obtained was up to 31.39 MPa on the 7th day. The density of geopolymer mortar was in the range between 2.0 g/cm3 to 2.23 g/cm3. Based on this findings, the special properties promoted by geopolymer mortar display high potential to be implemented in the field of concrete patch repair.

  9. LARC-13 adhesive development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Sheppard, C. H.; Johnson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A LARC-13 type adhesive system was developed and property data obtained that demonstrated improved thermomechanical properties superior to base LARC-13 adhesive. An improved adhesive for 589 K (600 F) use was developed by physical or chemical modification of LARC-13. The adhesive was optimized for titanium and composite bonding, and a compatible surface preparation for titanium and composite substrates was identified. The data obtained with the improved adhesive system indicated it would meet the 589 K (600 F) properties desired for application on space shuttle components. Average titanium lap shear data were: (1) 21.1 MPa (3355 psi) at RT, (2) 13.0 MPa (1881 psi) at 600 F, and (3) 16.4 MPa (2335) after aging 125 hours at 600 F and tested at 600 F.

  10. Properties, characterization, and decay of sticky rice–lime mortars from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall (China)

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Ya; Fu, Xuan; Gu, Haibing; Gao, Feng; Liu, Shaojun

    2014-04-01

    Urgent restoration of the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall brings about the need for a study of the formulation and properties of mortars. In the present paper, mortar samples from the Wugang Ming dynasty city wall were characterized in a combination of sheet polarized light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, thermogravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Results show that mortars are mainly built up from inorganic calcium carbonate based organic–inorganic hybrid material with a small amount of sticky rice, which plays a crucial role in forming dense and compact microstructure of mortars and effectively hindering penetration of water and air into mortars. Analysis of decayed products shows that the detrimental soluble salts originates from ambient environment. - Highlights: • Mortars used in the Wugang city wall are a calcium carbonate-sticky rice hybrid bonding material. • Carbonation processing is extremely slow due to dense and compact microstructure of mortars. • Decying of mortars results from the appearance of soluble salt from ambient environment.

  11. The Impact of Involvement in Mortar Board Senior Honor Society on Lifelong Views of Civic Engagement and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Daniel James

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact that involvement in Mortar Board National Senior Honor Society has on lifelong views of civic engagement and leadership. Mortar Board Senior Honor Society is a collegiate honor society established in 1918 that recognizes students for their outstanding contributions to their college or university community in the…

  12. Improving adhesion of seasonings to crackers with hydrocolloid solutions.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Matthew E; Barringer, Sheryl A

    2013-11-01

    Food powders were applied on crackers that had been coated using water, oil, emulsion, sucrose, or hydrocolloid solutions. The hydrocolloids that were used include gellan gum, kappa-carrageenan, methylcellulose, gum karaya, gum tragacanth, gum arabic, guar gum, modified starch, and maltodextrin. Solutions of similar hydrophobicity to the powder gave the greatest adhesion. NaCl, barbecue (BBQ), ranch, and sour cream & onion (SC&O) seasoning showed greatest adhesion with water, cheese powder with an emulsion of 12.5% to 25% oil, and cocoa powder with oil. For NaCl, BBQ, ranch, and SC&O seasoning, hydrocolloids improved the adhesion over using water alone, with gellan gum providing the greatest adhesion. Hydrocolloid structural differences, including the presence or absence of branching, substitution of sugar units, and molecular weight affect water binding and thickening of the hydrocolloid spray that seemed to be significant factors affecting adhesion of powders to the target surface. For cheese powder, hydrocolloids were capable of replacing the oil within an emulsion while improving or maintaining the same level of adhesion, with gum arabic providing the greatest adhesion. For cocoa powder, hydrocolloid solutions were ineffective adhesives due to differences in hydrophilicity that result in insolubility. The effect of hydrocolloid concentration on adhesion was dependent both on the hydrocolloid type and the concentration that is sprayable, with 0.5% being the optimum concentration for most gums. Adhesion using sucrose solutions was determined by particle size and relative hydrophobicity. Increasing sucrose concentration decreased adhesion of smaller particles, but increased adhesion of larger particles. Adhesion of NaCl significantly increased with decreasing NaCl size using oil, water, and sucrose solutions.

  13. Cyanoacrylate Adhesives in Eye Wounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EYE, *WOUNDS AND INJURIES), (*ADHESIVES, EYE), (*ACRYLIC RESINS, ADHESIVES), CORNEA , HEALING, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), NECROSIS, SURGICAL SUPPLIES, STRENGTH(PHYSIOLOGY), SURGERY, THERAPY

  14. Mechanical behavior of mortars containing sewage sludge ash (SSA) and Portland cements with different tricalcium aluminate content

    SciTech Connect

    Monzo, J.; Paya, J.; Borrachero, M.V.; Peris-Mora, E.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of sewage sludge ash (SSA) on cement mortars strength has been studied. To evaluate better the increase of strength compared to control mortar, relative compressive strength gain (CSGr) and flexural strength gain (FSGr) were calculated. The experience shows that SSA behaves as an active material, producing an increase of compressive strength compared to control mortar, probably due to pozzolanic properties of SSA. It can be emphasized that high sulfur content of SSA (12.4%) does not seem to have influence on compressive strength of mortars containing SSA. When CSGr of mortars containing different types of cements are compared, no clear correlation is observed between CSGr and C{sub 3}A content in cement.

  15. Use of olive biomass fly ash in the preparation of environmentally friendly mortars.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Yusta, Manuel; Mármol, Isabel; Morales, Julián; Sánchez, Luis

    2011-08-15

    The incorporation of fly ash from olive biomass (FAOB) combustion in cogeneration plants into cement based mortars was explored by analyzing the chemical composition, mineralogical phases, particle size, morphology, and IR spectra of the resulting material. Pozzolanic activity was detected and found to be related with the presence of calcium aluminum silicates phases. The preparation of new olive biomass fly ash content mortars is effective by replacing either CaCO(3) filler or cement with FAOB. In fact, up to 10% of cement can be replaced without detracting from the mechanical properties of a mortar. This can provide an alternative way to manage the olive biomass fly ash as waste produced in thermal plants and reduce cement consumption in the building industry, and hence an economically and environmentally attractive choice.

  16. Mechanical properties of the rust layer induced by impressed current method in reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Care, S. Nguyen, Q.T.

    2008-08-15

    This paper describes the mechanical effects of rust layer formed in reinforced mortar through accelerated tests of corrosion. The morphological and physico-chemical properties (composition, structures) of the corrosion system were characterized at different stages by using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The corrosion pattern was mainly characterized by a rust layer confined at the interface between the steel and the mortar. Expansion coefficient of rust products was determined from the rust thickness and the Faraday's law. Furthermore, in order to understand the mechanical effects of corrosion on the damage of mortar, displacement field measurements were obtained by using digital image correlation. An analytical model (hollow cylinder subjected to inner and outer pressures) was used with a set of experimental data to deduce the time of cracking and the order of magnitude of the mechanical properties of the rust layer.

  17. Influence of curing temperature on cement hydration and mechanical strength development of fly ash mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, Y.; Marchand, J.

    1997-07-01

    The influence of fly ash and curing temperature on cement hydration and compressive strength development of mortars was investigated. Test parameters included type of fly ash (two different Class F fly ashes were tested), the level of cement replacement (10, 20 and 30% by mass), and curing temperature (20 C and 40 C). The mortar physical and microstructural properties were determined by means of thermal analyses, compressive strength measurements and SEM observations. Test results confirm that fly ash tends to increase significantly the rate of cement hydration at early age. Data also demonstrate that an elevation of the curing temperature reduces the long-term compressive strength of the reference mortar mixture. In contrast, an increase of the curing temperature seems to have no detrimental effect on the long-term compressive strength of the fly ash mixtures.

  18. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L. J.; Borosnyói, A.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, soda-lime glass cullet (flint, amber, green) and special glass cullet (soda-alkaline earth-silicate glass coming from low pressure mercury-discharge lamp cullet and incandescent light bulb borosilicate glass waste cullet) were ground into fine powders in a laboratory planetary ball mill for 30 minutes. CEM I 42.5N Portland cement was applied in mortar mixtures, substituted with waste glass powder at levels of 20% and 30%. Characterisation and testing of waste glass powders included fineness by laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption technique, particle density by pycnometry and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry. Compressive strength, early age shrinkage cracking and drying shrinkage tests, heat of hydration of mortars, temperature of hydration, X-ray diffraction analysis and volume stability tests were performed to observe the influence of waste glass powder substitution for Portland cement on physical and engineering properties of mortar mixtures.

  19. Effect of Mineral Admixtures on Resistance to Sulfuric Acid Solution of Mortars with Quaternary Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhloufi, Zoubir; Bederina, Madani; Bouhicha, Mohamed; Kadri, El-Hadj

    This research consists to study the synergistic action of three mineral additions simultaneously added to the cement. This synergistic effect has a positive effect on the sustainability of limestone mortars. Tests were performed on mortars based on crushed limestone sand and manufactured by five quaternary binders (ordinary Portland cement and CPO mixed simultaneously with filler limestone, blast-furnace and natural pozzolan). The purpose of this research was to identify the resistance of five different mortars to the solution of sulfuric acid. Changes in weight loss and compressive strength measured at 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 days for each acid solution were studied. We followed up on the change in pH of the sulfuric acid solution at the end of each month up to 180 days.

  20. Effect of various superplasticizers on rheological properties of cement paste and mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, I.; Agarwal, S.K. )

    1994-01-01

    The effect of eight commercial superplasticizers including one developed from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL) at CBRI on the rheological properties viz. viscosity and flow of cement paste and mortars have been investigated. The viscosity measurements have been made at various shear rates (5--100 rpm). It is found that at higher rates (100 rpm) even with the low concentration of superplasticizers (0.1), the viscosity of the cement paste is more or less the same as that obtained with 0.6 % dosages of SPs at lesser shear rates. The effect of split addition (delayed addition) of superplasticizers on viscosity of cement paste and 1:3 cement sand mortar have also been studied. A decrease in viscosity due to split addition has been observed in the cement paste and there is an increase of 15--20 % in flow of mortars.

  1. Effect of brief heat-curing on microstructure and mechanical properties in fresh cement based mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, P.; Hidalgo, A.; Marmol, I.; Morales, J.; Sanchez, L.

    2009-07-15

    The effect of temperature on fresh mortar and cement paste was evaluated by simulating the curing conditions of external buildings plastering applied under extremely hot weather. The specimens were heated at controlled temperatures in the 40-80 {sup o}C range by exposure to IR radiation over short periods. The effect of soaking for a short time was also examined. The results of compressive strength tests, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mercury porosimetry helped to characterize the mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the studied sample. Early age behaviour (28 days) in neat cement was barely affected by the temperature. By contrast, exposure to high temperatures caused significant microstructural changes in the mortar. However, successive soaking over short periods was found to reactivate the mechanism of curing and restore the expected mechanical properties. Based on the results, application of cement based mortar at high temperatures is effective when followed by a short, specific soaking process.

  2. Stability Analysis of a mortar cover ejected at various Mach numbers and angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Jane; Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel; Andrejczyk, Joe; Kandis, Mike

    2011-11-01

    This study utilized CFD software to predict the aerodynamic coefficient of a wedge-shaped mortar cover which is ejected from a spacecraft upon deployment of its Parachute Recovery System (PRS). Concern over recontact or collision between the mortar cover and spacecraft served as the impetus for this study in which drag and moment coefficients were determined at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.6 at 30-degree increments. These CFD predictions were then used as inputs to a two-dimensional, multi-body, three-DoF trajectory model to calculate the relative motion of the mortar cover and spacecraft. Based upon those simulations, the study concluded a minimal/zero risk of collision with either the spacecraft or PRS. Sponsored by Pioneer Aerospace.

  3. Influence of bicarbonate ions on the deterioration of mortar bars in sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kunther, W.; Lothenbach, B.; Scrivener, K.

    2013-02-15

    This work investigates the influence of bicarbonate ions on the deterioration of cementitious material exposed to sulfate ions. Mortars based on a CEM I and on a CEM III/B cement were investigated. Experimental investigations were compared to thermodynamic modeling and phase characterization to understand the differences in deterioration. The presence of bicarbonate ions significantly reduced the expansion of the CEM I mortars. Thermodynamic modeling showed that at high concentrations of bicarbonate ettringite and gypsum become unstable. Microstructural characterization combined with information from thermodynamic modeling suggests that conditions of high supersaturation with respect to ettringite are unlikely in the samples exposed in solutions containing bicarbonate. Consequently, expansive forces are not generated by the crystallization pressure of ettringite. There was little expansion of the CEM III/B sample even in the sodium sulfate solution. In the bicarbonate solution this mortar showed a highly leached zone at the surface in which calcite was observed.

  4. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles.

  5. Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic and hydrophilic textured biomaterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Chong; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2014-06-01

    It is of great interest to use nano- or micro-structured surfaces to inhibit microbial adhesion and biofilm formation and thereby to prevent biomaterial-associated infection, without modification of the surface chemistry or bulk properties of the materials and without use of the drugs. Our previous study showed that a submicron textured polyurethane surface can inhibit staphylococcal bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. To further understand the effect of the geometry of textures on bacterial adhesion as well as the underlying mechanism, in this study, submicron and micron textured polyurethane surfaces featuring ordered arrays of pillars were fabricated and modified to have different wettabilities. All the textured surfaces were originally hydrophobic and showed significant reductions in Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A adhesion in phosphate buffered saline or 25% platelet poor plasma solutions under shear, as compared to smooth surfaces. After being subjected to an air glow discharge plasma treatment, all polyurethane surfaces were modified to hydrophilic, and reductions in bacterial adhesion on surfaces were subsequently found to be dependent on the size of the patterns. The submicron patterned surfaces reduced bacterial adhesion, while the micron patterned surfaces led to increased bacterial adhesion. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the S. epidermidis cell surfaces were extracted and purified, and were coated on a glass colloidal surface so that the adhesion force and separation energy in interactions of the EPS and the surface could be measured by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. These results were consistent with the bacterial adhesion observations. Overall, the data suggest that the increased surface hydrophobicity and the decreased availability of the contact area contributes to a reduction in bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic textured surfaces, while the availability of the contact area is the primary determinant factor

  6. Properties of Portland cement mortars incorporating high amounts of oil-fuel ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Paya, J.; Borrachero, M.V.; Monzo, J.; Bonilla, M.

    1999-06-01

    The residue of oil-fuel burned at the electrical power plant of Grao de Castellon (Spain) has been incorporated in Portland cement mortar and concrete. The used oil-fuel ash (OFA) had a high percentage of magnesium compounds because of magnesium oxide addition for removing slag and ashes from boilers and pipes. Several studies had been carried out on stabilization of toxic metals also occurring in oil-fuel ashes (particularly vanadium and nickel), by mixing with coal fly ashes and cement. In this case, the presence of magnesium compounds in the composition of the studied oil-fuel ashes could alter the mechanical and chemical properties of the cement matrix in fresh and hardened mortar and concrete. The authors present here the chemical, physical and mineralogical characterization of oil-fuel ashes and the behavior of Portland cement mortars incorporating high amounts of these oil-fuel ashes. The study includes workability, water demand, setting time, expansion and compressive strength developments. Preliminary results demonstrate a high absorption of water by oil-fuel ash particles, which promotes an increase in the water/cement ratio for a given workability. Acceleration of Portland cement/oil-fuel ash particles, which promotes an increase in the water/cement ratio for a given workability. Acceleration of Portland cement/oil-fuel ash pastes setting times was observed, due to the presence of carbonates. On the other hand, no significant expansion in specimens due to the presence of magnesium compounds was detected and, consequently, mechanical properties of hardened mortars containing oil-fuel ashes did not decrease with curing time. Compressive strengths for mortars containing OFA were much lower, however, than control mortar samples.

  7. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  8. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  9. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  10. Adhesion of Polymer Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, John J.; Bates, Frank S.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Silas, James A.

    2005-07-01

    The adhesion and bending modulus of polybutadiene-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer vesicles made from a bidisperse mixture of polymers is measured using micropipette aspiration. The adhesion energy between biotinylated vesicles and avidin beads is modeled by incorporating the extension of the adhesive ligands above the surface brush of the vesicle according to the blob model of bidisperse polymer mixtures of Komura and Safran assuming the polymer brush at the surface of the vesicle is compact. The same model accurately reproduces the scaling of the bending modulus with polymer composition.

  11. Adhesive Bonding for Shelters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    weru uvaluated, the type of etch bath " sweetener " and the type of rinse\\water used. The type of etch bath " sweetener " was found to have a dramatic effect...EA9601NW Adhesives on 50521134 Bare Adherenas 39 13 Stress-Durability Behavior Sun-mary 40 14 Effect of Ltch Bath Sweetening Alloy on Interracial Durability...34"’ -,,• , •’• •"• " ,,,,, 9 Adhesive/Primer/Adherend Alloy/Surface Preparation Combinations Adherend OFPL Sweetening Rinse Adhesive:Primer Alloy Alloy

  12. Steelmaking slag as aggregate for mortars: effects of particle dimension on compression strength.

    PubMed

    Faraone, Nicola; Tonello, Gabriele; Furlani, Erika; Maschio, Stefano

    2009-11-01

    The present paper reports on the results of some experiments obtained from the production, hydration and subsequent measurement of the mechanical properties of several mortars prepared using a commercial CII/B-LL Portland cement, steelmaking slag, superplasticizer and water. Relevant parameters for the mortar preparation are the weight ratios of cement/water, the weight ratio superplasticizer/cement and between fine and granulated coarse particles. It has been demonstrated that optimisation of such parameters leads to the production of materials with mechanical properties suitable for civil engineering applications. Moreover, materials with improved compressive strength can be prepared by the use of slag containing extensive amounts of large particles.

  13. Ultrasonic nondestructive characterization of mortars by the width of the resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bita, H.; Faiz, B.; Moudden, A.; Lotfi, H.; Ouacha, El H.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we study the width of the resonances of the ultrasound waves reflection coefficient backscattered by a plane structure of the mortar. We establish the relationship between this width with two parameters which are widely used in non-destructive characterization of cementitious materials namely the velocity and attenuation. Monitoring the hydration of three solutions of mortars produced with different sizes of sand grains shows that the experimental results confirmed the theoretical predictions. Linear correlations are established between the width of resonance and the two ultrasonic parameters.

  14. Enhanced affordable methods for assessment of material characteristics and consolidation effects on stone and mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdacky, M.; Slizkova, Z.

    2012-04-01

    In situ considerate testing of surface cohesion of historic stone and mortar materials suffers from a lack of suitable affordable non-destructive methods. The problem is mainly important for assessment of surface degradation characteristics and/or evaluation of effectiveness of consolidation treatment of degraded historic materials. The paper presents two innovations of simple testing methods which provide reliable data on material cohesion and water uptake. The so called "Scotch Tape Test" or peeling test has been introduced into the field of conservation for testing the cohesion qualities of historic materials mainly stone and renders in sixties without any standards or reliably verified recommendations for the above mentioned application in the conservation practice. Licentious use without adequate knowledge and sufficient understanding leads to non-comparable and non-reproducible as well as in many cases incorrect and severely biased results and assessments. Therefore, the authors after a research and comparative testing have established limits for its application, reliable procedures and a "standard" protocol for testing of cohesion characteristics of brittle and quasi brittle materials mainly mortars and stones. This article presents a detailed analysis of the peeling test procedures, and suggests recommendations for performing peeling tests and for evaluating the obtained results. Also in situ testing of material water uptake is a very basic and indispensable technique in conservation practice and it correlates significantly with some other material characteristics. The capillary properties of porous materials can be measured in situ using a Karsten tube and modified tools or methods which are quite cumbersome, and cannot be performed on inclined surfaces, e.g. vaults or ceilings. There are other difficulties with Karsten tube measurements, e.g. problems with fixing a heavy glass tube on vertical surfaces, a need for two operators, and soiling of the surface

  15. Probing adhesion forces at the molecular scale

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.C.; Houston, J.E.; Michalske, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of adhesion forces at the molecular scale, such as those discussed here, are necessary to understand macroscopic boundary-layer behavior such as adhesion, friction, wear, lubrication, and many other important phenomena. The authors` recent interfacial force microscopy (IFM) studies have provided detailed information about the mechanical response of both self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films and the underlying substrates. In addition, they recently demonstrated that the IFM is useful for studying the chemical nature of such films. In this talk, the authors discuss a new method for studying surface interactions and chemical reactions using the IFM. To quantitatively measure the work of adhesion and bond energies between two organic thin films, they modify both a Au substrate and a Au probe with self-assembling organomercaptan molecules having either the same or different end groups (-CH{sub 3}, -NH{sub 2}, and -COOH), and then analyze the force-versus-displacement curves (force profiles) that result from the approach to contact of the two surfaces. Their results show that the magnitude of the adhesive forces measured between methyl-methyl interactions are in excellent agreement with van der Waals calculations using Lifshitz theory and previous experimentally determined values. Moreover, the measured peak adhesive forces scale as expected for van der Waals, hydrogen-bonding, and acid-base interactions.

  16. Role of cellular adhesions in tissue dynamics spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Daniel A.; An, Ran; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2014-02-01

    Cellular adhesions play a critical role in cell behavior, and modified expression of cellular adhesion compounds has been linked to various cancers. We tested the role of cellular adhesions in drug response by studying three cellular culture models: three-dimensional tumor spheroids with well-developed cellular adhesions and extracellular matrix (ECM), dense three-dimensional cell pellets with moderate numbers of adhesions, and dilute three-dimensional cell suspensions in agarose having few adhesions. Our technique for measuring the drug response for the spheroids and cell pellets was biodynamic imaging (BDI), and for the suspensions was quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS). We tested several cytoskeletal chemotherapeutic drugs (nocodazole, cytochalasin-D, paclitaxel, and colchicine) on three cancer cell lines chosen from human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29), human pancreatic carcinoma (MIA PaCa-2), and rat osteosarcoma (UMR-106) to exhibit differences in adhesion strength. Comparing tumor spheroid behavior to that of cell suspensions showed shifts in the spectral motion of the cancer tissues that match predictions based on different degrees of cell-cell contacts. The HT-29 cell line, which has the strongest adhesions in the spheroid model, exhibits anomalous behavior in some cases. These results highlight the importance of using three-dimensional tissue models in drug screening with cellular adhesions being a contributory factor in phenotypic differences between the drug responses of tissue and cells.

  17. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  18. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  19. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  20. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  1. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K.; Park, Hyun S.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-01

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries.

  2. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K; Park, Hyun S; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-27

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries.

  3. Electrochemical deposition of conductive and adhesive polypyrrole-dopamine films

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Semin; Jang, Lindy K.; Park, Hyun S.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Electrode surfaces have been widely modified with electrically conductive polymers, including polypyrrole (PPY), to improve the performance of electrodes. To utilize conductive polymers for electrode modification, strong adhesion between the polymer films and electrode substrates should be ensured with high electrical/electrochemical activities. In this study, PPY films were electrochemically polymerized on electrodes (e.g., indium tin oxide (ITO)) with dopamine as a bio-inspired adhesive molecule. Efficient and fast PPY electrodeposition with dopamine (PDA/PPY) was found; the resultant PDA/PPY films exhibited greatly increased adhesion strengths of up to 3.7 ± 0.8 MPa and the modified electrodes had electrochemical impedances two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of an unmodified electrode. This electrochemical deposition of adhesive and conductive PDA/PPY offers a facile and versatile electrode modification for various applications, such as biosensors and batteries. PMID:27459901

  4. Visualizing and quantifying adhesive signals

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Wu, Yi; Hahn, Klaus; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the structural adaptation and signaling of adhesion sites in response to mechanical stimuli requires in situ characterization of the dynamic activation of a large number of adhesion components. Here, we review high resolution live cell imaging approaches to measure forces, assembly and interaction of adhesion components, and the activation of adhesion-mediated signals. We conclude by outlining computational multiplexing as a framework for the integration of these data into comprehensive models of adhesion signaling pathways. PMID:18586481

  5. Experimental Study of the Possibility to Make a Mortar with Ternary Sand (Natural and Artificial Fine Aggregates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baali, L.; Naceri, A.; Rahmouni, Z.; Mehidi, M. W. Noui

    This experimental study investigates the possibility to make a mortar with a ternary sand (natural and artificial fine aggregates). This method is utilized to correct the particle size distribution of various sands used in mortar. For this investigation, three sands have been used: a dune sand (DS), a slag sand (SS), and brick sand (BS) at different proportions in mortar. After crushing, the artificial fine aggregate (blast furnace slag and waste brick fine aggregate) was sifted in order to use it as fine aggregate. The effect of the quality and grain size distribution of natural fine aggregate (i.e., DS) and artificial fine aggregates (i.e., SS and BS) on the physical properties of ternary sand confected (density, porosity, fineness modulus, equivalent sand, particle size distribution, water absorption) and properties of fresh and hardened mortar were analysed. In the same way for this study, the physical properties and chemical compositions of DS, SS, BS and cement were investigated. The results obtained show that the mechanical strength on mortar depends of the nature and particle size distribution of sand studied. The reuse of this recycled material (slag blast furnace and waste brick) in the industry would contribute to the protection of the environment. This study shows the potential of this method to make mortar with ternary sand (natural and artificial fine aggreagates) in order to improve the physical properties of sand. Utilising natural and artificial fine aggregates to produce quality mortar should yield significant environmental benefits.

  6. The effects of different types of nano-silicon dioxide additives on the properties of sludge ash mortar.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huan-Lin; Chang, Wei-Che; Lin, Deng-Fong

    2009-04-01

    To improve the drawbacks caused by the sludge ash replacement in mortar, the previous studies have shown that the early strength and durability of sludge ash/cement mortar are improved by adding nano-silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2) to mortar. In this article, three types of nano-SiO2--SS, HS, and SP (manufacturer code names)--were applied to sludge ash/cement mixture to make paste or mortar specimens. The object is to further extend the recycle of the sludge ash by determining the better type of nano-SiO2 additive to improve properties of sludge ash/ cement paste or mortar. The cement was replaced by 0, 10, 20, and 30% of sludge ash, and 0 and 2% of nano-SiO2 additives were added to the sludge ash paste or mortar specimens. Tests such as setting time, compressive strength, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis were performed in this study. Test results show that nano-SiO2 additives can not only effectively increase the hydration product (calcium silicate hydrate [C-S-H] gel), but also make the crystal structure denser. Among the three types of nano-SiO2 additive, the SS type can best improve the properties of sludge ash/cement paste or mortar, followed by the SP and HS types.

  7. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaubroeck, David; Mader, Lothar; Dubruel, Peter; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  8. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  9. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shiyun; Ni, Kun; Li, Jinmei

    2012-07-01

    A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO(4)(2-) from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO(4)(2-) releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO(4)(2-) from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg·m(-2), which is lower than that from the mortar with 95% cement clinker and 5% FGD gypsum.

  10. Application of AMDS mortar as a treatment agent for arsenic in subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Lee, H.; Choi, U. K.; Yang, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    Among the treatment technologies available for As in soil and groundwater, adsorption or precipitation using acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge has become a promised technique because of high efficiency, inexpensiveness and simple to handling. The adsorbents were prepared by addition of Cement, Joomoonjin sand, fly ash, and Ca(OH)2 to air dry AMD sludge. In this work, the adsorption of As (III) and As (V) on AMDS mortar has been studied as a function of kinetic, pH, and initial arsenic concentration. Results of batch study showed that 75-90% of both As (III) and As (V) were removed at pH 7. Arsenic adsorption capacities were the highest at neutral pH condition and the adsorption equilibrium time reached in 7 days using AMDS mortar. Additionally, the adsorption kinetic process is expressed well by pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption capacities of AMDS mortar for As(III) and As(V) were found 19.04 and 30.75 mg g-1, respectively. The results of As (III) adsorption isotherms were fitted well to the Freundlich model. Moreover, As (V) adsorption isotherms were fitted well to the Langmuir model rather than Freundlich model. Based on experimental results in this study, we could conclude that AMDS mortar can be effectively used for arsenic removal agent from subsurface environment.

  11. Determination of Chlorinated Solvent Sorption by Porous Material—Application to Trichloroethene Vapor on Cement Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Musielak, Marion; Brusseau, Mark L.; Marcoux, Manuel; Morrison, Candice; Quintard, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the sorption of trichloroethene (TCE) vapor by concrete material or, more specifically, the cement mortar component. Gas-flow experiments were conducted using columns packed with small pieces of cement mortar obtained from the grinding of typical concrete material. Transport and retardation of TCE at high vapor concentrations (500 mg L−1) was compared to that of a non-reactive gas tracer (Sulfur Hexafluoride, SF6). The results show a large magnitude of retardation (retardation factor = 23) and sorption (sorption coefficient = 10.6 cm3 g−1) for TCE, compared to negligible sorption for SF6. This magnitude of sorption obtained with pollutant vapor is much bigger than the one obtained for aqueous-flow experiments conducted for water-saturated systems. The considerable sorption exhibited for TCE under vapor-flow conditions is attributed to some combination of accumulation at the air-water interface and vapor-phase adsorption, both of which are anticipated to be significant for this system given the large surface area associated with the cement mortar. Transport of both SF6 and TCE was simulated successfully with a two-region physical non-equilibrium model, consistent with the dual-medium structure of the crushed cement mortar. This work emphasizes the importance of taking into account sorption phenomena when modeling transport of volatile organic compounds through concrete material, especially in regard to assessing vapor intrusion. PMID:25530647

  12. Removal of graffiti from the mortar by using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjeevan, Poologanathan; Klemm, Agnieszka J.; Klemm, Piotr

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents part of the larger study on microstructural features of mortars and it's effects on laser cleaning process. It focuses on the influence of surface roughness, porosity and moisture content of mortars on the removal of graffiti by Nd:YAG laser. The properties of this laser are as follows: wavelength ( λ) 1.06 μm, energy: 500 mJ per pulse, pulse duration: 10 ns. The investigation shows that the variation of laser fluence with the number of pulses required for the laser cleaning can be divided into two zones, namely effective zone and ineffective zone. There is a linear relationship observed between number of pulses required for laser cleaning and the laser fluence in the effective zone, while the number of pulses required for the laser cleaning is almost constant even though the laser fluence increases in the ineffective zone. Moreover, surface roughness, porosity and moisture content of mortar samples have influence on the laser cleaning process. The effect of these parameters become however negligible at the high level of laser fluence. The number of pulses required for the laser cleaning is low for smooth surface or less porous mortar. Furthermore, the wetness of the samples facilitates the cleaning process.

  13. Is There a requirement for Heavy Mortars in Airland Battle Future (ALB- F)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-09

    ineffective the heavy mortars are in a fast -moving battle fought at the NTC, if they managed to get into the fight at all. Reports indicate that the heavy...Army Operational Concept," Final Draft, U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, Fort Leavenworth, KS. 10 January 1989. Forword . 2. Ibid. pp. D1-D3. 3. Ibid

  14. Tactical Means to Stow Super-Caliber Tailfins of a Developmental Flight-Controlled Mortar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Developmental Flight- Controlled Mortar CHRISTIAN A VALLEDOR MENTOR: JOHN CONDON GUIDANCE TECHNOLOGIES BRANCH, LETHALITY DIVISION WEAPONS AND MATERIALS...Materials Research Directorate,Guidance Technologies Branch, Lethality Division ,Aberdeen Proving Ground,MD,21005 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER... photosensitive polymer using a stereolithography 3-D printing process. This process resulted in highly accurate prototypes with physical properties close to

  15. The Shock Hugoniot Properties of Cement Paste & Mortar up to 18 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsembelis, K.; Proud, W. G.; Willmott, G. R.; Cross, D. L. A.

    2004-07-01

    A series of plate impact experiments was performed on cement paste and mortar. Longitudinal stresses were measured using embedded manganin stress gauges up to ca. 18 GPa. Data are then compared to those obtained in previous studies on concrete varied on aggregate size using a plate reverberation technique and velocity interferometry.

  16. Experimental study of the mechanical stabilization of electric arc furnace dust using fluid cement mortars.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, E F; Jiménez, J R; Ayuso, J; Fernández, J M; Brito, J de

    2017-03-15

    This article shows the results of an experimental study carried out in order to determine the maximum amount of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) that can be incorporated into fluid cement-based mortars to produce mechanically stable monolithic blocks. The leaching performance of all mixes was studied in order to classify them according to the EU Council Decision 2003/33/EC. Two mortars were used as reference and three levels of EAFD incorporation were tested in each of the reference mortars. As the incorporation ratio of EAFD/cement increases, the mechanical strength decreases. This is due to the greater EAFD/cement and water/cement ratios, besides the presence of a double-hydrated hydroxide of Ca and Zn (CaZn2(OH)6·2H2O) instead of the portlandite phase (Ca(OH)2) in the mixes made with EAFD, as well as non-hydrated tricalcium silicate. A mass ratio of 2:1 (EAFD: cement-based mortar) can be added maintaining a stable mechanical strength. The mechanical stabilization process also reduced the leaching of metals, although it was not able to reduce the Pb concentration below the limit for hazardous waste. The high amount of EAFD mechanically stabilized in this experimental study can be useful to reduce the storage volume required in hazardous waste landfills.

  17. Submicroscopic Deformation in Cement Paste and Mortar at High Load Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-15

    Composites: Strain Rate Effects on Fracture, S. Mindess and S. P. Shah, Eds., Materials Research Society Symposia Proceedings, Vol. 64, 1986, pp. 167-180. 3...Strength, and the Compressive Strength of Mortar," Bonding in Cementitious Composites, S. Mindess and S. P. Shah, Eds., Materials Research Society

  18. Advanced mortar coatings for cultural heritage protection. Durability towards prolonged UV and outdoor exposure.

    PubMed

    Pino, F; Fermo, P; La Russa, M; Ruffolo, S; Comite, V; Baghdachi, J; Pecchioni, E; Fratini, F; Cappelletti, G

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, two kinds of hybrid polymeric-inorganic coatings containing TiO2 or SiO2 particles and prepared starting from two commercial resins (Alpha®SI30 and Bluesil®BP9710) were developed and applied to two kinds of mortars (an air-hardening calcic lime mortar [ALM] and a natural hydraulic lime mortar [HLM]) to achieve better performances in terms of water repellence and consequently damage resistance. The two pure commercial resins were also applied for comparison purposes. Properties of the coated materials and their performance were studied using different techniques such as contact angle measurements, capillary absorption test, mercury intrusion porosimetry, surface free energy, colorimetric measurements and water vapour permeability tests. Tests were also performed to determine the weathering effects on both the commercial and the hybrid coatings in order to study their durability. Thus, exposures to UV radiation, to UV radiation/condensed water cycles and to a real polluted atmospheric environment have been performed. The effectiveness of the hybrid SiO2 based coating was demonstrated, especially in the case of the HLM mortar.

  19. On the role of hydrophobic Si-based protective coatings in limiting mortar deterioration.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, G; Fermo, P; Pino, F; Pargoletti, E; Pecchioni, E; Fratini, F; Ruffolo, S A; La Russa, M F

    2015-11-01

    In order to avoid both natural and artificial stone decay, mainly due to the interaction with atmospheric pollutants (both gases such as NOx and SO2 and particulate matter), polymeric materials have been widely studied as protective coatings enable to limit the penetration of fluids into the bulk material. In the current work, an air hardening calcic lime mortar (ALM) and a natural hydraulic lime mortar (HLM) were used as substrates, and commercially available Si-based resins (Alpha®SI30 and Silres®BS16) were adopted as protective agents to give hydrophobicity features to the artificial stones. Surface properties of coatings and their performance as hydrophobic agents were studied using different techniques such as contact angle measurements, capillary absorption test, mercury intrusion porosimetry, surface free energy, colorimetric measurements and water vapour permeability tests. Finally, some exposure tests to UV radiation and to real polluted atmospheric environments (a city centre and an urban background site) were carried out during a wintertime period (when the concentrations of the main atmospheric pollutants are higher) in order to study the durability of the coating systems applied. The effectiveness of the two commercial resins in reducing salt formation (sulphate and nitrate), induced by the interaction of the mortars with the atmospheric pollutants, was demonstrated in the case of the HLM mortar. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Binder characterisation of mortars used at different ages in the San Lorenzo church in Milan

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, Luca Carsana, Maddalena Gastaldi, Matteo Lollini, Federica Redaelli, Elena

    2013-06-15

    The paper describes a study on the mortars of the basilica of San Lorenzo in Milan, which was carried out to support an archaeological study aimed at dating and documenting the construction techniques used throughout the centuries. The church, which was founded between the 4th and 5th century, at the end of the period when Milan was the capital of the Roman Empire, was subjected in time to extensions, collapses and reconstructions that lasted until the Renaissance period and even later on. Thanks to the good state of conservation, San Lorenzo church is a collection of materials and construction techniques throughout a period of more than a millennium. Mortars were investigated in order to compare the binders used for structural elements built in different historical ages. From an archaeological study, samples of mortars attributed to the late Roman period, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance were available. The binder of each sample was separated by the aggregates and it was characterised on the basis of X-ray diffraction analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Constituents of the binder were identified and their origin is discussed in order to investigate if they could be attributed to the original composition of the binder or to possible alteration in time due to atmospheric pollution. Results show that, even though the binder is mainly based on magnesian lime, there are significant differences in the microstructure of the binding matrix used in mortars ascribed to the different historical periods. In the Roman period, in correspondence of the structural elements that required higher strength, also hydraulic cocciopesto mortars were detected. Gypsum was found in most samples, which was maybe added intentionally. - Highlights: • Binders of mortars of San Lorenzo church in Milan were investigated. • Roman, Middle Ages and Renaissance samples were studied by XRD, TG and SEM. • Magnesian-lime binders containing silico

  1. Genistein Modified Polymer Blends for Hemodialysis Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Teng; Kyu, Thein; Define, Linda; Alexander, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    A soybean-derived phytochemical called genistein was used as a modifying agent to polyether sulfone/polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PES/PVP) blends to produce multi-functional hemodialysis membranes. With the aid of phase diagrams of PES/PVP/genistein blends, asymmetric porous membranes were fabricated by coagulating in non-solvent. Both unmodified and genistein modified PES/PVP membranes were shown to be non-cytotoxic to the blood cells. Unmodified PES/PVP membranes were found to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, whereas the genistein modified membranes exhibited suppression for ˜60% of the ROS levels. Also, the genistein modified membranes revealed significant suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Moreover, addition of PVP to PES showed the reduced trend of platelet adhesion and then leveled off. However, the modified membranes exhibited suppression of platelet adhesion at low genistein loading, but beyond 15 wt%, the platelet adhesion level rised up.

  2. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  3. Fly and bottom ashes from biomass combustion as cement replacing components in mortars production: rheological behaviour of the pastes and materials compression strength.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Stefano; Tonello, Gabriele; Piani, Luciano; Furlani, Erika

    2011-10-01

    In the present research mortar pastes obtained by replacing a commercial cement with the equivalent mass of 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of fly ash or bottom ash from fir chips combustion, were prepared and rheologically characterized. It was observed that the presence of ash modifies their rheological behaviour with respect to the reference blend due to the presence, in the ashes, of KCl and K2SO4 which cause precipitation of gypsum and portlandite during the first hydration stages of the pastes. Hydrated materials containing 5 wt.% of ash display compression strength and absorption at 28 d of same magnitude as the reference composition; conversely, progressive increase of ash cause a continuous decline of materials performances. Conversely, samples tested after 180 d display a marked decline of compression strength, as a consequence of potassium elution and consequent alkali-silica reaction against materials under curing.

  4. Influence of the titanium dioxide addition in matrix formulation on the radwaste-mortar matrix characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Peric, A.D.

    1996-08-01

    The rutile form of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) was added to mortar matrix preparations with to improve the mechanical and physico-chemical characteristics of the radwaste-mortar matrix mixtures, in particular the leach-rate of the immobilized radionuclide. The final solidified radwaste form was made with high water-to-cement ratio (0.36) for easy leaching of the immobilized radionuclide, {sup 137}Cs. TiO{sub 2} was added to the mortar formulation, replacing the appropriate amount of cement, in the amounts of 1, 2, 5, 8 and 10 weight percents of total cement weight. In the highly basic environment of the mortar (pH {approx_equal} 12), the titanium will form a HTiO-type membrane, which is semipermeable and selective for the cations like Cs{sup +} in the pH range above 5.5. Only the rutile form of TiO{sub 2} was observed in the prospected radwaste mortar mixture samples, using X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry. Nevertheless, {sup 137}Cs leach-rate for the matrix formulations prepared with TiO{sub 2} was notably lower than the normally prepared (TiO{sub 2} free) samples. Furthermore, the mechanical strength of the samples prepared with TiO{sub 2} was higher than that of the TiO{sub 2}-free samples, and the correlation between the mechanical strength and TiO{sub 2} content appears to be exponential over the composition range explored here. Improvement of the physico-chemical properties of the titanium prepared formulations, is a topic of further investigations.

  5. Reduction of postoperative adhesion development.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Despite use of meticulous surgical techniques, and regardless of surgical access via laparotomy or laparoscopy, postoperative adhesions develop in the vast majority of women undergoing abdominopelvic surgery. Such adhesions represent not only adhesion reformation at sites of adhesiolysis, but also de novo adhesion formation at sites of surgical procedures. Application of antiadhesion adjuvants compliment the benefits of meticulous surgical techniques, providing an opportunity to further reduce postoperative adhesion development. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of adhesion development and distinguishing variations in the molecular biologic mechanisms from adhesion-free peritoneal repair represent future opportunities to improve the reduction of postoperative adhesions. Optimization of the reduction of postoperative adhesions will likely require identification of unique, personalized approaches in each individual, representing interindividual variation in peritoneal repair processes.

  6. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-04

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  7. Adhesion and wetting: Similarities and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, M.E.R. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines what is understood about adhesion and wetting both from the historical and scientific perspectives. Topics covered include mechanical adhesion, specific adhesion, chemical adhesion, adhesion by diffusion, the adsorption or wetting theory, bulk adhesion, the rheological theory, hysteresis effects in rubber adhesion, and hysteresis of wetting.

  8. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  9. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  10. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  11. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  12. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts.

    PubMed

    Torres, J R; Jay, G D; Kim, K-S; Bothun, G D

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  13. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  14. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  15. Discovery of Low Mucus Adhesion Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Minghao; Yildiz, Hasan; Carrier, Rebecca; Belfort, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Mucus secretion from the body is ubiquitous and finding materials that resist mucus adhesion is a major technological challenge of medical and consumer import. Here, using a high throughput platform (HTP) with photo-induced graft polymerization, we first rapidly synthesized, screened and tested a library of 55 different surfaces from six functional monomer classes to discover porcine intestinal low mucus adhesion surfaces using a 1 hr static mucus adsorption protocol. From this preliminary screen, two chemistries, a zwitterionic ([2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride) and a multiple hydroxyl (N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide) surface, exhibited the significantly low mucus adhesion from a Langmuir-type isotherm when exposed to increasing concentrations of mucus for 24 hr. Apolar or hydrophobic interactions were likely the dominant attractive forces during mucus binding since many polar or hydrophilic monomers reduced mucus adhesion. Hansen solubility parameters were used to illustrate the importance of monomer polarity and hydrogen-bonding in reducing mucus adsorption. For a series of PEG monomers with changing molecular weight from 144 g/mol to 1100 g/mol, we observed an excellent linear correlation (R2 = 0.998) between relative amount adsorbed and the distance from a water point in a specialized HSP plot, emphasizing the role of surface-water interactions for PEG modified surfaces. PMID:23072828

  16. Discovery of low mucus adhesion surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gu, Minghao; Yildiz, Hasan; Carrier, Rebecca; Belfort, Georges

    2013-02-01

    Mucus secretion from the body is ubiquitous, and finding materials that resist mucus adhesion is a major technological challenge. Here, using a high throughput platform with photo-induced graft polymerization, we first rapidly synthesized, screened and tested a library of 55 different surfaces from six functional monomer classes to discover porcine intestinal low mucus adhesion surfaces using a 1h static mucus adsorption protocol. From this preliminary screen, two chemistries, a zwitterionic ([2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride) and a multiple hydroxyl (N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide) surface, exhibited significantly low mucus adhesion from a Langmuir-type isotherm when exposed to increasing concentrations of mucus for 24 h. Apolar or hydrophobic interactions were likely the dominant attractive forces during mucus binding since many polar or hydrophilic monomers reduced mucus adhesion. Hansen solubility parameters were used to illustrate the importance of monomer polarity and hydrogen bonding in reducing mucus adsorption. For a series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomers with changing molecular weight from 144 g mol⁻¹ to 1100 g mol⁻¹, we observed an excellent linear correlation (R²=0.998) between relative amount adsorbed and the distance from a water point in a specialized Hansen solubility parameter plot, emphasizing the role of surface-water interactions for PEG modified surfaces.

  17. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  18. Germinant-Enhanced Decontamination of Bacillus Spores Adhered to Iron and Cement-Mortar Drinking Water Infrastructures

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Nur; Heckman, Lee; Rice, Eugene W.; Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    Germination was evaluated as an enhancement to decontamination methods for removing Bacillus spores from drinking water infrastructure. Germinating spores before chlorinating cement mortar or flushing corroded iron was more effective than chlorinating or flushing alone. PMID:22267659

  19. Germinant-enhanced decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to iron and cement-mortar drinking water infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Jeffrey G; Muhammad, Nur; Heckman, Lee; Rice, Eugene W; Hall, John

    2012-04-01

    Germination was evaluated as an enhancement to decontamination methods for removing Bacillus spores from drinking water infrastructure. Germinating spores before chlorinating cement mortar or flushing corroded iron was more effective than chlorinating or flushing alone.

  20. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  1. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C dating of lime mortars: Methodological aspects and field study applications at CIRCE (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Passariello, Isabella; Capano, Manuela; Ricci, Paola; Lubritto, Carmine; De Cesare, Nicola; Eramo, Giacomo; Quirós Castillo, Juan Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) has, recently, obtained some promising results in testing the feasibility of mortar radiocarbon dating by means of an ad hoc developed purification procedure (CryoSoniC: Cryobraking, Sonication, Centrifugation) applied to a series of laboratory mortars. Observed results encouraged CryoSoniC accuracy evaluation on genuine mortars sampled from archeological sites of known or independently constrained age (i.e., other 14C dates on different materials). In this study, some 14C measurements performed on genuine mortars will be discussed and compared with independently estimated (i.e., radiocarbon/archaeometrical dating) absolute chronologies of two Spanish sites. Observed results confirm the agreement of the CryoSoniC mortar dates with the archaeological expectations for both examined cases. Several authors reported the possibility of obtaining accurate radiocarbon dates of mortar matrices by analyzing lime lumps: binder-related particles of different sizes exclusively composed of calcium carbonate. In this paper, preliminary data for the absolute chronology reconstruction of the Basilica of the cemetery complex of Ponte della Lama (Canosa di Puglia, Italy) based on lime lumps will also be discussed. Dating accuracy will be quantified by comparing 14C data on mortar lime lumps from a funerary inscription of known age found near the Basilica, in the same study site. For this site, a comparison between absolute chronologies performed by bulk and CryoSoniC purified lime lumps, and charcoal incased in mortars (when found) will also be discussed. Observed results for this site provide evidence of how bulk lime lump dating may introduce systematic overestimations of the analyzed sample while CryoSoniC purification allows accurate dating.

  3. The Market Gate of Miletus: damages, material characteristics and the development of a compatible mortar for restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegesmund, Siegfried; Middendorf, Bernhard

    2008-12-01

    The indoor exhibit of the Market Gate of Miletus is unique for an archaeological monument. The reconstruction of the gate was done in such a way that most marble fragments were removed leaving cored marble columns 3-4 cm in thickness. These cored columns were mounted on a steel construction and filled with different mortars or filled with specially shaped blocks of brick combined with mortar. All the missing marble elements were replaced by copies made of a Portland cement based concrete, which is compositionally similar to the original building materials. During the Second World War the monument was heavily damaged by aerial bombardment. For 2 years the Market Gate of Miletus was exposed to weathering, because a brick wall protecting the gate was also destroyed. The deterioration phenomena observed are microcracks, macroscopic fractures, flaking, sugaring, greying, salt efflorescence, calcitic-sinter layers and iron oxide formation etc. The rapid deterioration seems to be due to indoor atmospheric effects, and also by a combination of incompatible materials (e.g. marble, steel, mortar, concrete, bricks etc.). Compatible building materials like mortars or stone replacing materials have to be developed for the planned restoration. The requirements for restoration mortars are chemical-mineralogical and physical-mechanical compatibilities with the existing building materials. In detail this means that the mortar should ensure good bonding properties, adapted strength development and not stain the marble when in direct contact. The favoured mortar was developed with a hydraulic binder based on iron-free white cement and pozzolana based on activated clay. A special limestone and quartz sand mixture was used as an aggregate. The cement was adjusted using chemical additives. Specially designed tests were applied extensively to prove whether the developed mortar is suitable for the restoration of this precious monument.

  4. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  5. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  6. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  7. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  8. The role of Na-hylan in reducing postsurgical tendon adhesions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, C; Levy, H J; Denlinger, J; Suros, J M; Weiss, H E

    1986-01-01

    Na-hylan, a chemically modified sodium hyaluronate jelly, was studied mechanically and histologically as a surgical device to diminish tendon adhesion in the rabbit long toe extensor three weeks after surgical abrasion. This device was found to be highly effective (55% of treated tendons formed no adhesions compared to 5% of controls, and only 18% formed severe adhesions compared to 62% of controls). No gross or histologic evidence of significant acute or chronic inflammatory reaction to the Na-hylan was found.

  9. Effects of Blended-Cement Paste Chemical Composition Changes on Some Strength Gains of Blended-Mortars

    PubMed Central

    Kirgiz, Mehmet Serkan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical compositions changes of blended-cement pastes (BCPCCC) on some strength gains of blended cement mortars (BCMSG) were monitored in order to gain a better understanding for developments of hydration and strength of blended cements. Blended cements (BC) were prepared by blending of 5% gypsum and 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% marble powder (MP) or 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% brick powder (BP) for CEMI42.5N cement clinker and grinding these portions in ball mill at 30 (min). Pastes and mortars, containing the MP-BC and the BP-BC and the reference cement (RC) and tap water and standard mortar sand, were also mixed and they were cured within water until testing. Experiments included chemical compositions of pastes and compressive strengths (CS) and flexural strengths (FS) of mortars were determined at 7th-day, 28th-day, and 90th-day according to TS EN 196-2 and TS EN 196-1 present standards. Experimental results indicated that ups and downs of silica oxide (SiO2), sodium oxide (Na2O), and alkali at MP-BCPCC and continuously rising movement of silica oxide (SiO2) at BP-BCPCC positively influenced CS and FS of blended cement mortars (BCM) in comparison with reference mortars (RM) at whole cure days as MP up to 6% or BP up to 35% was blended for cement. PMID:24587737

  10. Effects of blended-cement paste chemical composition changes on some strength gains of blended-mortars.

    PubMed

    Kirgiz, Mehmet Serkan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical compositions changes of blended-cement pastes (BCPCCC) on some strength gains of blended cement mortars (BCMSG) were monitored in order to gain a better understanding for developments of hydration and strength of blended cements. Blended cements (BC) were prepared by blending of 5% gypsum and 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% marble powder (MP) or 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% brick powder (BP) for CEMI42.5N cement clinker and grinding these portions in ball mill at 30 (min). Pastes and mortars, containing the MP-BC and the BP-BC and the reference cement (RC) and tap water and standard mortar sand, were also mixed and they were cured within water until testing. Experiments included chemical compositions of pastes and compressive strengths (CS) and flexural strengths (FS) of mortars were determined at 7th-day, 28th-day, and 90th-day according to TS EN 196-2 and TS EN 196-1 present standards. Experimental results indicated that ups and downs of silica oxide (SiO2), sodium oxide (Na2O), and alkali at MP-BCPCC and continuously rising movement of silica oxide (SiO2) at BP-BCPCC positively influenced CS and FS of blended cement mortars (BCM) in comparison with reference mortars (RM) at whole cure days as MP up to 6% or BP up to 35% was blended for cement.

  11. Utilization of recycled cathode ray tubes glass in cement mortar for X-ray radiation-shielding applications.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun; Lam, Wai-Shung; Chan, Tai-Po; Fung, Karl Ka-Lok

    2012-01-15

    Recycled glass derived from cathode ray tubes (CRT) glass with a specific gravity of approximately 3.0 g/cm(3) can be potentially suitable to be used as fine aggregate for preparing cement mortars for X-ray radiation-shielding applications. In this work, the effects of using crushed glass derived from crushed CRT funnel glass (both acid washed and unwashed) and crushed ordinary beverage container glass at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by volume) of sand on the mechanical properties (strength and density) and radiation-shielding performance of the cement-sand mortars were studied. The results show that all the prepared mortars had compressive strength values greater than 30 MPa which are suitable for most building applications based on ASTM C 270. The density and shielding performance of the mortar prepared with ordinary crushed (lead-free) glass was similar to the control mortar. However, a significant enhancement of radiation-shielding was achieved when the CRT glasses were used due to the presence of lead in the glass. In addition, the radiation shielding contribution of CRT glasses was more pronounced when the mortar was subject to a higher level of X-ray energy.

  12. Improved dental adhesive formulations based on reactive nanogel additives.

    PubMed

    Morães, R R; Garcia, J W; Wilson, N D; Lewis, S H; Barros, M D; Yang, B; Pfeifer, C S; Stansbury, J W

    2012-02-01

    Current challenges in adhesive dentistry include over-hydrophilic bonding formulations, which facilitate water percolation through the hybrid layer and result in unreliable bonded interfaces. This study introduces nanogel-modified adhesives as a way to control the material's hydrophobic character without changing the basic monomer formulation (keeping water-chasing capacity and operatory techniques unaltered). Nanogel additives of varied hydrophobicity were synthesized in solution, rendering 10- to 100-nm-sized particles. A model BisGMA/HEMA solvated adhesive was prepared (control), to which reactive nanogels were added. The increase in adhesive viscosity did not impair solvent removal by air-thinning. The degree of conversion in the adhesive was similar between control and nanogel-modified materials, while the bulk dry and, particularly, the wet mechanical properties were significantly improved through nanogel-based network reinforcement and reduced water solubility. As preliminary validation of this approach, short-term micro-tensile bond strengths to acid-etched and primed dentin were significantly enhanced by nanogel inclusion in the adhesive resins.

  13. Ceramic Adhesive for High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Everett G.

    1987-01-01

    Fused-silica/magnesium-phosphate adhesive resists high temperatures and vibrations. New adhesive unaffected by extreme temperatures and vibrations. Assuring direct bonding of gap filters to tile sidewalls, adhesive obviates expensive and time-consuming task of removal, treatment, and replacement of tiles.

  14. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  15. Gordon Conference on Microbial Adhesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    immunity against certain pathogens, the role of exopolysaccharides in adhesion and the role of lectin-glycolipid interactions in adhesion. Have...pathogenesis? What governs the specificity of p; exopolysaccharides in adhesion to surfaces? This session emphasized the molecular aspects of

  16. Rapid Adhesive Bonding of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Fox, R. L.; Sterling, S. Elmo, Jr.; Buckley, J. D.; Inge, Spencer V., Jr.; Burcher, L. G.; Wright, Robert E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Strong bonds created in less time and with less power than use of conventional bonding methods. Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) technique for composites uses high-frequency induction heating toroids to quickly heat metallic susceptor impregnated with thermoplastic adhesive or sandwiched between thermoset or thermoplastic adhesive cloths or films. Susceptor steel screen or perforated steel foil.

  17. Na and Li ion diffusion in modified ASTM C 1260 test by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X. Balcom, B.J.; Thomas, M.D.A.; Bremner, T.W.

    2008-12-15

    In the current study, MRI was applied to investigate lithium and sodium ion diffusion in cement paste and mortars containing inert sand and borosilicate glass. Paste and mortars were treated by complying with ASTM C 1260. Lithium and sodium distribution profiles were collected at different ages after different treatments. Results revealed that sodium ions had a greater diffusion rate than lithium ions, suggesting that Na reaches the aggregate particle surface before Li. Results also showed that Na and Li ions had a competitive diffusion process in mortars; soaking in a solution with higher [Li] favored Li diffusion but hindered Na diffusion. In mortars containing glass, a substantial amount of Li was consumed by the formation of ASR products. When [Li] in soaking solution was reduced to 0.37 N, a distinctive Na distribution profile was observed, indicating the free-state Na ions were continuously transformed to solid reaction products by ASR. Hence, in the modified ASTM C 1260 test, [Li] in the storage solution should be controlled at 0.74 N, in order to completely prevent the consumption of Na ions and thus stop ASR.

  18. Adhesion of perfume-filled microcapsules to model fabric surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Yanping; Bowen, James; Andrews, James W; Liu, Min; Smets, Johan; Zhang, Zhibing

    2014-01-01

    The retention and adhesion of melamine formaldehyde (MF) microcapsules on a model fabric surface in aqueous solution were investigated using a customised flow chamber technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A cellulose film was employed as a model fabric surface. Modification of the cellulose with chitosan was found to increase the retention and adhesion of microcapsules on the model fabric surface. The AFM force-displacement data reveal that bridging forces resulting from the extension of cellulose chains dominate the adhesion between the microcapsule and the unmodified cellulose film, whereas electrostatic attraction helps the microcapsules adhere to the chitosan-modified cellulose film. The correlation between results obtained using these two complementary techniques suggests that the flow chamber device can be potentially used for rapid screening of the effect of chemical modification on the adhesion of microparticles to surfaces, reducing the time required to achieve an optimal formulation.

  19. Effects of MMP inhibitors incorporated within dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Almahdy, A; Koller, G; Sauro, S; Bartsch, J W; Sherriff, M; Watson, T F; Banerjee, A

    2012-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition has been shown to reduce adhesive bond degradation when applied as a pre-conditioner, adding to clinical steps in the placement of adhesives, but their incorporation within dental adhesives has not been fully explored. This study examined the effect of including 2 MMP inhibitors (BB94 and GM6001) within the primers of 3 commercially available adhesives. Fluorometric assay and zymography showed that adhesives with MMP inhibitors had high affinity toward both synthetic fluorogenic FRET peptides (95%) and dentin powder substrates, respectively. The immediate microtensile bond strength was enhanced for 2 types of adhesives following the addition of both inhibitors. However, no changes were detected between the control and the inhibitor groups following 3-month storage. The modified two-step etch-and-rinse and single-step systems showed less Rhodamine B penetration to the "hybrid layer" and to the "adhesive", respectively. The incorporation of BB94 and GM6001 within the primers resulted in the inhibition of dentin MMPs with improved initial bond strength and enhanced sealing ability.

  20. Inverse characterisation of frequency-dependent properties of adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouleau, Lucie; Deü, Jean-François; Legay, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    Traditional damping treatments are usually applied to the vibrating structure by means of adhesive layers. Environmental parameters, such as frequencies of excitation, may influence the behaviour of the bonding layer and modify the damping efficiency of the treatment. Therefore it is desired to take into account the viscoelastic behaviour of the adhesive layer in the finite element model. The goal of this work is to present a procedure to characterise and model the adhesive layer. To that purpose, an experimental-numerical method for inverse characterisation of the frequency dependent properties of the adhesive layer is applied. The proposed inverse approach is based on a four-parameter fractional derivative model whose parameters are identified by minimising the difference between the simulated and the measured dynamic response of a multi-layered structure assembled by bonding. In the finite element model used for the optimisation, the adhesive layer is modelled by interface finite elements. The influence of the adhesive layer on the efficiency of a damping treatment is evidenced by performing dynamic testing on a sandwich structure with a viscoelastic core, assembled by bonding. The proposed approach is applied to the characterisation of a pressure-sensitive adhesive.

  1. A hybrid mortar virtual element method for discrete fracture network simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Matías Fernando; Berrone, Stefano; Borio, Andrea; Pieraccini, Sandra; Scialò, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    The most challenging issue in performing underground flow simulations in Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) is to effectively tackle the geometrical difficulties of the problem. In this work we put forward a new application of the Virtual Element Method combined with the Mortar method for domain decomposition: we exploit the flexibility of the VEM in handling polygonal meshes in order to easily construct meshes conforming to the traces on each fracture, and we resort to the mortar approach in order to "weakly" impose continuity of the solution on intersecting fractures. The resulting method replaces the need for matching grids between fractures, so that the meshing process can be performed independently for each fracture. Numerical results show optimal convergence and robustness in handling very complex geometries.

  2. Processing of Sugarcane Bagasse ash and Reactivity of Ash-blended Cement Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay, Goyal; Hattori, Kunio; Ogata, Hidehiko; Ashraf, Muhammad

    Sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA), a sugar-mill waste, has the potential of a partial cement replacement material if processed and obtained under controlled conditions. This paper discusses the reactivity of SCBA obtained by control burning of sugarcane bagasse procured from Punjab province of India. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to ascertain the amorphousness and morphology of the minerals ash particles. Destructive and non-destructive tests were conducted on SCBA-blended mortar specimens. Ash-blended cement paste specimens were analyzed by XRD, thermal analysis, and SEM methods to evaluate the hydration reaction of SCBA with cement. Results showed that the SCBA processed at 600°C for 5 hours was reactive as ash-blended mortar specimens with up to 15% substitution of cement gave better strength than control specimens.

  3. Properties of Roman bricks and mortars used in Serapis temple in the city of Pergamon

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkaya, Ozlem Aslan; Boeke, Hasan

    2009-09-15

    Serapis temple, which was constructed in the Roman period in the city of Pergamon (Bergama/Turkey), is one of the most important monuments of the world heritage. In this study, the characteristics of bricks and mortars used in the temple have been determined in order to define the necessary characteristics of the intervention materials, which will be used in the conservation works of the temple. Several analyses were carried out to determine their basic physical properties, raw material compositions, mineralogical and microstructural properties using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscope and a Thermo Gravimetric Analyzer. Analysis results indicated that the mortars are stiff, compact and hydraulic due to the use of natural pozzolanic aggregates. The Roman bricks are of low density, high porosity and were produced from raw materials containing calcium poor clays fired at low temperatures.

  4. Improvement of mechanical properties of fiber reinforced mortar using a linear optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kočí, V.; Černý, R.

    2017-02-01

    A linear optimization method is applied to improve mechanical properties of fiber reinforced cement mortar. Since this method is preferably used in other scientific disciplines, few preconditions are taken into account in advance, in order to accommodate it to the specifics related to building materials design. Defining physical limitations and accelerating the optimization process, the target values of optimization are reached in 21 days after 3 optimization steps. Within this relatively short time span, the compressive and bending strengths of fiber reinforced cement mortar increase from 36.9 to 52.2 MPa and from 9.1 to 10.1 MPa, respectively, while identical components are used. The improvements are achieved after preparation of only nine different mixtures, which is a very small number confirming the effectivity of this method in the field of building materials design.

  5. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzar, B.; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 104 to 4 × 104 s-1. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  6. Effects of lithium salts on ASR gel composition and expansion of mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Mitsunori; Fuwa, Hirohito

    2003-06-01

    Suppression of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) expansion in mortar and concrete by the addition of lithium salts has been confirmed by some workers. It has been revealed that lithium hydroxide tended to reduce the reaction between sodium or potassium hydroxide and reactive silica, and that the ASR gel incorporating lithium was less expansive. However, it has not been reported how the addition of a lithium salt influenced the composition of the ASR gel. The calcium in ASR gel is considered to play an important role in the expansion of the gel. Thus, it is significant to characterize ASR gel composition in mortars containing lithium salts by BSE-EDS analysis. This study aims to discuss the mechanisms of suppression of ASR expansion in mortar by lithium salts from the viewpoint of ASR gel composition. The average CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio in ASR gels decreased with increasing amount of added lithium salts. It should be noted that the extent of variations in the CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio in ASR gels significantly decreased with increasing amount of lithium salts. The addition of relatively small amounts of LiOH and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} resulted in increased expansion. We also obtained an unexpected result that ASR gels became homogeneous with respect to their CaO contents at high dosage levels. However, the reduction in average CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratios and the homogenization in the CaO content of ASR gels due to the addition of lithium salts may not be related to the expansion of mortars.

  7. Petrographic microscope investigation of mortar and ceramic technologies for the conservation of the built heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavia, S.; Caro, S.

    2007-07-01

    Polarised-light (or petrographic) microscopy has been widely applied to heritage materials to assess composition and diagnose damage. However, instead, this paper focuses on the petrographic investigation of brick and mortar technologies for the production of quality repair materials compatible with their adjacent fabrics. Furthermore, the paper relates production technologies to the physical properties of the materials fabricated, and thus their final quality and durability. According to Cesare Brandi´s theory of compatibility (the 20th century architect on whose work modern conservation theory and practice are largely based) existing historic materials should be replaced with their equivalent. This paper demonstrates that polarised-light microscopy provides data on the origin and nature of raw materials, and processing parameters such as blending, mixing, firing, calcination and slaking, and how these relate to the quality of the final product. In addition, this paper highlights the importance of production technologies as these directly impact the physical properties of the materials fabricated and thus determine their final quality and durability. In this context, the paper investigates mortar calcination and slaking, two important operations in the manufacture of building limes that govern the reactivity, shrinkage and water retention of a lime binder which will impact mortar's properties such as workability, plasticity and carbonation speed, and these in turn will determine the ease of execution, durability and strength of a lime mortar. Petrographic analysis also provides evidence of ceramic technology including identification of local or foreign production and processing parameters such as sieving, blending, mixing and firing. A petrographic study of the ceramic matrix coupled to the diagnosis of mineral phases formed during firing allows to quantify sintering and vitrification and thus determine firing temperatures. Finally, certain features of the raw

  8. Advances in Telemetry Capability as Demonstrated on an Affordable Precision Mortar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    mortar that allowed the guidance, navigation, and control ( GNC ) system to be effectively analyzed. The first is a technique for the real-time...guidance, navigation, and control ( GNC ) system to be effectively analyzed. The first is a technique for the real-time integration and extraction of GPS...introduction of a GPS receiver and GNC subsections in later tests created new telemetry challenges. This paper presents three of the techniques

  9. Practical aspects of the use of phosphate binding materials in refractory mixtures, mortars and putties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltysik, B.; Pawelek, A.; Witkowska, E.

    1983-01-01

    Phosphate binders, particularly acidic phosphates of Al and Cr, are used for binding Al silicate refractories used for lining of burners, SiC refractories, and refractory mortars. The binders have apparent d. 2.13-2.18 g/cu cm, porosity 21.4-23.8%, compressive strength 223 71 kg/ sq cm, total shrinkage 0.2-0.8%, and refractoriness 1240 deg.

  10. A fictitious domain/mortar element method for fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaijens, Frank P. T.

    2001-04-01

    A new method for the computational analysis of fluid-structure interaction of a Newtonian fluid with slender bodies is developed. It combines ideas of the fictitious domain and the mortar element method by imposing continuity of the velocity field along an interface by means of Lagrange multipliers. The key advantage of the method is that it circumvents the need for complicated mesh movement strategies common in arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods, usually used for this purpose. Copyright

  11. Cell Adhesion Molecules and Ubiquitination—Functions and Significance

    PubMed Central

    Homrich, Mirka; Gotthard, Ingo; Wobst, Hilke; Diestel, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily represent the biggest group of cell adhesion molecules. They have been analyzed since approximately 40 years ago and most of them have been shown to play a role in tumor progression and in the nervous system. All members of the Ig superfamily are intensively posttranslationally modified. However, many aspects of their cellular functions are not yet known. Since a few years ago it is known that some of the Ig superfamily members are modified by ubiquitin. Ubiquitination has classically been described as a proteasomal degradation signal but during the last years it became obvious that it can regulate many other processes including internalization of cell surface molecules and lysosomal sorting. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the ubiquitination of cell adhesion molecules of the Ig superfamily and to discuss its potential physiological roles in tumorigenesis and in the nervous system. PMID:26703751

  12. Design methodology for nano-engineered surfaces to control adhesion: Application to the anti-adhesion of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyung; Min, Cheongwan; Jung, Myungki; Lee, Jinhyung; Park, Changsu; Kang, Shinill

    2016-12-01

    With increasing demand for means of controlling surface adhesion in various applications, including the semiconductor industry, optics, micro/nanoelectromechanical systems, and the medical industry, nano-engineered surfaces have attracted much attention. This study suggests a design methodology for nanostructures using the Derjaguin approximation in conjunction with finite element analysis for the control of adhesion forces. The suggested design methodology was applied for designing a nano-engineered surface with low-adhesion properties. To verify this, rectangular and sinusoidal nanostructures were fabricated and analyzed using force-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy and centrifugal detachment testing. For force-distance curve measurements, modified cantilevers with tips formed with atypical particles were used. Subsequently, centrifugal detachment tests were also conducted. The surface wettability of rectangular and sinusoidal nanostructures was measured and compared with the measured adhesion force and the number of particles remaining after centrifugal detachment tests.

  13. Environmentally compliant adhesive joining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Adhesive joining offers one method of assembling products. Advantages of adhesive joining/assembly include distribution of applied forces, lighter weight, appealing appearance, etc. Selecting environmentally safe adhesive materials and accompanying processes is paramount in today`s business climate if a company wants to be environmentally conscious and stay in business. Four areas of adhesive joining (adhesive formulation and selection, surface preparation, adhesive bonding process, waste and pollution generation/cleanup/management) all need to be carefully evaluated before adhesive joining is selected for commercial as well as military products. Designing for six sigma quality must also be addressed in today`s global economy. This requires material suppliers and product manufacturers to work even closer together.

  14. Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John

    2008-07-07

    Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

  15. Comparative Effect of Bio-waste Ashes on Strength Properties of Cement Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay, Goyal; Hattori, Kunio; Ogata, Hidehiko; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmed, Mohamed Anwar

    Biomass fuels produce about 400 million tonnes of ashes as waste material. This paper discusses the pozzolanic character of bio-waste ashes obtained from dry tree leaves (AML), Korai grass (KRI) and Tifton grass (TFT). Ashes were obtained by control incineration of the wastes at 600°C for 5 hours and mortar specimens were prepared by substituting cement with 10, 20 and 30% ash. Strength development of ash-blended mortar specimens was evaluated by conducting destructive tests as well as non-destructive tests till 91 days. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopic and thermo-gravimetric techniques were used to analyze the influence of ash substitution on strength properties of blended-mortar. Pozzolanic reactivity of AML- and KRI-ash was confirmed, but TFT-ash did not show enough reactivity. Overall results confirmed that up to 20% substitution of cement can be made with AML- or KRI-ash with strength approaching 90% of that of control.

  16. Strength and Durability Performance of Alkali-Activated Rice Husk Ash Geopolymer Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Yong; Lee, Byung-Jae; Saraswathy, Velu

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental investigation carried out to develop the geopolymer concrete based on alkali-activated rice husk ash (RHA) by sodium hydroxide with sodium silicate. Effect on method of curing and concentration of NaOH on compressive strength as well as the optimum mix proportion of geopolymer mortar was investigated. It is possible to achieve compressive strengths of 31 N/mm2 and 45 N/mm2, respectively for the 10 M alkali-activated geopolymer mortar after 7 and 28 days of casting when cured for 24 hours at 60°C. Results indicated that the increase in curing period and concentration of alkali activator increased the compressive strength. Durability studies were carried out in acid and sulfate media such as H2SO4, HCl, Na2SO4, and MgSO4 environments and found that geopolymer concrete showed very less weight loss when compared to steam-cured mortar specimens. In addition, fluorescent optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies have shown the formation of new peaks and enhanced the polymerization reaction which is responsible for strength development and hence RHA has great potential as a substitute for ordinary Portland cement concrete. PMID:25506063

  17. Monitoring accelerated carbonation on standard Portland cement mortar by nonlinear resonance acoustic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Borrachero, M. V.; Payá, J.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonation is an important deleterious process for concrete structures. Carbonation begins when carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the atmosphere reacts with portlandite producing calcium carbonate (CaCO3). In severe carbonation conditions, C-S-H gel is decomposed into silica gel (SiO2.nH2O) and CaCO3. As a result, concrete pore water pH decreases (usually below 10) and eventually steel reinforcing bars become unprotected from corrosion agents. Usually, the carbonation of the cementing matrix reduces the porosity, because CaCO3 crystals (calcite and vaterite) occupy more volume than portlandite. In this study, an accelerated carbonation-ageing process is conducted on Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5. The evolution of the carbonation process on mortar is monitored at different levels of ageing until the mortar is almost fully carbonated. A nondestructive technique based on nonlinear acoustic resonance is used to monitor the variation of the constitutive properties upon carbonation. At selected levels of ageing, the compressive strength is obtained. From fractured surfaces the depth of carbonation is determined with phenolphthalein solution. An image analysis of the fractured surfaces is used to quantify the depth of carbonation. The results from resonant acoustic tests revealed a progressive increase of stiffness and a decrease of material nonlinearity.

  18. Application of nanoindentation testing to study of the interfacial transition zone in steel fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaohui Jacobsen, Stefan; He Jianying; Zhang Zhiliang; Lee, Siaw Foon; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2009-08-15

    The characteristics of the profiles of elastic modulus and hardness of the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zones in steel fiber reinforced mortars have been investigated by using nanoindentation and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), where two sets of parameters, i.e. water/binder ratio and content of silica fume were considered. Different interfacial bond conditions in the interfacial transition zones (ITZ) are discussed. For sample without silica fume, efficient interfacial bonds across the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfaces are shown in low water/binder ratio mortar; while in high water/binder ratio mortar, due to the discontinuous bleeding voids underneath the fiber, the fiber-matrix bond is not very good. On the other hand, for sample with silica fume, the addition of 10% silica fume leads to no distinct presence of weak ITZ in the steel fiber-matrix interface; but the effect of the silica fume on the steel fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zone is not obvious due to voids in the vicinity of steel fiber.

  19. Assessment and prediction of drying shrinkage cracking in bonded mortar overlays

    SciTech Connect

    Beushausen, Hans Chilwesa, Masuzyo

    2013-11-15

    Restrained drying shrinkage cracking was investigated on composite beams consisting of substrate concrete and bonded mortar overlays, and compared to the performance of the same mortars when subjected to the ring test. Stress development and cracking in the composite specimens were analytically modeled and predicted based on the measurement of relevant time-dependent material properties such as drying shrinkage, elastic modulus, tensile relaxation and tensile strength. Overlay cracking in the composite beams could be very well predicted with the analytical model. The ring test provided a useful qualitative comparison of the cracking performance of the mortars. The duration of curing was found to only have a minor influence on crack development. This was ascribed to the fact that prolonged curing has a beneficial effect on tensile strength at the onset of stress development, but is in the same time not beneficial to the values of tensile relaxation and elastic modulus. -- Highlights: •Parameter study on material characteristics influencing overlay cracking. •Analytical model gives good quantitative indication of overlay cracking. •Ring test presents good qualitative indication of overlay cracking. •Curing duration has little effect on overlay cracking.

  20. Biofouling on mortar mixed with steel slags in a laboratory biofilm reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, K.; Masuda, T.; Kanematsu, H.; Yokoyama, S.; Hirai, N.; Ogawa, A.; Kougo, T.; Yamazaki, K.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-01-01

    The slag produced as by-product in steel-making processes is utilized for various purpose due to its special qualities. Bacteria or other microorganisms generally form the biofilm. They are formed at the interface between materials and water environment by the action of bacteria. Biofilm can cause various problems. Therefore, the control of biofilm formation is needed. In this study, we focused on the application of slag to marine environments and carried out a research on biofouling of mortars mixed with various iron/steel slags through marine immersion and laboratory scale experiments. In this research, we dealt with various mortars. In some cases, iron/steel slags were mixed into mortars. In the laboratory scale research, we observed biofilm formation at the surfaces of sample specimens. As for marine immersion, we carried out the field experiments in summer and winter. Both results were compared. As for laboratory scale experiment, the tap water and artificial sea-water were used. And after the immersion, the specimens were measured and observed by a low vacuum SEM-EDX and the anti-fouling properties were analyzed and discussed. From these results, we confirmed that the biofouling became remarkable with the dissolved iron. Therefore, biofilm formation can be controlled by the concentration of iron/steel slags.

  1. Strength and durability performance of alkali-activated rice husk ash geopolymer mortar.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Yong; Lee, Byung-Jae; Saraswathy, Velu; Kwon, Seung-Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental investigation carried out to develop the geopolymer concrete based on alkali-activated rice husk ash (RHA) by sodium hydroxide with sodium silicate. Effect on method of curing and concentration of NaOH on compressive strength as well as the optimum mix proportion of geopolymer mortar was investigated. It is possible to achieve compressive strengths of 31 N/mm(2) and 45 N/mm(2), respectively for the 10 M alkali-activated geopolymer mortar after 7 and 28 days of casting when cured for 24 hours at 60°C. Results indicated that the increase in curing period and concentration of alkali activator increased the compressive strength. Durability studies were carried out in acid and sulfate media such as H2SO4, HCl, Na2SO4, and MgSO4 environments and found that geopolymer concrete showed very less weight loss when compared to steam-cured mortar specimens. In addition, fluorescent optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies have shown the formation of new peaks and enhanced the polymerization reaction which is responsible for strength development and hence RHA has great potential as a substitute for ordinary Portland cement concrete.

  2. [Fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek; Sadowska, Marta; Bogusławska-Walecka, Romana

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a rare disease with insidious course. It causes damage of the spinal cord and nerve roots. The causes of adhesive arachnoiditis include earlier traumatic injury of the spinal cord, surgery, intrathecal administration of therapeutic substances (e.g. anaesthetics, chemotherapy) or contrast media, bleeding, and inflammation. It can also be idiopathic or iatrogenic. We present the case of a 42-year-old patient with fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis which was provoked by spinal surgery and caused severe neurological disability with profound, progressive, flaccid paraparesis and bladder dysfunction. The electromyography (EMG) showed serious damage of nerves of both lower limbs at the level of motor roots L2-S2 and damage of the motor neuron at the level of Th11-Th12 on the right side. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral and thoracic part of the spinal cord demonstrated cystic liquid spaces in the lumen of the dural sac in the bottom part of the cervical spine and at the Th2-Th10 level, modelling the lateral and anterior surface of the cord. Because of the vast lesions, surgery could not be performed. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation brought only a small clinical improvement.

  3. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  4. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  5. Adhesion barrier reduces postoperative adhesions after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Hirata, Yasutaka; Achiwa, Ikuya; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Soto, Hajime; Kobayahsi, Jotaro

    2012-06-01

    Reoperation in cardiac surgery is associated with increased risk due to surgical adhesions. Application of a bioresorbable material could theoretically reduce adhesions and allow later development of a free dissection plane for cardiac reoperation. Twenty-one patients in whom a bioresorbable hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose adhesion barrier had been applied in a preceding surgery underwent reoperations, while 23 patients underwent reoperations during the same period without a prior adhesion barrier. Blinded observers graded the tenacity of the adhesions from surgical video recordings of the reoperations. No excessive bleeding requiring wound reexploration, mediastinal infection, or other complication attributable to the adhesion barrier occurred. Multiple regression analysis showed that shorter duration of the preceding surgery, non-use of cardiopulmonary bypass in the preceding surgery, and use of the adhesion barrier were significantly associated with less tenacious surgical adhesions. The use of a bioresorbable material in cardiac surgery reduced postoperative adhesions, facilitated reoperation, and did not promote complications. The use of adhesion barrier is recommended in planned staged procedures and those in which future reoperation is likely.

  6. Focal Adhesion Kinase Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening via Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Kristin E.; Dumbauld, David W.; Burns, Kellie L.; Hanks, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an essential nonreceptor tyrosine kinase regulating cell migration, adhesive signaling, and mechanosensing. Using FAK-null cells expressing FAK under an inducible promoter, we demonstrate that FAK regulates the time-dependent generation of adhesive forces. During the early stages of adhesion, FAK expression in FAK-null cells enhances integrin activation to promote integrin binding and, hence, the adhesion strengthening rate. Importantly, FAK expression regulated integrin activation, and talin was required for the FAK-dependent effects. A role for FAK in integrin activation was confirmed in human fibroblasts with knocked-down FAK expression. The FAK autophosphorylation Y397 site was required for the enhancements in adhesion strengthening and integrin-binding responses. This work demonstrates a novel role for FAK in integrin activation and the time-dependent generation of cell–ECM forces. PMID:19297531

  7. Cellular automaton simulation of the diffusive motion of bacteria and their adhesion to nanostructures on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Emura, Chie; Oya, Masashi

    2016-12-01

    The growth of a biofilm begins with the adhesion of bacteria to a solid surface. Consequently, biofilm growth can be managed by the control of bacterial adhesion. Recent experimental studies have suggested that bacterial adhesion can be controlled by modifying a solid surface using nanostructures. Computational prediction and analysis of bacterial adhesion behavior are expected to be useful for the design of effective arrangements of nanostructures for controlling bacterial adhesion. The present study developed a cellular automaton (CA) model for bacterial adhesion simulation that could describe both the diffusive motion of bacteria and dependence of their adhesion patterns on the distance between nanostructures observed in experimental studies. The diffusive motion was analyzed by the moment scaling spectrum theory, and the present model was confirmed to describe subdiffusion behavior due to obstacles. Adhesion patterns observed in experimental studies can be successfully simulated by introducing CA rules to describe a mechanism by which bacteria tend to move to increase the area of contact with nanostructures.

  8. Thermal stability and aging of some new anaerobic adhesives for structural binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Bruce, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    Polyurethane-modified high impact anaerobic adhesives have been chosen for a bonding application where impact cushion is critical. These adhesives meet all the requirements for high rate production and automatic assembly techniques. With aluminum adherends, one selected adhesive cured at room temperature with the recommended activator retained sixty percent of its original impact strength after twenty-six week aging at 100 C. The impact strength aging, the thermogravimetric analysis results, the outgassing data, and other observations made in this work indicate that the adhesives cured by simple heating give a more durable bond than that cured with an activator at room temperature.

  9. Development and characterization of a novel hydrogel adhesive for soft tissue applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lindsey Kennedy

    proper blend ratio may be used to achieve an accurate balance in bulk and tissue bond strengths, as well as the compliance and durability for expandable organ application, such as the bladder. Incorporation of chitosan expanded the utility of the bi-functional modified T1107 (TAS) adhesive to tissue wounds on highly vascularized organs (e.g., liver, kidney). Further, we demonstrated that the modified Tetronic adhesive is biocompatible and safe for treatment of small soft tissue wounds on rat's muscle using FDA requirements. The current findings helped our understanding of the material and mechanical properties of the modified Tetronic adhesive and ultimately progress the field of surgical adhesives and sealants by providing a tunable adhesive system for various internal soft tissue wound applications.

  10. Wet-chemical approach for the cell-adhesive modification of polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Matthias; Dahm, Manfred; Vahl, Christian-F

    2011-06-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a frequently utilized polymer for the fabrication of synthetic vascular grafts, was surface-modified by means of a wet-chemical process. The inherently non-cell-adhesive polymer does not support cellular attachment, a prerequisite for the endothelialization of luminal surface grafts in small diameter applications. To impart the material with cell-adhesive properties a treatment with sodium-naphthalene provided a basis for the subsequent immobilization of the adhesion promoting RGD-peptide using a hydroxy- and amine-reactive crosslinker. Successful conjugation was shown with cell culture experiments which demonstrated excellent endothelial cell growth on the modified surfaces.

  11. Biostability of the Proanthocyanidins-Dentin Complex and Adhesion Studies.

    PubMed

    Leme-Kraus, A A; Aydin, B; Vidal, C M P; Phansalkar, R M; Nam, J W; McAlpine, J; Pauli, G F; Chen, S; Bedran-Russo, A K

    2017-04-01

    Oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPACs) are potent and renewable natural bioactives possible to be refined into chemically standardized mixtures for biological applications. Herein, we found that multiscale interactions of OPACs with the dentin matrix create tight biointerfaces with hydrophobic methacrylate adhesives on wet surfaces. An enriched mixture of OPACs, with a known phytochemical profile, was produced from grape seed crude extract ( Vitis vinifera; enriched grape seed extract [e-GSE]) and applied to dentin matrices to determine changes to the mechanical properties and biodegradability of the dentin matrix and favorable resin adhesion mechanisms. Methods included a 3-point flexural test, quantification of hydroxyproline (collagen solubilization), static and dynamic nanomechanical analyses, resin-dentin microtensile bond strength, and micropermeability at the adhesive interface. The e-GSE-modified dentin matrix exhibited remarkably low collagen solubilization and sustained the bulk elastic properties over 12 mo. Tan δ findings reveal a more elastic-like behavior of the e-GSE-modified dentin matrix, which was not affected by H-bond destabilization by urea. Dentin-methacrylate biointerfaces with robust and stable adhesion were created on e-GSE-primed dentin surfaces, leading to a dramatic decrease of the interfacial permeability. Standardized OPAC mixtures provide a new mechanism of adhesion to type I collagen-rich tissues that does not rely on hydrophilic monomers. The bioadhesion mechanism involves physicochemical modifications to the dentin matrix, reduced tissue biodegradation, and bridging to methacrylate resins.

  12. Processing of mussel adhesive protein analog thin films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Patz, T.; Narayan, R. J.; Menegazzo, N.; Mizaikoff, B.; Mihaiescu, D. E.; Messersmith, P. B.; Stamatin, I.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2005-07-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins are a new class of biologically-derived materials that possess unique biocompatibility, bioactivity, and adhesion properties. We have demonstrated successful thin film growth of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl- L-alanine modified poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (DOPA modified- PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymer, a mussel adhesive protein analog, using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation. We have demonstrated that the main functional groups of the mussel adhesive protein analog are present in the transferred film. The effect of increasing of chain length of the mussel adhesive protein analog on film structure was also examined. These novel polymer thin films could have numerous medical and technological applications if their thin film properties are similar to what is found in bulk. This is the first report of successful MAPLE deposition of this material as thin films.

  13. Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Dolan, R A

    1993-06-01

    Forty-one cases of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis are presented. The key points are, first, that lumbar disc lesions, their investigations and surgical treatment and the use of nonabsorbable contrast materials are the most common etiological factors and, secondly, that operation is the best treatment. It is our contention that the majority of patients so treated do experience some improvement in what otherwise can be an unbearable amount of pain and disability. The use of adsorbable, nonirritative contrast materials such as Iohexol Parenteral will result in a marked reduction in the frequency of occurrence of arachnoiditis.

  14. CYANOACRYLATE ADHESIVES IN EYE WOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    adhesives. The following adhesives were tested: methyl, isobutyl, n-butyl, n-hexyl, n-heptyl, n-octyl, n-decyl, -trifluoroisopropyl 2- cyanoacrylate , and...Biobond. Of these, methyl and -trifluoroisopropyl cyanoacrylates are not well tolerated by eye tissues. Biobond sets too slowly, and does not seem... cyanoacrylate is the best adhesive found so far when tissue tolerance, tensile strength, and ability to seal eye perforations (alone and with silicone rubber patches) are the criteria. (Author)

  15. Durability of Adhesively Bonded Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-11

    frequently. Significant technology improvements have occurred In surface treatment, primers, joint analyses, adhesives and process controls. These have...clearly established the Initial cost savings potential for adhesive bonding. While this approach addresses the adequacy of joints early in service, there...processes with those changes which occur as a result of residual stress or cyclic loading in the adhesive joint 074-2R-bh 1 To fill a small part of this

  16. Hot melt adhesive attachment pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. L.; Frizzill, A. W.; Little, B. D.; Progar, D. J.; Coultrip, R. H.; Couch, R. H.; Gleason, J. R.; Stein, B. A.; Buckley, J. D.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hot melt adhesive attachment pad for releasably securing distinct elements together is described which is particularly useful in the construction industry or a spatial vacuum environment. The attachment pad consists primarily of a cloth selectively impregnated with a charge of hot melt adhesive, a thermo-foil heater, and a thermo-cooler. These components are securely mounted in a mounting assembly. In operation, the operator activates the heating cycle transforming the hot melt adhesive to a substantially liquid state, positions the pad against the attachment surface, and activates the cooling cycle solidifying the adhesive and forming a strong, releasable bond.

  17. Bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons: role of asphaltenes and resins.

    PubMed

    Warne Zoueki, Caroline; Ghoshal, Subhasis; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2010-08-01

    The influence of asphaltenes and resins on bacterial adhesion to model crude oils was examined using a modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay. Well-controlled bacterial adhesion experiments were conducted at three solution pHs (4, 6 and 7) using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida and four model crude oil systems containing up to four representative hydrocarbon compounds found in crude oils. The model crude oils were designed to independently evaluate the influence of asphaltenes and resins on hydrocarbon surface charge (i.e., electrophoretic mobility) and on bacterial adhesion to the liquid hydrocarbon phase. Asphaltenes and resins were found to make the hydrocarbon droplet surface charge less negative (or more positive) and to generally decrease microbial adhesion to the hydrocarbon. The experimental results were not in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of bacteria-hydrocarbon interactions based on the classical or extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek interaction energy profiles calculated from measured physicochemical properties of the microorganisms and hydrocarbons. Model calculations considering the role of steric repulsion in bacteria-hydrocarbon interactions suggest that the decreased adhesion behavior in the presence of asphaltenes and resins may be linked to a mechanism of steric hindrance.

  18. A Bone Glue with Sustained Adhesion under Wet Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wistlich, Laura; Rücker, Anja; Schamel, Martha; Kübler, Alexander C; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Bone glues often suffer from low adhesion to bone under wet conditions. This study aims to improve wet adhesiveness of a bone glue based on a photocurable poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate matrix through in situ interpenetrating network formation by addition of six-armed isocyanate functional star-shaped prepolymers (NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO)). Biodegradable ceramic fillers are added to adjust the paste workability. The 3-point bending strength of the bone glues is in the range of 3.5-5.5 MPa and not significantly affected by the addition of NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO). Storage in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) decreases the bending strength of all formulations to approximately 1 MPa but the adhesion to cortical bone increases from 0.15-0.2 to 0.3-0.5 MPa after adding 20-40 wt% NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO) to the matrix. Bone glues without the NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO) additive lose their adhesiveness to bone after aging in PBS for 7 days, whereas modified glues maintain a shear strength of 0.18-0.25 MPa demonstrating the efficacy of the approach. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy investigations of the fracture surfaces prove a high amount of residual adhesive on the bone surface indicating that adhesion to the bone under wet conditions is stronger than cohesion.

  19. Effects of MMP Inhibitors Incorporated within Dental Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Almahdy, A.; Koller, G.; Sauro, S.; Bartsch, J.W.; Sherriff, M.; Watson, T.F.; Banerjee, A.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition has been shown to reduce adhesive bond degradation when applied as a pre-conditioner, adding to clinical steps in the placement of adhesives, but their incorporation within dental adhesives has not been fully explored. This study examined the effect of including 2 MMP inhibitors (BB94 and GM6001) within the primers of 3 commercially available adhesives. Fluorometric assay and zymography showed that adhesives with MMP inhibitors had high affinity toward both synthetic fluorogenic FRET peptides (95%) and dentin powder substrates, respectively. The immediate microtensile bond strength was enhanced for 2 types of adhesives following the addition of both inhibitors. However, no changes were detected between the control and the inhibitor groups following 3-month storage. The modified two-step etch-and-rinse and single-step systems showed less Rhodamine B penetration to the “hybrid layer” and to the “adhesive”, respectively. The incorporation of BB94 and GM6001 within the primers resulted in the inhibition of dentin MMPs with improved initial bond strength and enhanced sealing ability. PMID:22518030

  20. Adhesion Peptide Immobilization on Electrospun Polymers: a Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Iucci, G.; Polzonetti, G.; Ghezzo, F.; Modesti, M.; Roso, M.; Dettin, M.

    2010-06-02

    The immobilization of an oligopeptide, mimicking the adhesion sequence of fibronectin, on the surface of polymer films prepared by electrospinning was investigated by XPS spectroscopy. Films of polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly(l-lactide-caprolactone)[P(LLA-CL)] were prepared by electrospinning onto aluminium substrates. A modified adhesion peptide containing a photoreactive group was immobilized on the surface of the polymer nanofibers by incubation in peptide solution and subsequent UV irradiation. XPS analysis yield evidence of successful peptide immobilization on the polymer surface; the amount of immobilized peptide increases with the concentration of the mother solution.

  1. Develop, demonstrate, and verify large area composite structural bonding with polyimide adhesives. [adhesively bonding graphite-polyimide structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhombal, B. D.; Wykes, D. H.; Hong, K. C.; Stenersen, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The technology required to produce graphite-polyimide structural components with operational capability at 598 K (600 F) is considered. A series of polyimide adhesives was screened for mechanical and physical properties and processibility in fabricating large midplane bonded panels and honeycomb sandwich panels in an effort to fabricate a structural test component of the space shuttle aft body flap. From 41 formulations, LaRC-13, FM34B-18, and a modified LaRC-13 adhesive were selected for further evaluation. The LaRC-13 adhesive was rated as the best of the three adhesives in terms of availability, cost, processibility, properties, and ability to produce void fee large area (12" x 12") midplane bonds. Surface treatments and primers for the adhesives were evaluated and processes were developed for the fabrication of honeycomb sandwich panels of very good quality which was evidenced by rupture in the honeycomb core rather than in the facesheet bands on flatwise tensile strength testing. The fabrication of the adhesively bonded honeycomb sandwich cover panels, ribs, and leading edge covers of Celion graphite/LARC-160 polyimide laminates is described.

  2. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-05

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  3. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  4. Effects of raised temperature of sulfate solutions on the sulfate resistance of mortars with and without silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Akoez, F.; Koral, S.; Yuezer, N.; Tuerker, F.

    1999-04-01

    Effect of raised temperature of sodium sulfate and magnesium sulfate solutions on the resistance of mortars was investigated. Experimental study was carried out on mortars with and without silica fume. Sulfate concentration was 18,000 mg/L as SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} for the sodium sulfate and 13,000 mg/L magnesium sulfate solutions. Temperatures of solutions were 20 and 40 C. Some physical and mechanical properties were tested during the 300 days of sulfate exposure. Test results showed that raised solution temperature did not accelerate the deterioration of mortars under the conditions used in this research. Moreover, raised temperature improved many properties of the specimens. It can be suggested that there are some problems with raising the temperature of sulfate solution as an accelerated test method.

  5. Mathematical model relating uniaxial compressive behavior of manufactured sand mortar to MIP-derived pore structure parameters.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhenghong; Bu, Jingwu

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial compression response of manufactured sand mortars proportioned using different water-cement ratio and sand-cement ratio is examined. Pore structure parameters such as porosity, threshold diameter, mean diameter, and total amounts of macropores, as well as shape and size of micropores are quantified by using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) technique. Test results indicate that strains at peak stress and compressive strength decreased with the increasing sand-cement ratio due to insufficient binders to wrap up entire sand. A compression stress-strain model of normal concrete extending to predict the stress-strain relationships of manufactured sand mortar is verified and agreed well with experimental data. Furthermore, the stress-strain model constant is found to be influenced by threshold diameter, mean diameter, shape, and size of micropores. A mathematical model relating stress-strain model constants to the relevant pore structure parameters of manufactured sand mortar is developed.

  6. Incorporation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mortars - Influence of microstructure in the hardened state properties and photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, S.S.

    2013-01-15

    The environmental pollution in urban areas is one of the causes for poor indoor air quality in buildings, particularly in suburban areas. The development of photocatalytic construction materials can contribute to clean the air and improve sustainability levels. Previous studies have focused mainly in cement and concrete materials, disregarding the potential application in historic buildings. In this work, a photocatalytic additive (titanium dioxide) was added to mortars prepared with aerial lime, cement and gypsum binders. The main goal was to study the way that microstructural changes affect the photocatalytic efficiency. The photocatalytic activity was determined using a reactor developed to assess the degradation rate with a common urban pollutant, NO{sub x}. The laboratory results show that all the compositions tested exhibited high photocatalytic efficiency. It was demonstrated that photocatalytic mortars can be applied in new and old buildings, because the nanoadditives do not compromise the mortar hardened state properties.

  7. Mathematical Model Relating Uniaxial Compressive Behavior of Manufactured Sand Mortar to MIP-Derived Pore Structure Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhenghong; Bu, Jingwu

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial compression response of manufactured sand mortars proportioned using different water-cement ratio and sand-cement ratio is examined. Pore structure parameters such as porosity, threshold diameter, mean diameter, and total amounts of macropores, as well as shape and size of micropores are quantified by using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) technique. Test results indicate that strains at peak stress and compressive strength decreased with the increasing sand-cement ratio due to insufficient binders to wrap up entire sand. A compression stress-strain model of normal concrete extending to predict the stress-strain relationships of manufactured sand mortar is verified and agreed well with experimental data. Furthermore, the stress-strain model constant is found to be influenced by threshold diameter, mean diameter, shape, and size of micropores. A mathematical model relating stress-strain model constants to the relevant pore structure parameters of manufactured sand mortar is developed. PMID:25133257

  8. Modified cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  9. An Adhesion-Dependent Switch between Mechanisms That Determine Motile Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Erin L.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Keren, Kinneret; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes. PMID:21559321

  10. Characterization and modeling of major constituent equilibrium chemistry of a blended cement mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J.; Kosson, D. S.; Brown, K. G.; Garrabrants, A. C.; Meeussen, J. C. L.; van der Sloot, H. A.

    2013-07-01

    Cementitious materials containing ground granulated iron blast furnace slag and coal combustion fly ash as admixtures are being used extensively for nuclear waste containment applications. Whereas the solid phases of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) have been studied in great detail, the chemistry of cement, fly ash and slag blends has received relatively less study. Given that OPC is generally more reactive than slag and fly ash, the mineralogy of OPC provides a logical starting point for describing the major constituent chemistry of blended cement mortars. To this end, a blended cement mortar containing Portland cement, granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash and quartz sand was modeled using a set of solid phases known to form in hydrated OPC with the geochemical speciation solver LeachXS/ORCHESTRA. Comparison of modeling results to the experimentally determined pH-dependent batch leaching concentrations (USEPA Method 1313) indicates that major constituent concentrations are described reasonably well with the Portland cement mineral set; however, modeled and measured aluminum concentrations differ greatly. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the mortar reveals the presence of Al-rich phyllosilicate minerals heretofore unreported in similar cementitious blends: kaolinite and potassic phyllosilicates similar in composition to illite and muscovite. Whereas the potassic phyllosilicates are present in the quartz sand aggregate, the formation of kaolinite appears to be authigenic. The inclusion of kaolinite in speciation modeling provides a substantially improved description of the release of Al and therefore, suggests that the behavior of phyllosilicate phases may be important for predicting long-term physico-chemical behavior of such systems.

  11. Fire-Retardant Epoxy Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    Phosphorus-containing epoxy is fire-retardant and translucent. Intended as adhesive for laminated plastic sheets, new material bonds well to titanium dioxide-filled plastic film, which ordinarily shows little surface interaction with adhesives. Fire retardancy has been demonstrated, and smoke density is low enough to avoid smoke obscuration.

  12. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  13. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-23

    pressure-activated adhesive is nearly complete. A 2:1 ratio of microcapsules:gorilla glue and a 1.5% dibutyltin diacetate concentration produced adhesion...Table I below. The best performers generally had between 1% and 1.5% dibutyltin diacetate (DBTDA). They also had a 2:1 ratio (vol/wt) of microcapsules

  14. Severe adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Catena, Fausto; Kelly, Michael D; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction is a frequent cause of hospital admission. Water soluble contrast studies may have diagnostic and therapeutic value and avoid challenging demanding surgical operations, but if bowel ischemia is suspected, prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. A 58-year-old patient was operated for extensive adhesive small bowel obstruction after having had two previous laparotomies for colorectal surgery, and had a complex clinical course with multiple operations and several complications. Different strategies of management have been adopted, including non-operative management with the use of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast medium, multiple surgical procedures, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, and finally use of antiadherences icodextrin solution. After 2 years follow-up the patient was doing well without presenting recurrent episodes of adhesive small bowel obstruction. For patients admitted several times for adhesive small bowel obstruction, the relative risk of recurring obstruction increases in relation to the number of prior episodes. Several strategies for non-operative conservative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction have already addressed diagnostic and therapeutic value of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast. According to the most recent evidence-based guidelines, open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating adhesive small bowel obstruction as well as after failed conservative management. Research interest and clinical evidence are increasing in adhesions prevention. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin may reduce incidence of adhesions.

  15. Transforming Anaerobic Adhesives into Highly Durable and Abrasion Resistant Superhydrophobic Organoclay Nanocomposite Films: A New Hybrid Spray Adhesive for Tough Superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Brown, Andrea; Steele, Adam; Loth, Eric

    2009-12-01

    The authors report fabrication of tough nanostructured self-cleaning superhydrophobic polymer-organoclay films from anaerobic acrylic adhesives displaying strong adhesion to metal surfaces. Both industrial and bio-grade anaerobic adhesives such as bone cements could be used. Montmorillonite clay filled anaerobic adhesives were modified by blending with a water dispersed fluoro-methacrylic latex in solution to form abrasion resistant interpenetrating polymer network films upon spray casting. The adhesive films could cure by thermosetting in oxygen-rich environments. Very high contact angles with low hysteresis were also measured for acidic (pH 2) and basic (pH 11) aqueous buffer solutions indicating resistance to acidic and basic media.

  16. Petrographic evidence of calcium oxychloride formation in mortars exposed to magnesium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Touton, Sayward . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Johnston, Dan . E-mail: Dan.Johnston@state.sd.us

    2006-08-15

    Many researchers have reported chemical interactions between CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions and hardened Portland cement paste. One potentially destructive phase reported in the literature is calcium oxychloride (3CaO.CaCl{sub 2}.15H{sub 2}O). In the past, limited numbers of researchers have reported identification of this phase by X-ray diffraction. In this work, petrographic evidence of oxychloride formation is presented based on optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis. This evidence indicates that calcium oxychloride does form in mortars exposed to MgCl{sub 2} solutions.

  17. Electronic microscopy and EDX characterization of Teotihuacan prehispanic mortar from the cave under the Sun Pyramid.

    PubMed

    Martinez, T; Martinez, G; Mendoza, D; Juarez, F; Cabrera, L

    2005-01-01

    A cave (102 m long) under the structure of the Sun pyramid of the prehispanic Teotihuacan City indicates the importance of the pyramid. Studies of the cave mortar samples using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed no difference in the chemical elemental composition. The elements can be distributed in three groups: major, minor and trace elements. The minerals identified were compatible with the origins of the cave and with the magnetic pattern.

  18. Mortar Interior Ballistics: Sensitivity Studies Using IBHVG2 and Progress Toward a Multidimensional Representation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    coefficient and exponent, covolume , and projectile weight) on the peak chamber pressure and projectile exit velocity. A sensitivity study on these...the percent change in the peak pressure of the main chamber as a function of a change in the propellant covolume for the 120-mm mortar (zones 0, 2...taken up by the gas molecules in the gas. The covolume becomes important at high (gun) pressures . 5 ’ fF R T , (1) where F is the force, R’ is

  19. Analysis of total least squares in estimating the parameters of a mortar trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, D.L.; Ng, L.C.

    1994-12-01

    Least Squares (LS) is a method of curve fitting used with the assumption that error exists in the observation vector. The method of Total Least Squares (TLS) is more useful in cases where there is error in the data matrix as well as the observation vector. This paper describes work done in comparing the LS and TLS results for parameter estimation of a mortar trajectory based on a time series of angular observations. To improve the results, we investigated several derivations of the LS and TLS methods, and early findings show TLS provided slightly, 10%, improved results over the LS method.

  20. Innovative method and apparatus for the deep cleaning of soluble salts from mortars and lithic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, Laura; Ferretti, Maurizio; Torrielli, Giulia; Caratto, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    Porous materials (e.g. plasters, mortars, concrete, and the like) used in the building industry or in artworks fail to develop, after their genesis, salts such as nitrates, carbonates (e.g. potassium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, calcium carbonate), chlorides (e.g. sodium chloride) and/or others, which are a concurrent cause of material deterioration phenomena. In the case of ancient or cultural heritage buildings, severe damage to structures and works of art, such as fresco paintings are possible. In general, in situ alteration pattern in mortars and frescoes by crystallization of soluble salts from solutions is caused by capillar rise or circulation in damp walls. Older buildings can be more subject to capillary rise of ion-rich waters, which, as water evaporates, create salt crystals inside the walls. If this pattern reveals overwhelming upon other environmental decay factors, the extraction of salts is the first restoration to recover the artpiece after the preliminary assessment and mitigation of the causes of soaking. A new method and apparatus, patented by University of Genoa [1] improves the quality and durability of decontamination by soluble salts, compared with conventional application of sepiolite or cellulose wraps. The conventional application of cellulose or sepiolite requires casting a more or less thick layer of wrap on the mortar, soaking with distilled water, and waiting until dry. The soluble salts result trapped within the wrap. A set of artificial samples reproducing the stratigraphy of frescoes was contaminated with saline solution of known concentration. The higher quality of the extraction was demonstrated by trapping the salts within layers of Japanese paper juxtaposed to the mortar; the extraction with the dedicated apparatus was operated in a significantly shorter time than with wraps (some hours vs. several days). Two cycles of about 15 minutes are effective in the deep cleaning from contaminant salts. The decontamination was

  1. Surveillance, detection, and 3D infrared tracking of bullets, rockets, mortars, and artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Daniel H.; Hyman, Howard; Moore, Fritz; Squire, Mark D.

    2001-09-01

    We describe test results using the FIRST (Fast InfraRed Sniper Tracker) to detect, track, and range to bullets in flight for determining the location of the bullet launch point. The technology developed for the FIRST system can be used to provide detection and accurate 3D track data for other small threat objects including rockets, mortars, and artillery in addition to bullets. We discuss the radiometry and detection range for these objects, and discuss the trade-offs involved in design of the very fast optical system for acquisition, tracking, and ranging of these targets.

  2. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Neviaser, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is characterized by painful, gradual loss of active and passive shoulder motion resulting from fibrosis and contracture of the joint capsule. Other shoulder pathology can produce a similar clinical picture, however, and must be considered. Management is based on the underlying cause of pain and stiffness, and determination of the etiology is essential. Subtle clues in the history and physical examination can help differentiate adhesive capsulitis from other conditions that cause a stiff, painful shoulder. The natural history of adhesive capsulitis is a matter of controversy. Management of true capsular restriction of motion (ie, true adhesive capsulitis) begins with gentle, progressive stretching exercises. Most patients improve with nonsurgical treatment. Indications for surgery should be individualized. Failure to obtain symptomatic improvement and continued functional disability following ≥6 months of physical therapy is a general guideline for surgical intervention. Diligent postoperative therapy to maintain motion is required to minimize recurrence of adhesive capsulitis.

  3. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  4. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, R.A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

  5. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, Ray A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

  6. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  7. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  8. Propulsion by directional adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John; Prakash, Manu

    2008-03-01

    The rough, hairy integument of water-walking arthropods is well known to be responsible for their water-repellency; we here consider its additional propulsive role. We demonstrate that the tilted flexible leg hairs of water-walking arthropods render the leg cuticle directionally anisotropic: contact lines advance most readily towards the leg tips. The dynamical role of the resulting unidirectional adhesion is explored, and yields new insight into the manner in which water-walking arthropods generate thrust, glide and leap from the free surface. We thus provide new rationale for the fundamental topological difference in the roughness on plants and insects, and suggest novel directions for biomimetic design of smart, hydrophobic surfaces.

  9. The adhesive properties of coacervated recombinant hybrid mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonghye; Choi, Yoo Seong; Kang, Dong Gyun; Song, Young Hoon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2010-05-01

    Marine mussels attach to substrates using adhesive proteins. It has been suggested that complex coacervation (liquid-liquid phase separation via concentration) might be involved in the highly condensed and non-water dispersed adhesion process of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). However, as purified natural MAPs are difficult to obtain, it has not been possible to experimentally validate the coacervation model. In the present work, we demonstrate complex coacervation in a system including recombinant MAPs and hyaluronic acid (HA). Our recombinant hybrid MAPs, fp-151 and fp-131, can be produced in large quantities, and are readily purified. We observed successful complex coacervation using cationic fp-151 or fp-131, and an anionic HA partner. Importantly, we found that highly condensed complex coacervates significantly increased the bulk adhesive strength of MAPs in both dry and wet environments. In addition, oil droplets were successfully engulfed using a MAP-based interfacial coacervation process, to form microencapsulated particles. Collectively, our results indicate that a complex coacervation system based on MAPs shows superior adhesive properties, combined with additional valuable features including liquid/liquid phase separation and appropriate viscoelasticity. Our microencapsulation system could be useful in the development of new adhesive biomaterials, including self-adhesive microencapsulated drug carriers, for use in biotechnological and biomedical applications.

  10. Tunicate-mimetic nanofibrous hydrogel adhesive with improved wet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Lee, Dohoon; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-07-01

    The main impediment to medical application of biomaterial-based adhesives is their poor wet adhesion strength due to hydration-induced softening and dissolution. To solve this problem, we mimicked the wound healing process found in tunicates, which use a nanofiber structure and pyrogallol group to heal any damage on its tunic under sea water. We fabricated a tunicate-mimetic hydrogel adhesive based on a chitin nanofiber/gallic acid (a pyrogallol acid) composite. The pyrogallol group-mediated cross-linking and the nanofibrous structures improved the dissolution resistance and cohesion strength of the hydrogel compared to the amorphous polymeric hydrogels in wet condition. The tunicate-mimetic adhesives showed higher adhesion strength between fully hydrated skin tissues than did fibrin glue and mussel-mimetic adhesives. The tunicate mimetic hydrogels were produced at low cost from recyclable and abundant raw materials. This tunicate-mimetic adhesive system is an example of how natural materials can be engineered for biomedical applications.

  11. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    PubMed

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  12. The impact of grafted modification of silicone surfaces with quantum-sized materials on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nune, C; Xu, W; Misra, R D K

    2012-12-01

    The majority of the infections associated with the biomedical devices including cardiovascular implants and catheters are instigated by the adhesion of bacteria including staphylococcus aureus, which is subsequently followed by biofilm formation. Keeping in mind the detrimental effect of bacterial adhesion, the objective of the study is to probe the impact of grafted modification of silicone surfaces with quantum-sized carbon on biofilm formation. Also, explored is the effect of protein adsorption on modified surface and its subsequent influence on bacterial adhesion. We compare and contrast the architecture and foot print of protein adsorption on unmodified and modified model silicone surfaces on bacterial adhesion. The study underscores that protein adsorption on quantum-sized carbon-grafted surface acts as a repellant for bacterial adhesion because of steric repulsion between the negatively charged protein and bacteria. Thus, we establish here the efficacy of modified surfaces in preventing biofilm formation.

  13. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (<50 nm), it is challenging to characterize their material properties for correlation to adhesive performance. We circumvent this problem by estimating the elastic modulus of the silane-based coatings using the buckling instability formed between two materials of a large elastic mismatch. The elastic modulus is found to effectively predict the joint strength of an epoxy/aluminum joint that has been reinforced with silane coupling agents. This buckling

  14. Mechanically Robust, Negative-Swelling, Mussel-Inspired Tissue Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Devin G.; Bushnell, Grace G.

    2013-01-01

    Most synthetic polymer hydrogel tissue adhesives and sealants swell considerably in physiologic conditions, which can result in mechanical weakening and adverse medical complications. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of mechanically tough zero- or negative-swelling mussel-inspired surgical adhesives based on catechol-modified amphiphilic poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymers. The formation, swelling, bulk mechanical, and tissue adhesive properties of the resulting thermosensitive gels were characterized. Catechol oxidation at or below room temperature rapidly resulted in a chemically cross-linked network, with subsequent warming to physiological temperature inducing a thermal hydrophobic transition in the PPO domains and providing a mechanism for volumetric reduction and mechanical toughening. The described approach can be easily adapted for other thermally sensitive block copolymers and cross-linking strategies, representing a general approach that can be employed to control swelling and enhance mechanical properties of polymer hydrogels used in a medical context. PMID:23184616

  15. Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael P; Kim, Seok; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    The complex structures that allow geckos to repeatably adhere to surfaces consist of multilevel branching fibers with specialized tips. We present a novel technique for fabricating similar multilevel structures from polymer materials and demonstrate the fabrication of arrays of two- and three-level structures, wherein each level terminates in flat mushroom-type tips. Adhesion experiments are conducted on two-level fiber arrays on a 12-mm-diameter glass hemisphere, which exhibit both increased adhesion and interface toughness over one-level fiber samples and unstructured control samples. These adhesion enhancements are the result of increased surface conformation as well as increased extension during detachment.

  16. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  17. Contractility Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening Through Focal Adhesion Kinase and Assembly of Vinculin-Containing Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Dumbauld, David W.; Shin, Heungsoo; Gallant, Nathan D.; Michael, Kristin E.; Radhakrishna, Harish; García, Andrés J.

    2010-01-01

    Actin-myosin contractility modulates focal adhesion assembly, stress fiber formation, and cell migration. We analyzed the contributions of contractility to fibroblast adhesion strengthening using a hydrodynamic adhesion assay and micropatterned substrates to control cell shape and adhesive area. Serum addition resulted in adhesion strengthening to levels 30–40% higher than serum-free cultures. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase or Rho-kinase blocked phosphorylation of myosin light chain to similar extents and eliminated the serum-induced enhancements in strengthening. Blebbistatin-induced inhibition of myosin II reduced serum-induced adhesion strength to similar levels as those obtained by blocking myosin light chain phosphorylation. Reductions in adhesion strengthening by inhibitors of contractility correlated with loss of vinculin and talin from focal adhesions without changes in integrin binding. In vinculin-null cells, inhibition of contractility did not alter adhesive force, whereas controls displayed a 20% reduction in adhesion strength, indicating that the effects of contractility on adhesive force are vinculin-dependent. Furthermore, in cells expressing FAK, inhibitors of contractility reduced serum-induced adhesion strengthening as well as eliminated focal adhesion assembly. In contrast, in the absence of FAK, these inhibitors did not alter adhesion strength or focal adhesion assembly. These results indicate that contractility modulates adhesion strengthening via FAK-dependent, vinculin-containing focal adhesion assembly. PMID:20205236

  18. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-09

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications.

  19. Modification of the adhesive properties of collagen by covalent grafting with RGD peptides.

    PubMed

    Myles, J L; Burgess, B T; Dickinson, R B

    2000-01-01

    Collagen, either alone or in combination with other materials, is an important natural biomaterial that is used in a variety of tissue-engineering applications. Cell adhesion and migration of cells within collagen-based biomaterials may be controlled by modifying the adhesive properties of collagen. Furthermore, spatially controlling the adhesiveness of the collagen may allow controlled localization or redistribution of cells. A method is presented for covalently coupling peptides that contain the well-characterized arginine-glycine-aspartic acid adhesion sequence directly to type I collagen monomers prior to fibrillogenesis. A heterobifunctional coupling agent was used to create stable amide and disulfide bonds with the lysine residues of the collagen monomers and the cysteine termini of the peptide molecules, respectively. The degree of conjugation could be controlled by changing the reaction conditions (ratios of reactants added and the length of incubation). The microstructure and gelation times of gels composed of covalently modified collagen were similar to those of unmodified gels. Cell adhesion on adsorbed monolayers of modified collagen was quantified using a well-established clonal cell line (K1735 murine melanoma). Cell adhesion was found to increase with both increasing degree of conjugation and increasing ratio of modified to unmodified collagen.

  20. On the relevance of volume increase for the length changes of mortar bars in sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kunther, Wolfgang; Lothenbach, Barbara; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2013-04-01

    The ingress of sulfate ions into cementitious materials leads to the formation of ettringite, gypsum and other phases. The increase in solid volume through the formation of these phases is often assumed to be the only reason for expansion. In this paper we systematically compare the volume increase predicted by thermodynamic modeling to macroscopic expansion for mortars made with CEM I in different sulfate solutions and for mortars made with a range of blended cements in sodium sulfate solution. It is shown that the length changes cannot be explained by simple volume increase alone. A more plausible explanation of expansion lies in the theory of crystallization pressure, in which crystals forming from a supersaturated solution may exert pressure on their surroundings. It is observed that expansion occurs in systems where thermodynamic modeling predicts the co-existence of ettringite with gypsum. In such a case, if monosulfate and gypsum are both present locally, the solution can be highly supersaturated with respect to ettringite, whose formation in confined conditions (such as within C–S–H) can then exert expansive forces.

  1. Transparent, Ultrahigh-Gas-Barrier Films with a Brick-Mortar-Sand Structure.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yibo; Pan, Ting; Xu, Simin; Yan, Hong; Han, Jingbin; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2015-08-10

    Transparent and flexible gas-barrier materials have shown broad applications in electronics, food, and pharmaceutical preservation. Herein, we report ultrahigh-gas-barrier films with a brick-mortar-sand structure fabricated by layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of XAl-layered double hydroxide (LDH, X=Mg, Ni, Zn, Co) nanoplatelets and polyacrylic acid (PAA) followed by CO2 infilling, denoted as (XAl-LDH/PAA)n-CO2. The near-perfectly parallel orientation of the LDH "brick" creates a long diffusion length to hinder the transmission of gas molecules in the PAA "mortar". Most significantly, both the experimental studies and theoretical simulations reveal that the chemically adsorbed CO2 acts like "sand" to fill the free volume at the organic-inorganic interface, which further depresses the diffusion of permeating gas. The strategy presented here provides a new insight into the perception of barrier mechanism, and the (XAl-LDH/PAA)n-CO2 film is among the best gas barrier films ever reported.

  2. Study on cement mortar and concrete made with sewage sludge ash.

    PubMed

    Chang, F C; Lin, J D; Tsai, C C; Wang, K S

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of reusing wastewater sludge ash in construction materials to replace partial materials. Wastewater sludge sampled from thermal power plant was burned into sludge ash at 800°C in the laboratory. The sludge incineration ash has low heavy metal including Pb, Cd, Cr and Cu, so it belongs to general enterprise waste. The chemical composition of sludge incineration ash was summed up in SiO₂, CaO, Fe₂O₃ and MgO. Then the wastewater sludge ash is also found to be a porous material with irregular surface. When the sludge ash was used to replace mortar or concrete cement, its water-adsorption capability will result in the reduction of mortar workability and compressive strength. Cement is being substituted for sludge ash, and 10 percent of sludge ash is more appropriate. Sludge ash is reused to take the place of construction materials and satisfies the requests of standard specification except for higher water absorption.

  3. Dimensional stability under wet curing of mortars containing high amounts of nitrates and phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Benard, P.

    2008-10-15

    Investigations were carried out in order to solidify in cement some aqueous streams resulting from nuclear decommissioning processes and characterized by a high salinity (300 g/L), as well as important concentrations of nitrate (150-210 g/L) and phosphate ions (0-50 g/L). Special attention was paid to the influence of these compounds on the dimensional variations under wet curing of simulated solidified waste forms. The length changes of mortars containing nitrate salts only (KNO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}) were shown to be governed by a concentration effect which involved osmosis: the higher their concentration in the mixing solution, the higher the swelling. The expansion of mortars containing high amounts of phosphates ({>=} 30 g/L in the mixing solution) was preceded by a shrinkage which increased with the phosphate concentration, and which could be suppressed by seeding the cement used with hydroxyapatite crystals. This transitory shrinkage was attributed to the conversion into hydroxyapatite of a precursor readily precipitated in the cement paste after mixing.

  4. Research on compressive strength of recycled cement mortar after high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianggang; Yang, Jianhui; Deng, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    In order to study cube compressive strength of recycled fine aggregate cement mortar after different temperatures, with the affect parameters between replacement rate of recycled fine aggregate and temperature, 45 standard cube test blocks were designed and produced to carry out compressive strength test. The failure process and failure mode of test blocks were observed. Ultimate compressive strength of cube blocks were measured, the relations between cube compressive strength and the replacement rates of recycled fine aggregate under different temperatures as well as the relations between cube compressive strength and temperatures under different replacement rates were all analyzed, the influence change parameters made on cube compressive strength was discussed. The results showed: the failure process and the failure mode of recycled fine aggregate cement mortar and the failure process and the failure mode of nature is similar; when the temperature reached 400°C, the block has no burst phenomenon, but the colour of block into a dark pink; with the increase of recycled fine aggregate, the mass lose rate of block is increase; effect different temperature make on cube compressive strength of test block is not obvious when temperature keeps same for 3h.

  5. Microstructure and its relationship to fracture in portland cement mortar and concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Anne Bernadine

    This research explores the relationship between the geometry of crack propagation and mechanical properties of mortar and concrete. The crack deflection and branching are measured using several microscopy techniques along with image analysis of crack profiles intruded by a low melting-point alloy. The toughness measured by mechanical testing, the fracture surface geometry, phases and elastic properties identified by image analysis and microscopy, along with the crack branching relationships are used to predict the increase in the toughness of these materials with respect to the flat-crack toughness using a micromechanical model. The effect of the model parameters, microscopy techniques, material elastic properties, void modeling and branching ratio were investigated. The parametric analysis and modeling conditions determine a nearly uniform flat-crack toughness for the cement matrix of the mortar samples and a higher flat-wrack toughness for the cement matrix of the concrete samples. The trend toward a single toughness value may be an indication that there is a single material parameter to describe the fracture energy of these materials.

  6. A novel method for a multi-level hierarchical composite with brick-and-mortar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Kristina; Wolff, Michael F. H.; Salikov, Vitalij; Heinrich, Stefan; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2013-07-01

    The fascination for hierarchically structured hard tissues such as enamel or nacre arises from their unique structure-properties-relationship. During the last decades this numerously motivated the synthesis of composites, mimicking the brick-and-mortar structure of nacre. However, there is still a lack in synthetic engineering materials displaying a true hierarchical structure. Here, we present a novel multi-step processing route for anisotropic 2-level hierarchical composites by combining different coating techniques on different length scales. It comprises polymer-encapsulated ceramic particles as building blocks for the first level, followed by spouted bed spray granulation for a second level, and finally directional hot pressing to anisotropically consolidate the composite. The microstructure achieved reveals a brick-and-mortar hierarchical structure with distinct, however not yet optimized mechanical properties on each level. It opens up a completely new processing route for the synthesis of multi-level hierarchically structured composites, giving prospects to multi-functional structure-properties relationships.

  7. Comparative experimental study of dynamic compressive strength of mortar with glass and basalt fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Leopold; Moćko, Wojciech; Fenu, Luigi; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Specimen reinforced with glass and basalt fibers were prepared using Standard Portland cement (CEM I, 52.5 R as prescribed by EN 197-1) and standard sand, in accordance with EN 196-1. From this cementitious mixture, a reference cement mortar without fibers was first prepared. Compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and mod of fracture were determined for all specimens. Static and dynamic properties were investigated using Instron testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar, respectively. Content of the glass fibers in the mortar does not influence the fracture stress at static loading conditions in a clearly observed way. Moreover at dynamic range 5% content of the fiber results in a significant drop of fracture stress. Analysis of the basalt fibers influence on the fracture stress shows that optimal content of this reinforcement is equal to 3% for both static and dynamic loading conditions. Further increase of the fiber share gives the opposite effect, i.e. drop of the fracture stress.

  8. Adhesion molecules in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Asrar, A.; Geboes, K.; Al-Kharashi, S.; Tabbara, K.; Missotten, L.; Desmet, V.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Adhesion molecules play a key role in the selective recruitment of different leucocyte population to inflammatory sites. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of adhesion molecules in the conjunctiva of patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC).
METHODS—The presence and distribution of adhesion molecules were studied in 14 conjunctival biopsy specimens from seven patients with active VKC and in four normal conjunctival biopsy specimens. We used a panel of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3), lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), very late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1). In addition, a panel of mAbs were used to characterise the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate.
RESULTS—In the normal conjunctiva, ICAM-1 was expressed on the vascular endothelium only, LFA-1 and ICAM-3 on epithelial and stromal mononuclear cells , and VLA-4 on stromal mononuclear cells. The expression of VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 was absent. The number of cells expressing adhesion molecules was found to be markedly increased in all VKC specimens. This was concurrent with a heavy inflammatory infiltrate. Strong ICAM-1 expression was induced on the basal epithelial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, ICAM-1 was expressed on stromal mononuclear cells. LFA-1 and ICAM-3 were expressed on the majority of epithelial and stromal infiltrating mononuclear cells. VLA-4 expression was noted on stromal mononuclear cells. Compared with controls, VKC specimens showed significantly more ICAM-3+, LFA-1+, and VLA-4+ cells. VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 were induced on the vascular endothelial cells.
CONCLUSIONS—Increased expression of adhesion molecules may play an important role in the pathogenesis of VKC.

 PMID

  9. Measuring graphene adhesion using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhu, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Van der Waals adhesion between graphene and various substrates has an important impact on the physical properties, device applications and nanomanufacturing processes of graphene. Here we report a general, high-throughput and reliable method that can measure adhesion energies between ultraflat graphene and a broad range of materials using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip. In our experiments, only van der Waals force between the tip and a graphene flake is measured. The Maugis-Dugdale theory is employed to convert the measured adhesion force using AFM to the adhesion energy. The ultraflatness of monolayer graphene on mica eliminates the effect of graphene surface roughness on the adhesion, while roughness of the microsphere tip is addressed by the modified Rumpf model. Adhesion energies of monolayer graphene to SiO2 and Cu are obtained as 0.46 and 0.75 J m-2, respectively. This work provides valuable insight into the mechanism of graphene adhesion and can readily extend to the adhesion measurement for other 2D nanomaterials.Van der Waals adhesion between graphene and various substrates has an important impact on the physical properties, device applications and nanomanufacturing processes of graphene. Here we report a general, high-throughput and reliable method that can measure adhesion energies between ultraflat graphene and a broad range of materials using atomic force microscopy with a microsphere tip. In our experiments, only van der Waals force between the tip and a graphene flake is measured. The Maugis-Dugdale theory is employed to convert the measured adhesion force using AFM to the adhesion energy. The ultraflatness of monolayer graphene on mica eliminates the effect of graphene surface roughness on the adhesion, while roughness of the microsphere tip is addressed by the modified Rumpf model. Adhesion energies of monolayer graphene to SiO2 and Cu are obtained as 0.46 and 0.75 J m-2, respectively. This work provides valuable insight into the

  10. Superstrong encapsulated monolayer graphene by the modified anodic bonding.

    PubMed

    Jung, Wonsuk; Yoon, Taeshik; Choi, Jongho; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Yong Hyup; Kim, Taek-Soo; Han, Chang-Soo

    2014-01-07

    We report a superstrong adhesive of monolayer graphene by modified anodic bonding. In this bonding, graphene plays the role of a superstrong and ultra-thin adhesive between SiO2 and glass substrates. As a result, monolayer graphene presented a strong adhesion energy of 1.4 J m(-2) about 310% that of van der Waals bonding (0.45 J m(-2)) to SiO2 and glass substrates. This flexible solid state graphene adhesive can tremendously decrease the adhesive thickness from about several tens of μm to 0.34 nm for epoxy or glue at the desired bonding area. As plausible causes of this superstrong adhesion, we suggest conformal contact with the rough surface of substrates and generation of C-O chemical bonding between graphene and the substrate due to the bonding process, and characterized these properties using optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  11. Adhesive Performance of Biomimetic Adhesive-Coated Biologic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John L.; Vollenweider, Laura; Xu, Fangmin; Lee, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical repair of a discontinuity in traumatized or degenerated soft tissues is traditionally accomplished using sutures. A current trend is to reinforce this primary repair with surgical grafts, meshes, or patches secured with perforating mechanical devices (i.e., sutures, staples, or tacks). These fixation methods frequently lead to chronic pain and mesh detachment. We developed a series of biodegradable adhesive polymers that are synthetic mimics of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), composed of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-derivatives, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polycaprolactone (PCL). These polymers can be cast into films, and their mechanical properties, extent of swelling, and degradation rate can be tailored through the composition of the polymers as well as blending with additives. When coated onto a biologic mesh used for hernia repair, these adhesive constructs demonstrated adhesive strengths significantly higher than fibrin glue. With further development, a pre-coated bioadhesive mesh may represent a new surgical option for soft tissue repair. PMID:20919699

  12. Green waxes, adhesives and lubricants.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Kong, X H; Ruan, M; Ma, F M; Jiang, Y F; Liu, M Z; Chen, Y; Zuo, X H

    2010-10-28

    General characteristics of waxes, adhesives and lubricants as well as the recent fundamental investigations on their physical and mechanical behaviour are introduced. The current R&D status for new type/generation of waxes, adhesives and lubricants from natural products is reviewed, with an emphasis on their tribological applications. In particular, some crucial issues and challenges relating to technological improvement and materials development are discussed. Based on the current predicted shortage of energy resources and environmental concerns, prospective research on the development of green waxes, adhesives and lubricants is suggested.

  13. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  14. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  15. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  16. Adhesion of platelets to artificial surfaces: effect of red cells.

    PubMed

    Brash, J L; Brophy, J M; Feuerstein, I A

    1976-05-01

    Adhesion of platelets to several polymer- and protein-coated glass surfaces has been studied in vitro. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical probe rotating in a test tube containing the platelet medium and allows close control of fluid shear and mass transport. Suspensions of washed pig platelets constitute the basic platelet medium, and can be modified by adding back red cells and plasma proteins. Adhesion is measured via 51Cr-labeling of platelets. In the absence of red cells, identical low levels of adhesion were seen on all surfaces and saturation was reached within 2 min. In the presence of red cells, adhesion was greater. Saturation on all surfaces except fibrinogen and collagen again occurred within 2 min. The adhesion levels on polymer surfaces and glass were indistinguishable, while those on albumin were lower and those on fibrinogen were higher. Collagen was the most reactive surface. It did not equilibrate within 15 min., and kinetic data indicated a platelet diffusivity strongly dependent on hematocrit. These effects were attributed to rotational and translational motion of the red cells causing increased diffusion and surface-platelet collision energy.

  17. Molecular determinants of bacterial adhesion monitored by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Razatos, Anneta; Ong, Yea-Ling; Sharma, Mukul M.; Georgiou, George

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and the subsequent formation of biofilm are major concerns in biotechnology and medicine. The initial step in bacterial adhesion is the interaction of cells with a surface, a process governed by long-range forces, primarily van der Waals and electrostatic interactions. The precise manner in which the force of interaction is affected by cell surface components and by the physiochemical properties of materials is not well understood. Here, we show that atomic force microscopy can be used to analyze the initial events in bacterial adhesion with unprecedented resolution. Interactions between the cantilever tip and confluent monolayers of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli mutants exhibiting subtle differences in cell surface composition were measured. It was shown that the adhesion force is affected by the length of core lipopolysaccharide molecules on the E. coli cell surface and by the production of the capsular polysaccharide, colanic acid. Furthermore, by modifying the atomic force microscope tip we developed a method for determining whether bacteria are attracted or repelled by virtually any biomaterial of interest. This information will be critical for the design of materials that are resistant to bacterial adhesion. PMID:9736689

  18. Radioactively contaminated electric arc furnace dust as an addition to the immobilization mortar in low- and medium-activity repositories.

    PubMed

    Castellote, Marta; Menéndez, Esperanza; Andrade, Carmen; Zuloaga, Pablo; Navarro, Mariano; Ordóñez, Manuel

    2004-05-15

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), generated by the steel-making industry, is in itself an intrinsic hazardous waste; however, the case may also be that scrap used in the process is accidentally contaminated by radioactive elements such as cesium. In this case the resulting EAFD is to be handled as radioactive waste, being duly confined in low- and medium-activity repositories (LMAR). What this paper studies is the reliability of using this radioactive EAFD as an addition in the immobilization mortar of the containers of the LMAR, that is, from the point of view of the durability. Different mixes of mortar containing different percentages of EAFD have been subjected to flexural and compressive strength, initial and final setting time, XRD study, total porosity and pore size distribution, determination of the chloride diffusion coefficient, dimensional stability tests, hydration heat, workability of the fresh mix, and leaching behavior. What is deduced from the results is that for the conditions used in this research, (cement + sand) can be replaced by EAFD upto a ratio [EAFD/(cement + EAFD)] of 46% in the immobilization mortar of LMAR, apparently without any loss in the long-term durability properties of the mortar.

  19. Effect of exposure conditions on the long-term dielectric properties of mortar samples containing ASR gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, A.; Donnell, K. M.; Zoughi, R.; Rashidi, M.; Kurtis, K. E.

    2017-02-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a chemical reaction between alkalis present in portland cement and amorphous or otherwise disordered siliceous minerals in particular aggregates. Through this reaction, reactive silica binds with hydroxyl and alkali ions and forms a gel, known as ASR gel. Recently, microwave materials characterization techniques have shown great potential for detecting ASR in mortar. However, the comprehensive understanding of variables that affect the extent of ASR in mortar and their interaction with microwave signals, in particular the effect of environmental exposure conditions requires more investigations. Therefore, parameters related to these conditions must be considered when using microwave techniques for ASR detection and evaluation. In this paper, the effect of exposure conditions on ASR gel formation and microwave dielectric properties of mortar samples is investigated. To this end, extended measurements of the complex dielectric constants of three different sets of mortar samples are presented at S-band (2.6 - 3.95 GHz). The samples were cast with potentially reactive ASR-aggregates and subjected to different environmental conditions. The results show slightly different permittivities for the differently stored samples, potentially indicating different amount of ASR gel. This observation was corroborated through UV fluorescence microscopy, where different amounts of ASR gel were observed in the samples. Moreover, the results indicate that ASR gel evolution may be better tracked through loss factor measurements, while pre-existing-gel may be better detected through permittivity measurements.

  20. High-affinity DNA base analogs as supramolecular, nanoscale promoters of macroscopic adhesion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cyrus A; Jones, Amanda R; Briggs, Ellen M; Novitsky, Eric J; Kuykendall, Darrell W; Sottos, Nancy R; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2013-05-15

    Adhesion phenomena are essential to many biological processes and to synthetic adhesives and manufactured coatings and composites. Supramolecular interactions are often implicated in various adhesion mechanisms. Recently, supramolecular building blocks, such as synthetic DNA base-pair mimics, have drawn attention in the context of molecular recognition, self-assembly, and supramolecular polymers. These reversible, hydrogen-bonding interactions have been studied extensively for their adhesive capabilities at the nano- and microscale, however, much less is known about their utility for practical adhesion in macroscopic systems. Herein, we report the preparation and evaluation of supramolecular coupling agents based on high-affinity, high-fidelity quadruple hydrogen-bonding units (e.g., DAN·DeUG, Kassoc = 10(8) M(-1) in chloroform). Macroscopic adhesion between polystyrene films and glass surfaces modified with 2,7-diamidonaphthyridine (DAN) and ureido-7-deazaguanine (DeUG) units was evaluated by mechanical testing. Structure-property relationships indicate that the designed supramolecular interaction at the nanoscale plays a key role in the observed macroscopic adhesive response. Experiments probing reversible adhesion or self-healing properties of bulk samples indicate that significant recovery of initial strength can be realized after failure but that the designed noncovalent interaction does not lead to healing during the process of adhesion loss.

  1. Fibrinogen matrix deposited on the surface of biomaterials acts as a natural anti-adhesive coating.

    PubMed

    Safiullin, Roman; Christenson, Wayne; Owaynat, Hadil; Yermolenko, Ivan S; Kadirov, Marsil K; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2015-10-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen on the luminal surface of biomaterials is a critical early event during the interaction of blood with implanted vascular graft prostheses which determines their thrombogenicity. We have recently identified a nanoscale process by which fibrinogen modifies the adhesive properties of various surfaces for platelets and leukocytes. In particular, adsorption of fibrinogen at low density promotes cell adhesion while its adsorption at high density results in the formation of an extensible multilayer matrix, which dramatically reduces cell adhesion. It remains unknown whether deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of vascular graft materials produces this anti-adhesive effect. Using atomic force spectroscopy, single cell force spectroscopy, and standard adhesion assays with platelets and leukocytes, we have characterized the adhesive and physical properties of the contemporary biomaterials, before and after coating with fibrinogen. We found that uncoated PET, PTFE and ePTFE exhibited high adhesion forces developed between the AFM tip or cells and the surfaces. Adsorption of fibrinogen at the increasing concentrations progressively reduced adhesion forces, and at ≥2 μg/ml all surfaces were virtually nonadhesive. Standard adhesion assays performed with platelets and leukocytes confirmed this dependence. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular events underlying thrombogenicity of vascular grafts.

  2. Testing Adhesive Bonds to Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Nondestructive tool simple and inexpensive. Easy-to-use tool nondestructively tests strength of adhesive bond between cloth and straight rigid edge. Developed for testing advanced flexible reusable surface insulation.

  3. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2016-07-12

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  4. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2008-03-26

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  5. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-09-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour.

  6. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour. PMID:27686622

  7. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Simon J; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-09-30

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour.

  8. Adhesive interactions between vesicles in the strong adhesion limit

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Arun; Anderson, Travers H.; Leal, L. Gary; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the adhesive interaction energy between a pair of vesicles in the strong adhesion limit, in which bending forces play a negligible role in determining vesicle shape compared to forces due to membrane stretching. Although force-distance or energy distance relationships characterizing adhesive interactions between fluid bilayers are routinely measured using the surface forces apparatus, the atomic force microscope and the biomembrane force probe, the interacting bilayers in these methods are supported on surfaces (e.g. mica sheet) and cannot be deformed. However, it is known that in a suspension, vesicles composed of the same bilayer can deform by stretching or bending, and can also undergo changes in volume. Adhesively interacting vesicles can thus form flat regions in the contact zone, which will result in an enhanced interaction energy as compared to rigid vesicles. The focus of this paper is to examine the magnitude of the interaction energy between adhesively interacting, deformed vesicles relative to free, undeformed vesicles as a function of the intervesicle separation. The modification of the intervesicle interaction energy due to vesicle deformability can be calculated knowing the undeformed radius of the vesicles, R0, the bending modulus kb, the area expansion modulus Ka, and the adhesive minimum WP(0) and separation DP(0) in the energy of interaction between two flat bilayers, which can be obtained from the force-distance measurements made using the above supported-bilayer methods. For vesicles with constant volumes, we show that adhesive potentials between non-deforming bilayers such as ∣WP(0)∣∼5×10−4mJ/m2, which are ordinarily considered weak in colloidal physics literature, can result in significantly deep (>10×) energy minima due to increase in vesicle area and flattening in the contact region. If the osmotic expulsion of water across the vesicles driven by the tense, stretched membrane in the presence of an osmotically active

  9. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-27

    technology is the use of pressure sensitive microcapsules , which release reactive amine crosslinkers into an adhesive putty when pressed against the surface...CLEANING AGENT RHEOLOGY 3 3.3 PRESSURE-ACTIVATED ADHESIVE 5 3.3.1 PROCESSING IMPROVEMENTS 5 3.3.2 MICROCAPSULE DIAMETER 5 3.3.3 MICROCAPSULE /RESIN...to attain a reasonable shelf life (- l wk.). The microcapsule diameter has been halved in order to improve mixing in the pressure-activated

  10. Multi-Scale Biomimetic Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-10

    Objectives: Same as originally stated 3. Status of Effort: Over the life of this grant, significant technical contributions have been made. When this...department of Defense as well, broadening our goals. 4. Accomplishments/New Findings (over the life of the grant): The mechanism of adhesion in the gecko...enabling microrobotics to explore extraterrestrial surfaces or harsh climates otherwise not accessible to man. In contrast to the adhesion seen in a rest

  11. Bacterial adhesion to bisphosphonate coated hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, A; Steward, C; Butler, S L; Philips, G J; Meikle, S T; Lloyd, A W; Grant, M H

    2005-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is commonly associated with microbial infection of orthopaedic implants. Such infections often lead to osteomyelitis, which may result in failure of the implant due to localised bone destruction. Bacterial adhesion and subsequent colonisation of the device may occur as a consequence of contamination during surgery, or by seeding from a distant site through the blood circulation. Coating of the hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic component of artificial hip joints with the bisphosphonates clodronate (C) and pamidronate (P) has been proposed as a means to minimise osteolysis and thereby prevent loosening of the implant. However, the effect of the bisphosphonate coating on bacterial adhesion to the HA materials must be determined before this approach can be implemented. In this study coated HA materials were incubated with the S. aureus and the number of adherent bacteria determined using the Modified Vortex Device (MVD) method. The number of bacteria adherent to the P coated HA material was significantly greater than that adherent to uncoated HA (60-fold increase) or to the C coated HA (90-fold increase). Therefore, even though earlier studies suggested that P bound to HA may improve osseointegration, the results presented would suggest that the use of this coating may be limited by the potential increased susceptibility of the coated device to infection.

  12. The central tower of the cathedral of Schleswig - New investigations to understand the alcali-silica reaction of historical mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedekind, Wanja; Protz, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The damaging alcali-silica reaction leads to crack-formation and structural destruction at noumerous, constructed with cement mortar, buildings worldwide. The ASR-reaction causes the expansion of altered aggregates by the formation of a swelling gel. This gel consists of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) that increases in volume with water, which exerts an expansive pressure inside the material. The cathedral of Schleswig is one of the oldest in northern Germany. The first church was built in 985-965. The Romanesque building part was erected around 1180 and the Gothic nave at the end of the 13th century. The central tower was constructed between 1888 and 1894 with brick and cement mortar. With 112 meters, the tower is the second-largest church spire of the country of Schleswig-Holstein in northern Germany. Due to the formation of cracks and damages from 1953 to 1956 first restoration works took place. Further developments of cracks are making restoration necessary again today. For developing a suitable conservation strategy, different investigations were done. The investigation included the determination of the pore space properties, the hygric and thermal dilatation and mercury porosimetry measurements. Furthermore, the application of cathodoluminescence microscopy may give information about the alteration process and microstructures present and reveal the differences between unaltered and altered mortars. An obvious relation between the porosity and the swelling intensity could be detected. Furthermore it becomes apparent, that a clear zonation of the mortar took place. The mortar near the surface is denser with a lower porosity and has a significantly lower swelling or dilatation.

  13. Silorane adhesive system: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro Júnior, Sylvio; Andrada, Mauro Amaral Caldeira de

    2014-01-01

    Silorane-based composite resin requires a specific adhesive system: a 2-step self-etching adhesive. Clinical protocols are well established and are based on the principles of adhesion to mineralized dental tissues. In this paper, we present a clinical application of the silorane adhesive system in a class-II restoration using silorane-based composite resin.

  14. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  15. Integrin-mediated adhesion complex

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau

    2010-01-01

    The integrin-mediated adhesion machinery is the primary cell-matrix adhesion mechanism in Metazoa. The integrin adhesion complex, which modulates important aspects of the cell physiology, is composed of integrins (alpha and beta subunits) and several scaffolding and signaling proteins. Integrins appeared to be absent in all non-metazoan eukaryotes so-far analyzed, including fungi, plants and choanoflagellates, the sister-group to Metazoa. Thus, integrins and, therefore, the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling mechanism was considered a metazoan innovation. Recently, a broad comparative genomic analysis including new genome data from several unicellular organisms closely related to fungi and metazoans shattered previous views. The integrin adhesion and signaling complex is not specific to Metazoa, but rather it is present in apusozoans and holozoan protists. Thus, this important signaling and adhesion system predated the origin of Fungi and Metazoa, and was subsequently lost in fungi and choanoflagellates. This finding suggests that cooption played a more important role in the origin of Metazoa than previously believed. Here, we hypothesize that the integrin adhesome was ancestrally involved in signaling. PMID:21057645

  16. Improvement of adhesion properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE) substrate using atmospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Nacher, L.; Garcia-Sanoguera, D.; Fenollar, O.; Balart, J.; Fombuena, V.

    2010-06-02

    In this work we have used atmospheric plasma technology on polyethylene surface with different treatment conditions. These modify surface pre-treatments on polyethylene, thus having a positive effect on overall surface activity of polymer surface and, consequently, adhesion properties can be remarkably improved. We have evaluated the influence of the nozzle/substrate distance and atmospheric plasma speed on wettability changes and adhesion properties. Wettability changes have been studied by contact angle measurements and subsequent surface energy calculation. Mechanical characterization of adhesion joints has been carried out in two different ways: peel and shear tensile test. The overall results show a remarkable increase in mechanical properties of adhesion joints for low nozzle/substrate distances and low speed. So plasma atmospheric technology is highly useful to increase adhesion properties of polypropylene.

  17. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  18. [Adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, C; Reis, F C

    1998-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis, an inflammatory process involving all three meningeal layers as well as the nerve roots, is a cause of persistent symptoms in 6% to 16% of postoperative patients. Although spinal surgery is the most common antecedent associated with arachnoiditis, multiple causes have been reported, including infection, intrathecal steroids or anesthetic agents, trauma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and ionic myelographic contrast material--both oil soluble and water soluble. In the past, oil-based intrathecal contrast agents (Pantopaque) were associated with arachnoiditis especially when this material was introduced into the thecal sac and mixed with blood. Arachnoiditis is apparently rarely idiopathic. The pathogenesis of spinal arachnoiditis is similar to the repair process of serous membranes, such as the peritoneum, with a negligible inflammatory cellular exudate and a prominent fibrinous exudate. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis of the lower spine is a myelographic diagnosis. The myelographic findings of arachnoiditis were divided into two types by Jorgensen et al. In type 1, "the empty thecal sac" appearance, there is homogeneous filling of the thecal sac with either absence of or defects involving nerve root sleeve filling. In type 2 arachnoiditis, there are localized or diffuse filling defects within the contrast column. MRI has demonstrated a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 100% in the diagnosis of arachnoiditis. The appearance of arachnoiditis on MRI can be assigned to three main groups. The MRI findings in group I are a conglomeration of adherent roots positioned centrally in the thecal sac. Patients in group II show roots peripherally adherent to the meninges--the so called empty sac. MRI findings in group III are a soft tissue mass within the subarachnoid space. It corresponds to the type 2 categorization defined by Jorgensen et al, where as the MRI imaging types I and II correspond to the myelographic type 1.

  19. Investigation of organic adhesives for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, K. L.; Licari, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of organic adhesives were investigated to acquire information for a guideline document regarding the selection of adhesives for use in high reliability hybrid microcircuits. Specifically, investigations were made of (1) alternate methods for determining the outgassing of cured adhesives, (2) effects of long term aging at 150 C on the electrical properties of conductive adhesives, (3) effects of shelf life age on adhesive characteristics, (4) bond strengths of electrically conductive adhesives on thick film gold metallization, (5) a copper filled adhesive, (6) effects of products outgassed from cured adhesives on device electrical parameters, (7) metal migration from electrically conductive adhesives, and (8) ionic content of electrically insulative adhesives. The tests performed during these investigations are described, and the results obtained are discussed.

  20. Cell adhesion and proliferation on polyethylene grafted with Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasálková, N. Slepičková; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Sajdl, P.; Bačáková, L.; Rimpelová, S.; Švorčík, V.

    2012-02-01

    Plasma treatment and subsequent Au nano-particles grafting of polyethylene (PE) lead to changes in surface morphology, roughness and wettability, significantly increasing the attractiveness of the material for cells. The PE samples were exposed to argon plasma. Plasma modified PE was chemically grafted by immersion to biphenyldithiol and consequently into solution of Au nano-particles. Changes in chemical structure of the modified PE were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and electrokinetic analysis ( ζ-potential). The surface wettability of the modified PE samples was examined by measurement of the contact angle by standard goniometry. The surface morphology of the plasma modified PE and that grafted with Au nano-particles was studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The modified PE samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Chemically bounded biphenyldithiol increases the number of the incorporated gold nano-particles and changes sample surface properties. The presence of the biphenyldithiol and the gold nano-particles on the PE surface influences dramatically adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs.

  1. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  2. Superhydrophobic Zr-based metallic glass surface with high adhesive force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Xia, Ting; Heng, Liping; Liu, Lin

    2013-06-01

    Micro/nano hierarchical structures were constructed on Zr35Ti30Be26.75Cu8.25 metallic glass surface by silicon moulding and subsequently chemical etching. The as-formed surface exhibited both superhydrophobicity and high adhesive force towards water. The superhydrophobicity is rationalized based on the modified Cassie-Baxter model [A. B. D. Cassie and S. Baxter, Trans. Faraday Soc. 40, 546 (1944)]. The origin of the robust adhesion is described in terms of intermolecular capillary forces. The present results not only provide a method to fabricate superhydrophobic metallic glasses surface but also explore an important industrial application as dry adhesives and transport of liquid microdroplets.

  3. The role of Na-hylan in reducing postsurgical tendon adhesions: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Weiss, C; Suros, J M; Michalow, A; Denlinger, J; Moore, M; Tejeiro, W

    1987-01-01

    Na-hylan, a chemically modified sodium hyaluronate jelly, was studied mechanically and histologically as a surgical device to diminish tendon adhesions in rabbit extensor hallucis longus tendons after severe surgical trauma. Na-hylan jelly of high viscoelastic properties was found to be highly effective in decreasing tendon adhesions. Na-hylan jelly of low viscoelastic properties was not effective in diminishing adhesion formation. There was no interference with the tensile strength of tendon healing, and no evidence of acute or chronic inflammatory response to the Na-hylan jelly.

  4. Glycan-functionalized diamond nanoparticles as potent E. coli anti-adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barras, Alexandre; Martin, Fernando Ariel; Bande, Omprakash; Baumann, Jean-Sébastien; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Boukherroub, Rabah; Beloin, Christophe; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation on biotic surfaces or medical devices is an increasing source of infections in clinical settings. A large proportion of these biofilm-related infections are caused by Escherichia coli, a major nosocomial pathogen, in which the major adhesion factor is the FimH adhesin located at the tip of type 1 fimbriae. Inhibition of FimH-mediated adhesion has been identified as an efficient antibiotic-alternative strategy to potentially reduce E. coli-related infections. In this article we demonstrate that nanodiamond particles, covently modified with mannose moieties by a ``click'' chemistry approach, are able to efficiently inhibit E. coli type 1 fimbriae-mediated adhesion to eukaryotic cells with relative inhibitory potency (RIP) of as high as 9259 (bladder cell adhesion assay), which is unprecedented when compared with RIP values previously reported for alternate multivalent mannose-functionalized nanostructures designed to inhibit E. coli adhesion. Also remarkable is that these novel mannose-modified NDs reduce E. coli biofilm formation, a property previously not observed for multivalent glyco-nanoparticles and rarely demonstrated for other multivalent or monovalent mannose glycans. This work sets the stage for the further evaluation of these novel NDs as an anti-adhesive therapeutic strategy against E. coli-derived infections.Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation on biotic surfaces or medical devices is an increasing source of infections in clinical settings. A large proportion of these biofilm-related infections are caused by Escherichia coli, a major nosocomial pathogen, in which the major adhesion factor is the FimH adhesin located at the tip of type 1 fimbriae. Inhibition of FimH-mediated adhesion has been identified as an efficient antibiotic-alternative strategy to potentially reduce E. coli-related infections. In this article we demonstrate that nanodiamond particles, covently modified with

  5. Cationized bovine serum albumin with pendant RGD groups forms efficient biocoatings for cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jeck Fei; Weil, Tanja; Jaenicke, Stephan

    2011-11-01

    Cationized bovine serum albumin (cBSA-147) has been modified by attaching the cyclic pentapeptide cRGDfK to its surface through linkers of different length. Coatings of these bioconjugates on glass surfaces were studied for their ability to stimulate cell adhesion. These chemically modified albumins combine a high number of positive charges which facilitate the initial cell adhesion to the surface with multiple Arg-Gly-Asp groups which enable focal adhesion of fibroblast cells by specific interactions with cell-surface receptors. The biocoatings are easily prepared within a few minutes by simple incubation from a dilute solution of the modified albumin. This constitutes a convenient approach for preparing surfaces for cell adhesion. Excellent focal adhesion of NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells on the biocoatings was observed. About 75% of the seeded cells attached to the cRGDfK-cBSA-147 coated surfaces, and 97% of them underwent focal adhesion. Adhering cells were able to grow and proliferate on the coated surfaces, confirming the outstanding biocompatibility of these biocoatings.

  6. Monocyte adhesion to endothelium in simian immunodeficiency virus-induced AIDS encephalitis is mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1/alpha 4 beta 1 integrin interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Sasseville, V. G.; Newman, W.; Brodie, S. J.; Hesterberg, P.; Pauley, D.; Ringler, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Because the mechanisms associated with recruitment of monocytes to brain in AIDS encephalitis are unknown, we used tissues from rhesus monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) to examine the relative contributions of various adhesion pathways in mediating monocyte adhesion to endothelium from encephalitic brain. Using a modified Stamper and Woodruff tissue adhesion assay, we found that the human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and the B cell line, Ramos, preferentially bound to brain vessels from monkeys with AIDS encephalitis. Using a combined tissue adhesion/immunohistochemistry approach, these cells only bound to vessels expressing vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Furthermore, pretreatment of tissues with antibodies to VCAM-1 or cell lines with antibodies to VLA-4 (CD49d) inhibited adhesion by more than 70%. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)/beta 2 integrin interactions were not significant in mediating cell adhesion to the vasculature in encephalitic simian brain using a cell line (JY) capable of binding rhesus monkey ICAM-1. In addition, selectin-mediated interactions did not significantly contribute to cell binding to encephalitic brain as there was no immunohistochemical expression of E-selectin and P-selectin in either normal or encephalitic brain, nor was there a demonstrable adhesive effect from L-selectin using L-selectin-transfected 300.19 cells on simian encephalitic brain. These results demonstrate that using the tissue adhesion assay, THP-1, U937, and Ramos cells bind to vessels in brain from animals with AIDS encephalitis using VCAM-1/alpha 4 beta 1 integrin interactions and suggest that VCAM-1 and VLA-4 may be integral for monocyte recruitment to the central nervous system during the development of AIDS encephalitis. Images Figure 1 PMID:7507300

  7. UV-cured adhesives for carbon fiber composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsiao-Chun

    Carbon fiber composite materials are increasingly used in automobile, marine, and aerospace industries due to their unique properties, including high strength, high stiffness and low weight. However, due to their brittle characteristic, these structures are prone to physical damage, such as a bird strike or impact damage. Once the structure is damaged, it is important to have fast and reliable temporary repair until the permanent repair or replacement can take place. In this dissertation, UV-based adhesives were used to provide a bonding strength for temporary repair. Adhesively bonded patch repair is an efficient and effective method for temporary repair. In this study, precured patches (hard patches) and dry fabric patches with laminating resins (soft patches) were performed. UV-based epoxy adhesives were applied to both patch repair systems. For precured patch repair, the bonding strengths were investigated under different surface treatments for bonding area and different adhesives thicknesses. The shear stresses of different UV exposure times and curing times were tested. Besides, the large patch repair was investigated as well. For soft patch repair, the hand wet lay-up was applied due to high viscosity of UV resins. A modified single lap shear testing (ASTM D5868) was applied to determine the shear stress. The large patches used fiber glass instead of carbon fiber to prove the possibility of repair with UV epoxy resin by hand wet lay-up process. The hand lay-up procedure was applied and assisted by vacuum pressure to eliminate the air bubbles and consolidate the patches. To enhance the bonding strength and effective soft patch repair, vacuum assisted resin transferring molding (VaRTM) is the better option. However, only low viscosity resins can be operated by VaRTM. Hence, new UV-based adhesives were formulated. The new UV-based adhesives included photoinitiator (PI), epoxy and different solvents. Solvents were used to compound the photoinitiator into epoxy

  8. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  9. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  10. Electrohydraulic shock wave generation as a means to increase intrinsic permeability of mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, O.; Reess, T.; Matallah, M.; De Ferron, A.; Chen, W.; La Borderie, C.; Pijaudier-Cabot, G.; Jacques, A.; Rey-Bethbeder, F.

    2010-12-15

    This article discusses the influence of compressive shock waves on the permeability of cementitious materials. Shock waves are generated in water by Pulsed Arc Electrohydraulic Discharges (PAED). The practical aim is to increase the intrinsic permeability of the specimens. The maximum pressure amplitude of the shock wave is 250 MPa. It generates damage in the specimens and the evolution of damage is correlated with the intrinsic permeability of the mortar. A threshold of pressure is observed. From this threshold, the increase of permeability is linear in a semi-log plot. The influence of repeated shocks on permeability is also discussed. Qualitative X Ray Tomography illustrates the evolution of the microstructure of the material leading to the increase of permeability. Comparative results from mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) show that the micro-structural damage process starts at the sub-micrometric level and that the characteristic size of pores of growing volume increases.

  11. GPU-based simulations of fracture in idealized brick and mortar composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William Pro, J.; Kwei Lim, Rone; Petzold, Linda R.; Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R.

    2015-07-01

    Stiff ceramic platelets (or bricks) that are aligned and bonded to a second ductile phase with low volume fraction (mortar) are a promising pathway to produce stiff, high-toughness composites. For certain ranges of constituent properties, including those of some synthetic analogs to nacre, one can demonstrate that the deformation is dominated by relative brick motions. This paper describes simulations of fracture that explicitly track the motions of individual rigid bricks in an idealized microstructure; cohesive tractions acting between the bricks introduce elastic, plastic and rupture behaviors. Results are presented for the stresses and damage near macroscopic cracks with different brick orientations relative to the loading orientation. The anisotropic macroscopic initiation toughness is computed for small-scale yielding conditions and is shown to be independent of specimen geometry and loading configuration. The results are shown to be in agreement with previously published experiments on synthetic nacre.

  12. Microstructural Changes Due to Alkali-Silica Reaction during Standard Mortar Test

    DOE PAGES

    Shin, Jun-Ho; Struble, Leslie; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructural development of mortar bars with silica glass aggregate undergoing alkali-silica reaction (ASR) under the conditions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test C1260 was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and qualitative X-ray microanalysis. Cracking in the aggregate, the hydrated paste, and the paste-aggregate interface was important in the development of the microstructure. Cracks were characterized according to their location, their relationship to other cracks, and whether they are filled with ASR gel. Expansion of the bars was approximately 1% at 12 days and 2% at 53 days. They fell apart by 63 days. The barsmore » contained two zones, an inner region that was undergoing ASR and an outer and much more highly damaged zone that extended further inward over time. Evidence of ASR was present even during the period when specimens were immersed in water, prior to immersion in NaOH solution.« less

  13. Microscopic observations of self-healing products in calcareous fly ash mortars.

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The results of microstructural characterization of mortars containing fly ash class C (High Calcium Fly Ash) from combustion of lignite are presented. The evaluation of the microstructure was performed using scanning electron microscope, optical, and confocal microscope. The tested beams were bent till the crack and microcracks opening, which were healed during the different curing time. The results showed that the replacement of cement with fly ash class C influenced the process of crack healing. The addition of HCFA, at both 30% and 60%, speeds up the self-healing process in cracks and particularly in micro-cracks. In the research, the completely filling up of the cracks by new phases has not been observed, only the beginning of such process has been noticed.

  14. Analysis of acid transport through multi-phase epoxy mortars for wastewater structures.

    PubMed

    Valix, M

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of acid migration through epoxy mortars were examined. Diffusion coefficients of typical sewer bio-metabolised acids: sulphuric, nitric, citric and oxalic acids were determined by gravimetric sorption method and fitted to the multi-phase Jacob-Jones model. Acid permeation was characterised by hindered pore diffusion with the extent being determined by the polarity of the acid and epoxy, and by the microstructure of the epoxy. Epoxy with higher polarity was able to reduce the diffusion coefficients by 49, while dense phases of the coating reduced the diffusion coefficient by 5,100. These results reflect the relative influence of epoxy polarity and microstructure on their performance as protective liners in sewers.

  15. Microstructural Changes Due to Alkali-Silica Reaction during Standard Mortar Test

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jun-Ho; Struble, Leslie; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructural development of mortar bars with silica glass aggregate undergoing alkali-silica reaction (ASR) under the conditions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test C1260 was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and qualitative X-ray microanalysis. Cracking in the aggregate, the hydrated paste, and the paste-aggregate interface was important in the development of the microstructure. Cracks were characterized according to their location, their relationship to other cracks, and whether they are filled with ASR gel. Expansion of the bars was approximately 1% at 12 days and 2% at 53 days. They fell apart by 63 days. The bars contained two zones, an inner region that was undergoing ASR and an outer and much more highly damaged zone that extended further inward over time. Evidence of ASR was present even during the period when specimens were immersed in water, prior to immersion in NaOH solution.

  16. Enhancement of thermal neutron shielding of cement mortar by using borosilicate glass powder.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bo-Kil; Lee, Jun-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2017-05-01

    Concrete has been used as a traditional biological shielding material. High hydrogen content in concrete also effectively attenuates high-energy fast neutrons. However, concrete does not have strong protection against thermal neutrons because of the lack of boron compound. In this research, boron was added in the form of borosilicate glass powder to increase the neutron shielding property of cement mortar. Borosilicate glass powder was chosen in order to have beneficial pozzolanic activity and to avoid deleterious expansion caused by an alkali-silica reaction. According to the experimental results, borosilicate glass powder with an average particle size of 13µm showed pozzolanic activity. The replacement of borosilicate glass powder with cement caused a slight increase in the 28-day compressive strength. However, the incorporation of borosilicate glass powder resulted in higher thermal neutron shielding capability. Thus, borosilicate glass powder can be used as a good mineral additive for various radiation shielding purposes.

  17. Insights into alkali-silica reaction damage in mortar through acoustic nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, M.; Kim, J.-Y.; Jacobs, L. J.; Kurtis, K. E.

    2016-02-01

    The progression of damage as a result of alkali-silica reaction in mortar samples is monitored by using the Nonlinear Impact Resonance Acoustic Spectroscopy (NIRAS) method and expansion measurements, which were performed daily. Results of this study show a strong correlation between the cumulative average nonlinearity parameter and expansion for each sample type, and a strong linear relationship between fourteen-day expansion and the cumulative average nonlinearity of among sample types. In addition to the cumulative average nonlinearity parameter, the standard deviation of average nonlinearity parameter shows strong correlation with the fourteen-day expansion of sample types. Results provide insights to the relationship with the acoustic nonlinearity and damage caused by the ASR.

  18. Colloids in the mortar backfill of a cementitious repository for radioactive waste.

    PubMed

    Wieland, E; Spieler, P

    2001-01-01

    Colloids are present in groundwater aquifers and water-permeable engineered barrier systems and may facilitate the migration of radionuclides. A highly permeable mortar is foreseen to be used as backfill for the engineered barrier of the Swiss repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. The backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation and, due to its high porosity, for colloid mobility. Colloid concentration measurements were carried out using an in-situ liquid particle counting system. The in-house developed counting system with three commercially available sensors allowed the detection of single particles and colloids at low concentrations in the size range 50-5000 nm. The counting system was tested using suspensions prepared from certified size standards. The concentrations of colloids with size range 50-1000 nm were measured in cement pore water, which was collected from a column filled with a highly permeable backfill mortar. The chemical composition of the pore water corresponded to a Ca(OH)2-controlled cement system. Colloid concentrations in the backfill pore water were found to be typically lower than approximately 0.1 ppm. The specific (geometric) surface areas of the colloid populations were in the range 240 m2 g(-1) to 770 m2 g(-1). The low colloid inventories observed in this study can be explained by the high ionic strength and Ca concentrations of the cement pore water. These conditions are favourable for colloid-colloid and colloid-backfill interactions and unfavourable for colloid-enhanced nuclide transport.

  19. Monitoring of self-healing phenomena towards enhanced sustainability of historic mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenta, M.; Karatasios, I.; Maravelaki, P.; Kilikoglou, V.

    2016-05-01

    Mortars are known for their ability to heal their defects in an autogenic way. This phenomenon is expressed by the filling of microcracks by secondary products, restoring or enhancing the material's performance. Parameterization of self-healing phenomenon could be a key factor for the enhanced sustainability of these materials in terms of reduced repair cost and consumption of natural raw materials and thus reduced environmental fingerprint. The fact that this phenomenon takes place autogenously suggests that the material can self-repair its defects, without external intervention, thus leading to a prolonged life cycle. In the present study, the autogenic self-healing phenomenon was studied in natural hydraulic lime mortars, considering aspects of curing time before initial cracking, duration and conditions of the healing period. Furthermore, strength recovery due to autogenic self-healing was measured under high humidity conditions, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (DTA/TG) was performed in all specimens in order to quantitatively assess the available unreacted components in the binder at all ages. Regarding the microstructure of the healing phases, the main products formed during healing consist of calcite and various C-S-H/C-A-H phases. Depending on the parameters mentioned above, there is a wide diversity in the intensity, typology and topography of the secondary phases inside the cracks. The main differences discussed were observed between specimens cracked at very early age and those damaged after 30 days of curing. Similarly, the mechanical properties of the crack-healed specimens were associated with the above findings and especially with the available each-time amount of lime, determined by thermo-gravimetric analysis.

  20. Capillarity-based switchable adhesion.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Michael J; Steen, Paul H

    2010-02-23

    Drawing inspiration from the adhesion abilities of a leaf beetle found in nature, we have engineered a switchable adhesion device. The device combines two concepts: The surface tension force from a large number of small liquid bridges can be significant (capillarity-based adhesion) and these contacts can be quickly made or broken with electronic control (switchable). The device grabs or releases a substrate in a fraction of a second via a low-voltage pulse that drives electroosmotic flow. Energy consumption is minimal because both the grabbed and released states are stable equilibria that persist with no energy added to the system. Notably, the device maintains the integrity of an array of hundreds to thousands of distinct interfaces during active reconfiguration from droplets to bridges and back, despite the natural tendency of the liquid toward coalescence. We demonstrate the scaling of adhesion strength with the inverse of liquid contact size. This suggests that strengths approaching those of permanent bonding adhesives are possible as feature size is scaled down. In addition, controllability is fast and efficient because the attachment time and required voltage also scale down favorably. The device features compact size, no solid moving parts, and is made of common materials.