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Sample records for modified multi-stage bubble

  1. A multi-stage heuristic algorithm for matching problem in the modified miniload automated storage and retrieval system of e-commerce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenrui; Wu, Yaohua; Wu, Yingying

    2016-05-01

    E-commerce, as an emerging marketing mode, has attracted more and more attention and gradually changed the way of our life. However, the existing layout of distribution centers can't fulfill the storage and picking demands of e-commerce sufficiently. In this paper, a modified miniload automated storage/retrieval system is designed to fit these new characteristics of e-commerce in logistics. Meanwhile, a matching problem, concerning with the improvement of picking efficiency in new system, is studied in this paper. The problem is how to reduce the travelling distance of totes between aisles and picking stations. A multi-stage heuristic algorithm is proposed based on statement and model of this problem. The main idea of this algorithm is, with some heuristic strategies based on similarity coefficients, minimizing the transportations of items which can not arrive in the destination picking stations just through direct conveyors. The experimental results based on the cases generated by computers show that the average reduced rate of indirect transport times can reach 14.36% with the application of multi-stage heuristic algorithm. For the cases from a real e-commerce distribution center, the order processing time can be reduced from 11.20 h to 10.06 h with the help of the modified system and the proposed algorithm. In summary, this research proposed a modified system and a multi-stage heuristic algorithm that can reduce the travelling distance of totes effectively and improve the whole performance of e-commerce distribution center.

  2. On the Prediction of Separation Bubbles Using a Modified Chen-Thyson Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platzer, Max F.; Ekaterinaris, John A.; Chandrasekhara, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    The prediction of separation bubbles on NACA 65-213 and NACA 0012 using a modified Chen-Thyson transition model is presented. The contents include: 1) Background; 2) Analysis of NACA 65-213 separation bubble using cebeci's viscous-inviscid interaction method; 3) Analysis of NACA 0012 separation bubble using navier-stokes method; and 4) Comparison with experiment.

  3. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, P.M.

    1980-06-26

    A multi-stage flash degaser is incorporated in an energy conversion system having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger in order that the heat exchanger and a turbine and condenser of the system can operate at optimal efficiency.

  4. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, Pascal M.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-stage flash degaser (18) is incorporated in an energy conversion system (10) having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger (22) in order that the heat exchanger (22) and a turbine (48) and condenser (32) of the system (10) can operate at optimal efficiency.

  5. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  6. Multi-stage complex contagions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Sergey; Ward, Jonathan A.; Gleeson, James P.; Porter, Mason A.

    2013-03-01

    The spread of ideas across a social network can be studied using complex contagion models, in which agents are activated by contact with multiple activated neighbors. The investigation of complex contagions can provide crucial insights into social influence and behavior-adoption cascades on networks. In this paper, we introduce a model of a multi-stage complex contagion on networks. Agents at different stages—which could, for example, represent differing levels of support for a social movement or differing levels of commitment to a certain product or idea—exert different amounts of influence on their neighbors. We demonstrate that the presence of even one additional stage introduces novel dynamical behavior, including interplay between multiple cascades, which cannot occur in single-stage contagion models. We find that cascades—and hence collective action—can be driven not only by high-stage influencers but also by low-stage influencers.

  7. Multi-stage complex contagions.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Sergey; Ward, Jonathan A; Gleeson, James P; Porter, Mason A

    2013-03-01

    The spread of ideas across a social network can be studied using complex contagion models, in which agents are activated by contact with multiple activated neighbors. The investigation of complex contagions can provide crucial insights into social influence and behavior-adoption cascades on networks. In this paper, we introduce a model of a multi-stage complex contagion on networks. Agents at different stages-which could, for example, represent differing levels of support for a social movement or differing levels of commitment to a certain product or idea-exert different amounts of influence on their neighbors. We demonstrate that the presence of even one additional stage introduces novel dynamical behavior, including interplay between multiple cascades, which cannot occur in single-stage contagion models. We find that cascades-and hence collective action-can be driven not only by high-stage influencers but also by low-stage influencers.

  8. A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Shi, Pan; Zhu, Lin; Ding, Jianfu; Chen, Qingmin; Wang, Qingjun

    2014-03-01

    In this work, a modification to the captive bubble method was proposed to test the advancing and receding contact angle. This modification is done by adding a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental system equipped with an optical angle mater equipped with a high speed CCD camera, a temperature control system and a computer. A series of samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared. The advancing and receding contact angles of these samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic surfaces through the new methods was comparable to the result tested by the traditional sessile drop method. It is proved that this method overcomes the limitation of the traditional captive bubble method and the modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. However, due to the nature of the captive bubble technique, this method is also only suitable for testing the surface with advancing or receding contact angle below 130°.

  9. Modified big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using peripheral air injection.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Sepehr; Faramarzi, Amir; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Jafarinasab, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    To introduce a modification to big-bubble deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) which can decrease the risk of Descemet membrane (DM) perforation during air injection. In Anwar's big-bubble technique, a 27-guage needle is inserted from the trephination site and advanced into the corneal stroma up to the centre. The technique we introduce modifies the original technique in the following fashion. After trephination to approximately 80% of corneal thickness, a 27-guage needle is inserted into the stroma peripherally from the trephination site towards the limbus. Air is injected gently into the deep stroma until a big bubble is formed. This technique was performed in 16 consecutive keratoconic eyes undergoing DALK. Additionally, peripheral air injection was carried out in 27 eye-bank corneas using a peripheral approach. In all (100%) eye-bank and 13 (81.3%) live corneas, a successful big bubble was easily achieved following peripheral air injection. In these 13 live corneas, all bubbles were formed at the central (n=10) or paracentral (n=3) cornea and extended centrifugally (type 1 bubble). In one of these corneas, an additional three bubbles were noted in the periphery between the DM and the pre-Descemet posterior stromal layer (Dua's layer, type 2) after a type 1 bubble was formed. In two live corneas in which peripheral air injection failed, a big bubble was successfully formed after air was injected inside the trephination site. Air injection peripheral to the trephination site is a reproducible modification to the standard technique which can decrease the risk of DM perforation during air injection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Multi-stage separations based on dielectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2004-07-13

    A system utilizing multi-stage traps based on dielectrophoresis. Traps with electrodes arranged transverse to the flow and traps with electrodes arranged parallel to the flow with combinations of direct current and alternating voltage are used to trap, concentrate, separate, and/or purify target particles.

  11. Multi-stage sampling in genetic epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Whittemore, A S; Halpern, J

    When data are expensive to collect, it can be cost-efficient to sample in two or more stages. In the first stage a simple random sample is drawn and then stratified according to some easily measured attribute. In each subsequent stage a random subset of previously selected units is sampled for more detailed observation, with a unit's sampling probability determined by its attributes as observed in the previous stages. These designs are useful in many medical studies; here we use them in genetic epidemiology. Two genetic studies illustrate the strengths and limitations of the approach. The first study evaluates nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in U.S. blacks. The goal is to estimate the relative contributions of white male genes and white female genes to the gene pool of African-Americans. This example shows that the Horvitz-Thompson estimators proposed for multi-stage designs can be inefficient, particularly when used with unnecessary stratification. The second example is a multi-stage study of familial prostate cancer. The goal is to gather pedigrees, blood samples and archived tissue for segregation and linkage analysis of familial prostate cancer data by first obtaining crude family data from prostate cancer cases and cancer-free controls. This second example shows the gains in efficiency from multi-stage sampling when the individual likelihood or quasilikelihood scores vary substantially across strata.

  12. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  13. Sensing Refractive Indices of Fluids by Wavelength-Tunable Laser and Novel Multi-stage Directional Couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ruei-Chang; Lee, Keh-Yi

    2017-05-01

    In this work, the authors propose a modified type of multi-stage directional couplers and combine it with a wavelength-tunable laser to measure the refractive index of an undetermined biochemical liquid/solution. Tuning the wavelength of the laser incident on the modified multi-stage directional couplers, the relationship between the wavelength corresponding to the maximal output optical power and the refractive index of the unknown fluid has been obtained.

  14. Modified big-bubble technique compared to manual dissection deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty in the treatment of keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Knutsson, Karl Anders; Rama, Paolo; Paganoni, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical findings and results of manual dissection deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) compared to a modified big-bubble DALK technique in eyes affected by keratoconus. Sixty eyes of 60 patients with keratoconus were treated with one of the two surgical techniques manual DALK (n = 30); big-bubble DALK (n = 30). The main outcomes measured were visual acuity, corneal topographic parameters, thickness of residual stroma and endothelial cell density (ECD). Patients were examined postoperatively at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 1 month after suture removal. Final best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) measured 1 month after suture removal was 0.11 ± 0.08 LogMAR in the big-bubble group compared to 0.13 ± 0.08 in the manual DALK group (p = 0.227). In patients treated with the big-bubble technique without complications (Descemet's membrane completely bared), the stromal residue was not measureable. Mean stromal residual thickness in the manual DALK group was 30.50 ± 27.60 μm. Data analysis of the manual DALK group demonstrated a significant correlation between BSCVA and residual stromal thickness; lower residual stromal thickness correlated with better BSCVA values (Spearman ρ = 0.509, p = 0.018). Postoperative ECD was similar in both groups at all intervals, with no statistically significant differences. In both groups, ECD loss was only significant during the 1- to 6-month interval (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001 in the big-bubble DALK and manual DALK groups, respectively). Manual DALK provides comparable results to big-bubble DALK. Big-bubble DALK permits faster visual recovery and is a surgical technique, which can be easily converted to manual DALK in cases of unsuccessful 'big-bubble' formation. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Preparation of Angiopep-2 Peptide-Modified Bubble Liposomes for Delivery to the Brain.

    PubMed

    Endo-Takahashi, Yoko; Ooaku, Kotomi; Ishida, Kazuma; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Negishi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    In the development of therapeutic approaches for central nervous system diseases, a significant obstacle is efficient drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier owing to its low permeability. Various nanocarriers have been developed for brain-targeted drug delivery by modification with specific ligands. We have previously developed polyethylene glycol-modified liposomes (Bubble liposomes [BLs]) that entrap ultrasound (US) contrast gas and can serve as both plasmid DNA or small interfering RNA carriers and US contrast agents. In this study, we attempted to prepare brain-targeting BLs modified with Angiopep-2 (Ang2) peptide (Ang2-BLs). Ang2 is expected to be a useful ligand for the efficient delivery of nanocarriers to the brain. We showed that Ang2-BLs interacted specifically with brain endothelial cells via low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1. We also confirmed that Ang2-BLs could entrap US contrast gas and had US imaging ability as well as unmodified BLs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Ang2-BLs accumulated in brain tissue after intravascular injection. These results suggested that Ang2-BLs may be a useful tool for brain-targeted delivery and US imaging via systemic administration.

  16. P-Values for Multi-Stage and Sequential Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    values for multi-stage tests about the parameter of an exponential distri- bution when test plans from MIL- STD -781C are used. DD I JAN 14173 F DIION OF I...tests. We also give some tables of p-values for multi-stage tests about the parameter of an exponential dis- tribution when test plans from MIL- STD -781C...We also give some tables of p-values for multi-stage tests about an exponential parameter using test plans from MIL- STD -781C. 2. DEFINITION OF P

  17. Multi-stage internal gear/turbine fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Eugen; Raney, Michael Raymond

    2004-07-06

    A multi-stage internal gear/turbine fuel pump for a vehicle includes a housing having an inlet and an outlet and a motor disposed in the housing. The multi-stage internal gear/turbine fuel pump also includes a shaft extending axially and disposed in the housing. The multi-stage internal gear/turbine fuel pump further includes a plurality of pumping modules disposed axially along the shaft. One of the pumping modules is a turbine pumping module and another of the pumping modules is a gerotor pumping module for rotation by the motor to pump fuel from the inlet to the outlet.

  18. Efficient Multi-Stage Time Marching for Viscous Flows via Local Preconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Wood, William A.; vanLeer, Bram

    1999-01-01

    A new method has been developed to accelerate the convergence of explicit time-marching, laminar, Navier-Stokes codes through the combination of local preconditioning and multi-stage time marching optimization. Local preconditioning is a technique to modify the time-dependent equations so that all information moves or decays at nearly the same rate, thus relieving the stiffness for a system of equations. Multi-stage time marching can be optimized by modifying its coefficients to account for the presence of viscous terms, allowing larger time steps. We show it is possible to optimize the time marching scheme for a wide range of cell Reynolds numbers for the scalar advection-diffusion equation, and local preconditioning allows this optimization to be applied to the Navier-Stokes equations. Convergence acceleration of the new method is demonstrated through numerical experiments with circular advection and laminar boundary-layer flow over a flat plate.

  19. Modified bubble level senses pitch and roll angles over wide range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, E. J.; Mcnally, P. F.

    1971-01-01

    Bubble level sensor with fiber-optic field flattener is simple, rugged, small, and impervious to temperature and vibration effects. Pitch angles from -15 deg to +40 deg and roll angles of +30 deg are determined within 0.5 deg.

  20. Multi-stage decoding of multi-level modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Kasami, Tadao; Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Various types of multi-stage decoding for multi-level modulation codes are investigated. It is shown that if the component codes of a multi-level modulation code and types of decoding at various stages are chosen properly, high spectral efficiency and large coding gain can be achieved with reduced decoding complexity. Particularly, it is shown that the difference in performance between the suboptimum multi-stage soft-decision maximum likelihood decoding of a modulation code and the single-stage optimum soft-decision decoding of the code is very small, only a fraction of dB loss in signal to noise ratio at a bit error rate (BER) of 10(exp -6).

  1. Multi-stage, isothermal CO preferential oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Skala, Glenn William; Brundage, Mark A.; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Pettit, William Henry; Stukey, Kevin; Hart-Predmore, David James; Fairchok, Joel

    2000-01-01

    A multi-stage, isothermal, carbon monoxide preferential oxidation (PrOx) reactor comprising a plurality of serially arranged, catalyzed heat exchangers, each separated from the next by a mixing chamber for homogenizing the gases exiting one heat exchanger and entering the next. In a preferred embodiment, at least some of the air used in the PrOx reaction is injected directly into the mixing chamber between the catalyzed heat exchangers.

  2. Multi-stage depressed collector for small orbit gyrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Amarjit; Ives, R. Lawrence; Schumacher, Richard V.; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-stage depressed collector for receiving energy from a small orbit gyrating electron beam employs a plurality of electrodes at different potentials for sorting the individual electrons on the basis of their total energy level. Magnetic field generating coils, for producing magnetic fields and magnetic iron for magnetic field shaping produce adiabatic and controlled non-adiabatic transitions of the incident electron beam to further facilitate the sorting.

  3. A Computerized Algorithm for Solving Multi-Stage Simultaneous Games.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    COMPUTERIZED ALGORITHM FOR SOLVING MULTI-STAGE SIMULTANEOUS GAMES I. Introduction The theory of games of strategy may be described as a mathematical...ticipants and the chance events [Ref 3:1]. Examples of games of strategy include poker, chess, and military battles. Each of these games allows the...In addition, the author learned a great deal from the book Games of Strategy by Melvin Dresher (Ref 3). A discussion of a solution developed by

  4. Multi-stage depressed collector for small orbit gyrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Singh, A.; Ives, R.L.; Schumacher, R.V.; Mizuhara, Y.M.

    1998-07-14

    A multi-stage depressed collector for receiving energy from a small orbit gyrating electron beam employs a plurality of electrodes at different potentials for sorting the individual electrons on the basis of their total energy level. Magnetic field generating coils, for producing magnetic fields and magnetic iron for magnetic field shaping produce adiabatic and controlled non-adiabatic transitions of the incident electron beam to further facilitate the sorting. 9 figs.

  5. The automated multi-stage substructuring system for NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, E. I.; Herting, D. N.; Herendeen, D. L.; Hoesly, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The substructuring capability developed for eventual installation in Level 16 is now operational in a test version of NASTRAN. Its features are summarized. These include the user-oriented, Case Control type control language, the automated multi-stage matrix processing, the independent direct access data storage facilities, and the static and normal modes solution capabilities. A complete problem analysis sequence is presented with card-by-card description of the user input.

  6. Unbiased statistical analysis for multi-stage proteomic search strategies.

    PubMed

    Everett, Logan J; Bierl, Charlene; Master, Stephen R

    2010-02-05

    "Multi-stage" search strategies have become widely accepted for peptide identification and are implemented in a number of available software packages. We describe limitations of these strategies for validation and decoy-based statistical analyses and demonstrate these limitations using a set of control sample spectra. We propose a solution that corrects the statistical deficiencies and describe its implementation using the open-source software X!Tandem.

  7. Figures of Merit for Multi-Stage Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, J.; Kadin, A. M.; Webber, R. J.; Track, E. K.

    2010-04-01

    The "coefficient of performance" (CoP) is often used as a measure of efficiency for single-stage cryocoolers, but such a parameter is not well defined for multi-stage cryocoolers. We propose a simple definition of an electrical "figure of merit" (FoM) representative of the distributed refrigeration power of multi-stage cryocoolers, that resolves this issue for applications where heat-sinking of power and signal leads at intermediate stages is an important end-user requirement. Two cases are considered which yield somewhat different results. A Power Lead FoM (PL-FoM) is derived, based on the largest electric current that can be flowed from ambient to the lowest temperature stage. A Signal Lead FoM (SL-FoM) is also derived, based on achieving minimum electrical attenuation on the signal leads. Each FoM represents a temperature-weighted combination of the heat lifts of the various stages. The two FoMs can aid in the selection of an optimal multi-stage cryocooler for operation of superconducting devices, for example.

  8. Bubbles Within Bubbles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-05

    This infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows a striking example of what is called a hierarchical bubble structure, in which one giant bubble, carved into the dust of space by massive stars, has triggered the formation of smaller bubbles.

  9. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-05-18

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process.

  10. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-05-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process.

  11. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process. PMID:27188258

  12. A Valuation Method for Multi-Stage Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Osamu; Ito, Junko; Ueda, Yoshikatsu

    A real-option based valuation method has been developed for multi-stage development projects which allow flexible stage-wise go/stop judgments. The proposed method measures the economic value of projects from potential future cash flow produced by them, and is characterized by following four functions: (1) Corporation of technical and market risks into project valuation, (2) Quantification of a project portfolio value, (3) Modeling of correlation between individual projects in a portfolio, and (4) Control of project portfolio risk with a risk index.

  13. Multi-Stage Data Fusion in Security and Defence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    providing a lower bound on target cardinality. Equation (2.19) requires (2.4). ( )( ) ( ) ( )( )! exp 1| 0 1 kj qqiNjNp B kj B i k kki STTS ... algorithm and on many of the multi-stage architectures listed in table 3.1 may be found in [5] and references therein, as well as in more recent papers...more complex single-stage tracking solutions. Further, the MHT algorithmic module at the heart of these architectures is highly modular, thus

  14. Multi-stage circulating fluidized bed syngas cooling

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Guan, Xiaofeng; Peng, WanWang

    2016-10-11

    A method and apparatus for cooling hot gas streams in the temperature range 800.degree. C. to 1600.degree. C. using multi-stage circulating fluid bed (CFB) coolers is disclosed. The invention relates to cooling the hot syngas from coal gasifiers in which the hot syngas entrains substances that foul, erode and corrode heat transfer surfaces upon contact in conventional coolers. The hot syngas is cooled by extracting and indirectly transferring heat to heat transfer surfaces with circulating inert solid particles in CFB syngas coolers. The CFB syngas coolers are staged to facilitate generation of steam at multiple conditions and hot boiler feed water that are necessary for power generation in an IGCC process. The multi-stage syngas cooler can include internally circulating fluid bed coolers, externally circulating fluid bed coolers and hybrid coolers that incorporate features of both internally and externally circulating fluid bed coolers. Higher process efficiencies can be realized as the invention can handle hot syngas from various types of gasifiers without the need for a less efficient precooling step.

  15. Multi-Stage System for Automatic Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas T.; Ye, David; Edens, Weston; Johnson, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    A multi-stage automated target recognition (ATR) system has been designed to perform computer vision tasks with adequate proficiency in mimicking human vision. The system is able to detect, identify, and track targets of interest. Potential regions of interest (ROIs) are first identified by the detection stage using an Optimum Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter combined with a wavelet transform. False positives are then eliminated by the verification stage using feature extraction methods in conjunction with neural networks. Feature extraction transforms the ROIs using filtering and binning algorithms to create feature vectors. A feedforward back-propagation neural network (NN) is then trained to classify each feature vector and to remove false positives. The system parameter optimizations process has been developed to adapt to various targets and datasets. The objective was to design an efficient computer vision system that can learn to detect multiple targets in large images with unknown backgrounds. Because the target size is small relative to the image size in this problem, there are many regions of the image that could potentially contain the target. A cursory analysis of every region can be computationally efficient, but may yield too many false positives. On the other hand, a detailed analysis of every region can yield better results, but may be computationally inefficient. The multi-stage ATR system was designed to achieve an optimal balance between accuracy and computational efficiency by incorporating both models. The detection stage first identifies potential ROIs where the target may be present by performing a fast Fourier domain OT-MACH filter-based correlation. Because threshold for this stage is chosen with the goal of detecting all true positives, a number of false positives are also detected as ROIs. The verification stage then transforms the regions of interest into feature space, and eliminates false positives using an

  16. Multi-stage absorption of rendering plant odours using sodium hypochlorite and other reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, D.; Davis, B. J.; Moss, R. L.

    Conditions for using sodium hypochlorite solution as the main component of a multi-stage absorption system for the treatment of malodorous process emissions were studied, together with the additional reagents needed for effective odour control. In laboratory experiments, mixtures containing vpm levels in air of trimethylamine, hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan, dimethyl disulphide, n-butanal and sometimes ammonia were passed through three bubble-plate columns containing some of the following: water, dilute sulphuric acid, sodium hypochlorite solutions (varying in pH and available chlorine content) sodium hydroxide and sodium hydrogen sulphite. Odour removal was monitored by Chromatographic and sensory methods. Conclusions from laboratory experiments were supported by field-tests at four rendering plants in the U.K., treating both ventilation and process gases. Alkaline hypochlorite with considerable excess available chlorine removes many sulphur-compounds and aldehydes but effective odour control requires an acid pre-wash to prevent the generation of odorous chlorinated compounds from ammonia and amines. Acidic hypochlorite solution followed by sodium hydrogen sulphite (to remove aldehyde) and sodium hydroxide was a most effective combination in both laboratory and field tests. Odour generated in chlorination reactions involving acidic hypochlorite solution was analysed by GC-MS and GC-MPD-odour-port and the odour key compounds identified.

  17. Multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    George, Thomas J.; Smith, William C.

    2000-01-01

    A high efficiency, multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus is provided. The fuel cell system is comprised of multiple fuel cell stages, whereby the temperatures of the fuel and oxidant gas streams and the percentage of fuel consumed in each stage are controlled to optimize fuel cell system efficiency. The stages are connected in a serial, flow-through arrangement such that the oxidant gas and fuel gas flowing through an upstream stage is conducted directly into the next adjacent downstream stage. The fuel cell stages are further arranged such that unspent fuel and oxidant laden gases too hot to continue within an upstream stage because of material constraints are conducted into a subsequent downstream stage which comprises a similar cell configuration, however, which is constructed from materials having a higher heat tolerance and designed to meet higher thermal demands. In addition, fuel is underutilized in each stage, resulting in a higher overall fuel cell system efficiency.

  18. Multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    George, Thomas J.; Smith, William C.

    1997-12-01

    A high efficiency, multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus is provided. The fuel cell system is comprised of multiple fuel cell stages, whereby the temperatures of the fuel and oxidant gas streams and the percentage of fuel consumed in each stage are controlled to optimize fuel cell system efficiency. The stages are connected in a serial, flow-through arrangement such that the oxidant gas and fuel gas flowing through an upstream stage is conducted directly into the next adjacent downstream stage. The fuel cell stages are further arranged such that unspent fuel and oxidant laden gases too hot to continue within an upstream stage because of material constraints are conducted into a subsequent downstream stage which comprises a similar cell configuration, however, which is constructed from materials having a higher heat tolerance and designed to meet higher thermal demands. In addition, fuel is underutilized in each stage, resulting in a higher overall fuel cell system efficiency.

  19. Hydrophobically-associating cationic polymers as micro-bubble surface modifiers in dissolved air flotation for cyanobacteria cell separation.

    PubMed

    Yap, R K L; Whittaker, M; Diao, M; Stuetz, R M; Jefferson, B; Bulmus, V; Peirson, W L; Nguyen, A V; Henderson, R K

    2014-09-15

    Dissolved air flotation (DAF), an effective treatment method for clarifying algae/cyanobacteria-laden water, is highly dependent on coagulation-flocculation. Treatment of algae can be problematic due to unpredictable coagulant demand during blooms. To eliminate the need for coagulation-flocculation, the use of commercial polymers or surfactants to alter bubble charge in DAF has shown potential, termed the PosiDAF process. When using surfactants, poor removal was obtained but good bubble adherence was observed. Conversely, when using polymers, effective cell removal was obtained, attributed to polymer bridging, but polymers did not adhere well to the bubble surface, resulting in a cationic clarified effluent that was indicative of high polymer concentrations. In order to combine the attributes of both polymers (bridging ability) and surfactants (hydrophobicity), in this study, a commercially-available cationic polymer, poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (polyDMAEMA), was functionalised with hydrophobic pendant groups of various carbon chain lengths to improve adherence of polymer to a bubble surface. Its performance in PosiDAF was contrasted against commercially-available poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) (polyDADMAC). All synthesised polymers used for bubble surface modification were found to produce positively charged bubbles. When applying these cationic micro-bubbles in PosiDAF, in the absence of coagulation-flocculation, cell removals in excess of 90% were obtained, reaching a maximum of 99% cell removal and thus demonstrating process viability. Of the synthesised polymers, the polymer containing the largest hydrophobic functionality resulted in highly anionic treated effluent, suggesting stronger adherence of polymers to bubble surfaces and reduced residual polymer concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimal design of multi-arm multi-stage trials.

    PubMed

    Wason, James M S; Jaki, Thomas

    2012-12-30

    In drug development, there is often uncertainty about the most promising among a set of different treatments. Multi-arm multi-stage (MAMS) trials provide large gains in efficiency over separate randomised trials of each treatment. They allow a shared control group, dropping of ineffective treatments before the end of the trial and stopping the trial early if sufficient evidence of a treatment being superior to control is found. In this paper, we discuss optimal design of MAMS trials. An optimal design has the required type I error rate and power but minimises the expected sample size at some set of treatment effects. Finding an optimal design requires searching over stopping boundaries and sample size, potentially a large number of parameters. We propose a method that combines quick evaluation of specific designs and an efficient stochastic search to find the optimal design parameters. We compare various potential designs motivated by the design of a phase II MAMS trial. We also consider allocating more patients to the control group, as has been carried out in real MAMS studies. We show that the optimal allocation to the control group, although greater than a 1:1 ratio, is smaller than previously advocated and that the gain in efficiency is generally small.

  1. Fully Automated Operational Modal Analysis using multi-stage clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, Eugen; Janser, Frank; Khatibi, Akbar A.; Orifici, Adrian C.

    2017-02-01

    The interest for robust automatic modal parameter extraction techniques has increased significantly over the last years, together with the rising demand for continuous health monitoring of critical infrastructure like bridges, buildings and wind turbine blades. In this study a novel, multi-stage clustering approach for Automated Operational Modal Analysis (AOMA) is introduced. In contrast to existing approaches, the procedure works without any user-provided thresholds, is applicable within large system order ranges, can be used with very small sensor numbers and does not place any limitations on the damping ratio or the complexity of the system under investigation. The approach works with any parametric system identification algorithm that uses the system order n as sole parameter. Here a data-driven Stochastic Subspace Identification (SSI) method is used. Measurements from a wind tunnel investigation with a composite cantilever equipped with Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors (FBGSs) and piezoelectric sensors are used to assess the performance of the algorithm with a highly damped structure and low signal to noise ratio conditions. The proposed method was able to identify all physical system modes in the investigated frequency range from over 1000 individual datasets using FBGSs under challenging signal to noise ratio conditions and under better signal conditions but from only two sensors.

  2. Controllability in Multi-Stage Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The present paper shows a concept for a future laser ion accelerator, which should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers and ion post acceleration devices. Based on the laser ion accelerator components, the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled, and a future compact laser ion accelerator would be designed for ion cancer therapy or for ion material treatment. In this study each component is designed to control the ion beam quality. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching are successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. A combination of each component provides a high controllability of the ion beam quality to meet variable requirements in various purposes in the laser ion accelerator. The work was partly supported by MEXT, JSPS, ASHULA project/ ILE, Osaka University, CORE (Center for Optical Research and Education, Utsunomiya University, Japan), Fudan University and CDI (Creative Dept. for Innovation) in CCRD, Utsunomiya University.

  3. Multi-stage FE simulation of hot ring rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2013-05-01

    As a unique and important member of the metal forming family, ring rolling provides a cost effective process route to manufacture seamless rings. Applications of ring rolling cover a wide range of products in aerospace, automotive and civil engineering industries [1]. Above the recrystallization temperature of the material, hot ring rolling begins with the upsetting of the billet cut from raw stock. Next a punch pierces the hot upset billet to form a hole through the billet. This billet, referred to as preform, is then rolled by the ring rolling mill. For an accurate simulation of hot ring rolling, it is crucial to include the deformations, stresses and strains from the upsetting and piercing process as initial conditions for the rolling stage. In this work, multi-stage FE simulations of hot ring rolling process were performed by mapping the local deformation state of the workpiece from one step to the next one. The simulations of upsetting and piercing stages were carried out by 2D axisymmetric models using adaptive remeshing and element erosion. The workpiece for the ring rolling stage was subsequently obtained after performing a 2D to 3D mapping. The commercial FE package LS-DYNA was used for the study and user defined subroutines were implemented to complete the control algorithm. The simulation results were analyzed and also compared with those from the single-stage FE model of hot ring rolling.

  4. Multi-stage constructed wetland systems for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Masi, F; Caffaz, S; Ghrabi, A

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper the detailed design and performances of two municipal wastewater treatment plants, a four-stage constructed wetlands (CW) system located in the city of Dicomano (about 3,500 inhabitants) in Italy, and a three-stage CW system for the village of Chorfech (about 500 inhabitants) in Tunisia, are presented. The obtained results demonstrate that multi-stage CWs provide an excellent secondary treatment for wastewaters with variable operative conditions, reaching also an appropriate effluent quality for reuse. Dicomano CWs have shown good performances, on average 86% of removal for the Organic Load, 60% for Total Nitrogen (TN), 43% for Total Phosphorus (TP), 89% for Total Suspended Solids (TSS) and 76% for Ammonium (NH4(+)). Even the disinfection process has performed in a very satisfactory way, reaching up to 4-5 logs of reduction of the inlet pathogens concentration, with an Escherichia coli average concentration in the outlet often below 200 UFC/100 mL. The mean overall removal rates of the Chorfech CWs during the monitored period have been, respectively, equal to 97% for TSS and Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5), 95% for Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), 71% for TN and 82% for TP. The observed removal of E. coli by the CW system was in this case 2.5 log units.

  5. Multi-Stage Multi-Task Feature Learning*

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Pinghua; Ye, Jieping; Zhang, Changshui

    2013-01-01

    Multi-task sparse feature learning aims to improve the generalization performance by exploiting the shared features among tasks. It has been successfully applied to many applications including computer vision and biomedical informatics. Most of the existing multi-task sparse feature learning algorithms are formulated as a convex sparse regularization problem, which is usually suboptimal, due to its looseness for approximating an ℓ0-type regularizer. In this paper, we propose a non-convex formulation for multi-task sparse feature learning based on a novel regularizer. To solve the non-convex optimization problem, we propose a Multi-Stage Multi-Task Feature Learning (MSMTFL) algorithm. Moreover, we present a detailed theoretical analysis showing that MSMTFL achieves a better parameter estimation error bound than the convex formulation. Empirical studies on both synthetic and real-world data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of MSMTFL in comparison with the state of the art multi-task sparse feature learning algorithms. PMID:24431924

  6. Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

    2004-09-14

    Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

  7. Research on Multi-Stage Inventory Model by Markov Decision Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Ke

    This paper researched multi-stage inventory system and established limited inventory Markov model, on the other hand it induced DP algorithm of limited inventory Markov model. The results proved that the reorder point of multi-stage inventory system can guarantee demand, and also allows the storage costs to a minimum level in accordance with the above model.

  8. Bodypart Recognition Using Multi-stage Deep Learning.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhennan; Zhan, Yiqiang; Peng, Zhigang; Liao, Shu; Shinagawa, Yoshihisa; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2015-01-01

    Automatic medical image analysis systems often start from identifying the human body part contained in the image; Specifically, given a transversal slice, it is important to know which body part it comes from, namely "slice-based bodypart recognition". This problem has its unique characteristic--the body part of a slice is usually identified by local discriminative regions instead of global image context, e.g., a cardiac slice is differentiated from an aorta arch slice by the mediastinum region. To leverage this characteristic, we design a multi-stage deep learning framework that aims at: (1) discover the local regions that are discriminative to the bodypart recognition, and (2) learn a bodypart identifier based on these local regions. These two tasks are achieved by the two stages of our learning scheme, respectively. In the pre-train stage, a convolutional neural network (CNN) is learned in a multi-instance learning fashion to extract the most discriminative local patches from the training slices. In the boosting stage, the learned CNN is further boosted by these local patches for bodypart recognition. By exploiting the discriminative local appearances, the learned CNN becomes more accurate than global image context-based approaches. As a key hallmark, our method does not require manual annotations of the discriminative local patches. Instead, it automatically discovers them through multi-instance deep learning. We validate our method on a synthetic dataset and a large scale CT dataset (7000+ slices from wholebody CT scans). Our method achieves better performances than state-of-the-art approaches, including the standard CNN.

  9. Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental physics of vapor bubbles in liquids. Work on bubble growth and condensation for stationary and translating bubbles is summarized and the differences with bubbles containing a permanent gas stressed. In particular, it is shown that the natural frequency of a vapor bubble is proportional not to the inverse radius, as for a gas bubble, but to the inverse radius raised to the power 2/3. Permanent gas dissolved in the liquid diffuses into the bubble with strong effects on its dynamics. The effects of the diffusion of heat and mass on the propagation of pressure waves in a vaporous bubbly liquid are discussed. Other topics briefly touched on include thermocapillary flow, plasmonic nanobubbles, and vapor bubbles in an immiscible liquid.

  10. Design and performance of a multi-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Brawley, E.L.; Duggin, B.W.; Cnare, E.C.; Rovang, D.C.; Widner, M.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A multi-stage, cylindrical reconnection launcher is being tested to demonstrate electrically-contactless, induction-launch technology for solenoidal coil geometry. A 6-stage launcher system is being developed to accelerate a 5 kg mass from rest to 300 m/s with a stored energy of {ge}200 kJ per coil stage. This launcher will provide data fro model verification and the engineering basis for proceeding with larger multistage systems. This paper describes the design of the multi-stage, discrete-coil launcher. Integration of coils, projectile, power systems, and real-time fire control are discussed. Results of multi-stage firings are presented.

  11. Flow Field Measurement in Multi-stage Axial Compressor Stator by Using Multi-hole Pneumatic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiqiang, Wang; Bo, Lu; Chenkai, Zhang; Jun, Hu

    2017-04-01

    In order to realize the stator's internal flow field measurement of the multi-stage axial compressor, many different lengths of L-type five-hole probes and one four-hole probe have been designed. The detailed 3D (three-dimensional) flow fields in the stator blade passage of original and modified large scale compressors have been measured with the probes traversed by a probe traverse mechanism. The objective of the study is to assess the measurement method of adopting multi-hole pneumatic probes to achieve the flow field of stator vane passage. Results clearly demonstrate the flow field characteristics of stator blade passage in original and modified compressors. Furthermore, the reliability of adopted multi-hole pneumatic probes is validated. Therefore, it is proved that the probe traverse mechanism drives the L-type five-hole probe or other probe method can be applied to internal flow field measurements for the stator of large scale multi-stage compressors.

  12. Antitumor effect of nuclear factor-κB decoy transfer by mannose-modified bubble lipoplex into macrophages in mouse malignant ascites

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yusuke; Kawakami, Shigeru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Patients with malignant ascites (MAs) display several symptoms, such as dyspnea, nausea, pain, and abdominal tenderness, resulting in a significant reduction in their quality of life. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play a crucial role in MA progression. Because TAMs have a tumor-promoting M2 phenotype, conversion of the M2 phenotypic function of TAMs would be promising for MA treatment. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a master regulator of macrophage polarization. Here, we developed targeted transfer of a NF-κB decoy into TAMs by ultrasound (US)-responsive, mannose-modified liposome/NF-κB decoy complexes (Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes) in a mouse peritoneal dissemination model of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma. In addition, we investigated the effects of NF-κB decoy transfection into TAMs on MA progression and mouse survival rates. Intraperitoneal injection of Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes and US exposure transferred the NF-κB decoy into TAMs effectively. When the NF-κB decoy was delivered into TAMs by this method in the mouse peritoneal dissemination model, mRNA expression of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 in TAMs was decreased significantly. In contrast, mRNA levels of Th1 cytokines (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-6) were increased significantly. Moreover, the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor in ascites was suppressed significantly, and peritoneal angiogenesis showed a reduction. Furthermore, NF-κB decoy transfer into TAMs significantly decreased the ascitic volume and number of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells in ascites, and prolonged mouse survival. In conclusion, we transferred a NF-κB decoy efficiently by Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes with US exposure into TAMs, which may be a novel approach for MA treatment. PMID:24850474

  13. A low-jitter self-break repetitive multi-stage gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng-cheng; Su, Jian-cang; Zeng, Bo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang; Cheng, Jie; Qiu, Xu-dong; Wu, Xiao-long

    2017-02-01

    A megavolt low-jitter self-break repetitive gas switch is developed by the use of the corona stabilization and the multi-stage structure in this paper. This switch is multi-stage, consisting of one corona stabilization stage and subsequent rimfire stages. The corona stabilization stage breakdowns first, then the subsequent rimfire stages are self-fired by the over-voltage from the closure of the corona stabilization stage. SF6 is used in the switch. It has been proven by experiment that the multi-stage gas switch, which consists of one 1.3-cm gap corona stabilization stage and five 0.5-cm gap rimfire stages, can operate at repetition rate frequency (PRF) of 50 Hz with a voltage jitter less than 2% in 2000 discharges. The breakdown voltage of this multi-stage switch reaches 770 kV and the single discharge current is 8.50 kA at 4 bars.

  14. Bubble and bubble cloud dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2000-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are formed from small air bubbles, so-called nuclei, with the surrounding pressure reduction caused by the flow, and then, the bubbles shrink and collapse with the surrounding pressure rise. Such volumetric changes of bubbles are calculated in detail and it is found that they are significantly influenced by the internal phenomena, such as thermal diffusion, mist formation due to a homogeneous condensation, mass diffusion between vapor and noncondensable gas, heat and mass transfer through the bubble wall. The structure in cavitating flow interacts with the cavitation bubbles, and those bubbles form a cloud cavitation. It is well known that cloud cavitation is one of the most destructive forms. The behavior of bubble clouds is simulated numerically. An inward propagating shock wave is formed during the collapse of the bubble cloud, and the shock wave and its precursor are focused at the cloud center area. These phenomena associate high frequency pressure oscillations and violent bubble collapses. Those bubble collapses emit high pressure peaks, which are several hundreds times larger than that of a single bubble collapse.

  15. Changes of Hematological Markers during a Multi-stage Ultra-marathon Competition in the Heat.

    PubMed

    Rama, L M; Minuzzi, L G; Carvalho, H M; Costa, R J S; Teixeira, A M

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the changes in resting hematological variables in ultra-endurance runners throughout a multi-stage ultra-marathon competition, and compared athletes that completed all stages with those that failed to complete at least one stage within the cut-off time of competition. 19 ultra-endurance runners competing in a 230 km multi-stage ultra-marathon, conducted over 5 consecutive days in hot ambient conditions (32-40°C T(max)), volunteered to participate in the study. Each day, whole blood samples were collected prior to stage commencement and analyzed for full cell counts by Coulter counter. Linear increases were observed for leukocytes, monocytes and lymphocytes; with increases until Stage 3 and a decrease thereafter. Granulocytes showed a cubic growth exponent, indicating decrements to baseline after the significant increments until Stage 3. Hemoglobin and hematocrit showed linear decrements throughout the multi-stage ultra-marathon. No changes in erythrocytes and platelets were observed throughout the multi-stage ultra-marathon. Granulocytes, erythrocytes, hemoglobin and hematocrit changes along the multi-stage ultra-marathon differed in runners that completed all stages compared to those who failed to complete at least one stage within the cut-off time. Multi-stage ultra-marathon in the heat has a large impact on hematological responses of ultra-endurance runners associated with altered performance.

  16. Motor and brake control for a multi-stage turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Marchand, W.C.

    1987-08-25

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine for driving a vehicle, the gas turbine engine comprising a turbine housing having a free turbine wheel rotatably mounted therein, and inlet means for directing a gas radially inwardly towards the free turbine wheel. The improvement described here consists of: a multi-stage stator assembly; a reverse stage of the multi-stage stator assembly, the reverse stage having predetermined shaped reverse vanes set at a reverse preselected angle of incidence angle of incidence such as to cause a reverse rotation of the free turbine wheel while minimizing losses due to momentum when the reverse stage is positioned over the inlet means; a forward stage of the multi-stage stator assembly disposed adjacent the reverse stage; mounting means mounting the multi-stage stator assembly to the inlet means for relative movement therebetween; detector means interconnected with the vehicle and operative to detect the direction of angular rotation of the free turbine wheel, the detector means further comprising at least one brake body pivotally interconnected with the vehicle; control means operatively connected to the multi-stage stator assembly to selectively displace the multi-stage stator assembly relative to the inlet means to cause a net torque on the free turbine wheel such as to decelerate the free turbine wheel.

  17. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  18. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  19. Adaptation of Decoy Fusion Strategy for Existing Multi-Stage Search Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mark V.; Levitsky, Lev I.; Gorshkov, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    A number of proteomic database search engines implement multi-stage strategies aiming at increasing the sensitivity of proteome analysis. These approaches often employ a subset of the original database for the secondary stage of analysis. However, if target-decoy approach (TDA) is used for false discovery rate (FDR) estimation, the multi-stage strategies may violate the underlying assumption of TDA that false matches are distributed uniformly across the target and decoy databases. This violation occurs if the numbers of target and decoy proteins selected for the second search are not equal. Here, we propose a method of decoy database generation based on the previously reported decoy fusion strategy. This method allows unbiased TDA-based FDR estimation in multi-stage searches and can be easily integrated into existing workflows utilizing popular search engines and post-search algorithms.

  20. Design and performance of a multi-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Duggin, B.W.; Cnare, E.C.; Rovang, D.C.; Widner, M.M. ); Brawley, E.L. )

    1989-01-01

    A multi-stage, cylindrical, reconnection launcher is being tested to demonstrate electrically-contactless, induction-launch technology for solenoidal coil geometry. A 6-stage launcher system is being developed to accelerate a 5 kg mass from rest to 300 m/s with a stored energy of {ge}200 kJ per coil stage. This launcher will provide data for model verification and the engineering basis for proceeding with larger multistage systems. This paper describes the design of the multi-stage, discrete-coil launcher. Integration of coils, projectile, power systems, and real-time fire control are discussed. Results of multi-stage firings are presented. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Application of Multi-Stage Orifices in Letdown System- Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun Kee; Kim, Chang Ho; Park, Jong Seob; Chung, Chang Kyu; Ro, Tae Sun; Park, Boo Sung

    2002-07-01

    Cavitation, vibration and severe noise in multi-stage orifice assemblies of the letdown system have been experienced during plant startup tests. Test results were reviewed and evaluated to investigate root causes for the problems. Root causes identified are design deficiencies and inadequate shop testing including improper test conditions and corrections. If conventional design criteria for single-stage orifice are applied directly to the design of multi-stage orifice assembly, unexpected problems might occur in the field. Discharge coefficients of multi-stage orifice showed to be significantly affected by Reynolds number, while empirical discharge coefficients of single-stage orifice were reported to be almost constant in turbulent regime. Some design considerations are recommended to avoid similar problems. (authors)

  2. Sinking Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Jeremy; Ewoldt, Randy

    2016-11-01

    Intuition tells us that bubbles will rise and steel objects will sink in liquids, though here we describe the opposite. With experimental demonstration and theoretical rationale, we describe how the motion of containers of liquid with immersed solid objects and air bubbles can cause curious behaviors: sinking bubbles and rising high-density particles. Bubbles and solid spheres of diameter on the order of a few millimeters are introduced into fluids with different rheological constitutive behaviors. Imposed motion of the rigid container allows for control of the trajectories of the immersed particles - without the container imparting direct shearing motion on the fluid. Results demonstrate the necessary conditions to prevent or produce net motion of the bubbles and heavy particles, both with and against gravitational expectations.

  3. A multi-stage drop-the-losers design for multi-arm clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Wason, James; Stallard, Nigel; Bowden, Jack; Jennison, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Multi-arm multi-stage trials can improve the efficiency of the drug development process when multiple new treatments are available for testing. A group-sequential approach can be used in order to design multi-arm multi-stage trials, using an extension to Dunnett's multiple-testing procedure. The actual sample size used in such a trial is a random variable that has high variability. This can cause problems when applying for funding as the cost will also be generally highly variable. This motivates a type of design that provides the efficiency advantages of a group-sequential multi-arm multi-stage design, but has a fixed sample size. One such design is the two-stage drop-the-losers design, in which a number of experimental treatments, and a control treatment, are assessed at a prescheduled interim analysis. The best-performing experimental treatment and the control treatment then continue to a second stage. In this paper, we discuss extending this design to have more than two stages, which is shown to considerably reduce the sample size required. We also compare the resulting sample size requirements to the sample size distribution of analogous group-sequential multi-arm multi-stage designs. The sample size required for a multi-stage drop-the-losers design is usually higher than, but close to, the median sample size of a group-sequential multi-arm multi-stage trial. In many practical scenarios, the disadvantage of a slight loss in average efficiency would be overcome by the huge advantage of a fixed sample size. We assess the impact of delay between recruitment and assessment as well as unknown variance on the drop-the-losers designs.

  4. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  5. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  6. Analysis of Non-Enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Neutral-Loss Triggered MS3 Versus Multi-Stage Activation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-10-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has been shown to outperform collision-induced dissociation (CID) in sequencing glycated peptides by tandem mass spectrometry, ETD instrumentation is not yet available in all laboratories. In this study, we evaluated different advanced CID techniques (i.e., neutral-loss triggered MS3 and multi-stage activation) during LC-MSn analyses of Amadori-modified peptides enriched from human serum glycated in vitro. During neutral-loss triggered MS3 experiments, MS3 scans triggered by neutral-losses of 3 H2O or 3 H2O + HCHO produced similar results in terms of glycated peptide identifications. However, neutral losses of 3 H2O resulted in significantly more glycated peptide identifications during multi-stage activation experiments. Overall, the multi-stage activation approach produced more glycated peptide identifications, while the neutral-loss triggered MS3 approach resulted in much higher specificity. Both techniques offer a viable alternative to ETD for identifying glycated peptides when that method is unavailable.

  7. Finite Element Analysis and Optimization for the Multi-stage Deep Drawing of Molybdenum Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Heung-Kyu; Hong, Seok Kwan; Kang, Jeong Jin; Heo, Young-moo; Lee, Jong-Kil; Jeon, Byung-Hee

    2005-08-05

    Molybdenum, a bcc refractory metal with a melting point of about 2600 deg. C, has a high heat and electrical conductivity. In addition, it remains strong mechanically at high temperatures as well as at low temperatures. Therefore it is a technologically very important material for the applications operating at high temperatures. However, a multi-stage process is required due to the low drawability for making a deep drawn part from the molybdenum sheet. In this study, a multi-stage deep drawing process for a molybdenum circular cup was designed by combining the drawing with the ironing, which was effective for the low drawability materials. A parametric study by FE analysis for the multi-stage deep drawing was conducted for evaluation of the design variables effect. Based on the FE analysis result, the multi-stage deep drawing process was parameterized by the design variables, and an optimum process design was obtained by the process optimization based on the FE simulation at each stage.

  8. 76 FR 19747 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Grundfos Pumps Manufacturing Corporation (Multi-Stage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Grundfos Pumps Manufacturing Corporation... manufacturing facility of Grundfos Pumps Manufacturing Corporation, located in Allentown, Pennsylvania (FTZ... status for activity related to the manufacturing of multi-stage centrifugal pumps at the Grundfos Pumps...

  9. Bayesian Analysis for Linearized Multi-Stage Models in Quantal Bioassay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Lynn; Cohen, Michael P.

    Bayesian methods for estimating dose response curves in quantal bioassay are studied. A linearized multi-stage model is assumed for the shape of the curves. A Gibbs sampling approach with data augmentation is employed to compute the Bayes estimates. In addition, estimation of the "relative additional risk" and the "risk specific…

  10. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  11. Quality Assurance in Higher Education--Meta-Evaluation of Multi-Stage Evaluation Procedures in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornmann, L.; Mittag, S.; Danie, H.-D.

    2006-01-01

    Systematic procedures for quality assurance and improvement through evaluation have been in place in Western Europe since the mid 1980s and in Germany since the mid 1990s. As studies in Europe and beyond show that multi-stage evaluation procedures as the main quality assurance instrument for evaluation of teaching and learning in higher education…

  12. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  13. The Effects of Routing and Scoring within a Computer Adaptive Multi-Stage Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallas, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examined the overall effects of routing and scoring within a computer adaptive multi-stage framework (ca-MST). Testing in a ca-MST environment has become extremely popular in the testing industry. Testing companies enjoy its efficiency benefits as compared to traditionally linear testing and its quality-control features over…

  14. A Multi-Stage Maturity Model for Long-Term IT Outsourcing Relationship Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luong, Ming; Stevens, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-Stage Maturity Model for Long-Term IT Outsourcing Relationship Success, a theoretical stages-of-growth model, explains long-term success in IT outsourcing relationships. Research showed the IT outsourcing relationship life cycle consists of four distinct, sequential stages: contract, transition, support, and partnership. The model was…

  15. Multi-stage decoding for multi-level block modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate various types of multi-stage decoding for multi-level block modulation codes, in which the decoding of a component code at each stage can be either soft-decision or hard-decision, maximum likelihood or bounded-distance. Error performance of codes is analyzed for a memoryless additive channel based on various types of multi-stage decoding, and upper bounds on the probability of an incorrect decoding are derived. Based on our study and computation results, we find that, if component codes of a multi-level modulation code and types of decoding at various stages are chosen properly, high spectral efficiency and large coding gain can be achieved with reduced decoding complexity. In particular, we find that the difference in performance between the suboptimum multi-stage soft-decision maximum likelihood decoding of a modulation code and the single-stage optimum decoding of the overall code is very small: only a fraction of dB loss in SNR at the probability of an incorrect decoding for a block of 10(exp -6). Multi-stage decoding of multi-level modulation codes really offers a way to achieve the best of three worlds, bandwidth efficiency, coding gain, and decoding complexity.

  16. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Mammini, Beth M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  17. Bubble Size Distribution in a Vibrating Bubble Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Wilson, Trevor; Valenzuela, Bret; Hinds, Tyler; Moseni, Kevin; Elbing, Brian

    2016-11-01

    While vibrating bubble columns have increased the mass transfer between phases, a universal scaling law remains elusive. Attempts to predict mass transfer rates in large industrial scale applications by extrapolating laboratory scale models have failed. In a stationary bubble column, mass transfer is a function of phase interfacial area (PIA), while PIA is determined based on the bubble size distribution (BSD). On the other hand, BSD is influenced by the injection characteristics and liquid phase dynamics and properties. Vibration modifies the BSD by impacting the gas and gas-liquid dynamics. This work uses a vibrating cylindrical bubble column to investigate the effect of gas injection and vibration characteristics on the BSD. The bubble column has a 10 cm diameter and was filled with water to a depth of 90 cm above the tip of the orifice tube injector. BSD was measured using high-speed imaging to determine the projected area of individual bubbles, which the nominal bubble diameter was then calculated assuming spherical bubbles. The BSD dependence on the distance from the injector, injector design (1.6 and 0.8 mm ID), air flow rates (0.5 to 5 lit/min), and vibration conditions (stationary and vibration conditions varying amplitude and frequency) will be presented. In addition to mean data, higher order statistics will also be provided.

  18. A Multi-Stage Wear Model for Grid-to-Rod Fretting of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2014-01-01

    The wear of fuel rod cladding against the supporting structures in the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors (PWRs) is an important and potentially costly tribological issue. Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), as it is known, involves not only time-varying contact conditions, but also elevated temperatures, flowing hot water, aqueous tribo-corrosion, and the embrittling effects of neutron fluences. The multi-stage, closed-form analytical model described in this paper relies on published out-of-reactor wear and corrosion data and a set of simplifying assumptions to portray the conversion of frictional work into wear depth. The cladding material of interest is a zirconium-based alloy called Zircaloy-4, and the grid support is made of a harder and more wear-resistant material. Focus is on the wear of the cladding. The model involves an incubation stage, a surface oxide wear stage, and a base alloy wear stage. The wear coefficient, which is a measure of the efficiency of conversion of frictional work into wear damage, can change to reflect the evolving metallurgical condition of the alloy. Wear coefficients for Zircaloy-4 and for a polyphase zirconia layer were back-calculated for a range of times required to wear to a critical depth. Inputs for the model, like the friction coefficient, are taken from the tribology literature in lieu of in-reactor tribological data. Concepts of classical fretting were used as a basis, but are modified to enable the model to accommodate the complexities of the PWR environment. Factors like grid spring relaxation, pre-oxidation of the cladding, multiple oxide phases, gap formation, impact, and hydrogen embrittlement are part of the problem definition but uncertainties in their relative roles limits the ability to validate the model. Sample calculations of wear depth versus time in the cladding illustrate how GTRF wear might occur in a discontinuous fashion during months-long reactor operating cycles. A means to account for grid/rod gaps

  19. A multi-stage noise adaptive switching filter for extremely corrupted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Hai; Adhami, Reza; Wang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    A multi-stage noise adaptive switching filter (MSNASF) is proposed for the restoration of images extremely corrupted by impulse and impulse-like noise. The filter consists of two steps: noise detection and noise removal. The proposed extrema-based noise detection scheme utilizes the false contouring effect to get better over detection rate at low noise density. It is adaptive and will detect not only impulse but also impulse-like noise. In the noise removal step, a novel multi-stage filtering scheme is proposed. It replaces corrupted pixel with the nearest uncorrupted median to preserve details. When compared with other methods, MSNASF provides better peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) and structure similarity index (SSIM). A subjective evaluation carried out online also demonstrates that MSNASF yields higher fidelity.

  20. Primordial Bubbles within Primordial Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhionero, Franco; Amendola, Luca; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano

    The nucleation of primordial bubbles during an inflationary phase transition has been suggested to promote the formation of structure either above or below the horizon, depending on whether the nucleation occurs more or less than 60 e-folds before the end of inflation. Here we propose a mechanism which has both features and produces subhorizon cavities up to hundreds of h-1 Mpc -- where excess power is observed -- inside superhorizon bubbles, i.e. in open universes. For this purpose we build a new inflationary two-field model with two vacuum channels in the potential surface: by modulating the energy difference between these channels, episodes of back and forth transition occur in sequence during inflation. Thus, one physical process may i) reconcile inflation with openness and ii) seed a distribution of observable voids. Bubble spectra are given in terms of phenomenological parameters which in turn are functions of microscopic physical parameters. In principle large scale structure constrains fundamental physics: for example, to account for power at scales of hundreds of h-1 Mpc the singularity in the Euclidean action -- which separates the first from the second phase transition -- must be mild enough. The smoking gun of the process might be the imprint of non-Gaussian, ring-like signals on the microwave background at l > 1000 by the subhorizon bubbles. On the other end of the spectrum, the contribution to l =1,2 from the off-centerness of the observer in the open bubble, is being evaluated.

  1. Multi-stage selective catalytic reduction of NOx in lean burn engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    Many studies suggest that the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} is an important intermediate step in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. Some effort has been devoted to separating the oxidative and reductive functions of the catalyst in a multi-stage system. This method works fine for systems that require hydrocarbon addition. The hydrocarbon has to be injected between the NO oxidation catalyst and the NO{sub 2} reduction catalyst; otherwise, the first-stage oxidation catalyst will also oxidize the hydrocarbon and decrease its effectiveness as a reductant. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is appropriate for diesel engine exhausts since they contain insufficient hydrocarbons for SCR, and the hydrocarbons can be added at the desired location. For lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts, the hydrocarbons already present in the exhausts will make it necessary to find an oxidation catalyst that can oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} but not oxidize the hydrocarbon. A plasma can also be used to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}. Plasma oxidation has several advantages over catalytic oxidation. Plasma-assisted catalysis can work well for both diesel engine and lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts. This is because the plasma can oxidize NO in the presence of hydrocarbons without degrading the effectiveness of the hydrocarbon as a reductant for SCR. In the plasma, the hydrocarbon enhances the oxidation of NO, minimizes the electrical energy requirement, and prevents the oxidation of SO{sub 2}. This paper discusses the use of multi-stage systems for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is compared to the plasma-assisted catalytic scheme.

  2. Improvement of DOC removal by multi-stage AOP-biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Fahmi; Nishijima, Wataru; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2003-03-01

    The single and multi-stages advanced oxidation process (AOP)-biological treatments were evaluated to apply for drinking water treatment, especially for the water containing less susceptible dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to ozone, comparing with the ozonation-biological treatment. Minaga reservoir water and the secondary effluent from a Municipal wastewater treatment plant were used as dissolved organic matter (DOM) solutions. DOC removals after 60 min AOP-biological treatment were 62% and 41% in the Minaga reservoir water and the secondary effluent, respectively, whereas those in the ozonation-biological treatment only 40% and 15% of DOC were removed, respectively. The result indicated that the single-stage AOP-biological treatment could improve DOC removal in comparison with the single-stage ozonation-biological treatment. This is because the AOP mineralized both biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) produced in the early stage of oxidation and non-biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (NBDOC), whereas only BDOC was mineralized by further ozonation and NBDOC was not oxidized in the ozonation-biological treatment. The multi-stage treatment could not improve DOC removal in comparison with the single-stage treatment in the ozonation-biological treatment for the secondary effluent containing less susceptible DOC to ozone. However, the multi-stage AOP-biological treatment significantly reduced DOC and achieved 71% of DOC removal by 4 times repetition of 15 min oxidation, whereas DOC removal was 41% in the single-stage AOP-biological treatment for the same oxidation time. The improvement of DOC removal by the multi-stage AOP-biological treatment was due to BDOC removal as a radical scavenger by subsequent biological treatment in the early stage of oxidation and direct mineralization in the latter stage of oxidation.

  3. Three-Dimensional, Unsteady, Parallel Simulation of a Multi-Stage Turbine with Conjugate Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daryl Yao-Wah

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedure has been developed to predict the three-dimensional unsteady flow through a multi-stage axial turbine including the effects of heat transfer. This procedure simultaneously solves the unsteady Reynold's-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for the flow along with the heat conduction equation for the solid. Solution time is minimized through the use of multiple central processing units (CPUs). The blades of the multi-stage turbine move in time and the flow interacts with adjacent vane (stationary) passages through the use of a parallel, sliding-grid, inter-blade-row treatment. Described are the techniques used to solve the governing equations, the inter-blade-row treatment, and the parallelization of the overall approach. The uniqueness of this prediction method lies in the unsteady, multi-stage conjugate solution and the use of multiple combined cores. The approach is validated for the High Impact Technology Turbine designed and tested at the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  4. MULTI-STAGE DELIVERY NANO-PARTICLE SYSTEMS FOR THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Serda, Rita E.; Godin, Biana; Blanco, Elvin; Chiappini, Ciro; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Background The daunting task for drug molecules to reach pathological lesions has fueled rapid advances in Nanomedicine. The progressive evolution of nanovectors has led to the development of multi-stage delivery systems aimed at overcoming the numerous obstacles encountered by nanovectors on their journey to the target site. Scope of Review This review summarizes major findings with respect to silicon-based drug delivery vectors for cancer therapeutics and imaging. Based on rational design, well established silicon technologies have been adapted for the fabrication of nanovectors with specific shapes, sizes, and porosities. These vectors are part of a multi-stage delivery system that contains multiple nano-components, each designed to achieve a specific task with the common goal of site-directed delivery of therapeutics. Major Conclusions Quasi-hemispherical and discoidal silicon microparticles are superior to spherical particles with respect to margination in the blood, with particles of different shapes and sizes having unique distributions in vivo. Cellular adhesion and internalization of silicon microparticles is influenced by microparticle shape and surface charge, with the latter dictating binding of serum opsonins. Based on in vitro cell studies, the internalization of porous silicon microparticles by endothelial cells and macrophages is compatible with cellular morphology, intracellular trafficking, mitosis, cell cycle progression, cytokine release, and cell viability. In vivo studies support superior therapeutic efficacy of liposomal encapsulated siRNA when delivered in multi-stage systems compared to free nanoparticles. PMID:20493927

  5. Health condition identification of multi-stage planetary gearboxes using a mRVM-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yaguo; Liu, Zongyao; Wu, Xionghui; Li, Naipeng; Chen, Wu; Lin, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Multi-stage planetary gearboxes are widely applied in aerospace, automotive and heavy industries. Their key components, such as gears and bearings, can easily suffer from damage due to tough working environment. Health condition identification of planetary gearboxes aims to prevent accidents and save costs. This paper proposes a method based on multiclass relevance vector machine (mRVM) to identify health condition of multi-stage planetary gearboxes. In this method, a mRVM algorithm is adopted as a classifier, and two features, i.e. accumulative amplitudes of carrier orders (AACO) and energy ratio based on difference spectra (ERDS), are used as the input of the classifier to classify different health conditions of multi-stage planetary gearboxes. To test the proposed method, seven health conditions of a two-stage planetary gearbox are considered and vibration data is acquired from the planetary gearbox under different motor speeds and loading conditions. The results of three tests based on different data show that the proposed method obtains an improved identification performance and robustness compared with the existing method.

  6. Time stamp technique using a nuclear emulsion multi-stage shifter for gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Aoki, Shigeki; Rokujo, Hiroki; Hamada, Kaname; Komatsu, Masahiro; Morishima, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Niwa, Kimio; Sato, Osamu; Yoshioka, Teppei; Kodama, Koichi

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion has a potential use as a gamma-ray telescope with high angular resolution. For this application it is necessary to know the time when each track was recorded in the emulsion. In previous experiments using nuclear emulsion, various efforts were used to associate time to nuclear emulsion tracks and to improve the time resolution. Using a high speed readout system for nuclear emulsion together with a clock-based multi-stage emulsion shifter, we invented a technique to give a time-stamp to emulsion tracks and greatly improve the time resolution. A test experiment with a 2-stage shifter was used to demonstrate the principle of multi-stage shifting, and we achieved a time resolution 1.5 s for 12.1 h (about 1 part in 29 000) with the time stamp reliability 97% and the time stamp efficiency 98%. This multi-stage shifter can achieve the time resolution required for a gamma-ray telescope and can also be applied to another cosmic ray observations and accelerator experiments using nuclear emulsion.

  7. Multi-stage decoding for multi-level block modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Kasami, Tadao

    1991-01-01

    Various types of multistage decoding for multilevel block modulation codes, in which the decoding of a component code at each stage can be either soft decision or hard decision, maximum likelihood or bounded distance are discussed. Error performance for codes is analyzed for a memoryless additive channel based on various types of multi-stage decoding, and upper bounds on the probability of an incorrect decoding are derived. It was found that, if component codes of a multi-level modulation code and types of decoding at various stages are chosen properly, high spectral efficiency and large coding gain can be achieved with reduced decoding complexity. It was found that the difference in performance between the suboptimum multi-stage soft decision maximum likelihood decoding of a modulation code and the single stage optimum decoding of the overall code is very small, only a fraction of dB loss in SNR at the probability of an incorrect decoding for a block of 10(exp -6). Multi-stage decoding of multi-level modulation codes really offers a way to achieve the best of three worlds, bandwidth efficiency, coding gain, and decoding complexity.

  8. Tiny Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1985-01-01

    A simple oxygen-collecting device (easily constructed from glass jars and a lid) can show bubbles released by water plants during photosynthesis. Suggestions are given for: (1) testing the collected gas; (2) using various carbon dioxide sources; and (3) measuring respiration. (DH)

  9. Leverage bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  10. Tiny Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1985-01-01

    A simple oxygen-collecting device (easily constructed from glass jars and a lid) can show bubbles released by water plants during photosynthesis. Suggestions are given for: (1) testing the collected gas; (2) using various carbon dioxide sources; and (3) measuring respiration. (DH)

  11. Soluble surfactants favorably modify fluid structure and wall shear stress profiles during near-occluding bubble motion in a computational model of intravascular gas embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, T. N.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.; Eckmann, D. M.

    2009-11-01

    Finite sized gas bubble motion in a blood vessel causes temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the endothelial cell surface lining the vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it and passes it by. Rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress imparted to the cell surface during this motion. The sign-reversing shear is a potently coupled source of cell surface mechanical stretch, potentiating cell injury. The presence of a suitable soluble surfactant in the bulk medium considerably reduces the level of the shear stress gradients imparted to the cell surface as compared to an equivalent surfactant-free system. The bubble shape and the film thickness between the bubble and the vessel wall are also different. Furthermore, the bubble residence time near the proximity of a cell surface changes in comparison. These results based on our modeling may help explain several phenomena observed in experimental studies related to gas embolism, a significant problem in cardiac surgery and decompression sickness.

  12. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-02

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  13. Bubble Drag Reduction Requires Large Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. However, the exact mechanism behind bubble drag reduction is unknown. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid. The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow and opens the door for an optimization of the process.

  14. On MaxMin and MinMax Strategies in Multi-Stage Games and ATACM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    of the computation of MaxMin and MinMax strategies in multi-stage games. A new method for finding Max- Min and MinMax strategies for one-stage... Methods for finding decisions that in some sense optimize the payoff are sought; traditionally, an equilibrium point in randomized strategies has been...As a result the total running time is greatly reduced from previous versions. This method can be adapted to find MaxMin and MinMax strategies of

  15. Vehicle Routing Problem Solving Method for a Cooperative Logistics Network by Using Multi-Stage GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoyama, Takashi; Maekawa, Takuya; Kubota, Sen; Tsuruta, Setsuo; Komoda, Norihisa

    A GA applied VRP (Vehicle Routing Problem) solving-method which realizes optimization of a cooperative logistics network is proposed. For this optimization a VRP solving-method that can obtain human expert-level solution, which realizes steady logistics operation, in interactive response time is required. The multi-stage GA enables to obtain the accurate solution under both hard and weak time constraints in interactive response time. Moreover, to realize the stable logistics operation, the daily fluctuation of shipping volume is taken into the fitness value of each individual in GA. The experimental result reveals the proposed method obtains the accurate solution that realizes the stable operation in interactive response time.

  16. CFD analysis of fluid flow in an axial multi-stage partial-admission ORC turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surwilo, Jan; Lampart, Piotr; Szymaniak, Mariusz

    2015-10-01

    Basic operational advantages of the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems and specific issues of turbines working in these systems are discussed. The strategy for CFD simulation of the considered ORC turbine and the main issues of the numerical model are presented. The method of constructing the 3D CAD geometry as well as discretisation of the flow domain are also shown. Main features of partial admission flow in the multi-stage axial turbine are discussed. The influence of partial admission on the working conditions of the subsequent stage supplied at the full circumference is also described.

  17. A Multi-Stage Hybrid Scheduler for Codebook-Based MU-MIMO System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingxiu; She, Xiaoming; Chen, Lan; Taoka, Hidekazu

    In this paper, we propose a multi-stage hybrid scheduling scheme for codebook-based precoding systems, which provides a framework to apply different scheduling criterions at different scheduling stages for selecting user equipment (UEs). Numerical simulation results show that the proposed scheme effectively fills the performance gap between maximum carrier-to-interference (Max C/I) power ratio and Proportional Fairness (PF) methods, and provides an important means at the media access control (MAC) layer to lever between aggregate cellular throughput and geometry-specific per-user fairness, in order to meet the requirements of more precise quality of service (QoS) provision for future mobile communication systems.

  18. Vibration Analysis of a Multi-Stage Gear System Including Drive Mechanism Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Eiichirou; Tanaka, Naoyuki; Ohno, Kousaku

    We have developed a new method for building a vibration model of an actual gear-drive system. Each gear has six degrees of freedom: three translational and three rotational motions. Stiffness matrixes representing each gear shaft and tooth meshing were made and overlapped into one stiffness matrix for the whole system. This enabled easy modelling of complex gear-drive systems such as multi-stage gears and branched gears. The results are in good agreement with experimental results with respect to the major resonance frequencies and vibration modes.

  19. Characterization of N-Boc/Fmoc/Z-N'-formyl-gem-diaminoalkyl derivatives using electrospray ionization multi-stage mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Verardo, Giancarlo; Gorassini, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    N-Boc/Fmoc/Z-N'-formyl-gem-diaminoalkyl derivatives, intermediates particularly useful in the synthesis of partially modified retro-inverso peptides, have been characterized by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion-trap multi-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The MS(2) collision induced dissociation (CID) spectra of the sodium adduct of the formamides derived from the corresponding N-Fmoc/Z-amino acids, dipeptide and tripeptide acids show the [M + Na-NH2CHO](+) ion, arising from the loss of formamide, as the base peak. Differently, the MS(2) CID spectra of [M + Na](+) ion of all the N-Boc derivatives yield the abundant [M + Na-C4H8](+) and [M + Na-Boc + H](+) ions because of the loss of isobutylene and CO2 from the Boc protecting function. Useful information on the type of amino acids and their sequence in the N-protected dipeptidyl and tripeptidyl-N'-formamides is provided by MS(2) and subsequent MS(n) experiments on the respective precursor ions. The negative ion ESI mass spectra of these oligomers show, in addition to [M-H](-), [M + HCOO](-) and [M + Cl](-) ions, the presence of in-source CID fragment ions deriving from the involvement of the N-protecting group. Furthermore, MS(n) spectra of [M + Cl](-) ion of N-protected dipeptide and tripeptide derivatives show characteristic fragmentations that are useful for determining the nature of the C-terminal gem-diamino residue. The present paper represents an initial attempt to study the ESI-MS behavior of these important intermediates and lays the groundwork for structural-based studies on more complex partially modified retro-inverso peptides. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Optimization strategies for single-stage, multi-stage and continuous ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR) have many advantages that are prompting a resurgence in their use in spaceflight and laboratory applications. They are solid-state coolers capable of very high efficiency and very wide operating range. However, their low energy storage density translates to larger mass for a given cooling capacity than is possible with other refrigeration techniques. The interplay between refrigerant mass and other parameters such as magnetic field and heat transfer points in multi-stage ADRs gives rise to a wide parameter space for optimization. This paper first presents optimization strategies for single ADR stages, focusing primarily on obtaining the largest cooling capacity per stage mass, then discusses the optimization of multi-stage and continuous ADRs in the context of the coordinated heat transfer that must occur between stages. The goal for the latter is usually to obtain the largest cooling power per mass or volume, but there can also be many secondary objectives, such as limiting instantaneous heat rejection rates and producing intermediate temperatures for cooling of other instrument components.

  1. Optimization Strategies for Single-Stage, Multi-Stage and Continuous ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR) have many advantages that are prompting a resurgence in their use in spaceflight and laboratory applications. They are solid-state coolers capable of very high efficiency and very wide operating range. However, their low energy storage density translates to larger mass for a given cooling capacity than is possible with other refrigeration techniques. The interplay between refrigerant mass and other parameters such as magnetic field and heat transfer points in multi-stage ADRs gives rise to a wide parameter space for optimization. This paper first presents optimization strategies for single ADR stages, focusing primarily on obtaining the largest cooling capacity per stage mass, then discusses the optimization of multi-stage and continuous ADRs in the context of the coordinated heat transfer that must occur between stages. The goal for the latter is usually to obtain the largest cooling power per mass or volume, but there can also be many secondary objectives, such as limiting instantaneous heat rejection rates and producing intermediate temperatures for cooling of other instrument components.

  2. Learning representations for object classification using multi-stage optimal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiming; Liu, Xiuwen; Mio, Washington

    2008-01-01

    Learning data representations is a fundamental challenge in modeling neural processes and plays an important role in applications such as object recognition. Optimal component analysis (OCA) formulates the problem in the framework of optimization on a Grassmann manifold and a stochastic gradient method is used to estimate the optimal basis. OCA has been successfully applied to image classification problems arising in a variety of contexts. However, as the search space is typically very high dimensional, OCA optimization often requires expensive computational cost. In multi-stage OCA, we first hierarchically project the data onto several low-dimensional subspaces using standard techniques, then OCA learning is performed hierarchically from the lowest to the highest levels to learn about a subspace that is optimal for data discrimination based on the K-nearest neighbor classifier. One of the main advantages of multi-stage OCA lies in the fact that it greatly improves the computational efficiency of the OCA learning algorithm without sacrificing the recognition performance, thus enhancing its applicability to practical problems. In addition to the nearest neighbor classifier, we illustrate the effectiveness of the learned representations on object classification used in conjunction with classifiers such as neural networks and support vector machines.

  3. Purification of High Salinity Brine by Multi-Stage Ion Concentration Polarization Desalination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bumjoo; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kwon, Hyukjin J.; Pham, Van Sang; Kim, Minseok; Al-Anzi, Bader; Lim, Geunbae; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for the desalination of high concentration brine (>TDS 35,000 ppm) efficiently and economically, either for the treatment of produced water from shale gas/oil development, or minimizing the environmental impact of brine from existing desalination plants. Yet, reverse osmosis (RO), which is the most widely used for desalination currently, is not practical for brine desalination. This paper demonstrates technical and economic feasibility of ICP (Ion Concentration Polarization) electrical desalination for the high saline water treatment, by adopting multi-stage operation with better energy efficiency. Optimized multi-staging configurations, dependent on the brine salinity values, can be designed based on experimental and numerical analysis. Such an optimization aims at achieving not just the energy efficiency but also (membrane) area efficiency, lowering the true cost of brine treatment. ICP electrical desalination is shown here to treat brine salinity up to 100,000 ppm of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) with flexible salt rejection rate up to 70% which is promising in a various application treating brine waste. We also demonstrate that ICP desalination has advantage of removing both salts and diverse suspended solids simultaneously, and less susceptibility to membrane fouling/scaling, which is a significant challenge in the membrane processes. PMID:27545955

  4. Purification of High Salinity Brine by Multi-Stage Ion Concentration Polarization Desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bumjoo; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kwon, Hyukjin J.; Pham, Van Sang; Kim, Minseok; Al-Anzi, Bader; Lim, Geunbae; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-08-01

    There is an increasing need for the desalination of high concentration brine (>TDS 35,000 ppm) efficiently and economically, either for the treatment of produced water from shale gas/oil development, or minimizing the environmental impact of brine from existing desalination plants. Yet, reverse osmosis (RO), which is the most widely used for desalination currently, is not practical for brine desalination. This paper demonstrates technical and economic feasibility of ICP (Ion Concentration Polarization) electrical desalination for the high saline water treatment, by adopting multi-stage operation with better energy efficiency. Optimized multi-staging configurations, dependent on the brine salinity values, can be designed based on experimental and numerical analysis. Such an optimization aims at achieving not just the energy efficiency but also (membrane) area efficiency, lowering the true cost of brine treatment. ICP electrical desalination is shown here to treat brine salinity up to 100,000 ppm of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) with flexible salt rejection rate up to 70% which is promising in a various application treating brine waste. We also demonstrate that ICP desalination has advantage of removing both salts and diverse suspended solids simultaneously, and less susceptibility to membrane fouling/scaling, which is a significant challenge in the membrane processes.

  5. Continuous flow multi-stage microfluidic reactors via hydrodynamic microparticle railing.

    PubMed

    Sochol, Ryan D; Li, Song; Lee, Luke P; Lin, Liwei

    2012-10-21

    "Multi-stage" fluidic reactions are integral to diverse biochemical assays; however, such processes typically require laborious and time-intensive fluidic mixing procedures in which distinct reagents and/or washes must be loaded sequentially and separately (i.e., one-at-a-time). Microfluidic processors that enable multi-stage fluidic reactions with suspended microparticles (e.g., microbeads and cells) to be performed autonomously could greatly extend the efficacy of lab-on-a-chip technologies. Here we present a single-layer microfluidic reactor that utilizes a microfluidic railing methodology to passively transport suspended microbeads and cells into distinct, adjacent laminar flow streams for rapid fluidic mixing and assaying. Four distinct molecular synthesis processes (i.e., consisting of 48 discrete fluidic mixing stages in total) were accomplished on polystyrene microbead substrates (15 μm in diameter) in parallel, without the need for external observation or regulation during device operation. Experimental results also revealed successful railing of suspended bovine aortic endothelial cells (approximately 13 to 17 μm in diameter). The presented railing system provides an effective continuous flow methodology to achieve bead-based and cell-based microfluidic reactors for applications including point-of-care (POC) molecular diagnostics, pharmacological screening, and quantitative cell biology.

  6. Purification of High Salinity Brine by Multi-Stage Ion Concentration Polarization Desalination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bumjoo; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kwon, Hyukjin J; Pham, Van Sang; Kim, Minseok; Al-Anzi, Bader; Lim, Geunbae; Han, Jongyoon

    2016-08-22

    There is an increasing need for the desalination of high concentration brine (>TDS 35,000 ppm) efficiently and economically, either for the treatment of produced water from shale gas/oil development, or minimizing the environmental impact of brine from existing desalination plants. Yet, reverse osmosis (RO), which is the most widely used for desalination currently, is not practical for brine desalination. This paper demonstrates technical and economic feasibility of ICP (Ion Concentration Polarization) electrical desalination for the high saline water treatment, by adopting multi-stage operation with better energy efficiency. Optimized multi-staging configurations, dependent on the brine salinity values, can be designed based on experimental and numerical analysis. Such an optimization aims at achieving not just the energy efficiency but also (membrane) area efficiency, lowering the true cost of brine treatment. ICP electrical desalination is shown here to treat brine salinity up to 100,000 ppm of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) with flexible salt rejection rate up to 70% which is promising in a various application treating brine waste. We also demonstrate that ICP desalination has advantage of removing both salts and diverse suspended solids simultaneously, and less susceptibility to membrane fouling/scaling, which is a significant challenge in the membrane processes.

  7. Comparison of multi-stage dose-response mixture models, with applications.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Eva María; Alonso, José

    2014-07-01

    This article concerns the analysis of a stochastic model that we propose for the population that generates a response (response measure) to the dose with the multi-stage model. The parameter uncertainty is dealt with via random dose and random size of the population at risk. The response measure is modeled by a random sum of mixed Bernoulli random variables with arbitrary distribution for the mixing parameters. Some extensions of the model are defined by functionals of the infection probability, fulfilling some convexity properties. We analyze the response by stochastic comparisons under different stochastic relations on the random dosages and the random sizes of the population at risk; or on the random infection rates. We provide stochastic exact bounds of the mixture model for the response, using inequalities and the positive quadrant dependence. Numerical bounds of the response by a dose having a scalar value or having an exponential or uniform distributions are obtained. Some conclusions are derived: the lower estimation of the response measure in the increasing convex order sense by replacing the dosages by their means; effects of the variation of the dose on the magnitude of the probability distribution of the response; effects of parameter correlation on the degree of variability of the response to any random dose; the low-dose region assessment; and also, the classical multi-stage model is compared versus the mixture model featuring independence and versus that with positive quadrant dependence. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Population balance modelling and multi-stage optimal control of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-07-01

    In this work, one-dimensional population balance models (PBMs) have been developed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The developed PBMs have linked the key binder solution spray operating factors of the binder spray rate, atomizing air pressure and pulsed frequency of spray with the granule properties to predict granule growth behaviour in the pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation process at different operating conditions with accuracy. A multi-stage open optimal control strategy based on the developed PBMs was proposed to reduce the model mismatch, in which through adjusting the trajectory of the evolution of the granule size distribution at predefined sample intervals, to determine the optimal operating variables related to the binder spray including the spray rate of binding liquid, atomizing air pressure and pulsed frequency of spray. The effectiveness of the proposed modelling and multi-stage open optimal control strategies has been validated by experimental and simulation tests. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-stage axial-flux PM machine for wheel direct drive

    SciTech Connect

    Caricchi, F.; Crescimbini, F.; Mezzetti, F.; Santini, E.

    1995-12-31

    The design of direct-driven wheel motors must comply with diameter restriction due to housing the motor in a wheel rim and allow the achievement of very high torque density and overload capability. Slotless axial-flux permanent magnet machines (AFPMs) prove to be one best candidate for application in electric vehicles as direct-drive wheel motors, as in comparison with conventional machines they allow designs with higher compactness, lightness and efficiency. The paper presents a newly-conceived AFPM which has multi-stage structure and water-cooled ironless stator. In the proposed new topology of the machine the space formerly occupied by the toroidal core becomes a water duct, which removes heat directly from the interior surface of the stator winding. The high efficiency of the machine cooling arrangement allows long-term 100% overload operation and great reduction of the machine weight. The multistage structure of the machine is suited to overcome the restriction on the machine diameter and meet the torque required at the wheel shaft. The paper gives guidelines for the design of a multi-stage AFPM with water-cooled ironless stator, and describes characteristics of a two-stage prototype machine rated 220 Nm, 1,100 rpm.

  10. A novel multi-stage direct contact membrane distillation module: Design, experimental and theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Gil; Kim, Woo-Seung; Choi, June-Seok; Ghaffour, Noreddine; Kim, Young-Deuk

    2016-12-15

    An economic desalination system with a small scale and footprint for remote areas, which have a limited and inadequate water supply, insufficient water treatment and low infrastructure, is strongly demanded in the desalination markets. Here, a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process has the simplest configuration and potentially the highest permeate flux among all of the possible MD processes. This process can also be easily instituted in a multi-stage manner for enhanced compactness, productivity, versatility and cost-effectiveness. In this study, an innovative, multi-stage, DCMD module under countercurrent-flow configuration is first designed and then investigate both theoretically and experimentally to identify its feasibility and operability for desalination application. Model predictions and measured data for mean permeate flux are compared and shown to be in good agreement. The effect of the number of module stages on the mean permeate flux, performance ratio and daily water production of the MDCMD system has been theoretically identified at inlet feed and permeate flow rates of 1.5 l/min and inlet feed and permeate temperatures of 70 °C and 25 °C, respectively. The daily water production of a three-stage DCMD module with a membrane area of 0.01 m(2) at each stage is found to be 21.5 kg. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. How quantitative measures unravel design principles in multi-stage phosphorylation cascades.

    PubMed

    Frey, Simone; Millat, Thomas; Hohmann, Stefan; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2008-09-07

    We investigate design principles of linear multi-stage phosphorylation cascades by using quantitative measures for signaling time, signal duration and signal amplitude. We compare alternative pathway structures by varying the number of phosphorylations and the length of the cascade. We show that a model for a weakly activated pathway does not reflect the biological context well, unless it is restricted to certain parameter combinations. Focusing therefore on a more general model, we compare alternative structures with respect to a multivariate optimization criterion. We test the hypothesis that the structure of a linear multi-stage phosphorylation cascade is the result of an optimization process aiming for a fast response, defined by the minimum of the product of signaling time and signal duration. It is then shown that certain pathway structures minimize this criterion. Several popular models of MAPK cascades form the basis of our study. These models represent different levels of approximation, which we compare and discuss with respect to the quantitative measures.

  12. Study on adjoint-based optimization method for multi-stage turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; Tian, Yong; Yi, Weilin; Ji, Lucheng; Shao, Weiwei; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-10-01

    Adjoint-based optimization method is a hotspot in turbomachinery. First, this paper presents principles of adjoint method from Lagrange multiplier viewpoint. Second, combining a continuous route with thin layer RANS equations, we formulate adjoint equations and anti-physical boundary conditions. Due to the multi-stage environment in turbomachinery, an adjoint interrow mixing method is introduced. Numerical techniques of solving flow equations and adjoint equations are almost the same, and once they are converged respectively, the gradients of an objective function to design variables can be calculated using complex method efficiently. Third, integrating a shape perturbation parameterization and a simple steepest descent method, a frame of adjoint-based aerodynamic shape optimization for multi-stage turbomachinery is constructed. At last, an inverse design of an annular cascade is employed to validate the above approach, and adjoint field of an Aachen 1.5 stage turbine demonstrates the conservation and areflexia of the adjoint interrow mixing method. Then a direct redesign of a 1+1 counter-rotating turbine aiming to increase efficiency and apply constraints to mass flow rate and pressure ratio is taken.

  13. Inspection logistics planning for multi-stage production systems with applications to semiconductor fabrication lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kyle Dakai

    Since the market for semiconductor products has become more lucrative and competitive, research into improving yields for semiconductor fabrication lines has lately received a tremendous amount of attention. One of the most critical tasks in achieving such yield improvements is to plan the in-line inspection sampling efficiently so that any potential yield problems can be detected early and eliminated quickly. We formulate a multi-stage inspection planning model based on configurations in actual semiconductor fabrication lines, specifically taking into account both the capacity constraint and the congestion effects at the inspection station. We propose a new mixed First-Come-First-Serve (FCFS) and Last-Come-First-Serve (LCFS) discipline for serving the inspection samples to expedite the detection of potential yield problems. Employing this mixed FCFS and LCFS discipline, we derive approximate expressions for the queueing delays in yield problem detection time and develop near-optimal algorithms to obtain the inspection logistics planning policies. We also investigate the queueing performance with this mixed type of service discipline under different assumptions and configurations. In addition, we conduct numerical tests and generate managerial insights based on input data from actual semiconductor fabrication lines. To the best of our knowledge, this research is novel in developing, for the first time in the literature, near-optimal results for inspection logistics planning in multi-stage production systems with congestion effects explicitly considered.

  14. Multi-stage pulsed laser deposition of aluminum nitride at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duta, L.; Stan, G. E.; Stroescu, H.; Gartner, M.; Anastasescu, M.; Fogarassy, Zs.; Mihailescu, N.; Szekeres, A.; Bakalova, S.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2016-06-01

    We report on multi-stage pulsed laser deposition of aluminum nitride (AlN) on Si (1 0 0) wafers, at different temperatures. The first stage of deposition was carried out at 800 °C, the optimum temperature for AlN crystallization. In the second stage, the deposition was conducted at lower temperatures (room temperature, 350 °C or 450 °C), in ambient Nitrogen, at 0.1 Pa. The synthesized structures were analyzed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). GIXRD measurements indicated that the two-stage deposited AlN samples exhibited a randomly oriented wurtzite structure with nanosized crystallites. The peaks were shifted to larger angles, indicative for smaller inter-planar distances. Remarkably, TEM images demonstrated that the high-temperature AlN "seed" layers (800 °C) promoted the growth of poly-crystalline AlN structures at lower deposition temperatures. When increasing the deposition temperature, the surface roughness of the samples exhibited values in the range of 0.4-2.3 nm. SE analyses showed structures which yield band gap values within the range of 4.0-5.7 eV. A correlation between the results of single- and multi-stage AlN depositions was observed.

  15. Multi-stage ponds-wetlands ecosystem for effective wastewater treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jian-feng; Wang, Bao-zhen; Wang, Lin

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the Dongying multi-stage ponds-wetlands ecosystem was investigated in this work. Study of the removal of different pollutants (BOD5, COD, SS, TP, TN, NH3-N, etc.) in different temperature seasons and different units in this system indicated that effluent BOD5 and SS were constant to less than 11 mg/L and 14 mg/L throughout the experimental processes; but that the removal efficiencies of pollutants such as TP, TN, NH3-N, COD varied greatly with season. The higher the temperature was, the higher was the observed removal in this system. Additionally, each unit of the system functioned differently in removing pollutants. BOD5 and SS were mainly removed in the first three units (hybrid facultative ponds, aeration ponds and aerated fish ponds), whereas nitrogen and phosphates were mainly removed in hydrophyte ponds and constructed reed wetlands. The multi-stage ponds-wetlands ecosystem exhibits good potential of removing different pollutants, and the effluent quality meet several standards for wastewater reuse. PMID:15822145

  16. Bubbling orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhi, Sunil; Smedbäck, Mikael

    2005-08-01

    We investigate a class of 1/2-BPS bubbling geometries associated to orientifolds of type-IIB string theory and thereby to excited states of the SO(N)/Sp(N) Script N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The geometries are in correspondence with free fermions moving in a harmonic oscillator potential on the half-line. Branes wrapped on torsion cycles of these geometries are identified in the fermi fluid description. Besides being of intrinsic interest, these solutions may also occur as local geometries in flux compactifications where orientifold planes are present to ensure global charge cancellation. We comment on the extension of this procedure to M-theory orientifolds.

  17. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  18. Single Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Jennifer; Hough, Shane

    2003-05-01

    Single Bubble Sonoluminescence is the emission of light from a single bubble suspended in a liquid caused by a continuum of repeated implosions due to pressure waves generated from a maintained ultrasonic sinusoidal wave source. H. Frenzel and H. Schultz first studied it in 1934 at the University of Cologne. It was not until 1988 with D.F. Gaitan that actual research began with single bubble sonoluminescence. Currently many theories exist attempting to explain the observed bubble phenomenon. Many of these theories require spherical behavior of the bubble. Observation of the bubble has shown that the bubble does not behave spherically in most cases. One explanation for this is known as jet theory. A spectrum of the bubble will give us the mean physical properties of the bubble such as temperature and pressure inside the bubble. Eventually, with the aide of fluorocene dye a full spectrum of the bubble will be obtained.

  19. Modeling Humans as Reinforcement Learners: How to Predict Human Behavior in Multi-Stage Games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ritchie; Wolpert, David H.; Backhaus, Scott; Bent, Russell; Bono, James; Tracey, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel framework for modeling interacting humans in a multi-stage game environment by combining concepts from game theory and reinforcement learning. The proposed model has the following desirable characteristics: (1) Bounded rational players, (2) strategic (i.e., players account for one anothers reward functions), and (3) is computationally feasible even on moderately large real-world systems. To do this we extend level-K reasoning to policy space to, for the first time, be able to handle multiple time steps. This allows us to decompose the problem into a series of smaller ones where we can apply standard reinforcement learning algorithms. We investigate these ideas in a cyber-battle scenario over a smart power grid and discuss the relationship between the behavior predicted by our model and what one might expect of real human defenders and attackers.

  20. Coupled finite element simulation and optimization of single- and multi-stage sheet-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamasco, Cynthia M.; Rais-Rohani, Masoud; Buijk, Arjaan

    2013-03-01

    This article presents the development and application of a coupled finite element simulation and optimization framework that can be used for design and analysis of sheet-forming processes of varying complexity. The entire forming process from blank gripping and deep drawing to tool release and springback is modelled. The dies, holders, punch and workpiece are modelled with friction, temperature, holder force and punch speed controlled in the process simulation. Both single- and multi-stage sheet-forming processes are investigated. Process simulation is coupled with a nonlinear gradient-based optimization approach for optimizing single or multiple design objectives with imposed sheet-forming response constraints. A MATLAB program is developed and used for data-flow management between process simulation and optimization codes. Thinning, springback, damage and forming limit diagram are used to define failure in the forming process design optimization. Design sensitivity analysis and optimization results of the example problems are presented and discussed.

  1. Multi stage peroxide and activated peroxide bleaching of kenaf bast pulp.

    PubMed

    Zeinaly, Farhad; Shakhes, Jalal; Zeinali, Nooshin

    2013-02-15

    Soda-anthraquinone kenaf bast pulp (12.5 kappa number and 32% ISO brightness) has been bleached with multi stage peroxide bleaching process. Bleaching process was carried out in different sequences of peroxide stage without and with activator (tetraacetylethylenediamine, TAED) to about 80% ISO brightness. Full bleached pulp production with high brightness and viscosity and also, low chemical oxygen demand (COD) and no adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in effluent are the aims of this study. The effects of temperature, retention time, chemical charges, TAED/peroxide ratio and alkalinity have been studied in order to maximize the brightness gain at the lowest viscosity loss. H(2)O(2) was activated as bleaching agent under milder conditions, such as low alkalinity or low temperature, by TAED activator. Therefore, TAED charge caused to an improvement in viscosity, pulp yield and effluent COD load. Pre-treatment with EDTA for 30 min and in acidic condition gave 2-4% gain in ISO brightness.

  2. Multi-stage continuous high cell density culture systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho Nam; Jung, Kwonsu; Choi, Jin-Dal-Rae; Lee, Joon Chul; Woo, Hee-Chul

    2014-01-01

    A multi-stage continuous high cell density culture (MSC-HCDC) system makes it possible to achieve high productivity together with high product titer of many bioproducts. For long-term continuous operation of MSC-HCDC systems, the cell retention time and hydraulic retention time must be decoupled and strains (bacteria, yeast, plant, and animal cells) must be stable. MSC-HCDC systems are suitable for low-value high-volume extracellular products such as fuel ethanol, lactic acid or volatile fatty acids, and high-value products such as monoclonal antibodies as well as intracellular products such as polyhydroxybutyric acid (PHB), microbial lipids or a number of therapeutics. Better understanding of the fermentation kinetics of a specific product and reliable high-density culture methods for the product-generating microorganisms will facilitate timely industrialization of MSC-HCDC systems for products that are currently obtained in fed-batch bioreactors.

  3. Multi-stage martensitic transformation in Ni-rich NiTi shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiebin; Verlinden, Bert; Kustov, Sergey

    Precipitation hardening is an effective way to improve the functional stability of NiTi shape memory alloys. The precipitates, mainly Ni4Ti3, could be introduced by aging treatment in Ni-rich NiTi alloys. However, the presence of Ni4Ti3 precipitates could disturb the transformation behavior, resulting in the multi-stage martensitic transformation (MMT). With the presence of MMT, it is difficult to control the transformation behavior, and thus limits the applicability of NiTi alloys. In this work, previous efforts on explaining the observed MMT are summarized. The difficulties in developing a unified explanation are discussed, and a possible way to avoid the MMT is proposed.

  4. Generation of High Pressure Oxygen via Electrochemical Pumping in a Multi-stage Electrolysis Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlock, John A (Inventor); Green, Robert D (Inventor); Farmer, Serene (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An oxygen pump can produce high-purity high-pressure oxygen. Oxygen ions (O.sup.2-) are electrochemically pumped through a multi-stage electrolysis stack of cells. Each cell includes an oxygen-ion conducting solid-state electrolyte between cathode and anode sides. Oxygen dissociates into the ions at the cathode side. The ions migrate across the electrolyte and recombine at the anode side. An insulator is between adjacent cells to electrically isolate each individual cell. Each cell receives a similar volt potential. Recombined oxygen from a previous stage can diffuse through the insulator to reach the cathode side of the next stage. Each successive stage similarly incrementally pressurizes the oxygen to produce a final elevated pressure.

  5. Development of an automated multi-stage modal synthesis system for NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herting, D. N.; Hoesly, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    A mode synthesis development to be scheduled in the NASTRAN multi-level substructuring system for general dynamics applications is described. The method combines the better features of several state of the art mode synthesis techniques, yet is general enough to provide for any arbitrary combination of boundary degrees of freedom and normal mode boundary conditions. Normal modes or complex eigenvectors may be used in the definition of a structure component which may be combined with other components of any type. Combination structures fabricated from component modes may be processed as normal substructures, including further multi-stage mode synthesis reductions. Included are discussions of the user control of the system and advantages in actual application.

  6. Removal of oxides of nitrogen from gases in multi-stage coal combustion

    DOEpatents

    Mollot, D.J.; Bonk, D.L.; Dowdy, T.E.

    1998-01-13

    Polluting NO{sub x} gas values are removed from off-gas of a multi-stage coal combustion process which includes an initial carbonizing reaction, firing of char from this reaction in a fluidized bed reactor, and burning of gases from the carbonizing and fluidized bed reactions in a topping combustor having a first, fuel-rich zone and a second, fuel-lean zone. The improvement by means of which NO{sub x} gases are removed is directed to introducing NO{sub x}-free oxidizing gas such as compressor air into the second, fuel-lean zone and completing combustion with this source of oxidizing gas. Excess air fed to the fluidized bed reactor is also controlled to obtain desired stoichiometry in the first, fuel-rich zone of the topping combustor. 2 figs.

  7. Removal of oxides of nitrogen from gases in multi-stage coal combustion

    DOEpatents

    Mollot, Darren J.; Bonk, Donald L.; Dowdy, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    Polluting NO.sub.x gas values are removed from off-gas of a multi-stage coal combustion process which includes an initial carbonizing reaction, firing of char from this reaction in a fluidized bed reactor, and burning of gases from the carbonizing and fluidized bed reactions in a topping combustor having a first, fuel-rich zone and a second, fuel-lean zone. The improvement by means of which NO.sub.x gases are removed is directed to introducing NO.sub.x -free oxidizing gas such as compressor air into the second, fuel-lean zone and completing combustion with this source of oxidizing gas. Excess air fed to the fluidized bed reactor is also controlled to obtain desired stoichiometry in the first, fuel-rich zone of the topping combustor.

  8. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Ninth quarterly report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johnson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.

    1995-06-01

    This quarterly report covers the activities of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction of Coal during the Period October 1 - December 31, 1994, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE Contract Period was from December 8, 1992 to December 7, 1994 and has been extended to September 30, 1995. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

  9. Decomposition and (importance) sampling techniques for multi-stage stochastic linear programs

    SciTech Connect

    Infanger, G.

    1993-11-01

    The difficulty of solving large-scale multi-stage stochastic linear programs arises from the sheer number of scenarios associated with numerous stochastic parameters. The number of scenarios grows exponentially with the number of stages and problems get easily out of hand even for very moderate numbers of stochastic parameters per stage. Our method combines dual (Benders) decomposition with Monte Carlo sampling techniques. We employ importance sampling to efficiently obtain accurate estimates of both expected future costs and gradients and right-hand sides of cuts. The method enables us to solve practical large-scale problems with many stages and numerous stochastic parameters per stage. We discuss the theory of sharing and adjusting cuts between different scenarios in a stage. We derive probabilistic lower and upper bounds, where we use importance path sampling for the upper bound estimation. Initial numerical results turned out to be promising.

  10. A Bayesian multi-stage cost-effectiveness design for animal studies in stroke research.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chunyan; Ning, Jing; Huang, Xuelin

    2016-07-08

    Much progress has been made in the area of adaptive designs for clinical trials. However, little has been done regarding adaptive designs to identify optimal treatment strategies in animal studies. Motivated by an animal study of a novel strategy for treating strokes, we propose a Bayesian multi-stage cost-effectiveness design to simultaneously identify the optimal dose and determine the therapeutic treatment window for administrating the experimental agent. We consider a non-monotonic pattern for the dose-schedule-efficacy relationship and develop an adaptive shrinkage algorithm to assign more cohorts to admissible strategies. We conduct simulation studies to evaluate the performance of the proposed design by comparing it with two standard designs. These simulation studies show that the proposed design yields a significantly higher probability of selecting the optimal strategy, while it is generally more efficient and practical in terms of resource usage. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Parallel, multi-stage processing of colors, faces and shapes in macaque inferior temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Visual-object processing culminates in inferior temporal (IT) cortex. To assess the organization of IT, we measured fMRI responses in alert monkey to achromatic images (faces, fruit, bodies, places) and colored gratings. IT contained multiple color-biased regions, which were typically ventral to face patches and, remarkably, yoked to them, spaced regularly at four locations predicted by known anatomy. Color and face selectivity increased for more anterior regions, indicative of a broad hierarchical arrangement. Responses to non-face shapes were found across IT, but were stronger outside color-biased regions and face patches, consistent with multiple parallel streams. IT also contained multiple coarse eccentricity maps: face patches overlapped central representations; color-biased regions spanned mid-peripheral representations; and place-biased regions overlapped peripheral representations. These results suggest that IT comprises parallel, multi-stage processing networks subject to one organizing principle. PMID:24141314

  12. Optimization of Adaboost Algorithm for Sonar Target Detection in a Multi-Stage ATR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Tsung Han (Hank)

    2011-01-01

    JPL has developed a multi-stage Automated Target Recognition (ATR) system to locate objects in images. First, input images are preprocessed and sent to a Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) filter to identify possible regions-of-interest (ROIs). Second, feature extraction operations are performed using Texton filters and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Finally, the features are fed to a classifier, to identify ROIs that contain the targets. Previous work used the Feed-forward Back-propagation Neural Network for classification. In this project we investigate a version of Adaboost as a classifier for comparison. The version we used is known as GentleBoost. We used the boosted decision tree as the weak classifier. We have tested our ATR system against real-world sonar images using the Adaboost approach. Results indicate an improvement in performance over a single Neural Network design.

  13. Performance of upflow gravel filtration in multi-stage filtration plants.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L D; Visscher, J T; Rietveld, L C

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of four full-scale upflow gravel filters that are part of full-scale multi-stage filtration. The study explored the design criteria, the operation and maintenance (O&M) practices, and the performance of the systems. Findings showed that most design criteria and O&M procedures are following the recommendations as presented in the literature but several diversions were also identified. Performance data showed that removal efficiencies were on the low side when compared to the literature, possibly because of the good influent quality water that was treated. Cleaning efficiency was analyzed and the overall conclusion is that an adjustment of the design criteria and O&M procedures is needed to enhance system performance. This includes drainage system design, surface cleaning by weir, and filter bed cleaning to allow a reduction in cleaning cycles and an improvement in operation control.

  14. A posteriori error estimation for multi-stage Runge–Kutta IMEX schemes

    DOE PAGES

    Chaudhry, Jehanzeb H.; Collins, J. B.; Shadid, John N.

    2017-02-05

    Implicit–Explicit (IMEX) schemes are widely used for time integration methods for approximating solutions to a large class of problems. In this work, we develop accurate a posteriori error estimates of a quantity-of-interest for approximations obtained from multi-stage IMEX schemes. This is done by first defining a finite element method that is nodally equivalent to an IMEX scheme, then using typical methods for adjoint-based error estimation. Furthermore, the use of a nodally equivalent finite element method allows a decomposition of the error into multiple components, each describing the effect of a different portion of the method on the total error inmore » a quantity-of-interest.« less

  15. Simulated dynamic response of a multi-stage compressor with variable molecular weight flow medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Dale A.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model of a multi-stage compressor with variable molecular weight flow medium is derived. The modeled system consists of a five stage, six cylinder, double acting, piston type compressor. Each stage is followed by a water cooled heat exchanger which serves to transfer the heat of compression from the gas. A high molecular weight gas (CFC-12) mixed with air in varying proportions is introduced to the suction of the compressor. Condensation of the heavy gas may occur in the upper stage heat exchangers. The state equations for the system are integrated using the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) for determining the system's dynamic and steady state characteristics under varying operating conditions.

  16. Numerical Study of a Multi-stage Dielectric Laser-driven Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yelong; Xia, Guoxing; Smith, Jonathan. D. A.; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete, Oznur; Jamison, Steve P.; Welsch, Carsten P.

    In order to overcome the limits of commonly used radiofrequency accelerators, it is highly desirable to reduce the unit cost and increase the maximum achievable accelerating gradient. Dielectric laser-driven accelerators (DLAs) based on grating structures have received considerable attention due to maximum acceleration gradients of several GV/m and mature lithographic techniques for structure fabrication. This paper explores different spatial harmonics excited by an incident laser pulse and their interaction with the electron beam from the non-relativistic (25 keV) to the highly relativistic regime in double-grating silica structures. The achievable acceleration gradient for different spatial harmonics and the optimal compromise between maximum acceleration gradient and simplicity of structure fabrication are discussed. Finally, the suitability of a multi-stage DLA which would enable the acceleration of electrons from 25 keV to relativistic energies is discussed.

  17. Multi-stage melt-rock interaction in the Mt. Maggiore (Corsica, France) ophiolitic peridotites: microstructural and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, Elisabetta; Piccardo, Giovanni B.; Hofmann, Albrecht W.

    2008-10-01

    Spinel and plagioclase peridotites from the Mt.Maggiore (Corsica, France) ophiolitic massif record a composite asthenosphere-lithosphere history of partial melting and subsequent multi-stage melt-rock interaction. Cpx-poor spinel lherzolites are consistent with mantle residues after low-degree fractional melting ( F = 5-10%). Opx + spinel symplectites at the rims of orthopyroxene porphyroclasts indicate post-melting lithospheric cooling ( T = 970-1,100°C); this was followed by formation of olivine embayments within pyroxene porphyroclasts by melt-rock interaction. Enrichment in modal olivine (up to 85 wt%) at constant bulk Mg values, and variable absolute REE contents (at constant LREE/HREE) indicate olivine precipitation and pyroxene dissolution during reactive porous melt flow. This stage occurred at spinel-facies depths, after incorporation of the peridotites in the thermal lithosphere. Plagioclase-enriched peridotites show melt impregnation microtextures, like opx + plag intergrowths replacing exsolved cpx porphyroclasts and interstitial gabbronoritic veinlets. This second melt-rock interaction stage caused systematic chemical changes in clinopyroxene (e.g. Ti, REE, Zr, Y increase), related to the concomitant effects of local melt-rock interaction at decreasing melt mass, and crystallization of small (<3%) trapped melt fractions. LREE depletion in minerals of the gabbronoritic veinlets indicates that the impregnating melts were more depleted than normal MORB. Preserved microtextural evidence of previous melt-rock interaction in the impregnated peridotites suggests that they were progressively uplifted in response to lithosphere extension and thinning. Migrating melts were likely produced by mantle upwelling and melting related to extension; they were modified from olivine-saturated to opx-saturated compositions, and caused different styles of melt-rock interaction (reactive spinel harzburgites, vs. impregnated plagioclase peridotites) depending on the

  18. Lumped-equivalent circuit model for multi-stage cascaded magnetoelectric dual-tunable bandpass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiu-Shi; Zhu, Feng-Jie; Zhou, Hao-Miao

    2015-10-01

    A lumped-equivalent circuit model of a novel magnetoelectric tunable bandpass filter, which is realized in the form of multi-stage cascading between a plurality of magnetoelectric laminates, is established in this paper for convenient analysis. The multi-stage cascaded filter is degraded to the coupling microstrip filter with only one magnetoelectric laminate and then compared with the existing experiment results. The comparison reveals that the insertion loss curves predicted by the degraded circuit model are in good agreement with the experiment results and the predicted results of the electromagnetic field simulation, thus the validity of the model is verified. The model is then degraded to the two-stage cascaded magnetoelectric filter with two magnetoelectric laminates. It is revealed that if the applied external bias magnetic or electric fields on the two magnetoelectric laminates are identical, then the passband of the filter will drift under the changed external field; that is to say, the filter has the characteristics of external magnetic field tunability and electric field tunability. If the applied external bias magnetic or electric fields on two magnetoelectric laminates are different, then the passband will disappear so that the switching characteristic is achieved. When the same magnetic fields are applied to the laminates, the passband bandwidth of the two-stage cascaded magnetoelectric filter with two magnetoelectric laminates becomes nearly doubled in comparison with the passband filter which contains only one magnetoelectric laminate. The bandpass effect is also improved obviously. This research will provide a theoretical basis for the design, preparation, and application of a new high performance magnetoelectric tunable microwave device. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11172285 and 11472259) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. LR13A020002).

  19. Nonlinear resonances in a multi-stage free-electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, S.; Takayama, K.

    1995-12-31

    A two-beam accelerator (TBA) is a possible candidate of future linear colliders, in which the demanded rf power is provided by a multi-stage free-electron laser (MFEL). After if amplification in each stage, a driving beam is re-accelerated by an induction unit and propagates into the next stage. Recently it has been recognized that the multi-stage character of the MFEL causes resonances between its periodicity and the synchrotron motion in an rf bucket. Since the synchrotron oscillation is strongly modulated by the resonance and at the worst a large fraction of particles is trapped in the resonance islands, the nonlinear resonances in the FEL longitudinal beam dynamics can lead to notable degradation of the MFEL performance, such as output fluctuation and phase modulation which have been big concerns in the accelerator society. The overall efficiency of the MFEL and the quality of the amplified microwave power are key issues for realizing the TBA/FEL Particularly the rf phase and amplitude errors must be maintained within tolerance. One of significant obstacles is an amplification of undesired modes. If a small-size waveguide is employed, the FEL resonance energies for undesired higher order modes shift very far from that for a fundamental mode; so it is possible to prevent higher order modes from evolving. Such a small-size waveguide, however, gives a high power density in the FEL. Simulation results have demonstrated that the nonlinear resonances occur in die FEL longitudinal motion when the power density exceeds some threshold. An analytical method for studying the nonlinear resonance in the TBA/FEL is developed based on the macroparticle model which can describe analytically the drastic behaviors in the evolutions of the phase and amplitude. In the theory the basic 1D-FEL equations are reduced to a nonlinear pendulum equation with respect to the ponderomotive phase.

  20. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  1. Micro Bubble and Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitome, Hideto

    2001-05-01

    The author reviews the interaction of micro bubbles with ultrasound. First, the action of acoustic radiation pressure on bubbles is discussed in contrast with that on small particles noting the concept of Bjerknes force, resonant bubbles and nonlinear oscillation of bubbles. In the past decade, sonoluminescence, light emission from a single oscillating bubble, attracted attention of researchers because of its strange characteristics. A short history of sonoluminescence and its characteristics are summarized based on bubble motion in a sound field. Lastly, industrial and medical applications of extreme environment generated by collapsing micro bubbles are discussed as promising technology in the new century.

  2. Mass transfer effects on the transmission of bubble screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, Daniel; Bergamasco, Luca

    2016-11-01

    In this work we investigate, theoretically and numerically, the reflection and transmission properties of bubble screens excited by pressure wave pulses. We use modified expressions for the bubble resonance frequency and the damping factor in order to capture the influence of mass transfer on the reflection-transmission coefficients. In addition to the influence of variables such as the bubble radius and the averaged inter-bubble distance, the analysis reveals that in conditions close to the saturation line there exists a regime where the heat transport surrounding the bubble plays an important role on the bubble's response also influencing the reflection properties of the bubble screen. The linear analysis allows us to predict the critical vapor content beyond which liquid heat's transport controls the dynamic response of the bubbles. Numerical simulations show that these effects become especially relevant in the nonlinear regime. ANR Cachmap.

  3. Lab-testing, predicting, and modeling multi-stage activated carbon adsorption of organic micro-pollutants from treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zietzschmann, F; Altmann, J; Hannemann, C; Jekel, M

    2015-10-15

    Multi-stage reuse of powdered activated carbon (PAC) is often applied in practice for a more efficient exploitation of the PAC capacity to remove organic micro-pollutants (OMP). However, the adsorption mechanisms in multi-stage PAC reuse are rarely investigated, as large-scale experiments do not allow for systematic tests. In this study, a laboratory method for the separation of PAC/water suspensions and the subsequent reuse of the PAC and the water was developed. The method was tested on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent in a setup with up to 7 PAC reuse stages. The tests show that the overall OMP removal from WWTP effluent can be increased when reusing PAC. The reason is that a repeated adsorption in multi-stage PAC reuse results in similar equilibrium concentrations as a single-stage adsorption. Thus, a single relationship between solid and liquid phase OMP concentrations appears valid throughout all stages. This also means that the adsorption efficiency of multi-stage PAC reuse setups can be estimated from the data of a single-stage setup. Furthermore, the overall OMP removals in multi-stage setups coincide with the overall UV254 removals, and for each respective OMP one relationship to UV254 removal is valid throughout all stages. The results were modeled by a simple modification of the equivalent background compound model (EBCM) which was also used to simulate the additional OMP removals in multi-stage setups with up to 50 reuse stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bubble drag reduction requires large bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben; van der Veen, Roeland; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    In the maritime industry, the injection of air bubbles into the turbulent boundary layer under the ship hull is seen as one of the most promising techniques to reduce the overall fuel consumption. A few volume percent (<= 4 %) of bubbles can reduce the overall drag up to 40% and beyond. However, the exact mechanism is unknown, thus hindering further progress and optimization. Here we show that bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow dramatically depends on the bubble size. By adding minute concentrations (6 ppm) of the surfactant Triton X-100 into otherwise completely unchanged strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow containing bubbles, we dramatically reduce the drag reduction from more than 40% to about 4%, corresponding to the trivial effect of the bubbles on the density and viscosity of the liquid . The reason for this striking behavior is that the addition of surfactants prevents bubble coalescence, leading to much smaller bubbles. Our result demonstrates that bubble deformability is crucial for bubble drag reduction in turbulent flow. We acknowledge support from STW and FOM.

  5. Research and Development for Multi-stage and Integrated Approach for Seafloor Massive Sulfides (SMSs) Exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Asakawa, E.; Sumi, T.; Kadoshima, K.; Kose, M.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Koizumi, A.; Koizumi, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Higashi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The seafloor hydrothermal systems and related mineral deposits had been discovered at more than 550 sites so for, and near the one-third of these sites were confirmed as the massive sulfide deposits (Hannington et al., 2011). However, we are now faced with the some task like the preservation of hydrothermal vent community and the secure of amount of mineral reserves for the commercialization. In Japan, the exploration and investigation researches in Japan's EEZ has been conducted from 1980s, and about 20 seafloor hydrothermal fields including several confirmed SMSs has been discovered so far. The Cabinet Office of Government Japan (2013) have been promoting "assessment of the amount of reserves of known mineral deposits, discovery of new mineral deposits and comprehension of the approximate amount of reserves, development of equipment technologies and environmental impact assessment methods related to mining and lifting, including actual offshore tests", expecting projects to be initiated aiming at commercialization with the participation of private companies in or after FY2023-FY2027. As part of the promotion, the "Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP)" was started at FY2014 by the Cabinet Office of Government Japan, and the research project of "Next-generation technology for ocean resources exploration" is also ongoing (FY2014-FY2018). J-MARES(Research and Development Partnership for Next Generation Technology of Marine Resources Survey) is one of the private union participated the SIP organized four Inc.(JAPAX, JGI, NSENGI, and MMTEC) aimed at construction of "Multi-stage and integrated approach for SMSs exploration" through the development of upgradable and effectual geophysical exploration methods on seismic and electric-magnetic methods, and combination of the known exploration tools and systems. In this presentation, we introduce some results obtained from two research cruise (JM14-01 and JM14-02) on the known seafloor hydrothermal

  6. Were the Trænadjupet and Nyk Slides multi-staged?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allin, Joshua; Mozzato, Alessandro; Tappin, David; Talling, Peter; Hunt, James

    2016-04-01

    Submarine landslides originating from active and extinct trough mouth fans are some of the largest single mass movements evident on Earth. These landslides are capable of damaging offshore infrastructure and can also trigger far-reaching tsunamis. For these reasons understanding the timing, dynamics, and triggering mechanisms of large submarine landslides is important for regional geohazard assessment. The Trænadjupet Slide occurred 4,000 ca. years ago and originated from the Trænadjupet paleo-ice stream on the Central Norwegian margin. The Trænadjupet Slide partially buried the deposits of a previous slide originating from the same section of the Norwegian margin; the Nyk Slide, which occurred at 16,000 ca years ago. Although the Trænadjupet Slide had an estimated volume of 900 km3 and originated from a shallow water depth, it does not appear to have triggered a tsunami. This is in contrast to the comparably-sized Storegga Slide, which produced a tsunami that devastated coastal areas as far away as Scotland. The apparent absence of a tsunami suggests that the failure dynamics for the Trænadjupet slide were different to that of other large slides along the Norwegian Margin. The deposits of both the Trænadjupet and Nyk Slides consist of several blocky lobes extending out into the Lofoten Basin. The lobate morphology of the deposits may imply that both slides occurred in a number of different and possibly temporally-disparate stages. Importantly, multi-staged failures have a much lower tsunamigenic potential due to the lower initial volume displacement. These staggered failures consisting of smaller sediment volumes might explain why no contemporaneous onshore tsunami deposits are found on nearby coastlines, particularly in the case of the post-glacial Trænadjupet Slide. Here we present a new sediment core dataset collected from the previously un-sampled lobes of the Trænadjupet and Nyk Slides. These cores will help us better characterise the deposit types

  7. Downstream processing of antibodies: single-stage versus multi-stage aqueous two-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Rosa, P A J; Azevedo, A M; Ferreira, I F; Sommerfeld, S; Bäcker, W; Aires-Barros, M R

    2009-12-11

    Single-stage and multi-stage strategies have been evaluated and compared for the purification of human antibodies using liquid-liquid extraction in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) composed of polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG 3350), dextran, and triethylene glycol diglutaric acid (TEG-COOH). The performance of single-stage extraction systems was firstly investigated by studying the effect of pH, TEG-COOH concentration and volume ratio on the partitioning of the different components of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells supernatant. It was observed that lower pH values and high TEG-COOH concentrations favoured the selective extraction of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) to the PEG-rich phase. Higher recovery yields, purities and percentage of contaminants removal were always achieved in the presence of the ligand, TEG-COOH. The extraction of IgG could be enhanced using higher volume ratios, however with a significant decrease in both purity and percentage of contaminants removal. The best single-stage extraction conditions were achieved for an ATPS containing 1.3% (w/w) TEG-COOH with a volume ratio of 2.2, which allowed the recovery of 96% of IgG in the PEG-rich phase with a final IgG concentration of 0.21mg/mL, a protein purity of 87% and a total purity of 43%. In order to enhance simultaneously both recovery yield and purity, a four stage cross-current operation was simulated and the corresponding liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data determined. A predicted optimised scheme of a counter-current multi-stage aqueous two-phase extraction was hence described. IgG can be purified in the PEG-rich top phase with a final recovery yield of 95%, a final concentration of 1.04mg/mL and a protein purity of 93%, if a PEG/dextran ATPS containing 1.3% (w/w) TEG-COOH, 5 stages and volume ratio of 0.4 are used. Moreover, according to the LLE data of all CHO cells supernatant components, it was possible to observe that most of the cells supernatant contaminants can be removed during this

  8. Research and Development for Multi-stage and Integrated Approach for Seafloor Massive Sulfides (SMSs) Exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Sumi, Tomonori; Kadoshima, Kazuyuki; Kose, Masami; Lee, Sangkyun; Murakami, Fumitoshi; Tsukahara, Hitoshi; Koizumi, Akira; Koizumi, Yukiko; Ikeda, Makoto; Higashi, Michio

    2016-04-01

    The Cabinet Office, Government Japan started the Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP) in 2014. "Next-generation Ocean Resource Exploration Techniques" is scheduled under SIP from 2014 to 2018. J-MARES (Research and Development Partnership for Next Generation Technology of Marine Resources Survey) participates this program and aims "Multi-stage and integrated approach for SMSs exploration" through the development of highly efficient and cost-effective geophysical exploration methods mainly on seismic and electric-magnetic methods, and combination of the known exploration tools and systems. J-MARES proposed Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) technique as seismic survey. It is one of reflection seismic methods that uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor. It is useful to delineate detailed structures in a spatially-limited area efficiently. JGI, a member of J-MARES, has developed autonomous VCS systems and carried out several VCS surveys in hydrothermal fields in Okinawa Trough. By the VCS survey, the detailed subsurface structure is revealed and velocity is estimated up to 100m. Then we could recognize the buried sulfide deposit beneath the sediments. As for EM survey, the system has been originally developed by Waseda University. The system is towed closely to seafloor using ROV. It is one of Time Domain EM (TDEM) survey systems that consists of a loop coil and a 3 component high-sensitive magnetometer. By analyzing the decay curve of the transient magnetic field induced by the loop coil, the subsurface resistivity structure is estimated. The exploration depth depends on the measurement time and it is designed up to 100m enough for SMS exploration. We carried out the EM surveys around the north mound along VCS survey lines in Izena Hole, Okinawa-trough. The EM survey detects the highly conductive zone around the north mound. The efficiency is 3 times faster than the conventional TDEM measurement on the ocean bottom. Based on

  9. The multi-stage fitness test as a predictor of endurance fitness in wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Tolfrey, Keith

    2008-03-01

    The aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to consider the criterion-related validity of the multi-stage fitness test (MSFT) by comparing the predicted maximal oxygen uptake (.VO(2max)) and distance travelled with peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak)) measured using a wheelchair ergometer (n = 24); and (2) to assess the reliability of the MSFT in a sub-sample of wheelchair athletes (n = 10) measured on two occasions. Twenty-four trained male wheelchair basketball players (mean age 29 years, s = 6) took part in the study. All participants performed a continuous incremental wheelchair ergometer test to volitional exhaustion to determine .VO(2peak), and the MSFT on an indoor wooden basketball court. Mean ergometer .VO(2peak) was 2.66 litres . min(-1) (s = 0.49) and peak heart rate was 188 beats . min(-1) (s = 10). The group mean MSFT distance travelled was 2056 m (s = 272) and mean peak heart rate was 186 beats . min(-1) (s = 11). Low to moderate correlations (rho = 0.39 to 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.02 to 0.69 and 0.23 to 0.80) were found between distance travelled in the MSFT and different expressions of wheelchair ergometer .VO(2peak). There was a mean bias of -1.9 beats . min(-1) (95% CI: -5.9 to 2.0) and standard error of measurement of 6.6 beats . min(-1) (95% CI: 5.4 to 8.8) between the ergometer and MSFT peak heart rates. A similar comparison of ergometer and predicted MSFT .VO(2peak) values revealed a large mean systematic bias of 15.3 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1) (95% CI: 13.2 to 17.4) and standard error of measurement of 3.5 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1) (95% CI: 2.8 to 4.6). Small standard errors of measurement for MSFT distance travelled (86 m; 95% CI: 59 to 157) and MSFT peak heart rate (2.4 beats . min(-1); 95% CI: 1.7 to 4.5) suggest that these variables can be measured reliably. The results suggest that the multi-stage fitness test provides reliable data with this population, but does not fully reflect the aerobic capacity of wheelchair athletes directly.

  10. Suicide Prevention among High School Students: Evaluation of a Nonrandomized Trial of a Multi-Stage Suicide Screening Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torcasso, Gina; Hilt, Lori M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a leading cause of death among youth. Suicide screening programs aim to identify mental health issues and prevent death by suicide. Objective: The present study evaluated outcomes of a multi-stage screening program implemented over 3 school years in a moderately-sized Midwestern high school. Methods: One hundred ninety-three…

  11. Suicide Prevention among High School Students: Evaluation of a Nonrandomized Trial of a Multi-Stage Suicide Screening Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torcasso, Gina; Hilt, Lori M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a leading cause of death among youth. Suicide screening programs aim to identify mental health issues and prevent death by suicide. Objective: The present study evaluated outcomes of a multi-stage screening program implemented over 3 school years in a moderately-sized Midwestern high school. Methods: One hundred ninety-three…

  12. Hydraulic design to optimize the treatment capacity of Multi-Stage Filtration units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushila, C. N.; Ochieng, G. M.; Otieno, F. A. O.; Shitote, S. M.; Sitters, C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Multi-Stage Filtration (MSF) can provide a robust treatment alternative for surface water sources of variable water quality in rural communities at low operation and maintenance costs. MSF is a combination of Slow Sand Filters (SSFs) and Pre-treatment systems. The general objective of this research was to optimize the treatment capacity of MSF. A pilot plant study was undertaken to meet this objective. The pilot plant was monitored for a continuous 98 days from commissioning till the end of the project. Three main stages of MSF namely: The Dynamic Gravel Filter (DGF), Horizontal-flow Roughing Filter (HRF) and SSF were identified, designed and built. The response of the respective MSF units in removal of selected parameters guiding drinking water quality such as microbiological (Faecal and Total coliform), Suspended Solids, Turbidity, PH, Temperature, Iron and Manganese was investigated. The benchmark was the Kenya Bureau (KEBS) and World Health Organization (WHO) Standards for drinking water quality. With respect to microbiological raw water quality improvement, MSF units achieved on average 98% Faecal and 96% Total coliform removal. Results obtained indicate that implementation of MSF in rural communities has the potential to increase access to portable water to the rural populace with a probable consequent decrease in waterborne diseases. With a reduced down time due to illness, more time would be spent in undertaking other economic activities.

  13. Low temperature difference thermoacoustic prime mover with asymmetric multi-stage loop configuration.

    PubMed

    Jin, T; Yang, R; Wang, Y; Feng, Y; Tang, K

    2017-08-09

    Environmentally friendly and low-cost technologies to recover low-grade heat source into usable energy can contribute to ease the energy shortage. Thermoacoustic technology is expected as one promising approach in this ascendant field. In this work, the multi-stage looped thermoacoustic prime movers with asymmetric configuration, which can provide travelling-wave resonator and appropriate acoustic field for efficient regenerator, have been proposed and experimentally studied. The presented looped thermoacoustic prime movers can start to oscillate with quite low temperature difference along the regenerator. The lowest onset temperature difference obtained in the experiments is only 17 °C (the corresponding heating temperature is 29 °C), which can be achieved in both three-stage and four-stage looped thermoacoustic prime movers, with CO2 of 1 MPa or 1.5 MPa as the working fluid. An electric generator driven by a three-stage looped thermoacoustic prime mover with low heating temperature was tested to achieve the acoustic to electric conversion.

  14. Lymphoma diagnosis in histopathology using a multi-stage visual learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codella, Noel; Moradi, Mehdi; Matasar, Matt; Sveda-Mahmood, Tanveer; Smith, John R.

    2016-03-01

    This work evaluates the performance of a multi-stage image enhancement, segmentation, and classification approach for lymphoma recognition in hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained histopathology slides of excised human lymph node tissue. In the first stage, the original histology slide undergoes various image enhancement and segmentation operations, creating an additional 5 images for every slide. These new images emphasize unique aspects of the original slide, including dominant staining, staining segmentations, non-cellular groupings, and cellular groupings. For the resulting 6 total images, a collection of visual features are extracted from 3 different spatial configurations. Visual features include the first fully connected layer (4096 dimensions) of the Caffe convolutional neural network trained from ImageNet data. In total, over 200 resultant visual descriptors are extracted for each slide. Non-linear SVMs are trained over each of the over 200 descriptors, which are then input to a forward stepwise ensemble selection that optimizes a late fusion sum of logistically normalized model outputs using local hill climbing. The approach is evaluated on a public NIH dataset containing 374 images representing 3 lymphoma conditions: chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), follicular lymphoma (FL), and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Results demonstrate a 38.4% reduction in residual error over the current state-of-art on this dataset.

  15. Multi-Stage Metering Mechanism for Transplanting of Vegetable Seedlings in Paper Pots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandede, B. M.; Raheman, H.

    2015-12-01

    A multi-stage rotating cup type metering mechanism was developed for transplanting of vegetable seedlings of tomato, brinjal and chili raised in paper pots. The developed setup consisted of a seedling feeding wheel, metering wheel, fixed slotted plate, seedling delivery tube, furrow opener, furrow closer and a power transmission system. Its evaluation was carried out with pot seedlings of tomato, brinjal and chili of 8-11 cm height at five forward speeds (0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 2.2 and 3.2 km/h) and two plant spacings (45 and 60 cm) in controlled soil bin condition. The mean values of feeding efficiency, conveying efficiency, planting efficiency and overall efficiency of the multistage metering unit were observed to be higher than 90 % for forward speeds of 0.6 to 2.2 km/h. With further increase in speed to 3.2 km/h, the feeding and conveying efficiency were observed to be higher than 90 %, whereas, the planting efficiency drastically reduced to around 50 % due to the problem in getting the pot seedlings vertically in the furrow. Also the seedlings were falling into the furrow at an angle greater than 70° to the vertical, hence not suitable for transplanting.

  16. Short-Term Multi-Stage Stochastic Optimization of Hydropower Reservoirs Under Meteorological Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanenberg, D.; Naumann, S.; Allen, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hydroelectric power systems are characterized by variability and uncertainty in yield and water resources obligations. Market volatility and the growing number of operational constraints for flood control, navigation, environmental obligations and ancillary services (including load balancing requirements for renewable resources) further the need to quantify sources of uncertainty. This research presents an integrated framework to handle several sources of uncertainty. Main focus is on the meteorological forecast uncertainty based on deterministic and probabilistic Numerical Weather Predictions (NWP), its consistent propagation through load and streamflow forecasts, and the generation of scenario trees with novel multi-dimensional distance metrics. The scenario trees enable us to extend a deterministic optimization setup to a multi-stage stochastic optimization approach as the mathematical formulation of the short-term system management. The Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS), managed by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, serves as a large-scale test case for the application of the new framework. We proof the feasibility of the new approach and verify the operational applicability within a real-time environment.

  17. A multi-stage genome-wide association study of bladder cancer identifies multiple susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Nathaniel; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Malats, Nuria; Wu, Xifeng; Figueroa, Jonine; Real, Francisco X; Van Den Berg, David; Matullo, Giuseppe; Baris, Dalsu; Thun, Michael; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Vineis, Paolo; De Vivo, Immaculata; Albanes, Demetrius; Purdue, Mark P; Rafnar, Thorunn; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Kiltie, Anne E; Cussenot, Olivier; Golka, Klaus; Kumar, Rajiv; Taylor, Jack A; Mayordomo, Jose I; Jacobs, Kevin B; Kogevinas, Manolis; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Zhaoming; Fu, Yi-Ping; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Burdette, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Wheeler, William; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R; Schned, Alan; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Eric J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Cortessis, Victoria K; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Pike, Malcolm C; Stern, Mariana C; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hunter, David; McGrath, Monica; Dinney, Colin P; Czerniak, Bogdan; Chen, Meng; Yang, Hushan; Vermeulen, Sita H; Aben, Katja K; Witjes, J Alfred; Makkinje, Remco R; Sulem, Patrick; Besenbacher, Soren; Stefansson, Kari; Riboli, Elio; Brennan, Paul; Panico, Salvatore; Navarro, Carmen; Allen, Naomi E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Canzian, Federico; Ljungberg, Borje; Tjonneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Bishop, David T; Teo, Mark T W; Knowles, Margaret A; Guarrera, Simonetta; Polidoro, Silvia; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Allione, Alessandra; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G; Dietrich, Holger; Fletcher, Tony; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Bolick, Sophia C E; Godfrey, Ashley; Xu, Zongli; Sanz-Velez, José I; García-Prats, María D; Sanchez, Manuel; Valdivia, Gabriel; Porru, Stefano; Benhamou, Simone; Hoover, Robert N; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Silverman, Debra T; Chanock, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a multi-stage, genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer with a primary scan of 589,299 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3,532 cases and 5,120 controls of European descent (5 studies) followed by a replication strategy, which included 8,381 cases and 48,275 controls (16 studies). In a combined analysis, we identified three new regions associated with bladder cancer on chromosomes 22q13.1, 19q12 and 2q37.1; rs1014971, (P=8×10−12) maps to a non-genic region of chromosome 22q13.1; rs8102137 (P=2×10−11) on 19q12 maps to CCNE1; and rs11892031 (P=1×10−7) maps to the UGT1A cluster on 2q37.1. We confirmed four previous GWAS associations on chromosomes 3q28, 4p16.3, 8q24.21 and 8q24.3, validated previous candidate associations for the GSTM1 deletion (P=4×10−11) and a tag SNP for NAT2 acetylation status (P=4×10−11), as well as demonstrated smoking interactions with both regions. Our findings on common variants associated with bladder cancer risk should provide new insights into mechanisms of carcinogenesis. PMID:20972438

  18. Design of optimally smoothing multi-stage schemes for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Leer, Bram; Tai, Chang-Hsien; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, a method is developed for designing multi-stage schemes that give optimal damping of high-frequencies for a given spatial-differencing operator. The objective of the method is to design schemes that combine well with multi-grid acceleration. The schemes are tested on a nonlinear scalar equation, and compared to Runge-Kutta schemes with the maximum stable time-step. The optimally smoothing schemes perform better than the Runge-Kutta schemes, even on a single grid. The analysis is extended to the Euler equations in one space-dimension by use of 'characteristic time-stepping', which preconditions the equations, removing stiffness due to variations among characteristic speeds. Convergence rates independent of the number of cells in the finest grid are achieved for transonic flow with and without a shock. Characteristic time-stepping is shown to be preferable to local time-stepping, although use of the optimally damping schemes appears to enhance the performance of local time-stepping. The extension of the analysis to the two-dimensional Euler equations is hampered by the lack of a model for characteristic time-stepping in two dimensions. Some results for local time-stepping are presented.

  19. Characteristics of Boundary Layer Transition in a Multi-Stage Low-Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, Dave; Halstead, David E.; Okiishi, Ted

    2007-01-01

    An experimental investigation of boundary layer transition in a multi-stage turbine has been completed using surface-mounted hot-film sensors. Tests were carried out using the two-stage Low Speed Research Turbine of the Aerodynamics Research Laboratory of GE Aircraft Engines. Blading in this facility models current, state-of-the-art low pressure turbine configurations. The instrumentation technique involved arrays of densely-packed hot-film sensors on the surfaces of second stage rotor and nozzle blades. The arrays were located at mid-span on both the suction and pressure surfaces. Boundary layer measurements were acquired over a complete range of relevant Reynolds numbers. Data acquisition capabilities provided means for detailed data interrogation in both time and frequency domains. Data indicate that significant regions of laminar and transitional boundary layer flow exist on the rotor and nozzle suction surfaces. Evidence of relaminarization both near the leading edge of the suction surface and along much of the pressure surface was observed. Measurements also reveal the nature of the turbulent bursts occuring within and between the wake segments convecting through the blade row. The complex character of boundary layer transition resulting from flow unsteadiness due to nozzle/nozzle, rotor/nozzle, and nozzle/rotor wake interactions are elucidated using these data. These measurements underscore the need to provide turbomachinery designers with models of boundary layer transition to facilitate accurate prediction of aerodynamic loss and heat transfer.

  20. Treatment of complex heavy metal wastewater using a multi-staged ferrite process.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yao-Jen; Chang, Chien-Kuei; You, Chen-Feng; Wang, Shan-Li

    2012-03-30

    Complete removal of heavy metal from complex heavy-metal wastewater (CHMW) requires advanced technology. This study investigated the feasibility of a multi-staged ferrite process (MSFP) for treating CHMW, containing Cd, Cu, Pb, Cr, Zn, Ag, Hg, Ni, Sn and Mn. Our experimental results showed that most of the supernatants after conventional single-step ferrite process could conform to the effluent standard of Environmental Protection Administration in Taiwan. However, the sludge could not satisfy the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limits due to high Cd, Cu, and Pb concentrations. The performance of MSFP in removing heavy metals from wastewater was subsequently investigated and the parameters of three treating steps in MSFP were optimized under 70°C and 90°C at pH 9, and 80°C at pH 10. After the three-staged procedures, all heavy metals in supernatant and sludge could fulfill the contamination levels regulated by law. In addition, the sludge generated from the MSFP was examined by XRD and forms a stable spinel structure, which could be effectively separated by external magnetic field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical framework to model temporally resolved multi-stage dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, M N; Bhasin, S; Szafran, A T; Mancini, M A; Jasuja, R

    2012-11-01

    Numerical modeling of steroid hormone signaling presents an exciting challenge involving spatiotemporal coordination of multiple events. Ligand binding in cytoplasm triggers dissociation and/or association of coregulators which subsequently regulate DNA binding and transcriptional activity in nucleus. In order to develop a comprehensive multi-stage model, it is imperative to follow not only the transcriptional outcomes but also the intermediate protein complexes. Accordingly, we developed a software toolkit for simulating complex biochemical pathways as a set of non-linear differential equations in LabVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation and Engineering Workbench, National Instruments, Austin, TX) environment. The toolkit is visual, highly modular, loosely coupled with the rest of LabVIEW, scalable and extensible. The toolkit can be used to develop and validate biochemical models and estimate model parameters from existing experimental data. We illustrate the application of the toolkit for simulation of steroid hormone response in cells, and demonstrate how the toolkit can be employed for other biological and chemical systems as well. The software module presented here can be used stand-alone as well as built into data collection and analysis applications.

  2. A Multi-stage Method to Extract Road from High Resolution Satellite Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijian, Huang; Zhang, Jinfang; Xu, Fanjiang

    2014-03-01

    Extracting road information from high-resolution satellite images is complex and hardly achieves by exploiting only one or two modules. This paper presents a multi-stage method, consisting of automatic information extraction and semi-automatic post-processing. The Multi-scale Enhancement algorithm enlarges the contrast of human-made structures with the background. The Statistical Region Merging segments images into regions, whose skeletons are extracted and pruned according to geometry shape information. Setting the start and the end skeleton points, the shortest skeleton path is constructed as a road centre line. The Bidirectional Adaptive Smoothing technique smoothens the road centre line and adjusts it to right position. With the smoothed line and its average width, a Buffer algorithm reconstructs the road region easily. Seen from the last results, the proposed method eliminates redundant non-road regions, repairs incomplete occlusions, jumps over complete occlusions, and reserves accurate road centre lines and neat road regions. During the whole process, only a few interactions are needed.

  3. Multi-Stage Feature Selection Based Intelligent Classifier for Classification of Incipient Stage Fire in Building

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Allan Melvin; Zakaria, Ammar; Mad Saad, Shaharil; Md Shakaff, Ali Yeon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an early fire detection algorithm has been proposed based on low cost array sensing system, utilising off- the shelf gas sensors, dust particles and ambient sensors such as temperature and humidity sensor. The odour or “smellprint” emanated from various fire sources and building construction materials at early stage are measured. For this purpose, odour profile data from five common fire sources and three common building construction materials were used to develop the classification model. Normalised feature extractions of the smell print data were performed before subjected to prediction classifier. These features represent the odour signals in the time domain. The obtained features undergo the proposed multi-stage feature selection technique and lastly, further reduced by Principal Component Analysis (PCA), a dimension reduction technique. The hybrid PCA-PNN based approach has been applied on different datasets from in-house developed system and the portable electronic nose unit. Experimental classification results show that the dimension reduction process performed by PCA has improved the classification accuracy and provided high reliability, regardless of ambient temperature and humidity variation, baseline sensor drift, the different gas concentration level and exposure towards different heating temperature range. PMID:26797617

  4. Aerodynamic Optimization Design of Multi-stage Turbine Using the Continuous Adjoint Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Chen, Jiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper develops a continuous adjoint formulation for the aerodynamic shape design of a turbine in a multi-stage environment based on S2 surface governed by the Euler equations with source terms. First, given the general expression of the objective function, the adjoint equations and their boundary conditions are derived by introducing the adjoint variable vectors. Then, the final expression of the objective function gradient only includes the terms pertinent to the physical shape variations. The adjoint system is solved numerically by a finite-difference method with the Jameson spatial scheme employing first and third order dissipative flux and the time-marching is conducted by Runge-Kutta time method. Integrating the blade stagger angles, stacking lines and passage perturbation parameterization with the Quasi-Newton method of BFGS, a gradient-based aerodynamic optimization design system is constructed. Finally, the application of the adjoint method is validated through the blade and passage optimization of a 2-stage turbine with an objective function of entropy generation. The efficiency increased by 0.37% with the deviations of the mass flow rate and the pressure ratio within 1% via the optimization, which demonstrates the capability of the gradient-based system for turbine aerodynamic design.

  5. A multi-stage anti-predator response increases information on predation risk.

    PubMed

    Hemmi, Jan M; Pfeil, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Optimal escape theory generally assumes that animals have accurate information about predator distance and direction of approach. To what degree such information is available depends not only on the prey's sensory capabilities but also on its behaviour. The structure of behaviour can strongly constrain or support the gathering of information. The ability of animals to collect and process information is therefore an important factor shaping predator avoidance strategies. Fiddler crabs, like many prey animals, escape predators in a multi-step sequence. In their initial response, they do not have accurate information about a predator's distance and approach trajectory and are forced to base their response decision on incomplete information that is not strictly correlated with risk. We show here that fiddler crabs gather qualitatively different visual information during successive stages of their escape sequence. This suggests that multi-stage anti-predator behaviours serve not only to successively reduce risk but also to increase the quality of information with regards to the actual risk. There are countless reasons why prey animals are not able to accurately assess risk. By concentrating on sensory limitations, we can quantify such information deficits and investigate how improving risk assessment helps prey optimise the balance between predation risk and escape costs.

  6. Transport line for a multi-staged laser-plasma acceleration: DACTOMUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancé, Antoine; Delferrière, Olivier; Schwindling, Jérôme; Bruni, Christelle; Delerue, Nicolas; Specka, Arnd; Cros, Brgitte; Maynard, Gillies; Paradkar, Bhooshan S.; Mora, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Laser-plasma acceleration is one of the most promising techniques to reach very high acceleration gradients up to a few hundreds of GeV/m. In order to push this acceleration scheme in the domain of the very high energies, the CILEX project was launched with the laser APOLLON. One of the main topics of this project is to study multi-staged acceleration. It consists in generating and pre-accelerating electrons in a first laser-plasma stage, to transport them up to a second stage where the electrons are accelerated again thanks to another laser pulse. The DACTOMUS project, based on a collaboration CEA-IRFU, CEA-IRAMIS, LAL, LPGP, LULI and LLR, aims at the study and realization of such a transfer line between these two stages. Firstly, a prototype will be developed and tested by the groups of CEA-IRAMIS-SPAM, LPGP, and LULI on the UHI100 facility (CEA-SPAM). This collaboration must enable to realize the first acceleration stage. For the transport line prototype, the main difficulties are to realize a very compact and energy accepting line with diagnostics to characterize the electron beam. We will present here the optics of this line, its performances and the inserted diagnostics.

  7. Rigging Test Bed Development for Validation of Multi-Stage Decelerator Extractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, Sivan J.; Gallon, John C.; Adams, Douglas S.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator project is developing new decelerator systems for Mars entry which would include testing with a Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle. One of the decelerator systems being developed is a large supersonic ringsail parachute. Due to the configuration of the vehicle it is not possible to deploy the parachute with a mortar which would be the preferred method for a spacecraft in a supersonic flow. Alternatively, a multi-stage extraction process using a ballute as a pilot is being developed for the test vehicle. The Rigging Test Bed is a test venue being constructed to perform verification and validation of this extraction process. The test bed consists of a long pneumatic piston device capable of providing a constant force simulating the ballute drag force during the extraction events. The extraction tests will take place both inside a high-bay for frequent tests of individual extraction stages and outdoors using a mobile hydraulic crane for complete deployment tests from initial pack pull out to canopy extraction. These tests will measure line tensions and use photogrammetry to track motion of the elements involved. The resulting data will be used to verify packing and rigging as well, as validate models and identify potential failure modes in order to finalize the design of the extraction system.

  8. Rigging Test Bed Enables Development of Multi-Stage Decelerator Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, Sivan J.; Brandeau, Erich J.; Gallon, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project developed a Parachute Deployment System (PDS) for use on its Supersonic Flight Dynamics Tests (SFDT). The PDS involves a multi-stage pilot driven extraction of a supersonic parachute. The uncertainties and complexities of developing the design for the lines and rigging of the PDS were addressed through testing in the Rigging Test Bed (RTB). The RTB provided a facility capable of simulating a variety of extraction scenarios with full scale hardware on the ground. Through more than 100 tests conducted in the facility, a wealth of data and experience were gained that fueled the PDS development. The utility of this testing and the lessons learned are presented in this paper. The goal is to inform the development of similar systems in the future and highlight the value and flexibility this type of testing offers rapid hardware development. The RTB provided a great compliment to the analytical models greatly compressing what would have otherwise been a very lengthy analytical effort or potentially much expanded flight test campaign.

  9. Variation transmission model for setting acceptance criteria in a multi-staged pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Montes, Richard O

    2012-03-01

    Pharmaceutical manufacturing processes consist of a series of stages (e.g., reaction, workup, isolation) to generate the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Outputs at intermediate stages (in-process control) and API need to be controlled within acceptance criteria to assure final drug product quality. In this paper, two methods based on tolerance interval to derive such acceptance criteria will be evaluated. The first method is serial worst case (SWC), an industry risk minimization strategy, wherein input materials and process parameters of a stage are fixed at their worst-case settings to calculate the maximum level expected from the stage. This maximum output then becomes input to the next stage wherein process parameters are again fixed at worst-case setting. The procedure is serially repeated throughout the process until the final stage. The calculated limits using SWC can be artificially high and may not reflect the actual process performance. The second method is the variation transmission (VT) using autoregressive model, wherein variation transmitted up to a stage is estimated by accounting for the recursive structure of the errors at each stage. Computer simulations at varying extent of variation transmission and process stage variability are performed. For the scenarios tested, VT method is demonstrated to better maintain the simulated confidence level and more precisely estimate the true proportion parameter than SWC. Real data examples are also presented that corroborate the findings from the simulation. Overall, VT is recommended for setting acceptance criteria in a multi-staged pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

  10. A Multi-Stage Reverse Logistics Network Problem by Using Hybrid Priority-Based Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Gen, Mitsuo; Rhee, Kyong-Gu

    Today remanufacturing problem is one of the most important problems regarding to the environmental aspects of the recovery of used products and materials. Therefore, the reverse logistics is gaining become power and great potential for winning consumers in a more competitive context in the future. This paper considers the multi-stage reverse Logistics Network Problem (m-rLNP) while minimizing the total cost, which involves reverse logistics shipping cost and fixed cost of opening the disassembly centers and processing centers. In this study, we first formulate the m-rLNP model as a three-stage logistics network model. Following for solving this problem, we propose a Genetic Algorithm pri (GA) with priority-based encoding method consisting of two stages, and introduce a new crossover operator called Weight Mapping Crossover (WMX). Additionally also a heuristic approach is applied in the 3rd stage to ship of materials from processing center to manufacturer. Finally numerical experiments with various scales of the m-rLNP models demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach by comparing with the recent researches.

  11. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry utilizing multi-stage fragmentation for the identification of oxysterols.

    PubMed

    Karu, Kersti; Hornshaw, Martin; Woffendin, Gary; Bodin, Karl; Hamberg, Mats; Alvelius, Gunvor; Sjövall, Jan; Turton, John; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J

    2007-04-01

    In humans, the brain accounts for about 20% of the body's free cholesterol, most of which is synthesized de novo in brain. To maintain cholesterol balance throughout life, cholesterol becomes metabolized to 24S-hydroxycholesterol, principally in neurons. In mouse, rat, and probably human, metabolism to 24S-hydroxycholesterol accounts for about 50% of cholesterol turnover; however, the route by which the remainder is turned over has yet to be elucidated. Here, we describe a novel liquid chromatography (LC) multi-stage fragmentation mass spectrometry (MS(n)) methodology for the identification, with high sensitivity (low pg), of cholesterol metabolites in rat brain. The methodology includes derivatization to enhance ionization, exact mass analysis at high resolution to identify potential metabolites, and LC-MS(n) (n=3) to allow their characterization. 24S-hydroxycholesterol was confirmed as a major oxysterol in rat brain, and other oxysterols identified for the first time in brain included 24,25-, 24,27-, 25,27-, 6,24,- 7alpha,25-, and 7alpha,27-dihydroxycholesterols. In addition, 3beta-hydroxy-5-oxo-5,6-secocholestan-6-al and its aldol, two molecules linked to amyloidogenesis of proteins, were characterized in rat brain.

  12. Vibration-based angular speed estimation for multi-stage wind turbine gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Cédric; Leclère, Quentin; Antoni, Jérôme; Guillaume, Patrick; Helsen, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Most processing tools based on frequency analysis of vibration signals are only applicable for stationary speed regimes. Speed variation causes the spectral content to smear, which encumbers most conventional fault detection techniques. To solve the problem of non-stationary speed conditions, the instantaneous angular speed (IAS) is estimated. Wind turbine gearboxes however are typically multi-stage gearboxes, consisting of multiple shafts, rotating at different speeds. Fitting a sensor (e.g. a tachometer) to every single stage is not always feasible. As such there is a need to estimate the IAS of every single shaft based on the vibration signals measured by the accelerometers. This paper investigates the performance of the multi-order probabilistic approach for IAS estimation on experimental case studies of wind turbines. This method takes into account the meshing orders of the gears present in the system and has the advantage that a priori it is not necessary to associate harmonics with a certain periodic mechanical event, which increases the robustness of the method. It is found that the MOPA has the potential to easily outperform standard band-pass filtering techniques for speed estimation. More knowledge of the gearbox kinematics is beneficial for the MOPA performance, but even with very little knowledge about the meshing orders, the MOPA still performs sufficiently well to compete with the standard speed estimation techniques. This observation is proven on two different data sets, both originating from vibration measurements on the gearbox housing of a wind turbine.

  13. Multi-stage robust scheme for citrus identification from high resolution airborne images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorós-López, Julia; Izquierdo Verdiguier, Emma; Gómez-Chova, Luis; Muñoz-Marí, Jordi; Zoilo Rodríguez-Barreiro, Jorge; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Calpe-Maravilla, Javier

    2008-10-01

    Identification of land cover types is one of the most critical activities in remote sensing. Nowadays, managing land resources by using remote sensing techniques is becoming a common procedure to speed up the process while reducing costs. However, data analysis procedures should satisfy the accuracy figures demanded by institutions and governments for further administrative actions. This paper presents a methodological scheme to update the citrus Geographical Information Systems (GIS) of the Comunidad Valenciana autonomous region, Spain). The proposed approach introduces a multi-stage automatic scheme to reduce visual photointerpretation and ground validation tasks. First, an object-oriented feature extraction process is carried out for each cadastral parcel from very high spatial resolution (VHR) images (0.5m) acquired in the visible and near infrared. Next, several automatic classifiers (decision trees, multilayer perceptron, and support vector machines) are trained and combined to improve the final accuracy of the results. The proposed strategy fulfills the high accuracy demanded by policy makers by means of combining automatic classification methods with visual photointerpretation available resources. A level of confidence based on the agreement between classifiers allows us an effective management by fixing the quantity of parcels to be reviewed. The proposed methodology can be applied to similar problems and applications.

  14. Multi-stage approach for structural damage detection problem using basis pursuit and particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerist, Saleheh; Maheri, Mahmoud R.

    2016-12-01

    In order to solve structural damage detection problem, a multi-stage method using particle swarm optimization is presented. First, a new spars recovery method, named Basis Pursuit (BP), is utilized to preliminarily identify structural damage locations. The BP method solves a system of equations which relates the damage parameters to the structural modal responses using the sensitivity matrix. Then, the results of this stage are subsequently enhanced to the exact damage locations and extents using the PSO search engine. Finally, the search space is reduced by elimination of some low damage variables using micro search (MS) operator embedded in the PSO algorithm. To overcome the noise present in structural responses, a method known as Basis Pursuit De-Noising (BPDN) is also used. The efficiency of the proposed method is investigated by three numerical examples: a cantilever beam, a plane truss and a portal plane frame. The frequency response is used to detect damage in the examples. The simulation results demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method in detecting multiple damage cases and exhibit its robustness regarding noise and its advantages compared to other reported solution algorithms.

  15. Rigging Test Bed Development for Validation of Multi-Stage Decelerator Extractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, Sivan J.; Gallon, John C.; Adams, Douglas S.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator project is developing new decelerator systems for Mars entry which would include testing with a Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle. One of the decelerator systems being developed is a large supersonic ringsail parachute. Due to the configuration of the vehicle it is not possible to deploy the parachute with a mortar which would be the preferred method for a spacecraft in a supersonic flow. Alternatively, a multi-stage extraction process using a ballute as a pilot is being developed for the test vehicle. The Rigging Test Bed is a test venue being constructed to perform verification and validation of this extraction process. The test bed consists of a long pneumatic piston device capable of providing a constant force simulating the ballute drag force during the extraction events. The extraction tests will take place both inside a high-bay for frequent tests of individual extraction stages and outdoors using a mobile hydraulic crane for complete deployment tests from initial pack pull out to canopy extraction. These tests will measure line tensions and use photogrammetry to track motion of the elements involved. The resulting data will be used to verify packing and rigging as well, as validate models and identify potential failure modes in order to finalize the design of the extraction system.

  16. Comparison of multi-arm multi-stage design and adaptive randomization in platform clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianchang; Bunn, Veronica

    2017-03-01

    Platforms trials are clinical trials that allow for concurrent evaluations of multiple treatments, thus allowing for more efficient and ethical studies compared to traditional two-arm trials. Conventional group-sequential multi-arm multi-stage (MAMS) designs use pre-specified stopping boundaries and treatment selection rules to determine if experimental treatments should be dropped. Flexible MAMS designs allow for interim modifications to the design plan without compromising error rates. Bayesian response adaptive randomization (BRAR) designs increase patient allocation to treatment arms that are performing well during the course of the trial. In this paper, we compare these two major methods and their extensions under several scenarios in the platform trials setting. Results show that BRAR and flexible MAMS designs have comparable power and type 1 error rate under varying simulated scenarios, allowing for addition of flexible treatment selection. BRAR outperforms flexible MAMS when there is a single effective treatment. Flexible MAMS designs are more efficient compared to BRAR when there are no effective treatments. BRAR performance increases as the probability of a treatment arm being dropped increases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Catalytic multi-stage process for hydroconversion and refining hydrocarbon feeds

    DOEpatents

    Comolli, Alfred G.; Lee, Lap-Keung

    2001-01-01

    A multi-stage catalytic hydrogenation and hydroconversion process for heavy hydrocarbon feed materials such as coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and plastic waste materials. In the process, the feedstock is reacted in a first-stage, back-mixed catalytic reactor with a highly dispersed iron-based catalyst having a powder, gel or liquid form. The reactor effluent is pressure-reduced, vapors and light distillate fractions are removed overhead, and the heavier liquid fraction is fed to a second stage back-mixed catalytic reactor. The first and second stage catalytic reactors are operated at 700-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure and 20-80 lb./hr per ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The vapor and light distillates liquid fractions removed from both the first and second stage reactor effluent streams are combined and passed to an in-line, fixed-bed catalytic hydrotreater for heteroatom removal and for producing high quality naphtha and mid-distillate or a full-range distillate product. The remaining separator bottoms liquid fractions are distilled at successive atmospheric and vacuum pressures, low and intermediate-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products are withdrawn, and heavier distillate fractions are recycled and further upgraded to provide additional low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products. This catalytic multistage hydrogenation process provides improved flexibility for hydroprocessing the various carbonaceous feedstocks and adjusting to desired product structures and for improved economy of operations.

  18. The proteasome of malaria parasites: A multi-stage drug target for chemotherapeutic intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Aminake, Makoah Nigel; Arndt, Hans-Dieter; Pradel, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system serves as a regulated protein degradation pathway in eukaryotes, and is involved in many cellular processes featuring high protein turnover rates, such as cell cycle control, stress response and signal transduction. In malaria parasites, protein quality control is potentially important because of the high replication rate and the rapid transformations of the parasite during life cycle progression. The proteasome is the core of the degradation pathway, and is a major proteolytic complex responsible for the degradation and recycling of non-functional ubiquitinated proteins. Annotation of the genome for Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria tropica, revealed proteins with similarity to human 26S proteasome subunits. In addition, a bacterial ClpQ/hslV threonine peptidase-like protein was identified. In recent years several independent studies indicated an essential function of the parasite proteasome for the liver, blood and transmission stages. In this review, we compile evidence for protein recycling in Plasmodium parasites and discuss the role of the 26S proteasome as a prospective multi-stage target for antimalarial drug discovery programs. PMID:24533266

  19. Investigation and modeling of bubble-bubble interaction effect in homogeneous bubbly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2010-06-01

    The effect of bubble-bubble interaction in homogeneous bubbly flow is investigated by direct numerical simulation and a bubbly mixture model for bubbly shock flows at void fraction 0.4%-13%. It is found that the bubble-bubble interaction effect is significant at void fraction higher than O(1)% and decreases the amplitude and wavelength of the macroscale oscillations in the dispersive shock structure. For the modeling of bubble-bubble interaction effect, the locally volume averaged Rayleigh-Plesset (LVARP) equation, which is an extended version of the original Rayleigh-Plesset equation, is proposed in the present study. The results of bubbly mixture model using LVARP agree well with the direct simulation results for bubbly shock flows at void fraction up to 13%. The bubble-bubble interaction in nonuniform bubbly flows is also investigated in bubbly flows with randomized initial bubble positions. It is found that the LVARP model predicts the ensemble averaged behavior with reasonable accuracy.

  20. Gas bubble dynamics in soft materials.

    PubMed

    Solano-Altamirano, J M; Malcolm, John D; Goldman, Saul

    2015-01-07

    Epstein and Plesset's seminal work on the rate of gas bubble dissolution and growth in a simple liquid is generalized to render it applicable to a gas bubble embedded in a soft elastic solid. Both the underlying diffusion equation and the expression for the gas bubble pressure were modified to allow for the non-zero shear modulus of the medium. The extension of the diffusion equation results in a trivial shift (by an additive constant) in the value of the diffusion coefficient, and does not change the form of the rate equations. But the use of a generalized Young-Laplace equation for the bubble pressure resulted in significant differences on the dynamics of bubble dissolution and growth, relative to an inviscid liquid medium. Depending on whether the salient parameters (solute concentration, initial bubble radius, surface tension, and shear modulus) lead to bubble growth or dissolution, the effect of allowing for a non-zero shear modulus in the generalized Young-Laplace equation is to speed up the rate of bubble growth, or to reduce the rate of bubble dissolution, respectively. The relation to previous work on visco-elastic materials is discussed, as is the connection of this work to the problem of Decompression Sickness (specifically, "the bends"). Examples of tissues to which our expressions can be applied are provided. Also, a new phenomenon is predicted whereby, for some parameter values, a bubble can be metastable and persist for long times, or it may grow, when embedded in a homogeneous under-saturated soft elastic medium.

  1. Brut: Automatic bubble classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Christopher; Goodman, Alyssa; Williams, Jonathan; Kendrew, Sarah; Simpson, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Brut, written in Python, identifies bubbles in infrared images of the Galactic midplane; it uses a database of known bubbles from the Milky Way Project and Spitzer images to build an automatic bubble classifier. The classifier is based on the Random Forest algorithm, and uses the WiseRF implementation of this algorithm.

  2. Bubbly Cavitation Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-31

    and 12. Comparison is also made with analytical predictions based on the Rayleigh - Plesset equations . In addition to the single bubble studies, the...bubble maximum size distributions and those predicted using the measured nuclei number distribution and the Rayleigh - Plesset model for the bubble dyna

  3. Multi-stage magma migration across the North Tanzanian Divergence zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mana, S.; Carr, M. J.; Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    the northward component of magma migration. The profile produced by plotting the cumulative NTD magmatic events against time reveals consecutive sharp changes in slope. This behavior matches the one described for precursory phenomena by Cornelius & Voight (1995), in which the onset of a volcanic eruption is derived from the time of failure implied by an accelerating rate of deformation. According to these authors, this method can be applied to any parameter describing accelerating deformation of the volcanic system. We argue that the increase in magmatic activity observed in the NTD at ~2.3Ma marks the mechanical deformation at the inception of a main rifting event. The later changes in slope underline subsequent pulses of magmatic activity and possibly of rifting. Evidences for multi-stage extensional faulting support the episodic development of the rift in the NTD. The ages of the faulting episodes are not well constrained. The earliest extension appeared on the W flank of the Natron basin where ~3Ma old basalts post-date the Oldonyo Ogol fault scarp (K-Ar, Foster et al. 1997). A second episode of extension is locally documented at 1.6Ma in the Olduvai lacustrine area (K-Ar, Le Gall et al. 2008). Therefore, although the overall rift morphology of the NTD is usually assigned to a single major faulting event, dated at 1.2Ma (K-Ar, MacIntyre et al. 1974), the data however suggests a multi-stage development.

  4. Three-dimensional Aerodynamic Instability in Multi-stage Axial Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth (Technical Monitor); Tan, Choon-Sooi

    2003-01-01

    Four separate tasks are reported. The first task: A Computational Model for Short Wavelength Stall Inception and Development In Multi-Stage Compressors; the second task: Three-dimensional Rotating Stall Inception and Effects of Rotating Tip Clearance Asymmetry in Axial Compressors; the third task:Development of an Effective Computational Methodology for Body Force Representation of High-speed Rotor 37; and the fourth task:Development of Circumferential Inlet Distortion through a Representative Eleven Stage High-speed axial compressor. The common theme that threaded throughout these four tasks is the conceptual framework that consists of quantifying flow processes at the fadcompressor blade passage level to define the compressor performance characteristics needed for addressing physical phenomena such compressor aerodynamic instability and compressor response to flow distoriton with length scales larger than compressor blade-to-blade spacing at the system level. The results from these two levels can be synthesized to: (1) simulate compressor aerodynamic instability inception local to a blade rotor tip and its development from a local flow event into the nonlinear limit cycle instability that involves the entire compressor as was demonstrated in the first task; (2) determine the conditions under which compressor stability assessment based on two-dimensional model may not be adequate and the effects of self-induced flow distortion on compressor stability limit as in the second task; (3) quantify multistage compressor response to inlet distortion in stagnation pressure as illustrated in the fourth task; and (4) elucidate its potential applicability for compressor map generation under uniform as well as non-uniform inlet flow given three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solution for each individual blade row as was demonstrated in the third task.

  5. Computational Analyses of Spectral Trees from Electrospray Multi-Stage Mass Spectrometry to Aid Metabolite Identification

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mingshu; Fraser, Karl; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography has become the major technical platform in metabolomics. Aided by peak detection algorithms, the detected signals are characterized by mass-over-charge ratio (m/z) and retention time. Chemical identities often remain elusive for the majority of the signals. Multi-stage mass spectrometry based on electrospray ionization (ESI) allows collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation of selected precursor ions. These fragment ions can assist in structural inference for metabolites of low molecular weight. Computational investigations of fragmentation spectra have increasingly received attention in metabolomics and various public databases house such data. We have developed an R package “iontree” that can capture, store and analyze MS2 and MS3 mass spectral data from high throughput metabolomics experiments. The package includes functions for ion tree construction, an algorithm (distMS2) for MS2 spectral comparison, and tools for building platform-independent ion tree (MS2/MS3) libraries. We have demonstrated the utilization of the package for the systematic analysis and annotation of fragmentation spectra collected in various metabolomics platforms, including direct infusion mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography coupled with either low resolution or high resolution mass spectrometry. Assisted by the developed computational tools, we have demonstrated that spectral trees can provide informative evidence complementary to retention time and accurate mass to aid with annotating unknown peaks. These experimental spectral trees once subjected to a quality control process, can be used for querying public MS2 databases or de novo interpretation. The putatively annotated spectral trees can be readily incorporated into reference libraries for routine identification of metabolites. PMID:24958264

  6. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle; Bagas, Leon; Thomsen, Tonny B.

    2017-03-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland's only operating metalliferous mine until its closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783-1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite-arsenopyrite-sericite-actinolite-pyrrhotite(-chlorite-plagioclase-löllingite-tourmaline-titanite), which is best developed in areas of exceptionally high gold grades. Aplite dykes dated to ca. 1762 Ma cross-cut the gold-quartz veins, providing a minimum age for mineralisation. A hydrothermal calcite-titanite alteration assemblage is dated to ca. 1766 Ma; however, this alteration is highly isolated, and as a result, its field relationships are poorly constrained. The hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation is cut by several generations of ca. 1745-Ma biotite granodiorite accompanied by brittle deformation. A ca. 1745-Ma lower greenschist facies hydrothermal epidote-calcite-zoisite alteration assemblage with numerous accessory minerals forms halos surrounding the late-stage fractures. The contrasting hydrothermal alteration styles at Nalunaq indicate a complex history of exhumation from amphibolite facies conditions to lower greenschist facies conditions in an orogenic belt which resembles modern Phanerozoic orogens.

  7. Seepage flow behaviors of multi-stage fractured horizontal wells in arbitrary shaped shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long; Shan, Bao-Chao; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Liu, Qi-Guo

    2016-10-01

    The horizontal well incorporated with massive hydraulic fracturing has become a key and necessary technology to develop shale gas reservoirs efficiently, and transient pressure analysis is a practical method to evaluate the effectiveness of the fracturing. Until now, however, the related studies on the pressure of such wells have mainly focused on regular outer-boundaries, such as infinite, circular and rectangular boundary shapes, which do not always fulfill the practical conditions and, of course, could cause errors. By extending the boundary element method (BEM) into the application of multi-staged fractured horizontal wells, this paper presents a way of analyzing the transient pressure in arbitrary shaped shale gas reservoirs considering ad-/de-sorption and diffusion of the shale gas with the ‘tri-porosity’ mechanism model. The boundary integral equation can be obtained by coupling the fundamental solution of the Helmholtz equation with the dimensionless diffusivity equation. After discretizing the outer-boundaries and the fractures, the boundary integral equations are linearized and the coefficient matrix of the pressure on the boundaries is assembled, after which bottom-hole pressure can be calculated conveniently. Comparing the BEM solution with semi-analytical solution cases, the accuracy of the new solution can be validated. Then, the characteristic curves of the dimensionless pseudo pressure, as well as its derivative for a well in shale gas reservoirs, are drawn, based on which the parameters’ sensitivity analyses are also conducted. This paper not only enriches the well testing theory and method in shale gas reservoirs, but also provides an effective method to solve problems with complex inner- and outer-boundaries.

  8. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle; Bagas, Leon; Thomsen, Tonny B.

    2016-07-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland's only operating metalliferous mine until its closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783-1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite-arsenopyrite-sericite-actinolite-pyrrhotite(-chlorite-plagioclase-löllingite-tourmaline-titanite), which is best developed in areas of exceptionally high gold grades. Aplite dykes dated to ca. 1762 Ma cross-cut the gold-quartz veins, providing a minimum age for mineralisation. A hydrothermal calcite-titanite alteration assemblage is dated to ca. 1766 Ma; however, this alteration is highly isolated, and as a result, its field relationships are poorly constrained. The hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation is cut by several generations of ca. 1745-Ma biotite granodiorite accompanied by brittle deformation. A ca. 1745-Ma lower greenschist facies hydrothermal epidote-calcite-zoisite alteration assemblage with numerous accessory minerals forms halos surrounding the late-stage fractures. The contrasting hydrothermal alteration styles at Nalunaq indicate a complex history of exhumation from amphibolite facies conditions to lower greenschist facies conditions in an orogenic belt which resembles modern Phanerozoic orogens.

  9. Multi-stage high cell continuous fermentation for high productivity and titer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho Nam; Kim, Nag-Jong; Kang, Jongwon; Jeong, Chang Moon; Choi, Jin-dal-rae; Fei, Qiang; Kim, Byoung Jin; Kwon, Sunhoon; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-05-01

    We carried out the first simulation on multi-stage continuous high cell density culture (MSC-HCDC) to show that the MSC-HCDC can achieve batch/fed-batch product titer with much higher productivity to the fed-batch productivity using published fermentation kinetics of lactic acid, penicillin and ethanol. The system under consideration consists of n-serially connected continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTRs) with either hollow fiber cell recycling or cell immobilization for high cell-density culture. In each CSTR substrate supply and product removal are possible. Penicillin production is severely limited by glucose metabolite repression that requires multi-CSTR glucose feeding. An 8-stage C-HCDC lactic acid fermentation resulted in 212.9 g/L of titer and 10.6 g/L/h of productivity, corresponding to 101 and 429% of the comparable lactic acid fed-batch, respectively. The penicillin production model predicted 149% (0.085 g/L/h) of productivity in 8-stage C-HCDC with 40 g/L of cell density and 289% of productivity (0.165 g/L/h) in 7-stage C-HCDC with 60 g/L of cell density compared with referring batch cultivations. A 2-stage C-HCDC ethanol experimental run showed 107% titer and 257% productivity of the batch system having 88.8 g/L of titer and 3.7 g/L/h of productivity. MSC-HCDC can give much higher productivity than batch/fed-batch system, and yield a several percentage higher titer as well. The productivity ratio of MSC-HCDC over batch/fed-batch system is given as a multiplication of system dilution rate of MSC-HCDC and cycle time of batch/fed-batch system. We suggest MSC-HCDC as a new production platform for various fermentation products including monoclonal antibody.

  10. Episodic, Multi-staged Lithospheric Delamination Responsible for Destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhong, S.

    2013-12-01

    Archean cratons represent the oldest tectonic units on the Earth and most of them are tectonically stable for >3 Ga. The North China Craton (NCC), however, had undergone extensive destruction during the Mesozoic to Cenozoic as seen from surface volcanism, magmatism, and tectonic deformation and geochemical and seismic observations suggesting removal and replacement of thick, old, and fertile cratonic lithosphere with thin, young, and depleted oceanic-type lithosphere [Griffin et al., 1998; Xu, 2001; Menzies et al., 2007; Zhu et al., 2012; Zhang et al., 2012]. Lithospheric delamination has been proposed to explain different episodes of volcanism in the Jurassic [Gao et al., 2004; 2008] and Cretaceous [Yang et al., 2003; Wu et al., 2003] on NCC and hence as a mechanism for destruction of NCC. However, the relatively long period (~100 Myr) of volcanism associated with the destruction of NCC was considered as a challenge to the delamination process [Menzies et al., 2007] which typically lasts for several Myr [Conrad and Molnar, 1999]. Here we show that delamination for cratonic lithosphere with chemically buoyant root and non-Newtonian rheology, different from that for normal lithosphere that was considered in most previous geodynamic studies, is episodic and multi-staged and may last for tens to 100 Myrs. For cratonic lithosphere with non-Newtonian rheology with relatively large chemical buoyancy, the cold, shallow part of the lithosphere goes unstable first, causing significant stirring and mixing of asthenospheric mantle and cratonic lithosphere. This delamination process may explain the main geochemical signatures in the Jurassic and Cretaceous volcanic rocks found in the NCC including their eclogite component [Gao et al., 2004, 2008] and sourcing both cratonic lithosphere and asthenosphere [Zheng et al., 2000]. Subduction process, by increasing tectonic stress and water content, helps reduce the lithospheric viscosity sufficiently to delaminate the entire

  11. Cellular association and assembly of a multi-stage delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Serda, Rita E.; Mack, Aaron; Pulikkathara, Merlyn; Zaske, Ana Maria; Chiappini, Ciro; Fakhoury, Jean; Webb, Douglas; Godin, Biana; Conyers, Jodie L.; Liu, XueWu; Bankson, James A.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The realization that blood-borne delivery systems must overcome a multiplicity of biological barriers has led to the fabrication of a multi-stage delivery system (MDS) designed to temporally release successive stages of particles or agents to conquer sequential barriers with a goal of enhancing delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents to the target site. In its simplest appearance, the MDS is comprised of stage one porous silicon microparticles that function as carriers of second stage nanoparticles. In this study, cellular uptake of non-targeted discoidal silicon microparticles by macrophages was confirmed by electron and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using SPIONs as a model of secondary nanoparticles, successful loading of the porous matrix of silicon microparticles was achieved and retention of the nanoparticles was enhanced by aminosilylation of the loaded microparticle with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The impact of silane concentration and reaction time on the nature of the silane polymer on porous silicon was investigated by AFM and X-ray photoelectron microscopy. Tissue samples from mice intravenously administered the MDS supported co-localization of silicon microparticles and SPIONs across various tissues with enhanced SPION release in spleen, compared to liver and lungs, and enhanced retention of SPIONs following silane capping of the MDS. Phantom models of the SPION-loaded MDS displayed negative contrast in magnetic resonance images. In addition to forming a cap over the silicon pores, the silane polymer provided free amines for antibody conjugation to the microparticles, with both VEGFR-2 and PECAM specific antibodies leading to enhanced endothelial association. This study demonstrates assembly and cellular association of a multi-particle delivery system that is bio-molecularly targeted and has potential for applications in biological imaging. PMID:20517877

  12. Due-date assignment for multi-server multi-stage assembly systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoubi, Saeed

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we attempt to present a constant due-date assignment policy in a multi-server multi-stage assembly system. This system is modelled as a queuing network, where new product orders are entered into the system according to a Poisson process. It is assumed that only one type of product is produced by the production system and multi-servers can be settled in each service station. Each operation of every work is operated at a devoted service station with only one of the servers located at a node of the network based on first come, first served (FCFS) discipline, while the processing times are independent random variables with exponential distributions. It is also assumed that the transport times between each pair of service stations are independent random variables with generalised Erlang distributions. Each product's end result has a penalty cost that is some linear function of its due date and its actual lead time. The due date is calculated by adding a constant to the time that the order enters into the system. Indeed, this constant value is decided at the beginning of the time horizon and is the constant lead time that a product might expect between the time of placing the order and the time of delivery. For computing the due date, we first convert the queuing network into a stochastic network with exponentially distributed arc lengths. Then, by constructing an appropriate finite-state continuous-time Markov model, a system of differential equations is created to find the manufacturing lead-time distribution for any particular product, analytically. Finally, the constant due date for delivery time is obtained by using a linear function of its due date and minimising the expected aggregate cost per product.

  13. Bubble particle heterocoagulation under turbulent conditions.

    PubMed

    Pyke, Brendan; Fornasiero, Daniel; Ralston, John

    2003-09-01

    An analytical model that enables the calculation of the flotation rate constant of particles as a function of particle size with, as input parameters, measurable particle, bubble, and hydrodynamic quantities has been derived. This model includes the frequency of collisions between particles and bubbles as well as their efficiencies of collision, attachment, and stability. The generalized Sutherland equation collision model and the modified Dobby-Finch attachment model developed previously for potential flow conditions were used to calculate the efficiencies of particle-bubble collision and attachment, respectively. The bubble-particle stability efficiency model includes the various forces acting between the bubble and the attached particle, and we demonstrate that it depends mainly on the relative magnitude of particle contact angle and turbulent dissipation energy. The flotation rate constants calculated with these models produced the characteristic shape of the flotation rate constant versus particle size curve, with a maximum appearing at intermediate particle size. The low flotation rate constants of fine and coarse particles result from their low efficiency of collision and low efficiencies of attachment and stability with gas bubbles, respectively. The flotation rate constants calculated with these models were compared with the experimental flotation rate constants of methylated quartz particles with diameters between 8 and 80 micro m interacting with gas bubbles under turbulent conditions in a Rushton flotation cell. Agreement between theory and experiment is satisfactory.

  14. Acoustic bubble traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Reinhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2000-07-01

    A small, oscillating bubble in a liquid can be trapped in the antinode of an acoustic standing wave field. Bubble stability is required for the study of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). The properties of the acoustic resonator are essential for the stable trapping of sonoluminescing bubbles. Resonators can be chosen according to the intended application: size and geometry can be varied in a wide range. In this work, the acoustic responses of different resonators were measured by means of holographic interferometry, hydrophones and a laser vibrometer. Also, high-speed photography was used to observe the bubble dynamics. Several single, stable sonoluminescent bubbles were trapped simultaneously within an acoustic resonator in the pressure antinodes of a higher harmonic mode (few bubble sonoluminescence, FBSL).

  15. Effect of proton-conduction in electrolyte on electric efficiency of multi-stage solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Tachikawa, Yuya; Somekawa, Takaaki; Hatae, Toru; Matsumoto, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Kazunari

    2015-07-28

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising electrochemical devices that enable the highest fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies under high operating temperatures. The concept of multi-stage electrochemical oxidation using SOFCs has been proposed and studied over the past several decades for further improving the electrical efficiency. However, the improvement is limited by fuel dilution downstream of the fuel flow. Therefore, evolved technologies are required to achieve considerably higher electrical efficiencies. Here we present an innovative concept for a critically-high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency of up to 85% based on the lower heating value (LHV), in which a high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation is combined with a proton-conducting solid electrolyte. Switching a solid electrolyte material from a conventional oxide-ion conducting material to a proton-conducting material under the high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation mechanism has proven to be highly advantageous for the electrical efficiency. The DC efficiency of 85% (LHV) corresponds to a net AC efficiency of approximately 76% (LHV), where the net AC efficiency refers to the transmission-end AC efficiency. This evolved concept will yield a considerably higher efficiency with a much smaller generation capacity than the state-of-the-art several tens-of-MW-class most advanced combined cycle (MACC).

  16. Effect of proton-conduction in electrolyte on electric efficiency of multi-stage solid oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Tachikawa, Yuya; Somekawa, Takaaki; Hatae, Toru; Matsumoto, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising electrochemical devices that enable the highest fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies under high operating temperatures. The concept of multi-stage electrochemical oxidation using SOFCs has been proposed and studied over the past several decades for further improving the electrical efficiency. However, the improvement is limited by fuel dilution downstream of the fuel flow. Therefore, evolved technologies are required to achieve considerably higher electrical efficiencies. Here we present an innovative concept for a critically-high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency of up to 85% based on the lower heating value (LHV), in which a high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation is combined with a proton-conducting solid electrolyte. Switching a solid electrolyte material from a conventional oxide-ion conducting material to a proton-conducting material under the high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation mechanism has proven to be highly advantageous for the electrical efficiency. The DC efficiency of 85% (LHV) corresponds to a net AC efficiency of approximately 76% (LHV), where the net AC efficiency refers to the transmission-end AC efficiency. This evolved concept will yield a considerably higher efficiency with a much smaller generation capacity than the state-of-the-art several tens-of-MW-class most advanced combined cycle (MACC). PMID:26218470

  17. Effect of proton-conduction in electrolyte on electric efficiency of multi-stage solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Tachikawa, Yuya; Somekawa, Takaaki; Hatae, Toru; Matsumoto, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Kazunari

    2015-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising electrochemical devices that enable the highest fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiencies under high operating temperatures. The concept of multi-stage electrochemical oxidation using SOFCs has been proposed and studied over the past several decades for further improving the electrical efficiency. However, the improvement is limited by fuel dilution downstream of the fuel flow. Therefore, evolved technologies are required to achieve considerably higher electrical efficiencies. Here we present an innovative concept for a critically-high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency of up to 85% based on the lower heating value (LHV), in which a high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation is combined with a proton-conducting solid electrolyte. Switching a solid electrolyte material from a conventional oxide-ion conducting material to a proton-conducting material under the high-temperature multi-stage electrochemical oxidation mechanism has proven to be highly advantageous for the electrical efficiency. The DC efficiency of 85% (LHV) corresponds to a net AC efficiency of approximately 76% (LHV), where the net AC efficiency refers to the transmission-end AC efficiency. This evolved concept will yield a considerably higher efficiency with a much smaller generation capacity than the state-of-the-art several tens-of-MW-class most advanced combined cycle (MACC).

  18. First demonstration of an emulsion multi-stage shifter for accelerator neutrino experiments in J-PARC T60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, K.; Aoki, S.; Cao, S.; Chikuma, N.; Fukuda, T.; Fukuzawa, Y.; Gonin, M.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hiramoto, A.; Hosomi, F.; Inoh, T.; Iori, S.; Ishiguro, K.; Kawahara, H.; Kim, H.; Kitagawa, N.; Koga, T.; Komatani, R.; Komatsu, M.; Matsushita, A.; Mikado, S.; Minamino, A.; Mizusawa, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuo, T.; Morimoto, Y.; Morishima, K.; Morishita, M.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Nakaya, T.; Nishio, A.; Ogawa, S.; Oshima, H.; Quilain, B.; Rokujo, H.; Sato, O.; Seiya, Y.; Shibuya, H.; Shiraishi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Tada, S.; Takahashi, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2017-06-01

    We describe the first ever implementation of a clock-based, multi-stage emulsion shifter in an accelerator neutrino experiment. The system was installed in the neutrino monitoring building at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex as part of a test experiment, T60, and stable operation was maintained for a total of 126.6 days. By applying time information to emulsion films, various results were obtained. Time resolutions of 5.3-14.7 s were evaluated in an operation spanning 46.9 days (yielding division numbers of 1.4-3.8×105). By using timing and spatial information, reconstruction of coincident events consisting of high-multiplicity and vertex-contained events, including neutrino events, was performed. Emulsion events were matched to events observed by INGRID, one of the on-axis near detectors of the T2K experiment, with high reliability (98.5%), and hybrid analysis of the emulsion and INGRID events was established by means of the multi-stage shifter. The results demonstrate that the multi-stage shifter can feasibly be used in neutrino experiments.

  19. Applications of the Magnetocaloric Effect in Single-Stage, Multi-Stage and Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADR), based on the magnetocaloric effect, are solid-state coolers that were the first to achieve cooling well into the sub-kelvin regime. Although supplanted by more powerful dilution refrigerators in the 1960s, ADRs have experienced a revival due to the needs of the space community for cooling astronomical instruments and detectors to temperatures below 100 mK. The earliest of these were single-stage refrigerators using superfluid helium as a heat sink. Their modest cooling power (<1 µW at 60 mK[1]) was sufficient for the small (6x6) detector arrays[2], but recent advances in arraying and multiplexing technologies[3] are generating a need for higher cooling power (5-10 µW), and lower temperature (<30 mK). Single-stage ADRs have both practical and fundamental limits to their operating range, as mass grows very rapidly as the operating range is expanded. This has led to the development of new architectures that introduce multi-staging as a way to improve operating range, efficiency and cooling power. Multi-staging also enables ADRs to be configured for continuous operation, which greatly improves cooling power per unit mass. This paper reviews the current field of adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, beginning with a description of the magnetocaloric effect and its application in single-stage systems, and then describing the challenges and capabilities of multi-stage and continuous ADRs.

  20. A risk-based interactive multi-stage stochastic programming approach for water resources planning under dual uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Huang, G. H.; Wang, S.; Li, W.; Guan, P. B.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a risk-based interactive multi-stage stochastic programming (RIMSP) approach is proposed through incorporating the fractile criterion method and chance-constrained programming within a multi-stage decision-making framework. RIMSP is able to deal with dual uncertainties expressed as random boundary intervals that exist in the objective function and constraints. Moreover, RIMSP is capable of reflecting dynamics of uncertainties, as well as the trade-off between the total net benefit and the associated risk. A water allocation problem is used to illustrate applicability of the proposed methodology. A set of decision alternatives with different combinations of risk levels applied to the objective function and constraints can be generated for planning the water resources allocation system. The results can help decision makers examine potential interactions between risks related to the stochastic objective function and constraints. Furthermore, a number of solutions can be obtained under different water policy scenarios, which are useful for decision makers to formulate an appropriate policy under uncertainty. The performance of RIMSP is analyzed and compared with an inexact multi-stage stochastic programming (IMSP) method. Results of comparison experiment indicate that RIMSP is able to provide more robust water management alternatives with less system risks in comparison with IMSP.

  1. Single and multi-stage phase demodulation based order-tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Michael D.; Randall, Robert B.

    2014-02-01

    Order-tracking is a method to remove speed fluctuations from a varying frequency signal allowing constant frequency based Machine Condition Monitoring (MCM) analysis techniques to be employed. This paper describes the generalised Phase Demodulation based Order-Tracking (PDOT) methodology whereby the "mapping" between rotation angle and time is obtained by phase demodulation of a reference signal. A variety of reference signal types can be used, including a tachometer, a shaft encoder, or an extracted reference signal from the response data signal itself, but each has different properties, which have to be taken into account. The primary advantage of the PDOT method, as opposed to methods based in the time domain, is that in principle it gives samples of the true relationship between rotation angle and time. For this to be true, however, there has to be no aliasing, in the sense of overlap of sidebands of the order to be demodulated with those of higher orders in the frequency domain. The paper defines the conditions for which this is valid. The PDOT method can be employed using a single stage, or the result improved by using progressive iterations in a multi-stage approach, even in the case of large speed variations, but for the iterations to give an improvement there must be no aliasing at the first stage. Such improvement is useful for some analyses, such as gear diagnostics, but not of much benefit for some others such as bearing diagnostics, where the characteristic frequencies are only stable to about 1-2%. A summary of the basic PDOT method is presented, highlighting the maximum speed variations of approximately ±30% which can be compensated for, and then the generalised PDOT method is presented using a variety of reference signal types and numbers of stages. Multiple experimental examples are presented for different applications of PDOT, including bearing diagnostics and gear diagnostics, in the presence of small to large speed variations, highlighting the

  2. A multi-stage 3-D stress field modelling approach exemplified in the Bavarian Molasse Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Moritz O.; Heidbach, Oliver; Reinecker, John; Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the contemporary in situ stress state is a key issue for safe and sustainable subsurface engineering. However, information on the orientation and magnitudes of the stress state is limited and often not available for the areas of interest. Therefore 3-D geomechanical-numerical modelling is used to estimate the in situ stress state and the distance of faults from failure for application in subsurface engineering. The main challenge in this approach is to bridge the gap in scale between the widely scattered data used for calibration of the model and the high resolution in the target area required for the application. We present a multi-stage 3-D geomechanical-numerical approach which provides a state-of-the-art model of the stress field for a reservoir-scale area from widely scattered data records. Therefore, we first use a large-scale regional model which is calibrated by available stress data and provides the full 3-D stress tensor at discrete points in the entire model volume. The modelled stress state is used subsequently for the calibration of a smaller-scale model located within the large-scale model in an area without any observed stress data records. We exemplify this approach with two-stages for the area around Munich in the German Molasse Basin. As an example of application, we estimate the scalar values for slip tendency and fracture potential from the model results as measures for the criticality of fault reactivation in the reservoir-scale model. The modelling results show that variations due to uncertainties in the input data are mainly introduced by the uncertain material properties and missing SHmax magnitude estimates needed for a more reliable model calibration. This leads to the conclusion that at this stage the model's reliability depends only on the amount and quality of available stress information rather than on the modelling technique itself or on local details of the model geometry. Any improvements in modelling and increases

  3. Instability of a bubble chain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; An, Yu

    2013-05-01

    Based on the theory of shape instability and diffusive instability for single bubbles, we have studied the instability of an individual bubble in a bubble chain and found that its stable area enlarges the narrower the distance between bubbles. The spatial stability of the bubble chain is due to the secondary Bjerknes force between bubbles. Numerical calculations show the tension of the bubble chain varies with bubble distance and maxima appear at certain distances which could correspond to the stable states of the bubble chain.

  4. Oscillating plasma bubbles. I. Basic properties and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2012-08-15

    Plasma bubbles are created in an ambient discharge plasma. A bubble is a plasma volume of typically spherical shape, which is separated from the ambient plasma by a negatively biased grid of high transparency. Ions and electrons from the ambient plasma flow into the bubble volume. In steady state the flow of particles and currents is divergence-free, which is established by the plasma potential inside the bubble. The grid has two sheaths, one facing the ambient plasma, the other the bubble plasma. The inner sheath is observed to become unstable, causing the plasma potential in the bubble to oscillate. The instability arises from an excess of ions and a deficiency of electrons. Its frequency is in the range of the ion plasma frequency but depends on all parameters which influence the charge density in the sheath. When the grid voltage is very negative, electrons cannot enter the outer sheath, and the inner sheath becomes a virtual anode which reflects ions such that the bubble interior is empty. When an electron source is placed into the bubble it can neutralize the ions and the bubble refills. Without plasma sources or sinks the bubble plasma is extremely sensitive to perturbations by probes. Modified current-voltage characteristics of Langmuir and emissive probes are demonstrated. A sequence of papers first describes the basic steady-state properties, then the time evolution of bubbles, the effects of electron sources in bubbles, and the role of the grid and bubble geometry. The physics of plasma bubbles is important to several fields of basic plasma physics such as sheaths, sheath instabilities, diagnostic probes, electrostatic confinement, and current and space charge neutralization of beams.

  5. Bubble formation in a quiescent pool of gold nanoparticle suspension.

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Saeid; Wen, Dongsheng

    2010-08-11

    This paper begins with an extensive review of the formation of gas bubbles, with a particular focus on the dynamics of triple lines, in a pure liquid and progresses into an experimental study of bubble formation on a micrometer-sized nozzle immersed in a quiescent pool of aqueous gold nanofluid. Unlike previous studies of triple line dynamics in a nanofluid under evaporation or boiling conditions, which are mainly caused by the solid surface modification due to particle sedimentation, this work focuses on the roles of nanoparticles suspended in the liquid phase. The experiments are conducted under a wide range of flow rates and nanoparticle concentrations, and many interesting phenomena are revealed. It is observed that nanofluids prevent the spreading of the triple line during bubble formation, i.e. the triple line is pinned somewhere around the middle of the tube wall during the rapid bubble formation stage whereas it spreads to the outer edge of the tube for pure water. A unique 'stick-slip' movement of the triple line is also observed for bubbles forming in nanofluids. At a given bubble volume, the radius of the contact line is found to be smaller for higher particle concentrations, but a reverse trend is found for the dynamic bubble contact angle. With the increase of particle concentration, the bubble frequency is raised and the bubble departure volume is decreased. The bubble shape is found to be in a good agreement with the prediction from Young-Laplace equation for given flow rates. The influence of nanoparticles on other detailed characteristics related to bubble growth inside, including the variation of bubble volume expansion rate, the radius of the curvature at the apex, the bubble height and bubble volume, is revealed. It is suggested that the variation of surface tensions and the resultant force balance at the triple line might be responsible for the modified dynamics of the triple line. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Microfluidic bubble logic.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Manu; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2007-02-09

    We demonstrate universal computation in an all-fluidic two-phase microfluidic system. Nonlinearity is introduced into an otherwise linear, reversible, low-Reynolds number flow via bubble-to-bubble hydrodynamic interactions. A bubble traveling in a channel represents a bit, providing us with the capability to simultaneously transport materials and perform logical control operations. We demonstrate bubble logic AND/OR/NOT gates, a toggle flip-flop, a ripple counter, timing restoration, a ring oscillator, and an electro-bubble modulator. These show the nonlinearity, gain, bistability, synchronization, cascadability, feedback, and programmability required for scalable universal computation. With increasing complexity in large-scale microfluidic processors, bubble logic provides an on-chip process control mechanism integrating chemistry and computation.

  7. Gas bubble detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Burchfield, David E. (Inventor); Hagey, John M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A gas bubble detector having a modulated IR source focused through a bandpass filter onto a venturi, formed in a sample tube, to illuminate the venturi with modulated filtered IR to detect the presence of gas bubbles as small as 0.01 cm or about 0.004 in diameter in liquid flowing through the venturi. Means are provided to determine the size of any detected bubble and to provide an alarm in the absence of liquid in the sample tube.

  8. The shape of bubbles rising near the nozzle exit in molten metal baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Manabu; Nakatani, Tadatoshi; Tokunaga, Hirohiko

    1997-06-01

    A previously developed multineedle electroresistivity probe was used to investigate the shape of bubbles generated at the exit of a central single-hole bottom nozzle in molten Wood’s metal and mercury baths. This probe is capable of detecting the vertical cross section of rising bubbles. The shape of bubbles just after the detachment from the nozzle exit was correlated as a function of a modified Reynolds number and a modified Weber number. Furthermore, the relations between the shape of bubbles and the radial distributions of bubble characteristics specified by gas holdup, bubble frequency, etc. were derived. As a result, it is possible to predict the shape of the bubbles by measuring the bubble characteristics with a conventional two-needle electroresistivity probe.

  9. Viscosity of bubble- and crystal- bearing magmas: Analogue results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, A.; Manga, M.

    2006-12-01

    Natural magmas often include both phenocrysts and bubbles. Such magmas can be regarded as suspensions including particles and bubbles and should have a viscosity different from the particle- and bubble- free melt. Viscosity is one of the key physical properties that affects eruption dynamics and magma flow. To understand the relation between the viscosity and the volume fraction of bubbles and particles, we directly measure the viscosity of suspensions with both particles and bubbles. Measurements are performed with the 4 degree cone-and-plate type rheometer (Thermo HAAKE Rheoscope 1), which allows us to observe the samples in situ during the measurement. The suspending fluid is corn syrup whose viscosity is 1.7 Pa·s at 23 °C. Particles are Techpolymer (polymethylmethacrylate) 40 μm diameter spheres. Bubbles are made by dissolving baking soda and citric acid; reaction between them generates carbon dioxide. No surfactant is added. The Peclet number is sufficiently large that Brownian motion does not influence our results. The measured viscosity for the suspensions with particles, and with both particles and bubbles, show strong shear thinning. The measured viscosities during increasing and decreasing shear rate differ from each other, indicating that the microstructure is modified by flow. When the deformation of bubbles is not significant, the measured viscosity with bubbles is higher than that without bubbles, and vice versa.

  10. Regimes of bubble volume oscillations in a pipe.

    PubMed

    Jeurissen, Roger; Wijshoff, Herman; van den Berg, Marc; Reinten, Hans; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-11-01

    The effect of an acoustically driven bubble on the acoustics of a liquid-filled pipe is theoretically analyzed and the dimensionless groups of the problem are identified. The different regimes of bubble volume oscillations are predicted theoretically with these dimensionless groups. Three main regimes can be identified: (1) For small bubbles and weak driving, the effect of the bubble oscillations on the acoustic field can be neglected. (2) For larger bubbles and still small driving, the bubble affects the acoustic field, but due to the small driving, a linear theory is sufficient. (3) For large bubbles and large driving, the two-way coupling between the bubble and the flow dynamics requires the solution of the full nonlinear problem. The developed theory is then applied to an air bubble in a channel of an inkjet printhead. A numerical model is developed to test the predictions of the theoretical analysis. The Rayleigh-Plesset equation is extended to include the influence of the bubble volume oscillations on the acoustic field and vice versa. This modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation is coupled to a channel acoustics calculation and a Navier-Stokes solver for the flow in the nozzle. The numerical simulations indeed confirm the predictions of the theoretical analysis.

  11. Multi-stage supra-subduction metasomatism in the Cabo Ortegal Complex, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilhac, Romain; O'Reilly, Suzanne; Griffin, William; Pearson, Norman; Ceuleneer, Georges; Grégoire, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Three harzburgitic massifs are exposed in the Cabo Ortegal Complex as part of the Variscan suture in Spain. Among these, the Herbeira massif has an unusually high volume of massive and layered pyroxenites whose formation has never comprehensively understood due to a particularly complex tectonothermal history (Ábalos et al., 2003). We use a detailed structural and geochemical approach to reveal a multi-stage metasomatic scenario unraveling the intricacy of magmatic and metamorphic features. Our new mapping of the Herbeira massif suggests that it consists of a single exposure of heterogeneous mantle cross-cut by different generations of mafic veins, outlining a potential metasomatic conduit developed in a subduction zone. The recognition of an overprinting sheath-fold deformation confirms that the whole massif has been deformed in a deep-subduction setting. However, thickness variations in pyroxenites may not only result from various degrees of shear deformation as previously suggested (Girardeau and Gil Ibarguchi, 1991), thus more than a single magmatic event potentially occurred. Structural and textural observations are consistent with the massive pyroxenites intruding the package of harzburgite and layered pyroxenites prior to its intrusion into the subduction zone. The massive pyroxenites display homogeneous enrichments of light rare earth elements (LREE) whereas layered pyroxenites are variously enriched, resulting in spoon-shaped to strongly LREE-fractionated patterns, characteristic of varying degrees of chromatographic re-equilibration. We suggest that an initial metasomatic episode occurred when the parental melt of the massive pyroxenites percolated through the massif, forming dunitic aureoles via additional melt extraction from harzburgites. After intrusion into the subduction zone, shear deformation was accompanied by fluid percolation controlled by inherited lithological heterogeneities and specifically the existence of dunitic channels, as evidenced

  12. NEW APPROACHES: Surface tension from deflating a soap bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rämme, Göran

    1997-05-01

    The surface tension of soap bubbles can be measured using simple apparatus. Results found using the method described here can be compared with a modified standard method also described, to allow students to evaluate the different approaches.

  13. Multi-Stage Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Sugar-Conjugated β-Turn Structures to be Used as Probes in Autoimmune Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangrande, Chiara; Auberger, Nicolas; Rentier, Cédric; Papini, Anna Maria; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Lavielle, Solange; Vinh, Joëlle

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic sugar-modified peptides were identified as antigenic probes in the context of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a mechanistic study on the fragmentation of different glycosylated analogs of a synthetic antigenic probe able to detect antibodies in a subpopulation of multiple sclerosis patients. In particular the N-glucosylated type I' β-turn peptide structure called CSF114(Glc) was used as a model to find signature fragmentations exploring the potential of multi-stage mass spectrometry by MALDI-LTQ Orbitrap. Here we compare the fragmentation of the glucosylated form of the synthetic peptide CSF114(Glc), bearing a glucose moiety on an asparagine residue, with less or non- immunoreactive forms, bearing different sugar-modifications, such as CSF114(GlcNAc), modified with a residue of N-acetylglucosamine, and CSF114[Lys7(1-deoxyfructopyranosyl)], this last one modified with a 1-deoxyfructopyranosyl moiety on a lysine at position 7. The analysis was set up using a synthetic compound specifically deuterated on the C-1 to compare its fragmentation with the fragmentation of the undeuterated form, and thus ascertain with confidence the presence on an Asn(Glc) within a peptide sequence. At the end of the study, our analysis led to the identification of signature neutral losses inside the sugar moieties to characterize the different types of glycosylation/glycation. The interest of this study lies in the possibility of applyimg this approach to the discovery of biomarkers and in the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases.

  14. Prospects for bubble fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  15. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal at HTI: Bench-scale studies in coal/waste plastics coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The development of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction (CMSL) at HTI has focused on both bituminous and sub-bituminous coals using laboratory, bench and PDU scale operations. The crude oil equivalent cost of liquid fuels from coal has been curtailed to about $30 per barrel, thus achieving over 30% reduction in the price that was evaluated for the liquefaction technologies demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties. Contrary to the common belief, the new generation of catalytic multistage coal liquefaction process is environmentally very benign and can produce clean, premium distillates with a very low (<10ppm) heteroatoms content. The HTI Staff has been involved over the years in process development and has made significant improvements in the CMSL processing of coals. A 24 month program (extended to September 30, 1995) to study novel concepts, using a continuous bench scale Catalytic Multi-Stage unit (30kg coal/day), has been initiated since December, 1992. This program consists of ten bench-scale operations supported by Laboratory Studies, Modelling, Process Simulation and Economic Assessments. The Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction is a continuation of the second generation yields using a low/high temperature approach. This paper covers work performed between October 1994- August 1995, especially results obtained from the microautoclave support activities and the bench-scale operations for runs CMSL-08 and CMSL-09, during which, coal and the plastic components for municipal solid wastes (MSW) such as high density polyethylene (HDPE)m, polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), and polythylene terphthlate (PET) were coprocessed.

  16. Downstream processing of virus-like particles: single-stage and multi-stage aqueous two-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Ladd Effio, Christopher; Wenger, Lukas; Ötes, Ozan; Oelmeier, Stefan A; Kneusel, Richard; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-02-27

    The demand for vaccines against untreated diseases has enforced the research and development of virus-like particle (VLP) based vaccine candidates in recent years. Significant progress has been made in increasing VLP titres during upstream processing in bacteria, yeast and insect cells. Considering downstream processing, the separation of host cell impurities is predominantly achieved by time-intensive ultracentrifugation processes or numerous chromatography and filtration steps. In this work, we evaluate the potential of an alternative separation technology for VLPs: aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE). The benefits of ATPE have been demonstrated for various biomolecules, but capacity and separation efficiency were observed to be low for large biomolecules such as VLPs or viruses. Both performance parameters were examined in detail in a case study on human B19 parvovirus-like particles derived from Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells. A solubility-guided approach enabled the design of polyethylene (PEG) salt aqueous two-phase systems with a high capacity of up to 4.1mg/mL VLPs. Unique separation efficiencies were obtained by varying the molecular weight of PEG, the pH value and by using neutral salt additives. Further improvement of the separation of host cell impurities was achieved by multi-stage ATPE on a centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) device in 500mL scale. While single-stage ATPE enabled a DNA clearance of 99.6%, multi-stage ATPE improved the separation of host cell proteins (HCPs). The HPLC purity ranged from 16.8% (100% VLP recovery) for the single-stage ATPE to 69.1% (40.1% VLP recovery) for the multi-stage ATPE. An alternative two-step downstream process is presented removing the ATPS forming polymer, cell debris and 99.77% DNA with a HPLC purity of 90.6% and a VLP recovery of 63.9%.

  17. Acoustical emission from bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuet-Higgins, Michael S.

    1991-12-01

    The scientific objectives of this report are to investigate the dynamics of bubbles formed from a free surface (particularly the upper surface of the ocean) by breaking waves, and the resulting emission of underwater sound. The chief natural source of underwater sound in the ocean at frequencies from 0.5 to 50 kHz is known to be the acoustical emission from newly-formed bubbles and bubble clouds, particularly those created by breaking waves and rain. Attention has been drawn to the occurrence of high-speed jets directed into the bubble just after bubble closure. They have been observed both in rain-drop impacts and in the release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle. Qualitatively they are similar to the inward jets seen in the collapse of a cavitation bubble. There is also a similarity to the highly-accelerated upward jets in standing water waves (accelerations greater than 20g) or in bubbles bursting at a free surface. We have adopted a theoretical approach based on the dynamics of incompressible fluids with a free surface.

  18. Clustering in bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Bernardo; Zenit, Roberto

    2004-11-01

    We are conducting experiments to determine the amount of clustering that occurs when small gas bubbles ascend in clean water. In particular, we are interested in flows for which the liquid motion around the bubbles can be described, with a certain degree of accuracy, using potential flow theory. This model is applicable for the case of bubbly liquids in which the Reynolds number is large and the Weber number is small. To clearly observe the formation of bubble clusters we propose the use of a Hele-Shaw-type channel. In this thin channel the bubbles cannot overlap in the depth direction, therefore the identification of bubble clusters cannot be misinterpreted. Direct video image analysis is performed to calculate the velocity and size of the bubbles, as well as the formation of clusters. Although the walls do affect the motion of the bubbles, the clustering phenomena does occur and has the same qualitative behavior as in fully three-dimensional flows. A series of preliminary measurements are presented. A brief discussion of our plans to perform PIV measurements to obtain the liquid velocity fields is also presented.

  19. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  20. Let Them Blow Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenic, Eileen

    1988-01-01

    Describes a series of activities and demonstrations involving the science of soap bubbles. Starts with a recipe for bubble solution and gives instructions for several activities on topics such as density, interference colors, optics, static electricity, and galaxy formation. Contains some background information to help explain some of the effects.…

  1. Let Them Blow Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenic, Eileen

    1988-01-01

    Describes a series of activities and demonstrations involving the science of soap bubbles. Starts with a recipe for bubble solution and gives instructions for several activities on topics such as density, interference colors, optics, static electricity, and galaxy formation. Contains some background information to help explain some of the effects.…

  2. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  3. Simulating Surfzone Bubbles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    D (Ripple) and 3-D ( Truchas ) Navier- Stokes solvers. In the continuation of this work, our objectives are to: 1) Implement a physics-based...a bubble phase with multiple bubble size (or, more accurately, mass) bins. The existing 3-D model Truchas has been extended to include Carrica et al

  4. Multi-stage IT project evaluation: The flexibility value obtained by implementing and resolving Berk, Green and Naik (2004) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, Fathi; Guermazi, Dorra

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we evaluate a multi-stage information technology investment project, by implementing and resolving Berk, Green and Naik's (2004) model, which takes into account specific features of IT projects and considers the real option to suspend investment at each stage. We present a particular case of the model where the project value is the solution of an optimal control problem with a single state variable. In this case, the model is more intuitive and tractable. The case study confirms the practical potential of the model and highlights the importance of the real-option approach compared to classical discounted cash flow techniques in the valuation of IT projects.

  5. Multi-stage pulse tube cryocooler with acoustic impedance constructed to reduce transient cool down time and thermal loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, David R. (Inventor); Wilson, Kyle B. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The cool down time for a multi-stage, pulse tube cryocooler is reduced by configuring at least a portion of the acoustic impedance of a selected stage, higher than the first stage, so that it surrounds the cold head of the selected stage. The surrounding acoustic impedance of the selected stage is mounted in thermally conductive connection to the warm region of the selected stage for cooling the acoustic impedance and is fabricated of a high thermal diffusivity, low thermal radiation emissivity material, preferably aluminum.

  6. Bubble collision with gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study vacuum bubble collisions with various potentials including gravitation, assuming spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry. We use numerical calculations from double-null formalism. Spherical symmetry can mimic the formation of a black hole via multiple bubble collisions. Planar and especially hyperbolic symmetry describes two bubble collisions. We study both cases, when two true vacuum regions have the same field value or different field values, by varying tensions. For the latter case, we also test symmetric and asymmetric bubble collisions, and see details of causal structures. If the colliding energy is sufficient, then the vacuum can be destabilized, and it is also demonstrated. This double-null formalism can be a complementary approach in the context of bubble collisions.

  7. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  8. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Michael P.

    2013-03-01

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  9. Studies of the impact of prerotation problem of the secondary impeller on performance of multi-stage centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, L. L.; Wu, P.; Jiang, Q. L.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    In engineering practice, part of the multi-stage centrifugal pumps is designed without space guide vanes due to the size restrictions and the volute is distorted much in shape. In these pumps, tangential velocity of the fluid at the outlet of the first-stage impeller is so great that it has caused a prerotation problem which will affect the inlet flow conditions of the secondary impeller leading to serious efficiency and head decline of the secondary impeller. The head problem of the second stage in multi-stage centrifugal pumps caused by prerotation at the entrance of the second stage was analyzed and the internal hydraulic performance was optimized by setting clapboards in the volute in this paper. CFD numerical simulation method combined with experiment was applied to predict the effect of internal clapboards on the performance of the centrifugal pump. The original prototype was transformed according to the simulation result and tested to verify the optimization work. The experiment result shows that hydraulic performance is remarkably improved compared with the original one and the prerotation problem is basically solved.

  10. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  11. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall.

    PubMed

    Suslov, Sergey A; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  12. Bubble core field modification by residual electrons inside the bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Haicheng; Xie Baisong; Zhao Xueyan; Zhang Shan; Hong Xueren; Liu Mingping

    2010-11-15

    Bubble core field modification due to the nondepleted electrons present inside the bubble is investigated theoretically. These residual electrons induce charge and current densities that can induce the bubble core field modification as well as the bubble shape change. It is found that the electrons entering into the bubble move backward at almost light speed and would weaken the transverse bubble fields. This reduces the ratio of longitudinal to transverse radius of the bubble. For the longitudinal bubble field, two effects compensate with each other because of their competition between the enhancement by the shortening of bubble shape and the reduction by the residual electrons. Therefore the longitudinal field is hardly changeable. As a comparison we perform particle-in-cell simulations and it is found that the results from theoretical consideration are consistent with simulation results. Implication of the modification of fields on bubble electron acceleration is also discussed briefly.

  13. Tribonucleation of bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles on solids that are gently rubbed against each other in a liquid. The phenomenon is found to depend strongly on the material and roughness of the solid surfaces. For a given surface, temperature, and gas content, a trail of growing bubbles is observed if the rubbing force and velocity exceed a certain threshold. Direct observation through a transparent solid shows that each bubble in the trail results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, themselves detaching from microscopic gas pockets forming between the solids. From a detailed study of the wear tracks, with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging, we conclude that these microscopic gas pockets originate from a local fracturing of the surface asperities, possibly enhanced by chemical reactions at the freshly created surfaces. Our findings will be useful either for preventing undesired bubble formation or, on the contrary, for “writing with bubbles,” i.e., creating controlled patterns of microscopic bubbles. PMID:24982169

  14. Analysis of airfoil transitional separation bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. L.; Carter, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    A previously developed local inviscid-viscous interaction technique for the analysis of airfoil transitional separation bubbles, ALESEP (Airfoil Leading Edge Separation) has been modified to utilize a more accurate windward finite difference procedure in the reversed flow region, and a natural transition/turbulence model has been incorporated for the prediction of transition within the separation bubble. Numerous calculations and experimental comparisons are presented to demonstrate the effects of the windward differencing scheme and the natural transition/turbulence model. Grid sensitivity and convergence capabilities of this inviscid-viscous interaction technique are briefly addressed. A major contribution of this report is that with the use of windward differencing, a second, counter-rotating eddy has been found to exist in the wall layer of the primary separation bubble.

  15. Cardiovascular bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bull, Joseph L

    2005-01-01

    Gas bubbles can form in the cardiovascular system as a result of patho-physiological conditions or can be intentionally introduced for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. The dynamic behavior of these bubbles is caused by a variety of mechanisms, such as inertia, pressure, interfacial tension, viscosity, and gravity. We review recent advances in the fundamental mechanics and applications of cardiovascular bubbles, including air embolism, ultrasound contrast agents, targeted microbubbles for drug delivery and molecular imaging, cavitation-induced tissue erosion for ultrasonic surgery, microbubble-induced angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, and gas embolotherapy.

  16. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  17. Viscosity Destabilizes Sonoluminescing Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toegel, Ruediger; Luther, Stefan; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-01

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar as larger viscosity normally stabilizes the dynamics. Suslick and co-workers call this new mysterious state of SBSL “moving-SBSL.” We identify the history force (a force nonlocal in time) as the origin of this destabilization and show that the instability is parametric. A force balance model quantitatively accounts for the observed quasiperiodic bubble trajectories.

  18. Viscosity destabilizes sonoluminescing bubbles.

    PubMed

    Toegel, Ruediger; Luther, Stefan; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-24

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar as larger viscosity normally stabilizes the dynamics. Suslick and co-workers call this new mysterious state of SBSL "moving-SBSL." We identify the history force (a force nonlocal in time) as the origin of this destabilization and show that the instability is parametric. A force balance model quantitatively accounts for the observed quasiperiodic bubble trajectories.

  19. Aerator Combined With Bubble Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    System produces bubble-free oxygen-saturated water. Bubble remover consists of outer solid-walled tube and inner hydrophobic, porous tube. Air bubbles pass from water in outer tube into inner tube, where sucked away. Developed for long-term aquaculture projects in space. Also applicable to terrestrial equipment in which entrained bubbles dry membranes or give rise to cavitation in pumps.

  20. Development of Liposomal Bubbles with Perfluoropropane Gas as Gene Delivery Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Kazuo; Suzuki, Ryo; Sawamura, Kaori; Takizawa, Tomoko; Utoguchi, Naoki; Negishi, Yoichi

    2007-05-01

    Liposomes have some advantages as drug, antigen and gene delivery carriers. Their size can be easily controlled and they can be modified to add a targeting function. Based on liposome technology, we developed novel liposomal bubbles (Bubble liposomes) containing the ultrasound imaging gas, perfluoropropane. We assessed the feasibility of Bubble liposomes as carriers for gene delivery after cavitation induced by ultrasound. At first, we investigated their ability to deliver genes with Bubble liposomes and ultrasound to various types of cells such as mouse sarcoma cells, mouse melanoma cells, human T cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results showed that the Bubble liposomes could deliver plasmid DNA to many cell types without cytotoxicity. In addition, we found that Bubble liposomes could effectively deliver plasmid DNA into mouse femoral artery in vivo. The gene transduction with Bubble liposomes was more effectively than conventional lipofection. We conclude that Bubble liposomes are unique and efficient gene delivery carriers in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Bubble motion and size variation during thermal migration with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurse, Asha; McFadden, Geoffrey; Coriell, Sam; Mathematical Modeling Group Team

    2011-11-01

    An analysis of the motion of a spherical bubble in a two-phase, single component system with a vertical linear temperature gradient is presented. The model for the migration of an immiscible bubble considered by Young, Goldstein and Block is modified to allow for phase change at the bubble surface, including the possibility of both bubble translation and the change of bubble radius with time. Depending of the material parameters, the thermocapillary effects that normally lead to migration of an immiscible bubble can be overwhelmed by the effects of latent heat generation, resulting in a change in the mechanism driving the motion. For a water-steam system conditions are determined for a stationary bubble in which the the effects of buoyancy and thermal migration are balanced. The stability of the bubble is also considered.

  2. The life of bubbles under negative pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Woo; Park, Keunhwan; Nagashima, So; Moon, Myoung-Woon; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation of sap in plant vessels, or embolism, may occur when the liquid pressure becomes negative either in a high elevation or a dry environment. Effective suppression of nucleation and growth of cavitation bubbles is important for continuous transport of water and thus survival of the plant. Here we investigate the life of cavitation bubbles under negative pressure from their nucleation through growth and maturation. As a model system for the plant vessel, we fabricate hydrogel microchannels whose inner pressure is reduced to a negative value. The roughness of the channel surface is modified by plasma treatment to form wrinkles emulating observed xylem wall surfaces. We find a finite effect of surface wrinkles on the critical nucleation pressure. Also, dense wrinkles tend to slow down bubble growth. In all the channel roughness conditions, the bubbles grow diffusively with time until their maturation. Then in the matured stage, the growth speed is substantially lowered and follows the value determined by Darcy's law. Our results suggest that surface wrinkles or roughness can be used to control the nucleation pressure and bubble growth behavior. Also, the observations can give deeper insight into embolism control mechanisms of tall trees.

  3. Improvement of acoustic theory of ultrasonic waves in dilute bubbly liquids

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Keita; Colonius, Tim; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    The theory of the acoustics of dilute bubbly liquids is reviewed, and the dispersion relation is modified by including the effect of liquid compressibility on the natural frequency of the bubbles. The modified theory is shown to more accurately predict the trend in measured attenuation of ultrasonic waves. The model limitations associated with such high-frequency waves are discussed. PMID:19739700

  4. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; ...

    2015-06-11

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. In this paper, we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally “blow” magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of thesemore » dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. Finally, the demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics.« less

  5. What's in a Bubble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunderson, Megan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit on detergents and bubbles that establishes an interest in the properties of materials and focuses on active learning involving both hands- and minds-on learning rather than passive learning. (ASK)

  6. Consistent cosmic bubble embeddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, S. Shajidul; Underwood, Bret

    2017-05-01

    The Raychaudhuri equation for null rays is a powerful tool for finding consistent embeddings of cosmological bubbles in a background spacetime in a way that is largely independent of the matter content. We find that spatially flat or positively curved thin wall bubbles surrounded by a cosmological background must have a Hubble expansion that is either contracting or expanding slower than the background, which is a more stringent constraint than those obtained by the usual Israel thin-wall formalism. Similarly, a cosmological bubble surrounded by Schwarzschild space, occasionally used as a simple "swiss cheese" model of inhomogenities in an expanding universe, must be contracting (for spatially flat and positively curved bubbles) and bounded in size by the apparent horizon.

  7. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M. Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L.; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-06-11

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. In this paper, we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally “blow” magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. Finally, the demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics.

  8. What's in a Bubble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunderson, Megan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit on detergents and bubbles that establishes an interest in the properties of materials and focuses on active learning involving both hands- and minds-on learning rather than passive learning. (ASK)

  9. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M. Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L.; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-01

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally “blow” magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics.

  10. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  11. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  12. Faces in water bubbles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-12

    ISS036-E-018290 (12 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, squeezes a water bubble out of her beverage container, showing her image refracted, in the Unity node of the International Space Station.

  13. Faces in water bubbles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-12

    NASA astronaut Karen Nyberger, Expedition 36 flight engineer, watches a water bubble float freely between her and the camera, showing her image refracted in the droplet, while in the Node 1Unity module of the International Space Station.

  14. Faces in water bubbles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-12

    ISS036-E-018302 (12 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, watches a water bubble float freely between him and the camera, showing his image refracted, in the Unity node of the International Space Station.

  15. Multi-stage 3D-2D registration for correction of anatomical deformation in image-guided spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M. W.; Goerres, J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-06-01

    A multi-stage image-based 3D-2D registration method is presented that maps annotations in a 3D image (e.g. point labels annotating individual vertebrae in preoperative CT) to an intraoperative radiograph in which the patient has undergone non-rigid anatomical deformation due to changes in patient positioning or due to the intervention itself. The proposed method (termed msLevelCheck) extends a previous rigid registration solution (LevelCheck) to provide an accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of spinal deformation. The method employs a multi-stage series of rigid 3D-2D registrations performed on sets of automatically determined and increasingly localized sub-images, with the final stage achieving a rigid mapping for each label to yield a locally rigid yet globally deformable solution. The method was evaluated first in a phantom study in which a CT image of the spine was acquired followed by a series of 7 mobile radiographs with increasing degree of deformation applied. Second, the method was validated using a clinical data set of patients exhibiting strong spinal deformation during thoracolumbar spine surgery. Registration accuracy was assessed using projection distance error (PDE) and failure rate (PDE  >  20 mm—i.e. label registered outside vertebra). The msLevelCheck method was able to register all vertebrae accurately for all cases of deformation in the phantom study, improving the maximum PDE of the rigid method from 22.4 mm to 3.9 mm. The clinical study demonstrated the feasibility of the approach in real patient data by accurately registering all vertebral labels in each case, eliminating all instances of failure encountered in the conventional rigid method. The multi-stage approach demonstrated accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of strong spinal deformation. The msLevelCheck method maintains other advantageous aspects of the original LevelCheck method (e.g. compatibility with standard clinical workflow, large

  16. Blowing DNA bubbles.

    PubMed

    Severin, N; Zhuang, W; Ecker, C; Kalachev, A A; Sokolov, I M; Rabe, J P

    2006-11-01

    We report here experimental observations which indicate that topologically or covalently formed polymer loops embedded in an ultrathin liquid film on a solid substrate can be "blown" into circular "bubbles" during scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging. In particular, supercoiled vector DNA has been unraveled, moved, stretched, and overstretched to two times its B-form length and then torn apart. We attribute the blowing of the DNA bubbles to the interaction of the tapping SFM tip with the ultrathin liquid film.

  17. 2012 Problem 8: Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kejing; Xia, Qing; Wang, Sihui; Zhou, Huijun

    2015-10-01

    When a large number of bubbles exist in the water, an object may float on the surface or sink. The assumption of equivalent density is proposed in this article to explain the concrete example. According to the assumption, an object is floatable only if its density is less than the equivalent density of the water-bubble mixture. This conclusion is supported by the floating experiment and by measuring the pressure underwater to a satisfactory approximation.

  18. Bubble coalescence in magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, Richard A.; Pinkerton, Harry

    1993-01-01

    The most important factors governing the nature of volcanic eruptions are the primary volatile contents, the ways in which volatiles exsolve, and how the resulting bubbles grow and interact. In this contribution we assess the importance of bubble coalescence. The degree of coalescence in alkali basalts has been measured using Image Analysis techniques and it is suggested to be a process of considerable importance. Binary coalescence events occur every few minutes in basaltic melts with vesicularities greater than around 35 percent.

  19. Colloquium: Soap bubble clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Frank

    2007-07-01

    Soap bubble clusters and froths model biological cells, metallurgical structures, magnetic domains, liquid crystals, fire-extinguishing foams, bread, cushions, and many other materials and structures. Despite the simplicity of the governing principle of energy or area minimization, the underlying mathematical theory is deep and still not understood, even for rather simple, finite clusters. Only with the advent of geometric measure theory could mathematics treat surfaces which might have unprescribed singularities and topological complexities. In 1884, Schwarz gave a rigorous mathematical proof that a single round soap bubble provides the least-area way to enclose a given volume of air. Similarly, the familiar double bubble provides the absolute least-area way to enclose and separate the two given volumes of air, although the proof did not come until 2000 and has an interesting story, as this Colloquium explains in some detail. Whether a triple soap bubble provides the least-area way to enclose and separate three given volumes of air remains an open conjecture today. Even planar bubble clusters remain mysterious. In about 200 B.C. Zenodorus essentially proved that a circle provides the least-perimeter way to enclose a single given area. The planar double and triple bubbles were proved minimizing recently. The status of the planar four-bubble remains open today. In most spaces other than Euclidean space, even the best single bubble remains unproven. One exception is Gauss space, which is of much interest to probabilists and should be more familiar to physicists. General “isoperimetric” problems of minimizing area for given volume occur throughout mathematics and play an important role in differential geometry and analysis, including Perelman’s proof of the Poincaré conjecture.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of violently collapsing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Storey, Brian D.; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2002-08-01

    In a classical paper Plesset has determined conditions under which a bubble changing in volume maintains a spherical shape. The stability analysis was further developed by Prosperetti to include the effects of liquid viscosity on the evolving shape modes. In the present work the theory is further modified to include the changing density of the bubble contents. The latter is found to be important in violent collapses where the densities of the gas and vapor within a bubble may approach densities of the liquid outside. This exerts a stabilizing influence on the Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism of shape instability of spherical bubbles. A comparison with experimental data shows good agreement with the new theory; the Rayleigh-Taylor instability does provide an extinction threshold for violently collapsing bubbles. It is also explained why earlier works did not produce a slope in the Rayleigh-Taylor stability curve that conforms with that of the present work.

  1. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  2. How many bubbles in your glass of bubbly?

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2014-03-20

    The issue about how many carbon dioxide bubbles are likely to nucleate in a glass of champagne (or bubbly) is of concern for sommeliers, wine journalists, experienced tasters, and any open minded physical chemist wondering about complex phenomena at play in a glass of bubbly. The whole number of bubbles likely to form in a single glass is the result of the fine interplay between dissolved CO2, tiny gas pockets trapped within particles acting as bubble nucleation sites, and ascending bubble dynamics. Based on theoretical models combining ascending bubble dynamics and mass transfer equations, the falsely naı̈ve question of how many bubbles are likely to form per glass is discussed in the present work. A theoretical relationship is derived, which provides the whole number of bubbles likely to form per glass, depending on various parameters of both the wine and the glass itself.

  3. Multi-stage FEL amplifier with diaphragm focusing line as direct energy driver for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    An FEL based energy driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is proposed. The key element of the scheme is free electron laser system. Novel technical solutions, namely, using of multichannel, multi-stage FEL amplifier with diaphragm focusing line, reveal a possibility to construct the FEL system operating at radiation wavelength {lambda} = 0.5 {mu}m and providing flush energy E = 1 MJ and brightness 4 x 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1} within steering pulse duration {tau} {approximately} 0.1-2 ns. Total energy efficiency of the proposed ICF energy driver is about of 11% and repetition rate is 40 Hz. It is shown that the FEL based ICF energy driver may be constructed at the present level of accelerator technique R& D.

  4. Analysis of a Multi-component Multi-stage Malaria Vaccine Candidate--Tackling the Cocktail Challenge.

    PubMed

    Boes, Alexander; Spiegel, Holger; Voepel, Nadja; Edgue, Gueven; Beiss, Veronique; Kapelski, Stephanie; Fendel, Rolf; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele; Bolscher, Judith M; Behet, Marije C; Dechering, Koen J; Hermsen, Cornelus C; Sauerwein, Robert W; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Combining key antigens from the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle in the context of a multi-stage-specific cocktail offers a promising approach towards the development of a malaria vaccine ideally capable of preventing initial infection, the clinical manifestation as well as the transmission of the disease. To investigate the potential of such an approach we combined proteins and domains (11 in total) from the pre-erythrocytic, blood and sexual stages of P. falciparum into a cocktail of four different components recombinantly produced in plants. After immunization of rabbits we determined the domain-specific antibody titers as well as component-specific antibody concentrations and correlated them with stage specific in vitro efficacy. Using purified rabbit immune IgG we observed strong inhibition in functional in vitro assays addressing the pre-erythrocytic (up to 80%), blood (up to 90%) and sexual parasite stages (100%). Based on the component-specific antibody concentrations we calculated the IC50 values for the pre-erythrocytic stage (17-25 μg/ml), the blood stage (40-60 μg/ml) and the sexual stage (1.75 μg/ml). While the results underline the feasibility of a multi-stage vaccine cocktail, the analysis of component-specific efficacy indicates significant differences in IC50 requirements for stage-specific antibody concentrations providing valuable insights into this complex scenario and will thereby improve future approaches towards malaria vaccine cocktail development regarding the selection of suitable antigens and the ratios of components, to fine tune overall and stage-specific efficacy.

  5. Analysis of a Multi-component Multi-stage Malaria Vaccine Candidate—Tackling the Cocktail Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Voepel, Nadja; Edgue, Gueven; Beiss, Veronique; Kapelski, Stephanie; Fendel, Rolf; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele; Bolscher, Judith M.; Behet, Marije C.; Dechering, Koen J.; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Combining key antigens from the different stages of the P. falciparum life cycle in the context of a multi-stage-specific cocktail offers a promising approach towards the development of a malaria vaccine ideally capable of preventing initial infection, the clinical manifestation as well as the transmission of the disease. To investigate the potential of such an approach we combined proteins and domains (11 in total) from the pre-erythrocytic, blood and sexual stages of P. falciparum into a cocktail of four different components recombinantly produced in plants. After immunization of rabbits we determined the domain-specific antibody titers as well as component-specific antibody concentrations and correlated them with stage specific in vitro efficacy. Using purified rabbit immune IgG we observed strong inhibition in functional in vitro assays addressing the pre-erythrocytic (up to 80%), blood (up to 90%) and sexual parasite stages (100%). Based on the component-specific antibody concentrations we calculated the IC50 values for the pre-erythrocytic stage (17–25 μg/ml), the blood stage (40–60 μg/ml) and the sexual stage (1.75 μg/ml). While the results underline the feasibility of a multi-stage vaccine cocktail, the analysis of component-specific efficacy indicates significant differences in IC50 requirements for stage-specific antibody concentrations providing valuable insights into this complex scenario and will thereby improve future approaches towards malaria vaccine cocktail development regarding the selection of suitable antigens and the ratios of components, to fine tune overall and stage-specific efficacy. PMID:26147206

  6. Adaptive multi-stage integrators for optimal energy conservation in molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pendás, Mario; Akhmatskaya, Elena; Sanz-Serna, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new Adaptive Integration Approach (AIA) to be used in a wide range of molecular simulations. Given a simulation problem and a step size, the method automatically chooses the optimal scheme out of an available family of numerical integrators. Although we focus on two-stage splitting integrators, the idea may be used with more general families. In each instance, the system-specific integrating scheme identified by our approach is optimal in the sense that it provides the best conservation of energy for harmonic forces. The AIA method has been implemented in the BCAM-modified GROMACS software package. Numerical tests in molecular dynamics and hybrid Monte Carlo simulations of constrained and unconstrained physical systems show that the method successfully realizes the fail-safe strategy. In all experiments, and for each of the criteria employed, the AIA is at least as good as, and often significantly outperforms the standard Verlet scheme, as well as fixed parameter, optimized two-stage integrators. In particular, for the systems where harmonic forces play an important role, the sampling efficiency found in simulations using the AIA is up to 5 times better than the one achieved with other tested schemes.

  7. Multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin: Fundamentals and applications

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Erika L.; Angel, Joe M; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2011-01-01

    For more than 60 years, the chemical induction of tumors in mouse skin has been used to study mechanisms of epithelial carcinogenesis and evaluate modifying factors. In the traditional two-stage skin carcinogenesis model, initiation is accomplished by the application of a subcarcinogenic dose of a carcinogen. Subsequently, tumor development is elicited by repeated treatment with a tumor promoting agent. The initiation protocol can be completed within 1–3 hours depending on the number of mice used, while the promotion phase requires twice weekly treatments (1–2 hours) and once weekly tumor palpation (1–2 hours) for the duration of the study. A highly reproducible papilloma burden is expected within 10–20 weeks with progression of a portion of the tumors to squamous cell carcinomas within 20–50 weeks. In contrast to complete skin carcinogenesis, the two-stage model allows for greater yield of premalignant lesions as well as separation of the initiation and promotion phases. PMID:19713956

  8. Progress with viral vectored malaria vaccines: A multi-stage approach involving "unnatural immunity".

    PubMed

    Ewer, Katie J; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Salman, Ahmed M; Illingworth, Joseph J; Draper, Simon J; Biswas, Sumi; Hill, Adrian V S

    2015-12-22

    Viral vectors used in heterologous prime-boost regimens are one of very few vaccination approaches that have yielded significant protection against controlled human malaria infections. Recently, protection induced by chimpanzee adenovirus priming and modified vaccinia Ankara boosting using the ME-TRAP insert has been correlated with the induction of potent CD8(+) T cell responses. This regimen has progressed to field studies where efficacy against infection has now been reported. The same vectors have been used pre-clinically to identify preferred protective antigens for use in vaccines against the pre-erythrocytic, blood-stage and mosquito stages of malaria and this work is reviewed here for the first time. Such antigen screening has led to the prioritization of the PfRH5 blood-stage antigen, which showed efficacy against heterologous strain challenge in non-human primates, and vectors encoding this antigen are in clinical trials. This, along with the high transmission-blocking activity of some sexual-stage antigens, illustrates well the capacity of such vectors to induce high titre protective antibodies in addition to potent T cell responses. All of the protective responses induced by these vectors exceed the levels of the same immune responses induced by natural exposure supporting the view that, for subunit vaccines to achieve even partial efficacy in humans, "unnatural immunity" comprising immune responses of very high magnitude will need to be induced.

  9. The dynamics of histotripsy bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2011-09-01

    Histotripsy describes treatments in which high-amplitude acoustic pulses are used to excite bubbles and erode tissue. Though tissue erosion can be directly attributed to bubble activity, the genesis and dynamics of bubbles remain unclear. Histotripsy lesions that show no signs of thermal coagulative damage have been generated with two different acoustic protocols: relatively long acoustic pulses that produce local boiling within milliseconds and relatively short pulses that are higher in amplitude but likely do not produce boiling. While these two approaches are often distinguished as `boiling' versus `cavitation', such labels can obscure similarities. In both cases, a bubble undergoes large changes in radius and vapor is transported into and out of the bubble as it oscillates. Moreover, observations from both approaches suggest that bubbles grow to a size at which they cease to collapse violently. In order to better understand the dynamics of histotripsy bubbles, a single-bubble model has been developed that couples acoustically excited bubble motions to the thermodynamic state of the surrounding liquid. Using this model for bubbles exposed to histotripsy sound fields, simulations suggest that two mechanisms can act separately or in concert to lead to the typically observed bubble growth. First, nonlinear acoustic propagation leads to the evolution of shocks and an asymmetry in the positive and negative pressures that drive bubble motion. This asymmetry can have a rectifying effect on bubble oscillations whereby the bubble grows on average during each acoustic cycle. Second, vapor transport to/from the bubble tends to produce larger bubbles, especially at elevated temperatures. Vapor transport by itself can lead to rectified bubble growth when the ambient temperature exceeds 100 °C (`boiling') or local heating in the vicinity of the bubble leads to a superheated boundary layer.

  10. Statistical equilibrium of bubble oscillations in dilute bubbly flows

    PubMed Central

    Colonius, Tim; Hagmeijer, Rob; Ando, Keita; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of predicting the moments of the distribution of bubble radius in bubbly flows is considered. The particular case where bubble oscillations occur due to a rapid (impulsive or step change) change in pressure is analyzed, and it is mathematically shown that in this case, inviscid bubble oscillations reach a stationary statistical equilibrium, whereby phase cancellations among bubbles with different sizes lead to time-invariant values of the statistics. It is also shown that at statistical equilibrium, moments of the bubble radius may be computed using the period-averaged bubble radius in place of the instantaneous one. For sufficiently broad distributions of bubble equilibrium (or initial) radius, it is demonstrated that bubble statistics reach equilibrium on a time scale that is fast compared to physical damping of bubble oscillations due to viscosity, heat transfer, and liquid compressibility. The period-averaged bubble radius may then be used to predict the slow changes in the moments caused by the damping. A benefit is that period averaging gives a much smoother integrand, and accurate statistics can be obtained by tracking as few as five bubbles from the broad distribution. The period-averaged formula may therefore prove useful in reducing computational effort in models of dilute bubbly flow wherein bubbles are forced by shock waves or other rapid pressure changes, for which, at present, the strong effects caused by a distribution in bubble size can only be accurately predicted by tracking thousands of bubbles. Some challenges associated with extending the results to more general (nonimpulsive) forcing and strong two-way coupled bubbly flows are briefly discussed. PMID:19547725

  11. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  12. A numerical simulation of flows around a deformable gas bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Minoru; Ishii, Ryuji; Morioka, Shigeki

    1991-12-01

    A numerical simulation of flows around a (deformable) gas bubble rising through an incompressible viscous fluid was carried out on a supercomputer Fujitsu VP2600 at Data Processing Center of Kyoto University. The solution algorithm is a modified Marker And Cell (MAC) method. For the grid generation, an orthogonal mapping proposed by Ryskin and Leal was applied. it is assumed that the shape of the bubble and the flow field are axisymmetric.

  13. A study of multi-stage/multi-function column for fine particle separation. Quarterly technical progress report, July 8, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Shiao-Hung

    1995-01-20

    The overall objective of the proposed research program is to explore the potential application of a new invention involving a multi-stage column equipped with vortex-inducing loop-flow contactors (hereafter referred to as the multi-stage flotation column) for fine coal cleaning and other solid-solid separations. The research work will identify the design parameters and their effect on the performance of the separation process. The results of this research will provide a basis for further development of the technology. In the past three months, the efforts focused on project planning and design of test equipment. A description of technical progress is presented.

  14. Blowing cosmic bubbles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-17

    This entrancing image shows a few of the tenuous threads that comprise Sh2-308, a faint and wispy shell of gas located 5200 light-years away in the constellation of Canis Major (The Great Dog). Sh2-308 is a large bubble-like structure wrapped around an extremely large, bright type of star known as a Wolf-Rayet Star — this particular star is called EZ Canis Majoris. These type of stars are among the brightest and most massive stars in the Universe, tens of times more massive than our own Sun, and they represent the extremes of stellar evolution. Thick winds continually poured off the progenitors of such stars, flooding their surroundings and draining the outer layers of the Wolf-Rayet stars. The fast wind of a Wolf-Rayet star therefore sweeps up the surrounding material to form bubbles of gas. EZ Canis Majoris is responsible for creating the bubble of Sh2-308 — the star threw off its outer layers to create the strands visible here. The intense and ongoing radiation from the star pushes the bubble out further and further, blowing it bigger and bigger. Currently the edges of Sh2-308 are some 60 light-years apart! Beautiful as these cosmic bubbles are, they are fleeting. The same stars that form them will also cause their death, eclipsing and subsuming them in violent supernova explosions.

  15. Bubbles of Metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-11-01

    Metamorphosis presents a puzzling challenge where, triggered by a signal, an organism abruptly transforms its entire shape and form. Here I describe the role of physical fluid dynamic processes during pupal metamorphosis in flies. During early stages of pupation of third instar larvae into adult flies, a physical gas bubble nucleates at a precise temporal and spatial location, as part of the normal developmental program in Diptera. Although its existence has been known for the last 100 years, the origin and control of this ``cavitation'' event has remained completely mysterious. Where does the driving negative pressure for bubble nucleation come from? How is the location of the bubble nucleation site encoded in the pupae? How do molecular processes control such a physical event? What is the role of this bubble during development? Via developing in-vivo imaging techniques, direct bio-physical measurements in live insect pupal structures and physical modeling, here I elucidate the physical mechanism for appearance and disappearance of this bubble and predict the site of nucleation and its exact timing. This new physical insight into the process of metamorphosis also allows us to understand the inherent design of pupal shell architectures in various species of insects. Milton Award, Harvard Society of Fellows; Terman Fellowship, Stanford

  16. A Bubble Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars.

    The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top.

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  17. The Dueling Bubble Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anshuman; Borrell, Marcos; Felts, John; Leal, Gary; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    When two drops or bubbles are brought into close proximity to each other, the thin film of the fluid between them drains as they are squeezed together. If the film becomes thin enough that intermolecular forces of attraction overwhelm capillary forces, the drops/bubbles coalesce and the time it takes for this to happen, starting from the point of apparent contact is referred to as the drainage time. One practical version of this scenario occurs during the formation of foams, when the thin film forms between gas bubbles that are growing in volume with time. We performed an experimental study that is intended to mimic this process in which the two drops (or bubbles) in the size range of 50-100 microns diameter are created by oozing a liquid/gas out of two capillaries of diameter less than 100 microns directly facing each other and immersed in a second fluid. We present measurements of drainage times for the cases of very low viscosity ratios PDMS drops in Castor oil (less than 0.05) and bubbles of air in PDMS, and highlight the differences that arise in part due to the different boundary conditions for thin film drainage for liquid-liquid versus gas-liquid systems, and in part due to the different Hamaker constants for the two systems.

  18. A Bubble Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars.

    The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top.

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  19. Multi stage three-dimensional sweeping and annealing of disc galaxies in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Steven; Struck, Curtis

    2001-11-01

    We present new three-dimensional, hydrodynamic simulations of the ram pressure stripping of disc galaxies via interaction with a hot intracluster medium (ICM). The simulations were carried with the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics, adaptive mesh `hydra' code (SPH-AP3M), with model galaxies consisting of gas and stellar disc components and dark haloes. The simulations also include radiative cooling, which is important for keeping the warm, diffuse gas of moderate density from being unrealistically heated by the ICM. We examine the role that wind velocity, density and galaxy tilt play in gas stripping. We include cases with lower ram pressures than other recent studies. In accord with previous studies, we find that low column density gas is promptly removed from the outer disc. However, we also find that not all of the gas stripped from the disc escapes immediately from the halo, some of material can linger for times of order 108yr. We use a simple analytic model to demonstrate that gas elements in the ICM wind feel an effective potential with a minimum displaced downstream from the halo centre. The onset of the ICM wind has a profound effect on the disc gas that is not immediately stripped. This remnant disc is displaced relative to the halo centre and compressed. This can trigger gravitational instability and the formation of numerous flocculent spirals. These waves transport angular momentum outward, resulting in further compression of the inner disc and the formation of a prominent gas ring. This `annealing' process makes the inner disc, which contains much of the total gas mass, resistant to further stripping, but presumably susceptible to global starbursts. Spirals in the outer disc stretch, shear and are eventually stripped on time-scales of a few times 108yr, after which time, mass and angular momentum loss effectly cease. For inclined galaxies, these effects are considerably modified over the same time-scale. The amount of mass loss is reduced. In addition

  20. Theoretical model for coupled radial and translational motion of two bubbles at arbitrary separation distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical model is developed that describes nonlinear spherical pulsations and translational motions of two interacting bubbles at arbitrary separation distances between the bubbles. The derivation of the model is based on the multipole expansion of the bubble velocity potentials and the use of the Lagrangian formalism. The model consists of four coupled ordinary differential equations. Two of them are modified Rayleigh-Plesset equations for the radial oscillations of the bubbles and the other two describe the translational displacement of the bubble centers. The equations are not subject to the assumption that the distance between the bubbles is large compared to the bubble radii and hence make it possible to simulate the bubble dynamics starting from large separation distances up to contact between the bubbles providing that the deviation of the bubble shape from sphericity is negligible. Numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the capabilities of the developed model. It is shown that the correct modeling of the translational dynamics of the bubbles at small separation distances requires terms accurate up to ninth order in the inverse separation distance. Physical mechanisms are analyzed that lead to the change of the direction of the relative translational motion of the bubbles in finite-amplitude acoustic fields.

  1. Effect of direct bubble-bubble interactions on linear-wave propagation in bubbly liquids.

    PubMed

    Fuster, D; Conoir, J M; Colonius, T

    2014-12-01

    We study the influence of bubble-bubble interactions on the propagation of linear acoustic waves in bubbly liquids. Using the full model proposed by Fuster and Colonius [J. Fluid Mech. 688, 253 (2011)], numerical simulations reveal that direct bubble-bubble interactions have an appreciable effect for frequencies above the natural resonance frequency of the average size bubble. Based on the new results, a modification of the classical wave propagation theory is proposed. The results obtained are in good agreement with previously reported experimental data where the classical linear theory systematically overpredicts the effective attenuation and phase velocity.

  2. Analyzing cosmic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gobbetti, Roberto; Kleban, Matthew E-mail: mk161@nyu.edu

    2012-05-01

    We develop a set of controlled, analytic approximations to study the effects of bubble collisions on cosmology. We expand the initial perturbation to the inflaton field caused by the collision in a general power series, and determine its time evolution during inflation in terms of the coefficients in the expansion. In models where the observer's bubble undergoes sufficient slow-roll inflation to solve the flatness problem, in the thin wall limit only one coefficient in the expansion is relevant to observational cosmology, allowing nearly model-independent predictions. We discuss two approaches to determining the initial perturbation to the inflaton and the implications for the sign of the effect (a hot or cold spot on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature map). Lastly, we analyze the effects of collisions with thick-wall bubbles, i.e. away from the thin-wall limit.

  3. Bubbles from nothing

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Ramadhan, Handhika S.; Shlaer, Benjamin E-mail: handhika@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of flux compactifications, we construct an instanton describing the quantum creation of an open universe from nothing. The solution has many features in common with the smooth 6d bubble of nothing solutions discussed recently, where the spacetime is described by a 4d compactification of a 6d Einstein-Maxwell theory on S{sup 2} stabilized by flux. The four-dimensional description of this instanton reduces to that of Hawking and Turok. The choice of parameters uniquely determines all future evolution, which we additionally find to be stable against bubble of nothing instabilities.

  4. Multivariate bubbles and antibubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, John

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop models for multivariate financial bubbles and antibubbles based on statistical physics. In particular, we extend a rich set of univariate models to higher dimensions. Changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. Moreover, our multivariate models are able to capture some of the contagious effects that occur during such episodes. We are able to show that declining lending quality helped fuel a bubble in the US stock market prior to 2008. Further, our approach offers interesting insights into the spatial development of UK house prices.

  5. Fluid Dynamics of Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Y. H.; Koch, D. L.; Zenit, R.; Sangani, A.; Kushch, V. I.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Hoffman, M.; Nahra, H.; Fritz, C.; Dolesh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the average flow properties of inertially dominated bubbly liquids which may be described by a novel analysis. Bubbles with high Reynolds number and low Weber number may produce a fluid velocity disturbance that can be approximated by a potential flow. We studied the behavior of suspensions of bubbles of about 1.5 mm diameter in vertical and inclined channels. The suspension was produced using a bank of 900 glass capillaries with inner diameter of about 100 microns in a quasi-steady fashion. In addition, salt was added to the suspension to prevent bubble-bubble coalescence. As a result, a nearly monodisperse suspension of bubble was produced. By increasing the inclination angle, we were able to explore an increasing amount of shear to buoyancy motion. A pipe flow experiment with the liquid being recirculated is under construction. This will provide an even larger range of shear to buoyancy motion. We are planning a microgravity experiment in which a bubble suspension is subjected to shearing in a couette cell in the absence of a buoyancy-driven relative motion of the two phases. By employing a single-wire, hot film anemometer, we were able to obtain the liquid velocity fluctuations. The shear stress at the wall was measured using a hot film probe flush mounted on the wall. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, and bubble velocity fluctuations were measured using a homemade, dual impedance probe. In addition, we also employed a high-speed camera to obtain the bubble size distribution and bubble shape in a dilute suspension. A rapid decrease in bubble velocity for a dilute bubble suspension is attributed to the effects of bubble-wall collisions. The more gradual decrease of bubble velocity as gas volume fraction increases, due to subsequent hindering of bubble motion, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani for the effects of potential-flow bubble-bubble interactions on the mean velocity. The

  6. Fluid Dynamics of Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Y. H.; Koch, D. L.; Zenit, R.; Sangani, A.; Kushch, V. I.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Hoffman, M.; Nahra, H.; Fritz, C.; Dolesh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the average flow properties of inertially dominated bubbly liquids which may be described by a novel analysis. Bubbles with high Reynolds number and low Weber number may produce a fluid velocity disturbance that can be approximated by a potential flow. We studied the behavior of suspensions of bubbles of about 1.5 mm diameter in vertical and inclined channels. The suspension was produced using a bank of 900 glass capillaries with inner diameter of about 100 microns in a quasi-steady fashion. In addition, salt was added to the suspension to prevent bubble-bubble coalescence. As a result, a nearly monodisperse suspension of bubble was produced. By increasing the inclination angle, we were able to explore an increasing amount of shear to buoyancy motion. A pipe flow experiment with the liquid being recirculated is under construction. This will provide an even larger range of shear to buoyancy motion. We are planning a microgravity experiment in which a bubble suspension is subjected to shearing in a couette cell in the absence of a buoyancy-driven relative motion of the two phases. By employing a single-wire, hot film anemometer, we were able to obtain the liquid velocity fluctuations. The shear stress at the wall was measured using a hot film probe flush mounted on the wall. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, and bubble velocity fluctuations were measured using a homemade, dual impedance probe. In addition, we also employed a high-speed camera to obtain the bubble size distribution and bubble shape in a dilute suspension. A rapid decrease in bubble velocity for a dilute bubble suspension is attributed to the effects of bubble-wall collisions. The more gradual decrease of bubble velocity as gas volume fraction increases, due to subsequent hindering of bubble motion, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani for the effects of potential-flow bubble-bubble interactions on the mean velocity. The

  7. Low Energy Multi-Stage Atrial Defibrillation Therapy Terminates Atrial Fibrillation with Less Energy than a Single Shock

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenwen; Janardhan, Ajit H.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Sha, Qun; Schuessler, Richard B.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Implantable device therapy of atrial fibrillation (AF) is limited by pain from high-energy shocks. We developed a low-energy multi-stage defibrillation therapy and tested it in a canine model of AF. Methods and Results AF was induced by burst pacing during vagus nerve stimulation. Our novel defibrillation therapy consisted of three stages: ST1 (1-4 low energy biphasic shocks), ST2 (6-10 ultra-low energy monophasic shocks), and ST3 (anti-tachycardia pacing). Firstly, ST1 testing compared single or multiple monophasic (MP) and biphasic (BP) shocks. Secondly, several multi-stage therapies were tested: ST1 versus ST1+ST3 versus ST1+ST2+ST3. Thirdly, three shock vectors were compared: superior vena cava to distal coronary sinus (SVC>CSd), proximal coronary sinus to left atrial appendage (CSp>LAA) and right atrial appendage to left atrial appendage (RAA>LAA). The atrial defibrillation threshold (DFT) of 1BP shock was less than 1MP shock (0.55 ± 0.1 versus 1.38 ± 0.31 J; p =0.003). 2-3 BP shocks terminated AF with lower peak voltage than 1BP or 1MP shock and with lower atrial DFT than 4 BP shocks. Compared to ST1 therapy alone, ST1+ST3 lowered the atrial DFT moderately (0.51 ± 0.46 versus 0.95 ± 0.32 J; p = 0.036) while a three-stage therapy, ST1+ST2+ST3, dramatically lowered the atrial DFT (0.19 ± 0.12 J versus 0.95 ± 0.32 J for ST1 alone, p=0.0012). Finally, the three-stage therapy ST1+ST2+ST3 was equally effective for all studied vectors. Conclusions Three-stage electrotherapy significantly reduces the AF defibrillation threshold and opens the door to low energy atrial defibrillation at or below the pain threshold. PMID:21980076

  8. Bubble Evolution During Acoustic Droplet Vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamar, Adnan; Bull, Joseph

    2009-11-01

    A first theoretical model of bubble evolution in Acoustic Droplet Vaporization (ADV) inside a circular microchannel is presented. This work is motivated by a novel gas embolotherapy technique, which is intended to treat cancers by occluding blood flow using gas bubbles. The intended therapy involves the injection of superheated Dodecafluoropentane (DDFP, C5F12, boiling point 29 C) droplets, each encapsulated in an albumin shell, into the blood stream. The blood circulation carries these droplets into the tumor region where high-intensity ultrasound is used to trigger ADV to form bubbles near the desired occlusion sites. The proposed model describes the rapid phase transition from highly superheated DDFP droplet to the vapor phase via a homogeneous nucleation within the DDFP droplet. For every time step the radial component of the Navier-Stokes equation is integrated from the nucleated bubble surface to the expanding boundary of the droplet with proper boundary conditions taking into account for the vaporization process. Further from the droplet boundary to the end of microchannel a modified unsteady Bernoulli equation with the head loss term is utilized. Close agreement with experimental data for all the acoustic parameters and different initial droplet sizes is obtained. The proposed model is expected to elucidate the role of different parameters involved in the complex ADV process. This work is supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  9. Non-Abelian bubbles in microstate geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Pedro F.

    2016-11-01

    We find the first smooth bubbling microstate geometries with non-Abelian fields. The solutions constitute an extension of the BPS three-charge smooth microstates. These consist in general families of regular supersymmetric solutions with non-trivial topology, i.e. bubbles, of {N}=d , d = 5 Super-Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, having the asymptotic charges of a black hole or black ring but with no horizon. The non-Abelian fields make their presence at the very heart of the microstate structure: the physical size of the bubbles is affected by the non-Abelian topological charge they carry, which combines with the Abelian flux threading the bubbles to hold them up. Interestingly the non-Abelian fields carry a set of adjustable continuous parameters that do not alter the asymptotics of the solutions but modify the local geometry. This feature can be used to obtain a classically infinite number of microstate solutions with the asymptotics of a single black hole or black ring.

  10. Cohesion of Bubbles in Foam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sydney

    1978-01-01

    The free-energy change, or binding energy, of an idealized bubble cluster is calculated on the basis of one mole of gas, and on the basis of a single bubble going from sphere to polyhedron. Some new relations of bubble geometry are developed in the course of the calculation. (BB)

  11. The Early Years: Blowing Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Blowing bubbles is not only a favorite summer activity for young children. Studying bubbles that are grouped together, or "foam," is fun for children and fascinating to many real-world scientists. Foam is widely used--from the bedroom (mattresses) to outer space (insulating panels on spacecraft). Bubble foam can provide children a…

  12. The Early Years: Blowing Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Blowing bubbles is not only a favorite summer activity for young children. Studying bubbles that are grouped together, or "foam," is fun for children and fascinating to many real-world scientists. Foam is widely used--from the bedroom (mattresses) to outer space (insulating panels on spacecraft). Bubble foam can provide children a…

  13. Bubble injected hydrocyclone flotation cell

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, D.A.; Jordon, C.E.

    1990-11-20

    This patent describes an apparatus for selective separation of a mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic mineral particles. It comprises: a bubble-injected hydrocyclone flotation cell and a bubble slurry. The cell comprises an enclosed body section; a mineral pulp feed port; a bubble slurry feed port; and a vortex finder.

  14. Multi-stage Continuous Culture Fermentation of Glucose-Xylose Mixtures to Fuel Ethanol using Genetically Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-stage continuous (chemostat) culture fermentation (MCCF) with variable fermentor volumes was carried out to study utilizing glucose and xylose for ethanol production by means of mixed sugar fermentation (MSF). Variable fermentor volumes were used to enable enhanced sugar u...

  15. Multi-stage Continuous Culture Fermentation of Glucose-Xylose Mixtures to Fuel Ethanol using Genetically Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-stage continuous (chemostat) culture fermentation (MCCF) with variable fermentor volumes was carried out to study utilizing glucose and xylose for ethanol production by means of mixed sugar fermentation (MSF). Variable fermentor volumes were used to enable enhanced sugar u...

  16. The Bubble N10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, D.; Lepine, J.; Wu, Y.; Yuan, J.

    2014-10-01

    We studied the environment surrounding the infrared bubble N10 in molecular and infrared emission. There is an HII region at the center of this bubble. We investigated J=1-0 transitions of molecules ^{12}CO, ^{13}CO and C^{18}O towards N10. This object was detected by GLIMPSE, a survey carried out between 3.6 and 8.0 μ m. We also analyzed the emission at 24 μ m, corresponding to the emission of hot dust, with a contribution of small grains heated by nearby O stars. Besides, the contribution at 8 μ m is dominated by PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) excited by radiation from the PDRs of bubbles. In the case of N10, it is proposed that the excess at 4.5 μ m IRAC band indicate an outflow, a signature of early stages of massive star formation. This object was the target of observations at the PMO 13.7 m radio telescope. The bubble N10 presents clumps, from which we can derive physical features through the observed parameters. We also intended to discuss the evolutionary stage of the clumps and their distribution. It can lead us to understand the triggered star formation scenario in this region.

  17. The Liberal Arts Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agresto, John

    2011-01-01

    The author expresses his doubt that the general higher education bubble will burst anytime soon. Although tuition, student housing, and book costs have all increased substantially, he believes it is still likely that the federal government will continue to pour billions into higher education, largely because Americans have been persuaded that it…

  18. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  19. The Liberal Arts Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agresto, John

    2011-01-01

    The author expresses his doubt that the general higher education bubble will burst anytime soon. Although tuition, student housing, and book costs have all increased substantially, he believes it is still likely that the federal government will continue to pour billions into higher education, largely because Americans have been persuaded that it…

  20. Bubble fusion: Preliminary estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    The collapse of a gas-filled bubble in disequilibrium (i.e., internal pressure {much_lt} external pressure) can occur with a significant focusing of energy onto the entrapped gas in the form of pressure-volume work and/or acoustical shocks; the resulting heating can be sufficient to cause ionization and the emission of atomic radiations. The suggestion that extreme conditions necessary for thermonuclear fusion to occur may be possible has been examined parametrically in terms of the ratio of initial bubble pressure relative to that required for equilibrium. In this sense, the disequilibrium bubble is viewed as a three-dimensional ``sling shot`` that is ``loaded`` to an extent allowed by the maximum level of disequilibrium that can stably be achieved. Values of this disequilibrium ratio in the range 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}6} are predicted by an idealized bubble-dynamics model as necessary to achieve conditions where nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium might be observed. Harmonic and aharmonic pressurizations/decompressions are examined as means to achieve the required levels of disequilibrium required to create fusion conditions. A number of phenomena not included in the analysis reported herein could enhance or reduce the small levels of nuclear fusions predicted.

  1. Yamazaki and water bubble

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-12

    S131-E-009282 (12 April 2010) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Naoko Yamazaki, STS-131 mission specialist, squeezes a water bubble out of her beverage container, showing her image refracted, on the middeck of space shuttle Discovery while docked with the International Space Station.

  2. Yamazaki and water bubble

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-12

    S131-E-009285 (12 April 2010) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Naoko Yamazaki, STS-131 mission specialist, watches a water bubble float freely between her and the camera, showing her image refracted, on the middeck of space shuttle Discovery while docked with the International Space Station.

  3. Anderson and water bubble

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-12

    S131-E-009299 (12 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, watches a water bubble float freely between him and the camera, showing his image refracted, on the middeck of space shuttle Discovery while docked with the International Space Station.

  4. Anderson and water bubble

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-12

    S131-E-009277 (12 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, watches a water bubble float freely between him and the camera, showing his image refracted, on the middeck of space shuttle Discovery while docked with the International Space Station.

  5. Poindexter and water bubble

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-12

    S131-E-009294 (12 April 2010) --- NASA astronaut Alan Poindexter, STS-131 commander, watches a water bubble float freely between him and the camera, showing his image refracted, on the middeck of space shuttle Discovery while docked with the International Space Station.

  6. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Mariela; Vinicio Sánchez, René; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-09-18

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The Sensors 2015, 15 23904 approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%.

  7. Multi-stage filtering for improving confidence level and determining dominant clusters in clustering algorithms of gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Kasim, Shahreen; Deris, Safaai; Othman, Razib M

    2013-09-01

    A drastic improvement in the analysis of gene expression has lead to new discoveries in bioinformatics research. In order to analyse the gene expression data, fuzzy clustering algorithms are widely used. However, the resulting analyses from these specific types of algorithms may lead to confusion in hypotheses with regard to the suggestion of dominant function for genes of interest. Besides that, the current fuzzy clustering algorithms do not conduct a thorough analysis of genes with low membership values. Therefore, we present a novel computational framework called the "multi-stage filtering-Clustering Functional Annotation" (msf-CluFA) for clustering gene expression data. The framework consists of four components: fuzzy c-means clustering (msf-CluFA-0), achieving dominant cluster (msf-CluFA-1), improving confidence level (msf-CluFA-2) and combination of msf-CluFA-0, msf-CluFA-1 and msf-CluFA-2 (msf-CluFA-3). By employing double filtering in msf-CluFA-1 and apriori algorithms in msf-CluFA-2, our new framework is capable of determining the dominant clusters and improving the confidence level of genes with lower membership values by means of which the unknown genes can be predicted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A design methodology for a magnetorheological fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. R.; Zhao, D. X.; Xie, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode is put forward, compared with traditional ones with annular damping channel which are of low magnetic field utilization and high energy consumption. The equivalent magnetic circuit model is derived, along with the relation between the magnetic induction at the working gap and the exciting current in the field coils. The finite-element software ANYSY is used to analyze the distribution of the magnetic field in the MR valve. The flow differential equation for a MR fluid in radial flow is theoretically set up, and the numerical solution is validated by means of the Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model. A MR damper was designed and fabricated in Chongqing University in accordance with the technical requirements of a railway vehicle anti-yaw damper, and the force-displacement characteristic of the damper was tested with J95-I type shock absorber test-bed. The results show that the experimental damping forces are in good agreement with the analytical ones, and the methodology is believed to help predict the damping force of a MR damper.

  9. Seven novel prostate cancer susceptibility loci identified by a multi-stage genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Canzian, Frederico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim; Gronberg, Henrik; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Thun, Michael J; Ingles, Sue; Chanock, Stephen; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Pharoah, Paul; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E.; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Dörk, Thilo; Andriole, Gerald; Dickinson, Joanne L.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith A.; Chambers, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Frank Gardiner, R. A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Schaid, Dan; John, Esther M.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Park, Jong Y.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Habuchi, Tomonori; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Kaneva, Radka; Muir, Ken; Benlloch, Sara; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Saunders, Edward J.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Mahmud, Nadiya; Guy, Michelle; O’Brien, Lynne T.; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Hall, Amanda L.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Morrison, Jonathan; Dearnaley, David P.; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Parker, Christopher C.; Van As, Nicholas; Woodhouse, Christopher J.; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin S.; Lophatonanon, Aritaya; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo LJ; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Røder, M. Andreas; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Bojesen, Stig E.; Travis, Ruth; Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Lindstrom, Sara; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan; Stern, Mariana C; Corral, Roman; Virtamo, Jarmo; Cox, Angela; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; FitzGerald, Liesel; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika M.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Borre, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Serth, Jürgen; Yeager, Meredith; Berndt, Sonja I.; Marthick, James R; Patterson, Briony; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Batra, Jyotsna; Lose, Felicity; McDonnell, Shannon K; Joshi, Amit D.; Shahabi, Ahva; Rinckleb, Antje E.; Ray, Ana; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lin, Huo-Yi; Stephenson, Robert A; Farnham, James; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Narita, Shintaro; Cao, Guang-Wen; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. To identify common PrCa susceptibility alleles, we conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study and previously reported the results of the first two stages, which identified 16 novel susceptibility loci for PrCa. Here we report the results of stage 3 in which we evaluated 1,536 SNPs in 4,574 cases and 4,164 controls. Ten novel association signals were followed up through genotyping in 51,311 samples in 30 studies through the international PRACTICAL consortium. In addition to previously reported loci, we identified a further seven new prostate cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 2p, 3q, 5p, 6p, 12q and Xq (P=4.0 ×10−8 to P=2.7 ×10−24). We also identified a SNP in TERT more strongly associated with PrCa than that previously reported. More than 40 PrCa susceptibility loci, explaining ~25% of the familial risk in this disease, have now been identified. PMID:21743467

  10. Performance assessment and transient optimization of multi-stage solid desiccant air conditioning systems with building PV/T integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadalla, Mohamed; Saghafifar, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    One of the popular solar air conditioning technologies is desiccant air conditioning. Nonetheless, single stage desiccant air conditioning systems' coefficient of performance (COP) are relatively low. Therefore, multi-stage solid desiccant air conditioning systems are recommended. In this paper, an integrated double-stage desiccant air conditioning systems and PV/T collector is suggested for hot and humid climates such as the UAE. The results for the PV/T implementation in the double-stage desiccant cooling system are assessed against the PV/T results for a single-stage desiccant air conditioning system. In order to provide a valid comparative evaluation between the single and double stage desiccant air conditioning systems, an identical PV/T module, in terms of dimensions, is incorporated into these systems. The overall required auxiliary air heating is abated by 46.0% from 386.8 MWh to 209.0 MWh by replacing the single stage desiccant air conditioning system with the proposed double stage configuration during June to October. Moreover, the overall averaged solar share during the investigated months for the single and double stage systems are 36.5% and 43.3%.

  11. Thermodynamics of the multi-stage self-assembly of pH-sensitive gradient copolymers in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Černochová, Zulfiya; Bogomolova, Anna; Borisova, Olga V; Filippov, Sergey K; Černoch, Peter; Billon, Laurent; Borisov, Oleg V; Štěpánek, Petr

    2016-08-10

    The self-assembly thermodynamics of pH-sensitive di-block and tri-block gradient copolymers of acrylic acid and styrene was studied for the first time using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) performed at varying pH. We were able to monitor each step of micellization as a function of decreasing pH. The growth of micelles is a multi-stage process that is pH dependent with several exothermic and endothermic components. The first step of protonation of the acrylic acid monomer units was accompanied mainly by conformational changes and the beginning of self-assembly. In the second stage of self-assembly, the micelles become larger and the number of micelles becomes smaller. While solution acidity increases, the isothermal calorimetry data show a broad deep minimum corresponding to an exothermic process attributed to an increase in the size of hydrophobic domains and an increase in the structure's hydrophobicity. The minor change in heat capacity (ΔCp) confirms the structural changes during this exothermic process. The exothermic process terminates deionization of acrylic acid. The pH-dependence of the ζ-potential of the block gradient copolymer micelles exhibits a plateau in the regime corresponding to the pH-controlled variation of the micellar dimensions. The onset of micelle formation and the solubility of the gradient copolymers were found to be dependent on the length of the gradient block.

  12. Task I: A Computational Model for Short Wavelength Stall Inception and Development In Multi-Stage Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth (Technical Monitor); Tan, Choon-Sooi

    2003-01-01

    A computational model is presented for simulating axial compressor stall inception and development via disturbances with length scales on the order of several (typically about three) blade pitches. The model was designed for multi-stage compressors in which stall is initiated by these short wavelength disturbances, also referred to as spikes. The inception process described is fundamentally nonlinear, in contrast to the essentially linear behavior seen in so-called modal stall inception . The model was able to capture the following experimentally observed phenomena: (1) development of rotating stall via short wavelength disturbances, (2) formation and evolution of localized short wavelength stall cells in the first stage of a mismatched compressor, (3) the switch from long to short wavelength stall inception resulting from the re-staggering of the inlet guide vane, (4) the occurrence of rotating stall inception on the negatively sloped portion of the compressor characteristic. Parametric investigations indicated that (1) short wavelength disturbances were supported by the rotor blade row, (2) the disturbance strength was attenuated within the stators, and (3) the reduction of inter-blade row gaps can suppress the growth of short wavelength disturbances. It is argued that each local component group (rotor plus neighboring stators) has its own instability point (i.e. conditions at which disturbances are sustained) for short wavelength disturbances, with the instability point for the compressor set by the most unstable component group.

  13. A Risk-Constrained Multi-Stage Decision Making Approach to the Architectural Analysis of Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Pavone, Marco; Balaram, J. (Bob)

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel risk-constrained multi-stage decision making approach to the architectural analysis of planetary rover missions. In particular, focusing on a 2018 Mars rover concept, which was considered as part of a potential Mars Sample Return campaign, we model the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) phase and the rover traverse phase as four sequential decision-making stages. The problem is to find a sequence of divert and driving maneuvers so that the rover drive is minimized and the probability of a mission failure (e.g., due to a failed landing) is below a user specified bound. By solving this problem for several different values of the model parameters (e.g., divert authority), this approach enables rigorous, accurate and systematic trade-offs for the EDL system vs. the mobility system, and, more in general, cross-domain trade-offs for the different phases of a space mission. The overall optimization problem can be seen as a chance-constrained dynamic programming problem, with the additional complexity that 1) in some stages the disturbances do not have any probabilistic characterization, and 2) the state space is extremely large (i.e, hundreds of millions of states for trade-offs with high-resolution Martian maps). To this purpose, we solve the problem by performing an unconventional combination of average and minimax cost analysis and by leveraging high efficient computation tools from the image processing community. Preliminary trade-off results are presented.

  14. Free-face-Assisted Rock Breaking Method Based on the Multi-stage Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) Cutterhead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Qi; Wei, Zhengying; Meng, Hao; Macias, Francisco Javier; Bruland, Amund

    2016-11-01

    In order to improve the rock breaking efficiency of hard rock tunnel boring, many innovative rock breaking methods have been proposed (e.g., the water jet cutting, the high-power laser cutting, the impact-rotary drilling, and the undercutting method). However, most of the methods are not applicable to TBMs due to some structural reasons. Aiming on this problem, a free-face-assisted rock breaking method based on the multi-stage TBM cutterhead has been proposed. Series of proof-of-concept tests includes (1) the static compression test with vertical free face and (2) the rotary cutting tests in different free surface conditions were designed and carried out. The results show that the rock breaking force and efficiency can be significantly reduced and improved, respectively, with the assistance of the free face, due to the failure of the rock close to the free face is tensile-dominated failure. The influencing distance of the free face in the radial direction is at least 330 mm which covers about 5 disk cutters. Finally, the general structure of a small two-stage cutterhead (4 m in diameter) was tentatively designed in order to provide a possible approach to apply the free-face effect to TBMs.

  15. A Risk-Constrained Multi-Stage Decision Making Approach to the Architectural Analysis of Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Pavone, Marco; Balaram, J. (Bob)

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel risk-constrained multi-stage decision making approach to the architectural analysis of planetary rover missions. In particular, focusing on a 2018 Mars rover concept, which was considered as part of a potential Mars Sample Return campaign, we model the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) phase and the rover traverse phase as four sequential decision-making stages. The problem is to find a sequence of divert and driving maneuvers so that the rover drive is minimized and the probability of a mission failure (e.g., due to a failed landing) is below a user specified bound. By solving this problem for several different values of the model parameters (e.g., divert authority), this approach enables rigorous, accurate and systematic trade-offs for the EDL system vs. the mobility system, and, more in general, cross-domain trade-offs for the different phases of a space mission. The overall optimization problem can be seen as a chance-constrained dynamic programming problem, with the additional complexity that 1) in some stages the disturbances do not have any probabilistic characterization, and 2) the state space is extremely large (i.e, hundreds of millions of states for trade-offs with high-resolution Martian maps). To this purpose, we solve the problem by performing an unconventional combination of average and minimax cost analysis and by leveraging high efficient computation tools from the image processing community. Preliminary trade-off results are presented.

  16. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal

    PubMed Central

    Cerrada, Mariela; Sánchez, René Vinicio; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%. PMID:26393603

  17. An efficient multi-stage fermentation strategy for the production of microbial oil rich in arachidonic acid in Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jia; Zhang, Ai-Hui; Peng, Chao; Ren, Lu-Jing; Song, Ping; Yu, Ya-Dong; Huang, He; Ji, Xiao-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Fungal morphology and aeration play a significant role in the growth process of Mortierella alpina. The production of microbial oil rich in arachidonic acid (ARA) in M. alpina was enhanced by using a multi-stage fermentation strategy which combined fed-batch culture with precise control of aeration and agitation rates at proper times. The fermentation period was divided into four stages according to the cultivation characteristics of M. alpina. The dissolved oxygen concentration was well suited for ARA biosynthesis. Moreover, the ultimate dry cell weight (DCW), lipid, and ARA yields obtained using this strategy reached 41.4, 22.2, 13.5 g/L, respectively. The respective values represent 14.8, 25.8, and 7.8% improvements over traditional fed-batch fermentation processes. This strategy provides promising control insights for the mass production of ARA-rich oil on an industrial scale. Pellet-like fungal morphology was transformed into rice-shaped particles which were beneficial for oxygen transfer and thus highly suitable for biomass accumulation.

  18. Indiana forest cover mapping based on multi-stage integrated classification using satellite and in situ forest inventory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Gang

    Forest species classification through remote sensing data is a complex process, which usually is done either at a coarse level or with low accuracy. This study examines a multi-stage classification algorithm combining supervised and unsupervised classifications to classify forest areas in Indiana. Integrated classification makes the procedures automatic and reduces human errors. Splitting the classification into two steps increases the accuracy with limited ground data. In the first step, in which the Indiana state forest area is classified, the point plug-in classification algorithm is employed, because plenty of ground data are available. In the second step the classifying of the state forest including a surrounding 8km buffer, the ground data are insufficient to process the point plug-in classification approach. In this case, the polygon plug-in classification algorithm is used to realize the extended area classification at the second stage. The resultant land cover map has six tree species (conifer, mixed forest, oak and hickory, mixed oak and hickory/ hardwood, maple and other hardwood). The overall accuracy is 81.93%.

  19. Multi-stage ranking of emergency technology alternatives for water source pollution accidents using a fuzzy group decision making tool.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianhua; Meng, Xianlin; You, Hong

    2016-06-05

    Due to the increasing number of unexpected water source pollution events, selection of the most appropriate disposal technology for a specific pollution scenario is of crucial importance to the security of urban water supplies. However, the formulation of the optimum option is considerably difficult owing to the substantial uncertainty of such accidents. In this research, a multi-stage technical screening and evaluation tool is proposed to determine the optimal technique scheme, considering the areas of pollutant elimination both in drinking water sources and water treatment plants. In stage 1, a CBR-based group decision tool was developed to screen available technologies for different scenarios. Then, the threat degree caused by the pollution was estimated in stage 2 using a threat evaluation system and was partitioned into four levels. For each threat level, a corresponding set of technique evaluation criteria weights was obtained using Group-G1. To identify the optimization alternatives corresponding to the different threat levels, an extension of TOPSIS, a multi-criteria interval-valued trapezoidal fuzzy decision making technique containing the four arrays of criteria weights, to a group decision environment was investigated in stage 3. The effectiveness of the developed tool was elaborated by two actual thallium-contaminated scenarios associated with different threat levels.

  20. Length and bursting of separation bubbles: A physical interpretation. [of pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A physical interpretation of the observed form of the pressure distribution beneath a two-dimensional separation bubble which modified the external inviscid pressure distribution only locally is given in terms of boundary layer concepts. A simple method for estimating along a mean streamline entrained into the underside of a growing shear layer through the transition region is discussed, and predictions of bubble bursting conditions and a lower bound on the bubble length are compared with experiment.

  1. Bubble dynamics and bubble-induced turbulence of a single-bubble chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohyoung; Park, Hyungmin

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the bubble dynamics and liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles injected from a single nozzle have been experimentally investigated. Using a high-speed two-phase particle image velociemtry, measurements on the bubbles and liquid-phase velocity field are conducted in a transparent tank filled with water, while varying the bubble release frequency from 0.1 to 35 Hz. The tested bubble size ranges between 2.0-3.2 mm, and the corresponding bubble Reynolds number is 590-1100, indicating that it belongs to the regime of path instability. As the release frequency increases, it is found that the global shape of bubble dispersion can be classified into two regimes: from asymmetric (regular) to axisymmetric (irregular). In particular, at higher frequency, the wake vortices of leading bubbles cause an irregular behaviour of the following bubble. For the liquid phase, it is found that a specific trend on the bubble-induced turbulence appears in a strong relation to the above bubble dynamics. Considering this, we try to provide a theoretical model to estimate the liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles. Supported by a Grant funded by Samsung Electronics, Korea.

  2. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  3. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  4. Signature of anisotropic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2010-09-15

    Our universe may have formed via bubble nucleation in an eternally inflating background. Furthermore, the background may have a compact dimension--the modulus of which tunnels out of a metastable minimum during bubble nucleation--which subsequently grows to become one of our three large spatial dimensions. When in this scenario our bubble universe collides with other ones like it, the collision geometry is constrained by the reduced symmetry of the tunneling instanton. While the regions affected by such bubble collisions still appear (to leading order) as disks in an observer's sky, the centers of these disks all lie on a single great circle, providing a distinct signature of anisotropic bubble nucleation.

  5. Bubble-solid interactions in water and electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Pushkarova, Rada A; Horn, Roger G

    2008-08-19

    Surface forces between an air bubble and a flat mica surface immersed in aqueous electrolyte solutions have been investigated using a modified surface force apparatus. An analysis of the deformation of the air bubble with respect to the mutual position of the bubble and the mica surface, the capillary pressure, and the disjoining pressure allows the air-liquid surface electrical potential to be determined. The experiments show that a long-range, double-layer repulsion acts between the mica (which is negatively charged) and an air bubble in water and in various electrolyte solutions at low concentration, thereby indicating that the air bubble surface is negatively charged. However, there is clear evidence that charge regulation occurs at the air-water interface to maintain a constant surface potential, and as a result of this, the charge at this interface changes from negative to positive as the bubble approaches the mica surface. Because of the attraction that arises as a result of the charge reversal, a finite force is required to separate the bubble from the mica, though the mica remains wetted by the aqueous phase. At the low concentrations investigated, the potential on the gas-liquid interface is independent of the electrolyte type within experimental uncertainty.

  6. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Ultrasound in Liquids with Gas Bubble Agglomerates: Examples of Bubbly-Liquid-Type Acoustic Metamaterials (BLAMMs).

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian

    2017-01-17

    This work deals with a theoretical analysis about the possibility of using linear and nonlinear acoustic properties to modify ultrasound by adding gas bubbles of determined sizes in a liquid. We use a two-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the effect that one and several monodisperse bubble populations confined in restricted areas of a liquid have on ultrasound by calculating their nonlinear interaction. The filtering of an input ultrasonic pulse performed by a net of bubbly-liquid cells is analyzed. The generation of a low-frequency component from a single cell impinged by a two-frequency harmonic wave is also studied. These effects rely on the particular dispersive character of attenuation and nonlinearity of such bubbly fluids, which can be extremely high near bubble resonance. They allow us to observe how gas bubbles can change acoustic signals. Variations of the bubbly medium parameters induce alterations of the effects undergone by ultrasound. Results suggest that acoustic signals can be manipulated by bubbles. This capacity to achieve the modification and control of sound with oscillating gas bubbles introduces the concept of bubbly-liquid-based acoustic metamaterials (BLAMMs).

  7. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Ultrasound in Liquids with Gas Bubble Agglomerates: Examples of Bubbly-Liquid-Type Acoustic Metamaterials (BLAMMs)

    PubMed Central

    Vanhille, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with a theoretical analysis about the possibility of using linear and nonlinear acoustic properties to modify ultrasound by adding gas bubbles of determined sizes in a liquid. We use a two-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the effect that one and several monodisperse bubble populations confined in restricted areas of a liquid have on ultrasound by calculating their nonlinear interaction. The filtering of an input ultrasonic pulse performed by a net of bubbly-liquid cells is analyzed. The generation of a low-frequency component from a single cell impinged by a two-frequency harmonic wave is also studied. These effects rely on the particular dispersive character of attenuation and nonlinearity of such bubbly fluids, which can be extremely high near bubble resonance. They allow us to observe how gas bubbles can change acoustic signals. Variations of the bubbly medium parameters induce alterations of the effects undergone by ultrasound. Results suggest that acoustic signals can be manipulated by bubbles. This capacity to achieve the modification and control of sound with oscillating gas bubbles introduces the concept of bubbly-liquid-based acoustic metamaterials (BLAMMs). PMID:28106748

  8. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  9. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  10. Magnetic bubble collapse in the presence of a microwave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. L.; Artman, J. O.; Charap, S. H.

    1988-10-01

    A bubble collapse experiment has been done on a garnet sample with the composition Y1.92Sm0.1Ca0.98Fe4.02Ge0.98O12 both with and without an applied local microwave field. To explain the experimental results, the analysis of bubble domain wall motion by Callen and Josephs has been modified by introducing a nonlinear velocity-drive characteristic. In the case of no microwave excitation, a good fit between the theory and the experimental data is then obtained. A bubble collapse model in the presence of a microwave field which includes contributions from microwave-produced ``dipolar pressure'' and ``intrinsic pressure'' has been made. While some discrepancies exist between theory and experiment, nevertheless these results may be helpful in understanding the observations of microwave bubble generation reported by a number of research groups.

  11. Instability of two rising bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galper, Alexander; Miloh, Touvia

    1999-11-01

    We consider the stability of two rising ideal gas spherical bubbles subject of an intrinsic dynamics. The dynamics is prescribed or governed by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation adjusted for the pressure field induced by the other bubble in the center of each. Hence, each bubble exhibits linear (nonlinear) oscillations about a stable equilibrium. In order to treat the Liapunov stability problem of bubbles spatial motion we develop the corresponding Hamiltonian formalism. Thus, we find that the oscillations can stabilize the side-by-side and one-below-the-other bubbles translation. These types of translation are known to be asymptotically stable (unstable) for the motion of a pair of purely spherical rigid bubbles. The stabilization phenomenon depends on the frequency and phase difference in the bubbles fast oscillations. The ``rigid'' bubbles theory of the motion is known to have certain discrepancies with the relevant experiments. In order to remove them it is proposed to account for the vorticity wake behind each bubble. Nevertheless, we are able to explain the experiments remaining within the potential framework. Finally, we consider the case of chaotic pulsations. The motion of the two bubbles can also inherit a chaotic character. It results, in turn, in a certain strange attractor for the spatial motion of a pair.

  12. Rectified growth of histotripsy bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Simon, Julianna C.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy treatments use high-amplitude shock waves to fractionate tissue. Such treatments have been demonstrated using both cavitation bubbles excited with microsecond-long pulses and boiling bubbles excited for milliseconds. A common feature of both approaches is the need for bubble growth, where at 1 MHz cavitation bubbles reach maximum radii on the order of 100 microns and boiling bubbles grow to about 1 mm. To explore how histotripsy bubbles grow, a model of a single, spherical bubble that accounts for heat and mass transport was used to simulate the bubble dynamics. Results suggest that the asymmetry inherent in nonlinearly distorted waveforms can lead to rectified bubble growth, which is enhanced at elevated temperatures. Moreover, the rate of this growth is sensitive to the waveform shape, in particular the transition from the peak negative pressure to the shock front. Current efforts are focused on elucidating this behavior by obtaining an improved calibration of measured histotripsy waveforms with a fiber-optic hydrophone, using a nonlinear propagation model to assess the impact on the focal waveform of higher harmonics present at the source’s surface, and photographically observing bubble growth rates. PMID:26413193

  13. Bubble colloidal AFM probes formed from ultrasonically generated bubbles.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Lee, Judy; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a simple and effective experimental approach to measuring the interaction forces between two small bubbles (approximately 80-140 microm) in aqueous solution during controlled collisions on the scale of micrometers to nanometers. The colloidal probe technique using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was extended to measure interaction forces between a cantilever-attached bubble and surface-attached bubbles of various sizes. By using an ultrasonic source, we generated numerous small bubbles on a mildly hydrophobic surface of a glass slide. A single bubble picked up with a strongly hydrophobized V-shaped cantilever was used as the colloidal probe. Sample force measurements were used to evaluate the pure water bubble cleanliness and the general consistency of the measurements.

  14. Sonoluminescence, sonochemistry and bubble dynamics of single bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Shin-ichi

    2012-09-01

    The amount of hydroxyl radicals produced from a single cavitation bubble was quantified by terephthalate dosimetry at various frequencies and pressure amplitudes, while the dynamics of the single bubble was observed by stroboscopic and light-scattering methods. Also, sonoluminescence (SL), sonochemiluminescence (SCL) of luminol, and sodium atom emission (Na*) in the cavitation field were observed. The amount of hydroxyl radicals per cycle as well as the intensity of SL was proportional to pressure amplitude at every frequency performed, and it decreased with increasing frequency. When the single bubble was dancing with a decrease in pressure amplitude, however, the amount of hydroxyl radicals was greater than that for the stable bubble at the higher pressure amplitude and did not significantly decrease with frequency. Furthermore, SCL and Na* were detected only under unstable bubble conditions. These results imply that the instability of bubbles significantly enhances sonochemical efficiency for non-volatile substances in liquid phase.

  15. Exprimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency for large gas turbine engines. Under ERA, the highly loaded core compressor technology program attempts to realize the fuel burn reduction goal by increasing overall pressure ratio of the compressor to increase thermal efficiency of the engine. Study engines with overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70 are now being investigated. This means that the high pressure compressor would have to almost double in pressure ratio while keeping a high level of efficiency. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by testing the first two stages of an advanced GE compressor designed to meet the requirements of a very high pressure ratio core compressor. Previous test experience of a compressor which included these front two stages indicated a performance deficit relative to design intent. Therefore, the current rig was designed to run in 1-stage and 2-stage configurations in two separate tests to assess whether the bow shock of the second rotor interacting with the upstream stage contributed to the unpredicted performance deficit, or if the culprit was due to interaction of rotor 1 and stator 1. Thus, the goal was to fully understand the stage 1 performance under isolated and multi-stage conditions, and additionally to provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to understand fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to rotor shock interaction and endwall losses. This paper will present the description of the compressor test article and its measured performance and operability, for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the paper on measurements at 97% corrected speed with design intent vane setting angles.

  16. Multi-Stage 20-m Shuttle Run Fitness Test, Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Velocity at Maximal Oxygen Uptake.

    PubMed

    Paradisis, Giorgos P; Zacharogiannis, Elias; Mandila, Dafni; Smirtiotou, Athanasia; Argeitaki, Polyxeni; Cooke, Carlton B

    2014-06-28

    The multi-stage 20-m shuttle run fitness test (20mMSFT) is a popular field test which is widely used to measure aerobic fitness by predicting maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) and performance. However, the velocity at which VO2max occurs (vVO2max) is a better indicator of performance than VO2max, and can be used to explain inter-individual differences in performance that VO2max cannot. It has been reported as a better predictor for running performance and it can be used to monitor athletes' training for predicting optimal training intensity. This study investigated the validity and suitability of predicting VO2max and vVO2max of adult subjects on the basis of the performance of the 20mMST. Forty eight (25 male and 23 female) physical education students performed, in random order, a laboratory based continuous horizontal treadmill test to determine VO2max, vVO2max and a 20mMST, with an interval of 3 days between each test. The results revealed significant correlations between the number of shuttles in the 20mMSFT and directly determined VO2max (r = 0.87, p<0.05) and vVO2max (r = 0.93, p<0.05). The equation for prediction of VO2max was y = 0.0276x + 27.504, whereas for vVO2max it was y = 0.0937x + 6.890. It can be concluded that the 20mMSFT can accurately predict VO2max and vVO2max and this field test can provide useful information regarding aerobic fitness of adults. The predicted vVO2max can be used in monitoring athletes, especially in determining optimal training intensity.

  17. Multi-stage sampling for large scale natural resources surveys: a case study of rice and waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Joshua D; Reinecke, Kenneth J; Kaminski, Richard M; Gerard, Patrick D

    2006-03-01

    Large-scale sample surveys to estimate abundance and distribution of organisms and their habitats are increasingly important in ecological studies. Multi-stage sampling (MSS) is especially suited to large-scale surveys because of the natural clustering of resources. To illustrate an application, we: (1) designed a stratified MSS to estimate late autumn abundance (kg/ha) of rice seeds in harvested fields as food for waterfowl wintering in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV); (2) investigated options for improving the MSS design; and (3) compared statistical and cost efficiency of MSS to simulated simple random sampling (SRS). During 2000-2002, we sampled 25-35 landowners per year, 1 or 2 fields per landowner per year, and measured seed mass in 10 soil cores collected within each field. Analysis of variance components and costs for each stage of the survey design indicated that collecting 10 soil cores per field was near the optimum of 11-15, whereas sampling >1 field per landowner provided few benefits because data from fields within landowners were highly correlated. Coefficients of variation (CV) of annual estimates of rice abundance ranged from 0.23 to 0.31 and were limited by variation among landowners and the number of landowners sampled. Design effects representing the statistical efficiency of MSS relative to SRS ranged from 3.2 to 9.0, and simulations indicated SRS would cost, on average, 1.4 times more than MSS because clustering of sample units in MSS decreased travel costs. We recommend MSS as a potential sampling strategy for large-scale natural resource surveys and specifically for future surveys of the availability of rice as food for waterfowl in the MAV and similar areas.

  18. Multi-stage sampling for large scale natural resources surveys: A case study of rice and waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, J.D.; Reinecke, K.J.; Kaminski, R.M.; Gerard, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale sample surveys to estimate abundance and distribution of organisms and their habitats are increasingly important in ecological studies. Multi-stage sampling (MSS) is especially suited to large-scale surveys because of the natural clustering of resources. To illustrate an application, we: (1) designed a stratified MSS to estimate late autumn abundance (kg/ha) of rice seeds in harvested fields as food for waterfowl wintering in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV); (2) investigated options for improving the MSS design; and (3) compared statistical and cost efficiency of MSS to simulated simple random sampling (SRS). During 2000?2002, we sampled 25?35 landowners per year, 1 or 2 fields per landowner per year, and measured seed mass in 10 soil cores collected within each field. Analysis of variance components and costs for each stage of the survey design indicated that collecting 10 soil cores per field was near the optimum of 11?15, whereas sampling >1 field per landowner provided few benefits because data from fields within landowners were highly correlated. Coefficients of variation (CV) of annual estimates of rice abundance ranged from 0.23 to 0.31 and were limited by variation among landowners and the number of landowners sampled. Design effects representing the statistical efficiency of MSS relative to SRS ranged from 3.2 to 9.0, and simulations indicated SRS would cost, on average, 1.4 times more than MSS because clustering of sample units in MSS decreased travel costs. We recommend MSS as a potential sampling strategy for large-scale natural resource surveys and specifically for future surveys of the availability of rice as food for waterfowl in the MAV and similar areas.

  19. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.

  20. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Šafařík, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple "kitchen" experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic) effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  1. Magnetic bubble domain memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ypma, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Some attractive features of Bubble Domain Memory and its relation to existing technologies are discussed. Two promising applications are block access mass memory and tape recorder replacement. The required chip capabilities for these uses are listed, and the specifications for a block access mass memory designed to fit between core and HPT disk are presented. A feasibility model for a tape recorder replacement is introduced.

  2. Study on the bubble transport mechanism in an acoustic standing wave field.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaoyu; Cegla, Frederic B; Lowe, Michael; Thiemann, Andrea; Nowak, Till; Mettin, Robert; Holsteyns, Frank; Lippert, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    The use of bubbles in applications such as surface chemistry, drug delivery, and ultrasonic cleaning etc. has been enormously popular in the past two decades. It has been recognized that acoustically-driven bubbles can be used to disturb the flow field near a boundary in order to accelerate physical or chemical reactions on the surface. The interactions between bubbles and a surface have been studied experimentally and analytically. However, most of the investigations focused on violently oscillating bubbles (also known as cavitation bubble), less attention has been given to understand the interactions between moderately oscillating bubbles and a boundary. Moreover, cavitation bubbles were normally generated in situ by a high intensity laser beam, little experimental work has been carried out to study the translational trajectory of a moderately oscillating bubble in an acoustic field and subsequent interactions with the surface. This paper describes the design of an ultrasonic test cell and explores the mechanism of bubble manipulation within the test cell. The test cell consists of a transducer, a liquid medium and a glass backing plate. The acoustic field within the multi-layered stack was designed in such a way that it was effectively one dimensional. This was then successfully simulated by a one dimensional network model. The model can accurately predict the impedance of the test cell as well as the mode shape (distribution of particle velocity and stress/pressure field) within the whole assembly. The mode shape of the stack was designed so that bubbles can be pushed from their injection point onto a backing glass plate. Bubble radial oscillation was simulated by a modified Keller-Miksis equation and bubble translational motion was derived from an equation obtained by applying Newton's second law to a bubble in a liquid medium. Results indicated that the bubble trajectory depends on the acoustic pressure amplitude and initial bubble size: an increase of

  3. In Search of the Big Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  4. In Search of the Big Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  5. Multi-stage classification method oriented to aerial image based on low-rank recovery and multi-feature fusion sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Cheng, Yongmei; Hao, Shuai

    2016-12-10

    Automatic classification of terrain surfaces from an aerial image is essential for an autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) landing at an unprepared site by using vision. Diverse terrain surfaces may show similar spectral properties due to the illumination and noise that easily cause poor classification performance. To address this issue, a multi-stage classification algorithm based on low-rank recovery and multi-feature fusion sparse representation is proposed. First, color moments and Gabor texture feature are extracted from training data and stacked as column vectors of a dictionary. Then we perform low-rank matrix recovery for the dictionary by using augmented Lagrange multipliers and construct a multi-stage terrain classifier. Experimental results on an aerial map database that we prepared verify the classification accuracy and robustness of the proposed method.

  6. Collapse of large vapor bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J.; Dominick, S.

    1982-01-01

    The refilling of propellant tanks while in a low-gravity environment requires that entrapped vapor bubbles be collapsed by increasing the system pressure. Tests were performed to verify the mechanism of collapse for these large vapor bubbles with the thermodynamic conditions, geometry, and boundary conditions being those applicable to propellant storage systems. For these conditions it was found that conduction heat transfer determined the collapse rate, with the specific bubble geometry having a significant influence.

  7. Two-way Interaction of Lagrangian Bubble Dynamics and Eulerian Mixture Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges

    2007-11-01

    Although under simple flow conditions a well dispersed bubble cloud in a liquid can be modeled with an Eulerian continuum model, the fine scale interactions between the two phases, the potential non-uniformities and high bubble concentrations in stiff gradient regions of complex flows can only be represented by more detailed numerical models such as Lagrangian tracking of individual bubbles. To meet both needs of describing individual bubbles and of including the collective effects in the two-phase continuum, we have developed a method coupling in a two-way fashion the two approaches. The bubble dynamics and tracking scheme is based on extensive studies on bubble dynamics and interactions at Dynaflow and is based on a Surface Averaged Pressure spherical model using a modified incompressible Rayleigh-Plesset equation or a modified compressible Gilmore equation. The bubbles presence in the Eulerian flow field is considered through a variable medium density formulation resulting from the instantaneous bubble population distribution in the field. The developed method is applicable to many practical flows in pipes, jets, pumps, propellers, ships, and the ocean. We present the method and its application to waterjet thrust augmentation by bubble injection.

  8. Bubble induced flow field modulation for pool boiling enhancement over a tubular surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghupathi, P. A.; Joshi, I. M.; Jaikumar, A.; Emery, T. S.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of using a strategically placed enhancement feature to modify the trajectory of bubbles nucleating on a horizontal tubular surface to increase both the critical heat flux (CHF) and the heat transfer coefficient (HTC). The CHF on a plain tube is shown to be triggered by a local dryout at the bottom of the tube due to vapor agglomeration. To mitigate this effect and delay CHF, the nucleating bubble trajectory is modified by incorporating a bubble diverter placed axially at the bottom of the tube. The nucleating bubble at the base of the diverter experiences a tangential evaporation momentum force (EMF) which causes the bubble to grow sideways away from the tube and avoid localized bubble patches that are responsible for CHF initiation. High speed imaging confirmed the lateral displacement of the bubbles away from the diverter closely matched with the theoretical predictions using EMF and buoyancy forces. Since the EMF is stronger at higher heat fluxes, bubble displacement increases with heat flux and results in the formation of separate liquid-vapor pathways wherein the liquid enters almost unobstructed at the bottom and the vapor bubble leaves sideways. Experimental results yielded CHF and HTC enhancements of ˜60% and ˜75%, respectively, with the diverter configuration when compared to a plain tube. This work can be used for guidance in developing enhancement strategies to effectively modulate the liquid-vapor flow around the heater surface at various locations to enhance HTC and CHF.

  9. Bubble measuring instrument and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  10. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  11. Bubble Measuring Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer. respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  12. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  13. Bubble generation during transformer overload

    SciTech Connect

    Oommen, T.V. . Materials and Mfg. Technology Dept.)

    1990-03-01

    Bubble generation in transformers has been demonstrated under certain overload conditions. The release of large quantities of bubbles would pose a dielectric breakdown hazard. A bubble prediction model developed under EPRI Project 1289-4 attempts to predict the bubble evolution temperature under different overload conditions. This report details a verification study undertaken to confirm the validity of the above model using coil structures subjected to overload conditions. The test variables included moisture in paper insulation, gas content in oil, and the type of oil preservation system. Two aged coils were also tested. The results indicated that the observed bubble temperatures were close to the predicted temperatures for models with low initial gas content in the oil. The predicted temperatures were significantly lower than the observed temperatures for models with high gas content. Some explanations are provided for the anomalous behavior at high gas levels in oil. It is suggested that the dissolved gas content is not a significant factor in bubble evolution. The dominant factor in bubble evolution appears to be the water vapor pressure which must reach critical levels before bubbles can be released. Further study is needed to make a meaningful revision of the bubble prediction model. 8 refs., 13 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  15. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  16. A multi-stage curing technique toward improved dimensional infidelity of curve-shaped composites manufactured with vacuum assisted resin transfer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, Kai Jin

    The occurrence of dimensional infidelity during the curing process is detected as curved composites are being released from the mold after full consolidation. On the other hand, the lengthy cure cycle, thermal spiking and non-uniform consolidation in thick composite manufacturing are often strong deterrents to widespread industrial implementation. Therefore, a multi-stage curing technique is implemented and its outcome toward the spring-in phenomenon is investigated in this research. The composite processing technique of stage curing is useful for assessing the effects of thermal spiking, non-uniform consolidation and fiber wrinkling on mechanical integrity for thick composite structures. However, the prediction of spring-in behavior for a multi-stage curing process is still a relatively unexplored area in engineering research. As a result, a compatibility model based on the residual stress that builds up at each curing stage is performed in our study. Since the resin provides a lubricant effect between each curing stage, a partial slipping interface factor w is introduced to our numerical simulation model. The newly developed multi-stage curing model shows good agreement with the experimental results under Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process.

  17. Bubble motion and size variation during thermal migration with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurse, A. K.; McFadden, G. B.; Coriell, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of the motion of a spherical bubble in a two-phase (fluid-fluid), single component system with a vertical linear temperature gradient is presented. The model for the migration of an immiscible bubble under the effects of buoyancy and thermocapillarity, considered by Young et al. ["The motion of bubbles in a vertical temperature gradient," J. Fluid Mech. 6, 350-356 (1959)], is modified to allow for phase change at the bubble surface. We allow the possibility of both translation of the bubble in the vertical direction and the change of bubble radius with time. Depending on the material parameters, the thermocapillary and buoyancy effects that govern the migration of an immiscible bubble can be overwhelmed by the effects of latent heat generation, resulting in a change in the mechanism driving the motion. For a water-steam system, conditions are determined for a stationary bubble in which the effects of buoyancy and thermal migration are balanced. The linear stability of the bubble is considered, and conditions are determined that correspond to small-amplitude oscillations of the position and radius of the bubble. A weakly nonlinear analysis of the solution in the vicinity of the unstable solution is performed, and the results are compared with a numerical solution of the nonlinear equations.

  18. Taylor bubbles at high viscosity ratios: experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube, often occurring in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, particularly oil and gas production. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of three-dimensional Taylor bubble rising in highly viscous silicone oil in a vertical pipe. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is adopted here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rising and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control volume and finite element formulation, a `volume of fluid'-type method for the interface-capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Experimental results for the Taylor bubble shape and rise velocity are presented, together with numerical results for the dynamics of the bubbles. A comparison of the simulation predictions with experimental data available in the literature is also presented to demonstrate the capabilities of our numerical method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  19. Numerical study of Taylor bubbles with adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry

    2014-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube. This type of bubble flow regime often occurs in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, including oil-and-gas production, chemical and nuclear reactors, and heat exchangers. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of Taylor bubbles rising in a vertical pipe filled with oils of extremely high viscosity (mimicking the ``heavy oils'' found in the oil-and-gas industry). A modelling and simulation framework is presented here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rise and reduce the computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control-volume and finite-element formulation, a ``volume of fluid''-type method for the interface capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Numerical examples of some benchmark tests and the dynamics of Taylor bubbles are presented to show the capability of this method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  20. Optimization of atrazine and imidacloprid removal from water using biochars: Designing single or multi-staged batch adsorption systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhishek; Singh, Neera

    2017-05-01

    Contamination of surface and ground water by pesticides from agricultural runoff and industrial discharge is one of the main causes of aqueous contaminations world over. Biochar, agricultural waste derived highly aromatic substance produced after pyrolysis and carbonification of biomass have exhibited good adsorption capacity for pesticides and can be used to develop on-site bio-purification systems for organic contaminant removal from polluted waters. However, high amounts of adsorbent required in single stage-batch sorption plant increases the cost of water treatment; therefore, multistage plant systems were investigated. Normal (RSBC) and phosphoric acid treated (T-RSBC) rice straw biochars were evaluated for atrazine and imidacloprid sorption and data fitted to the Freundlich isotherm. The adsorption data was modelled to develop single or multi-staged adsorber plants for pesticide removal from water. Both biochars showed significantly high adsorption capacity for imidacloprid and atrazine. Modelling studies using the Freundlich adsorption parameters suggested that the amounts (kg/1000L) of RSBC and T-RSBC for 95% of atrazine removal (10mg/L) in single-, two- and three-staged adsorber plant models were 8.84, 2.44, 1.61kg and 4.47, 1.42, 0.98kg, respectively. Corresponding amounts for 95% imidacloprid removal (10mg/L) were 3.97, 1.22, 0.84kg and 3.98, 1.38, 0.96kg, respectively. Thus, the two-staged model suggested 65-72% reduction in amount of adsorbent required over the single stage model, while the three-staged model suggested 30-34% adsorbent saving over the two-staged plant model. Single and two-staged adsorber plant model findings were validated for atrazine removal using T-RSBC. Results suggested that amounts calculated using modelling studies were fairly accurate. Biochars, as low cost adsorbents for atrazine and imidacloprid removal from contaminated water, can be used to develop low cost adsorber plants based on multiple batch sorption systems for the

  1. Drill Cuttings-based Methodology to Optimize Multi-stage Hydraulic Fracturing in Horizontal Wells and Unconventional Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Mercado, Camilo Ernesto

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques have become almost mandatory technologies for economic exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs. Key to commercial success is minimizing the risk while drilling and hydraulic fracturing these wells. Data collection is expensive and as a result this is one of the first casualties during budget cuts. As a result complete data sets in horizontal wells are nearly always scarce. In order to minimize the data scarcity problem, the research addressed throughout this thesis concentrates on using drill cuttings, an inexpensive direct source of information, for developing: 1) A new methodology for multi-stage hydraulic fracturing optimization of horizontal wells without any significant increases in operational costs. 2) A new method for petrophysical evaluation in those wells with limited amount of log information. The methods are explained using drill cuttings from the Nikanassin Group collected in the Deep Basin of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). Drill cuttings are the main source of information for the proposed methodology in Item 1, which involves the creation of three 'log tracks' containing the following parameters for improving design of hydraulic fracturing jobs: (a) Brittleness Index, (b) Measured Permeability and (c) An Indicator of Natural Fractures. The brittleness index is primarily a function of Poisson's ratio and Young Modulus, parameters that are obtained from drill cuttings and sonic logs formulations. Permeability is measured on drill cuttings in the laboratory. The indication of natural fractures is obtained from direct observations on drill cuttings under the microscope. Drill cuttings are also the main source of information for the new petrophysical evaluation method mentioned above in Item 2 when well logs are not available. This is important particularly in horizontal wells where the amount of log data is almost non-existent in the vast majority of the wells. By combining data

  2. Visualization of airflow growing soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Rahbi, Hamood; Bock, Matthew; Ryu, Sangjin

    2016-11-01

    Visualizing airflow inside growing soap bubbles can answer questions regarding the fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing, which is a model system for flows with a gas-liquid-gas interface. Also, understanding the soap bubble blowing process is practical because it can contribute to controlling industrial processes similar to soap bubble blowing. In this study, we visualized airflow which grows soap bubbles using the smoke wire technique to understand how airflow blows soap bubbles. The soap bubble blower setup was built to mimic the human blowing process of soap bubbles, which consists of a blower, a nozzle and a bubble ring. The smoke wire was placed between the nozzle and the bubble ring, and smoke-visualized airflow was captured using a high speed camera. Our visualization shows how air jet flows into the growing soap bubble on the ring and how the airflow interacts with the soap film of growing bubble.

  3. A bubbling bolt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossard, Guillaume; Katmadas, Stefanos

    2014-07-01

    We present a new solvable system, solving the equations of five-dimensional ungauged = 1 supergravity coupled to vector multiplets, that allows for non-extremal solutions and reduces to a known system when restricted to the floating brane Ansatz. A two-centre globally hyperbolic smooth geometry is obtained as a solution to this system, describing a bubble linking a Gibbons-Hawking centre to a charged bolt. However this solution turns out to violate the BPS bound, and we show that its generalisation to an arbitrary number of Gibbons-Hawking centres never admits a spin structure.

  4. Application of micro-bubbles on oral care.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Ju; Chuang, Ming-Chuen; Chang, Szu-Chung

    2017-09-15

    This study proposed a method of using a modified micro-bubble generator with its ejection nozzle connected to an ergonomically designed soft teeth-tray for plaque removal. The applicability of this method was verified and the influence on plaque removal efficacy of some parameters of this device was clarified. The micro-bubble generator used in this study has 5 rotation speed settings, 5 nozzle sizes, and a soft teeth-tray ejection pore diameters. These were used as independent variables to investigate their effect on the ejected flow volume, velocity and micro-bubble dimension, and how they eventually affect the plaque removal efficacy from a denture. When the micro-bubble generator coupled with large (4.8 mm) ejection pore teeth-tray and the largest (1.2 mm) nozzle diameter more than 98% of plaque can be removed; its applicability on cleaning denture can be verified. In general, the larger nozzle diameter and teeth-tray ejection pore diameter will remove more plaques; while the higher the flow velocity and the smaller the micro-bubble of the ejected stream, better cleaning efficacy can be achieved. The application of micro-bubble on plaque removal seems effective, although at this moment it is applied on denture cleaning. The finding of the influence of some critical design parameters of micro-bubble generator and variables of ejected stream can be referred to further design a new micro-bubble cleaner for effective plaque removal from the teeth in human oral cavity.

  5. Bubble, bubble, flow and Hubble: large scale galaxy flow from cosmological bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Larjo, Klaus; Levi, Thomas S. E-mail: tslevi@phas.ubc.ca

    2010-08-01

    We study large scale structure in the cosmology of Coleman-de Luccia bubble collisions. Within a set of controlled approximations we calculate the effects on galaxy motion seen from inside a bubble which has undergone such a collision. We find that generically bubble collisions lead to a coherent bulk flow of galaxies on some part of our sky, the details of which depend on the initial conditions of the collision and redshift to the galaxy in question. With other parameters held fixed the effects weaken as the amount of inflation inside our bubble grows, but can produce measurable flows past the number of efolds required to solve the flatness and horizon problems.

  6. Bubble levitation and translation under single-bubble sonoluminescence conditions.

    PubMed

    Matula, Thomas J

    2003-08-01

    Bubble levitation in an acoustic standing wave is re-examined for conditions relevant to single-bubble sonoluminescence. Unlike a previous examination [Matula et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1522-1527 (1997)], the stable parameter space [Pa,R0] is accounted for in this realization. Forces such as the added mass force and drag are included, and the results are compared with a simple force balance that equates the Bjerknes force to the buoyancy force. Under normal sonoluminescence conditions, the comparison is quite favorable. A more complete accounting of the forces shows that a stably levitated bubble does undergo periodic translational motion. The asymmetries associated with translational motion are hypothesized to generate instabilities in the spherical shape of the bubble. A reduction in gravity results in reduced translational motion. It is hypothesized that such conditions may lead to increased light output from sonoluminescing bubbles.

  7. Na emission and bubble instability in single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pak-Kon; Takumori, Keisuke; Lee, Hyang-Bok

    2017-09-01

    Na emission in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) was observed from 0.1mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution containing a dissolved noble gas at a low acoustic pressure, at which a continuous spectral component was negligible. High-speed shadowgraph movies were captured at a frame rate of 30,000fps, which indicated that bubble dancing is responsible for the Na emission. The measured bubble path length was well correlated with the Na intensity. The disintegration of a daughter bubble followed by immediate coalescence was frequently observed, which may have been the cause of the bubble dancing. A comparison of the Na spectra obtained in SBSL and multibubble SL showed that the conditions under which Na emission is generated are twofold. A narrow component was observed in the Na spectrum in SBSL, while narrow and broad components were observed in MBSL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bubbles attenuate elastic waves at seismic frequencies: First experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Chapman, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yury; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The migration of gases from deep to shallow reservoirs can cause damageable events. For instance, some gases can pollute the biosphere or trigger explosions and eruptions. Seismic tomography may be employed to map the accumulation of subsurface bubble-bearing fluids to help mitigating such hazards. Nevertheless, how gas bubbles modify seismic waves is still unclear. We show that saturated rocks strongly attenuate seismic waves when gas bubbles occupy part of the pore space. Laboratory measurements of elastic wave attenuation at frequencies <100 Hz are modeled with a dynamic gas dissolution theory demonstrating that the observed frequency-dependent attenuation is caused by wave-induced-gas-exsolution-dissolution (WIGED). This result is incorporated into a numerical model simulating the propagation of seismic waves in a subsurface domain containing CO2-gas bubbles. This simulation shows that WIGED can significantly modify the wavefield and illustrates how accounting for this physical mechanism can potentially improve the monitoring and surveying of gas bubble-bearing fluids in the subsurface.

  9. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media.

  10. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  11. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  12. Bubbles attenuate elastic waves at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Chapman, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yury; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The vertical migration of multiphase fluids in the crust can cause hazardous events such as eruptions, explosions, pollution and earthquakes. Although seismic tomography could potentially provide a detailed image of such fluid-saturated regions, the interpretation of the tomographic signals is often controversial and fails in providing a conclusive map of the subsurface saturation. Seismic tomography should be improved considering seismic wave attenuation (1/Q) and the dispersive elastic moduli which allow accounting for the energy lost by the propagating elastic wave. In particular, in saturated media a significant portion of the energy carried by the propagating wave is dissipated by the wave-induced-fluid-flow and the wave-induced-gas-exsolution-dissolution (WIGED) mechanisms. The WIGED mechanism describes how a propagating wave modifies the thermodynamic equillibrium between different fluid phases causing the exsolution and the dissolution of the gas in the liquid, which in turn causes a significant frequency dependent 1/Q and moduli dispersion. The WIGED theory was initially postulated for bubbly magmas but only recently was extended to bubbly water and experimentally demonstrated. Here we report these theory and laboratory experiments. Specifically, we present i) attenuation measurements performed by means of the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel on porous media saturated with water and different gases, and ii) numerical experiments validating the laboratory observations. Finally, we will extend the theory to fluids and to pressure-temperature conditions which are typical of phreatomagmatic and hydrocarbon domains and we will compare the propagation of seismic waves in bubble-free and bubble-bearing subsurface domains. With the present contribution we extend the knowledge about attenuation in rocks which are saturated with multiphase fluid demonstrating that the WIGED mechanism could be extremely important to image subsurface gas plumes.

  13. Acoustic Behavior of Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Oguz, Hasan N.

    1996-01-01

    In a microgravity environment vapor bubbles generated at a boiling surface tend to remain near it for a long time. This affects the boiling heat transfer and in particular promotes an early transition to the highly inefficient film boiling regime. This paper describes the physical basis underlying attempts to remove the bubbles by means of pressure radiation forces.

  14. Magnetoelastic interactions in bubble materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, H.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of magnetoelastic phenomena in bubble materials (garnet and amorphous thin films) are presented. An attempt is made to describe these problems within the framework of group theory. Moreover, several microscopic models of magnetoelastic interactions in bubble materials is presented.

  15. Bubble detector investigations in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shi-Lun

    2006-01-01

    Investigation on bubble detectors started in China in 1989. Five types of bubble detectors have been developed, with LET thresholds ranging from 0.05 to 6.04 MeV mg(-1) cm(2) at 25 degrees C. The neutron response of bubble detectors made with freon-12 has been investigated with mono-energetic neutrons from 20 keV to 19 MeV. Its effective threshold energy for neutron detection is approximately 100 keV at 28 degrees C. The response above this threshold is approximately 1.5 x 10(-4) (bubble cm(-2))/(n cm(-2)). Bubble detectors are unique not only for neutron dosimetry but also for monitoring and identifying high-energy heavy ions such as cosmic radiation in the space. High-energy heavy ion tracks in large size bubble detectors have been investigated in cooperation with scientists in Japan. The key parameter behind the thresholds of bubble detectors for track registration is the critical rate of energy loss. Three approaches to identify high-energy heavy ions with bubble detectors are suggested.

  16. Tuning bubbly structures in microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Sharon M.; Anna, Shelley L.

    2012-01-01

    Foams have many useful applications that arise from the structure and size distribution of the bubbles within them. Microfluidics allows for the rapid formation of uniform bubbles, where bubble size and volume fraction are functions of the input gas pressure, liquid flow rate, and device geometry. After formation, the microchannel confines the bubbles and determines the resulting foam structure. Bubbly structures can vary from a single row (“dripping”), to multiple rows (“alternating”), to densely packed bubbles (“bamboo” and dry foams). We show that each configuration arises in a distinct region of the operating space defined by bubble volume and volume fraction. We describe the boundaries between these regions using geometric arguments and show that the boundaries are functions of the channel aspect ratio. We compare these geometric arguments with foam structures observed in experiments using flow-focusing, T-junction, and co-flow designs to generate stable nitrogen bubbles in aqueous surfactant solution and stable droplets in oil containing dissolved surfactant. The outcome of this work is a set of design parameters that can be used to achieve desired foam structures as a function of device geometry and experimental control parameters. PMID:22655008

  17. Bubble Transport through Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Omer

    2012-11-01

    In current energy research, artificial photosynthetic devices are being designed to split water and harvest hydrogen gas using energy from the sun. In one such design, hydrogen gas bubbles evolve on the catalytic surfaces of arrayed micropillars. If these bubbles are not promptly removed from the surface, they can adversely affect gas evolution rates, water flow rates, sunlight capture, and heat management of the system. Therefore, an efficient method of collecting the evolved gas bubbles is crucial. Preliminary flow visualization has been conducted of bubbles advecting through dense arrays of pillars. Bubbles moving through square and hexagonal arrays are tracked, and the results are qualitatively described. Initial attempts to correlate bubble motion with relevant lengthscales and forces are also presented. These observations suggest how bubble transport within such pillar arrays can be managed, as well as guide subsequent experiments that investigate bubble evolution and collection. This material is based upon work performed by the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award Number DE-SC0004993.

  18. Blue bubble in Carina

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-22

    Sparkling at the centre of this beautiful NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a Wolf–Rayet star known as WR 31a, located about 30 000 light-years away in the constellation of Carina (The Keel). The distinctive blue bubble appearing to encircle WR 31a, and its uncatalogued stellar sidekick, is a Wolf–Rayet nebula — an interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other gases. Created when speedy stellar winds interact with the outer layers of hydrogen ejected by Wolf–Rayet stars, these nebulae are frequently ring-shaped or spherical. The bubble — estimated to have formed around 20 000 years ago — is expanding at a rate of around 220 000 kilometres per hour! Unfortunately, the lifecycle of a Wolf–Rayet star is only a few hundred thousand years — the blink of an eye in cosmic terms. Despite beginning life with a mass at least 20 times that of the Sun, Wolf–Rayet stars typically lose half their mass in less than 100 000 years. And WR 31a is no exception to this case. It will, therefore, eventually end its life as a spectacular supernova, and the stellar material expelled from its explosion will later nourish a new generation of stars and planets.

  19. Coalescence of Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Christopher; Thete, Sumeet; Sambath, Krishnaraj; Basaran, Osman

    2014-11-01

    Drop and bubble coalescence plays a central role in industry and nature. During drop coalescence, two drops touch and merge as a liquid neck connecting them grows from microscopic to macroscopic scales. The hydrodynamic singularity that arises as two drops begin coalescing in a dynamically passive outer fluid (air) has been studied thoroughly in recent years. As a preliminary to developing a similar level of understanding when two drops coalesce in an outer fluid of non-negligible density and viscosity, we use simulation to analyze the coalescence of two identical gas bubbles (idealized as two passive spherical voids) in a liquid. This problem has recently been studied experimentally by Nagel and coworkers (2014). The simulations allow probing of the dynamics for neck radii much smaller than what is possible in experiments. At times earlier than those accessible in experiments, simulations reveal a new type of scaling response than those reported by Nagel et al. However, at larger times, the dynamics is shown to transition to regimes that have been proposed by Nagel and coworkers. Unlike in the experiments, it is shown that the observed scaling regimes can be readily rationalized by judicious interrogation of computed flow fields.

  20. Triangular bubble spline surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kapl, Mario; Byrtus, Marek; Jüttler, Bert

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method for generating a Gn-surface from a triangular network of compatible surface strips. The compatible surface strips are given by a network of polynomial curves with an associated implicitly defined surface, which fulfill certain compatibility conditions. Our construction is based on a new concept, called bubble patches, to represent the single surface patches. The compatible surface strips provide a simple Gn-condition between two neighboring bubble patches, which are used to construct surface patches, connected with Gn-continuity. For n≤2, we describe the obtained Gn-condition in detail. It can be generalized to any n≥3. The construction of a single surface patch is based on Gordon–Coons interpolation for triangles. Our method is a simple local construction scheme, which works uniformly for vertices of arbitrary valency. The resulting surface is a piecewise rational surface, which interpolates the given network of polynomial curves. Several examples of G0, G1 and G2-surfaces are presented, which have been generated by using our method. The obtained surfaces are visualized with reflection lines to demonstrate the order of smoothness. PMID:22267872

  1. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  2. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  3. Bubble dynamics in N dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Alexander R.

    2013-08-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics are central concepts in engineering, the natural sciences, and the mathematics of fluid mechanics. Due to the nonlinear nature of their dynamics, the governing equations are not fully solvable. Here, the dynamics of a spherical bubble in an N-dimensional fluid are discussed in the hope that examining bubble behavior in N dimensions will add insight to their behavior in three dimensions. Several canonical results in bubble dynamics are re-derived, including the Rayleigh collapse time, the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, and the Minnaert frequency. Recent analytical approximations to the Rayleigh collapse are discussed, and the N-dimensional generalization is used to resolve a known discrepancy. Numerical simulations are used to examine the onset of nonlinear behavior. Overall, the dynamics of bubbles are faster at higher dimensions, with nonlinear behavior occurring at lower strain. Several features are found to be unique to three dimensions, including the trend of nonlinear behavior and apparent coincidences in timescales.

  4. Multi-stage uplift of the Colorado Plateau and the age of Grand Canyon and precursor canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, K. E.; Lee, J. P.; Kelley, S. A.; Crow, R.

    2012-12-01

    Debates about the age of Grand Canyon link to debates about the timing of surface uplift(s) of the Colorado Plateau- Rocky Mountain (CP-RM) region. One "old Grand Canyon" model proposes that a paleocanyon of almost the same depth and location as today's Grand Canyon was carved by a NE-flowing "California" paleoriver 80-70 Ma, then was re-used at ~55 Ma by a SW-flowing "Arizona" paleoriver. This model postulates the CP-RM region was uplifted to near modern elevations during the Laramide orogeny. A second model postulates a 17 Ma Grand Canyon; this time corresponds to Basin and Range extension and postulated mantle-driven surface uplift. The "young Grand Canyon" model postulates that >2/3 of modern Grand Canyon was carved by W-flowing Colorado River that became integrated to the Gulf of California at 5-6 Ma during Neogene mantle-driven uplift of the CP/RM region. Thermochronologic data are poised to substantially resolve these debates. Our thermochronology dataset combines published and new apatite fission-track and helium analyses, and joint thermal history modeling using both systems. This dataset reveals three major cooling episodes: 1) a multi-stage Sevier-Laramide contraction episode from about 90 Ma to 50 Ma with structural relief on upwarps on the order 0.5-1 km, compatible with a similar magnitude of surface uplift; 2) 30-20 Ma cooling that was associated with denudation and northward cliff retreat of most of the Mesozoic section from Grand Canyon region; 3) <10 Ma cooling that is best documented in eastern Grand Canyon as part of a general pattern of decreasing age of cooling/denudation to the NE. Combined geologic and thermochronologic data define the age and 3-D geometry of Cenozoic paleotopography that led to Grand Canyon carving. Combined AHe and AFT data indicate 2-4 km of sedimentary rocks covered the Grand Canyon region until about 40 Ma, negating the California River model. These strata were not removed from the Marble Canyon area until after about

  5. Titanite-scale insights into multi-stage magma mixing in Early Cretaceous of NW Jiaodong terrane, North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Yang, Kui-Feng; Fan, Hong-Rui; Liu, Xuan; Cai, Ya-Chun; Yang, Yue-Heng

    2016-08-01

    REEs contents, and Th/U ratios, but reveal high F contents (0.35-0.76 wt.%) and extreme high Nb/Ta ratios (up to 65.6). Such titanites are perceived to record late-stage mingling, during which F-rich and REE-poor hybrid granodioritic magma squeezed into the incompletely consolidated dioritic enclaves with accompanying fluid-rock interaction. Combining our results with previous isotopic studies, a new genetic model for Guojialing-type granodiorites is envisaged, which involves multi-stage magma mixing between Archean lower crust-derived felsic magma and mafic lower crust-derived dioritic magma, triggered by mantle-derived mafic magma underplating during the course of asthenospheric upwelling in Early Cretaceous. Such process further implicates the reactivation of Jiaodong lower crust during the destruction of NCC.

  6. Multi-stage barites in partially melted UHP eclogite: implications for fluid/melt activities during deep continental subduction in the Sulu orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Songjie; Wang, Lu

    2015-04-01

    . Zr-in-rutile thermometry shows their formation temperature to be 586-664 oC at 1.5-2.5 GPa. Barite-bearing MS inclusions with Ba-bearing K-feldspar (type-II) connected by Kfs+Pl+Bt veinlets of in-situ phengite breakdown and thin barite veinlets along grain boundaries (type-III) are products of phengite breakdown and induced fluid flow during exhumation. These barites have witnessed the gradational separation process of melt/ fluid from miscibility on/above the second critical endpoint during UHP metamorphism, to immiscibility along the exhumation path of the subducted slab. Associated reactions from pyrite to hematite and goethite with the type-III barite ring surrounding the pyrite provide evidence for a local high oxygen fugacity environment during eclogite partial melting and subsequent melt/fluid crystallization processes. Moreover, large grain barite aggregations (type-IV) modified by amphibole+albite symplectite are most likely formed by release of molecular and hydroxyl water from anhydrous minerals of eclogite during high-grade amphibolite-facies retrogression. The growth of multi-stage barites in UHP eclogite further advances our understanding of fluid/melt transfer, crystallization processes along the subduction-exhumation path of the partially melted eclogite, broadening our knowledge of melt/fluid evolution within subduction-collision zones worldwide. REFERENCES Chen Y.X., et al., 2014, Lithos, 200, 1-21. Liu J.B., et al., 2000, Acta Petrologica Sinica 16(4), 482-484. Zeng L.S., et al., 2007, Chinese Science Bulletin, 52(21), 2995-3001. Gao X.Y., et al., 2012, Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 30(2), 193-212.

  7. High-contrast active cavitation imaging technique based on multiple bubble wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shukuan; Xu, Shanshan; Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a unique method that combines the ultrafast active cavitation imaging technique with multiple bubble wavelet transform (MBWT) for improving cavitation detection contrast was presented. The bubble wavelet was constructed by the modified Keller-Miksis equation that considered the mutual effect among bubbles. A three-dimensional spatial model was applied to simulate the spatial distribution of multiple bubbles. The effects of four parameters on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of cavitation images were evaluated, including the following: initial radii of bubbles, scale factor in the wavelet transform, number of bubbles, and the minimum inter-bubble distance. And the other two spatial models and cavitation bubble size distributions were introduced in the MBWT method. The results suggested that in the free-field experiments, the averaged SNR of images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 7.16 ± 0.09 dB and 3.14 ± 0.14 dB compared with the values of images acquired by the B-mode and single bubble wavelet transform (SBWT) methods. In addition, in the tissue experiments, the averaged cavitation-to-tissue ratio of cavitation images acquired by the MBWT method was improved by 4.69 ± 0.25 dB and 1.74± 0.29 dB compared with that of images acquired by B-mode and SBWT methods.

  8. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles.

    PubMed

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L. It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V=L(3)/6π(2), and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V<αL(3)/6π(2), with α≈0.21, such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V<αL(3)/6π(2) cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  9. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L . It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V =L3/6 π2 , and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V <α L3/6 π2 , with α ≈0.21 , such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V <α L3/6 π2 cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  10. A Multi-Stage Ultra-Endurance Run over 1,200 KM Leads to a Continuous Accumulation of Total Body Water

    PubMed Central

    Knechtle, Beat; Duff, Brida; Schulze, Ingo; Kohler, Götz

    2008-01-01

    We determined whether ultra-runners in a multi-stage ultra- endurance run lose body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass or total body water in a descriptive field study at the ‘Deutschlandlauf’ 2007 a 1,200 km run within 17 consecutive days with 10 male non-professional Caucasian ultra-runners (mean ± SD, 43.8 ± 6.2 years, 73.8 ± 6.0 kg body mass, 1.77 ± 0.05 m body height, BMI 23.3 ± 1.8 kg·m-2). Body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, lean body mass and percent total body water were determined using bioelectrical impedance analysis and the anthropometric method before the race and after each stage. In addition, urinary specific gravity was measured in order to quantify hydration status. Fat mass (bioelectrical impedance analysis) decreased by 3.9 kg (p < 0.05), skeletal muscle mass (anthropometric method) decreased by 2.0 kg (p < 0.05) whereas percent total body water increased by 6.1 % (p < 0.05) by the end of the race. Ultra-runners in a multi-stage ultra-endurance event over 1,200 km, with 17 consecutive stages, showed a cumulative increase in percent total body water, a decrease in skeletal muscle mass and a decrease in fat mass, depending upon the method used. We presume that the eccentric component of running leads to damage of skeletal muscle, leading to rhabdomyolysis, with impaired renal function. Key pointsUltra-runners in a multi-stage ultra-endurance run over 1,200 km in 17 consecutive stages suffered a decrease in fat mass, skeletal muscle mass and an increase in total body water, whereas overall body mass showed no change. PMID:24149903

  11. Simulation of multi-stage nonlinear bone remodeling induced by fixed partial dentures of different configurations: a comparative clinical and numerical study.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhipeng; Yoda, Nobuhiro; Chen, Junning; Zheng, Keke; Sasaki, Keiichi; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing

    2017-04-01

    This paper aimed to develop a clinically validated bone remodeling algorithm by integrating bone's dynamic properties in a multi-stage fashion based on a four-year clinical follow-up of implant treatment. The configurational effects of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) were explored using a multi-stage remodeling rule. Three-dimensional real-time occlusal loads during maximum voluntary clenching were measured with a piezoelectric force transducer and were incorporated into a computerized tomography-based finite element mandibular model. Virtual X-ray images were generated based on simulation and statistically correlated with clinical data using linear regressions. The strain energy density-driven remodeling parameters were regulated over the time frame considered. A linear single-stage bone remodeling algorithm, with a single set of constant remodeling parameters, was found to poorly fit with clinical data through linear regression (low [Formula: see text] and R), whereas a time-dependent multi-stage algorithm better simulated the remodeling process (high [Formula: see text] and R) against the clinical results. The three-implant-supported and distally cantilevered FPDs presented noticeable and continuous bone apposition, mainly adjacent to the cervical and apical regions. The bridged and mesially cantilevered FPDs showed bone resorption or no visible bone formation in some areas. Time-dependent variation of bone remodeling parameters is recommended to better correlate remodeling simulation with clinical follow-up. The position of FPD pontics plays a critical role in mechanobiological functionality and bone remodeling. Caution should be exercised when selecting the cantilever FPD due to the risk of overloading bone resorption.

  12. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  13. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  14. Terminating marine methane bubbles by superhydrophobic sponges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wu, Yuchen; Su, Bin; Wang, Jingming; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2012-11-14

    Marine methane bubbles are absorbed, steadily stored, and continuously transported based on the employment of superhydrophobic sponges. Antiwetting sponges are water-repellent in the atmosphere and absorb gas bubbles under water. Their capacity to store methane bubbles increases with enhanced submerged depth. Significantly, trapped methane bubbles can be continuously transported driven by differential pressure.

  15. Bubble stimulation efficiency of dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Latz, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence, a common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, is stimulated by flow agitation. Although bubbles are anecdotally known to be stimulatory, the process has never been experimentally investigated. This study quantified the flash response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum to stimulation by bubbles rising through still seawater. Cells were stimulated by isolated bubbles of 0.3-3 mm radii rising at their terminal velocity, and also by bubble clouds containing bubbles of 0.06-10 mm radii for different air flow rates. Stimulation efficiency, the proportion of cells producing a flash within the volume of water swept out by a rising bubble, decreased with decreasing bubble radius for radii less than approximately 1 mm. Bubbles smaller than a critical radius in the range 0.275-0.325 mm did not stimulate a flash response. The fraction of cells stimulated by bubble clouds was proportional to the volume of air in the bubble cloud, with lower stimulation levels observed for clouds with smaller bubbles. An empirical model for bubble cloud stimulation based on the isolated bubble observations successfully reproduced the observed stimulation by bubble clouds for low air flow rates. High air flow rates stimulated more light emission than expected, presumably because of additional fluid shear stress associated with collective buoyancy effects generated by the high air fraction bubble cloud. These results are relevant to bioluminescence stimulation by bubbles in two-phase flows, such as in ship wakes, breaking waves, and sparged bioreactors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Multi-Stage Open Peer Review: Scientific Evaluation Integrating the Strengths of Traditional Peer Review with the Virtues of Transparency and Self-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pöschl, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The traditional forms of scientific publishing and peer review do not live up to all demands of efficient communication and quality assurance in today’s highly diverse and rapidly evolving world of science. They need to be advanced and complemented by interactive and transparent forms of review, publication, and discussion that are open to the scientific community and to the public. The advantages of open access, public peer review, and interactive discussion can be efficiently and flexibly combined with the strengths of traditional scientific peer review. Since 2001 the benefits and viability of this approach are clearly demonstrated by the highly successful interactive open access journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP, www.atmos-chem-phys.net) and a growing number of sister journals launched and operated by the European Geosciences Union (EGU, www.egu.eu) and the open access publisher Copernicus (www.copernicus.org). The interactive open access journals are practicing an integrative multi-stage process of publication and peer review combined with interactive public discussion, which effectively resolves the dilemma between rapid scientific exchange and thorough quality assurance. Key features and achievements of this approach are: top quality and impact, efficient self-regulation and low rejection rates, high attractivity and rapid growth, low costs, and financial sustainability. In fact, ACP and the EGU interactive open access sister journals are by most if not all standards more successful than comparable scientific journals with traditional or alternative forms of peer review (editorial statistics, publication statistics, citation statistics, economic costs, and sustainability). The high efficiency and predictive validity of multi-stage open peer review have been confirmed in a series of dedicated studies by evaluation experts from the social sciences, and the same or similar concepts have recently also been adopted in other disciplines, including

  17. Multi-stage open peer review: scientific evaluation integrating the strengths of traditional peer review with the virtues of transparency and self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Pöschl, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The traditional forms of scientific publishing and peer review do not live up to all demands of efficient communication and quality assurance in today's highly diverse and rapidly evolving world of science. They need to be advanced and complemented by interactive and transparent forms of review, publication, and discussion that are open to the scientific community and to the public. The advantages of open access, public peer review, and interactive discussion can be efficiently and flexibly combined with the strengths of traditional scientific peer review. Since 2001 the benefits and viability of this approach are clearly demonstrated by the highly successful interactive open access journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP, www.atmos-chem-phys.net) and a growing number of sister journals launched and operated by the European Geosciences Union (EGU, www.egu.eu) and the open access publisher Copernicus (www.copernicus.org). The interactive open access journals are practicing an integrative multi-stage process of publication and peer review combined with interactive public discussion, which effectively resolves the dilemma between rapid scientific exchange and thorough quality assurance. Key features and achievements of this approach are: top quality and impact, efficient self-regulation and low rejection rates, high attractivity and rapid growth, low costs, and financial sustainability. In fact, ACP and the EGU interactive open access sister journals are by most if not all standards more successful than comparable scientific journals with traditional or alternative forms of peer review (editorial statistics, publication statistics, citation statistics, economic costs, and sustainability). The high efficiency and predictive validity of multi-stage open peer review have been confirmed in a series of dedicated studies by evaluation experts from the social sciences, and the same or similar concepts have recently also been adopted in other disciplines, including the

  18. Free energy calculations along entropic pathways. III. Nucleation of capillary bridges and bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2017-05-01

    Using molecular simulation, we analyze the capillary condensation and evaporation processes for argon confined in a cylindrical nanopore. For this purpose, we define the entropy of the adsorbed fluid as a reaction coordinate and determine the free energy associated with both processes along entropic pathways. For capillary condensation, we identify a complex free energy profile resulting from the multi-stage nature of this phenomenon. We find capillary condensation to proceed through the nucleation of a liquid bridge across the nanopore, followed by its expansion throughout the pore to give rise to the stable phase of high density. In the case of capillary evaporation, the free energy profile along the entropy pathway also exhibits different regimes, corresponding to the initial destabilization of the layered structure of the fluid followed by the formation, and subsequent expansion, of a bubble across the nanopore.

  19. Bubble Dynamics and Resulting Noise from Traveling Bubble Cavitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    has resulted in models which aqree well with bubble dynamics recorded by high speed film . Chahine, et. al. (23) incorporated asymmetric bubble...recording on the tape soundtrack . 3.8 Measurement of Gas Nuclei in Water The role of nuclei density and size in cavitation inception has been the subject...interference between the coherent background and the particle-diffracted radiation exooses photographic film in the far-field of the nuclei. This

  20. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  1. Arresting bubble coarsening: A two-bubble experiment to investigate grain growth in the presence of surface elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salonen, A.; Gay, C.; Maestro, A.; Drenckhan, W.; Rio, E.

    2016-11-01

    Many two-phase materials suffer from grain growth due to the energy cost which is associated with the interface that separates both phases. While our understanding of the driving forces and the dynamics of grain growth in different materials is well advanced by now, current research efforts address the question of how this process may be slowed down, or, ideally, arrested. We use a model system of two bubbles to explore how the presence of a finite surface elasticity may interfere with the coarsening process and the final grain size distribution. Combining experiments and modelling in the analysis of the evolution of two bubbles, we show that clear relationships can be predicted between the surface tension, the surface elasticity and the initial/final size ratio of the bubbles. We rationalise these relationships by the introduction of a modified Gibbs criterion. Besides their general interest, the present results have direct implications for our understanding of foam stability.

  2. Cavitation in confined water: ultra-fast bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In the hydraulic vessels of trees, water can be found at negative pressure. This metastable state, corresponding to mechanical tension, is achieved by evaporation through a porous medium. It can be relaxed by cavitation, i.e. the sudden nucleation of vapor bubbles. Harmful for the tree due to the subsequent emboli of sap vessels, cavitation is on the contrary used by ferns to eject spores very swiftly. We will focus here on the dynamics of the cavitation bubble, which is of primary importance to explain the previously cited natural phenomena. We use the recently developed method of artificial tress, using transparent hydrogels as the porous medium. Our experiments, on water confined in micrometric hydrogel cavities, show an extremely fast dynamics: bubbles are nucleated at the microsecond timescale. For cavities larger than 100 microns, the bubble ``rings'' with damped oscillations at MHz frequencies, whereas for smaller cavities the oscillations become overdamped. This rich dynamics can be accounted for by a model we developed, leading to a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Interestingly, this model predicts the impossibility to nucleate bubbles above a critical confinement that depends on liquid negative pressure and corresponds to approximately 100 nm for 20 MPa tensions.

  3. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  4. Holography in small bubble chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Lecoq, P.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on an experiment to determine the total charm cross section at different incident momenta using the small, heavy liquid bubble chamber HOBC. Holography in liquid hydrogen is also tested using the holographic lexan bubble chamber HOLEBC with the aim of preparing a future holographic experiment in hydrogen. The high intensity tests show that more than 100 incident tracks per hologram do not cause a dramatic effect on the picture quality. Hydrogen is more favorable than freon as the bubble growth is much slower in hydrogen. An advantage of holography is to have the maximum resolution in the full volume of the bubble chamber, which allows a gain in sensitivity by a factor of 10 compared to classical optics as 100 tracks per hologram look reasonable. Holograms are not more difficult to analyze than classical optics high-resolution pictures. The results show that holography is a very powerful technique which can be used in very high resolution particle physics experiments.

  5. Pulling bubbles from a bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Justin C. T.; Blakemore, Andrea L.; Hosoi, A. E.

    2010-06-01

    Deposition of bubbles on a wall withdrawn from a liquid bath is a phenomenon observed in many everyday situations—the foam lacing left behind in an emptied glass of beer, for instance. It is also of importance to the many industrial processes where uniformity of coating is desirable. We report work on an idealized version of this situation, the drag-out of a single bubble in Landau-Levich-Derjaguin flow. We find that a well-defined critical wall speed exists, separating the two regimes of bubble persistence at the meniscus and bubble deposition on the moving wall. Experiments show that this transition occurs at Ca∗˜Bo0.73. A similar result is obtained theoretically by balancing viscous stresses and gravity.

  6. Transient bubbles, bublets and breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Giles; Blake, John

    1999-11-01

    The non-spherical nature of the collapse of bubbles has important ramifications in many practical situations such as ultrasonic cleaning, tanning of leather, and underwater explosions. In particular the high speed liquid jet that can thread a collapsing bubble is central to the functional performance. An impressive photographic record of a liquid jet was obtained by Crum using a bubble situated in the vicinity of a platform oscillating vertically at a frequency of 60 Hz. A boundary integral method is used to model this situation and is found to closely mimic some of the observations. However, a slight variation of parameters or a change in the phase of the driving frequency can lead to dramatically different bubble behaviour, a feature also observed by Crum.

  7. Smashing Bubbles and Vanishing Sugar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Science activities with soap bubbles for primary school children are described in this article. Another activity involves children in determining the whereabouts of sugar as it dissolves in water. (SA)

  8. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, G.; Harris, D. M.; Bush, J. W. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette ["Simulations of surfactant effects on the dynamics of coalescing drops and bubbles," Phys. Fluids 27, 012103 (2015)] and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  9. Bubble of Our Sun Influence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    New data from NASA Cassini spacecraft suggest that the shape of our solar system moving through the local Milky Way galaxy looks like a bubble -- or a rat -- traveling through a boa constrictor belly.

  10. Driving bubbles out of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Surface tension gradient in melt forces gas bubbles to surface, increasing glass strength and transparency. Conventional chemical and buoyant fining are extremely slow in viscous glasses, but tension gradient method moves 250 um bubbles as rapidly as 30 um/s. Heat required for high temperature part of melt is furnished by stationary electrical or natural-gas heater; induction and laser heating are also possible. Method has many applications in industry processes.

  11. Driving bubbles out of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Surface tension gradient in melt forces gas bubbles to surface, increasing glass strength and transparency. Conventional chemical and buoyant fining are extremely slow in viscous glasses, but tension gradient method moves 250 um bubbles as rapidly as 30 um/s. Heat required for high temperature part of melt is furnished by stationary electrical or natural-gas heater; induction and laser heating are also possible. Method has many applications in industry processes.

  12. Numerical investigation of strong compression of vapor inside spherical cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalitova, T. F.; Toporkov, D. Yu

    2016-11-01

    Numerical investigation of possibility of realizing shock waves in cavitation bubbles during their collapse in water, acetone, and tetradecane is performed. The radius of the bubble is 500 pm, the liquid pressure and temperature are in the ranges of 1-100 bar and 293-313 K, respectively. A numerical technique is used in which the movement of the interphase boundary is governed by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The thermodynamic parameters of the vapor are assumed uniform, the state of the vapor being described by the modified Van der Waals equation. The shock waves inside a bubble in tetradecane are found to arise in all the conditions under consideration. By contrast, inside the bubble in acetone they do not appear at relatively low pressures, while inside the bubble in water they never arise. At equal initial data the shock wave is formed much closer to the interface in the case of tetradecane.

  13. Slowing down bubbles with sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Cedric; Dangla, Remie; Guinard, Marion

    2009-11-01

    We present experimental evidence that a bubble moving in a fluid in which a well-chosen acoustic noise is superimposed can be significantly slowed down even for moderate acoustic pressure. Through mean velocity measurements, we show that a condition for this effect to occur is for the acoustic noise spectrum to match or overlap the bubble's fundamental resonant mode. We render the bubble's oscillations and translational movements using high speed video. We show that radial oscillations (Rayleigh-Plesset type) have no effect on the mean velocity, while above a critical pressure, a parametric type instability (Faraday waves) is triggered and gives rise to nonlinear surface oscillations. We evidence that these surface waves are subharmonic and responsible for the bubble's drag increase. When the acoustic intensity is increased, Faraday modes interact and the strongly nonlinear oscillations behave randomly, leading to a random behavior of the bubble's trajectory and consequently to a higher slow down. Our observations may suggest new strategies for bubbly flow control, or two-phase microfluidic devices. It might also be applicable to other elastic objects, such as globules, cells or vesicles, for medical applications such as elasticity-based sorting.

  14. Temperature measurements in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is usually a nearly isothermal process in the liquid phase, but in some specific flow conditions like hot water or cryogenic fluids, significant temperature variations are detected. In addition, a large temperature increase happens inside the cavitation bubbles at the very end of their collapse, due to the fast compression of the gas at the bubble core, which is almost adiabatic. This process is of primary interest in various biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, where the mechanisms of bubble collapse plays a major role. To investigate the amplitude and the spatial distribution of these temperature variations inside and outside the cavitation bubbles, a system based on cold wires has been developed. They have been tested in a configuration of a single bubble obtained by submitting a small air bubble to a large amplitude pressure wave. Some promising results have been obtained after the initial validation tests. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research Global under Grant N62909-16-1-2116, Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed & Ki-Han Kim program managers.

  15. Bubble baths: just splashing around?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Wesley; Speirs, Nathan; Sharker, Saberul Islam; Hurd, Randy; Williams, Bj; Truscott, Tadd

    2016-11-01

    Soap Bubbles on the water surface would seem to be an intuitive means for splash suppression, but their presence appears to be a double edged sword. We present on the water entry of hydrophilic spheres where the liquid surface is augmented by the presence of a bubble layer, similar to a bubble bath. While the presence of a bubble layer can diminish splashing upon impact at low Weber numbers, it also induces cavity formation at speeds below the critical velocity. The formation of a cavity generally results in larger Worthington jets and thus, larger amounts of ejected liquid. Bubble layers induce cavity formation by wetting the sphere prior to liquid impact, causing them to form cavities similar to those created by hydrophobic spheres. Droplets present on a pre-wetted sphere disrupt the flow of the advancing liquid during entry, pushing it away from the impacting body to form an entrained air cavity. This phenomena was noted by Worthington with pre-wetted stone marbles, and suggests that the application of a bubble layer is generally ineffective as a means of splash suppression.

  16. An analytic-geometric model of the effect of spherically distributed injection errors for Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft - The multi-stage problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longuski, James M.; Mcronald, Angus D.

    1988-01-01

    In previous work the problem of injecting the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft from low earth orbit into their respective interplanetary trajectories has been discussed for the single stage (Centaur) vehicle. The central issue, in the event of spherically distributed injection errors, is what happens to the vehicle? The difficulties addressed in this paper involve the multi-stage problem since both Galileo and Ulysses will be utilizing the two-stage IUS system. Ulysses will also include a third stage: the PAM-S. The solution is expressed in terms of probabilities for total percentage of escape, orbit decay and reentry trajectories. Analytic solutions are found for Hill's Equations of Relative Motion (more recently called Clohessy-Wiltshire Equations) for multi-stage injections. These solutions are interpreted geometrically on the injection sphere. The analytic-geometric models compare well with numerical solutions, provide insight into the behavior of trajectories mapped on the injection sphere and simplify the numerical two-dimensional search for trajectory families.

  17. Identification of peptides with high red blood cell and hepatocyte binding activity in the Plasmodium falciparum multi-stage invasion proteins: PfSPATR and MCP-1.

    PubMed

    Curtidor, Hernando; García, Jeison; Vanegas, Magnolia; Puentes, Fabian; Forero, Martha; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum multi-stage proteins are involved in vital processes for parasite survival, which turns them into attractive targets for studies aimed at developing a fully effective antimalarial vaccine. MCP-1 and PfSPATR are both found in sporozoite and merozoite forms, and have been associated respectively with invasion of hepatocytes and red blood cells (RBCs). Binding assays with synthetic peptides derived from these two important proteins have enabled identifying those sequences binding with high specific activity (named High activity binding peptides-HABPs) to hepatoma-derived HepG2 cells and human RBCs. Twelve RBC HABPs were identified within the MCP-1 amino acid sequence, most of them in the C-terminal region. The MCP-1 HABPs 33387 and 33397 also presented high activity binding to HepG2 cells. PfSPATR presented four RBC HABPs and two HepG2 HABPs, but only one (32686) could bind to both cell types. RBC binding assays evidenced that binding of all HABPs was saturable and differentially affected by the enzymatic treatment of target cells. Moreover, all HABPs inhibited in vitro invasion of merozoites at 200 microM and had particular structural features when analyzed by circular dichroism. The results suggest that these synthetic peptides capable of binding to the two P. falciparum target cells could be potentially included in the design of a multi-stage, subunit-based, chemically synthesized antimalarial vaccine.

  18. Stall/surge dynamics of a multi-stage air compressor in response to a load transient of a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Mohammad Ali; Brouwer, Jacob

    2017-10-01

    A better understanding of turbulent unsteady flows in gas turbine systems is necessary to design and control compressors for hybrid fuel cell-gas turbine systems. Compressor stall/surge analysis for a 4 MW hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine system for locomotive applications is performed based upon a 1.7 MW multi-stage air compressor. Control strategies are applied to prevent operation of the hybrid SOFC-GT beyond the stall/surge lines of the compressor. Computational fluid dynamics tools are used to simulate the flow distribution and instabilities near the stall/surge line. The results show that a 1.7 MW system compressor like that of a Kawasaki gas turbine is an appropriate choice among the industrial compressors to be used in a 4 MW locomotive SOFC-GT with topping cycle design. The multi-stage radial design of the compressor enhances the ability of the compressor to maintain air flow rate during transient step-load changes. These transient step-load changes are exhibited in many potential applications for SOFC/GT systems. The compressor provides sustained air flow rate during the mild stall/surge event that occurs due to the transient step-load change that is applied, indicating that this type of compressor is well-suited for this hybrid application.

  19. Kinetics of the pyrolysis of arundo, sawdust, corn stover and switch grass biomass by thermogravimetric analysis using a multi-stage model.

    PubMed

    Biney, Paul O; Gyamerah, Michael; Shen, Jiacheng; Menezes, Bruna

    2015-03-01

    A new multi-stage kinetic model has been developed for TGA pyrolysis of arundo, corn stover, sawdust and switch grass that accounts for the initial biomass weight (W0). The biomass were decomposed in a nitrogen atmosphere from 23°C to 900°C in a TGA at a single 20°C/min ramp rate in contrast with the isoconversion technique. The decomposition was divided into multiple stages based on the absolute local minimum values of conversion derivative, (dx/dT), obtained from DTG curves. This resulted in three decomposition stages for arundo, corn stover and sawdust and four stages for switch grass. A linearized multi-stage model was applied to the TGA data for each stage to determine the pre-exponential factor, activation energy, and reaction order. The activation energies ranged from 54.7 to 60.9 kJ/mol, 62.9 to 108.7 kJ/mol, and 18.4 to 257.9 kJ/mol for the first, second and the third decomposition stages respectively.

  20. Thermodynamics of the multi-stage DNA lesion recognition and repair by formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase using pyrrolocytosine fluorescence—stopped-flow pre-steady-state kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2012-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase, Fpg protein from Escherichia coli, initiates base excision repair in DNA by removing a wide variety of oxidized lesions. In this study, we perform thermodynamic analysis of the multi-stage interaction of Fpg with specific DNA-substrates containing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG), or tetrahydrofuran (THF, an uncleavable abasic site analog) and non-specific (G) DNA-ligand based on stopped-flow kinetic data. Pyrrolocytosine, highly fluorescent analog of the natural nucleobase cytosine, is used to record multi-stage DNA lesion recognition and repair kinetics over a temperature range (10–30°C). The kinetic data were used to obtain the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of the specific stages using van’t Hoff approach. The data suggest that not only enthalpy-driven exothermic oxoG recognition, but also the desolvation-accompanied entropy-driven enzyme-substrate complex adjustment into the catalytically active state play equally important roles in the overall process. PMID:22584623

  1. Selection of the optimal completion of horizontal wells with multi-stage hydraulic fracturing of the low-permeable formation, field C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozoev, A. M.; Demidova, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    At the moment, many fields of Western Siberia are in the later stages of development. In this regard, the multilayer fields are actually involved in the development of hard to recover reserves by conducting well interventions. However, most of these assets may not to be economical profitable without application of horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing treatment. Moreover, location of frac ports in relative to each other, number of stages, volume of proppant per one stage are the main issues due to the fact that the interference effect could lead to the loss of oil production. The optimal arrangement of horizontal wells with multi-stage hydraulic fracture was defined in this paper. Several analytical approaches have been used to predict the started oil flow rate and chose the most appropriate for field C reservoir J1. However, none of the analytical equations could not take into account the interference effect and determine the optimum number of fractures. Therefore, the simulation modelling was used. Finally, the universal equation is derived for this field C, the reservoir J1. This tool could be used to predict the flow rate of the horizontal well with hydraulic fracturing treatment on the qualitative level without simulation model.

  2. Multi-stage Mass Spectrometry of Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and Its Vinyl Succinimide Copolymer Formed upon Exposure to Sodium Hypochlorite

    PubMed Central

    Fouquet, Thierry; Torimura, Masaki; Sato, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The degradation routes of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) exposed to sodium hypochlorite (bleach) have been previously investigated using chemical analyses such as infrared spectroscopy. So far, no reports have proposed mass spectrometry (MS) as an alternative tool despite its capability to provide molecular and structural information using its single stage electrospray (ESI) or matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and multi stage (MSn) configurations, respectively. The present study thus reports on the characterization of PVP after its exposure to bleach by high resolution MALDI spiralTOF-MS and Kendrick mass defect analysis providing clues as to the formation of a vinyl pyrrolidone/vinyl succinimide copolymeric degradation product. A thorough investigation of the fragmentation pathways of PVP adducted with sodium and proton allows one main route to be described—namely the release of the pyrrolidone pendant group in a charge remote and charge driven mechanism, respectively. Extrapolating this fragmentation pathway, the oxidation of vinyl pyrrolidone into vinyl succinimide hypothesized from the single stage MS is validated by the detection of an alternative succinimide neutral loss in lieu of the pyrrolidone release in the ESI-MSn spectra of the aged PVP sample. It constitutes an example of application of multi-stage mass spectrometry for the characterization of the degradation of polymeric samples at a molecular level. PMID:27800293

  3. Reconstructing the Growth History of Bubbles in Magma from Preserved Volatile Concentrations in Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Llewellin, E. W.; Humphreys, M.; Larsen, J. F.; Blower, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are driven by the nucleation and growth of bubbles that are formed when volatile species (particularly water) exsolve from magma. Once nucleated, bubbles may continue to grow through a combination of diffusion of volatiles from the melt and decompressive expansion. The kinetics of bubble formation and growth exert a critical influence on eruption dynamics, particularly on the explosivity of the eruption; consequently, numerical models of volcanic eruptions are sensitive to the choice of bubble growth model. We present preliminary results of analyses of experimentally-decompressed phonolite and rhyolite samples, which provide data against which bubble growth models can be validated. Data interpretation is supported by numerical modelling of the growth of isolated and paired bubbles in three-dimensions. Previous numerical modelling of bubble growth has demonstrated the importance of the dynamic feedback between the concentration of water in the melt, its diffusivity, and the viscosity of the melt shell in which the bubble grows (e.g. Blower et al., 2001). Diffusion of water, therefore, not only alters the water concentration profile surrounding the bubble, but is itself modified by the resulting concentration profile. This concentration profile may be preserved when the magma is quenched to glass. We adapt the technique of Humphreys et al (2008) to extract sub-micron resolution water concentration data from backscatter SEM images of volcanic glasses by using greyscale variation as a proxy for water content. The profiles are calibrated using SEM-Raman and FTIR. We present preliminary two-dimensional maps of water concentration around isolated bubbles and bubble-pairs in synthetically hydrated and decompressed samples of volcanic glass. To support the interpretation of the data, we have developed a finite element model of bubble growth, which couples volatile diffusion with concentration dependent viscosity and melt hydrodynamics around the growing

  4. Bubble-Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Wei; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Perillo, Evan P; Dunn, Andrew K; Akinwande, Deji; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-01-13

    Current lithography techniques, which employ photon, electron, or ion beams to induce chemical or physical reactions for micro/nano-fabrication, have remained challenging in patterning chemically synthesized colloidal particles, which are emerging as building blocks for functional devices. Herein, we develop a new technique - bubble-pen lithography (BPL) - to pattern colloidal particles on substrates using optically controlled microbubbles. Briefly, a single laser beam generates a microbubble at the interface of colloidal suspension and a plasmonic substrate via plasmon-enhanced photothermal effects. The microbubble captures and immobilizes the colloidal particles on the substrate through coordinated actions of Marangoni convection, surface tension, gas pressure, and substrate adhesion. Through directing the laser beam to move the microbubble, we create arbitrary single-particle patterns and particle assemblies with different resolutions and architectures. Furthermore, we have applied BPL to pattern CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on plasmonic substrates and polystyrene (PS) microparticles on two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layer materials. With the low-power operation, arbitrary patterning and applicability to general colloidal particles, BPL will find a wide range of applications in microelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanomedicine.

  5. Acoustical Emission from Bubbles and Dynamics of Bubbles and Bubble Clouds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    distribution of bubble sizes from a breaking wave , that is immediately following on the entrainment and disintegration of a given volume of air? In the...experimental confirmation was found by later workers. A simple statistical model has been proposed for the initial bubble sizes from breaking waves ...which also has received experimental support. A direct method of calculating wave -generated ripples has been proposed, which accounts quantitatively

  6. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas

  7. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas

  8. Single-bubble sonoluminescence from hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1999-09-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) from a hydrogen bubble is studied theoretically based on a quasiadiabatic compression model of a bubble collapse. It is clarified that the maximum temperature in a hydrogen bubble in 20 °C water under conditions of SBSL is always about 6000 K due to the effect of chemical reactions inside the bubble. It is suggested that the light emission at such temperature is by the transition from the lowest stable triplet state of the H2 molecule to the repulsive state resulting from two normal atoms (H2*→2H+hν). It is shown that the number of hydrogen molecules inside the bubble remains almost constant in spite of the high temperature and pressure inside the bubble at the collapse. It is also shown that the addition of argon to a hydrogen bubble results in the higher maximum temperature inside the bubble.

  9. Mechanisms of single bubble cleaning.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Fabian; Mettin, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of collapsing bubbles close to a flat solid is investigated with respect to its potential for removal of surface attached particles. Individual bubbles are created by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses focused into water close to glass plates contaminated with melamine resin micro-particles. The bubble dynamics is analysed by means of synchronous high-speed recordings. Due to the close solid boundary, the bubble collapses with the well-known liquid jet phenomenon. Subsequent microscopic inspection of the substrates reveals circular areas clean of particles after a single bubble generation and collapse event. The detailed bubble dynamics, as well as the cleaned area size, is characterised by the non-dimensional bubble stand-off γ=d/Rmax, with d: laser focus distance to the solid boundary, and Rmax: maximum bubble radius before collapse. We observe a maximum of clean area at γ≈0.7, a roughly linear decay of the cleaned circle radius for increasing γ, and no cleaning for γ>3.5. As the main mechanism for particle removal, rapid flows at the boundary are identified. Three different cleaning regimes are discussed in relation to γ: (I) For large stand-off, 1.8<γ<3.5, bubble collapse induced vortex flows touch down onto the substrate and remove particles without significant contact of the gas phase. (II) For small distances, γ<1.1, the bubble is in direct contact with the solid. Fast liquid flows at the substrate are driven by the jet impact with its subsequent radial spreading, and by the liquid following the motion of the collapsing and rebounding bubble wall. Both flows remove particles. Their relative timing, which depends sensitively on the exact γ, appears to determine the extension of the area with forces large enough to cause particle detachment. (III) At intermediate stand-off, 1.1<γ<1.8, only the second bubble collapse touches the substrate, but acts with cleaning mechanisms similar to an effective small γ collapse: particles are removed by

  10. Micro-bubble drag reduction on a high speed vessel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanuar; Gunawan; Sunaryo; Jamaluddin, A.

    2012-09-01

    Ship hull form of the underwater area strongly influences the resistance of the ship. The major factor in ship resistance is skin friction resistance. Bulbous bows, polymer paint, water repellent paint (highly water-repellent wall), air injection, and specific roughness have been used by researchers as an attempt to obtain the resistance reduction and operation efficiency of ships. Micro-bubble injection is a promising technique for lowering frictional resistance. The injected air bubbles are supposed to somehow modify the energy inside the turbulent boundary layer and thereby lower the skin friction. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of injected micro bubbles on a navy fast patrol boat (FPB) 57 m type model with the following main dimensions: L=2 450 mm, B=400 mm, and T=190 mm. The influence of the location of micro bubble injection and bubble velocity was also investigated. The ship model was pulled by an electric motor whose speed could be varied and adjusted. The ship model resistance was precisely measured by a load cell transducer. Comparison of ship resistance with and without micro-bubble injection was shown on a graph as a function of the drag coefficient and Froude number. It was shown that micro bubble injection behind the mid-ship is the best location to achieve the most effective drag reduction, and the drag reduction caused by the micro-bubbles can reach 6%-9%.

  11. Size-differentiated lateral migration of bubbles in Couette flow of two-dimensional foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadigoushki, Hadi; Feng, James J.

    2012-11-01

    In this Talk, we report experiments on lateral migration of bubbles in a two-dimensional foam sheared in a narrow-gap Couette device. A larger bubble in an otherwise monodisperse bubble raft migrates toward the center of the gap as long as the bubble size ratio and the shear rate are each above a threshold. The migration speed is roughly two orders of magnitude higher than that of a single bubble, and increases with the shear rate and the size ratio. The bubble also deforms much more than an isolated one at the same shear rate. Modifying the Chan-Leal solution for the migration of a single submerged bubble or drop, we derive a formula that successfully predicts all the migration trajectories recorded in the experiment. The threshold for migration corresponds to the wall repulsion force overcoming the capillary force in the 2D foam. The size-differentiated bubble migration provides an explanation for previously observed size segregation in sheared 3D polydisperse foams.

  12. Size-Differentiated Lateral Migration of Bubbles in Couette Flow of Two-Dimensional Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadigoushki, Hadi; Feng, James J.

    2012-08-01

    We report experiments on lateral migration of bubbles in a two-dimensional foam sheared in a narrow-gap Couette device. A larger bubble in an otherwise monodisperse bubble raft migrates toward the center of the gap as long as the bubble size ratio and the shear rate are each above a threshold. The migration speed is roughly two orders of magnitude higher than that of a single bubble, and increases with the shear rate and the size ratio. The bubble also deforms much more than an isolated one at the same shear rate. Modifying the Chan-Leal solution for the migration of a single submerged bubble or drop, we derive a formula that successfully predicts all the migration trajectories recorded in the experiment. The threshold for migration corresponds to the wall repulsion force overcoming the capillary force in the two-dimensional foam. The size-differentiated bubble migration provides an explanation for previously observed size segregation in sheared three-dimensional polydisperse foams.

  13. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  14. Modelling single- and tandem-bubble dynamics between two parallel plates for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, C.-T.; Choi, J.-K.; Singh, S.; Chahine, G. L.; Hay, T. A.; Ilinskii, Yu. A.; Zabolotskaya, E. A.; Hamilton, M. F.; Sankin, G.; Yuan, F.; Zhong, P.

    2013-01-01

    Carefully timed tandem microbubbles have been shown to produce directional and targeted membrane poration of individual cells in microfluidic systems, which could be of use in ultrasound-mediated drug and gene delivery. This study aims at contributing to the understanding of the mechanisms at play in such an interaction. The dynamics of single and tandem microbubbles between two parallel plates is studied numerically and analytically. Comparisons are then made between the numerical results and the available experimental results. Numerically, assuming a potential flow, a three-dimensional boundary element method (BEM) is used to describe complex bubble deformations, jet formation, and bubble splitting. Analytically, compressibility and viscous boundary layer effects along the channel walls, neglected in the BEM model, are considered while shape of the bubble is not considered. Comparisons show that energy losses modify the bubble dynamics when the two approaches use identical initial conditions. The initial conditions in the boundary element method can be adjusted to recover the bubble period and maximum bubble volume when in an infinite medium. Using the same conditions enables the method to recover the full dynamics of single and tandem bubbles, including large deformations and fast re-entering jet formation. This method can be used as a design tool for future tandem-bubble sonoporation experiments. PMID:24293683

  15. An Analysis of Bubble Deformation by a Sphere Relevant to the Measurements of Bubble-Particle Contact Interaction and Detachment Forces.

    PubMed

    Sherman, H; Nguyen, A V; Bruckard, W

    2016-11-22

    Atomic force microscopy makes it possible to measure the interacting forces between individual colloidal particles and air bubbles, which can provide a measure of the particle hydrophobicity. To indicate the level of hydrophobicity of the particle, the contact angle can be calculated, assuming that no interfacial deformation occurs with the bubble retaining a spherical profile. Our experimental results obtained using a modified sphere tensiometry apparatus to detach submillimeter spherical particles show that deformation of the bubble interface does occur during particle detachment. We also develop a theoretical model to describe the equilibrium shape of the bubble meniscus at any given particle position, based on the minimization of the free energy of the system. The developed model allows us to analyze high-speed video captured during detachment. In the system model deformation of the bubble profile is accounted for by the incorporation of a Lagrange multiplier into both the Young-Laplace equation and the force balance. The solution of the bubble profile matched to the high-speed video allows us to accurately calculate the contact angle and determine the total force balance as a function of the contact point of the bubble on the particle surface.

  16. Single-Bubble and Multibubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1999-11-01

    Computer simulations of radiation processes in an air bubble and an argon bubble are performed under a condition of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) based on a quasiadiabatic compression model of a bubble collapse. It is clarified that emissions from excited molecules are strongly quenched by high pressure and temperature inside a SBSL bubble and SBSL originates in the emissions from plasma. It is pointed out that sonoluminescence from cavitation fields (MBSL) originates in emissions from excited molecules, which is not quenched due to the much lower pressure and temperature inside the MBSL bubbles.

  17. Bubble nucleation in an explosive micro-bubble actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broek, D. M.; Elwenspoek, M.

    2008-06-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a thin layer of liquid reaches a temperature close to the critical temperature in a very short time. At these temperatures spontaneous nucleation takes place. The nucleated bubbles instantly coalesce forming a vapour film followed by rapid growth due to the pressure impulse. In this paper we take a closer look at the bubble nucleation. The moment of bubble nucleation was determined by both stroboscopic imaging and resistance thermometry. Two nucleation regimes could be distinguished. Several different heater designs were investigated under heat fluxes of hundreds of W mm-2. A close correspondence between current density in the heater and point of nucleation was found. This results in design rules for effective heaters.

  18. Fused Mycobacterium tuberculosis multi-stage immunogens with an Fc-delivery system as a promising approach for the development of a tuberculosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mosavat, Arman; Soleimanpour, Saman; Farsiani, Hadi; Sadeghian, Hamid; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Sankian, Mojtaba; Jamehdar, Saeid Amel; Rezaee, Seyed Abdolrahim

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem worldwide. Currently, the Bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only available licensed TB vaccine, which has low efficacy in protection against adult pulmonary TB. Therefore, the development of a safe and effective vaccine against TB needs global attention. In the present study, a novel multi-stage subunit vaccine candidate from culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10) and heat shock protein X (HspX) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis fused to the Fc domain of mouse IgG2a as a selective delivery system for antigen-presenting cells (APCs) was produced and its immunogenicity assessed. The optimized gene constructs were introduced into pPICZαA expression vectors, and the resultant plasmids (pPICZαA-CFP-10:Hspx:Fcγ2a and pPICZαA-CFP-10:Hspx:His) were transferred into Pichia pastoris by electroporation. The identification of both purified recombinant fusion proteins was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. Then the immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins with and without BCG was evaluated in BALB/c mice by assessing the level of IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-4, IL-17 and TGF-β cytokines. Both multi-stage vaccines (CFP-10:HspX:Fcγ2a and CFP-10:HspX:His) induced Th1-type cellular responses by producing high level of IFN-γ (272 pg/mL, p<0.001) and IL-12 (191 pg/mL, p<0.001). However, the Fc-tagged recombinant protein induced more effective Th1-type cellular responses with a low level of IL-4 (10 pg/mL) compared to the CFP-10:HspX:His group. The production of IFN-γ to CFP-10:HspX:Fcγ2a was markedly consistent and showed an increasing trend for IL-12 compared with the BCG or CFP-10:HspX:His primed and boosted groups. Findings revealed that CFP-10:Hspx:Fcγ2a fusion protein can elicit strong Th1 antigen-specific immune responses in favor of protective immunity in mice and could provide new insight for introducing an effective multi-stage subunit vaccine against TB.

  19. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Sheen S.; Apfelbaum, Evan P.; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L.; Zajac, Edward J.; Stark, David

    2014-01-01

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others’ decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity. PMID:25404313

  20. Phase diagrams for sonoluminescing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P.

    1996-11-01

    Sound driven gas bubbles in water can emit light pulses. This phenomenon is called sonoluminescence (SL). Two different phases of single bubble SL have been proposed: diffusively stable and diffusively unstable SL. We present phase diagrams in the gas concentration versus forcing pressure state space and also in the ambient radius versus gas concentration and versus forcing pressure state spaces. These phase diagrams are based on the thresholds for energy focusing in the bubble and two kinds of instabilities, namely (i) shape instabilities and (ii) diffusive instabilities. Stable SL only occurs in a tiny parameter window of large forcing pressure amplitude Pa˜1.2-1.5 atm and low gas concentration of less than 0.4% of the saturation. The upper concentration threshold becomes smaller with increased forcing. Our results quantitatively agree with experimental results of Putterman's UCLA group on argon, but not on air. However, air bubbles and other gas mixtures can also successfully be treated in this approach if in addition (iii) chemical instabilities are considered. All statements are based on the Rayleigh-Plesset ODE approximation of the bubble dynamics, extended in an adiabatic approximation to include mass diffusion effects. This approximation is the only way to explore considerable portions of parameter space, as solving the full PDEs is numerically too expensive. Therefore, we checked the adiabatic approximation by comparison with the full numerical solution of the advection diffusion PDE and find good agreement.

  1. Numerical analysis of incompressible viscous flow around a bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Minoru; Ishii, Ryuji; Morioka, Shigeki

    1992-12-01

    A numerical simulation of flows around a deformable gas bubble rising through an incompressible viscous fluid is carried out on a supercomputer Fujitsu VP-2600 at the Data Processing Center of Kyoto University. The solution algorithm is a modified MAC (Marker And Cell) method. For the grid generation, an orthogonal mapping proposed by Ryskin and Leal is applied. The numerical results are compared with Ryskin and Leal's results and previous experiments. It will be shown that a good agreement is obtained between them.

  2. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J.; Noack, J.; Vogel, A.

    1999-03-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored. Time-resolved experimental photographs and simulations of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) cylindrical bubble dynamics are presented. The experiments and calculations exhibit similar dynamics. A small high-pressure cylindrical bubble initially expands radially with hardly any axial motion. Then, after reaching its maximum volume, a cylindrical bubble collapses along its long axis with relatively little radial motion. The growth-collapse period of these very aspherical bubbles differs only sightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble energy even for aspherical bubbles. The prolongation of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also discussed.

  3. Gravity driven flows of bubble suspensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto; Koch, Donald L.; Sangani, Ashok K.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments on vertical and inclined channels were performed to study the behavior of a mono-dispersed bubble suspension for which the dual limit of large Reynolds number and small Weber number is satisfied. A uniform stream of 1.5 mm diameter bubbles is produced by a bank of identical capillaries and coalescence is inhibited by addition of salt to the water. Measurements of the liquid velocity and bubble-probe collision rate are obtained with a hot wire anemometer. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, velocity variance and chord length are measured using a dual impedance probe. Image analysis is used to quantify the distributions of bubble size and aspect ratio. For vertical channels the bubble velocity is observed to decrease as the bubble concentration increases in accord with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani (1998). The bubble velocity variance arises largely due to bubble-wall and bubble-bubble collisions. For inclined channels, the strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  4. Profiles of electrified drops and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Axisymmetric equilibrium shapes of conducting drops and bubbles, (1) pendant or sessile on one face of a circular parallel-plate capacitor or (2) free and surface-charged, are found by solving simultaneously the free boundary problem consisting of the augmented Young-Laplace equation for surface shape and the Laplace equation for electrostatic field, given the surface potential. The problem is nonlinear and the method is a finite element algorithm employing Newton iteration, a modified frontal solver, and triangular as well as quadrilateral tessellations of the domain exterior to the drop in order to facilitate refined analysis of sharply curved drop tips seen in experiments. The stability limit predicted by this computer-aided theoretical analysis agrees well with experiments.

  5. How safe is Bubble Soccer?

    PubMed

    Halani, Sameer H; Riley, Jonathan P; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic neurologic injury in contact sports is a rare but serious consequence for its players. These injuries are most commonly associated with high-impact collisions, for example in football, but are found in a wide variety of sports. In an attempt to minimize these injuries, sports are trying to increase safety by adding protection for participants. Most recently is the seemingly 'safe' sport of Bubble Soccer, which attempts to protect its players with inflatable plastic bubbles. We report a case of a 16-year-old male sustaining a cervical spine burst fracture with incomplete spinal cord injury while playing Bubble Soccer. To our knowledge, this is the first serious neurological injury reported in the sport.

  6. Bubbles Responding to Ultrasound Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (435KB, 13-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300162.html.

  7. Bubbles Responding to Ultrasound Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (435KB, 13-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300162.html.

  8. Bubble Dynamics in Laser Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Milad; Martinez Mercado, Julian; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-12-01

    Laser lithotripsy is a medical procedure for fragmentation of urinary stones with a fiber guided laser pulse of several hundred microseconds long. Using high-speed photography, we present an in-vitro study of bubble dynamics and stone motion induced by Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy. The experiments reveal that detectable stone motion starts only after the bubble collapse, which we relate with the collapse-induced liquid flow. Additionally, we model the bubble formation and dynamics using a set of 2D Rayleigh-Plesset equations with the measured laser pulse profile as an input. The aim is to reduce stone motion through modification of the temporal laser pulse profile, which affects the collapse scenario and consequently the remnant liquid motion.

  9. An economical and efficient technology for the extraction of resveratrol from peanut (Arachis hypogaea) sprouts by multi-stage countercurrent extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianghua; Bian, Yanhong; Shi, Yingying; Zheng, Shangyong; Gu, Xu; Zhang, Danyan; Zhu, Xiufang; Wang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Dingyun; Xiong, Qingping

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, an economical and efficient technology for the extraction of resveratrol from peanut sprouts by multi-stage countercurrent extraction (MSCE) was investigated based on the alkaline extraction and acid precipitation method (AEAP). Firstly, the MSCE equipment and operation procedures were designed. Then, the optimal parameters of MSCE were obtained by using single-factor experiments and Box-Behnken design (BBD) as follows: extraction temperature of 46.6 °C, CaO to raw material ratio of 6:100, water to raw material ratio of 8.8:1 and extraction time of 51.7 min. Finally, the performance of MSCE was compared against the single pot extraction (SPE) under optimal conditions. The results demonstrated that MSCE was a time-saving, energy-saving, and cost-saving extraction technology for manufacturing resveratrol from peanut sprouts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. iGC2: an architecture for micro gas chromatographs utilizing integrated bi-directional pumps and multi-stage preconcentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yutao; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports an integrated micro gas chromatography (µGC) architecture which utilizes a bi-directional micropump. Four integral components--the bi-directional Knudsen pump (KP2), a two-stage preconcentrator-focuser (PCF2), a separation column, and a gas detector--are integrated in a 4.3 cm3 stack, forming a serial flow path. All four components are fabricated using the same three-mask process. Compared to the conventional approach used with multi-stage preconcentrators, in which valves are used to reverse flow between the sampling phase and the separation phase, this µGC architecture reduces the overall complexity. In this architecture, the vapors being sampled are drawn through the detector and column before reaching the PCF2. The microsystem operation is experimentally validated by quantitative analyses of benzene, toluene, and xylene vapors ranging in concentration from 43-1167 mg m-3.

  11. A multi-stage compartmental model for HIV-infected individuals: II--application to insurance functions and health-care costs.

    PubMed

    Billard, L; Dayananda, P W A

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic population processes have received a lot of attention over the years. One approach focuses on compartmental modeling. Billard and Dayananda (2012) developed one such multi-stage model for epidemic processes in which the possibility that individuals can die at any stage from non-disease related causes was also included. This extra feature is of particular interest to the insurance and health-care industries among others especially when the epidemic is HIV/AIDS. Rather than working with numbers of individuals in each stage, they obtained distributional results dealing with the waiting time any one individual spent in each stage given the initial stage. In this work, the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on several functions relevant to these industries (such as adjustments to premiums) is investigated. Theoretical results are derived, followed by a numerical study.

  12. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wrenn, Steven P.; Dicker, Stephen M.; Small, Eleanor F.; Dan, Nily R.; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG) - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those

  13. Bursting bubbles and bilayers.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, Steven P; Dicker, Stephen M; Small, Eleanor F; Dan, Nily R; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition-- in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG)--is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the "brush" regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those involving

  14. From rational bubbles to crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent μ<1. We then outline the main results of Malevergne and Sornette, who extend the RE bubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent μ<1 for all assets. The distribution of price differences and of returns is dominated by the same power-law over an extended range of large returns. Although power-law tails are a pervasive feature of empirical data, the numerical value μ<1 is in disagreement with the usual empirical estimates μ≈3. We then discuss two extensions (the crash hazard rate model and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  15. Electric field observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Hanson, W. B.; Saba, Jack L.

    1992-01-01

    Results from the double floating probe experiment performed on the San Marco D satellite are presented, with emphasis on the observation of large incremental changes in the convective electric field vector at the boundary of equatorial plasma bubbles. Attention is given to isolated bubble structures in the upper ionospheric F regions; these observed bubble encounters are divided into two types - type I (live bubbles) and type II (dead bubbles). Type I bubbles show varying degrees of plasma depletion and large upward velocities range up to 1000 km/s. The geometry of these bubbles is such that the spacecraft orbit may cut them where they are tilting either eastward or (more often) westward. Type II bubbles exhibit plasma density depletion but no appreciable upward convection. Both types of events are usually surrounded by a halo of plasma turbulence, which can extend considerably beyond the region of plasma depletion.

  16. Bubble memory module for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, P. J.; Looney, K. T.; Nichols, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Bubble domain technology offers an all-solid-state alternative for data storage in onboard data systems. A versatile modular bubble memory concept was developed. The key module is the bubble memory module which contains all of the storage devices and circuitry for accessing these devices. This report documents the bubble memory module design and preliminary hardware designs aimed at memory module functional demonstration with available commercial bubble devices. The system architecture provides simultaneous operation of bubble devices to attain high data rates. Banks of bubble devices are accessed by a given bubble controller to minimize controller parts. A power strobing technique is discussed which could minimize the average system power dissipation. A fast initialization method using EEPROM (electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory) devices promotes fast access. Noise and crosstalk problems and implementations to minimize these are discussed. Flight memory systems which incorporate the concepts and techniques of this work could now be developed for applications.

  17. Electric field observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Maynard, N. C.; Hanson, W. B.; Saba, Jack L.

    1992-03-01

    Results from the double floating probe experiment performed on the San Marco D satellite are presented, with emphasis on the observation of large incremental changes in the convective electric field vector at the boundary of equatorial plasma bubbles. Attention is given to isolated bubble structures in the upper ionospheric F regions; these observed bubble encounters are divided into two types - type I (live bubbles) and type II (dead bubbles). Type I bubbles show varying degrees of plasma depletion and large upward velocities range up to 1000 km/s. The geometry of these bubbles is such that the spacecraft orbit may cut them where they are tilting either eastward or (more often) westward. Type II bubbles exhibit plasma density depletion but no appreciable upward convection. Both types of events are usually surrounded by a halo of plasma turbulence, which can extend considerably beyond the region of plasma depletion.

  18. Removal of hydrogen bubbles from nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1980-01-01

    Method proposed for removing large hydrogen bubbles from nuclear environment uses, in its simplest form, hollow spheres of palladium or platinum. Methods would result in hydrogen bubble being reduced in size without letting more radioactivity outside reactor.

  19. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  20. Soap Bubbles on a Cold Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waiveris, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the effects of blowing bubbles in extremely cold weather. Describes the freezing conditions of the bubbles and some physical properties. Suggests using the activity with all ages of students. (MVL)

  1. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  2. Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangani, A. S.; Kushch, V. I.; Hoffmann, M.; Nahra, H.; Koch, D. L.; Tsang, Y.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment to be carried out aboard the International Space Station is described. A suspension consisting of millimeter-sized bubbles in water containing some dissolved salt, which prevents bubbles from coalescing, will be sheared in a Couette cylindrical cell. Rotation of the outer cylinder will produce centrifugal force which will tend to accumulate the bubbles near the inner wall. The shearing will enhance collisions among bubbles creating thereby bubble phase pressure that will resist the tendency of the bubbles to accumulate near the inner wall. The bubble volume fraction and velocity profiles will be measured and compared with the theoretical predictions. Ground-based research on measurement of bubble phase properties and flow in vertical channel are described.

  3. Bubble Departure Diameter and Bubble Release Frequency Measurement from TAMU Subcooled Flow Boiling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jun Soo

    2016-12-01

    The bubble departure diameter and bubble release frequency were obtained through the analysis of TAMU subcooled flow boiling experimental data. The numerous images of bubbles at departure were analyzed for each experimental condition to achieve the reliable statistics of the measured bubble parameters. The results are provided in this report with simple discussion.

  4. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Daniele, M.; Renggli, C.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C.; Hess, K. U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Rising bubbles may significantly affect magma mixing paths as has been demonstrated by analogue experiments in the past. Here, bubble-advection experiments are performed for the first time employing natural materials at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of basaltic glass were placed below cylinders of rhyolite glass. Upon melting, interstitial air formed bubbles that rose into the rhyolite melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. The formation of plume-like filaments of advected basalt within the rhyolite was characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Melt entrainment by bubble ascent appears as efficient mechanism to mingle contrasting melt compositions. MicroCT imaging shows bubbles trailing each other and trails of multiple bubbles having converged. Rheological modelling of the filaments yields viscosities of up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the surrounding rhyolitic liquid. Such a viscosity contrast implies that subsequent bubbles rising are likely to follow the same pathways that previously ascending bubbles have generated. Filaments formed by multiple bubbles would thus experience episodic replenishment with mafic material. Fundamental implications for the concept of bubble advection in magma mixing are thus a) an acceleration of mixing because of decreased viscous resistance for bubbles inside filaments and b) non-conventional diffusion systematics because of intermittent supply of mafic material (instead of a single pulse) inside a filament. Inside these filaments, the mafic material was variably hybridised to andesitic through rhyolitic composition. Compositional profiles alone are ambiguous, however, to determine whether single or multiple bubbles were involved during formation of a filament. Statistical analysis, employing concentration variance as measure of homogenisation, demonstrates that also filaments appearing as single-bubble filaments are likely to have experienced multiple bubbles passing through

  5. Frictional drag reduction by bubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    The injection of gas bubbles into a turbulent boundary layer of a liquid phase has multiple different impacts on the original flow structure. Frictional drag reduction is a phenomenon resulting from their combined effects. This explains why a number of different void-drag reduction relationships have been reported to date, while early works pursued a simple universal mechanism. In the last 15 years, a series of precisely designed experimentations has led to the conclusion that the frictional drag reduction by bubble injection has multiple manifestations dependent on bubble size and flow speed. The phenomena are classified into several regimes of two-phase interaction mechanisms. Each regime has inherent physics of bubbly liquid, highlighted by keywords such as bubbly mixture rheology, the spectral response of bubbles in turbulence, buoyancy-dominated bubble behavior, and gas cavity breakup. Among the regimes, bubbles in some selected situations lose the drag reduction effect owing to extra momentum transfer promoted by their active motions. This separates engineers into two communities: those studying small bubbles for high-speed flow applications and those studying large bubbles for low-speed flow applications. This article reviews the roles of bubbles in drag reduction, which have been revealed from fundamental studies of simplified flow geometries and from development of measurement techniques that resolve the inner layer structure of bubble-mixed turbulent boundary layers.

  6. Bubble-driven inertial micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torniainen, Erik D.; Govyadinov, Alexander N.; Markel, David P.; Kornilovitch, Pavel E.

    2012-12-01

    The fundamental action of the bubble-driven inertial micropump is investigated. The pump has no moving parts and consists of a thermal resistor placed asymmetrically within a straight channel connecting two reservoirs. Using numerical simulations, the net flow is studied as a function of channel geometry, resistor location, vapor bubble strength, fluid viscosity, and surface tension. Two major regimes of behavior are identified: axial and non-axial. In the axial regime, the drive bubble either remains inside the channel, or continues to grow axially when it reaches the reservoir. In the non-axial regime, the bubble grows out of the channel and in all three dimensions while inside the reservoir. The net flow in the axial regime is parabolic with respect to the hydraulic diameter of the channel cross-section, but in the non-axial regime it is not. From numerical modeling, it is determined that the net flow is maximal when the axial regime crosses over to the non-axial regime. To elucidate the basic physical principles of the pump, a phenomenological one-dimensional model is developed and solved. A linear array of micropumps has been built using silicon-SU8 fabrication technology that is used to manufacture thermal inkjet printheads. Semi-continuous pumping across a 2 mm-wide channel has been demonstrated experimentally. Measured net flow with respect to viscosity variation is in excellent agreement with simulation results.

  7. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  8. "Financial Bubbles" and Monetary Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikhonov, Yuriy A.; Pudovkina, Olga E.; Permjakova, Juliana V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of this research is caused by the need of strengthening a role of monetary regulators to prevent financial bubbles in the financial markets. The aim of the article is the analysis of a problem of crisis phenomena in the markets of financial assets owing to an inadequate growth of their cost, owing to subjective reasons. The leading…

  9. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  10. The Coming Law School Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author explains how forty years of politicized hiring in the law schools has left its destructive mark. The results are potentially catastrophic: Market forces and internal law school policies may be combining to produce a legal education bubble the likes of which the country has never seen. (Contains 11 footnotes.)

  11. Affirmative Discrimination and the Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Roger

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, the author discusses how affirmative action contributed to an unnatural rise in enrollments in college. In considering the higher education bubble, he makes the case that as the opposition to preferences continues to build, the momentum of this trend will only increase as funding shrinks. He offers some tentative answers to a series…

  12. LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

    1964-07-08

    The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

  13. Ice bubbles confirm big chill

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1996-06-14

    Clues buried in Greenland`s icesheet indicate that during the last ice age, the climate repeatedly warmed sharply, only to slide into a renewed chill lasting thousands of years. New indicators derived from trapped bubbles of ancient gases, nitrogen and methane, indicate that these were indeed catastrophic events. This article describes the research and adjunct issues.

  14. Electrolysis Bubbles Make Waterflow Visible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    Technique for visualization of three-dimensional flow uses tiny tracer bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen made by electrolysis of water. Strobe-light photography used to capture flow patterns, yielding permanent record that is measured to obtain velocities of particles. Used to measure simulated mixing turbulence in proposed gas-turbine combustor and also used in other water-table flow tests.

  15. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  16. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  17. The effects of bubble-bubble interactions on pressures and temperatures produced by bubbles collapsing near a rigid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation occurs in a wide range of hydraulic applications, and one of its most important consequences is structural damage to neighboring surfaces following repeated bubble collapse. A number of studies have been conducted to predict the pressures produced by the collapse of a single bubble. However, the collapse of multiple bubbles is known to lead to enhanced collapse pressures. In this study, we quantify the effects of bubble-bubble interactions on the bubble dynamics and pressures/temperatures produced by the collapse of a pair of bubbles near a rigid surface. For this purpose, we use an in-house, high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing method to solve the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations for gas/liquid flows. The non-spherical bubble dynamics are investigated and the subsequent pressure and temperature fields are characterized based on the relevant parameters entering the problem: stand-off distance, geometrical configuation, collapse strength. We demonstrate that bubble-bubble interactions amplify/reduce pressures and temperatures produced at the collapse, and increase the non-sphericity of the bubbles and the collapse time, depending on the flow parameters.

  18. Bubble bouncing at a clean water surface.

    PubMed

    Zawala, Jan; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Malysa, Kazimierz

    2013-10-28

    Experiments on the coalescence time of submillimeter bubbles colliding with a distilled water/air interface either being at rest (undisturbed) or vibrating vertically (with controlled amplitude and frequency) were carried out. It was found that the outcome of the bubble collision (coalescence or bounce) depends on impact velocity and size of the bubble, i.e. the parameters determining the bubble deformation degree. With the surface at rest, when the deformation of the bubble was sufficiently high, bubble bouncing was observed. It was caused by the fact that the radius of the intervening liquid film formed between the colliding bubble and water/air interface was large enough to prevent the liquid layer from reaching its thickness of rupture within the time of bubble-interface contact. Coalescence occurred in a consecutive collision if the bubble deformation was below a threshold value, as a result of dissipation of the kinetic energy associated with the bubble motion. The hypothesis about the crucial role of the bubble deformation and size of the liquid film formed in the bouncing mechanism was confirmed in a series of experiments where the bubble collided with a vibrating water/air interface. It was shown that when the kinetic energy was properly re-supplied from an external source (interface vibrations), the spectacular phenomenon of "immortal" bubbles, dancing indefinitely at the water/air interface, was achieved. It was shown that "immortal" bubble formation is a consequence of a similarly high degree of the bubble shape deformation and consequently a large enough radius of the liquid film formed.

  19. Tiny Bubbles in my BEC

    SciTech Connect

    Blinova, Alina A.

    2012-08-01

    Ultracold atomic gases provide a unique way for exploring many-body quantum phenomena that are inaccessible to conventional low-temperature experiments. Nearly two decades ago the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) - an ultracold gas of bosons in which almost all bosons occupy the same single-particle state - became experimentally feasible. Because a BEC exhibits superfluid properties, it can provide insights into the behavior of low-temperature helium liquids. We describe the case of a single distinguishable atom (an impurity) embedded in a BEC and strongly coupled to the BEC bosons. Depending on the strength of impurity-boson and boson-boson interactions, the impurity self-localizes into two fundamentally distinct regimes. The impurity atom can behave as a tightly localized 'polaron,' akin to an electron in a dielectric crystal, or as a 'bubble,' an analog to an electron bubble in superfluid helium. We obtain the ground state wavefunctions of the impurity and BEC by numerically solving the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations that characterize the system. We employ the methods of imaginary time propagation and conjugate gradient descent. By appropriately varying the impurity-boson and boson-boson interaction strengths, we focus on the polaron to bubble crossover. Our results confirm analytical predictions for the polaron limit and uncover properties of the bubble regime. With these results we characterize the polaron to bubble crossover. We also summarize our findings in a phase diagram of the BEC-impurity system, which can be used as a guide in future experiments.

  20. Antioscillons from bubble collisions at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersini-Houghton, Laura

    2014-04-01

    We study the role of the topology of bubbles at finite temperatures plays on collisions and the existence of new field configurations. We show that in the case of false vacuum decay at finite temperature, the cylindrical symmetry of bubbles admits a new exotic field with negative energies, the antiperiodic "twisted" field. New field configurations arise generically, not only at finite temperatures but whenever a cluster of bubbles resulting from collisions form nontrivial topologies. The interaction of both configurations induces instabilites on the bubble. Collisions of bubbles occupied by the new fields can lead to the emergence of new structures, named antioscillons.

  1. Robust acoustic wave manipulation of bubbly liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gumerov, N. A.; Akhatov, I. S.; Ohl, C.-D.; Sametov, S. P.; Khazimullin, M. V.; Gonzalez-Avila, S. R.

    2016-03-28

    Experiments with water–air bubbly liquids when exposed to acoustic fields of frequency ∼100 kHz and intensity below the cavitation threshold demonstrate that bubbles ∼30 μm in diameter can be “pushed” away from acoustic sources by acoustic radiation independently from the direction of gravity. This manifests formation and propagation of acoustically induced transparency waves (waves of the bubble volume fraction). In fact, this is a collective effect of bubbles, which can be described by a mathematical model of bubble self-organization in acoustic fields that matches well with our experiments.

  2. Asymmetric interface temperature during vapor bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, A.; Castillo, M.; Steinberg, T.; Brutin, D.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the nucleation, growth, and detachment of single vapor bubbles at the interface microscale. Shear flow is used to investigate pool and convective boiling situations using visible and infrared visualizations. We determine a threshold Reynolds number for the onset of asymmetric interfacial temperatures. Below this threshold, bubble growth is geometrically and thermally symmetric, while above, bubbles no longer grow thermally symmetrically. This is explained by the dominance of convective heat transfer removal over viscous effects at the bubble interface. We experimentally demonstrate asymmetric interfacial temperature profiles that should be taken into account for future bubble growth modeling.

  3. Asymmetric interface temperature during vapor bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Antoine; Castillo, Martin; Steinberg, Ted; Brutin, David; AMU Collaboration; QUT Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the nucleation, growth, and detachment of single vapor bubbles at the interface microscale. Shear flow is used to investigate pool and convective boiling situations using visible and infrared visualizations. We determine a threshold Reynolds number for the onset of asymmetric interfacial temperatures. Below this threshold, bubble growth is geometrically and thermally symmetric, while above, bubbles no longer grow thermally symmetrically. This is explained by the dominance of convective heat transfer removal over viscous effects at the bubble interface. We experimentally demonstrate asymmetric interfacial temperature profiles that should be taken into account for future bubble growth modeling.

  4. Rise of an argon bubble in liquid steel in the presence of a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, K.; Kumar, P.; Vanka, S. P.; Thomas, B. G.

    2016-09-01

    The rise of gaseous bubbles in viscous liquids is a fundamental problem in fluid physics, and it is also a common phenomenon in many industrial applications such as materials processing, food processing, and fusion reactor cooling. In this work, the motion of a single argon gas bubble rising in quiescent liquid steel under an external magnetic field is studied numerically using a Volume-of-Fluid method. To mitigate spurious velocities normally generated during numerical simulation of multiphase flows with large density differences, an improved algorithm for surface tension modeling, originally proposed by Wang and Tong ["Deformation and oscillations of a single gas bubble rising in a narrow vertical tube," Int. J. Therm. Sci. 47, 221-228 (2008)] is implemented, validated and used in the present computations. The governing equations are integrated by a second-order space and time accurate numerical scheme, and implemented on multiple Graphics Processing Units with high parallel efficiency. The motion and terminal velocities of the rising bubble under different magnetic fields are compared and a reduction in rise velocity is seen in cases with the magnetic field applied. The shape deformation and the path of the bubble are discussed. An elongation of the bubble along the field direction is seen, and the physics behind these phenomena is discussed. The wake structures behind the bubble are visualized and effects of the magnetic field on the wake structures are presented. A modified drag coefficient is obtained to include the additional resistance force caused by adding a transverse magnetic field.

  5. Module for Oxygenating Water without Generating Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Anuncia; Sidik, Reyimjan; Kim, Jinseong

    2004-01-01

    A module that dissolves oxygen in water at concentrations approaching saturation, without generating bubbles of oxygen gas, has been developed as a prototype of improved oxygenators for water-disinfection and water-purification systems that utilize photocatalyzed redox reactions. Depending on the specific nature of a water-treatment system, it is desirable to prevent the formation of bubbles for one or more reasons: (1) Bubbles can remove some organic contaminants from the liquid phase to the gas phase, thereby introducing a gas-treatment problem that complicates the overall water-treatment problem; and/or (2) in some systems (e.g., those that must function in microgravity or in any orientation in normal Earth gravity), bubbles can interfere with the flow of the liquid phase. The present oxygenation module (see Figure 1) is a modified version of a commercial module that contains >100 hollow polypropylene fibers with a nominal pore size of 0.05 m and a total surface area of 0.5 m2. The module was originally designed for oxygenation in a bioreactor, with no water flowing around or inside the tubes. The modification, made to enable the use of the module to oxygenate flowing water, consisted mainly in the encapsulation of the fibers in a tube of Tygon polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with an inside diameter of 1 in. (approx.=25 mm). In operation, water is pumped along the insides of the hollow fibers and oxygen gas is supplied to the space outside the hollow tubes inside the PVC tube. In tests, the pressure drops of water and oxygen in the module were found to be close to zero at water-flow rates ranging up to 320 mL/min and oxygen-flow rates up to 27 mL/min. Under all test conditions, no bubbles were observed at the water outlet. In some tests, flow rates were chosen to obtain dissolved-oxygen concentrations between 25 and 31 parts per million (ppm) . approaching the saturation level of approx.=35 ppm at a temperature of 20 C and pressure of 1 atm (approx.=0.1 MPa). As one

  6. Evaluation of stability and size distribution of sunflower oil-coated micro bubbles for localized drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Micro bubbles were initially introduced as contrast agents for ultrasound examinations as they are able to modify the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging, thus improving the assessment of clinical information on human tissue. Recent developments have demonstrated the feasibility of using these bubbles as drug carriers in localized delivery. In micro fluidics devices for generation of micro bubbles, the bubbles are formed at interface of liquid gas through a strangulation process. A device that uses these features can produce micro bubbles with small size dispersion in a single step. Methods A T-junction micro fluidic device constructed using 3D prototyping was made for the production of mono dispersed micro bubbles. These micro bubbles use sunflower oil as a lipid layer. Stability studies for micro bubbles with diameters different generated from a liquid phase of the same viscosity were conducted to evaluate whether micro bubbles can be used as drug carriers. The biocompatibility of coating layer, the ability to withstand environmental pressure variations combined with echogenicity, are key factors that they can safely play the role of drug transporters. Results The normal distribution curve with small dispersion of the diameter of bubbles validates the process of generating micro bubbles with low value of variation coefficient, i.e., 0.381 at 1.90%. The results also showed the feasibility of using sunflower oil as the lipid matrix with stable population of bubbles over 217 minutes for micro bubbles with an average diameter of 313.04 μm and 121 minutes for micro bubbles with an average diameter of 73.74 μm, considering bubbles with air as gaseous phase. Conclusion The results indicate that the micro fluidic device designed can be used for producing micro bubbles with low variation coefficient using sunflower oil as a coating of micro bubbles. These carriers were stable for periods of time that are long enough for clinical applications even when regular

  7. Alternative model of single-bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi

    1997-12-01

    A model of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is constructed. In the model, the temperature is assumed to be spatially uniform inside the bubble except at the thermal boundary layer near the bubble wall even at the strong collapse based on the theoretical results of Kwak and Na [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4454 (1996)]. In the model, the effect of the kinetic energy of gases inside the bubble is taken into account, which heats up the whole bubble when gases stop their motions at the end of the strong collapse. In the model, a bubble in water containing air is assumed to consist mainly of argon based on the hypothesis of Lohse et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1359 (1997)]. Numerical calculations under a SBSL condition reveal that the kinetic energy of gases heats up the whole bubble considerably. It is also clarified that vapor molecules (H2O) undergo chemical reactions in the heated interior of the bubble at the collapse and that chemical reactions decrease the temperature inside the bubble considerably. It is suggested that SBSL originates in thermal radiation from the whole bubble rather than a local point (the bubble center) heated by a converging spherical shock wave widely suggested in the previous theories of SBSL.

  8. Mechanics of gas-vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Yuhang; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Most bubbles contain a mixture of vapor and incondensible gases. While the limit cases of pure vapor and pure gas bubbles are well studied, much less is known about the more realistic case of a mixture. The bubble contents continuously change due to the combined effects of evaporation and condensation and of gas diffusion in the liquid and in the bubble. This paper presents a model for this situation and illustrates by means of examples several physical processes that can occur: a bubble undergoing a temporary pressure reduction, which makes the liquid temporarily superheated; a bubble subjected to a burst of sound; and a bubble continuously growing by rectified diffusion of heat in the presence of an incondensible gas.

  9. Study of Critical Heat Flux Mechanism in Flow Boiling Using Bubble Crowding Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Nariai, Hideki; Inasaka, Fujio

    Critical heat flux (CHF) of Subcooled Flow Boiling with water in a tube was investigated from the viewpoint of mechanistic models. The Weisman-Pei bubble crowding model was selected to predict CHF in a short tube and in a tube with an internal twisted tape under nonuniform heating conditions, Based on the results of bubble behavior observation and preliminary analysis. The original Weisman-Pei model was modified in order to explain the physical phenomena of CHF. The modified model predicted well CHF in a smooth tube including the very short tube and the tube with an internal twisted tape under uniform and nonuniform heating conditions.

  10. Applicability of a "Multi-Stage Pulse Labeling" (15)N Approach to Phenotype N Dynamics in Maize Plant Components during the Growing Season.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Silva, Amanda; Camberato, James J; Coram, Tristan; Filley, Timothy; Vyn, Tony J

    2017-01-01

    Highlights This work utilizes "multi-stage pulse labeling" (15)N applications, primarily during reproductive growth stages, as a phenotyping strategy to identify maize hybrids with superior N use efficiency (NUE) under low N conditions. Research using labeled isotopic N ((15)N) can precisely quantify fertilizer nitrogen (N) uptake and organ-specific N allocation in field crops such as maize (Zea mays L.). The overall research objective was to study plant N uptake patterns potentially correlated with N use efficiency (NUE) in field-grown maize hybrids using a "multi-stage pulse labeling" (15)N phenotyping strategy with an emphasis on the reproductive period. Five hybrids varying in NUE were compared under zero N fertilizer application (0N) plus a moderate rate of 112 kg N ha(-1) (112N) in 2013 (2 locations) and 2014 growing seasons. The equivalent of 3.2 (2013) to 2.1 (2014) kg of (15)N ha(-1), as labeled Ca((15)NO3)2, was injected into soil on both sides of consecutive plants at multiple stages between V14 and R5. Aboveground plant biomass was primarily collected in short-term intervals (4-6 days after each (15)N application) in both years, and following a single long-term interval (at R6 after (15)N injection at R1) in 2014. Averaged across hybrids and site-years, the moderate N rate (112N) increased absolute (15)N uptake at all stages; however, plants in the 0N treatment allocated proportionally more (15)N to reproductive organs. Before flowering, short-term recovery of (15)N ((15)Nrec) totaled ~0.30 or 0.40 kg kg(-1) of the (15)N applied, and ~50% of that accumulated (15)Nu was found in leaves and 40% in stems. After flowering, plant (15)Nrec totaled ~0.30 kg kg(-1) of (15)N applied, and an average 30% of accumulated (15)Nu was present in leaves, 17% in stems, and the remainder-usually the majority-in ears. At the R5 stage, despite a declining overall rate of (15)N uptake per GDD thermal unit, plant (15)Nrec represented ~0.25 kg kg(-1) of (15)N applied, of which

  11. Numerical studies of the spectrum of low-intensity ultrasound scattered by bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatock, B. C.; Nishi, R. Y.; Johnston, G. W.

    1985-05-01

    The magnitude of the nonlinear effect in the scattering of ultrasound by nitrogen bubbles in water is examined numerically, for ultrasonic frequencies and amplitudes typical of diagnostic medical devices, to determine the suitability of this effect for the detection of bubbles in blood or tissue for application in decompression research. Numerical solutions of the modified 'Rayleigh' equation, including the effects of acoustic, thermal, and viscous damping, and the dependence of the polytropic exponent on frequency are presented for pulsed ultrasound. For the chosen conditions, it is shown that nonlinear scattering is significant only for the population of bubbles which are smaller than, or close to, resonance size, and primarily for those bubbles that are one-half resonance size.

  12. Generation of Bubbly Suspensions in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hoffmann, Monica I.; Hussey, Sam; Bell, Kimberly R.

    2000-01-01

    Generation of a uniform monodisperse bubbly suspension in low gravity is a rather difficult task because bubbles do not detach as easily as on Earth. Under microgravity, the buoyancy force is not present to detach the bubbles as they are formed from the nozzles. One way to detach the bubbles is to establish a detaching force that helps their detachment from the orifice. The drag force, established by flowing a liquid in a cross or co-flow configuration with respect to the nozzle direction, provides this additional force and helps detach the bubbles as they are being formed. This paper is concerned with studying the generation of a bubbly suspension in low gravity in support of a flight definition experiment titled "Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubbly Suspension." Generation of a bubbly suspension, composed of 2 and 3 mm diameter bubbles with a standard deviation <10% of the bubble diameter, was identified as one of the most important engineering/science issues associated with the flight definition experiment. This paper summarizes the low gravity experiments that were conducted to explore various ways of making the suspension. Two approaches were investigated. The first was to generate the suspension via a chemical reaction between the continuous and dispersed phases using effervescent material, whereas the second considered the direct injection of air into the continuous phase. The results showed that the reaction method did not produce the desired bubble size distribution compared to the direct injection of bubbles. However, direct injection of air into the continuous phase (aqueous salt solution) resulted in uniform bubble-diameter distribution with acceptable bubble-diameter standard deviation.

  13. Splitting and dispersion of bubbles by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Carlos

    The transient evolution of the bubble-size probability density function resulting from the break-up of an air bubble injected into a fully developed turbulent water flow has been measured experimentally using digital image processing techniques. These measurements were used to determine the break up frequency of the bubbles as a function of their size and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy of the underlying turbulence, e , as well as to determine the bubble size probability density function of the daughter bubbles formed from the break-up of a mother bubble of size, D0. A phenomenological model for the break-up frequency is proposed showing that for large bubbles whose sizes are much greater than Dc=1.26(sr )3/5e-2/5 , it decreases with the bubble size as e1/3D-2/3 . The model is shown to be in good agreement with the measurements performed over a wide range of bubble sizes and values of e . Based on energy principles, a statistical model to describe the bubble size probability density function of the daughter bubbles resulting from the shattering of a mother bubble of size D0 immersed into a fully developed turbulent flow is proposed. The model shows that the bubble-size pdf depends not only on D0, but also on the value of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy of the underlying turbulence, e . This simple model predicts detailed experimental measurements of the transient bubble size pdfs performed over a range of bubble sizes and dissipation rates e , in a consistent manner. The agreement between the model and the experiments is particularly good for low and moderate values of turbulent Weber number of the bubbles, Wet=rDu2 D0D0 s , where the assumption of the binary break-up is shown to be consistent with the experimental observations. At larger values of Wet, it was found that the most probable number of daughter bubbles increases, and the assumption of tertiary break-up is shown to lead to a better fit of the experimental measurements

  14. Suppression of cavitation inception by gas bubble injection: a numerical study focusing on bubble-bubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masato; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2007-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of cavitation and gas bubbles under negative pressure has been studied numerically to evaluate the effect of gas bubble injection into a liquid on the suppression of cavitation inception. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated by direct observation that cavitation occurs in liquid mercury when mechanical impacts are imposed, and this will cause cavitation damage in spallation neutron sources, in which liquid mercury is bombarded by a high-power proton beam. In the present paper, we describe numerical investigations of the dynamics of cavitation bubbles in liquid mercury using a multibubble model that takes into account the interaction of a cavitation bubble with preexisting gas bubbles through bubble-radiated pressure waves. The numerical results suggest that, if the mercury includes gas bubbles whose equilibrium radius is much larger than that of the cavitation bubble, the explosive expansion of the cavitation bubble (i.e., cavitation inception) is suppressed by the positive-pressure wave radiated by the injected bubbles, which decreases the magnitude of the negative pressure in the mercury.

  15. Development and interactions of two inert gas bubbles during decompression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Homer, L D; Thalmann, E D

    1996-09-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the evolution of two inert gas bubbles in tissue. This is useful for understanding the dynamics of bubbles that presumably arise during decompression. It is assumed that they are spherical and that the tissue volume surrounding them is infinite. The total pressure in each bubble is determined by the barometric and metabolic gas pressures as well as the pressure due to surface tension. Bipolar coordinates are employed to determine the inert gas pressure distribution. Two coupled governing equations for bubble radii are then derived and solved numerically. The results demonstrate how bubble evolution is affected by the distance between bubbles and the initial bubble radii. The existence time and bubble surface flux of two equal-sized bubbles are calculated and compared with those of a single gas bubble model. The results indicate that when two bubbles are very close, it takes 20% more time for two bubbles to dissolve than for a single one, and the total surface flux of two bubbles is nearly 20% less than twice of a single bubble. When the center-to-center distance is 10 times of bubble radius, the effect of bubble interaction on bubble existence time and surface flux are about 6 and 9% changes, respectively. We conclude that if bubbles are not too small, the interactions among bubbles should be included in inert gas bubble models predicting bubble evolution.

  16. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  17. Sonoporation from Jetting Cavitation Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Arora, Manish; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the detachment of cells. Cells at the edge of the circular area of detachment are found to be permanently porated, whereas cells at some distance from the detachment area undergo viable cell membrane poration (sonoporation). The wall flow field leading to cell detachment is modeled with a self-similar solution for a wall jet, together with a kinetic ansatz of adhesive bond rupture. The self-similar solution for the δ-type wall jet compares very well with the full solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for a jet of finite thickness. Apart from annular sites of sonoporation we also find more homogenous patterns of molecule delivery with no cell detachment. PMID:16950843

  18. Bubble formed as a result of a Zeolite Crystal Growth experiment in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-14

    ISS006-E-08775 (14 December 2002) --- View of a bubble formed as a result of a Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) experiment in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). Expedition Six Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox used a Space Station drill to mix 12 Zeolite samples in clear tubes. Scientists on the ground watching on TV noticed bubbles in the samples. Bowersox used a modified mixing procedure to process autoclaves to isolate bubbles. He re-inserted the samples in the ZCG furnace in Express Rack 2 in the U.S. laboratory/Destiny. This experiment has shown that the bubbles could cause larger number of smaller deformed crystals to grow. Bowersox rotated the samples so that the heavier fluid was thrown to the outside while the lighter bubbles stayed on the inside.

  19. Bubble formed as a result of a Zeolite Crystal Growth experiment in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-14

    ISS006-E-08835 (14 December 2002) --- View of a bubble formed as a result of a Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) experiment in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). Expedition Six Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox used a Space Station drill to mix 12 Zeolite samples in clear tubes. Scientists on the ground watching on TV noticed bubbles in the samples. Bowersox used a modified mixing procedure to process autoclaves to isolate bubbles. He re-inserted the samples in the ZCG furnace in Express Rack 2 in the U.S. laboratory/Destiny. This experiment has shown that the bubbles could cause larger number of smaller deformed crystals to grow. Bowersox rotated the samples so that the heavier fluid was thrown to the outside while the lighter bubbles stayed on the inside.

  20. Bubble formed as a result of a Zeolite Crystal Growth experiment in the U.S. Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-14

    ISS006-E-08805 (14 December 2002) --- View of a bubble formed as a result of a Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) experiment in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). Expedition Six Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox used a Space Station drill to mix 12 Zeolite samples in clear tubes. Scientists on the ground watching on TV noticed bubbles in the samples. Bowersox used a modified mixing procedure to process autoclaves to isolate bubbles. He re-inserted the samples in the ZCG furnace in Express Rack 2 in the U.S. laboratory/Destiny. This experiment has shown that the bubbles could cause larger number of smaller deformed crystals to grow. Bowersox rotated the samples so that the heavier fluid was thrown to the outside while the lighter bubbles stayed on the inside.