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Sample records for modified pillared clays

  1. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  2. Physicochemical of pillared clays prepared by several metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Nino; Kristiani, Anis

    2017-03-01

    Natural clays could be modified by the pillarization method, called as Pillared Clays (PILCs). PILCs have been known as porous materials that can be used for many applications, one of the fields is catalysis. PILCs as two dimensional materials are interesting because their structures and textural properties can be controlled by using a metal oxide as the pillar. Different metal oxide used as the pillar causes different properties results of pillared clays. Usually, natural smectite clays/bentonites are used as a raw material. Therefore, a series of bentonite pillared by metal oxides was prepared through pillarization method. Variation of metals pillared into bentonite are aluminium, chromium, zirconium, and ferro. The physicochemical properties of catalysts were characterized by using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Barret-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurement. Noteworthy characterization results showed that different metals pillared into bentonite affected physical and chemical properties, i.e. basal spacing, surface area, pore size distribution, thermal stability and acidity.

  3. Cobalt sorption in silica-pillared clays.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, A; Fetter, G; Bosch, P; Bulbulian, S

    2006-01-03

    Silicon pillared samples were prepared following conventional and microwave irradiation methods. The samples were characterized and tested in cobalt sorption. Ethylenediammine was added before cobalt addition to improve the amount of cobalt retained. The amount of cobalt introduced in the original clay in the presence of ethylenediammine was the highest. In calcined pillared clays the cobalt retention with ethylenediammine was lower (ca. 40%). In all cases the presence of ethylenediammine increased twice the amount of cobalt sorption measured for aqueous solutions.

  4. Decomposition of nitrous oxide on pillared clays.

    PubMed

    De Stefanis, A; Dondi, M; Perez, G; Tomlinson, A A

    2000-10-01

    Alumina-pillared smectites have been found to abate nitrous oxide in the presence of methane. The results indicate that the yield of the reaction (N20 --> N2 + (1/2)O2) increases when pillared clays are exchanged with transition metals, single-pass conversion rates of >70% being attainable. In particular, when double exchanged (calcium and subsequently copper) alumina pillared montmorillonite/beidellite is used as a catalyst, de-N2O activity reaches a maximum, which is maintained even after 4 h of work at a space velocity of 5.5 h(-1). A mechanism for the reaction is suggested, which implies that N2O is first adsorbed by the catalyst and then decomposes through two different paths: catalyst oxidation and catalyst reduction. Such a redox process explains the kinetic data.

  5. Naphthene upgrading with pillared synthetic clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrotreatment of methylcyclohexane was investigated to model upgrading of coal-derived naphthenes. Nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM), alumina-pillared NiSMM and Zirconia-pillared NiSMM were prepared and tested for hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of methylcyclohexane. Infrared and thermal desorption studies of the pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Total acidity and surface area increased with pillaring of NiSMM with polyoxy aluminum and polyoxy zirconium cations. Methylcyclohexane was reacted with these catalysts under a variety of conditions. Pillared clays gave higher gas yields and higher hydrocracking but lower hydroisomerization activity than nonpillared clay. The majority of the products were branched alkanes (isoparaffinic). These catalysts effectively use hydrogen as indicated by the minimal formation of aromatic hydrocarbons, coke, or other oligomeric materials. The effect of various operating conditions, i.e., reaction temperature, contact time, H{sub 2} pressure, and catalyst, on the product distribution will be described.

  6. Naphthene upgrading with pillared synthetic clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrotreatment of methylcyclohexane was investigated to model upgrading of coal-derived naphthenes. Nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM), alumina-pillared NiSMM, and zirconia-pillared NiSMM were prepared and tested for hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of mediylcyclohexane. Infrared and thermal desorption studies of the pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of Lewis as well as Bronsted acid sites. Total acidity and surface area increased with pillaring of NiSMM with polyoxy aluminum and polyoxy zirconium cations. Most of the products were branched alkanes (isoparaffins). These compositions are highly desirable for environmentally acceptable transportation fuels. Furthermore, dehydrogenation was not a major pathway, as indicated by the minimal formation of aromatic hydrocarbons, coke, or other oligomeric materials. This paper describes the effect of various operating conditions, which included reaction temperature, contact time, hydrogen pressure, and catalyst on the product distribution.

  7. Pillared smectite clay coatings for ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagota, S.; Harmer, M.A.; Lemon, M.F.; Jagota, A.; McCarron, E.M. III.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a novel route for the low-temperature formation of mullite, from pillared smectite clay precursors, for use as fiber coatings in ceramic-matrix composites. In particular, alumina-pillared bentonite converts in part to mullite at the unusually low temperature of about 800 C. The clay precursors display excellent film-forming capability and have been coated onto silicon carbide fibers. Mechanical tests on composites of the coated fibers and a borosilicate glass demonstrate their success as debond coatings, suggesting that this approach is a viable and simple route to oxide coatings for fibers.

  8. Modified clay sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Fogler, H. Scott; Srinivasan, Keeran R.

    1990-01-01

    A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

  9. Single and multi-component adsorptive removal of bisphenol A and 2,4-dichlorophenol from aqueous solutions with transition metal modified inorganic-organic pillared clay composites: Effect of pH and presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Martínez, Krisiam; Reddy, Pratap; Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2016-07-15

    Pillared clay based composites containing transition metals and a surfactant, namely MAlOr-NaBt (Bt=bentonite; Or=surfactant; M=Ni(2+), Cu(2+)or Co(2+)), were prepared to study selectivity and capacity toward single and multiple-component adsorption of bisphenol A (BPA) and 2,4-diclorophenol (DCP) from water. Tests were also performed to account for the presence of natural organic matter in the form of humic acid (HA). Equilibrium adsorption capacities for single components increased as follows: NaBtpillared clay capacities. Inclusion of the transition metal brought an increase of nearly two-fold in adsorption capacity over the materials modified only with surfactant. The MAlOr-NaBt adsorbents displayed remarkable selectivity for BPA. Multi-component fixed-bed tests, however, revealed competition between the adsorbates, with the exception of the CuAlOr-NaBt beds. Inclusion of HA, surprisingly, enhanced the phenols adsorption capacity. Preliminary regeneration tests suggested that the adsorbent capacity can be recovered via thermal treatment or by washing with alkaline solutions. The former strategy, however, requires surfactant replenishment. More complex schemes would be needed to deal with absorbed HA.

  10. Silylated pillared clay (SPILC): A novel bentonite-based inorgano-organo composite sorbent synthesized by integration of pillaring and silylation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhong; Tian, Senlin; Zhu, Jianxi; Shi, Yao

    2007-11-01

    This research examines the feasibility of synthesizing inorgano-organo composites based on bentonite-silylated pillared interlayered clays (SPILCs) by pre-pillaring of bentonite with the Keggin ion (hydroxyaluminum polycation) and then silylating with alkylchlorosilanes. The results of organic carbon content analysis, FTIR, XRD, and DTA/TG indicated that the silyl group can be successfully grafted to the inner surface of pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) through reaction with the OH groups of the pillars and the d-spacing of synthesized PILCs and SPILCs were almost the same. SPILCs have both the higher organic carbon content relative to original bentonite and PILCs and the better surface and pore properties relative to surfactants-modified organobentonites. A comparison of the modifier demand of SPILCs and CTMAB-bentonites indicated that the silylation of PILCs was a modifier-economized process for organically modification of bentonite. The heat-resistant temperature of SPILCs, 508 degrees C for OTS-Al-PILC and 214 degrees C for TMCS-Al-PILC, are more excellent organobentonites. Unlike the partition-predominated sorption mechanisms of organobentonites, both adsorption and partition are important components of sorption mechanism of SPILCs. The VOC sorption capacity of SPILCs is approximately same with that of organobentonites and the hydrophobicity of SPILCs is superior to that of PILCs.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of TiO2-pillared Romanian clay and their application for azoic dyes photodegradation.

    PubMed

    Dvininov, E; Popovici, E; Pode, R; Cocheci, L; Barvinschi, P; Nica, V

    2009-08-15

    The synthesis and properties of metal oxide pillared cationic clays (PILCs) has been subject to numerous studies in the last decades. In order to obtain TiO(2)-pillared type materials, sodium montmorillonite from Romania-areal of Valea Chioarului, having the following composition (% wt): SiO(2)-72.87; Al(2)O(3)-14.5; MgO-2.15; Fe(2)O(3)-1.13; Na(2)O-0.60; K(2)O-0.60; CaO-0.90; PC-5.70 and cation exchange capacity, determined by ammonium acetate method, of 82 meq/100g, as matrix, was used. Sodium form of the clay was modified, primarily, by intercalation of cetyl-trimethylammonium cations between negatively charged layers which will lead to the expansion of the interlayer space. For the preparation of the TiO(2)-pillared clay, the alkoxide molecules, as titania precursor, were adsorbed onto/into clay samples (1 mmol Ti/g clay), in hydrochloric acid environment, the resulted species being converted into TiO(2) pillars by calcination. The as-prepared materials have been used as catalysts for Congo Red dye photodegradation, under UV. The photocatalytic activity of the pillared clays is a function of TiO(2) pillars size, their increase leading to the enhancement of the contact areas between dye solution and photoactive species present in the interlayer space. The structural characteristics and properties of the obtained materials were investigated by X-ray Diffraction, Thermogravimetry Analysis, UV-vis Diffuse Reflectance, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis.

  12. Effect of ultrasound on the structural and textural properties of copper-impregnated cerium-modified zirconium-pillared bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomul, Fatma

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the synthesis of zirconium-pillared bentonite modified with cerium was performed via two different methods by the application of conventional and ultrasonic treatments during the intercalation stage. To synthesise copper-impregnated pillared clays by wet impregnation, cerium-modified zirconium-pillared clays were used as supportive materials after being calcined at 300 °C. Ultrasonic treatment significantly decreased the required processing time compared with the conventional treatment of the synthesised pillared bentonites. Chemical analysis confirmed the incorporation of Zr 4+, Ce 4+ and Cu 2+ species into the pillared bentonites. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of zirconium- and cerium/zirconium-pillared bentonites prepared by conventional treatment show that one large d-spacing above 3.5 nm corresponds to the mesoporous delaminated part, and another small d-spacing above 1.7 nm is indicative of the microporous pillared part. Zirconium- and cerium/zirconium-pillared bentonites prepared via ultrasonic treatment exhibited similar results, with the same high d-spacing but with a second low-intensity d-spacing above 1.9 nm. The delaminated structures of the pillared bentonites synthesised by both methods were conserved after copper impregnation. Nitrogen-adsorption isotherm analysis showed that the textural characteristics of products synthesised by ultrasonic treatment were comparable to those of products synthesised by conventional treatment. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses showed the presence of Brønsted- and Lewis-acid sites, and zirconium-pillared clays synthesised by conventional treatment exhibited increased numbers of Brønsted- and Lewis-acid sites after cerium addition and copper impregnation. However, the products synthesised by ultrasonic treatment exhibited an increased number of Brønsted- and Lewis-acid sites after cerium addition, but a decreased number of acid sites after copper impregnation.

  13. Cooperative coadsorption of 4-nitrophenol and basic yellow 28 dye onto an iron organo-inorgano pillared montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Zermane, Faiza; Bouras, Omar; Baudu, Michel; Basly, Jean-Philippe

    2010-10-01

    Sorption properties of an iron surfactant-modified pillared montmorillonite (Fe-SMPM) toward two organic pollutants, basic yellow 28 dye (BY28) and 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), were studied at different pH values in both single component and binary pollutant systems. The pseudo-first-order model fits well with the kinetic data obtained in single component studies and sorption capacities of both BY28 and 4-NP increased with the pH value. A sorption synergetic mechanism was observed in binary systems; 4-nitrophenol adsorption was enhanced by the presence of BY28 in the mixture and increased with dye concentrations. Isotherms were described using the Freundlich model in single component systems and the Sheindorf-Rebhun-Sheintuch (SRS) model, an extended Freundlich model, in binary mixtures systems. Hydrophobic interactions between the surfactant-modified pillared clay and the pollutants were suggested to explain the sorption mechanisms.

  14. Single and multi-component adsorption of salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine from water onto transition metal modified and partially calcined inorganic-organic pillared clay fixed beds.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2015-01-23

    Fixed-beds of transition metal (Co(2+), Ni(2+) or Cu(2+)) inorganic-organic pillared clays (IOCs) were prepared to study single- and multi-component non-equilibrium adsorption of a set of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs: salicylic acid, clofibric acid, carbamazepine and caffeine) from water. Adsorption capacities for single components revealed that the copper(II) IOCs have better affinity toward salicylic and clofibric acid. However, multi-component adsorption tests showed a considerable decrease in adsorption capacity for the acids and an unusual selectivity toward carbamazepine depending on the transition metal. This was attributed to a combination of competition between PPCPs for adsorption sites, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, and plausible pore blocking caused by carbamazepine. The cobalt(II) IOC bed that was partially calcined to fractionate the surfactant moiety showcased the best selectivity toward caffeine, even during multi-component adsorption. This was due to a combination of a mildly hydrophobic surface and interaction between the PPCP and cobalt(II). In general, the tests suggest that these IOCs may be a potential solution for the removal of PPCPs if employed in a layered-bed configuration, to take care of families of adsorbates in a sequence that would produce sharpened concentration wavefronts.

  15. In situ synthesis, characterization, and catalytic performance of tungstophosphoric acid encapsulated into the framework of mesoporous silica pillared clay.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoshan; Liu, Zhenxing; Han, Chunying; Ma, Wei; Zhao, Songjie

    2012-07-01

    Mesoporous silica pillared clay (SPC) incorporated with tungstophosphoric acid (HPW) has been synthesized via in situ introducing P and W source in the acidic suspension of the clay interlayer template during the formation of the silica pillared clay. The samples were characterized by XRD, XRF, FT-IR, TG-DTA, N(2) adsorption-desorption, and SEM techniques. The results showed that the HPW formed by in situ method has been effectively introduced into the framework of mesoporous silica pillared clay and its Keggin structure remained perfectly after formation of the materials. In addition, samples with similar HPW loadings were also prepared by impregnation method using SPC as the support. HPW in the incorporated samples was better dispersed into the silica pillared clay than in the impregnated samples. The results of catalytic tests indicated that the encapsulated materials demonstrated better catalytic performance than the impregnated samples in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT).

  16. Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

    1997-08-01

    During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

  17. Self-assembling electron-transport chains at electrodes modified with clay and related microporous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, D.

    1992-01-01

    Clay-modified electrodes (CME) were made by binding Al[sub 13]O[sub 4](OH)[sub 28][sup 3+]-pillared montmorillonite to SnO[sub 2] surfaces via a 2-4 monolayer thick coating of polymerized silane. The cationic polymer provides binding sites for anions, while the relatively remote clay surface strongly absorbs cations. When the CME is exchanged with Fe(CN)[sub 6][sup 4[minus

  18. The synthesis and application of pillared clays prepared from charge reduced montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engwall, Erik Edwin

    The synthesis of pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) makes use of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of clay minerals to prop their structures open with large hydroxy-metal cations. Homo-ionic Ca-Montmorillonite with a CEC of 83.9 meq/100 g has been partially exchanged with varied amounts of Li+ and heated to 200°C for 24 hours. These have been used to produce Zr and Al PILCs making use of ethanol/water synthesis solutions to overcome the hydrophobic nature of the clay. For the Zr-PILC system, the d(001) spacings determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD) were relatively constant at 19.0--20.1 A with respect to changing the unpillared CEC. The Zr-PILCs had type I isotherms for argon at 87 K and for benzene, p-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene adsorption at 30°C. Several Al-PILC synthesis procedures were evaluated and all produced materials whose adsorption capacity decreased with decreasing unpillared CEC. This reduction in adsorption capacity with unpillared CEC could be partially overcome by the combined use of ethanol/water pillaring solutions with ethanol/water washing. Previously unreported d(001) values in the range of 26.8 to 29.8 A were observed in Al-PILCs and were often bimodal with the expected values of about 18 A. These larger d(001) values were most prevalent at lower CEC values, if pillaring conditions favored the formation of polymeric species other than the Keggin cation. A new micropore size distribution model was developed to better understand PILC pore structure. The new model was compared to the Horvath and Kawazoe (1983) model (HK) and the Cheng and Yang (1994) model (CY) using argon adsorption at 87 K on Zr and Al-PILCs. The interlayer spacings determined by XRD for the test PILCs were 9.5 and 8.5 A for Zr and Al-PILCs respectively. Pore sizes predicted by the new model were 7.5 and 7.3 A for Zr and Al-PILCs respectively. The new model consistently predicts values that are closer to the interlayer spacing than either the HK or CY models. The new

  19. Adsorption of probe molecules in pillared interlayered clays: Experiment and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, A. Guil, J. M.; Lomba, E.; Almarza, N. G.; Khatib, S. J.; Cabrillo, C.; Sanz, A.; Pires, J.

    2014-06-14

    In this paper we investigate the adsorption of various probe molecules in order to characterize the porous structure of a series of pillared interlayered clays (PILC). To that aim, volumetric and microcalorimetric adsorption experiments were performed on various Zr PILC samples using nitrogen, toluene, and mesitylene as probe molecules. For one of the samples, neutron scattering experiments were also performed using toluene as adsorbate. Various structural models are proposed and tested by means of a comprehensive computer simulation study, using both geometric and percolation analysis in combination with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations in order to model the volumetric and microcalorimetric isotherms. On the basis of this analysis, we propose a series of structural models that aim at accounting for the adsorption experimental behavior, and make possible a microscopic interpretation of the role played by the different interactions and steric effects in the adsorption processes in these rather complex disordered microporous systems.

  20. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

    2000-09-01

    Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

  1. Preparation, characterization and application in deep catalytic ODS of the mesoporous silica pillared clay incorporated with phosphotungstic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoshan; Liu, Zhenxing; Liu, Jianjun; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Gao, Xiaohui; Pang, Xinmei; Sheng, Huiting

    2011-10-15

    Mesoporous silica pillared clay (SPC) materials with different contents of H(3)PW(12)O(40) (HPW) heteropoly acid were synthesized by introducing HPW into clay interlayer template in an acidic suspension using sol-gel method. Samples with similar HPW loadings were also prepared by impregnation method using SPC as the support. The results of the characterizations showed that HPW was dispersed more homogeneously in the encapsulated samples than in the impregnated samples. The encapsulated materials exhibited better catalytic performance than the impregnated samples in oxidative desulfurization of dibenzothiophene-containing model oil. The sulfur removal reached up to 98.6% for the model oil under the experiential conditions.

  2. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R. T. Yang; R.Q. Long

    1999-03-31

    In the last annual reports, we reported Cu-exchanged pillared clays as superior selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. During the past year we explored the possibilities with MCM-41, a new class of molecular sieve. In this report, Rh exchanged Al-MCM-41 is studied for the SCR of NO by C{sub 3}H{sub 6} in the presence of excess oxygen. It shows a high activity in converting NO to N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O at low temperatures. In situ FT-IR studies indicate that Rh-NO{sup +} species (1910-1898 cm{sup {minus}1}) is formed on the Rh-Al-MCM-41 catalyst in flowing NO/He, NO+O{sub 2}/He and NO+C{sub 3}H{sub 6}+O{sub 2}/He at 100-350 C. This species is quite active in reacting with propylene and/or propylene adspecies (e.g., {pi}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, polyene, etc.) at 250 C in the presence/absence of oxygen, leading to the formation of the isocyanate species (Rh-NCO, at 2174 cm{sup {minus}1}), CO and CO{sub 2}. Rh-NCO is also detected under reaction conditions. A possible reaction pathway for reduction of NO by C{sub 3}H{sub 6} is proposed. In the SCR reaction, Rh-NO{sup +} and propylene adspecies react to generate the Rh-NCO species, then Rh-NCO reacts with O{sub 2}, NO and NO{sub 2} to produce N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. Rh-NO{sup +} and Rh-NCO species are two main intermediates for the SCR reaction on Rh-Al-MCM-41 catalyst.

  3. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied.

  4. Synthesis of silica-pillared clay (SPC) with ordered mesoporous structure by one-step method without preswelling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Huihui; Li, Baoshan; Li, Xiao; Liu, Zhengxing; Ma, Wei

    2009-02-01

    The simultaneous intercalation of surfactants and TEOS into clay interlayers and subsequent intragallery ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis of TEOS resulted in mesoporous silica-pillared clay (SPC). These SPC materials exhibited refractions corresponding to a basal spacing of 3.7-4.3 nm, a uniform pore size of 2.5-3.16 nm and large surface areas of 567-576 m 2/g. Our results indicate that surfactants play a decisive role in pore formation, because they act as micelle-like template during the hydrolysis of TOES. Moreover, the pore size of SPC derivatives is controllable by the molecular length of surfactant. All of the SPC materials reported here exhibit high catalytic activity and selectivity for coker gas oil (CGO) cracking reaction in comparison to parent MCM-41 and Al-MCM-41. The excellent acid catalytic activity, together with their sable, well-organized porous structure, opens up new opportunities for applications in catalysis.

  5. Effective Removal of Heavy Metals from Wastewater Using Modified Clay.

    PubMed

    Song, Mun-Seon; Vijayarangamuthu, K; Han, EunJi; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2016-05-01

    We report an economical and eco-friendly way to remove the heavy metal pollutant using modified clay. The modification of clay was done by calcining the natural clay from Kyushu region in Japan. Further, the removal efficiency for various pH and contact time was evaluated. The morphology of the clays was studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structural and chemical analyses of modified clay were done by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and Energy dispersion analysis (EDAX) to understand the properties related to the removal of heavy metal pollutant. Further, we studied the absorption efficiency of clay for various pH and contacting time using Ni polluted water. The modified clays show better removal efficiency for all pH with different saturation time. The adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption capacity of modified clay is 1.5 times larger than that of natural clay. The increase in the adsorption efficiency of modified clay was correlated to the increase in hematite phase along with increase in surface area due to surface morphological changes.

  6. Solid-solid transformation mechanism for nanocrystalline sodalite from pillared clay.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jin-Ho; Lee, Sung-Reol; Han, Yang-Su; Park, Man; Park, Gyeong-Su

    2003-08-07

    We here report the synthesis of nanocrystalline sodalite by a solid-solid transformation from a solid gel mixture of Al2O3 pillared montmorillonite (Al2O3-PILM) and NaOH under an ambient atmosphere at 80 degrees C. HR-TEM clearly shows both the formation of sodalite nuclei by the solid-solid transformation of the montmorillonite matrix and the crystal growth of nanocrystalline sodalite through the rearrangement of delocalized nuclei.

  7. Evaluation of modified clay coagulant for sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Pearce, Pete

    2004-07-01

    The use of modified clays as coagulants for sewage treatment was investigated in this study. The raw clays were montmorillonites K10 and KSF, and were modified by polymeric Al or Fe and/or Al/Fe mixing polymeric species. The comparative performance of modified clays and aluminium sulphate and ferric sulphate were evaluated in terms of the removal of turbidity, suspended solids, UV(254)-abs, colour, and total and soluble CODs. The results demonstrated that after being modified with mixing polymeric Al/Fe species, two montmorillonite clays possess greater properties to remove the particles (as suspended solids) and organic pollutants (as COD and UV(254)-abs) from the sewage and to enhance the particle settling rate significantly.

  8. Controlling harmful algae blooms using aluminum-modified clay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xihua; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Qiu, Lixia

    2016-02-15

    The performances of aluminum chloride modified clay (AC-MC), aluminum sulfate modified clay (AS-MC) and polyaluminum chloride modified clay (PAC-MC) in the removal of Aureococcus anophagefferens were compared, and the potential mechanisms were analyzed according to the dispersion medium, suspension pH and clay surface charges. The results showed that AC-MC and AS-MC had better efficiencies in removing A.anophagefferens than PAC-MC. The removal mechanisms of the three modified clays varied. At optimal coagulation conditions, the hydrolysates of AC and AS were mainly monomers, and they transformed into Al(OH)3(am) upon their addition to algae culture, with the primary mechanism being sweep flocculation. The PAC mainly hydrolyzed to the polyaluminum compounds, which remained stable when added to the algae culture, and the flocculation mainly occurred through polyaluminum compounds. The suspension pH significantly influenced the aluminum hydrolysate and affected the flocculation between the modified clay and algae cells.

  9. Cyclic voltammetry of aquocobalamin on clay-modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, V.; Morra, M.J.

    1998-07-15

    Halogenated synthetic compounds are widespread contaminants of the environment. Although corrinoids reductively dehalogenate synthetic contaminants in solution, the redox behavior of sorbed tetrapyrroles has received limited attention. Colloidal clay suspensions were prepared as Ca{sup 2+} forms of hectorite (SHCa-1), montmorillonite (SWy-1, Syn-1, and SAz-1), and vermiculite (VTx-1) and spin coated on platinum electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry was performed with the clay-modified electrodes immersed in buffered solutions containing 1.0 mM aquocobalamin. Aquocobalamin in the presence of vermiculite-coated electrodes displayed the same cathodic and anodic peak potentials as unmodified electrodes immersed in aquocobalamin solutions. All other clay-modified electrodes shifted cathodic peaks to more negative values, while anodic peak shifts varied with the clay. Hectorite caused the largest shift in formal redox potential as compared to aquocobalamin in solution. The redox behavior of aquocobalamin as modified by sorption to clay minerals potentially affects dehalogenation rates of synthetic organic compounds in the environment. Clays lowering the formal redox potential of the tetrapyrrole create a potentially more efficient catalyst for pollutant degradation. However, thermodynamic data as obtained using cyclic voltammetry cannot be used to make definitive predictions about the kinetics of contaminant dehalogenation. Reductive dehalogenation will be a function of altered electrochemical properties of the tetrapyrrole as well as rates of contaminant diffusion to the site of tetrapyrrole sorption.

  10. Fenton-like processes and adsorption using iron oxide-pillared clay with magnetic properties for organic compound mitigation.

    PubMed

    Tireli, Aline Auxiliadora; Guimarães, Iara do Rosário; Terra, Júlio César de Souza; da Silva, Robson Rosa; Guerreiro, Mário Cesar

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new step was added to the classic route of iron-pillared clay obtention, resulting in a material with both magnetic and oxidative properties. The saturation of the material surface intercalated with trinuclear acetate-hydroxo iron (III) nitrate in glacial acetic acid atmosphere before heat treatment promoted magnetic phase formation (FePMAG). The material was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FePMAG showed an increase of 0.57 nm in basal spacing which contributed to the specific surface area increase from 39.1 to 139.2 m(2)/g. The iron phase identified by XRD and XPS was maghemite, with a little presence of hematite formed by the trinuclear acetate-hydroxo iron (III) nitrate decomposition during heat treatment. In the adsorption tests, FePMAG displayed a good capacity for organic dye methylene blue (MB) removal, reaching 41 % at 150 min. Under photo-Fenton conditions, the material showed an excellent MB oxidation capacity, completely removing the color of the solution within 90 min. Identification of the oxidation products with lower molecular (m/z = 160, 220, and 369) mass was performed by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS).

  11. Antimicrobial activity of organically modified nano-clays.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seek-In; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2008-11-01

    Antimicrobial activity of three kinds of commercially available montmorillonite nano-clays including a naturally occurring one (Cloisite Na+) and two organically modified ones (Cloisite 20A and Cloisite 30B) against four representative pathogenic bacteria (two Gram-positive ones such as Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, and two Gram-negative ones such as Salmonella typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7) was investigated. Antimicrobial activity was found to be dependent on the type of nano-clay and microorganisms tested. Among the nano-clays tested, Cloisite 30B showed the highest antibacterial activity followed by Cloisite 20A, however, the unmodified montmorillonite (Cloisite Na+) did not show any antibacterial activity. Especially, Cloisite 30B inactivated Gram-positive bacteria completely within an hour of incubation and inactivated Gram-negative bacteria by more than 2-3 log cycles after 8 hours incubation. SEM and TEM images of cell structure indicated that the organically modified nano-clay caused rupture of cell membrane and inactivation of the bacteria. This finding of antimicrobial activity of the organo-clay would open a new opportunity to develop polymer nanocomposites with additional functionality, i.e., antimicrobial function.

  12. Surfactant-modified bentonite clays: preparation, characterization, and atrazine removal.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Singh, Neera

    2015-03-01

    Bentonite clay was modified using quaternary ammonium cations, viz. phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), trioctylmethylammonium (TOMA) [100 % of cation exchange capacity of clay], and stearylkonium (SK) [100 % (SK-I) and 250 % (SK-II) of cation exchange capacity of clay]. The organoclays were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Atrazine adsorption on modified clays was studied using a batch method. Bentonite clay was a poor adsorbent of atrazine as 9.4 % adsorption was observed at 1 μg mL(-1) atrazine concentration. Modification of clay by PTMA cation did not improve atrazine adsorption capacity. However, atrazine adsorption in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-bentonites varied between 49 and 72.4 % and data fitted well to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm (R > 0.96). Adsorption of atrazine in organoclays was nonlinear and slope (1/n) values were <1. The product of Freundlich adsorption constants, K f(1/n) in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-I-bentonites was 239.2, 302.4, and 256.6, respectively, while increasing the SK cation loading in the clay (SK-II) decreased atrazine adsorption [K f(1/n) - 196.4]. Desorption of atrazine from organoclays showed hysteresis and TOMA- and SK-I-bentonites were the best organoclays to retain the adsorbed atrazine. Organoclays showed better atrazine removal from wastewater than an aqueous solution. The synthesized organoclays may find application in soil and water decontamination and as a carrier for atrazine-controlled released formulations.

  13. Searching for reciclability of modified clays for an environmental application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Antequera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants related to the food industry by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and

  14. Synthesis of magnetic FexOy@silica-pillared clay (SPC) composites via a novel sol-gel route for controlled drug release and targeting.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huihui; Liu, Xiaoting; Yang, Jihe; Li, Baoshan; Yao, Chao; Kong, Yong

    2014-07-01

    Novel magnetic silica-pillared clay (SPC) materials with an ordered interlayered mesopore structure were synthesized via a two-step method including gallery molecular self-assembly and sol-gel magnetic functionalization, resulting in the formation of FexOy@SPC composites. Small-angle XRD, TEM and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms results show that these composites conserved a regular layered and ordered mesoporous structure after the formation of FexOy nanoparticles. Wide-angle XRD and XPS analyses confirmed that the FexOy generated in these mesoporous silica-pillared clay hosts is mainly composed of γ-Fe2O3. Magnetic measurements reveal that these composites with different γ-Fe2O3 loading amounts possess super-paramagnetic properties at 300K, and the saturation magnetization increases with increasing Fe ratio loaded. Compared to the pure SPC, the in vitro drug release rate of the FexOy@SPC composites was enhanced due to the fact that the intensities of the SiOH bands on the pore surface of SPC decrease after the generation of FexOy. However, under an external magnetic field of 0.15T, the drug release rate of the FexOy@SPC composites decreases dramatically owing to the aggregation of the magnetic FexOy@SPC particles triggered by non-contact magnetic force. The obtained FexOy@SPC composites imply the possibility of application in magnetic drug targeting.

  15. Nitrate removal using natural clays modified by acid thermoactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena-Duran, C. J.; Sun Kou, M. R.; Lopez, T.; Azamar-Barrios, J. A.; Aguilar, D. H.; Domínguez, M. I.; Odriozola, J. A.; Quintana, P.

    2007-04-01

    Groundwater pollution by nitrates is a widespread problem in many locations in the world. The underground aquatic mantle of the Peninsula of Yucatan is highly vulnerable due to its karstic nature. Adsorption methods are a good choice for nitrate elimination. In this work, a natural calcium bentonite was modified by acid thermoactivation with HCl and H 2SO 4, and tested as a media for nitrate removal in an aqueous solution. The nitrate concentration in the solution was measured by FT-IR, using the Lambert-Beer law. Clay characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy; surface area was measured by the BET method.

  16. Interaction of surface-modified silica nanoparticles with clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omurlu, Cigdem; Pham, H.; Nguyen, Q. P.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the adsorption of 5-nm silica nanoparticles onto montmorillonite and illite is investigated. The effect of surface functionalization was evaluated for four different surfaces: unmodified, surface-modified with anionic (sulfonate), cationic (quaternary ammonium (quat)), and nonionic (polyethylene glycol (PEG)) surfactant. We employed ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy to determine the concentration of adsorbed nanoparticles in conditions that are likely to be found in subsurface reservoir environments. PEG-coated and quat/PEG-coated silica nanoparticles were found to significantly adsorb onto the clay surfaces, and the effects of electrolyte type (NaCl, KCl) and concentration, nanoparticle concentration, pH, temperature, and clay type on PEG-coated nanoparticle adsorption were studied. The type and concentration of electrolytes were found to influence the degree of adsorption, suggesting a relationship between the interlayer spacing of the clay and the adsorption ability of the nanoparticles. Under the experimental conditions reported in this paper, the isotherms for nanoparticle adsorption onto montmorillonite at 25 °C indicate that adsorption occurs less readily as the nanoparticle concentration increases.

  17. Effect of Al and Ce on Zr-pillared bentonite and their performance in catalytic oxidation of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnasri-Ghnimi, Saida; Frini-Srasra, Najoua

    2016-09-01

    Catalysts based on pillared clays with Zr and/or Al and Ce-Zr and/or Al polycations have been synthesized from a Tunisian bentonite and tested in catalytic oxidation of phenol at 298 K. The Zr-pillared clay showed higher activity than the Al-one in phenol oxidation. Mixed Zr-Al pillars lead to an enhancement of the catalytic activity due to the modification of the zirconium properties. The clays modified with Ce showed high conversions of phenol and TOC thus showing to be very selective towards the formation of CO2 and H2O.

  18. Using of surfactant modified Fe-pillared bentonite for the removal of pentachlorophenol from aqueous stream.

    PubMed

    Bouras, O; Houari, M; Khalaf, H

    2001-01-01

    The first part of this work considers the preparing of the adsorbent type Montm-FeOH-CTAC. After purification of two types Algerian bentonites (Maghnia and Mostaghanem) and preparation of cationic polyhydroxy ferric solution, we have optimized following parameters: CTAC/Montm.-FeOH = 7 mmol.g-1 and pH = 3.4, in order to obtain the adsorbent with maximum uptake of PCP. The study of the different experimental equilibrium isotherms showed clearly the high efficiency of these new adsorbents toward PCP, with significant quantities adsorbed especially onto Maghnia samples in acidic environment. Using two mathematical models Langmuir and Freundlich was found to be the Freundlich the best fitted. A comparative study of PCP adsorption onto the two modified clays and an activated carbon in the same conditions has been done.

  19. [Effect of KI modified clay on elemental mercury removal efficiency].

    PubMed

    Shen, Bo-Xiong; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cai, Ji; He, Chuan; Li, Zhuo

    2014-08-01

    Adsorption tests of elemental mercury were carried out by using KI modified clay (bentonite) in simulated flue gas under different conditions. Brunauer-Emett-Teller measurement (BET), Fourier Transform Infraredspectroscopy (FTIR) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to analyze the physical and chemical properties of the materials. Compared with the original bentonite, Hg(0) removal efficiency and Hg(0) adsorption capacity were drastically improved by the KI treatment. The experiment results also indicated that temperature could enhance the property of Hg(0) adsorption. Chemical adsorption was the dominant part in the process of Hg(0) adsorption. O2 was a beneficial factor for Hg(0) adsorption. SO2 was found to have a slight promotional effect on Hg(0) adsorption. The existence of H2O exhibited a dramatic inhibitory effect on Hg(0) adsorption.

  20. [Flocculation and removal of water bloom cells Microcystis aeruginosa by chitosan-modified clays].

    PubMed

    Zou, Hua; Pan, Gang; Chen, Hao

    2004-11-01

    The kinetics of flocculation and removal of Microcystis aeruginosa by chitosan-modified clays was studied. The efficiency of flocculating and removing of algal cells was greatly improved after the modification of the clays. About 80% of algae cell was removed in 0.5 hour, and 90% in 2 hours, when 11 mg/L modified sepiolite was added. Algae-removal capacities of different clays were all improved to a similar level of >90% at a total loading of 11 mg/L after being modified with chitosan. The efficiency of algae-removing was reduced when the clay loading was larger or smaller than the optimum loading.

  1. Unusual mechanism of capillary condensation in pores modified with chains forming pillars.

    PubMed

    Borówko, M; Patrykiejew, A; Sokołowski, S

    2011-08-07

    Density functional approach is applied to study the phase behavior of Lennard-Jones(12,6) fluid in pillared slit-like pores. Our focus is in the evaluation of phase transitions in fluid adsorbed in the pore of a fixed width. If the length of pillars is sufficiently large, we observe additional phase transitions of the first and second order due to the symmetry breaking of the distribution of chain segments and fluid species with respect to the slit-like pore center. Re-entrant symmetry changes and additional critical, critical end points and tricritical points then are observed. The scenario of phase changes is sensitive to the energy of fluid-solid interaction, the amount, and the length of the pillars. Quantitative trends and qualitative changes of the phase diagrams topology are examined depending on the values of these parameters.

  2. Adsorption of thorium cation on modified clays MTTZ derivative.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Denis L; Viana, Rúbia R; Airoldi, Claudio

    2009-09-15

    Diquite (D) and bentonite (B) mineral samples from the Amazon region, Brazil, were modified by MTTZ derivative (5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole) using heterogeneous route. These materials were characterized by textural and elemental analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), power X-ray diffraction and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The chemically modified clay (D(MTTZ) and B(MTTZ)) samples showed modification of its physical-chemical properties including: specific area 41.4 (B) to 398.5m(2)g(-1) (B(MTTZ)) and 25.0 (D) to 178.8m(2)g(-1) (D(MTTZ)). The adsorption experiments performed under batch process with Th(IV) concentration, pH and contact time as variables. The ability of these materials to remove thorium from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation at room temperature and pH 2.0, with variable concentration of Th(IV). The maximum number of moles adsorbed was determined to be 10.45 x 10(-2) and 12.76 x 10(-2)mmol g(-1) for D(MTTZ) and B(MTTZ), respectively. The energetic effects (Delta(int)H degrees , Delta(int)G degrees and Delta(int)S degrees ) caused by thorium cation adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations.

  3. Immobilization of fungal laccase onto a nonionic surfactant-modified clay material: application to PAH degradation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Tang; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Liu, Keng-Hua; Liao, Yi-Fen; Yang, Vivian

    2016-03-01

    Nonionic surfactant-modified clay is a useful absorbent material that effectively removes hydrophobic organic compounds from soil/groundwater. We developed a novel material by applying an immobilized fungal laccase onto nonionic surfactant-modified clay. Low-water-solubility polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (naphthalene/phenanthrene) were degraded in the presence of this bioactive material. PAH degradation by free laccase was higher than degradation by immobilized laccase when the surfactant concentration was allowed to form micelles. PAH degradation by immobilized laccase on TX-100-modified clay was higher than on Brij35-modified clay. Strong laccase degradation of PAH can be maintained by adding surfactant monomers or micelles. The physical adsorption of nonionic surfactants onto clay plays an important role in PAH degradation by laccase, which can be explained by the structure and molecular interactions of the surfactant with the clay and enzyme. A system where laccase is immobilized onto TX-100-monomer-modified clay is a good candidate bioactive material for in situ PAHs bioremediation.

  4. Sorption study of an acid dye from an aqueous solutions using modified clays.

    PubMed

    Bouberka, Z; Kacha, S; Kameche, M; Elmaleh, S; Derriche, Z

    2005-03-17

    The removal of the pollutant Supranol Yellow 4GL (S.Y.4GL) was studied by using different clays: clay exchanged with sodium (BNa+) and hydroxyaluminic polycation pillared clays in the presence or absence of non-ionic surfactant. While decomposing the surfactant at 500 degrees C, the surface of the clay changed significantly. The study of the behaviour of the three clays with respect to coloring solutions, allowed to determine the equilibrium time and the rate-determining step of the dye S.Y.4GL adsorption. Two simplified kinetic models, were tested to investigate the adsorption mechanisms in terms of pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order equations. Besides, the adsorption capacity data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich equations as well. A better fixation was obtained with an acidic pH. The effect of temperature on the adsorption of dye has been also studied and the thermodynamic parameters DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees were determined.

  5. Novel Organically Modified Core-Shell Clay for Epoxy Composites—“SOBM Filler 1”

    PubMed Central

    Iheaturu, Nnamdi Chibuike; Madufor, Innocent Chimezie

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of a novel organically modified clay from spent oil base drilling mud (SOBM) that could serve as core-shell clay filler for polymers is herein reported. Due to the hydrophilic nature of clay, its compatibility with polymer matrix was made possible through modification of the surface of the core clay sample with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) compound prior to its use. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize clay surface modification. Electron dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to expose filler chemical composition and morphology, while electrophoresis measurement was used to examine level of filler dispersion. Results show an agglomerated core clay powder after high temperature treatment, while EDX analysis shows that the organically modified clay is composed of chemical inhomogeneities, wherein elemental compositions in weight percent vary from one point to the other in a probe of two points. Micrographs of the 3-APTES coupled SOBM core-shell clay filler clearly show cloudy appearance, while FT-IR indicates 25% and 5% increases in fundamental vibrations band at 1014 cm−1 and 1435 cm−1, respectively. Furthermore, 3-APTES coupled core-shell clay was used to prepare epoxy composites and tested for mechanical properties. PMID:27355022

  6. Removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution using modified and unmodified kaolinite clay.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming-qin; Wang, Qing-ping; Jin, Xiao-ying; Chen, Zu-liang

    2009-10-15

    Modified kaolinite clay with 25% (w/w) aluminium sulphate and unmodified kaolin were investigated as adsorbents to remove Pb(II) from aqueous solution. The results show that amount of Pb(II) adsorbed onto modified kaolin (20mg/g) was more than 4.5-fold than that adsorbed onto unmodified kaolin (4.2mg/g) under the optimized condition. In addition, the linear Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe equilibrium isotherm. It is observed that the data from both adsorbents fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic adsorption of modified and unmodified kaolinite clay fitted well to the pseudo-second-order model. Furthermore, both modified and unmodified kaolinite clay were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Finally, both modified and unmodified kaolinite clay were used to remove metal ions from real wastewater, and results show that higher amount of Pb(II) (the concentration reduced from 178 to 27.5mg/L) and other metal ions were removed by modified kaolinite clay compared with using unmodified adsorbent (the concentration reduced from 178 to 168 mg/L).

  7. SO2 gas adsorption by modified kaolin clays: influence of previous heating and time acid treatments.

    PubMed

    Volzone, Cristina; Ortiga, Jose

    2011-10-01

    Modified kaolin clays were used as adsorbents for SO(2) gas adsorptions. The clays were heated up to 900 °C previous to acid treatments with 0.5 N sulfuric acid solutions at boiling temperature during different times up to 1440 min. Equilibrium adsorption at 25 °C and 0.1 MPa was carried out by using a volumetric apparatus. The samples were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis. The heating of the clays followed by acid treatment improved the adsorption capacity of the kaolin clays. The presence of amorphous silica and hydroxyl in the final products improved SO(2) adsorption capacity. Better properties for SO(2) adsorption were found in kaolin rich in not well ordered kaolinite clay mineral.

  8. Transformation of anthracene on various cation-modified clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Xiyou; Wang, Chuanyi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, anthracene was employed as a probe to explore the potential catalytic effect of clay minerals in soil environment. Clay minerals saturated with various exchangeable cations were tested. The rate of anthracene transformation follows the order: Fe-smectite > Cu-smectite > Al-smectite ≈ Ca-smectite ≈ Mg-smectite ≈ Na-smectite. This suggests that transition-metal ions such as Fe(III) play an important role in anthracene transformation. Among Fe(III)-saturated clays, Fe(III)-smectite exhibits the highest catalytic activity followed by Fe(III)-illite, Fe(III)-pyrophyllite, and Fe(III)-kaolinite, which is in agreement with the interlayer Fe(III) content. Moreover, effects by two common environmental factors, pH and relative humidity (RH), were evaluated. With an increase in pH or RH, the rate of anthracene transformation decreases rapidly at first and then is leveled off. GC-MS analysis identifies that the final product of anthracene transformation is 9,10-anthraquinone, a more bioavailable molecule compared to anthracene. The transformation process mainly involves cation-π bonding, electron transfer leading to cation radical, and further oxidation by chemisorbed O2. The present work provides valuable insights into the abiotic transformation and the fate of PAHs in the soil environment and the development of contaminated land remediation technologies.

  9. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    PubMed Central

    Jaynes, William F.; Zartman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (Kd = 13,800) and carnitine (Kd = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity. PMID:22069725

  10. Biodegradable nanocomposites from toughened polyhydroxybutyrate and titanate-modified montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Parulekar, Yashodhan; Mohanty, Amar K; Imam, Syed H

    2007-10-01

    Montmorillonite clay treated with neopentyl (diallyl)oxy tri(dioctyl) pyrophosphato titanate was used as a reinforcement for toughened bacterial bioplastic, Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in order to develop novel biodegradable nanocomposites. The modified clay, PHB, toughening partner and specific compatibilizer were processed by extrusion followed by injection molding. Different microscopy and goniometry techniques, rheology analysis, X-ray diffraction and thermo-mechanical testing were used to characterize the nanocomposites. Results showed that the nanocomposites with 5 wt% titanate-modified clay loading exhibited about 400% improvement in impact properties and 40% reduction in modulus in comparison with virgin PHB. The novel aspect of the titanate-based modification was that the nanocomposites still maintained nearly the same impact strength value as that of toughened PHB. The diffraction patterns suggest exfoliation of the organically modified clays and this was further supported by transmission electron microscopy and melt rheological analysis. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were correlated with a modified Halpin-Tsai theoretical model and the predictions matched significantly with the experimental results. Toughened and compatibilized PHB showed significantly lower biodegradation rate than virgin PHB and most significantly the addition of the titanate-modified clay in the same formulation enhanced the biodegradation several fold.

  11. Enhanced decolorization of dyes by an iron modified clay and thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Contreras Olivares, N; Díaz-Nava, M C; Solache-Ríos, M

    2016-01-01

    The sorption processes of red 5 (R5) and yellow 5 (Y5) dyes by iron modified and sodium bentonite in aqueous solutions was evaluated. The modified clay was prepared, conditioned and characterized. The sodium clay did not remove any of either dye. The sorption kinetics and isotherms of R5 and Y5 dyes by iron modified clay were determined. The maximum removal percentages achieved were 97% and 98% for R5 and Y5, respectively, and a contact time of 72 h; the experimental data were best adjusted to Ho model. The isotherms of both dyes were best adjusted to the Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacities of the modified clay were 11.26 mg/g and 5.28 mg/g for R5 and Y5, respectively. These results indicate that adsorption processes have a high probability to be described as chemisorption on a homogeneous material. Temperature range between 283 and 213 K does not affect the adsorption of Y5 by the iron modified clay, but the adsorption process of R5 was affected, and the thermodynamic parameters could be calculated, which indicate a chemisorption mechanism.

  12. Modified clay minerals efficiency against chemical and biological warfare agents for civil human protection.

    PubMed

    Plachá, Daniela; Rosenbergová, Kateřina; Slabotínský, Jiří; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Studentová, Soňa; Martynková, Gražyna Simha

    2014-04-30

    Sorption efficiencies of modified montmorillonite and vermiculite of their mono ionic Na and organic HDTMA and HDP forms were studied against chemical and biological warfare agents such as yperite and selected bacterial strains. Yperite interactions with modified clay minerals were observed through its capture in low-density polyethylene foil-modified clay composites by measuring yperite gas permeation with using chemical indication and gas chromatography methods. The antibacterial activities of synthetized organoclays were tested against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species in minimum inhibitory concentration tests. The obtained results showed a positive influence of modified clay minerals on the significant yperite breakthrough-time increase. The most effective material was the polyethylene-Na form montmorillonite, while the polyethylene-Na form vermiculite showed the lowest efficiency. With increasing organic cations loading in the interlayer space the montmorillonite efficiency decreased, and in the case of vermiculite an opposite effect was observed. Generally the modified montmorillonites were more effective than modified vermiculites. The HDP cations seem to be more effective compare to the HDTMA. The antibacterial activity tests confirmed efficiency of all organically modified clay minerals against Gram-positive bacteria. The confirmation of antibacterial activity against Y. pestis, plague bacteria, is the most interesting result of this part of the study.

  13. Structural and thermodynamics properties of organo-modified montmorillonite clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoukou, K.; Zaoui, A.; Zaïri, F.; Naït-Abdelaziz, M.; Gloaguen, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Polymer clay nanocomposites (PCNs) have been seen as the most novel materials in engineering applications since they exhibit significant improvement in mechanical and physical properties. Indeed, with few amount of organoclay, PCNs exhibit enhanced mechanical, optical, thermal and liquid or gas barrier properties compared to pure polymers and to their counterpart microcomposites. Thus, organoclays are extensively used as precursors in the preparation of PCNs. They are the best candidate in reinforcing PCNs because of the lightweight and the high availability of clay minerals in the nature. However, structure and physical phenomena arising at molecular level in organoclays, and subsequently in PCNs, are not completely or difficultly accessible with existing experimental techniques. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was conducted using the combination of two force fields (CLAYFF and CHARMM) to evaluate the thermodynamics and structural properties of organoclay such as heat capacities, isothermal bulk modulus, density, basal spacing and chains arrangement in the interlayer spacing. Our results regarding the basal spacing and density are in fairly good agreement with available experimental data. This allows us to validate the use of the two force fields to represent interactions in organoclays. The effect of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) on the basal spacing and the thermodynamics properties is assessed. We found, through our MD simulation, that the calculated isothermal bulk modulus is in good agreement with the density value of organoclays with two different CEC.

  14. Fish DNA-modified clays: Towards highly flame retardant polymer nanocomposite with improved interfacial and mechanical performance

    PubMed Central

    Zabihi, Omid; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Khayyam, Hamid; Naebe, Minoo

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) has been recently found to be an efficient renewable and environmentally-friendly flame retardant. In this work, for the first time, we have used waste DNA from fishing industry to modify clay structure in order to increase the clay interactions with epoxy resin and take benefit of its additional thermal property effect on thermo-physical properties of epoxy-clay nanocomposites. Intercalation of DNA within the clay layers was accomplished in a one-step approach confirmed by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, and XRD analyses, indicating that d-space of clay layers was expanded from ~1.2 nm for pristine clay to ~1.9 nm for clay modified with DNA (d-clay). Compared to epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt of Nanomer I.28E organoclay (m-clay), it was found that at 2.5%wt d-clay loading, significant enhancements of ~14%, ~6% and ~26% in tensile strength, tensile modulus, and fracture toughness of epoxy nanocomposite can be achieved, respectively. Effect of DNA as clay modifier on thermal performance of epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt d-clay was evaluated using TGA and cone calorimetry analysis, revealing significant decreases of ~4000 kJ/m2 and ~78 kW/m2 in total heat release and peak of heat release rate, respectively, in comparison to that containing 2.5%wt of m-clay. PMID:27917901

  15. Fish DNA-modified clays: Towards highly flame retardant polymer nanocomposite with improved interfacial and mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabihi, Omid; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Khayyam, Hamid; Naebe, Minoo

    2016-12-01

    Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) has been recently found to be an efficient renewable and environmentally-friendly flame retardant. In this work, for the first time, we have used waste DNA from fishing industry to modify clay structure in order to increase the clay interactions with epoxy resin and take benefit of its additional thermal property effect on thermo-physical properties of epoxy-clay nanocomposites. Intercalation of DNA within the clay layers was accomplished in a one-step approach confirmed by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, and XRD analyses, indicating that d-space of clay layers was expanded from ~1.2 nm for pristine clay to ~1.9 nm for clay modified with DNA (d-clay). Compared to epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt of Nanomer I.28E organoclay (m-clay), it was found that at 2.5%wt d-clay loading, significant enhancements of ~14%, ~6% and ~26% in tensile strength, tensile modulus, and fracture toughness of epoxy nanocomposite can be achieved, respectively. Effect of DNA as clay modifier on thermal performance of epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt d-clay was evaluated using TGA and cone calorimetry analysis, revealing significant decreases of ~4000 kJ/m2 and ~78 kW/m2 in total heat release and peak of heat release rate, respectively, in comparison to that containing 2.5%wt of m-clay.

  16. Modified clay sorbents for wastewater treatment and immobilization of heavy metals in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlakovs, Juris; Klavins, Maris; Vincevica-Gaile, Zane; Stapkevica, Mara

    2014-05-01

    Soil and groundwater pollution with heavy metals is the result of both, anthropogenic and natural processes in the environment. Anthropogenic influence in great extent appears from industry, mining, treatment of metal ores and waste incineration. Contamination of soil and water can be induced by diffuse sources such as applications of agrochemicals and fertilizers in agriculture, air pollution from industry and transport, and by point sources, e.g., wastewater streams, runoff from dump sites and factories. Treatment processes used for metal removal from polluted soil and water include methodologies based on chemical precipitation, ion exchange, carbon adsorption, membrane filtration, adsorption and co-precipitation. Optimal removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous medium can be achieved by adsorption process which is considered as one of the most effective methods due to its cost-effectiveness and high efficiency. Immobilization of metals in contaminated soil also can be done with different adsorbents as the in situ technology. Use of natural and modified clay can be developed as one of the solutions in immobilization of lead, zinc, copper and other elements in polluted sites. Within the present study clay samples of different geological genesis were modified with sodium and calcium chlorides, iron oxyhydroxides and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate in variable proportions of Ca/P equimolar ratio to test and compare immobilization efficiency of metals by sorption and batch leaching tests. Sorption capacity for raw clay samples was considered as relatively lower referring to the modified species of the same clay type. In addition, clay samples were tested for powder X-ray difractometry, cation exchange, surface area properties, elemental composition, as well as scanning electron microscopy pictures of clay sample surface structures were obtained. Modified clay sorbents were tested for sorption of lead as monocontaminant and for complex contamination of heavy metals. The

  17. Adsorption of chlorpyrifos, penconazole and metalaxyl from aqueous solution by modified clays.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Nicoleta A; Capri, Ettore

    2009-08-01

    Sorption of three pesticides (chlorpyrifos, metalaxyl and penconazole) has been measured on a commercial clay montmorillonite and on the same mineral modified with either of two cationic-surfactant micelles. Both micelle-clay complexes, commercial names Cloisite 20A and Cloisite 30B, showed a good capacity to sorb all three pesticides from water, whereas their sorption on the natural montmorillonite was not described by an isotherm. Modelling sorption on both micelle-clay complexes showed that the Freundlich sorption constant (K(F)) was higher for chlorpyrifos on Cloisite 20A (K(F) = 7.76) than on Cloisite 30B (K(F) = 5.91), whereas the sorption of metalaxyl was stronger on Cloisite 30B (K(F) = 1.07) than on Cloisite 20A (K(F) = 0.57). Moreover the micelle-clay complex Cloisite 20A also showed a good affinity for penconazole, the maximum quantity adsorbed (q(m)) of 6.33 mg g(-1) being 45% more than that on Cloisite 30B. Single-batch adsorption of each pesticide onto both micelle-clay complexes was studied using the Freundlich isotherm for chlorpyrifos and metalaxyl and the Langmuir isotherm for penconazole. The Cloisite 20A micelle-clay complex was predicted to require 23% less adsorbent to treat certain volumes of wastewater containing 30 mg L(-1) chlorpyrifos, 43% more to treat metalaxyl similarly and 57% less to treat penconazole compared with Cloisite 30B.

  18. Antimicrobial activities and cellular responses to natural silicate clays and derivatives modified by cationic alkylamine salts.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shan-Hui; Tseng, Hsiang-Jung; Hung, Huey-Shan; Wang, Ming-Chien; Hung, Chiung-Hui; Li, Pei-Ru; Lin, Jiang-Jen

    2009-11-01

    Nanometer-scale silicate platelet (NSP) materials were previously developed by increasing the interlayer space and exfoliation of layered silicate clays such as montmorillonite and synthetic fluorinated mica by the process of polyamine exfoliation. In this study, the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of these nanometer-scale silicate clays were evaluated. The derivatives of NSP (NSP-S) which were modified by C18-fatty amine salts via ionic exchange association exhibited the highest antibacterial activity in the aqueous state among all clays. The high antibacterial activity, however, was accompanied by elevated cytotoxicity. The variations of cell surface markers (CD29 and CD44) and type I collagen expression of fibroblasts treated with the clays were measured to clarify the mechanism of the silicate-induced cytotoxicity. The signal transduction pathway involved the downregulation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which appeared to participate in silicate-induced cytotoxicity. This study helped to understand the antibacterial potential of NSP and the interaction of natural and modified clays with cellular activities.

  19. Adsorption of phenol on inorganic-organic pillared montmorillonite in polluted water.

    PubMed

    Wu, P X; Liao, Z W; Zhang, H F; Guo, J G

    2001-05-01

    Both inorganic- and organic-pillared montmorillonites (PMts) were used to adsorb phenol to study suitable conditions for adsorption and adsorption isotherms. The adsorbing capacity of modified clays depends not only surface area, but mainly on micropore structure and surface components. After incandescing at 500 degrees C, the pillar structure and the basal interlayer spacing (1.83 nm) remained stable. Using modified PMt with surfactant can improve adsorbing capacity greatly. The PMt can be recycled, and it is a potential substance for adsorption of environmental pollutants.

  20. Simultaneous enhancements of UV resistance and mechanical properties of polypropylene by incorporation of dopamine-modified clay.

    PubMed

    Phua, Si Lei; Yang, Liping; Toh, Cher Ling; Guoqiang, Ding; Lau, Soo Khim; Dasari, Aravind; Lu, Xuehong

    2013-02-01

    Inspired by the radical scavenging function of melanin-like materials and versatile adhesive ability of mussel-adhesion proteins, dopamine-modified clay (D-clay) was successfully incorporated into polypropylene (PP) using an amine-terminated PP oligomer as the compatibilizer. Although the PP/D-clay nanocomposites exhibit intercalated morphology, the incorporation of D-clay greatly improves the thermo-oxidative stability and UV resistance of PP owing to the strong radical scavenging ability of polydopamine (PDA) and large contact area between PP and the PDA coating on clay mineral. Moreover, the reinforcement effect brought by D-clay is fairly significant at very low clay loadings probably owing to the strong interfacial interactions between the layered silicates and the compatibilizer as well as that between the compatibilizer and the PP matrix. The work demonstrates that D-clay is a type of promising nanofiller for thermoplastics used for outdoor applications since it stabilizes and reinforces the polymers simultaneously.

  1. Sol-gel network silica/modified montmorillonite clay hybrid nanocomposites for hydrophobic surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Meera, Kamal Mohamed Seeni; Sankar, Rajavelu Murali; Murali, Adhigan; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-02-01

    Sol-gel silica/nanoclay composites were prepared through sol-gel polymerization technique using tetraethylorthosilicate precursor and montmorillonite (MMT) clay in aqueous media. In this study, both montmorillonite-K(+) and organically modified MMT (OMMT) clays were used. The prepared composites were coated on glass substrate by making 1 wt% solution in ethyltrichlorosilane. The incorporation of nanoclay does not alter the intensity of characteristic Si-O-Si peak of silica network. Thermogravimetric studies show that increasing clay content increased the degradation temperature of the composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results of organically modified MMT nanoclay incorporated composite show a shift in the melting behavior up to 38°C. From DSC thermograms, we observed that the ΔH value decreased with increasing clay loading. X-ray diffraction patterns prove the presence of nanoclay in the composite and increase in the concentration of organically modified nanoclay from 3 to 5 wt% increases the intensity of the peak at 2θ=8° corresponds to OMMT. Morphology of the control silica gel composite was greatly influenced by the incorporation of OMMT. The presence of nanoclay changed the surface of control silica gel composite into cleaved surface with brittle in nature. Contact angle measurements were done for the coatings to study their surface behavior. These hybrid coatings on glass substrate may have applications for hydrophobic coatings on leather substrate.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and cure kinetics of polyaniline modified MMT clay/epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aykanat, Aydin

    bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy prepolymer crosslinked with tri ethylene tetra amine (TETA) was analyzed by DSC. The tensile, flexural and impact tests of carbon fiber epoxy micro composites showed that PANi coated carbon fiber epoxy systems have higher modulus, toughness and mechanical strengths compared to unmodified carbon fiber epoxy composites. In the second part of the research work, conducting polyaniline (PANi) montmorillonite (MMT) clay nanocomposites were synthesized by using in-situ polymerization. The X-Ray diffraction patterns showed that polyaniline was intercalated between clay galleries in the order of nanoscale. From the SEM micrographs, it was revealed that, in-situ polymerization of aniline took place both in and out of the clay galleries. Polyaniline surface modified clay nanoparticles were then dispersed in diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy prepolymer using high shear mixing and ultrasonication. The viscosity measurements of modified and unmodified clay dispersed in epoxy prepolymer systems showed that PANi modified clay has lower viscosity than the pristine clay that provides easiness during processing. Infrared spectroscopy data proves that reactive secondary and tertiary amine groups on the fully dispersed polyaniline modified clay platelets react with epoxy resin resulting a strong chemical and physical interaction between nanoparticles and polymeric matrix. The effect of PANi surface modified nano particles on the curing reaction and kinetics of epoxy with tri-ethylene tetra amine (TETA) was analyzed by using DSC and explained by modified Avrami equation. The X-Ray diffraction pattern of fully cured 5% (w/w) PANi-MMT clay epoxy nanocomposites showed exfoliation behavior. Thermal analysis showed that for 5% (w/w) PANi-MMT filled epoxy nanocomposites has higher thermal stability than both fully cured pristine epoxy and 5% (w/w) clay epoxy nanocomposite. With the addition and exfoliation of 5% (w/w) PANi modified clay an increase of 8°C in

  3. Chromate adsorption on acid-treated and amines-modified clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjaji, M.; Beraa, A.

    2015-03-01

    Acid-treated montmorillonite-rich clay and amines (methylamine, morpholine, and aniline)-modified clay adsorbents were investigated and their abilities to remove chromate from aqueous solution were studied. For the later purpose, kinetic studies were carried out under different operating conditions (chromate concentration, adsorbent content, and temperature), and adsorption isotherm measurements were performed. It was found that the kinetic of adsorption was fast and the data followed the pseudo-second rate equation. The rate of adsorption was controlled by the intra-particle diffusion and mass transfer through the liquid film, and the relative importance of these limiting steps depended on the operating conditions. Chromate adsorption was an endothermic process and took place spontaneously by physisorption. The free energy at 25 ≤ T ≤ 40 °C varied from -1.5 to -46 kJ/mol. Adsorption isotherms of Na+-saturated clay (AN), acid-treated clay (AA), and methylamine-clay and morpholine-clay (A-Me, A-Mo) were type V, whereas those of aniline-clay (A-An) were type III. The estimated maximum uptakes were 105, 29, 15, 11, and 10 mmol/kg for A-An, AN, A-Mo, AA, and A-Me, respectively. The mechanism of chromate adsorption was discussed based on the shape of the isotherms. Considering for instance the most efficient absorbent (A-An), the isotherm followed the Freundlich equation and hydrogen chromate (the main stable form at working pH) adsorbed to solid particles once aniline species were entirely desorbed.

  4. Comparison of modified montmorillonite adsorbents. Part II: The effects of the type of raw clays and modification conditions on the adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Zeng, Zhiqiang

    2003-10-01

    This paper builds on the preceding researches to study the effects of the type of clays (montmorillonites K10, KSF) and modifying conditions on the structure and adsorption behavior of resulting clay adsorbents. The raw clays were modified by polymeric Al/Fe species, hexadecyl-trimethylammonium (HDTMA) surfactant and a complex of polymeric Al/Fe-HDTMA. X-ray diffraction spectra was applied to analyze the structure of the raw and modified clays. After modification, the basal spacing of the clays varied, depending on the types of raw clay and modification conditions. Copper and phenol were selected as adsorbates for evaluating the adsorption performance of various clays, which was affected significantly by the types of raw clay and modification conditions. In general the inorganic contaminant (e.g., Cu) tend to be adsorbed by the polymeric Al/Fe modified clay and the organic impurities (e.g., phenol) will be preferably captured by the surfactant modified clay; both due to the specific surface properties resulting from introducing the modifiers. The complex modified clays possessed the ability of adsorbing both inorganic and organic contaminants. In addition, the d 0 0 1 spacing of modified KSF was greater than that of K10; the adsorption performance with modified KSF was thus greater than that with the modified K10. Finally, the ratio of modifiers to the clay (metal:surfactant:clay) has been observed to affect the adsorption performance; the optimal conditions have been defined.

  5. Quaternary ammonium functionalized clay film electrodes modified with polyphenol oxidase for the sensitive detection of catechol.

    PubMed

    Mbouguen, Justin Kemmegne; Ngameni, Emmanuel; Walcarius, Alain

    2007-09-30

    Naturally occurring Cameroonian smectite clay has been grafted with trimethylpropylammonium (TMPA) groups and the resulting organoclay has been deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode surface as a suitable immobilization matrix for polyphenol oxidase (PPO). High sensitivity of the electrochemical device to catechol biosensing can be achieved when the enzyme was impregnated within the organoclay film subsequent to its deposition due to favorable electrostatic interaction between PPO and the TMPA-clay layer. The bioelectrode preparation method was also compatible with the use of a mediator (i.e., ferrocene) and the best performance was obtained with a three-layer configuration made of glassy carbon coated with a first layer of ferrocene (Fc), which was then covered with the PPO-impregnated TMPA-clay layer, and finally overcoated with an enzyme-free TMPA-clay film acting as a protecting overlayer to avoid leaching of the biomolecule in solution. The electrochemical behavior of the modified film electrodes was first characterized by cyclic voltammetry and, then, they were evaluated for the amperometric biosensing of the model analyte catechol in batch conditions and in flow injection analysis. Various experimental parameters likely to influence the biosensor response have been investigated, including the electrode preparation mode (composition configuration, thickness), the usefulness of a mediator, the operating potential and pH of the medium, as well as the advantageous features of the TMPA-clay in comparison to related film electrodes based on non-functionalized clays. The organoclay was found to provide a favorable environment to enzyme activity and the multilayer configuration of the film electrode to provide a biosensor with good characteristics, such as an extended linear range for catechol detection (2 x 10(-8) to 1.2 x 10(-5)M) and a detection limit in the nanomolar range (9 x 10(-9)M).

  6. Electrochemical detection of phenolic estrogenic compounds at clay modified carbon paste electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkamssa, N.; Ouattara, L.; Kawachi, A.; Tsujimura, M.; Isoda, H.; Chtaini, A.; Ksibi, M.

    2015-04-01

    A simple and sensitive electroanalytical method was developed to determine the Endocrine Disrupting chemical 4-tert-octylphenol on clay modified carbon paste electrode (Clay/CPE). The electrochemical response of the proposed electrode was studied by means of cyclic and square wave voltammetry. It has found that the oxidation of 4-tert-octylphenol on the clay/CPE displayed a well-defined oxidation peak. Under these optimal conditions, a linear relation between concentrations of 4-tert-octylphenol current response was obtained over range of 7.26×10-6 to 3.87×10-7 with a detection and quantification limit of 9.2×10-7 M and 3.06×10-6 M, respectively. The correlation coefficient is 0.9963. The modified electrode showed suitable sensitivity, high stability and an accurate detection of 4-tert-octylphenol. The modified electrode also relevant suitable selectivity for various phenolic estrogenic compounds.

  7. Using surfactant-modified clays to determine sorption mechanisms for a representative organic base, quinoline.

    PubMed

    Bonczek, J L; Nkedi-Kizza, P

    2007-01-01

    Sorption of a representative ionizable nitrogen heterocycle, quinoline (pKa = 4.92), was investigated to determine the relative contributions of the neutral and protonated species to the overall process. Batch sorption experiments were conducted on surfactant-modified clays that were synthesized from the exchange of hexadecyltrimethylammonium cations for resident sodium cations on a specimen smectite (Swy-2) at 0, 60, 80, and 100% of the clay's cation exchange capacity (CEC). Hexadecyltrimethylammonium exchange creates highly effective organic partitioning domains within the clay interlayers in proportion to their coverage on the exchange complex. The fractionally exchanged clays, therefore, provided discrete exchange and organic partitioning domains for the protonated and neutral species of quinoline. Data were described by a combined Langmuir-linear isotherm that permitted independent characterization of both sorption components. Results indicated that cationic sorption dominated but that the neutral species can contribute substantially given sufficient organic carbon content relative to the CEC and at pH above the pKa of quinoline. The data obtained in this study for quinoline demonstrated that the combined isotherm (including cation exchange and hydrophobic partitioning terms) describes sorption data and compares favorably with the purely empirical Freundlish isotherm.

  8. Characterization of a carbon paste electrode modified with tripolyphosphate-modified kaolinite clay for the detection of lead.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Yoleydis; Fernández, Lenys; Borrás, Carlos; Mostany, Jorge; Scharifker, Benjamín

    2011-09-15

    We report about the use of carbon paste electrode modified with kaolinite for analytical detection of trace lead(II) in domestic water by differential pulse voltammetry. Kaolinite clay was modified with tripolyphosphate (TPP) by impregnation method. The results show that TPP in kaolinite clay plays an important role in the accumulation process of Pb(II) on the modified electrode surface. The electroanalytical procedure for determination of Pb(II) comprised two steps: chemical accumulation of the analyte under open-circuit conditions, followed by electrochemical detection of the pre-concentrated species using differential pulse voltammetry. The analytical performance of this system has been explored by studying the effects of preconcentration time, carbon paste composition, pH, supporting electrolyte concentration, as well as interferences due to other ions. The calculated detection limit based on the variability of a blank solution (3s(b) criterion) for 10 measurements was 8.4×10(-8) mol L(-1), and the sensitivity determined from the slope of the calibration graph was 0.910 mol L(-1). The reproducibility (RSD) for five replicate measurements at 1.0 mg L(-1) lead level was 1.6%. The results indicate that this electrode is sensitive and effective for the determination of Pb(2+).

  9. Effect of organically modified clay on mechanical properties, cytotoxicity and bactericidal properties of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mishra, Anupam; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of organically-modified clay nanoparticles in poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) for developing biodegradable composites. PCL nanocomposites reinforced with two different types of organically-modified clay (Cloisite 30B, C30B and Cloisite 93A, C93A) were prepared by melt-mixing. Morphology of PCL/clay nanocomposites characterized by scanning electron microscopy indicated good dispersion of nanoclay in the PCL matrix. Reinforcement of nanoclay in PCL enhanced mechanical properties without affecting thermal and degradation properties of PCL. Cytocompatibility of PCL/clay nanocomposites was studied using both osteoblasts and endothelial cells in vitro. Both composites (PCL/C30B and PCL/C93A) were cytotoxic with high toxicity observed for C30B even at low content of 1 wt %. The cytotoxicity was found to arise due to leachables from PCL/clay composites. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous media confirmed leaching of cationic surfactant from the PCL/clay composites PCL matrix. Both composites were found to be bactericidal but C30B was more effective than C93A. Taken together, it was observed that organically-modified nanoclay as fillers in PCL improves mechanical properties and imparts bactericidal properties but with increased risk of toxicity. These PCL/clay composites may be useful as stronger packaging material with antibacterial properties but are not suited as biomedical implants or for food packaging applications.

  10. Modeling of adsorption of toxic chromium on natural and surface modified lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalhori, Ebrahim Mohammadi; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Uygur, Nihan; Zarrabi, Mansur; Shmeis, Reham M. Abu

    2013-12-01

    Lightweight Expanded Clay Aggregate (LECA) modified with an aqueous solution of magnesium chloride MgCl2 and hydrogen peroxide H2O2 was used to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption properties of the used adsorbents were investigated through batch studies, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effect created by magnesium chloride on the modification of the LECA surface was greater than that of hydrogen peroxide solution and showed a substantial increase in the specific surface area which has a value of 76.12 m2/g for magnesium chloride modified LECA while the values of 53.72 m2/g, and 11.53 m2/g were found for hydrogen peroxide modified LECA and natural LECA, respectively. The extent of surface modification with enhanced porosity in modified LECA was apparent from the recorded SEM patterns. XRD and FTIR studies of themodified LECA surface did not show any structural distortion. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the modified Freundlich kinetic model and the equilibrium data fitted the Sips and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations better than other models. Maximum sorption capacities were found to be 198.39, 218.29 and 236.24 mg/g for natural LECA, surface modified LECA with H2O2 and surface modified LECA with MgCl2, respectively. Adsorbents were found to have only a weak effect on conductivity and turbidity of aqueous solutions. Spent natural and surface modified LECA with MgCl2 was best regenerated with HCl solution, while LECA surface modified with H2O2 was best regenerated with HNO3 concentrated solution. Thermal method showed a lower regeneration percentage for all spent adsorbents.

  11. Modeling sorption and diffusion of organic sorbate in hexadecyltrimethylammonium-modified clay nanopores - a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Burns, Susan E

    2013-03-19

    Organoclays are highly sorptive engineered materials that can be used as amendments in barrier systems or geosynthetic liners. The performance of confining and isolating the nonpolar organic contaminants by those barrier/lining systems is essentially controlled by the process of organic contaminant mass transport in nanopores of organoclays. In this article, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the sorption and diffusion of organic sorbates in interlayers of sodium montmorillonite and hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA(+))-modified montmorillonite clays. Simulated system consisted of the clay framework, interlayer organic cation, water, and organic sorbate. Their interactions were addressed by the combined force field of ClayFF, constant-valence force field, and SPC water model. Simulation results indicated that in HDTMA coated clay nanopores, diffusion of nonpolar species benzene was slowed because they were subjected to influence of both the pore wall and the HDTMA surfactant. This suggested the nonpolar organic compound diffusion in organophilic clays can be affected by molecular size of diffusive species, clay pore size, and organic surfactant loading. Additionally, a model that connected the diffusion rate of organic compounds in the bulk organoclay matrix with macropores and nanopores was established. The impact of intercalated organic cations on the diffusion dominated mass transport of organic compounds yielded insight into the prediction of the apparent diffusion behavior of organic compounds in organic-modified clays.

  12. Characterization of sodium dodecyl sulfate modified iron pillared montmorillonite and its application for the removal of aqueous Cu(II) and Co(II).

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Zhen; Wu, Ping-Xiao

    2010-01-15

    Anionic surfactant modified Fe-pillared montmorillonites were prepared by Fe-hydrate solution and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution. These organo-inorgano complex montmorillonites were divided into three types (CM1, CM2 and CM3) depending on different intercalation processes. X-ray diffraction spectra, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were used to analyze the structure of the raw and modified montmorillonites. X-ray photoelectron spectra of the samples have been studied to determine spectral characteristics to allow the identification of Fe(III) hydroxide. The specific surface area of the host montmorillonite (M0) is 73.2m(2)/g, while for the modified montmorillonites it is 114.0m(2)/g, 117.2m(2)/g, and 115.8m(2)/g, respectively. The mesopore volumes of the montmorillonites decrease after modification. Ions of copper and cobalt were selected as adsorbates to evaluate the adsorption performance of each montmorillonite. The adsorption data was analyzed by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models and the data was well fit by the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption was efficient and significantly influenced by metal speciation, metal concentration, contact time, and pH. Higher adsorption capacity of the modified montmorillonites were obtained at pH 5-6. The results of desorption indicated that the metal ions were covalently bound to the modified montmorillonites.

  13. Preliminary creep and pillar closure data for shales

    SciTech Connect

    Lomenick, T.F.; Russell, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    The results of fourteen laboratory creep tests on model pillars of four different shales are reported. Initial pillar stresses range from 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) and temperatures range from ambient to 100/sup 0/C. Laboratory response data are used to evaluate the parameters in the transient power-law pillar closure equation similar to that previously used for model pillars of rock salt. The response of the model pillars of shale shows many of the same characteristics as for rock salt. Deformation is enhanced by higher stresses and temperatures, although the shale pillars are not as sensitive to either stress or temperature as are pillars of rock salt. These test results must be considered very preliminary since they represent the initial, or scoping, phase of a comprehensive model pillar test program that will lead to the development and validation of creep laws for clay-rich rocks. 11 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Ultrasonic treatment and synthesis of sugar alcohol modified Na+-montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Deeptangshu; Liu, Huihua

    2013-01-01

    Na(+)-montmorillonite clay (generally referred to as MMT) is very useful for reinforcing polymeric matrix at very low concentrations (typically, 2-5% wt). These clay particles are typically exfoliated before they can demonstrate the significant gains in heat deflection temperature, modulus, and elongation properties. In the case of hydrophilic biopolymer based matrices, such as carbohydrates and chitosan, exfoliating these nanoclay particles needs greater attention because the exfoliation is typically carried out using hydrophobic oligomers through ion-exchange. This study reports a new method of synthesizing completely hydrophilic MMT-assemblages using hydrophilic plasticizers for biopolymers. We used sugar alcohols (glycerol, xylitol with 3 and 5 hydroxyl groups) and polysaccharide maltodextrin to exfoliate the MMT. Sonication was conducted for MMT nanoclay and plasticizers at different weight ratios. It was confirmed that all plasticizer/modifier led to expansion of MMT gallery spacing (d-spacing) and the change in d-spacing could be related to the molecular structure of the plasticizer. Meanwhile, the extent of exfoliation was maximum with maltodextrin (fully exfoliation with 1:10 and 1:20 ratio of MMT:plasticizer) across all test samples and interestingly, glycerol and xylitol samples quickly established within the MMT galleries and exhibited minimal influence with further increase in relative concentrations.

  15. Study of malachite green adsorption by organically modified clay using a batch method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano-Cárdenas, Sofía; López-Cortez, Socorro; Cornejo-Mazón, Maribel; Mares-Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The adsorption of toxic dye malachite green from aqueous effluents by organically modified clay was studied in a batch system. The organoclay (OC) used was prepared by the intercalation of cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide in a Mexican montmorillonite. The effects of initial dye concentration, temperature, pH, and contact time were investigated. The OC showed a high dye removal (99.6%) from an initial dye concentration of 60 mg L-1 at pH 6 and 25 °C. The adsorption capacity was independent of pH and increased with the temperature. Equilibrium data were well fitted by Langmuir adsorption model. The rate of sorption was adjusted to a pseudo second-order kinetic model.

  16. Application of a montmorillonite clay modified with iron in photo-Fenton process. Comparison with goethite and nZVI.

    PubMed

    De León, María A; Sergio, Marta; Bussi, Juan; Ortiz de la Plata, Guadalupe B; Cassano, Alberto E; Alfano, Orlando M

    2015-01-01

    Iron pillared clay (Fe-PILC) was prepared from a montmorillonite and was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence. Fe-PILC catalytic activity was evaluated in photo-Fenton processes applied to the degradation of 2-clorophenol. Different catalyst loads were assayed. The Fe-PILC allowed almost complete degradation of the contaminant. An increase in the contaminant degradation rate was observed, following leaching of iron during catalytic assays, which suggest the existence of a homogeneous photo-Fenton mechanism. The catalytic performance of the Fe-PILC was compared with that for goethite and zero valent iron nanoparticles. Differences were found regarding the achieved degradation levels, the efficiency in oxidant consumption, and the extension of iron leaching.

  17. Radionuclide separations using pillared layered materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, A.

    1995-08-31

    The objective of this project is to prepare an all inorganic strontium specific sorbent or ion exchanger for the removal of highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions. A series of clays and layered titanates were pillared and calcined to convert their essentially two dimensional structure to three dimensional porous structures with high surface areas. The pillaring agents were alumina, zirconia, chromia and silica based. The pillared clays, particularly those containing Zr pillars, achieved moderate (Kd as high at 13,700 ml/g with V:m = 28) selectivities for Sr{sup 2+}. In contrast, the silica pillared titanates showed exceptional affinities for Sr{sup 2+} with Kd values in excess of 100,000 ml/g in 5M NaNO{sup 3} + 1M NaOH. These latter results suggest a more detailed study of the pillared titanates in the presence of simulants closely resembling real waste solutions.

  18. Adsorption-regeneration by heterogeneous Fenton process using modified carbon and clay materials for removal of indigo blue.

    PubMed

    Almazán-Sánchez, Perla Tatiana; Solache-Ríos, Marcos J; Linares-Hernández, Ivonne; Martínez-Miranda, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Indigo blue dye is mainly used in dyeing of denim clothes and its presence in water bodies could have adverse effects on the aquatic system; for this reason, the objective of this study was to promote the removal of indigo blue dye from aqueous solutions by iron and copper electrochemically modified clay and activated carbon and the saturated materials were regenerated by a Fenton-like process. Montmorillonite clay was modified at pH 2 and 7; activated carbon at pH 2 and pH of the system. The elemental X-ray dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that the optimum pH for modification of montmorillonite with iron and copper was 7 and for activated carbon was 2. The dye used in this work was characterized by infrared. Unmodified and modified clay samples showed the highest removal efficiencies of the dye (90-100%) in the pH interval from 2 to 10 whereas the removal efficiencies decrease as pH increases for samples modified at pH 2. Unmodified clay and copper-modified activated carbon at pH 2 were the most efficient activated materials for the removal of the dye. The adsorption kinetics data of all materials were best adjusted to the pseudo-second-order model, indicating a chemisorption mechanism and the adsorption isotherms data showed that the materials have a heterogeneous surface. The iron-modified clay could be regenerated by a photo-Fenton-like process through four adsorption-regeneration cycles, with 90% removal efficiency.

  19. Humic substances interfere with phosphate removal by Lanthanum modified clay in controlling eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Lürling, Miquel; Waajen, Guido; van Oosterhout, Frank

    2014-05-01

    The lanthanum (La) modified bentonite Phoslock(®) has been proposed as dephosphatisation technique aiming at removing Filterable Reactive Phosphorus (FRP) from the water and blocking the release of FRP from the sediment. In the modified clay La is expected the active ingredient. We conducted controlled laboratory experiments to measure the FRP removal by Phoslock(®) in the presence and absence of humic substances, as La complexation with humic substances might lower the effectiveness of La (Phoslock(®)) to bind FRP. The results of our study support the hypothesis that the presence of humic substances can interfere with the FRP removal by the La-modified bentonite. Both a short-term (1 d) and long-term (42 d) experiment were in agreement with predictions derived from chemical equilibrium modelling and showed lower FRP removal in presence of humic substances. This implies that in DOC-rich inland waters the applicability of exclusively Phoslock(®) as FRP binder should be met critically. In addition, we observed a strong increase of filterable La in presence of humic substances reaching in a week more than 270 μg La l(-1) that would infer a violation of the Dutch La standard for surface water, which is 10.1 μg La l(-1). Hence, humic substances are an important factor that should be given attention when considering chemical FRP inactivation as they might play a substantial role in lowering the efficacy of metal-based FRP-sorbents, which makes measurements of humic substances (DOC) as well as controlled experiments vital.

  20. Influence of dissolved organic carbon on the efficiency of P sequestration by a lanthanum modified clay.

    PubMed

    Dithmer, Line; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Lundberg, Daniel; Reitzel, Kasper

    2016-06-15

    A laboratory scale experiment was set up to test the effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as well as ageing of the La-P complex formed during phosphorus (P) sequestration by a La modified clay (Phoslock(®)). Short term (7 days) P adsorption studies revealed a significant negative effect of added DOC on the P sequestration of Phoslock(®), whereas a long-term P adsorption experiment revealed that the negative effect of added DOC was reduced with time. The reduced P binding efficiency is kinetic, as evident from solid-state (31)P magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, who showed that the P binding did not change in the presence of DOC. (31)P MAS NMR also reveals that up to 26% of the sequestered phosphate is as loosely bound redox-sensitive P species on the surface of rhabdophane (LaPO4 · nH2O, n ≤ 3). The ratio between the loosely bound P and lanthanum phosphate did not change with time, however both NMR and La LIII-extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy shows a transformation of lanthanum phosphate from the initially formed rhabdophane towards the more stable monazite (LaPO4). Furthermore, the effect of natural DOC on the P binding capacity was tested using water and pore water from 16 Danish lakes. Whilst DOC has an immediate negative impact on P binding in the lake water, with time this effect is reduced.

  1. Impacts of Cation Type and Clay on Transport of Surface-modified Nanoparticles through Saturated Sand Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkzaban, S.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2010-12-01

    Transport of three different nanoparticles (NPs) was studied in columns packed with different sands (unwashed Accusand, washed Accusand, and ultrapure quartz) at different ionic strengths (IS) and cation types. The NPs were functionalized (polyacrylic acid) quantum dots (QDs), carboxylic-modified latex, and bare silica. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed there were regions on the unwashed Accusand grains covered with clay particles. The SEM images of washed Accusand showed that the sand surfaces contained significantly less clay coatings. The breakthrough curves (BTCs) of QDs and latex NPs from unwashed Accusand columns showed minute deposition at 50 and 100 mM Na+. However, significant NP deposition occurred in unwashed Accusand columns at 0.5, 1, and 2 mM Ca2+. The amount of deposition increased as the Ca2+ concentration was increased. These results suggest that, in contrast to monovalent Na+, divalent Ca2+ enhanced deposition of the NPs. The BTCs of QDs and latex NPs in washed Accusand exhibited a similar trend as those of unwashed Accusand, however, much less deposition occurred at any given IS. The BTCs from the ultrapure quartz sand column showed negligible QD deposition at 2 mM Ca2+. Following completion of column experiments, a few Accusand sand grains were analyzed with SEM and the images showed that most of QDs were deposited on the clay surfaces. In contrast with our results from surface-modified NPs, the column experiments using bare silica NPs at 5 mM Ca2+ in unwashed Accusand showed negligible deposition. The enhanced deposition of surface-modified NPs may be attributed to cation bridging in which Ca2+ cations serve as a bridge between the NP, which contain carboxyl group on its surface, and negatively charged clay surfaces at 7. Because Ca2+ is commonly a major cation in groundwater, our results suggest that transport of carboxylic ligand-modified NPs may be very limited in subsurface environments.

  2. Phosphate adsorption by lanthanum modified bentonite clay in fresh and brackish water.

    PubMed

    Reitzel, Kasper; Andersen, Frede Ø; Egemose, Sara; Jensen, Henning S

    2013-05-15

    Effects of pH, alkalinity and conductivity on the adsorption of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) onto lanthanum (La) modified bentonite clay (Phoslock(®)) were investigated in laboratory experiments using eight different types of filtered water representing freshwater with low and normal alkalinity and brackish water with high alkalinity. Different dose ratios (0-200; w/w) of Phoslock(®):P were applied to determine the maximum P binding capacity of Phoslock(®) at SRP concentrations typical of those of sediment pore water. The 100:1 Phoslock(®:)P dose ratio, recommended by the manufacturer, was tested with 12 days exposure time and generally found to be insufficient at binding whole target SRP pool. The ratio performed best in the soft water from Danish Lake Hampen and less good in the hard water from Danish Lake Langesø and in brackish water. The explanation may be an observed negative relationship between alkalinity and the SRP binding capacity of Phoslock(®). A comparative study of Lake Hampen and Lake Langesø suggested that the recorded differences in P adsorption between the two lakes could be attributed to a more pronounced dispersion of Phoslock(®) in the soft water of Lake Hampen, leading to higher fractions of dissolved (<0.2 μm) La and of La in fine particles. In the same two lakes, pH affected the SRP binding of Phoslock(®) negatively at a pH level above 8.1, the effect being reversible, however. The negative pH effect was most significant in hard water Lake Langesø, most likely because of higher [Formula: see text] concentrations.

  3. Colloid modifiers: Soluble and admixture salts and their contribution to clay slurry properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John Lawrence, Jr.

    The interactions of calcium and sulfate, impurities normally entrained within clay raw materials, with modifying additives has been investigated. Solubilities of these additives and expected reaction products were measured as a function of pH to aid in reaction determination. Slurries were prepared in order to show effects of different colloid modifiers on slurry properties. Barium carbonate was shown to promote only partial sulfate conversion at elevated pH's for equal molar ratios of barium and sulfate for the entire concentration range tested. When excess barium was supplied, full conversion of sulfate was achieved at all pH's. Calcium carbonate was shown to be a pH dependent product of these reactions. Residual calcium was suppressed in the presence of excess carbonate ion. The interaction of calcium and sulfate with sodium silicate was shown to produce a calcium silicate gel at elevated pH's for overdosages of silicate. As the concentration of silicate increased, the pH and overdosage required for gel formation was reduced. Upon addition of sodium carbonate to solutions containing calcium and sulfate, precipitation of calcium carbonate was evident as a pH dependent reaction product, with overdosage cases further suppressing calcium release. The pH at which all calcium was present in solution was lower for the overdosage case than the equimolar one. As the concentration of sodium carbonate added increased, the pH at which full calcium residual was seen to decrease. Sodium carbonate was shown to be more effective in sequestering calcium than sodium silicate for equal concentrations. Rheological and filtration tests showed that for equal cation concentrations with the same anion, calcium produced a partially flocculated slurry with moderate viscosity and good casting properties, while magnesium produced a gelled slurry with a higher viscosity and poor casting qualities. With equal cation concentrations, and calcium as the cation, addition of chloride produced a

  4. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  5. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Clay and pillard clay membranes: Synthesis, characterization and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Sven

    In this work, the preparation and characterization of ceramic multilayer membranes with an Alsb2Osb3-pillared montmorillonite (Al-PILC) and a Laponite separating layer have been studied. Al-PILC is a pillared clay prepared by intercalation of polyoxo cations of aluminium between the montmorillonite clay sheets, followed by a thermal treatment (400sp°C) to obtain rigid oxide pillars. The free spacing between the clay plates is about 0.8 nm. Laponite is a synthetic clay with a pore structure formed by the stacking of very small clay plates. To deposit an Al-PILC top layer on a macro- or mesoporous aluminiumoxide support membrane, two preparation routes were considered. According to the standard preparation route of a pillared clay, the easiest way is to use a suspension of clay mixed with the pillaring solution in which the support membrane is dipped. However, it is not possible to deposit uniform and crack-free top layers in this way because of the formation of unstable suspensions. A second preparation route is based on an indirect pillaring procedure. By dipping a support membrane in a stable clay suspension, a thin clay film is deposited in a first step. Pillaring is achieved via immersion of the supported clay film in the pillaring solution in a second step. After a washing procedure, the membrane is dried and calcined at 400sp°C. Laponite membranes were simply prepared by dipping a support membrane in a suspension of this synthetic clay in water. Afterwards a drying at room temperature and a calcination at 400 ar 500sp°C is performed. Both membrane types were tested for gas separation and pervaporation purposes. Transport of permanent gases (He, N2) occurs by means of Knudsen diffusion. Diffusion is kinetically controlled and for a binary mixture, the maximum separation factor is determined by the difference in molecular weight of both components. From pervaporation experiments with water/alcohol mixtures it was found that Al-PILC membranes can be used for

  7. Tetrabutylammonium-modified clay film electrodes: characterization and application to the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Maghear, Adela; Tertiş, Mihaela; Fritea, Luminţa; Marian, Iuliu O; Indrea, Emil; Walcarius, Alain; Săndulescu, Robert

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the preparation and characterization of smectite clay partially exchanged with tetrabutylammonium ions (TBA(+)) and its subsequent deposition onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for application to the preconcentration electroanalysis of metal ions (Cd, Pb, and Cu). Such partial exchange of TBA(+) induces the expansion of the interlayer region between the clay sheets (as ascertained by XRD) while maintaining its ion exchange capacity, which resulted in enhanced mass transport rates (as pointed out by electrochemical monitoring of permeability properties of these thin (organo)clay films on GCE). This principle was applied here to the anodic stripping square wave voltammetric analysis of metal ions after accumulation at open circuit. Among others, detection limits as low as 3.6×10(-8)M for copper and 7.2×10(-8)M for cadmium have been achieved.

  8. Modified centroid for estimating sand, silt and clay from soil texture class

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Models that require inputs of soil particle size commonly use soil texture class for input; however, texture classes do not represent the continuum of soil size fractions. Soil texture class and clay percentage are collected as a standard practice for many land management agencies (e.g., NRCS, BLM, ...

  9. Lanthanum from a modified clay used in eutrophication control is bioavailable to the marbled crayfish (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis).

    PubMed

    van Oosterhout, Frank; Goitom, Eyerusalem; Roessink, Ivo; Lürling, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate eutrophication in fresh standing waters the focus is on phosphorus (P) control, i.e. on P inflows to a lake as well as a lake's sediment as internal P source. The in-lake application of the lanthanum (La) modified clays - i.e. La modified bentonite (Phoslock) or La modified kaolinite, aim at dephosphatising the water column and at reducing the release of P from a lake's sediment. Application of these clays raises the question whether La from these clays can become bioavailable to biota. We investigated the bioavailability of La from Phoslock in a controlled parallel groups experiment in which we measured the La in carapace, gills, ovaries, hepatopancreas and abdominal muscle after 0, 14 and 28 days of exposure to Phoslock. Expressing the treatment effect as the difference of the median concentration between the two treatment groups (Phoslock minus control group) yield the following effects, the plus sign (+) indicating an increase, concentrations in µg g(-1) dry weight: Day 14: carapace +10.5 µg g(-1), gills +112 µg g(-1), ovaries +2.6 µg g(-1), hepatopancreas +32.9 µg g(-1) and abodminal muscle +3.2 µg g(-1). Day 28: carapace +17.9 µg g(-1); gills +182 µg g(-1); ovaries +2.2 µg g(-1); hepatopancreas +41.9 µg g(-1) and abdominal muscle +7.6 µg g(-1), all effects were statistically significant. As La from Phoslock is bio-available to and taken up by the marbled crayfishes (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis), we advocate that the application of in-lake chemical water treatments to mitigate eutrophication should be accompanied by a thorough study on potential side effects.

  10. Study of structural irregularities of smectite clay systems by small-angle neutron scattering and adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stefanis, A.; Tomlinson, A. A. G.; Steriotis, Th. A.; Charalambopoulou, G. Ch.; Keiderling, U.

    2007-04-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and its contrast-matching variant are employed in order to determine structural properties (inter-pillar distances and mass/surface fractal dimensions of the clay layers and pillars) of a series of smectite natural clays (montmorillonite, beidellite, and bentonite) and their pillared and pillared/ion-exchanged analogues. Moreover, a comparative analysis with the adsorption data is carried out on the basis of a systematic study of the structural changes induced by a particular treatment or modification (e.g. pillaring) of the clay systems.

  11. Antimicrobial nanocomposites based on natural modified materials: a review of carbons and clays.

    PubMed

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Valásková, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The review is focused on the recent research and development of antimicrobial nanocomposites based on selected carbon nanomaterials and natural nanoclay minerals. The nanocomposites comprised of two or several components, where at least one presents antimicrobial properties, are discussed. Yet the most popular agent remains silver as nanoparticle or in ionic form. Second, broadly studied group, are organics as additives or polymeric matrices. Both carbons and clays in certain forms possess antimicrobial properties. A lot of interest is put on to research graphene oxide. The low-environmental impact technologies-based on sustainable biopolymers have been studied. Testing of antimicrobial properties of nanomaterials is performed most frequently on E. coli and S. aureus bacterias.

  12. Pillared montmorillonite catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1994-12-31

    Pillared clays contain large micropores and have considerable potential for catalytic hydrogenation and cleavage of coal macromolecules. Pillared montmorillonite-supported catalysts were prepared by the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxychromium cations and subsequent impregnation of nickel and molybdenum. Infrared and thermogravimetric studies of pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of both Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Thus, the catalysts have both acidic properties that can aid in hydrocracking and cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds as well as hydrogen-activating bimetallic sites. These catalysts were applied to the hydrodesulfurization and liquefaction of coal-derived intermediates. The reactions of model organosulfur compounds and coal liquids were carried out at 300{degrees}-400{degrees}C for 3 hours in the presence of 1000 psi of molecular hydrogen. Reaction products were analyzed by GC/FT-IR/MS/AED. The catalysts have been found to be very effective in removing sulfur from model compounds as well as liquefaction products.

  13. Equilibrium, kinetic and sorber design studies on the adsorption of Aniline blue dye by sodium tetraborate-modified Kaolinite clay adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Unuabonah, Emmanuel I; Adebowale, Kayode O; Dawodu, Folasegun A

    2008-09-15

    Raw Kaolinite clay obtained Ubulu-Ukwu, Delta State of Nigeria and its sodium tetraborate (NTB)-modified analogue was used to adsorb Aniline blue dye. Fourier transformed infrared spectra of NTB-modified Kaolinite suggests that modification was effective on the surface of the Kaolinite clay with the strong presence of inner -OH functional group. The modification of Kaolinite clay raised its adsorption capacity from 1666 to 2000 mg/kg. Modeling adsorption data obtained from both unmodified and NTB-modified Kaolinite clay reveals that the adsorption of Aniline blue dye on unmodified Kaolinite clay is on heterogeneous adsorption sites because it followed strongly the Freundlich isotherm equation model while adsorption data from NTB-modified Kaolinite clay followed strongly the Langmuir isotherm equation model which suggest that Aniline blue dye was adsorb homogeneous adsorption sites on the NTB-modified adsorbent surface. There was an observed increase in the amount of Aniline blue adsorbed as initial dye concentration was increased from 10 to 30 mg/L. It was observed that kinetic data obtained generally gave better robust fit to the second-order kinetic model (SOM). The initial sorption rate was found to increased with increasing initial dye concentration (from 10 to 20 mg/L) for data obtained from 909 to 1111 mg kg(-1)min(-1) for unmodified and 3325-5000 mg kg(-1) min(-1) for NTB-modified adsorbents. Thereafter there was a decrease in initial sorption rate with further increase in dye concentration. The linearity of the plots of the pseudo-second-order model with very high-correlation coefficients indicates that chemisorption is involved in the adsorption process. From the design of a single-batch adsorber it is predicted that the NTB-modified Kaolinite clay adsorbent will require 50% less of the adsorbent to treat certain volumes of wastewater containing 30 mg/L of Aniline blue dye when it is compared with the unmodified adsorbent. This will be cost effective in

  14. Stability and removal of dexamethasone sodium phosphate from wastewater using modified clays.

    PubMed

    Sulaimana, Saleh; Khamis, Mustafa; Nir, Shlomo; Lelario, Filomena; Scrano, Laura; Bufo, Sabino Aurelio; Karaman, Rafik

    2014-08-01

    Stability and removal of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) from wastewater produced at Al-Quds University Campus were investigated. Kinetic studies in both pure water and wastewater coming from secondary treatment (activated sludge) demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory DSP underwent degradation to its hydrolytic derivative, dexamethasone, in both media. The first-order hydrolysis rate of DSP in activated sludge at 25 degrees C (3.80 x 10(-6) s-1) was about 12-fold larger than in pure water (3.25 x 10(-7) s-1). The overall performance of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) installed in the University Campus was also assessed showing that 90% of spiked DSP was removed together with its newly identified metabolites by the ultra-filtration (UF) system, which consists of a UF hollow fibre (HF) with a 100-kDa cutoff membrane as the pre-polishing stage for the UF spiral wound with a 20-kDa cutoffmembrane. In testing other technologies, the effectiveness of adsorption and filtration by micelle-clay (MC) preparation for removing DSP was ascertained in comparison with activated charcoal. Batch adsorption in aqueous suspensions of the MC composite and activated carbon was well described by Langmuir isotherms showing the best results for MC material. Filtration of DSP water solutions demonstrated a significant advantage of columns filled in with a mixture of sand and MC complex in comparison with activated carbon/sand filters.

  15. Use of modified clays for removal of phosphorus from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Moharami, Somayeh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) removal from aqueous solutions was investigated using modified bentonite, calcite, kaolinite, and zeolite with FeCl3, CaCl2, and NaCl. The maximum sorption capacity of P was obtained by modified adsorbents with Fe(3+) ions (Fe-adsorbents). The results showed that P sorption capacity by Fe-adsorbents (bentonite (1.31 mg g(-1)), calcite (1.97 mg g(-1)), kaolinite (1.31 mg g(-1)), and zeolite (1.58 mg g(-1))) was improved by ∼467, 107, 409, and 427 %, respectively, compared to unmodified adsorbents (bentonite (0.28 mg g(-1)), calcite (1.82 mg g(-1)), kaolinite (0.32 mg g(-1)), and zeolite (0.37 mg g(-1))). Sorption isotherms were well described by the Freundlich model. Desorption experiments showed that the desorption capacity was in order of unmodified adsorbents > modified adsorbents with Na(+) ions (Na-adsorbents) > modified adsorbents with Ca(2+) ions (Ca adsorbents) > Fe-adsorbents. Effect of pH and ion strength was also investigated. At different pH, changes in the ionic strength had little effect on the adsorption. Results showed that double-layer model (DLM) could model P adsorption onto modified adsorbents over a wide range of pH and varying ionic strength. According to the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and saturation indices (SIs), high P removal by adsorbents was partly due to the P precipitation.

  16. Hydrophobicity and polymer compatibility of POSS-modified Wyoming Na-montmorillonite for developing polymer-clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Hojiyev, Rustam; Ulcay, Yusuf; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Çelik, Mehmet S; Carty, William M

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the hydrophobicity and polymer compatibility of aminopropylisooctyl polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane (POSS) - modified Na-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) towards developing polymer-clay nanocomposites. The effect of different concentrations of POSS on properties of Na-MMT was studied. The intercalation ability of the POSS molecules into the Na-MMT interlayer was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. It was found that the d001 value was increased with increasing the POSS concentration, indicating the successful intercalation of the POSS molecules into the Na-MMT interlayer. The d001 value was 4.12nm at 0.4 cation exchange capacity (CEC) loading of POSS, increased at a slight rate upon further increase of CEC loading, and finally reached 4.25nm at 1.0 CEC loading of POSS. The results of the thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis confirmed the high thermal stability of the POSS-MMT. The thermal stability was defined as a 5% mass loss (T5) at 0.2 CEC loading of POSS was observed at 352°C and slightly decreased with further increase in the POSS concentration. The porous properties, such as specific surface area (SSA), pore volume, and pore size were estimated by the adsorption of N2 molecules on the Na-MMT surface. The SSA and pore volume were reduced with increasing the concentration of the POSS molecules due to the adsorption of the POSS molecules on the Na-MMT, while the pore size was increased upon the formation of macroporous structure. The interfacial interaction energy between water and POSS-MMT (ΔGClay/Water/Clay(IF)) was used to evaluate the surface hydrophobicity, and a similar approach was also applied to assess the polymer compatibility of the developed composite. The obtained results confirm that the polymer compatibility of POSS-MMT prepared in this study is better than that of commonly used HDTMA-MMT.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of pillared stevensites: application to chromate adsorption.

    PubMed

    Benhammou, A; Yaacoubi, A; Nibou, L; Bonnet, J P; Tanouti, B

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the synthesis of pillared interlayered clays from Moroccan stevensite called locally 'Ghassoul'. This clay has been intercalated with cetyltrimethylammonium surfactant (CTA-Stv) and aluminium hydroxypolycation (Al13-Stv). Characterization studies were performed using XRF, XRD, FTIR and DTA/TG analysis. Basal spacing values of Al13-Stv and CTA-Stv increased respectively from 13.5 A for natural stevensite to 17.5 and 17.6 A with increasing Al13(7+)/clay and CTA+/clay ratios. The DTA/TG results showed that Al13-Stv has a relatively high thermal stability compared with CTA-Stv. A quasi-irreversible intercalation by exchanging the interlayer inorganic cations with voluminous pillars Al13(7+) or CTA+ was observed. Batch adsorption of chromate anions from aqueous solutions was investigated and the results showed that both pillared clays had great affinity for the chromate compared with untreated stevensite. The Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR) model was selected to describe the adsorption isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacities for natural stevensite, Al13-Stv and CTA-Stv are 13.7, 75.4 and 195.6 mmol/kg, respectively.

  18. Simultaneous removal of multiple pesticides from water: effect of organically modified clays as coagulant aid and adsorbent in coagulation-flocculation process.

    PubMed

    Shabeer, T P Ahammed; Saha, Ajoy; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, Suman; Manjaiah, K M; Varghese, Eldho

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water sources with agrochemical residues became a major concern in the twenty-first century. Coagulation-flocculation is the most widely used water-treatment process, but the efficiency to remove pesticides and other organic pollutants are limited compared to adsorption process. Thus, simultaneous action of adsorption on normal bentonite or organo-modified montmorillonite clays [modified with octadecylamine (ODA-M) and octadecylamine + amino-propyltriethoxysilane (ODAAPS-M)] followed by coagulation-flocculation by alum and poly aluminium chloride has been evaluated for removal of 10 different pesticides, namely atrazine, lindane, metribuzin, aldrin, chlorpyriphos, pendimethalin, alpha-endosulphan, beta-endosulphan, p,p'-DDT, cypermethrin and two of its metabolites, endosulphan sulphate and p,p'-DDE, from water. The coagulation without integration of adsorption was less effective (removal % varies from 12 to 49) than the adsorption-coagulation integrated system (removal % varies from 71 to 100). Further, coagulation integrated with adsorption was more effective when organically modified montmorillonite was used as adsorbent compared to normal bentonite. The removal efficiency of organic clay depends upon the concentration of pesticides, doses of clay minerals, and efficiency was more for ODAAPS-M as compared to ODA-M. The combination of ODAAPS-M-clay with coagulants was also used efficiently for the removal of pesticides from natural and fortified natural water collected and the results exhibit the usefulness of this remediation technique for application in water decontamination and in treatment of industrial and agricultural waste waters.

  19. Preparation and thermal properties of Zr-intercalated clays

    SciTech Connect

    Figueras, F.; Mattrod-Bashi, A.; Fetter, G.; Thrierr, A. ); Zanchetta, J.V. )

    1989-09-01

    Montmorillonites intercalated by zirconium macrocations have been prepared. Diffusion of the Zr cations within the particles of clay controls the rate of ion exchange, and hence the distribution of the Zr pillars. This effect accounts for the influence of particle size on the degree of exchange, the surface area, and the thermal stability of the pillared clay. The thermal stability of the Zr clays prepared under these conditions is limited to 973 K in dry air. The changes in microporosity, evaluated from nitrogen adsorption using the equation of Dubinin, show that collapse of the structure occurs by sintering of the pillars. This sintering can be decreased by doping the pillars with rare earth cations. The resulting material then retains a surface area of 180 m{sup 2}/g after calcination at 1023 K in dry air, and is more acidic than the corresponding Zr-clay.

  20. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-08-01

    In an effort to develop new disposable catalysts for direct coal liquefaction, several types of clay-supported pyrrhotite catalysts were prepared and tested. These included iron-pillared montmorillonite, mixed iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite, iron-impregnated montmorillonite, and iron oxometallate-impregnated montmorillonite.

  1. Effects of modified clay flocculation on major nutrients and diatom aggregation during Skeletonema costatum blooms in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guangyuan; Song, Xiuxian; Yu, Zhiming; Cao, Xihua; Yuan, Yongquan

    2015-07-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) can elicit several negative effects on aquatic environment (such as depleting the oxygen, blocking the sunlight, destroying the habitats of organisms) and life health (including poisoning/killing marine mammals, birds and human). Among the various control strategies for HABs (physical manipulation needs lots of manpower and expensive equipment, chemicals treatment has some toxic byproduct and high residual, microbial agents only has limited in laboratory research), the coagulation-flocculation of HAB species by modified clay (MC) has been proven to be an effective, low-cost and environmentally friendly method that has been widely applied in the field, particularly in eastern Asia. In order to examine the long-term effects of MC treatment, this study investigated the alternations in seawater of Skeletonema costatum, a high biomass dominant HAB species along the Chinese coast, by comparing the degradation of S. costatum detritus (A1) with the application of MC treatment (A2) and MC treatment in sediment condition (A3). The low dosage of 0.25 g/L MC could efficiently remove 4×108 cells/L of S. costatum cells within 3.5 h (approximately 97% removal). In addition, the results showed that both inorganic and organic nutrients were effectively reduced from seawater by MC particles. Compared to the total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations in A1 seawater, 44% of TN and 93% of TP in A2 seawater, as well as 72% of TN and 93% of TP in A3 seawater were removed during the one-month incubation period. Simultaneously, 64% of DISi in A2 and 44% of DISi in A3 significantly decreased ( P<0.001). This study demonstrated that MC treatment was able to significantly increase the downward flux of nutrients and delay the release velocity of inorganic nutrient from MC-algae matrix into the overlying seawater, particularly within sediment environment.

  2. [Efficiency of Sediment Amendment with Zirconium-Modified Kaolin Clay to Control Phosphorus Release from Sediments in Heavily Polluted Rivers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jian-wei; Zhan, Yan-hui; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Di-ru

    2015-10-01

    A zirconium-modified kaolin- clay (ZrMK) was prepared and used as a sediment amendment to control the release of phosphorus (P) from sediments in heavily polluted rivers under low dissolved oxygen (DO) condition. Results showed that the ZrMK exhibited excellent adsorption performance of phosphate in water. The phosphate adsorption capacity of the ZrMK increased with the increasing of loading amount of zirconium in the ZrMK. The phosphate adsorption capacity of the ZrMK increased with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 8 to 10, remained basically unchangeable with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 10 to 11, but decreased with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 11 to 12. The phosphate equilibrium adsorption data of the ZrMK can be better described by the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model when the ZrMK was prepared with the precipitated pH value 10. Sequential extraction of P from the phosphate-adsorbed ZrMK showed that most of phosphate-P bound by the ZrMK (about 84% of total P) existed in the form of the metal oxide P (NaOH-P) and residual P (Res-P), which was unlikely to be released under hypoxia and common pH (5-9) conditions. The fluxes of phosphate-P and total P (TP) from sediments into the overlying water column were greatly reduced with the adding of ZrMK to sediments under low dissolved oxygen conditions. The ZrMK-amended sediments exhibited much higher phosphate adsorption capacity than the original sediments, and the former had much lower phosphate adsorption/desorption equilibrium concentration (EPC,) than the latter. Our findings suggest that the ZrMK can be used as an efficient sediment amendment for controlling P release from sediments in heavily polluted rivers under low dissolved oxygen conditions.

  3. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of TiO2 pillared montmorillonites: application for methylene blue degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daimei; Du, Gaoxiang; Zhu, Qian; Zhou, Fengsan

    2013-11-01

    TiO2 pillared clay composites were prepared by modifying of montmorillonite (Mt) with cetyl-trimethyammoniumbromide (CTAB) and then using an acidic solution of hydrolyzed Ti alkoxide to intercalate into the interlayer space of the organic modified Mt. The as-prepared materials were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, SEM TG-DTA, specific surface area and porosity measurements. The composites had a porous delaminated structure with pillared fragments and well dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. Introduction of CTAB into the synthetic system accelerated the hydrolysis and condensation of the Ti source, which promoted TiO2 formation. In addition, the CTAB also significantly increased the porosity and surface area of the composites. A number of anatase particles, with crystal sizes of 5-10 nm, were homogenously distributed on the surface of the Mt as the result of the templating role of CTAB. The resultant TiO2 pillared Mt exhibited good thermal stability as indicated by its surface area after calcination at 800°C. No phase transformations from anatase to rutile were observed even under calcination at 900°C. The grain size of the anatase in prepared sample increased from 2.67 nm to 13.42 nm as the calcination temperature increased from 300°C to 900°C. The photocatalytic performance of these new porous materials was evaluated by using methylene blue degradation. The composite exhibited better photocatalytic property than P 25. The maximum removal efficiency of this composite was up to 99% within 60 min.

  5. Kinetic and thermodynamics of the removal of Zn2+ and Cu2+ from aqueous solution by sulphate and phosphate-modified Bentonite clay.

    PubMed

    Olu-Owolabi, Bamidele I; Unuabonah, Emmanuel I

    2010-12-15

    The modification of pristine Bentonite clay with sulphate and phosphate anions was found to increase its cation-exchange capacity (CEC), adsorption capacity and overall pseudo-second order kinetic rate constant for the adsorption of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). Modification with sulphate and phosphate anion decreased the specific surface area of pristine Bentonite clay. Phosphate-modified Bentonite clay was found to give the highest adsorption capacity for both metal ions. The adsorption process was observed to be endothermic and spontaneous in nature for both metal ions with Zn(2+) being more adsorbed. Modification with phosphate anion increased the spontaneity of the adsorption process. The effective modification of pristine Bentonite clay with sulphate anion was confirmed from hypochromic shifts in the range of 13-18 cm(-1) which is typical of physisorption while modification with phosphate anion was confirmed by its hyperchromic shifts typical of chemisorption in the infrared red region using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the model efficiency indicator, kinetic data were found to show very strong fit to the pseudo-second order kinetic model implying that the adsorption of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) were basically by chemisorption.

  6. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pillar recovery. 75.207 Section 75.207 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.207 Pillar recovery. Pillar recovery shall be... pillar recovery shall not be conducted on the same pillar line, except where physical conditions such...

  7. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pillar recovery. 75.207 Section 75.207 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.207 Pillar recovery. Pillar recovery shall be... pillar recovery shall not be conducted on the same pillar line, except where physical conditions such...

  8. Clays, specialty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the specialty clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. The specialty clays mined in the U.S. are ball clay, fuller's earth, bentonite, fire clay, and kaolin. Sales of specialty clays in the U.S. were around 17 Mt in 1997. Approximately 53 kt of specialty clays were imported.

  9. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  10. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  11. The effect of pillaring montmorillonite and beidellite on the conversion of trimethylbenzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, M.; Hartford, R.; O'Connor, C.T. )

    1991-04-01

    Natural montmorillonite, synthetic mica-montmorillonite (SMM), and Ni-substituted SMM were treated with hydroxy-Al solutions and the activities of the respective unpillared and pillared clays were tested using 1,2 4-trimethylbenzene as a reactant. Pillaring montmorillonite and, to a lesser extent, synthetic beidellite gave the largest % increase in the conversion level. The selectivity to 1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene, the smallest of the tetramethylbenzene isomers, was found to be a function not of the extent of pillaring, but rather of the extent of isomerization of the alkylbenzenes.

  12. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  13. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  14. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, November 9, 1991--February 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    The investigation of methods for the production and testing of iron-pillared clay catalysts was continued in this quarter. The surface area of the mixed alumina/iron pillared clay catalyst decreased to 51 m{sup 2}/g on sulfidation. Thus the stability of the alumina pillars during the sulfidation and thermal treatments prevented the total collapse that occurred in the case of the iron-pillared clays. Previously the mixed alumina/iron pillared clays were tested for hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl. This testing was extended to a determination of activity with a second model compound substrate (pyrene), representative of the polynuclear aromatic systems present in coal. Testing of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts with 1-methylnaphthalene gave interesting results that demonstrate shape selectivity. The clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts prepared by impregnation of iron species on acidic clays were further investigated. Sulfidation of these catalysts using the carbon disulfide in situ method gave hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl that were somewhat less than those obtained by presulfidation with H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S mixtures. Liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal was very successful with the iron impregnated clay catalyst, giving a highly soluble product. High conversions were also obtained with the mixed alumina/iron-pillared clay catalyst, but the yield of oil-solubles was considerably lower. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. These catalysts were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars. Finally the iron component was added either before or after thermal removal of organic pillars.

  15. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical report, May 9, 1991--August 8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-12-31

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  16. Stress reduction for pillar filled structures

    DOEpatents

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam; Shao, Qinghui; Voss, Lars; Cheung, Chin Li; Dar, Mushtaq A.

    2015-09-01

    According to one embodiment, an apparatus for detecting neutrons includes an array of pillars, wherein each of the pillars comprises a rounded cross sectional shape where the cross section is taken perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the respective pillar, a cavity region between each of the pillars, and a neutron sensitive material located in each cavity region.

  17. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  18. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the fire clay industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the leading fire clay producer in the U.S. is the state of Missouri. The other major producers include California, Texas and Washington. It reports that the use of heavy clay products made of fire clay like brick, cement and lightweight aggregate has increased slightly in 2010.

  19. Clays, common

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of a special section on the state of industrial minerals in 1997. The state of the common clay industry worldwide for 1997 is discussed. Sales of common clay in the U.S. increased from 26.2 Mt in 1996 to an estimated 26.5 Mt in 1997. The amount of common clay and shale used to produce structural clay products in 1997 was estimated at 13.8 Mt.

  20. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  1. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, February 9, 1992--May 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of iron-pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. Previous work in this project showed that a catalyst prepared by adding ferric nitrate and ammonia to an acid-washed clay gave an active catalyst following sulfidation. Further testing of this catalyst with a model compound showed that its hydrocracking activity was considerably lower when used in 10% concentration rather than 50%. In contrast, the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts were still highly effective at 10% concentration and gave good conversions at one and two hour reaction times. An investigation of preparation methods demonstrated that calcination of both the iron hydroxyoxide-impregnated clay and the mixed iron/alumina pillared clays is essential for activity. High activity was obtained for these catalysts only when they were removed from the aqueous media rapidly, dried, and calcined. The use of ferric sulfate to prepare a clay-supported sulfated iron catalyst was attempted, the resulting catalyst was relatively inactive for hydrocracking. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. A zirconia-pillared clay with low pillar density was prepared and intercalated with triiron complex. The hydrocracking activity of this catalyst was somewhat lower than that of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalyst. Other new catalysts, that were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars, and finally the iron component, were also tested. The mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts was further tested at low concentration for pyrene hydrogenating and hydrocracking activities.

  2. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies mined fire clay in three states in 2012. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 230 kt (254,000 st) valued at $6.98 million, an increase from 215 kt (237,000 st) valued at $6.15 million in 2011. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Colorado and Texas, in decreasing order by quantity. The number of companies mining fire clay declined in 2012 because several common clay producers that occasionally mine fire clay indicated that they did not do so in 2012.

  3. Formation and Stabilization of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals Induced by the Interaction of Anthracene with Fe(III)-Modified Clays.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hanzhong; Nulaji, Gulimire; Gao, Hongwei; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-06-21

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are occasionally detected in Superfund sites but the formation of EPFRs induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well understood. In the present work, the formation of EPFRs on anthracene-contaminated clay minerals was quantitatively monitored via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and surface/interface-related environmental influential factors were systematically explored. The obtained results suggest that EPFRs are more readily formed on anthracene-contaminated Fe(III)-montmorillonite than in other tested systems. Depending on the reaction condition, more than one type of organic radicals including anthracene-based radical cations with g-factors of 2.0028-2.0030 and oxygenic carbon-centered radicals featured by g-factors of 2.0032-2.0038 were identified. The formed EPFRs are stabilized by their interaction with interlayer surfaces, and such surface-bound EPFRs exhibit slow decay with 1/e-lifetime of 38.46 days. Transformation pathway and possible mechanism are proposed on the basis of experimental results and quantum mechanical simulations. Overall, the formation of EPFRs involves single-electron-transfer from anthracene to Fe(III) initially, followed by H2O addition on formed aromatic radical cation. Because of their potential exposure in soil and atmosphere, such clay surface-associated EPFRs might induce more serious toxicity than PAHs and exerts significant impacts on human health.

  4. Characterization of phosphate sequestration by a lanthanum modified bentonite clay: A solid- state NMR, EXAFS and PXRD study

    SciTech Connect

    Dithmer, Line; Lipton, Andrew S.; Reitzel, Kasper; Warner, Terence E.; Lundberg, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-04-07

    Phosphate (P) sequestration by a lanthanum (La) exchanged bentonite (a clay mineral), which is extensively used in chemical lake restoration, was investigated on the molecular level using a combination of 31P and 139La solid state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR), extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EX-AFS) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) in combination with sorption studies. 31P SSNMR show that all phosphate is immobilized as rhabdophane, LaPO4·xH2O, which is further supported by 139La SSNMR and EXAFS; whereas PXRD results are ambiguous with respect to rhabdophane and monazite (LaPO4). Adsorption studies show that, at humic acids (HA) concentrations above ca. 250 μM the binding capacity is only 50 % of the theoretical value or even less. No other lanthanum or phosphate phases are detected by SSNMR and EXAFS indicating the effect of HA is kinetic. Moreover, 31P SSNMR shows that rhabdophane formed upon P sequestration is in close proximity to the clay matrix.

  5. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, six companies mined fire clay in Missouri, Ohio and South Carolina. Production was estimate to be 300 kt with a value of $8.3 million. Missouri was the leading producer state followed by Ohio and South Carolina. For the third consecutive year, sales and use of fire clays have been relatively unchanged. For the next few years, sales of fire clay is forecasted to remain around 300 kt/a.

  6. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The state of the ball clay industry in 1999 is presented. Record highs in the sales and use of ball clay were attained in 1999 due to the continued strength of the U.S. economy. U.S. production was estimated at 1.25 million st for the year, with more than half of that amount mined in Tennessee. Details of the consumption, price, imports, and exports of ball clay in 1999 and the outlook for ball clay over the next few years are provided.

  7. Processing research and development of 'green' polymer nanoclay composites containing a polyhydroxybutyrate, vinyl acetates, and modified montmorillonite clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKirahan, James N., Jr.

    The purpose of this research was to determine the feasibility of direct melt-blending (intercalation) montmorillonite nanoclay to polyhydroxybutyrate along with vinyl acetate, at different weight percentages, to enhance plasticization using typical plastic processing equipment and typical processing methodology. The purpose was to determine and compare the specific mechanical properties of tensile strength and flexural strength developed as a result from this processing. Single screw and twin screw extrusion, Banbury mixer compounding, and compression molding were used to intercalate montmorillonite, and for sample preparation purposes, to test tensile and flexural strength of the resultant polymer clay nanocomposites (PCN). Results indicate Polyhydroxybutyrate and Ethylene vinyl acetate, and weight percentages of 70%, 65% and 60% PHB, and 15%, 20%, and 25% of EVA, respectively, influenced mechanical properties. The resultant materials remained in a mostly amorphous state. The nanoclay, at specific weight percentage of 10%, acted as an antimicrobial and preservative for the materials produced during the research. The intention of the research was to promote knowledge and understanding concerning these materials and processes so technology transfer regarding the use, mechanical properties, manufacture, and process ability of these bio-friendly materials to academia, industry, and society can occur.

  8. Six Pillars of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Joseph J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching organic chemistry, which is to have students build their knowledge of organic chemistry upon a strong foundation of the fundamental concepts of the subject. Specifically, the article focuses upon a core set of concepts that I call "the six pillars of organic chemistry": electronegativity, polar…

  9. Six Pillars of Dynamic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Steven W.; Chapman, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    "Six Pillars of Dynamic Schools" uncovers an often overlooked truth--effective change is the product of hard work and dedication. There is no silver bullet; no matter how many programs, software packages, or new initiatives a district uses, the magic won't just "happen." Dynamic schools result from consistent and redundant focus on the fundamental…

  10. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    DOE PAGES

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; ...

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-rangingmore » lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.« less

  11. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  12. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Teresa B; Strickhouser, Rachel B; Hatab, Nahla A; Charlton, Jennifer J; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2015-05-21

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2 μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200-400 nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  13. Characterization and Catalytic Performance of Montmorillonites with Mixed Aluminium/Lanthanide Pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, F.; Pesquera, C.; Blanco, C.

    Pillared montmorillonites with mixed Al/lanthanide pillars were prepared. The materials present characteristics that are very different from montmorillonite pillared with only aluminium. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies indicated total absence of tetrahedral aluminium in the pillars when lanthanide cations are incorporated between the clay layers. They have a high thermal stability, high specific surface area and porosity, with pores at the limit between the microporosity and mesoporosity. The textural parameters maintained high values up to 700 °C. The number and the strength of the acid sites in these materials were also high. The increase of the conversion in dehydration of 1-butanol as in hydroisomerization of n-heptane shows their better behaviour as acid catalysts. The Al/lanthanide-pillared samples showed increased conversion and improved the selectivity towards the products of cracking. The study of 1-butanol dehydration showed that there is an increase in the acidity, thermal stability and smaller deactivation by carbonaceous deposits in the Al/lanthanide-pillared sample.

  14. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Five companies mined fire clay in four states in 2011. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 240 kt (265,000 st), valued at $7.68 million, an increase from 216 kt (238,000 st), valued at $6.12 million in 2010. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Texas, Washington and Ohio, in decreasing order by quantity.

  15. A modified version of the combined in-diffusion/abrasive peeling technique for measuring diffusion of strongly sorbing radionuclides in argillaceous rocks: a test study on the diffusion of caesium in Opalinus Clay.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, Luc R; Müller, Werner

    2014-08-01

    A filter free diffusion set-up was developed for measuring the diffusion of strongly sorbing radionuclides in indurated argillaceous rocks such as Opalinus Clay (OPA) that normally disintegrate when contacted with a solution. Small bore cores drilled parallel to the bedding plane and embedded in epoxy resin were found to be stable and could be used for performing in-diffusion measurements. The method was tested with the diffusion of caesium, spiked with caesium-134, in Opalinus Clay. The profile of Cs in the clay sample was determined with a modified version of the abrasive peeling technique. The diffusion parameters obtained for caesium were in fair agreement with those determined earlier using the classical through-diffusion technique where stainless steel filters were used to confine the samples.

  16. All Pillars Point to Eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Eta Carinae Starforming RegionSimulated Infrared View of Comet Tempel 1 (artist's concept)

    These false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the 'South Pillar' region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope 'busted open' this murky cloud to reveal star embryos (yellow or white) tucked inside finger-like pillars of thick dust (pink). Hot gases are green and foreground stars are blue. Not all of the newfound star embryos can be easily spotted.

    Though the nebula's most famous and massive star, Eta Carinae, is too bright to be observed by infrared telescopes, the downward-streaming rays hint at its presence above the picture frame. Ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from Eta Carinae and its siblings have shredded the cloud to pieces, leaving a mess of tendrils and pillars. This shredding process triggered the birth of the new stars uncovered by Spitzer.

    The inset visible-light picture (figure 2) of the Carina Nebula shows quite a different view. Dust pillars are fewer and appear dark because the dust is soaking up visible light. Spitzer's infrared detectors cut through this dust, allowing it to see the heat from warm, embedded star embryos, as well as deeper, more buried pillars. The visible-light picture is from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

    Eta Carina is a behemoth of a star, with more than 100 times the mass of our Sun. It is so massive that it can barely hold itself together. Over the years, it has brightened and faded as material has shot away from its surface. Some astronomers think Eta Carinae might die in a supernova blast within our lifetime.

    Eta Carina's home, the Carina Nebula, is located in the southern portion of our Milky Way galaxy, 10,000 light-years from Earth. This colossal cloud of gas and dust

  17. Application of natural and modified hectorite clays as adsorbents to removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution--thermodynamic and equilibrium study.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Denis L; Viana, Rúbia R; Airoldi, Claudio

    2009-12-15

    A hectorite (H) clay sample has been modified with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) using homogeneous and heterogeneous routes. Both modification methodologies resulted in similar products, named H(HOM) and H(HET), respectively. These materials were characterized by CO(2) gas adsorption, elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic nuclei of carbon-13 and silicon-29. The effect of two variables (contact time and metal concentration) has been studied using batch technique at room temperature and pH 2.0. After achieving the best conditions for Cr(VI) adsorption, isotherms of this adsorbate on using the chosen adsorbents were obtained, which were fitted to non-linear Sips isotherm model. The maximum number of moles adsorbed was determined to be 11.63, 12.85 and 14.01 mmol g(-1) for H, H(HOM) and H(HET), respectively, reflecting the maximum adsorption order of H(HET)>H(HOM)>H. The energetic effects (Delta(int)H degrees , Delta(int)G degrees and Delta(int)S degrees ) caused by chromium ion adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations.

  18. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  19. Pillar-Shaped Macrocyclic Hosts Pillar[n]arenes: New Key Players for Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Yamagishi, Tada-Aki; Nakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-27

    In 2008, we reported a new class of pillar-shaped macrocyclic hosts, known as "pillar[n]arenes". Today, pillar[n]arenes are recognized as key players in supramolecular chemistry because of their facile synthesis, unique pillar shape, versatile functionality, interesting host-guest properties, and original supramolecular assembly characteristics, which have resulted in numerous electrochemical and biomedical material applications. In this Review, we have provided historical background to macrocyclic chemistry, followed by a detailed discussion of the fundamental properties of pillar[n]arenes, including their synthesis, structure, and host-guest properties. Furthermore, we have discussed the applications of pillar[n]arenes to materials science, as well as their applications in supramolecular chemistry, in terms of their fundamental properties. Finally, we have described the future perspectives of pillar[n]arene chemistry. We hope that this Review will provide a useful reference for researchers working in the field and inspire discoveries concerning pillar[n]arene chemistry.

  20. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  1. Photoinduced catalytic adsorption of model contaminants on Bi/Cu pillared montmorillonite in the visible light range

    EPA Science Inventory

    Montmorillonite K10 clay was pillared with BiCl3 and Cu(NO3)2 to extend its applicability as catalytic adsorbent to degrade aqueous solution of anionic azo-dye Methyl Orange (MO) in the presence of visible light irradiation. The preparation of Bi/Cu-montmorillonite utilized benig...

  2. Flow through an Array of Superhydrophopic Pillars: The Role of the Air-Water Interface Shape on Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    In this study, measurements of the pressure drop and the velocity fields associated with the flow of water through a regular array of superhydrophobic pillars were systematically performed to investigate the role of the air-water interface shape on drag reduction. A microfluidic channel was created with circular and superhydrophobic apple-core-shaped pillars bridging across the entire channel. The apple-core-shaped pillars were designed to trap an air pocket along the side of the pillars. The shape of the interface was systematically modified from concave to convex by changing the static pressure within the microchannel. For superhydrophobic pillars having a circular cross section, D /D0 = 1.0, a drag reduction of 7% and a slip velocity of 20% the average channel velocity along the air-water interface were measured. At large static pressures, the interface was driven into the pillars resulting in a decrease in the effective size of the pillars, an increase in the effective spacing between pillars and a pressure drop reduction of as much as 18% when the interface was compressed to D /D0 = 0.8. At low static pressures, the pressure drop increased significantly even as the slip velocity increased as the expanding air-water interface constricted flow through the array of pillars. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1334962.

  3. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, May 9, 1992--August 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of mixed pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported catalysts and determination of their catalytic activities were continued in this quarter. To demonstrate the reproducibility of the preparative method for high activity iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite catalysts, a new batch of the catalyst was prepared and tested for hydrocracking activity with bibenzyl. This preparation gave conversion and product distribution similar to that reported previously. The mixed iron/alumina-pillared clay was also prepared using a pillaring solution that was aged for longer period of time. To determine the importance of the type of pillaring support in hydrocracking activity, iron/zirconia-pillared montmorillonite was prepared using the same technique as that for iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite. The reaction of bibenzyl with the sulfided iron/zirconia-pillared catalyst gave a lower hydrocracking conversion than the iron/alumina-pillared catalyst. Addition of a second catalytic metal to the clay support was attempted to determine if a synergistic effect could improve liquefaction. Ferric nitrate and stannous chloride were added to the clay, but the resulting catalyst was relatively poor for hydrocracking and hydrogenation compared with ferric nitrate supported on the clay. New disposable iron catalysts with high acidity and surface area are desired for coal liquefaction. Synthetic iron aluminosilicates were prepared by methods similar to those used for the nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM) catalysts, which are very effective for hydrogenation and reforming of hydrocarbons. The iron aluminosilicate catalysts were tested for hydrocracking and hydrogenation of bibenzyl, naphthalene and pyrene. Pyrene hydrogenation was effectively catalyzed by the sulfided synthetic iron catalyst.

  4. Clay for Little Fingers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Joan Bouza

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the renewed interest in clay as a modeling compound in early childhood programs; describes the nature of clay and presents a working vocabulary. Suggests methods of working with clay, including introducing clay to children, discovering its uses, clean up, firing clay, and finishing baked clay. Includes activity suggestions and…

  5. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Seven companies mined fire clay in four states during 2003. From 1984 to 1992, production declined to 383 kt (422,000 st) from a high of 1.04 Mt (1.14 million st) as markets for clay-based refractories declined. Since 1992, production levels have been erratic, ranging from 383 kt (422,000 st) in 1992 and 2001 to 583 kt (642,000 st) in 1995. Production in 2003, based on preliminary data, was estimated to be around 450 kt (496,000 st) with a value of about $10.5 million. This was about the same as in 2002. Missouri remained the leading producer state, followed by South Carolina, Ohio and California.

  6. Montmorillonite-based porous clay heterostructures (PCHs) intercalated with silica-titania pillars—synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielarz, Lucjan; Gil, Barbara; Kuśtrowski, Piotr; Piwowarska, Zofia; Dudek, Barbara; Michalik, Marek

    2009-05-01

    Porous clay heterostructures (PCHs) were synthesized using natural montmorillonite as a raw material. Apart from pure silica pillars also silica-titania pillars were intercalated into the interlayer space of the parent clay. The detailed studies of the calcination process of the as-prepared PCH samples as well as thermal stability of the pillared structure of these materials were performed. The pillared structure of PCHs intercalated with both silica and silica-titania clusters was found to be thermally stable up to temperatures exceeding 600 °C. It was found that titanium incorporated into the silica pillars was present mainly in the form of separated tetracoordinated cations. For the samples with the higher Ti loading also small contribution of titanium in the form of the polymeric oxide species was detected. Titanium incorporated into the PCH materials significantly increased their surface acidity forming mainly Brønsted acid sites.

  7. Lake responses following lanthanum-modified bentonite clay (Phoslock®) application: an analysis of water column lanthanum data from 16 case study lakes.

    PubMed

    Spears, Bryan M; Lürling, Miquel; Yasseri, Said; Castro-Castellon, Ana T; Gibbs, Max; Meis, Sebastian; McDonald, Claire; McIntosh, John; Sleep, Darren; Van Oosterhout, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Phoslock(®) is a lanthanum (La) modified bentonite clay that is being increasingly used as a geo-engineering tool for the control of legacy phosphorus (P) release from lake bed sediments to overlying waters. This study investigates the potential for negative ecological impacts from elevated La concentrations associated with the use of Phoslock(®) across 16 case study lakes. Impact-recovery trajectories associated with total lanthanum (TLa) and filterable La (FLa) concentrations in surface and bottom waters were quantified over a period of up to 60 months following Phoslock(®) application. Both surface and bottom water TLa and FLa concentrations were <0.001 mg L(-1) in all lakes prior to the application of Phoslock(®). The effects of Phoslock(®) application were evident in the post-application maximum TLa and FLa concentrations reported for surface waters between 0.026 mg L(-1)-2.30 mg L(-1) and 0.002 mg L(-1) to 0.14 mg L(-1), respectively. Results of generalised additive modelling indicated that recovery trajectories for TLa and FLa in surface and bottom waters in lakes were represented by 2nd order decay relationships, with time, and that recovery reached an end-point between 3 and 12 months post-application. Recovery in bottom water was slower (11-12 months) than surface waters (3-8 months), most probably as a result of variation in physicochemical conditions of the receiving waters and associated effects on product settling rates and processes relating to the disturbance of bed sediments. CHEAQS PRO modelling was also undertaken on 11 of the treated lakes in order to predict concentrations of La(3+) ions and the potential for negative ecological impacts. This modelling indicated that the concentrations of La(3+) ions will be very low (<0.0004 mg L(-1)) in lakes of moderately low to high alkalinity (>0.8 mEq L(-1)), but higher (up to 0.12 mg L(-1)) in lakes characterised by very low alkalinity. The effects of elevated La(3+) concentrations following

  8. Behaviour of abandoned room and pillar mines in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marino, G.G.; Bauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Little comprehensive information has been reported on the behaviour of room-and-pillar mines. The objective of this paper is to present case data on mine failures in the Illinois basin for use in practice. Presented are results of an ongoing study and details on the site characteristics of cases where sags have developed on the surface. Site data are reported to show the geologic, mining, and sag conditions that existed. Sags mainly develop from pillar, floor, or pillar-floor failure. The character of the sags depends upon the type of mine failure as well as the overburden response. Preliminary results show that the statistical no-risk tributary pressure decreases over 300% as the mine age increases from about 2 to 100 years at a long-term value of approximately 300 psi (2070 kPa). As more information is collected and more analysis is done, the allowable tributary pressure can be determined for different site conditions. A plot is also reported that depicts the relationship of the maximum subsidence to site conditions. It was found that the modified subsidence factor was heavily dependent upon the overburden rock thickness. ?? 1989 Chapman & Hall Ltd.

  9. Environmental Remediation and Sorption of Metal Cations Using Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifai, Rifai; Abou El Safa, Magda

    2015-04-01

    The release of heavy metal cations into the environment is a potential threat to water and soil quality. Some clay minerals play an important role, as physical and chemical barriers, for the isolation of metal-rich wastes and to adsorb heavy metals as well as to avoid their environmental dispersion. In the present study, the bentonitic clay (southeast El-Hammam City, Egypt) was subjected to pillaring using hydroxyl-aluminum solution. The XRD patterns of the Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite (APNB) showed severe alteration of the crystal structure after pillaring. Poly metal solutions with different metal concentrations of Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb (0.001, 0.005 and 0.01 moles), and pH (1, 2.5, 5 and 6) were subjected to treatment by the APNB. The removal process is very rapid and spontaneous and the contact time may be short (several minutes) for most adsorption to occur. The criterion for environmental remediation of APNB is less stringent and a short contact time is sufficient. The rate of Cu2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+sorption remained higher or equal to the CEC. The sorption of metal ions by APNB are complex and probably involve several mechanisms. In general, APNB can be used to immobilize Cu2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+ to any extent. For each metal ion, the most effective immobilization occurs over a particular pH around 5. According to the experimental data obtained, the uptake amount of the studied cations by APNB increased with increasing solution pH, sorbent dose and contact time. The preference of the APNB adsorption for heavy metal ions that are through the cation exchange processes decreases in the order: Cu2+>Zn2+>Co2+>Cd2+ >Ni2+ >Pb2+. Keywords: Bentonitic clay, Egypt, Aluminum Pillared Nano-Bentonite, heavy metal, environmental remediation

  10. The Paramagnetic Pillared Bentonites as Digestive Tract MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojović, Miloš; Daković, Marko; Omerašević, Mia; Mojović, Zorica; Banković, Predrag; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jovanović, Dušan

    The increased use of imaging techniques in diagnostic studies, such as MRI, has contributed to the development of the wide range of new materials which could be successfully used as image improving agents. However, there is a lack of such substances in the area of gastrointestinal tract MRI. Many of the traditionally popular relaxation altering agents show poor results and disadvantages provoking black bowel, side effects of diarrhea and the presence of artifacts arising from clumping. Paramagnetic species seem to be potentially suitable agents for these studies, but contrast opacification has been reported and less than 60% of the gastrointestinal tract magnetic resonance scans showed improved delineation of abdominal pathologies. The new solution has been proposed as zeolites or smectite clays (hectorite and montmorillonite) enclosing of paramagnetic metal ions obtained by ion-exchange methods. However, such materials have problems of leakage of paramagnetic ions causing the appearance of the various side-effects. In this study we show that Co+2 and Dy+3 paramagnetic-pillared bentonites could be successfully used as MRI digestive tract non-leaching contrast agents, altering the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of fluids in contact with the clay minerals.

  11. Pillar[5,6]arene-functionalized silicon dioxide: synthesis, characterization, and adsorption of herbicide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Song, Nan; Yu, Hao; Yang, Ying-Wei

    2015-02-03

    A layer of synthetic supramolecular macrocycles, that is, perhydroxyl-pillar[5]arene and perhydroxyl-pillar[6]arene, has been covalently attached to hydrophilic silica supports through Si-O-Si linkages with a coverage of up to 250 μmol pillar[5,6]arenes/g to form novel absorbent hybrid materials. Their adsorption toward a typical herbicide, namely, paraquat, from its aqueous solution has been investigated. Kinetic studies disclosed that paraquat adsorption fits a first-order kinetic model. Equilibrium adsorption data could be explained very well by the Langmuir equation. The pillar[6]arene-modified materials showed more obvious adsorption as compared with pillar[5]arene-modified ones and the saturation adsorption quantity reached about 0.20 mmol of paraquat per gram of materials. The entire process of adsorption was endothermic, and significantly an elevated temperature led to an increase in the adsorption quantity. This new type of pillarene-based adsorbent materials can be considered as a potential adsorbent for harmful substances removal from wastewaters.

  12. Clay: The Forgotten Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Doris Marie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the tactile and kinesthetic areas of learning children experience when using clay. Includes practical tips for using and storing clay for preschool use and notes the differences between potters' clay and play dough. (HTH)

  13. Killer clays! Natural antibacterial clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, L.B.; Holland, M.; Eberl, D.D.; Brunet, T.; De Courrsou, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The clay chemical properties that may be important in medicine were investigated. It was found that natural clay minerals can have striking and very specific effects on microbial populations. The effects can range from potentially enhanced microbial growth to complete sterilization. This paper presents evidence that natural clay minerals can be effective antimicrobial agents.

  14. Surface properties of pillared acid-activated bentonite as catalyst for selective production of linear alkylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihian, Hossein; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Acid-activated and pillared montmorillonite were prepared as novel catalysts for alkylation of benzene with 1-decene for production of linear alkylbenzene. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 adsorption isotherms, temperature programmed desorption of NH3, scanning electron microscopy and elemental and thermal analysis techniques. It was found that acid-activation of clays prior to pillaring increased the porosity, total specific surface area, total pore volume and surface acidity of the catalysts. Optimization of the reaction conditions was performed by varying catalyst concentration (0.25-1.75 wt%), reactants ratio (benzene to 1-decene of 8.75, 12 and 15) and temperature (115-145 °C) in a batch slurry reactor. Under optimized conditions more than 98% conversion of 1-decene, and complete selectivity for monoalkylbenzenes were achieved.

  15. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  16. Enhancement of the contrast ratio associated with surface waves in a metal pillar-slit structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yunsong; Zhao Liming; Wang Huaiyu; Lan Sheng

    2011-03-15

    A simple optical structure, termed a pillar-slit structure, is proposed to enhance the contrast ratio of the weak optical signal. The structure consists of a metal slit surrounded by two metal pillars and can be directly incorporated onto optical sensors. The waves excited on the incident surface are modulated by the pillars and then scattered by the slit entrance so as to generate the in-slit surface plasmon polaritons passing through the slit. The transmission power is modified by the surface wave intensity. This structure is capable of suppressing background and enhancing signal light simultaneously. A calculated illustration by the numerical simulation method shows that an increase of the contrast ratio can be exceeded 900 times.

  17. Intercalated layered clay composites and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phukan, Anjali

    Supported inorganic reagents are rapidly emerging as new and environmentally acceptable reagents and catalysts. The smectite group of layered clay minerals, such as, Montmorillonite, provides promising character for adsorption, catalytic activity, supports etc. for their large surface area, swelling behavior and ion exchange properties. Aromatic compounds intercalated in layered clays are useful in optical molecular devices. Clay is a unique material for adsorption of heavy metals and various toxic substances. Clay surfaces are known to be catalytically active due to their surface acidity. Acid activated clays possess much improved surface areas and acidities and have higher pore volumes so that can absorb large molecules in the pores. The exchangeable cations in clay minerals play a key role in controlling surface acidity and catalytic activity. Recently, optically active metal-complex-Montmorillonite composites are reported to be active in antiracemization purposes. In view of the above, a research work, relating to the preparation of different modified clay composites and their catalytic applications were carried out. The different aspects and results of the present work have been reported in four major chapters. Chapter I: This is an introductory chapter, which contains a review of the literature regarding clay-based materials. Clay minerals are phyllosilicates with layer structure. Montmorillonite, a member of smectite group of clay, is 2:1 phyllosilicate, where a layer is composed of an octahedral sheet sandwiched by two tetrahedral sheets. Such clay shows cation exchange capacity (CEC) and is expressed in milli-equivalents per 100 gm of dry clay. Clays can be modified by interaction with metal ion, metal complexes, metal cluster and organic cations for various applications. Clays are also modified by treating with acid followed by impregnation with metal salts or ions. Montmorillonite can intercalate suitable metal complexes in excess of CEC to form double

  18. Clay mineral provinces in tidal mud flats at Germany's North Sea coast with illite K-Ar ages potentially modified by biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockamp, Olaf; Clauer, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    Mineralogical studies, chemical analyses and K-Ar dating were carried out on clay fractions from tidal mud flats along the Lower Saxony coast and its bays to identify material sources and sedimentary processes at this dynamic interface between air, land and sea. From the coast into the bays, sediments are enriched in fine-grained smectite relative to the coarser grained illite, chlorite and kaolinite, due to the weakening of the tidal current energy in the bays. In addition, the study area can be divided into two provinces on the basis of the illite K/Rb ratios and Mg contents. To the west [Schiermonnikoog, Dollart, Ley Bay up to Norderney island], longshore currents carry suspensions from the Belgian and Dutch coasts; to the east [from Langeoog island, Jade Bay to the Helgoland mud area] suspensions from the Elbe and Weser rivers are mixed with submarine reworked glacial sediments, whereas the portion of longshore current suspensions from the west decreases, becoming negligible in the Helgoland mud area off the Elbe and Weser estuaries. The illite K-Ar data vary considerably and fail as source indicators due to differential settling and mixing of the clay material and probably to Ar loss from illite by biodegradation during digestive processes. Only further offshore, outside the zone of dynamic sediment dispersion, do the K-Ar data fit provenance patterns.

  19. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  20. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  1. Method of underground mining by pillar extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, Ray J.; Bowen, William R.

    1980-08-12

    A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

  2. Elastocapillary coalescence of plates and pillars

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Z.; Schneider, T. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, H.-Y.; Aizenberg, J.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    When a fluid-immersed array of supported plates or pillars is dried, evaporation leads to the formation of menisci on the tips of the plates or pillars that bring them together to form complex patterns. Building on prior experimental observations, we use a combination of theory and computation to understand the nature of this instability and its evolution in both the two- and three-dimensional setting of the problem. For the case of plates, we explicitly derive the interaction torques based on the relevant physical parameters associated with pillar deformation, contact-line pinning/depinning and fluid volume changes. A Bloch-wave analysis for our periodic mechanical system captures the window of volumes where the two-plate eigenvalue characterizes the onset of the coalescence instability. We then study the evolution of these binary clusters and their eventual elastic arrest using numerical simulations that account for evaporative dynamics coupled to capillary coalescence. This explains both the formation of hierarchical clusters and the sensitive dependence of the final structures on initial perturbations, as seen in our experiments. We then generalize our analysis to treat the problem of pillar collapse in three dimensions, where the fluid domain is completely connected and the interface is a minimal surface with the uniform mean curvature. Our theory and simulations capture the salient features of experimental observations in a range of different situations and may thus be useful in controlling the ensuing patterns. PMID:25792949

  3. Contact angle hysteresis on regular pillar-like hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Li-Jen; Chang, Jeng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    A series of pillar-like patterned silicon wafers with different pillar sizes and spacing are fabricated by photolithography and further modified by a self-assembled fluorosilanated monolayer. The dynamic contact angles of water on these surfaces are carefully measured and found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions of the Cassie model and the Wenzel model. When a water drop is at the Wenzel state, its contact angle hysteresis increases along with an increase in the surface roughness. While the surface roughness is further raised beyond its transition roughness (from the Wenzel state to the Cassie state), the contact angle hysteresis (or receding contact angle) discontinuously drops (or jumps) to a lower (or higher) value. When a water drop is at the Cassie state, its contact angle hysteresis strongly depends on the solid fraction and has nothing to do with the surface roughness. Even for a superhydrophobic surface, the contact angle hysteresis may still exhibit a value as high as 41 degrees for the solid fraction of 0.563.

  4. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  5. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  6. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  7. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  8. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  9. Permeation properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalendova, A.; Merinska, D.; Gerard, J. F.

    2012-07-01

    The important characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposites are stability, barrier properties and in the case of polyvinyl chloride also plasticizer migration into other materials. Therefore, the permeation properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites are discussed in this paper. The attention was focused to the polyethylene (PE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Natural type of montmorillonite MMTNa+ and modified types of montmorillonite from Southern Clay Products were used as the inorganic phase. As the compounding machine, one screw Buss KO-kneader was employed. The principal aim is to fully exfoliate the clay into polymer matrix and enhanced the permeation properties. Prepared samples were tested for O2 and CO2 permeability. Polymer/clay nanocomposite structure was determined on the base of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy (TEM).

  10. Design methods to control violent pillar failures in room-and-pillar mines

    SciTech Connect

    Zipf, R.K. Jr.; Mark, C.

    1996-12-01

    The sudden, violent collapse of large areas of room-and-pillar mines poses a special hazard to miners and mine operators. This type of failure, termed a {open_quotes}Cascading Pillar Failure{close_quotes} (CPF), occurs when one pillar in a mine layout fails transfering its load to neighboring pillars causing them to fail, and so forth. Recent examples of this kind of failure in coal, metal and nonmetal mines in the U.S. are documented. Mining engineers can limit the danger posed by these failures through improved mine design practices. Whether failure occurs in a slow, nonviolent manner or in a rapid, violent manner is governed by the local mine stiffness stability criterion. This stability criterion is used as the basis for three design approaches to control cascading pillar failure in room-and-pillar mines, namely, the containment approach, the prevention approach, and the full extraction mining approach. These design approaches are illustrated with practical examples for coal mining.

  11. [Reduction of chromium (VI) by nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on Al-pillared bentonite].

    PubMed

    Yin, Li-Jing; Li, Yi-Min; Zhang, Lu-Ji; Peng, Yuan-Fei; Ying, Zhe-Lan

    2009-04-15

    In the presence of Al-pillared bentonite with good sorption capacity, nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on Al-pillared bentonite (NZVI/Al-PILC) was prepared with NaBH4 and FeSO4 aqueous solution. The structure of NZVI/Al-PILC was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The effects of pH values and initial chromium (VI) concentrations on its removal rate by NZVI/Al-PILC were investigated, and were compared with those of unsupported nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) containing the same iron mount of NZVI/Al-PILC. The results indicate that in the same experimental condition, the chromium (VI) removal by NZVI/Al-PILC reached 100% after 120 min. The removal is not only much higher than that (63.0%) of the NZVI containing same iron mount, but also superior to the sum of removal (75.4%) by NZVI containing the same iron amount and the Al-pillared bentonite containing the same clay amount with NZVI/Al-PILC.

  12. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  13. Bromate adsorption using Fe-pillared bentonite.

    PubMed

    He, Shilong; Zhang, Dandan; Gu, Li; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Bromate is an emerging hazardous substance in drinking water. In this study, the removal ofbromate by Fe-pillared bentonite was investigated using various experimental parameters: contact time, initial concentration (Co), temperature, initial pH and competing anions. The adsorption ofbromate followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic better than it followed other kinetic models, and the pseudo-second-order kinetic study showed that equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min. Equilibrium isotherms were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson and Toth isotherm models. The Toth and Redlich-Peterson models better represented the bromate adsorption. Results also indicated that, other than the competing anions and solution pH, temperature was a key parameter affecting adsorption. It was ultimately concluded that Fe-pillared bentonite was effective at removing bromate from water.

  14. Slow-release formulations of the herbicide picloram by using Fe-Al pillared montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Marco-Brown, Jose L; Undabeytia, Tomás; Torres Sánchez, Rosa M; Dos Santos Afonso, María

    2017-04-01

    Slow-release formulations of the herbicide picloram (PCM, 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropyridine-2-carboxylic acid) were designed based on its adsorption on pillared clays (pillared clays (PILCs)) for reducing the water-polluting risk derived from its use in conventional formulations. Fe-Al PILCs were synthesized by the reaction of Na(+)-montmorillonite (SWy-2) with base-hydrolyzed solutions of Fe and Al. The Fe/(Fe + Al) ratios used were 0.15 and 0.50. The PCM adsorption isotherms on Fe-Al PILCs were well fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich models. The PCM adsorption capacity depended on the Fe content in the PILCs. Slow-release formulations were prepared by enhanced adsorption of the herbicide from PCM-cyclodextrin (CD) complexes in solution. CDs were able to enhance up to 2.5-fold the solubility of PCM by the formation of inclusion complexes where the ring moiety of the herbicide was partially trapped within the CD cavity. Competitive adsorption of anions such as sulfate, phosphate, and chloride as well as the FTIR analysis of PCM-PILC complexes provided evidence of formation of inner sphere complexes of PCM-CD on Fe-Al PILCs. Release of the herbicide in a sandy soil was lower from Fe-Al PILC formulations relative to a PCM commercial formulation.

  15. Electrolytic Bubble Growth on Pillared Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Omer

    2013-11-01

    In current energy research, artificial photosynthetic (AP) devices are being designed to split water and harvest hydrogen gas using sunlight. In one such design, hydrogen gas bubbles evolve on catalytic surfaces of arrayed micropillars. If these bubbles are not promptly removed from the surface, they can adversely affect gas evolution rates, water flow rates, sunlight capture, and heat management of the system - all of which deteriorate device performance. Therefore, understanding how to remove evolved gas bubbles from the pillar surfaces is crucial. Flow visualization of electrolytic bubble nucleation and detachment from the catalytic pillar surfaces has been conducted. The bubble departure diameter and lift-off frequency are extracted and compared with known correlations from boiling heat transfer. Bubble tracking indicates that bubble detachment is enhanced by local interactions with neighboring bubbles. These observations suggest how hydrogen gas bubbles can be effectively removed from pillared surfaces to prolong AP device longevity. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovations Hub.

  16. Radionuclide separations using pillared layered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, N.C.; Wade, K.L.; Morgan, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Pillared Layered Materials (PLMs) are layered inorganic ion exchangers propped apart by metal oxide pillars. PLMs have been synthesized to sorb strontium from liquid nuclear wastes. A study that compared over 60 sorbers for their ability to sorb strontium from Hanford simulants showed that PLMs were the best sorbers; strontium distribution coefficients ({sup Sr}K{sub d}) > 20000 mL/g were obtained. In addition, PLMs showed a high degree of selectivity for strontium over cesium, transition metals, lanthanides and actinides. The sorption of strontium is, however, inhibited by complexants (EDTA); {sup Sr}K{sub d} values drop to <20 mL/g when they are present. The most promising PLMs were the Cr, Ti, Zr, and Si pillared tantalum tungstate. The K{sub d} values for Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} show a strong pH dependence; K{sub d} values increase to >10{sup 4} above pH 12. The general surface complexation mechanism explains the sorption of these cations on PLMs.

  17. Clays in prebiological chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M.; Oro, J.; Odom, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    The ways in which clays have been utilized in studies of prebiological chemistry are reviewed, and an assessment is given of the possible role of clays in prebiological systems. The adsorption of organic molecules on clays has been demonstrated, as has the synthesis of bioorganic monomers in the presence of clays. For instance, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines have been obtained from carbon monoxide and nitric acid in the presence of clays at relatively high temperatures (250-325 C). The oligomerization of biochemical monomers, mediated by clays, has also been shown to result in the formation of polymer molecules basic to life. Clays have also been found to affect the condensation of mononucleotides to oligonucleotides.

  18. A model for the emergence of pillars, walls and royal chambers in termite nests

    PubMed Central

    Bonabeau, E.

    1998-01-01

    A simple model of the emergence of pillars in termite nests by Deneubourg is modified to include several additional features that break the homogeneity of the original model: (i) a convection air stream that drives molecules of pheromone along a given direction; (ii) a net flux of individuals in a specific direction; (iii) a well-defined self-maintained pheromone trail; and (iv) a pheromonal template representing the effect of the presence of a queen that continuously emits pheromone. It is shown that, under certain conditions, pillars are transformed into walls or galleries or chambers, and that this transformation may not be driven by any change in the termites' behaviour. Because the same type of response at the individual level can generate different patterns under different conditions, and because previous construction modifies current building conditions, we hypothesize that nest complexity can result from the unfolding of a morphogenetic process that progressively generates a diversity of history-dependent structures.

  19. Preparation of a porous clay heterostructure and study of its adsorption capacity of phenol and chlorinated phenols from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Cárdenas, Sofía; Gallardo-Velázquez, Tzayhrí; Osorio-Revilla, Guillermo; López-Cortez, Ma del Socorro

    2008-01-01

    A porous clay heterostructure (PCH) from a Mexican clay was prepared and characterized, and its aqueous phenol and dichlorophenols (DCPs) adsorption capacities were studied using a batch equilibrium technique. The PCH displayed a surface area of 305.5 m2/g, 37.2 A average porous diameter, and a basal space of 23.2 A. The adsorption capacity shown by the PCH for both phenol and DCPs from water (14.5 mg/g for phenol; 48.7 mg/g for 3,4-DCP; and 45.5 mg/g for 2,5-DCP) suggests that the PCH has both hydrophobic and hydrophilic characteristics, as a result of the presence of silanol and siloxane groups formed during the pillaring and calcination of the PCH. The values of maximal adsorption capacity for dichlorophenols were higher than those reported for aluminum pillared clays and some inorgano-organo clays and comparable with some ionic exchange resins.

  20. Pillared Structure Design of MXene with Ultralarge Interlayer Spacing for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianmin; Zhang, Wenkui; Yuan, Huadong; Jin, Chengbin; Zhang, Liyuan; Huang, Hui; Liang, Chu; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Gan, Yongping; Tao, Xinyong

    2017-03-28

    Two-dimensional transition-metal carbide materials (termed MXene) have attracted huge attention in the field of electrochemical energy storage due to their excellent electrical conductivity, high volumetric capacity, etc. Herein, with inspiration from the interesting structure of pillared interlayered clays, we attempt to fabricate pillared Ti3C2 MXene (CTAB-Sn(IV)@Ti3C2) via a facile liquid-phase cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) prepillaring and Sn(4+) pillaring method. The interlayer spacing of Ti3C2 MXene can be controlled according to the size of the intercalated prepillaring agent (cationic surfactant) and can reach 2.708 nm with 177% increase compared with the original spacing of 0.977 nm, which is currently the maximum value according to our knowledge. Because of the pillar effect, the assembled LIC exhibits a superior energy density of 239.50 Wh kg(-1) based on the weight of CTAB-Sn(IV)@Ti3C2 even under higher power density of 10.8 kW kg(-1). When CTAB-Sn(IV)@Ti3C2 anode couples with commercial AC cathode, LIC reveals higher energy density and power density compared with conventional MXene materials.

  1. Fabrication of Pillar-Structured Thermal Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R J; Conway, A M; Reinhardt, C E; Graff, R T; Wang, T F; Deo, N; Cheung, C L

    2007-11-19

    Pillar detector is an innovative solid state device structure that leverages advanced semiconductor fabrication technology to produce a device for thermal neutron detection. State-of-the-art thermal neutron detectors have shortcomings in achieving simultaneously high efficiency, low operating voltage while maintaining adequate fieldability performance. By using a 3-dimensional silicon PIN diode pillar array filled with isotopic boron 10, ({sup 10}B) a high efficiency device is theoretically possible. The fabricated pillar structures reported in this work are composed of 2 {micro}m diameter silicon pillars with a 4 {micro}m pitch and pillar heights of 6 and 12 {micro}m. The pillar detector with a 12 {micro}m height achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 7.3% at 2V.

  2. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  3. Efficient stabilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae external invertase by immobilisation on modified beidellite nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Andjelković, Uroš; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jović-Jovičić, Nataša; Banković, Predrag; Bajt, Teja; Mojović, Zorica; Vujčić, Zoran; Jovanović, Dušan

    2015-02-01

    The external invertase isoform 1 (EINV1) was immobilised on eight differently modified beidellite nanoclays. Modifications were composed of organo-modification with different amounts of surfactant - hexadecyl trimethylammonium cation (HDTMA), pillaring with Al/Fe containing polyhydroxy cations and acid modification of Na-enriched and pillared clays. The modified nanoclays were characterised by XRD, N2-physisorption, SEM and FT-IR spectroscopy. The amount of bound enzyme activity was significantly influenced by the modification of beidellite ranging from 50 to remarkable 2200U/g. Biochemical characterization was performed for five modified nanoclays showing the highest enzyme activity after invertase immobilisation. The investigation demonstrated that after immobilisation the structure and the catalytic properties of invertase were preserved, while Km values were slightly increased from 26 to 37mM. immobilisation significantly improved thermal and storage stability of EINV1. Results indicate that beidellite nanoclays obtained by low cost modifications can be applied as a suitable support for the immobilisation of invertase. The immobilizate can be efficiently engaged in sucrose hydrolysis in batch reactor.

  4. Pillar III--optimisation of anaemia tolerance.

    PubMed

    Meier, Jens; Gombotz, Hans

    2013-03-01

    In the case of acute bleeding, the use of the anaemia tolerance of a patient enables the physician to either avoid blood transfusions or delay them after bleeding has ceased. This concept is the cornerstone of the third pillar of modern patient blood management programmes. Its efficacy depends on the degree of utilisation of anaemia tolerance, which is not constant but depends on the compensatory capacity of the individual patient in a given situation. Fortunately, the specifications of anaemia tolerance can be influenced by the anaesthesiologist. This article presents the concept of anaemia tolerance and highlights the options for how anaemia tolerance can be optimised in the pre-, intra-, and postoperative periods.

  5. Mid-infrared silicon pillar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Neetesh; Hudson, Darren D.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2015-12-01

    In this work silicon pillar waveguides have been proposed to exploit the entire transparent window of silicon. These geometries posses a broad and at dispersion (from 2 to 6 μm) with four zero dispersion wavelengths. We calculate supercontinuum generation spanning over two octaves (2 to >8 μm) with long wavelengths interacting weakly with the lossy substrate. These structures have higher mode confinement in the silicon - away from the substrate, which makes them substrate independent and are promising for exploring new nonlinear phenomena and highly sensitive molecular sensing over the entire silicon's transparency range

  6. Molecular interactions alter clay and polymer structure in polymer clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Debashis; Katti, Kalpana S; Katti, Dinesh R

    2008-04-01

    In this work, using photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) we have studied the structural distortion of clay crystal structure in organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) and polymer clay nanocomposites (PCN). To study the effect of organic modifiers on the distortion of crystal structure of clay, we have synthesized OMMTs and PCNs containing same polymer and clay but with three different organic modifiers (12-aminolauric acid, n-dodecylamine, and 1,12-diaminododecane), and conducted the FTIR study on these PCNs. Our previous molecular dynamics (MD) study on these PCNs reveals that significant nonbonded interactions (van der Waals, electrostatic interactions) exist between the different constituents (polymer, organic modifier, and clay) of nanocomposites. Previous work based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the same set of PCNs shows that crystallinity of polymer in PCNs have changed significantly in comparison to those in pristine polymer; and, the nonbonded interactions between different constituents of PCN are responsible for the change in crystal structure of polymer in PCN. In this work to evaluate the structural distortion of crystal structure of clay in OMMTs and PCNs, the positions of bands corresponding to different modes of vibration of Si-O bonds are determined from the deconvolution of broad Si-O bands in OMMTs and PCNs obtained from FTIR spectra. Intensity and area under the Si-O bands are indicative of orientation of clay crystal structures in OMMTs and PCNs. Significant changes in the Si-O bands are observed from each vibration mode in OMMTs and PCNs containing three different organic modifiers indicating that organic modifiers influence the structural orientation of silica tetrahedra in OMMTs and PCNs. Deconvolution of Si-O bands in OMMTs indicate a band at approximately 1200 cm(-1) that is orientation-dependent Si-O band. The specific changes in intensity and area under this band for

  7. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  8. Controlling cyanobacterial blooms through effective flocculation and sedimentation with combined use of flocculants and phosphorus adsorbing natural soil and modified clay.

    PubMed

    Noyma, Natalia Pessoa; de Magalhães, Leonardo; Furtado, Luciana Lima; Mucci, Maíra; van Oosterhout, Frank; Huszar, Vera L M; Marinho, Marcelo Manzi; Lürling, Miquel

    2016-06-15

    Eutrophication often results in blooms of toxic cyanobacteria that hamper the use of lakes and reservoirs. In this paper, we experimentally evaluated the efficacy of a metal salt (poly-aluminium chloride, PAC) and chitosan, alone and combined with different doses of the lanthanum modified bentonite Phoslock(®) (LMB) or local red soil (LRS) to sediment positively buoyant cyanobacteria from Funil Reservoir, Brazil, (22°30'S, 44°45'W). We also tested the effect of calcium peroxide (CaO2) on suspended and settled cyanobacterial photosystem efficiency, and evaluated the soluble reactive P (SRP) adsorbing capacity of both LMB and LRS under oxic and anoxic conditions. Our data showed that buoyant cyanobacteria could be flocked and effectively precipitated using a combination of PAC or chitosan with LMB or LRS. The SRP sorption capacity of LMB was higher than that of LRS. The maximum P adsorption was lowered under anoxic conditions especially for LRS ballast. CaO2 addition impaired photosystem efficiency at 1 mg L(-1) or higher and killed precipitated cyanobacteria at 4 mg L(-1) or higher. A drawback was that oxygen production from the peroxide gave positive buoyancy again to the settled flocs. Therefore, further experimentations with slow release pellets are recommended.

  9. [Mechanisms of removing red tide organisms by organo-clays].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi-Hua; Song, Xiu-Xian; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Kui

    2006-08-01

    We tested the influence of the preparation conditions of the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) modified clays on their capacities to remove red tide organisms, then discussed the mechanisms of the organo-clays removing red tide organisms. Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) improved the capacity of clays to flocculate red tide algae, and the HDTMA in metastable state enhanced the toxicity of the clay complexes to algae. The capacities of the organo-clays correlated with the toxicity and the adsorbed amount of the QACs used in clays modification, but as the incubation time was prolonged the stability of the organo-clays was improved and the algal removal efficiencies of the clay complexes decreased. When the adsorbed HDTMA was arranged in different clays in which the spatial resistance was different, there was more HDTMA in metastable state in the three-layer montmorillonite. Because of the homo-ion effect the bivalent or trivalent metal ions induced more HDTMA in metastable state and the corresponding organo-clays had high capacities to remove red tide organisms. When the reaction temperature was 60 degrees C the adsorbed HDTMA was easily arranged on cation exchange sites, if the temperature rose or fell the metastable HDTMA would increase so that the capacity of the clays was improved.

  10. Efficient approach to improving the flame retardancy of poly(vinyl alcohol)/clay aerogels: incorporating piperazine-modified ammonium polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Tao; Liao, Shi-Fu; Shang, Ke; Chen, Ming-Jun; Huang, Jian-Qian; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2015-01-28

    Ammonium polyphosphates (APP) modified with piperazine (PA-APP) was used to improve the flame retardancy of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/montmorillonite (MMT) aerogels, which were prepared via an environmentally friendly freeze-drying method. The thermal stabilities of the samples were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TG); the flammability behaviors of samples were investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning test (UL-94) and cone calorimeter (CC) tests. TG test results showed that the 5% weight loss temperature (T5%) of PVA/MMT/PA-APP was 10 °C higher than that of PVA/MMT/APP. In combustion testing, all of PVA/MMT/PA-APP aerogels achieved V-0 ratings and have a higher LOI values than the unmodified PVA/MMT aerogel. Moreover, the aerogel with 1% PA-APP5, which means that the content of piperazine is 5% in PA-APP, decreased the cone calorimetry THR value to 5.71 MJ/m(2), and increased the char residue to 52%. The compressive modulus of PVA/MMT/PA-APP was increased by 93.4% compared with PVA/MMT/APP because of the increase in interfacial adhesion between matrix and PA-APP fillers. The densities of the PVA/MMT/PA-APP samples were slightly lower than those of the unmodified aerogels because of reduced shrinkage in the presence of PA-APP. All the tests results indicated that the incorporation of PA-APP not only improved the thermal stability and flame retardancy of aerogels but also maintained their mechanical properties.

  11. Ultrasound promoted selective synthesis of 1,1'-binaphthyls catalyzed by Fe impregnated pillared Montmorillonite K10 in presence of TBHP as an oxidant.

    PubMed

    Bhor, Malhari D; Nandurkar, Nitin S; Bhanushali, Mayur J; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2008-03-01

    Naphthols were selectively coupled under sonication using Fe(+3) impregnated pillared Montmorillonite K10 and TBHP as an oxidant. Considerable enhancement in the reaction rate was observed under sonication as compared to the reaction performed under silent condition. The activity of catalyst was compared with other Fe clay catalysts. Various parameters like solvent, catalyst and TBHP concentration has been studied. The heterogeneous active catalyst K10-FePLS120 was recycled without loss in activity and selectivity performance.

  12. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  13. The Science of Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Students' natural curiosity provides a rich opportunity for teachers to make meaningful scientific connections between art and ceramics that will enhance the understanding of both natural forces and scientific aspects at work in the creation of clay artworks. This article discusses the scientific areas of study related to clay, which include…

  14. Clay Portrait Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  15. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Part of the 2002 industrial minerals review. The production, consumption, and price of shale and common clay in the U.S. during 2002 are discussed. The impact of EPA regulations on brick and structural clay product manufacturers is also outlined.

  16. Finicky clay divers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordry, Sean M.

    1998-02-01

    Clay spheres dropped into a dilute vinegar/baking-soda solution accumulate CO2 bubbles on their surfaces. Spheres below a certain size will then float, otherwise they remain sunken. Students must determine the maximum size that will float by considering the net density of the clay/bubble system.

  17. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones. (a... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  18. Biomechanical Characterization of Cardiomyocyte Using PDMS Pillar with Microgrooves

    PubMed Central

    Oyunbaatar, Nomin-Erdene; Lee, Deok-Hyu; Patil, Swati J.; Kim, Eung-Sam; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the surface-patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pillar arrays for enhancing cell alignment and contraction force in cardiomyocytes. The PDMS micropillar (μpillar) arrays with microgrooves (μgrooves) were fabricated using a unique micro-mold made using SU-8 double layer processes. The spring constant of the μpillar arrays was experimentally confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). After culturing cardiac cells on the two different types of μpillar arrays, with and without grooves on the top of μpillar, the characteristics of the cardiomyocytes were analyzed using a custom-made image analysis system. The alignment of the cardiomyocytes on the μgrooves of the μpillars was clearly observed using a DAPI staining process. The mechanical force generated by the contraction force of the cardiomyocytes was derived from the displacement of the μpillar arrays. The contraction force of the cardiomyocytes aligned on the μgrooves was 20% higher than that of the μpillar arrays without μgrooves. The experimental results prove that applied geometrical stimulus is an effective method for aligning and improving the contraction force of cardiomyocytes. PMID:27517924

  19. Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood: A Finnish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkkinen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The organizers of the Decade for Childhood have formulated Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood as basic requirements for an optimal childhood. The pillars can be used to analyze the quality of childhood in homes and nations, and to guide policies and practices related to the experience of childhood. In this article, the author shall illustrate, pillar…

  20. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  1. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  2. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  3. [Removal of red tide organisms by organo-modified bentonite].

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuesong; Xu, Zirong; Xia, Meisheng; Ye, Ying; Hu, Caihong

    2004-01-01

    A series of organo-bentonites were synthesized by exchanging cation surfactants such as cyltrimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium to remove red tide organisms Skeletonema costatum. The results showed that the removal rate of Skeletonema costatum by the bentonites was in the order of cyltrimethylammonium surfactant modified iron pillared bentonite > cetyltrimethylammoium surfactant modified iron pillared bentonite > iron pillared bentonite > cyltrimethylammonium surfactant modified sodium bentonite > cetyltrimethylammoium surfactant modified > sodium bentonite. The removal rate of Skeletonema costatum was related to the length of alkyl chains and the amount of cation surfactants exchanged on bentonites.

  4. Stress distribution and pillar design in oil shale retorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. S.; Thill, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The design of retort interchamber pillars is important in determining surface stability over in situ retort mines and to the health and safety of miners, particularly with respect to possible escape of heat and toxic gases from retort chambers. Stress distribution in retort interchamber pillars, roof, and floor was examined with the aid of linear, finite-element analysis using data from experimentally determined mechanical properties. Properties determined included elastic moduli, strength, and creep constants in laboratory tests on core covering a 100-foot depth interval in the oil shale from the Piceance Basin in Colorado. The most critical stress concentration was found in the rib side of the interchamber pillar at a height above the floor line of 1.25 times the width. Guidelines for pillar design that consider pillar strength, creep, and retorting temperature effects are proposed.

  5. Numerical Modeling for Yield Pillar Design: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenfeng; Bai, Jianbiao; Peng, Syd; Wang, Xiangyu; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Two single-entry gateroad systems employing a yield pillar for bump control in a Chinese coal mine were introduced. The overburden depth of the longwall panels was approximately 390 m. When the width/height (W/H) ratio of the yield pillar was 2.67, coal bumps in the tailgate occurred in front of the longwall retreating face. However, in another panel, the coal bump was eliminated because the W/H ratio was reduced to 1.67. Under this condition, instrumentation results indicated that the roof-to-floor and rib-to-rib convergences reached 1,050 and 790 mm, respectively, during longwall retreat. The numerical model was used to back-analyze the two cases of yield pillar application in the hope to find the principle for yield pillar design. In order to improve the reliability of the numerical model, the strain-hardening gob and strain-softening pillar materials were meticulously calibrated, and the coal/rock interface strength was determined by laboratory direct shear tests. The results of the validated model indicate that if the W/H ratio of the yield pillar equals 1.67, the peak vertical stress in the panel rib (37.7 MPa) is much larger than that in the yield pillar (21.1 MPa); however, the peak vertical stress in the panel rib (30.87 MPa) is smaller than that in the yield pillar (36 MPa) when the W/H ratio of yield pillar is 2.67. These findings may be helpful to the design of yield pillars for bump control.

  6. Nanoscale pillar hypersonic surface phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudistira, D.; Boes, A.; Graczykowski, B.; Alzina, F.; Yeo, L. Y.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.; Mitchell, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on nanoscale pillar-based hypersonic phononic crystals in single crystal Z-cut lithium niobate. The phononic crystal is formed by a two-dimensional periodic array of nearly cylindrical nanopillars 240 nm in diameter and 225 nm in height, arranged in a triangular lattice with a 300-nm lattice constant. The nanopillars are fabricated by the recently introduced nanodomain engineering via laser irradiation of patterned chrome followed by wet etching. Numerical simulations and direct measurements using Brillouin light scattering confirm the simultaneous existence of nonradiative complete surface phononic band gaps. The band gaps are found below the sound line at hypersonic frequencies in the range 2-7 GHz, formed from local resonances and Bragg scattering. These hypersonic structures are realized directly in the piezoelectric material lithium niobate enabling phonon manipulation at significantly higher frequencies than previously possible with this platform, opening new opportunities for many applications in plasmonic, optomechanic, microfluidic, and thermal engineering.

  7. Reinforced polyethylene/clay nanocomposites: influence of different silane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ming; Zhang, Liying; Chen, Xuelong; Hu, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Montmorillonite (MMT) was first cation exchanged by cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and then treated by short chain silane (methyltrimethoxylsilane) or different amount of long chain silane (dodecyltrimethoxylsilane). High density polyethylene (HDPE)/clay nanocomposites were prepared through twin screw extruder using these silane modified clays without any compatibilizer. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) proved the successful grafting of silanes onto clay. The effects of the chain length and content of the silanes on the dispersion state of clay and properties of the composites were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), mechanical tests, creep tests and so on. The results indicate that the grafting of long chain silanes at higher content could improve the compatibility between clay and PE, thus more efficiently enhancing mechanical and creep properties of the composites than other silane treated clays.

  8. A computational study of electrolyte adsorption in a simple model for intercalated clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomba, E.; Weis, J.-J.

    2010-03-01

    A pillared interlayered clay is represented by a two-dimensional quenched charged disordered medium, in which the pillar configuration is produced by the quench of a two-dimensional electrolyte and the subsequent removal of the anions (that act as a template). The cation charge is counterbalanced by a neutralizing background that is an ideal representation of the layer's negative charge in the experimental system. In this paper we investigate the adsorption of electrolyte particles in this charged disordered medium resorting both to the use of the replica Ornstein-Zernike equation in the hypernetted chain approximation and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The theoretical approach qualitatively reproduces the simulated behavior of the adsorbed fluids. Theoretical estimates of the material porosities obtained for various types of pillar distributions are in good agreement with the simulation. We investigate the influence of the matrix on correlation functions and adsorption isotherms.

  9. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. LONG; R.T. YANG

    1998-09-30

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by hydrocarbons was investigated on Pt doped MCM-41 and copper ion and/or cerium ion-exchanged Al-MCM-41 in the presence of excess oxygen. It was found that Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts reported in the literature, such as Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt/ZSM-5. For different hydrocarbons, the catalytic activity decreased according to the sequence of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} {approx} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} >> C{sub 3}H{sub 8} > CH{sub 4}. This catalyst was also stable in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. Cu exchanged Al-MCM-41 and cerium promoted Cu-Al-MCM-41 (i.e., Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41) were also found to be active in this reaction. Higher NO{sub x} conversions to N2 were obtained on the Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41 as compared with Cu-Al-MCM-41. The activity of Ce-Cu-Al-MCM-41 was approximately the same as that of Cu-ZSM-5; but the former had a wider temperature window. TPR results indicated that only isolated Cu{sup 2+} and Cu{sup +} ions were detected in the Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged Al-MCM-41 samples, which may play an important role in the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. After some cerium ions were introduced into Cu-Al-MCM-41, Cu{sup 2+} in the molecular sieve became more easily reducible by H{sub 2}. This may be related to the increase of catalytic activity of NO{sub x} reduction by ethylene.

  10. Clays as prebiotic photocatalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lawless, J.; Lahav, N.; Sutton, S.; Sweeney, M.

    1981-01-01

    Clay minerals catalyze peptide bond formation in fluctuating environments. A number of plausible mechanisms have been proposed and tested. The possibility that clays may actually be energizing the reaction by means of electronic excitation, creating mobile or trapped holes and electrons in the lattice, is explored. It has been discovered that clays emit light upon dehydration. The correlation between dehydration-induced, or thermoluminescent, processes and the yield of glycine oligomers after treatments known to affect the luminescent yields is being tested, in an effort to understand the catalytic mechanism

  11. Effect of sulfuric acid concentration of bentonite and calcination time of pillared bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mara, Ady; Wijaya, Karna; Trisunaryati, Wega; Mudasir

    2016-04-01

    An activation of natural clay has been developed. Activation was applied by refluxing the natural bentonite in variation of the sulfuric acid concentration and calcination time of pillared bentonite (PLC). Calcination was applied using oven in microwave 2,45 GHz. Determination of acidity was applied by measuring the amount of adsorbed ammonia and pyridine. Morphological, functional groups and chrystanility characterizations were analyzed using SEM, TEM, FTIR and XRD. Porosity was analyzed using SSA. The results showed that the greater of the concentration of sulfuric acid and calcination time was, the greater the acidity of bentonite as well as the pore diameter were. FTIR spectra showed no fundamental changes in the structure of the natural bentonite, SEM, and TEM images were showing an increase in space or field due to pillarization while the XRD patterns showed a shift to a lower peak. Optimization was obtained at a concentration of 2 M of sulfuric acid and calcination time of 20 minutes, keggin ion of 2.2 and suspension of 10 mmol, respectively each amounted to 11.7490 mmol/gram of ammonia and 2.4437 mmol/gram of pyridine with 154.6391 m2/gram for surface area, 0.130470 m3/gram of pore volume and 3.37484 nm of pore diameter.

  12. Fractal dimensions of flocs between clay particles and HAB organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Yu, Zhiming; Cao, Xihua; Song, Xiuxian

    2011-05-01

    The impact of harmful algal blooms (HABs) on public health and related economics have been increasing in many coastal regions of the world. Sedimentation of algal cells through flocculation with clay particles is a promising strategy for controlling HABs. Previous studies found that removal efficiency (RE) was influenced by many factors, including clay type and concentration, algal growth stage, and physiological aspects of HAB cells. To estimate the effect of morphological characteristics of the aggregates on HAB cell removal, fractal dimensions were measured and the RE of three species of HAB organism, Heterosigma akashiwo, Alexandrium tamarense, and Skeletonema costatum, by original clay and modified clay, was determined. For all HAB species, the modified clay had a higher RE than original clay. For the original clay, the two-dimensional fractal dimension ( D 2) was 1.92 and three-dimensional fractal dimension ( D 3) 2.81, while for the modified clay, D 2 was 1.84 and D 3 was 2.50. The addition of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) lead to a decrease of the repulsive barrier between clay particles, and resulted in lower D 2 and D 3. Due to the decrease of D 3, and the increase of the effective sticking coefficient, the flocculation rate between modified clay particles and HAB organisms increased, and thus resulted in a high RE. The fractal dimensions of flocs differed in HAB species with different cell morphologies. For example, Alexandrium tamarense cells are ellipsoidal, and the D 3 and D 2 of flocs were the highest, while for Skeletonema costatum, which has filamentous cells, the D 3 and D 2 of flocs were the lowest.

  13. Modernity and putty-clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  14. Stability analysis of a backfilled room-and-pillar mine

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, D.R.; Seymour, J.B.; Yanske, T.R.; McKibbin, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Displacement and stress changes in cemented backfill and ore pillars at the Buick Mine, near Boss, MO, were monitored by engineers from the US Bureau of Mines and The Doe Run Co., St. Louis, MO. A test area in this room-and-pillar mine was backfilled to provide support when remnant ore pillars were mined. Objectives of this research were to evaluate the effect of backfill on mine stability, observe backfill conditions during pillar removal, and calibrate a numerical model to be used to design other areas of the mine. Relative vertical displacements in the backfill were measured with embedment strain gauges and vertical extensometers. Other types of instruments used were earth pressure cells (to identify loading trends in the backfill), borehole extensometers (to measure relative displacement changes in the mine roof and support pillars), and biaxial stressmeters (to measure stress changes in several support pillars and abutments). Two- and three-dimensional numeric codes were used to model the study area. With information from these codes and the installed instruments, two failed pillars were identified and rock mass properties were estimated.

  15. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. The legislation, production, and consumption of common clay and shale are discussed. The average prices of the material and outlook for the market are provided.

  16. Hydrodynamics of the Eagle Nebula: the Pillars of Creation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, J. O.; Ryutov, D. D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Pound, Marc; Arnett, David

    2001-05-01

    The towering `Pillars of Creation' of the Eagle Nebula are a long-standing astrophysical mystery. A new initiative is underway to develop a model for the formation of the Pillars, employing three-dimensional numerical modeling and scaled verification experiments using intense lasers. In the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RT) model of the Pillars advanced almost fifty years ago by Spitzer and Frieman (Spitzer, L. 1954, ApJ 120, 1; Frieman, E. A. 1954, ApJ 120, 18), radiation from nearby stars photo-evaporates and accelerates the cloud surface, and the Pillars are falling `spikes' of dense gas. Recently, fluid velocities and column densities in the Pillars have been measured (Pound, M. W. 1998, ApJ 493, L113). Preliminary two-dimensional numerical simulations of the RT model have been performed which produce results consistent these observations, assuming compressible fluids and a thin initial cloud. Since the radiation may impact the surface at an angle, a `Tilted Radiation' instability can cause the spikes to translate as waves whose tips may `break', producing the small gas `bullets' visible near the Pillars in images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. In an alternate model for the Pillars, the cometary model, the Pillars consist of gas swept behind dense preexisting nuclei. However, it appears difficult to reproduce the observed velocities and densities in numerical models with dense preexisting nuclei as the initial condition. The maturing field of laser astrophysics presents an opportunity for testing models for the Pillars in the laboratory. Theoretical and numerical evaluations of various models, implications for observations, and plans for verification experiments are presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  17. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  18. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    At present, 150 companies produce common clay and shale in 41 US states. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), domestic production in 2005 reached 24.8 Mt valued at $176 million. In decreasing order by tonnage, the leading producer states include North Carolina, Texas, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. For the whole year, residential and commercial building construction remained the major market for common clay and shale products such as brick, drain tile, lightweight aggregate, quarry tile and structural tile.

  19. Combined influences of micro-pillar geometry and substrate constraint on microplastic behavior of compressed single-crystal micro-pillar: Two-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyanga, Chaojun; Lia, Zhenhuan; Huanga, Minsheng; Hua, Lili; Houa, Chuantao

    2009-11-01

    2D discrete dislocation dynamic modeling of compressed micro-pillars attached on a huge base is executed to study the size-dependent microplastic behavior of micro-pillars and the corresponding size effect. In addition to the conventional dimensional parameters of the micro-pillar such as the micro-pillar size and the height-to-width ratio, the micro-pillar taper angle and the dislocation slip plane orientation angle in the micro-pillar are also considered to address the size effect and its rich underlying mechanism. Computational results show that there are at least two operating mechanisms responsible for the plastic behavior of micro-pillars. One is associated with the dislocation free slip-out from the micro-pillar sidewall; the other is related to the dislocation pile-up at the base and the top end of the pillar. The overall mechanism governing the size effect of the micro-pillar rests with multi-factors, including the micro-pillar size, the height-to-width ratio, the micro-pillar taper and the slip plane orientation angle; however, whether the "free slip band" exists or not is the most important denotation. The well-known Schmid law still validates in the slender micro-pillars due to existence of the free slip band, whereas it may fail in the podgier micro-pillars due to absence of the free slip band; as a result, a complicated even "reverse" size effect appears.

  20. Pillared and open-framework uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Adelani, Pius O.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-09-15

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranium trioxide, uranyl acetate, or uranyl nitrate with 1,4-benzenebisphosphonic acid in the presence of very small amount of HF at 200 deg. C results in the formation of three different uranyl diphosphonate compounds, [H{sub 3}O]{sub 2}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 2}OH)]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ubbp-1), [H{sub 3}O]{sub 4}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}F{sub 4}{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-2), and {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-3). The crystal structures of these compounds were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. Ubbp-1 consists of UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged by the phosphonate moieties to form a three-dimensional pillared structure. Ubbp-2 is composed of UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged through the phosphonate oxygen atoms into one-dimensional chains that are cross-linked by the phenyl spacers into a pillared structure. The structure of Ubbp-3 is a three-dimensional open-framework with large channels containing water molecules with internal dimensions of approximately 10.9x10.9 A. Ubbp-1 and Ubbp-2 fluoresce at room temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Illustration of the three-dimensional open-framework structure of {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} units, pentagonal bipyramids=green, oxygen=red, phosphorus=magenta, carbon=black, hydrogen=white. Highlights: > The influence of the uranyl salt anions and pH were critically examined in relation to structural variation. > The acetate and nitrate counter ions of uranyl may be acting as structure directing agents. > The use of rigid phenyl spacer yield

  1. Transparent conductor-Si pillars heterojunction photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Joondong; Park, Yun Chang

    2014-08-14

    We report a high-performing heterojunction photodetector by enhanced surface effects. Periodically, patterned Si substrates were used to enlarge the photo-reactive regions and yield proportionally improved photo-responses. An optically transparent indium-tin-oxide (ITO) was deposited on a Si substrate and spontaneously formed an ITO/Si heterojunction. Due to an electrical conductive ITO film, ITO/Si heterojunction device can be operated at zero-bias, which effectively suppresses the dark current, resulting in better performances than those by a positive or a negative bias operation. This zero-bias operating heterojunction device exhibits a short response time (∼ 22.5 ms) due to the physical reaction to the incident light. We revealed that the location of the space charge region (SCR) is crucial for a specific photon-wavelength response. The SCR space has the highest collection efficiency of the photo-generated carriers. The photo-response can be maximized when we design the photodetector by superposing the SCR space over a corresponding photon-absorption length. The surface enhanced Si pillar devices significantly improved the photo-responses ratios from that of a planar Si device. According to this design scheme, a high photo-response ratio of 5560% was achieved at a wavelength of 600 nm. This surfaced-enhanced heterojunction design scheme would be a promising approach for various photoelectric applications.

  2. Screening Hofmann Compounds as CO 2 Sorbents: Nontraditional Synthetic Route to Over 40 Different Pore-Functionalized and Flexible Pillared Cyanonickelates

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Jeffrey T.; Madden, Catherine; Kauffman, Kristi; Shi, Fan; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-04-15

    A simple reaction scheme based on the heterogeneous intercalation of pillaring ligands (HIPLs) provides a convenient method for systematically tuning pore size, pore functionality, and network flexibility in an extended series of pillared cyanonickelates (PICNICs), commonly referred to as Hofmann compounds. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated through the preparation of over 40 different PICNICs containing pillar ligands ranging from ~4 to ~15 Å in length and modified with a wide range of functional groups, including fluoro, aldehyde, alkylamine, alkyl, aryl, trifluoromethyl, ester, nitro, ether, and nonmetalated 4,4'-bipyrimidine. The HIPL method involves reaction of a suspension of preformed polymeric sheets of powdered anhydrous nickel cyanide with an appropriate pillar ligand in refluxing organic solvent, resulting in the conversion of the planar [Ni{sub 2}(CN){sub 4}]{sub n} networks into polycrystalline three-dimensional porous frameworks containing the organic pillar ligand. Preliminary investigations indicate that the HIPL reaction is also amenable to forming Co(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, and Fe(L)Pd(CN){sub 4} networks. The materials show variable adsorption behavior for CO{sub 2} depending on the pillar length and pillar functionalization. Several compounds show structurally flexible behavior during the adsorption and desorption of CO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the newly discovered flexible compounds include two flexible Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4} derivatives that are structurally related to previously reported porous spin-crossover compounds. The preparations of 20 pillar ligands based on ring-functionalized 4,4'-dipyridyls, 1,4-bis(4- pyridyl)benzenes, and N-(4-pyridyl)isonicotinamides are also described.

  3. Screening Hofmann Compounds as CO 2 Sorbents: Nontraditional Synthetic Route to Over 40 Different Pore-Functionalized and Flexible Pillared Cyanonickelates

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Jeffrey T.; Madden, Catherine; Kauffman, Kristi; Shi, Fan; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-04-15

    A simple reaction scheme based on the heterogeneous intercalation of pillaring ligands (HIPLs) provides a convenient method for systematically tuning pore size, pore functionality, and network flexibility in an extended series of pillared cyanonickelates (PICNICs), commonly referred to as Hofmann compounds. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated through the preparation of over 40 different PICNICs containing pillar ligands ranging from 4 to 15 Å in length and modified with a wide range of functional groups, including fluoro, aldehyde, alkylamine, alkyl, aryl, trifluoromethyl, ester, nitro, ether, and nonmetalated 4,4'-bipyrimidine. The HIPL method involves reaction of a suspension of preformed polymeric sheets of powdered anhydrous nickel cyanide with an appropriate pillar ligand in refluxing organic solvent, resulting in the conversion of the planar [Ni{sub 2}(CN){sub 4}]{sub n} networks into polycrystalline three-dimensional porous frameworks containing the organic pillar ligand. Preliminary investigations indicate that the HIPL reaction is also amenable to forming Co(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4}, and Fe(L)Pd(CN){sub 4} networks. The materials show variable adsorption behavior for CO{sub 2} depending on the pillar length and pillar functionalization. Several compounds show structurally flexible behavior during the adsorption and desorption of CO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the newly discovered flexible compounds include two flexible Fe(L)Ni(CN){sub 4} derivatives that are structurally related to previously reported porous spin-crossover compounds. The preparations of 20 pillar ligands based on ring-functionalized 4,4'-dipyridyls, 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)benzenes, and N-(4-pyridyl)isonicotinamides are also described.

  4. Preparation of silica or alumina pillared crystalline titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Udomsak, S.; Nge, R.; Dufner, D.C.; Anthony, R.G.; Lott, S.E.

    1994-05-01

    Layered crystalline titanates (CT) [Anthony and Dosch, US Patent 5 177 045 (1993)] are pillared with tetraethyl orthosilicate, 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, and aluminum acetylacetonate to prepare porous and high surface area supports for sulfided NiMo catalyst. Tetra-ethyl orthosilicate or aluminum acetylacetonate intercalated CT are prepared by stepwise intercalation. First, the basal distance is increased by n-alkylammonium ions prior to intercalation with inorganic compounds. However, an aqueous solution of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane could directly pillar CT without first swelling the titanate with n-alkylamine. The catalytic activities for hydrogenation of pyrene of sulfided NiMo supported silica or alumina pillared CT were higher than those of commercial catalysts (Shell324 and Amocat1C). The silicon and aluminum contents of the pillared CT, used as supports, have a considerable effect on the catalytic activities and physical properties of the supports.

  5. Phononic crystal plate with hollow pillars connected by thin bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yabin; Pennec, Yan; Pan, Yongdong; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    A new type of phononic crystal plate consisting of hollow pillars on a bar-connected plate is proposed. With respect to usual pillar based phononic crystal plates, the Bragg band gap can be tuned to be much wider and extended to a sub-wavelength region, and the low frequency gap can be moved to an extremely low frequency range. Such a structure can generate quadrapolar, hexapolar and octopolar whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) inside the band gaps with very high confinement and quality factors. By filling the hollow pillars with a liquid, these WGMs, together with additional localized compressional and solid-liquid coupling modes, can be tuned either by varying the inner radius of the pillars or controlling the height of the liquid. We discuss some possible functionalities of these phononic crystals for the purpose of sensing the acoustic properties of liquids, multiplexer and wireless communication.

  6. 16. LIGHTING AND PILLAR DETAIL VIEW ON HYPERION BOULEVARD VIADUCT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. LIGHTING AND PILLAR DETAIL VIEW ON HYPERION BOULEVARD VIADUCT AT OVERCROSSING OF RIVERSIDE DRIVE. LOOKING NORTH. - Glendale-Hyperion Viaduct, Spanning Golden State Freeway (I-5) & Los Angeles River at Glendale Boulevard, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Cohesive detachment of an elastic pillar from a dissimilar substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, N. A.; Khaderi, S. N.; McMeeking, R. M.; Arzt, E.

    The adhesion of micron-scale surfaces due to intermolecular interactions is a subject of intense interest spanning electronics, biomechanics and the application of soft materials to engineering devices. The degree of adhesion is sensitive to the diameter of micro-pillars in addition to the degree of elastic mismatch between pillar and substrate. Adhesion-strength-controlled detachment of an elastic circular cylinder from a dissimilar substrate is predicted using a Dugdale-type of analysis, with a cohesive zone of uniform tensile strength emanating from the interface corner. Detachment initiates when the opening of the cohesive zone attains a critical value, giving way to crack formation. When the cohesive zone size at crack initiation is small compared to the pillar diameter, the initiation of detachment can be expressed in terms of a critical value Hc of the corner stress intensity. The estimated pull-off force is somewhat sensitive to the choice of stick/slip boundary condition used on the cohesive zone, especially when the substrate material is much stiffer than the pillar material. The analysis can be used to predict the sensitivity of detachment force to the size of pillar and to the degree of elastic mismatch between pillar and substrate.

  8. Dewatering of industrial clay wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smelley, A.G.; Scheiner, B.J.; Zatko, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    As a part of research conducted to effect pollution a dewatering technique that allows for disposal of clay wastes, for reuse of water now lost with clays, and for reclamation of mined land was developed. The technique utilizes a high-molecular-weight nonionic polyethylene oxide polymer (PEO) that has the ability to flocculate and dewater materials containing clay wastes. In laboratory experiments, coal-clay waste, potash-clay brine slurry, phosphatic clay waste, uranium tailings, and talc tailings were successfully consolidated. Coal-clay waste was consolidated from 3.6 to 57%; potash-clay brine slurry was consolidated from 3.8 to 35%; phosphatic clay waste from 15.6 to 49%; uranium tailings from 15.4 to 67%; tailings from talc production from 9.7 to 53%; and an acidic TiO/sub 2/ slurr slurry from 1.68 to 30%.

  9. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    PubMed

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  10. Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons.

  11. Glowing clay: Real time tracing using a suite of novel clay based fluorescent tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Robert; Quinton, John; Pates, Jackie; Coogan, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Clay is one of the most mobile fractions of soil due to its small particle size. It is also known to sorb many chemicals, such as nutrients (notably phosphorus), agrochemicals and heavy metals. The movement of clay is therefore linked with the transport and fate of these substances. A novel fluorescent clay tracing suite has been produced, together with an imaging technique. This suite consists of qualitative clay tracers, using rhodamine based fluorophores, and quantitative clay tracers, using metal based fluorophores. Efforts have also been made to allow integration of commercially available tracers, which are silt and sand sized. The clay tracers exploit the high affinity that montmorillonite has for Rhodamine B and Ru(bpy)3. This allows for an extremely thin layer of the fluorophore to be sorbed onto the clay's surface, in much that same way as materials in the natural environment will bind to clay. The tracer that is produced retains key chemical and physical properties of clay, such as size, shape and density. The retention of these micro-properties results in the retention of macro-properties, such as tendency to aggregate and cracking on drying. Imaging techniques have been developed to analyse these tracers. The imaging system uses diffused laser light to excite the tracer and a modified DSLR camera to image the soil surface. The images have been compiled into a time lapse video showing the movement of clay over the course of a rainfall event. This is the first time that the quantitative movement of clay has been recorded over a soil surface in real time. 4D data can be extracted from the images allowing the spatial location and intensity of tracer to be monitored over time, with mm precision and on the timescale of seconds. As the system can also work with a commercial tracer it is possible to investigate the movement of particles of almost any size and over a range of scales from soil box to hillside. This allows users to access this technique without

  12. Spectroscopic study of the polymerization of intercalated anilinium ions in different montmorillonite clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Gustavo M.; Temperini, Marcia L. A.

    2011-09-01

    The polymerization of the intercalated aniline ions was studied in three different clays, Swy2-montmorillonite (MMT), synthetic mica-montmorillonite (Syn1) and pillarized Swy2-montmorillonite (PILC). PANI is formed between the MMT and Syn1 clay layers, being confirmed by the shift of d001 peak in the X-ray pattern. X-ray Absorption near to Si K edge (Si K XANES) data show that the structures of clays are preserved after the polymerization process and in addition to the SEM images show that morphologies of the clays are maintained after polymerization, indicating no polymerization in their external surface. UV-vis-NIR and resonance Raman data display that the PANI formed in Syn1 galleries has higher amount of phenazinic rings than observed for PANI intercalated in montmorillonite (MMT) clay. No polymer formation was detected in the PILC. N K XANES and EPR spectroscopies show the presence of azo and radical nitrogen in intercalated PANI chains. Hence, the results are rationalized considering the structural differences between the clays for understanding the role of the anilinium polymerization within the clays galleries.

  13. Moving Along: Sporting Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Presents a junior high school student art project where three-dimensional art sculptures of surfing, snow boarding, or dirt biking were created. Discusses how the students created their three-dimensional works of art using a clay-slab technique. (CMK)

  14. Rattles of Clay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  15. Common clay and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the common clay and shale industry is provided. In 2000, U.S. production increased by 5 percent, while sales or use declined to 23.6 Mt. Despite the slowdown in the economy, no major changes are expected for the market.

  16. Modeling in Ceramic Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louis J.

    1976-01-01

    Modeling is an additive process of building up a sculpture with some plastic material like clay. It affords the student an opportunity to work in three dimensions, a creative relief from the general two-dimensional drawing and design activities that occupy a large segment of time in the art curriculum. (Author/RK)

  17. Thermal simulation of flexible LED package enhanced with copper pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Leung, Stanley Y. Y.; Wong, Cell K. Y.; Yuan, Cadmus A.; Guoqi, Zhang; Fenglian, Sun

    2015-06-01

    Chip on flexible substrate (COF) is a new packaging technology for light emitting diodes (LED). This paper investigated the effect of Cu-pillar in the polyimide (PI) layer on the thermal properties of COF LED packages by finite element analysis. The thermal distribution and thermal resistance were studied in both COF LED packages with and without Cu-pillar. The PI layer showed the highest thermal resistance in the typical package and led to a high chip temperature. With the addition of Cu-pillars, however, the thermal resistance of the PI layer significantly decreased due to the improvement of vertical thermal dissipation under LED chips. Based on the results of simulation and calculation, the relationship between the amount of Cu-pillar and thermal resistance of the COF package has been built. For the packages studied in this research, an 8 × 8 Cu-pillars array was adequate to improve the thermal performance of COF packages. Project supported by the Research and Scientific Foundation of Heilongjiang Education Department (No. 12541112).

  18. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  19. Retention in porous layer pillar array planar separation platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Danielle R.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2016-08-11

    Here, this work presents the retention capabilities and surface area enhancement of highly ordered, high-aspect-ratio, open-platform, two-dimensional (2D) pillar arrays when coated with a thin layer of porous silicon oxide (PSO). Photolithographically prepared pillar arrays were coated with 50–250 nm of PSO via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and then functionalized with either octadecyltrichlorosilane or n-butyldimethylchlorosilane. Theoretical calculations indicate that a 50 nm layer of PSO increases the surface area of a pillar nearly 120-fold. Retention capabilities were tested by observing capillary-action-driven development under various conditions, as well as by running one-dimensional separations on varying thicknesses of PSO. Increasing the thickness of PSO on an array clearly resulted in greater retention of the analyte(s) in question in both experiments. In culmination, a two-dimensional separation of fluorescently derivatized amines was performed to further demonstrate the capabilities of these fabricated platforms.

  20. Fabrication of pillared PLGA microvessel scaffold using femtosecond laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiao-Wei; Cheng, Chung-Wei; Li, Ching-Wen; Chang, Han-Wei; Wu, Ping-Han; Wang, Gou-Jen

    2012-01-01

    One of the persistent challenges confronting tissue engineering is the lack of intrinsic microvessels for the transportation of nutrients and metabolites. An artificial microvascular system could be a feasible solution to this problem. In this study, the femtosecond laser ablation technique was implemented for the fabrication of pillared microvessel scaffolds of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). This novel scaffold facilitates implementation of the conventional cell seeding process. The progress of cell growth can be observed in vitro by optical microscopy. The problems of becoming milky or completely opaque with the conventional PLGA scaffold after cell seeding can be resolved. In this study, PLGA microvessel scaffolds consisting of 47 μm × 80 μm pillared branches were produced. Results of cell culturing of bovine endothelial cells demonstrate that the cells adhere well and grow to surround each branch of the proposed pillared microvessel networks. PMID:22605935

  1. Comparison of tetrachloromethane sorption to an alkylammonium-clay and an alkyldiammonium-clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, J.A.; Jaffe, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    The interlamellar space of Wyoming bentonite (clay) was modified by exchanging either decyltrimethyl-ammonium (DTMA) or decyltrimethyldiammonium (DTMDA) cations for inorganic ions, and tetrachloromethane sorption to the resulting two organoclays from water was studied at 10, 20, and 35??C. Only one end of the 10-carbon alkyl chain of the DTMA cation is attached to the silica surface of the clay mineral, and tetrachloromethane sorption of DTMA-clay is characterized by isotherm linearity, noncompetitive sorption, weak solute uptake, and a relatively low heat of sorption. Both ends of the 10-carbon chain of the DTMDA cation are attached to the silica surface of the clay mineral, and tetrachloromethane sorption to DTMDA-clay is characterized by nonlinear isotherms, competitive sorption, strong solute uptake, and a relatively high, exothermic heat of sorption that varies as a function of the mass of tetrachloromethane sorbed. Therefore, the attachment of both ends of the alkyl chain to the interlamellar mineral surface appears to change the sorption mechanism from a partition-dominated process to an adsorption-dominated process. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  2. Clay at Nili Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across.

    CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE.

    In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image.

    The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image

  3. Eco-Friendly Magnetic Iron Oxide Pillared Montmorillonite for Advanced Catalytic Degradation of Dichlorophenol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eco-friendly pillared montmorillonites, in which the pillars consist of iron oxide are expected to have interesting and unusual magnetic properties that are applicable for environmental decontamination. Completely “green” and effective composite was synthesized using mild reactio...

  4. X-ray absorption in pillar shaped transmission electron microscopy specimens.

    PubMed

    Bender, H; Seidel, F; Favia, P; Richard, O; Vandervorst, W

    2017-03-07

    The dependence of the X-ray absorption on the position in a pillar shaped transmission electron microscopy specimen is modeled for X-ray analysis with single and multiple detector configurations and for different pillar orientations relative to the detectors. Universal curves, applicable to any pillar diameter, are derived for the relative intensities between weak and medium or strongly absorbed X-ray emission. For the configuration as used in 360° X-ray tomography, the absorption correction for weak and medium absorbed X-rays is shown to be nearly constant along the pillar diameter. Absorption effects in pillars are about a factor 3 less important than in planar specimens with thickness equal to the pillar diameter. A practical approach for the absorption correction in pillar shaped samples is proposed and its limitations discussed. The modeled absorption dependences are verified experimentally for pillars with HfO2 and SiGe stacks.

  5. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  6. The Sixth Pillar of Reading Instruction: Knowledge Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervetti, Gina N.; Hiebert, Elfrieda H.

    2015-01-01

    The National Reading Panel (NRP) identified five pillars, or essential components, of reading instruction that lead to the highest chance of reading success--phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. A decade after the NRP's report, the majority of US states adopted the Common Core State Standards/English Language Arts…

  7. A Novel Experimental Technique to Simulate Pillar Burst in Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M. C.; Zhao, F.; Cai, M.; Du, S.

    2015-09-01

    Pillar burst is one type of rockburst that occurs in underground mines. Simulating the stress change and obtaining insight into the pillar burst phenomenon under laboratory conditions are essential for studying the rock behavior during pillar burst in situ. To study the failure mechanism, a novel experimental technique was proposed and a series of tests were conducted on some granite specimens using a true-triaxial strainburst test system. Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used to monitor the rock fracturing process. The damage evolution process was investigated using techniques such as macro and micro fracture characteristics observation, AE energy evolution, and b value analysis and fractal dimension analysis of cracks on fragments. The obtained results indicate that stepped loading and unloading simulated the pillar burst phenomenon well. Four deformation stages are divided as initial stress state, unloading step I, unloading step II, and final burst. It is observed that AE energy has a sharp increase at the initial stress state, accumulates slowly at unloading steps I and II, and increases dramatically at peak stress. Meanwhile, the mean b values fluctuate around 3.50 for the first three deformation stages and then decrease to 2.86 at the final stage, indicating the generation of a large amount of macro fractures. Before the test, the fractal dimension values are discrete and mainly vary between 1.10 and 1.25, whereas after failure the values concentrate around 1.25-1.35.

  8. Mechanical thinning pillar peach trees - second year results and observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnar (pillar) form peach trees were mechanically thinned at 50 days after full bloom during the pit hardening stage of development. A spike-drum mechanical shaker, which showed promise for peach fruit thinning, during preliminary tests in 2005 was used to remove the young fruits. The shaker wa...

  9. Boundary layer eruption behind the bridge pillar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecka, K.; Kudela, H.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental quantitative (local velocity measurements by Laser Doppler Anemometry) and qualitative researches (visualization by dye marker) of flow around a bridge pillar model for the Reynolds number Re D in the range of 40 up to 350 (for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow) were conducted. Re D was the Reynolds number referred to the diameter of the model (cylinder), D = 14.65 mm.

  10. Superhydrophobic Analyte Concentration Utilizing Colloid-Pillar Array SERS Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Ryan A.; Charlton, Jennifer J.; Kirchner, Teresa B.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Datskos, Panos G.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2014-11-04

    In order to detect a few molecules present in a large sample it is important to know the trace components in the medicinal and environmental sample. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a technique that can be utilized to detect molecules at very low absolute numbers. However, detection at trace concentration levels in real samples requires properly designed delivery and detection systems. Moreover, the following work involves superhydrophobic surfaces that includes silicon pillar arrays formed by lithographic and dewetting protocols. In order to generate the necessary plasmonic substrate for SERS detection, simple and flow stable Ag colloid was added to the functionalized pillar array system via soaking. The pillars are used native and with hydrophobic modification. The pillars provide a means to concentrate analyte via superhydrophobic droplet evaporation effects. A 100-fold concentration of analyte was estimated, with a limit of detection of 2.9 10-12 M for mitoxantrone dihydrochloride. Additionally, analytes were delivered to the surface via a multiplex approach in order to demonstrate an ability to control droplet size and placement for scaled-up applications in real world applications. Finally, a concentration process involving transport and sequestration based on surface treatment selective wicking is demonstrated.

  11. Superhydrophobic Analyte Concentration Utilizing Colloid-Pillar Array SERS Substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Wallace, Ryan A.; Charlton, Jennifer J.; Kirchner, Teresa B.; ...

    2014-11-04

    In order to detect a few molecules present in a large sample it is important to know the trace components in the medicinal and environmental sample. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a technique that can be utilized to detect molecules at very low absolute numbers. However, detection at trace concentration levels in real samples requires properly designed delivery and detection systems. Moreover, the following work involves superhydrophobic surfaces that includes silicon pillar arrays formed by lithographic and dewetting protocols. In order to generate the necessary plasmonic substrate for SERS detection, simple and flow stable Ag colloid was added tomore » the functionalized pillar array system via soaking. The pillars are used native and with hydrophobic modification. The pillars provide a means to concentrate analyte via superhydrophobic droplet evaporation effects. A 100-fold concentration of analyte was estimated, with a limit of detection of 2.9 10-12 M for mitoxantrone dihydrochloride. Additionally, analytes were delivered to the surface via a multiplex approach in order to demonstrate an ability to control droplet size and placement for scaled-up applications in real world applications. Finally, a concentration process involving transport and sequestration based on surface treatment selective wicking is demonstrated.« less

  12. Studies of layered and pillared manganese oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying

    Synthetic Birnessite, an octahedral layered manganese oxide material called OL-1 was synthesized with Na+, K+, Na +/Mg2+, K+/Mg2+, Na +/K+ ions as interlayer cations by redox reactions between permanganate and alcohols in a strong basic media. Chromia pillared OL-1s were prepared under reflux conditions using trinuclear chromium hydroxyl acetate as a pillaring agent followed by calcination in a N2 atmosphere at 200°C. Vanadium oxide pillared OL-1s were obtained by intercalating neutral vanadyl acetylacetonate (VOacac) or vanadium acetylacetonate (Vacac) into the interlayer of OL-1 and subsequently calcining in air at 300°C. The synthesis procedures were monitored using X-ray diffraction studies. The resultant materials were characterized by XRD, X-ray absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectra, FTIR, UV-VIS, inductively coupled plasma, transmission electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, potentiometric titration, thermal analyses, TPD measurements, BET surface area and pore size distribution measurements. OL-1 materials prepared using this alcohol route showed enhanced thermal stabilities and increased Mg accommodation compared to OL-1s prepared with other methods. Based on the analysis methods developed here, Na-OL-1 exhibited recoverable and reversible structural and surface O2 oxygen species while K-OL-1 showed higher stability. Na-OL-1 had predominantly Bronsted acid sites resulting from OH groups bonded to Mn on Na-OL-1 surfaces, while the Na/Mg-OL-1 had mainly Lewis acid sites. Large porosity was obtained in chromia pillared OL-1 materials with a narrow pore size distribution centered around 18 A. Although these materials remained "amorphous" as determined by XRD after calcination, TEM morphology studies suggest that the materials were still layered. EXAFS studies indicated the formation of Cr-O-Mn bonds in the resultant materials via comer-shared linkages of CrO6 and MnO6 octahedra. Good crystallinity in

  13. Mechanism of fatigue failure of clay-epoxy nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Juwono, Ariadne; Edward, Graham

    2006-12-01

    This work investigates the fatigue behaviour and the mechanism of fatigue failure of an epoxy resin with a dispersion of modified layered silicates in the polymer matrix. The fatigue properties are very important for structural application of nanocomposite materials. Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were successfully synthesized with a commercially available 1-Methylimidazole curing agent. The XRD and TEM findings demonstrated a pattern of clay morphology typically found in nanocomposite systems. The fatigue performance and fatigue failure mechanism of the clay-epoxy materials were studied under repetitive bending loads. The results showed that the fatigue life of filled epoxy improved significantly at strain amplitudes below a threshold value. The E-SEM observations of the epoxy and the clay-epoxy fracture surfaces showed different patterns. In conclusion, the addition of silicate strongly determines the fracture mechanism and enhances the fatigue performance.

  14. Attempted caveolae-mediated phagocytosis of surface-fixed micro-pillars by human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Moerke, Caroline; Mueller, Petra; Nebe, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Cells are sensitive to their underlying micro- and nano-topography, but the complex interplay is not completely understood especially if sharp edges and ridges of stochastically modified surfaces interfere with an attached cell body. Micro-topography offers cues that evoke a large range of cell responses e.g. altered adhesion behavior and integrin expression resulting in disturbed cell functions. In this study, we analyzed why osteoblastic cells mimic the underlying geometrical micro-pillar structure (5 × 5 × 5 μm, spacing of 5 μm) with their actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, we discovered an attempted caveolae-mediated phagocytosis of each micro-pillar beneath the cells, which was accompanied by increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduced intracellular ATP levels. This energy consuming process hampered the cells in their function as osteoblasts at the interface. The raft-dependent/caveolae-mediated phagocytic pathway is regulated by diverse cellular components including caveolin-1 (Cav-1), cholesterol, actin cytoskeleton as well as actin-binding proteins like annexin A2 (AnxA2). Our results show a new aspect of osteoblast-material interaction and give insight into how cells behave on extraordinary micro-structures. We conclude that stochastically structured implants used in orthopedic surgery should avoid any topographical heights which induce phagocytosis to prevent their successful ingrowth.

  15. Crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal via clay-microbe-oil interactions: Effect of acid activated clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Fialips, Claire I

    2017-03-09

    Acid treatment of clay minerals is known to modify their properties such as increase their surface area and surface acidity, making them suitable as catalysts in many chemical processes. However, the role of these surface properties during biodegradation processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is only known for mild acid (0.5 M Hydrochloric acid) treated clays. Four different clay minerals were used for this study: a montmorillonite, a saponite, a palygorskite and a kaolinite. They were treated with 3 M hydrochloric acid to produce acid activated clay minerals. The role of the acid activated montmorillonite, saponite, palygorskite and kaolinite in comparison with the unmodified clay minerals in the removal of PAHs during biodegradation was investigated in microcosm experiments. The microcosm experiments contained micro-organisms, oil, and clays in aqueous medium with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community predominantly composed of Alcanivorax spp. Obtained results indicated that acid activated clays and unmodified kaolinite did not enhance the biodegradation of the PAHs whereas unmodified montmorillonite, palygorskite and saponite enhanced their biodegradation. In addition, unmodified palygorskite adsorbed the PAHs significantly due to its unique channel structure.

  16. The stabilization of a clay suspension with sulfonated humates of earth and compact lignites

    SciTech Connect

    Girina, L.V.; Sharanova, I.E.

    1995-12-31

    Lignite humates are used as chemical reagents for regulating the properties of dispersed systems, in particular for stabilizing clay and coal-water suspensions. We have performed a comparative analysis of the cation stability of modified humates obtained from earth and compact lignite and of the efficiency of stabilization of highly mineralized clay suspensions. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and properties of fluoroelastomer/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, Sriram

    The aim of the thesis is to prepare fluoroelastomer/clay nanocomposites by melt-mixing and investigate the effect of nano-dispersion on composite properties. Using theological and morphological analyses, it was found that intercalated FKM nanocomposites can he obtained by using di(hydrogenated tallow-alkyl) dimethyl ammonium modified organoclays. However, the presence of excess amount of modifier did not improve the composite morphology but rather resulted in plasticization of the elastomer matrix. The vulcanization conditions were shown to be detrimental to the nanocomposite morphology resulting in considerable decrease of d-spacing. Still, the mechanical properties of organofilled composites were superior to that of the carbon black or unmodified clay filled counterparts. This was attributed to efficient energy release mechanism in the presence of intercalated clays. However, the addition of carbon black to the nanocomposites led to a decrease in mechanical properties. The Payne effect was clearly seen in the nanocomposites evidenced using dynamic mechanical analysis.

  18. [Kinetics and mechanism of removing Microcystis aeruginosa using clay flocculation].

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Hai; Zou, Hua; Chen, Hao

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-six natural clays were studied for their kinetics of flocculating and removing algal cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. According to the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies and removal rates at a clay-loading of 0.7 g.L-1, all the 26 clays were classified into three categories. Type-I clay, which includes talc, ferric oxide, sepiolite, ferroferric oxide, and kaolinite, has an equilibrium removal efficiency greater than 90%, a t50 (time needed to remove 50% of the algae) of less than 30 min, and a t80 (time needed to remove 80% of the algae) of less than 2.5 h. Type-II clay, which includes argillanceous rocks, attapulgite, rectorite, illite, and argil, etc., has an equilibrium removal efficiency of 50%-80%, a t50 of less than 2.5 h, and a t80 of more than 5 h. Type-III clay consists of 14 minerals, including laterite, zeolite, mica, clinoptilolite, pumice, tripoli, feldspar and quartz, etc. with the removal efficiency less than 50%, and t50 > > 8 h. When the clay loading was decreased to 0.1-0.2 g.L-1, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies for 25 clays declined to below 60%, except for sepiolite, a Type-I clay, which maintained around 90%. After the sepiolite was modified with Fe3+ to increase its surface charge (Zeta potential from -24.0 mV to +0.43 mV at pH 7.4), the initial removal rate was increased remarkably although its 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency was not improved substantially. As a comparison, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency of PAC was no greater than 40% at loadings of 0.02-0.2 g.L-1. Following the analysis of the flocculation mechanism it was concluded that the effect of bridging and netting may play a key role in the clay-algae flocculation processes, which may be important for selecting and modifying clays to improve significantly the removal efficiency.

  19. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Simona; Mauro, Marco; Daniel, Christophe; Galimberti, Maurizio; Guerra, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT) intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT) led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS), have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals. PMID:24790956

  20. Analytical Characterization of Natural Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sheikhy, Refat; Al-Shamrani, Mosleh

    2010-10-01

    The current paper introduces the study of morphology and electronic microscopy characterization of one type of the smectite Saudi nano clay montmorillonite type. During the last decade, nanotechnology achieved a recognized progress in many fields based mainly on synthesized materials. Much attention is devoted to produce natural nano particles. It was found that the clay is one of the rare materials which have platelets of nano scale size. The nano clay minerals are found in different types. It is investigated that the nano clay minerals have super properties which can not be found in the other materials. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has many zones having different types of good nano clays. These nano clays are found in certain mixtures with other different materials such as Mg, Ca, Fe and others. By developing an innovated technique we could extract Saudi Arabian nano clay with high grade purity. The results are very interesting. The produced nano clay particles are with good quality and super properties. It can be used in many fields of nanocomposites.

  1. Barrier and Mechanical Properties of Starch-Clay Nanocomposite Films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The poor barrier and mechanical properties of biopolymer-based food packaging can potentially be enhanced by the use of layered silicates (nanoclay) to produce nanocomposites. In this study, starch-clay nano-composites were synthesized by a melt extrusion method. Natural (MMT) and organically modifi...

  2. Mineral resource of the Month: Clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Clays were one of the first mineral commodities used by people. Clay pottery has been found in archeological sites that are 12,000 years old, and clay figurines have been found in sites that are even older.

  3. Heated mine room and pillar secondary creep response

    SciTech Connect

    Tillerson, J.R.; Dawson, P.R.

    1980-04-01

    Heated salt mine room and pillar simulations have been performed to provide information regarding parameters affecting room closure rates to designers of radioactive waste isolation facilities. A coupled secondary creep and heat transfer formulation with large strain capabilities was used to assess the effects of variations in creep law parameters, thermal properties, imposed boundary conditions, temporal integration, and meshing resolution on room closure rates. Results indicate that the greatest effect results from variations in parameters appearing in the creep constitutive equation.

  4. EVALUATION USING AN ORGANOPHILIC CLAY TO CHEMICALLY STABILIZE WASTE CONTAINING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modified clay (organophilic) was utilized to evaluate the potential for chemically stabilizing a waste containing organic compounds. hemical bonding between the binder and the contaminants was indicated. eachate testing also indicated strong binding. Copy available at NTIS as ...

  5. Gamma discrimination in pillar structured thermal neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Q; Radev, R P; Conway, A M; Voss, L F; Wang, T F; Nikolic, R J; Deo, N; Cheung, C L

    2012-03-26

    Solid-state thermal neutron detectors are desired to replace {sup 3}He tube based technology for the detection of special nuclear materials. {sup 3}He tubes have some issues with stability, sensitivity to microphonics and very recently, a shortage of {sup 3}He. There are numerous solid-state approaches being investigated that utilize various architectures and material combinations. By using the combination of high-aspect-ratio silicon PIN pillars, which are 2 {micro}m wide with a 2 {micro}m separation, arranged in a square matrix, and surrounded by {sup 10}B, the neutron converter material, a high efficiency thermal neutron detector is possible. Besides intrinsic neutron detection efficiency, neutron to gamma discrimination is an important figure of merit for unambiguous signal identification. In this work, theoretical calculations and experimental measurements are conducted to determine the effect of structure design of pillar structured thermal neutron detectors including: intrinsic layer thickness, pillar height, substrate doping and incident gamma energy on neutron to gamma discrimination.

  6. Process Development for Stamping Á-Pillar Covers with Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Rohatgi, Aashish; Smith, Mark T.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2015-02-20

    In this work, performed in close collaboration with PACCAR and Magna International, a 6XXX series aluminum alloy was used for the development of A-Pillar cover for the cab of a typical heavy-duty Class-8 truck. The use of Al alloy for the A-pillar cover represents an approximately 40% weight savings over its steel or molded fiberglass composite counterpart. For the selected Al alloy, a small amount of cold work (5% tensile strain), following prior hot-forming, was found to significantly improve the subsequent age-hardening response. The role of solutionizing temperature and rate of cooling on the age-hardening response after paint-bake treatment were investigated. For the temperature range selected in this work, higher solutionizing temperature correlated with greater subsequent age-hardening and vice-versa. However, the age-hardening response was insensitive to the mode of cooling (water quench vs. air cooling). Finally, a two-step forming process was developed where, in the first step, the blank was heated to solutionizing temperature, quenched, and then partially formed at room temperature. For the second step, the pre-form was re-heated and quenched as in the first step, and the forming was completed at room temperature. The resulting A-pillars had sufficient residual ductility to be compatible with hemming and riveting

  7. Retention in porous layer pillar array planar separation platforms

    DOE PAGES

    Lincoln, Danielle R.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; ...

    2016-08-11

    Here, this work presents the retention capabilities and surface area enhancement of highly ordered, high-aspect-ratio, open-platform, two-dimensional (2D) pillar arrays when coated with a thin layer of porous silicon oxide (PSO). Photolithographically prepared pillar arrays were coated with 50–250 nm of PSO via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and then functionalized with either octadecyltrichlorosilane or n-butyldimethylchlorosilane. Theoretical calculations indicate that a 50 nm layer of PSO increases the surface area of a pillar nearly 120-fold. Retention capabilities were tested by observing capillary-action-driven development under various conditions, as well as by running one-dimensional separations on varying thicknesses of PSO. Increasing the thicknessmore » of PSO on an array clearly resulted in greater retention of the analyte(s) in question in both experiments. In culmination, a two-dimensional separation of fluorescently derivatized amines was performed to further demonstrate the capabilities of these fabricated platforms.« less

  8. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  9. Clay energetics in chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Clays have been implicated in the origin of terrestrial life since the 1950's. Originally they were considered agents which aid in selecting, concentrating and promoting oligomerization of the organic monomeric substituents of cellular life forms. However, more recently, it has been suggested that minerals, with particular emphasis on clays, may have played a yet more fundamental role. It has been suggested that clays are prototypic life forms in themselves and that they served as a template which directed the self-assembly of cellular life. If the clay-life theory is to have other than conceptual credibility, clays must be shown by experiment to execute the operations of cellular life, not only individually, but also in a sufficiently concerted manner as to produce some semblance of the functional attributes of living cells. Current studies are focussed on the ability of clays to absorb, store and transfer energy under plausible prebiotic conditions and to use this energy to drive chemistry of prebiotic relevance. Conclusions of the work are applicable to the role of clays either as substrates for organic chemistry, or in fueling their own life-mimetic processes.

  10. Removal of waterborne microorganisms by filtration using clay-polymer complexes.

    PubMed

    Undabeytia, Tomas; Posada, Rosa; Nir, Shlomo; Galindo, Irene; Laiz, Leonila; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Morillo, Esmeralda

    2014-08-30

    Clay-polymer composites were designed for use in filtration processes for disinfection during the course of water purification. The composites were formed by sorption of polymers based on starch modified with quaternary ammonium ethers onto the negatively charged clay mineral bentonite. The performance of the clay-polymer complexes in removal of bacteria was strongly dependent on the conformation adopted by the polycation on the clay surface, the charge density of the polycation itself and the ratio between the concentrations of clay and polymer used during the sorption process. The antimicrobial effect exerted by the clay-polymer system was due to the cationic monomers adsorbed on the clay surface, which resulted in a positive surface potential of the complexes and charge reversal. Clay-polymer complexes were more toxic to bacteria than the polymers alone. Filtration employing our optimal clay-polymer composite yielded 100% removal of bacteria after the passage of 3L, whereas an equivalent filter with granular activated carbon (GAC) hardly yielded removal of bacteria after 0.5L. Regeneration of clay-polymer complexes saturated with bacteria was demonstrated. Modeling of the filtration processes permitted to optimize the design of filters and estimation of experimental conditions for purifying large water volumes in short periods.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of clays and clay minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Hughes, R.E.

    1971-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) proves to be ideally suited for studying the configuration, texture, and fabric of clay samples. Growth mechanics of crystalline units-interpenetration and interlocking of crystallites, crystal habits, twinning, helical growth, and topotaxis-also are uniquely revealed by the SEM. Authigenic kaolins make up the bulk of the examples because their larger crystallite size, better crystallinity, and open texture make them more suited to examination by the SEM than most other clay mineral types. ?? 1971.

  12. Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Komadel, P.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2009-04-01

    Modified bentonites are of widespread technological importance. Common modifications include acid activation and organic treatment. Acid activation has been used for decades to prepare bleaching earths for adsorbing impurities from edible and industrial oils. Organic treatment has sparked an explosive interest in a class of materials called polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNs). The most commonly used clay mineral in PCNs is montmorillonite, which is the main constituent of bentonite. PCN materials are used for structural reinforcement and mechanical strength, for gas permeability barriers, as flame retardants, and to minimize surface erosion (ablation). Other specialty applications include use as conducting nanocomposites and bionanocomposites.

  13. Stress Changes and Deformation Monitoring of Longwall Coal Pillars Located in Weak Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Zhang, Zhenyu; Kuang, Tiejun; Liu, Jinrong

    2016-08-01

    Coal pillar stability is strongly influenced by the site-specific geological and geotechnical conditions. Many geological structures such as faults, joints, or rock intrusions can be detrimental to mining operations. In order to evaluate the performance of coal pillars under weak roof degraded by igneous rock intrusion, stress and deformation monitoring was conducted in the affected tailgate areas of Nos. 8208 and 8210 longwalls in Tashan coal mine, Shanxi Province, China. The measurements in the 8208 longwall tailgate showed that the mining-induced stresses in 38-m-wide coal chain pillars under the overburden depth of 300-500 m started to increase at about 100 m ahead of the 8208 longwall working face and reached its peak level at approximately 50 m ahead of the longwall face. The peak stress of 9.16 MPa occurred at the depth of 8-9 m into the pillar from the tailgate side wall. In comparison, disturbance of the headgate block pillar area was negligible, indicating the difference of abutment pressure distribution between the tailgate and headgate sites where the adjacent unmined longwall block carried most of the overburden load. However, when the longwall face passed the headgate monitoring site by 360-379 m, the pillar stress increased to a peak value of 21.4 MPa at the pillar depth of 13 m from the gob side mainly due to stress redistribution in the chain pillar. In contrast to the headgate, at the tailgate side, the adjacent goaf was the dominant triggering factor for high stress concentrations in the chain pillar. Convergence measurements in the tailgate during longwall mining further indicated the evolution characteristics of coal pillar deformation, clearly showing that the gateroad deformation is mainly induced by the longwall extraction it serves. When predicting the future pillar loads from the monitored data, two stress peaks appeared across the 38-m-wide tailgate coal pillar, which are separated by the lower stress area within the pillar center. This

  14. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  15. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  16. Charge transport in nanoscale vertical organic semiconductor pillar devices

    PubMed Central

    Wilbers, Janine G. E.; Xu, Bojian; Bobbert, Peter A.; de Jong, Michel P.; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.

    2017-01-01

    We report charge transport measurements in nanoscale vertical pillar structures incorporating ultrathin layers of the organic semiconductor poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). P3HT layers with thickness down to 5 nm are gently top-contacted using wedging transfer, yielding highly reproducible, robust nanoscale junctions carrying high current densities (up to 106 A/m2). Current-voltage data modeling demonstrates excellent hole injection. This work opens up the pathway towards nanoscale, ultrashort-channel organic transistors for high-frequency and high-current-density operation. PMID:28117371

  17. Modification of clay-based waste containment materials

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Whang, J.M.; McDevitt, M.F.

    1997-12-31

    Bentonite clays are used extensively for waste containment barriers to help impede the flow of water in the subsurface because of their low permeability characteristics. However, they do little to prevent diffusion of contaminants, which is the major transport mechanism at low water flows. A more effective way of minimizing contaminant migration in the subsurface is to modify the bentonite clay with highly sorptive materials. Batch sorption studies were conducted to evaluate the sorptive capabilities of organo-clays and humic- and iron-based materials. These materials proved to be effective sorbents for the organic contaminants 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, nitrobenzene, and aniline in water, humic acid, and methanol solution media. The sorption capacities were several orders of magnitude greater than that of unmodified bentonite clay. Modeling results indicate that with small amounts of these materials used as additives in clay barriers, contaminant flux through walls could be kept very small for 100 years or more. The cost of such levels of additives can be small compared to overall construction costs.

  18. Paraquat adsorption onto clays and organoclays from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Seki, Y; Yurdakoç, K

    2005-07-01

    Clays were compared with organoclays for the sorption of paraquat from aqueous solution. Sepiolite (S), bentonite (B), and illite (I) were used as clay samples. Organoclays were prepared by the modification of the clays with nonyl- and dodecylammonium chlorides, denoted as NS, DS, NB, DB, NI, and DI, respectively. Specific surface area and pore size distribution of the samples were determined by N2 adsorption-desorption at 77 K using the BET method. X-ray powder diffraction analysis of the samples was used to determine the effects of modifying agents on the layer structure of the clays. In the adsorption experiments, C(m) values increased from 0.038 mmol/g for DS to 0.223 mmol/g for NI. Kd0.3 values ranged from 0.177 for DS to 0.843 for NI. The adsorption data indicated that illite and NI are the most effective adsorbents among these clays and organoclay samples, respectively.

  19. Clay preference and particle transport behavior of Formosan subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae): a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai; Henderson, Gregg

    2014-12-01

    Although preference and utilization of clay have been studied in many higher termites, little attention has been paid to lower termites, especially subterranean termites. The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, can modify its habitat by using clay to fill tree cavities. Here, the biological significance of clay on C. formosanus was investigated. Choice tests showed that significantly more termites aggregated in chambers where clay blocks were provided, regardless of colony group, observation period, or nutritional condition (fed or starved). No-choice tests showed that clay had no observable effect on survivorship, live or dry biomass, water content, and tunneling activity after 33-35 d. However, clay appeared to significantly decrease filter paper consumption (dry weight loss). Active particle (sand, paper, and clay) transport behavior was observed in both choice and no-choice tests. When present, clay was preferentially spread on the substrate, attached to the smooth surfaces of the containers, and used to line sand tunnels. Mechanisms and potential application of clay attraction are discussed.

  20. Determination of adsorptive and catalytic properties of copper, silver and iron contain titanium-pillared bentonite for the removal bisphenol A from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomul, Fatma; Turgut Basoglu, Funda; Canbay, Hale

    2016-01-01

    Ti-pillared bentonite, Cu, Ag and Fe modified Ti-pillared bentonite and Cu/Ti- and Fe/Ti-mixed pillared bentonite were synthesized using different titanium sources by direct synthesis or by modification after synthesis. The effects of synthesis conditions on the surface characteristics, pore structure and acidity of the pillared bentonites were investigated by SEM⿿EDS, XPS, XRD, N2-adsorption/desorption and FTIR analyses before and after ammonia adsorption. The results of EDS, XPS and XRD analysis confirmed that titanium, copper, silver and iron were incorporated into the bentonite structure. In the XRD patterns, the formation of delaminated structure reflecting the non-parallel distribution of the bentonite layers by pillaring with Ti, Cu/Ti and Fe/Ti-pillars was observed. XPS spectra indicated the presence of TiO2, CuO, Ag and Ag2O and Fe2O3 species depending on the source of active metals in the synthesized samples. In the FTIR spectra, an increase in the Bronsted/Lewis peak intensity was observed with the loading of copper and iron, whereas a decrease in Lewis and Bronsted acidities was observed with incorporation of silver. Adsorption studies indicated that the adsorption capacity of the sample synthesized using titanium (IV) propoxide and incorporating iron to the structure by ion exchange (Fe-PTi-PILC) were higher than those in other samples. The adsorption of BPA (bisphenol A) by all tested samples was found to fit the Langmuir isotherm. In the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) over PTi-PILC (prepared by titanium (IV) propoxide), Fe-PTi-PILC and Cu-PTi-PILC (prepared by copper impregnated Ti-pillared bentonite) samples, BPA values close to complete conversion were achieved within 30 min at 25 °C, pH 4 and 5 g/L mcat. CWPO results showed that increasement of pH causes a decrease the rate of oxidation. On the other hand, by the time catalyst and BPA concentration is increased, the rate of oxidation is increased as well.

  1. Removal of rhodamine B using iron-pillared bentonite.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mei-Fang; Ma, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Wei-De; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Fan, Yan-Ning; Wan, Hong-Fu

    2011-02-28

    The iron-pillared bentonite (Fe-Ben) was prepared by ion-exchange using the natural bentonite (GZ-Ben) from Gaozhou, China, at room temperature without calcination. Both Fe-Ben and GZ-Ben were characterized by X-ray diffraction, N(2) adsorption and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the d(001) value and surface area of the bentonite material increased after iron pillaring. Fe-Ben adsorbed much more Rhodamine B (RhB) than GZ-Ben, which can be ascribed to the special surface properties and large surface area of Fe-Ben. The optimum pH value for the adsorption of RhB on Fe-Ben is 5.0. The adsorption of RhB onto Fe-Ben can be well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion kinetic model. The adsorption isotherm of RhB onto Fe-Ben matches well with the Langmuir model.

  2. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-05-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  3. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-08-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  4. Length scale selects directionality of droplets on vibrating pillar ratchet

    DOE PAGES

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; ...

    2014-09-22

    Directional control of droplet motion at room temperature is of interest for applications such as microfluidic devices, self-cleaning coatings, and directional adhesives. Here, arrays of tilted pillars ranging in height from the nanoscale to the microscale are used as structural ratchets to directionally transport water at room temperature. Water droplets deposited on vibrating chips with a nanostructured ratchet move preferentially in the direction of the feature tilt while the opposite directionality is observed in the case of microstructured ratchets. This remarkable switch in directionality is consistent with changes in the contact angle hysteresis. To glean further insights into the lengthmore » scale dependent asymmetric contact angle hysteresis, the contact lines formed by a nonvolatile room temperature ionic liquid placed onto the tilted pillar arrays were visualized and analyzed in situ in a scanning electron microscope. As a result, the ability to tune droplet directionality by merely changing the length scale of surface features all etched at the same tilt angle would be a versatile tool for manipulating multiphase flows and for selecting droplet directionality in other lap-on-chip applications.« less

  5. Length scale selects directionality of droplets on vibrating pillar ratchet

    SciTech Connect

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay V.

    2014-09-22

    Directional control of droplet motion at room temperature is of interest for applications such as microfluidic devices, self-cleaning coatings, and directional adhesives. Here, arrays of tilted pillars ranging in height from the nanoscale to the microscale are used as structural ratchets to directionally transport water at room temperature. Water droplets deposited on vibrating chips with a nanostructured ratchet move preferentially in the direction of the feature tilt while the opposite directionality is observed in the case of microstructured ratchets. This remarkable switch in directionality is consistent with changes in the contact angle hysteresis. To glean further insights into the length scale dependent asymmetric contact angle hysteresis, the contact lines formed by a nonvolatile room temperature ionic liquid placed onto the tilted pillar arrays were visualized and analyzed in situ in a scanning electron microscope. As a result, the ability to tune droplet directionality by merely changing the length scale of surface features all etched at the same tilt angle would be a versatile tool for manipulating multiphase flows and for selecting droplet directionality in other lap-on-chip applications.

  6. Potential performance of pillared inorgano- organo bentonite for soil mix technology permeable reactive barrier (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abunada, Z. M.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2013-12-01

    Modified bentonite has gained more interest for their effect in contaminant removal and environmental protection. This study is investigating the use of three different modified inorgano-organo bentonite (IOB) in soil mixing permeable reactive barrier. IOB were prepared using pillaring agents and quaternary ammonium cations (QAC) with different loading ratios. The permeabilities of compacted specimens containing IOB with two different soil types (sandy and gravelly soil) were measured for site contaminated groundwater, pure water and TEX compounds to study the potential of soil mix permeable reactive barrier (PRB). The soil permeability decreased by 1-2 order of magnitude once mixed with IOB. It also decreased by about 100 in case of TEX compound and site groundwater. The IOB was tested to remove Toluene, Ethyl-benzene, and o-Xylene (TEX) compound from model contaminated water in both batch and column test. Physical characteristics such as pore volume, porosity and specific structure in addition to level of surfactant loading were determined. Materials removal efficiency varied due to the surfactant loading, soil type and contaminant molecular weight. Sorption isotherm showed that the adsorbates preference increased in the order of T>E>X in all IOB types. Maximum TEX compound sorptive capacity varied also due to soil type with the highest was 86.89% 93.19% and 90.2% for T,E,X respectively on sandy soil. Key words: Inorgano-organo bentonite, permeability, reactive barrier, soil mix, sorption

  7. A molecular model for epsilon-caprolactam-based intercalated polymer clay nanocomposite: Integrating modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Debashis; Katti, Dinesh R; Katti, Kalpana S

    2006-08-29

    In studying the morphology, molecular interactions, and physical properties of organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) and polymer clay nanocomposites (PCNs) through molecular dynamics (MD), the construction of the molecular model of OMMT and PCN is important. Better understanding of interaction between various constituents of PCN will improve the design of polymer clay nanocomposite systems. MD is an excellent tool to study interactions, which require accurate modeling of PCN under consideration. Previously, the PCN models were constructed by different researchers on the basis of specific criteria such as minimum energy configuration, density of the polymer clay nanocomposite, and so forth. However, in this article we describe the development of models combining experimental and conventional molecular modeling to develop models, which are more representative of true intercalated PCN systems. The models were used for studying the morphological interactions and physical properties. These studies gave useful information regarding orientation of organic modifiers, area of coverage of organic modifiers over the interlayer clay surface, interaction of organic modifiers with clay in OMMT, interaction among different constituents of PCN, conformational and density change, and actual proportion of mixing of polymer with clay in PCN. We have X-ray diffraction and photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to verify the model.

  8. The Effect of processing on the PVC/Clay Nanocomposites Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalendova, A.; Zykova, J.; Kovarova, L.; Slouf, M.; Gerard, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    Reported nanocomposites of poly(vinyl chloride) have been prepared using bentonite-based clay, Na-montmorillonite (nature clay) and organophilic clay 30B. Polymer nanocomposites of differing compositions were produced using Buss KO-kneader via melt intercalation method. The effect of different type of plasticizer (both low molecular and high molecular) and compounding conditions on the structure of PVC/clay nanocomposites was investigated. Different compounding conditions were tested to study their influence on nanoparticles dispersion, orientation and exfoliation in PVC/clay nanocomposites. The structure of PVC/MMT nanocomposites was observed using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). It was found that the Na-montmorillonite offer low exfoliation level, while 30B modified by plasticizer exhibits fine dispersion of partial to nearly full exfoliated MMT. Moreover the processing conditions play also important role in nanocomposite production.

  9. The Sloan-C Pillars: Towards a Balanced Approach to Measuring Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Kee Meng; Mayadas, A. Frank

    2010-01-01

    The Sloan Pillars have set the standard for university-wide online learning program assessment for more than a dozen years. In this paper, the authors propose the extension of the Pillars to corporate e-learning, offering an alternative to traditional enterprise learning assessments. Claiming that conventional methods stress individual courses or…

  10. Building Training on the Pillars: Applying Total Quality in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Jo D.; And Others

    This paper focuses on the application of total quality management (TQM) in human resources development. It analyzes writings of five leading total quality authors from which four basic principles, or pillars, are derived as the basis for the application of total quality within the instructional setting. The pillars are: (1) customer satisfaction;…

  11. 78 FR 19291 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Billings and Pompeys Pillar National Monument Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Draft Billings and Pompeys Pillar National... Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Billings and Pompeys Pillar National Monument within the Billings Field Office of the BLM Montana/ Dakotas State Office and by this notice is announcing the...

  12. Clay minerals for advanced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.H. )

    1989-11-01

    The author describes new and improved beneficiation techniques available to allow the production of clay minerals of exceptionally high purity. This is particularly true for kaolins and smectites. Wet processing techniques include particle size separation, high intensity magnetic separation, chemical leaching, flotation, and selective flocculation. The blending of clay minerals with other minerals provides opportunities to make special ceramic materials such as cordierite and other minerals that have very special ceramic properties including low heat expansion, high fired strength, low absorption, and other desired qualities.

  13. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  14. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  15. Clickable di- and tetrafunctionalized pillar[n]arenes (n = 5, 6) by oxidation-reduction of pillar[n]arene units.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Yamafuji, Daiki; Kotera, Daisuke; Aoki, Takamichi; Fujinami, Shuhei; Yamagishi, Tada-aki

    2012-12-21

    We report a new route for the selective synthesis of di- and tetrafunctionalized pillararenes via oxidation and reduction of the pillararene units. Hypervalent-iodine oxidation of perethylated pillar[5]arene afforded pillar[5]arene derivatives containing one benzoquinone unit and two benzoquinones at the A,B- and A,C-units. A pillar[6]arene derivative containing one benzoquinone unit was also synthesized. Reduction of the benzoquinone units yielded position-selective di- and tetrahydroxylated pillararene derivatives. This methodology avoids the generation of many constitutional isomers and overcomes the isolation problem of numerous constitutional isomers. From these hydroxylated pillararenes, Huisgen reaction-based clickable di- and tetraalkynylated pillar[5]arenes were prepared. Because of the highly selective and reactive nature of Huisgen alkyne-azide cycloaddition, these pillar[5]arenes can serve as key compounds for a large library of di- and tetrafunctionalized pillararenes. Based on these di- and tetrafunctionalized pillar[5]arenes as key compounds, fluorescent sensors were created by the modification of di- and tetrapyrene moieties via Huisgen-type click reactions.

  16. Stress Distribution on Blasting Gallery Barrier Pillar due to Goaf Formation During Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Reddy, Sandi; Sastry, Vedala Rama

    2016-10-01

    Semi-mechanised blasting gallery mining is a sustainable option to achieve higher production and productivity from underground thick coal seams. Judicious design of underground blasting gallery panel requires understanding of stress distribution on barrier pillars during different stages of extraction. This paper presents a study of stress distribution in and around barrier pillar for the different stages of extraction in the blasting gallery panel. Finite difference analysis taken up for final excavation (depillaring) in the panel with different stages of extraction. Analysis revealed that the stress transferred on barrier pillar increased as progress of excavation increased. Maximum stress was observed at a distance of 10 and 12 m from the pillar edge for virgin and goaved out panel sideby respectively, which gradually decreased towards centre of the pillar.

  17. Evaporation-driven clustering of microscale pillars and lamellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Jungchul; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-02-01

    As a liquid film covering an array of micro- or nanoscale pillars or lamellae evaporates, its meniscus pulls the elastic patterns together because of capillary effects, leading to clustering of the slender microstructures. While this elastocapillary coalescence may imply various useful applications, it is detrimental to a semiconductor manufacturing process called the spin drying, where a liquid film rinses patterned wafers until drying. To understand the transient mechanism underlying such self-organization during and after liquid evaporation, we visualize the clustering dynamics of polymer micropatterns. Our visualization experiments reveal that the patterns clumped during liquid evaporation can be re-separated when completely dried in some cases. This restoration behavior is explained by considering adhesion energy of the patterns as well as capillary forces, which leads to a regime map to predict whether permanent stiction would occur. This work does not only extend our understanding of micropattern stiction, but also suggests a novel path to control and prevent pattern clustering.

  18. Pillaring effects in macroporous carrageenan-silica composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Boissière, M; Tourrette, A; Devoisselle, J M; Di Renzo, F; Quignard, F

    2006-02-01

    The impregnation of a carrageenan gel by a silica sol is an efficient method to form a composite material which can be conveniently activated by CO2 supercritical drying. The textural properties of the solids have been characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption at 77 K and their composition by thermogravimetric analysis and EDX microprobe. Morphology was examined by SEM. The silica-carrageenan composites present an open macroporous structure. Silica particles retained inside the gel behaved as pillars between the polysaccharide fibrils and form a stick-and-ball network. The stiffening of the carrageenan gel by silica prevented its shrinkage upon drying. The nature of the alkali cations affected the retention of silica particles inside the gel. In the absence of silica, carrageenan fibrils rearrange under supercritical drying and form an aerogel with cavities in the mesopore range.

  19. Strain relaxation in nanopatterned strained silicon round pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himcinschi, C.; Singh, R.; Radu, I.; Milenin, A. P.; Erfurth, W.; Reiche, M.; Gösele, U.; Christiansen, S. H.; Muster, F.; Petzold, M.

    2007-01-01

    Periodic arrays of strained Si (sSi) round nanopillars were fabricated on sSi layers deposited on SiGe virtual substrates by electron-beam lithography and subsequent reactive-ion etching. The strain in the patterned sSi nanopillars was determined using high-resolution UV micro-Raman spectroscopy. The strain relaxes significantly upon nanostructuring: from 0.9% in the unpatterned sSi layer to values between 0.22% and 0.57% in the round sSi pillars with diameters from 100 up to 500nm. The strain distribution in the sSi nanopillars was analyzed by finite element (FE) modeling. The FE calculations confirm the strain relaxation after patterning, in agreement with the results obtained from Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Evaporation-driven clustering of microscale pillars and lamellae

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Jungchul; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-02-15

    As a liquid film covering an array of micro- or nanoscale pillars or lamellae evaporates, its meniscus pulls the elastic patterns together because of capillary effects, leading to clustering of the slender microstructures. While this elastocapillary coalescence may imply various useful applications, it is detrimental to a semiconductor manufacturing process called the spin drying, where a liquid film rinses patterned wafers until drying. To understand the transient mechanism underlying such self-organization during and after liquid evaporation, we visualize the clustering dynamics of polymer micropatterns. Our visualization experiments reveal that the patterns clumped during liquid evaporation can be re-separated when completely dried in some cases. This restoration behavior is explained by considering adhesion energy of the patterns as well as capillary forces, which leads to a regime map to predict whether permanent stiction would occur. This work does not only extend our understanding of micropattern stiction, but also suggests a novel path to control and prevent pattern clustering.

  1. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  2. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  3. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  4. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.

  5. Stools - pale or clay-colored

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003129.htm Stools - pale or clay-colored To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stools that are pale, clay, or putty-colored may be due to problems ...

  6. Effect of ten quaternary ammonium cations on tetrachloromethane sorption to clay from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The mineral surface of Wyoming bentonite (clay) was modified by replacing inorganic ions by each of 10 quaternary ammonium compounds, and tetrachloromethane sorption to the modified sorbents from water was studied. Tetrachloromethane sorption from solution to clay modified with tetramethyl-, tetraethyl-, benzyltrimethyl-, or benzyltriethylammonium cations generally is characterized by relatively high solute uptake, isotherm nonlinearity, and competitive sorption (with trichloroethene as the competing sorbate). For these sorbents, the ethyl functional groups yield reduced sorptive capacity relative to methyl groups, whereas the benzyl group appears to have a similar effect on sorbent capacity as the methyl group. Sorption of tetrachloromethane to clay modified with dodecyldimethyl(2-phenoxyethyl)-, dodecyltrimethyl-, tetradecyltrimethyl-, hexadecyltrimethyl-, or benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium bromide is characterized by relatively low solute uptake, isotherm linearity, and noncompetitive sorption. For these sorbents, an increase in the size of the nonpolar functional group(s) causes an increase in the organic carbon normalized sorption coefficient (Koc). No measurable uptake of tetrachloromethane sorption by the unmodified clay or clay modified by ammonium bromide was observed. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  7. Clay complexes support HDS catalyst.

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, C. L.; Carrado, K.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-01-01

    Hydroprocessing represents a crucial component of petroleum refining operations both in terms of environmental and economic considerations. Regulations concerning maximum amount of sulfur content of gasoline and emissions of sulfur-oxide compounds upon combustion are becoming more and more stringent. One 1994-2000 focus of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been the development of catalysts for hydrodesulfurization (HDS). Typical HDS catalysts are comprised of Co-Mo sulfides or Ni-Mo sulfides on an alumina support. Modification of the pore structure of the support has generated great attention among researchers. Most desulfurization test reactions have used dibenzothiophene (DBT) as the model compound to test various configurations of support material with Co-Mo-S and Ni-Mo-S catalysts. In this testing, the desired product would be biphenyl and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). A competing reaction creates cyclohexylbenzene by saturating one aromatic ring prior to desulfurization. Ring saturation requires more costly hydrogen and is not desirable. Fortunately, a more effective catalyst for adding hydrogen at the sulfur site with hydrogenating the aromatic rings has been found. However, this has only been tested on DBT. HDS uses various types of catalysts to add hydrogen to reduce unwanted sulfur compounds. Typically this requires expensive, high-pressure, high-temperature equipment to produce the environmentally friendly low-sulfur fuels. ANL scientists identified several new desulfurization catalysts with improved HDS activity and selectivity. From these new catalysts, it may be possible to achieve HDS processing at lower temperature and pressure. The catalysts used for HDS at ANL are various clay complexes. Natural clays have a history of use in the hydroprocessing industry since they are abundant and inexpensive. ANL's approach is to create synthetic organo-clay complexes (SOCC). An advantage of SOCCs is that the pore size and distribution can be controlled by

  8. Mineral resource of the month: clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Clays represent one of the largest mineral commodities in the world in terms of mineral and rock production and use. Many people, however, do not recognize that clays are used in an amazingly wide variety of applications. Use continues to increase worldwide as populations and their associated needs increase. Robert Virta, clay and shale commodity specialist for the U.S. Geological Survey, has prepared the following information about clays.

  9. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  10. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  11. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  12. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and....1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain varying quantities of alkalies...

  13. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin)...

  14. Clay & Children: More than Making Pots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolbe, Ursula

    1997-01-01

    Working with clay enables young children to express, explore, and communicate their feelings and ideas. This resource booklet for early childhood practitioners and it promotes the clay table as a special place for shared discoveries, social interaction, and discussion. The booklet provides a glossary of terms used in clay work, as well as reasons…

  15. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  16. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Li, Lianchong; Rutqvist, Jonny; Liu, Hui -Hai; Birkholzer, Jens

    2012-05-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated or plastic clays (Tsang and Hudson, 2010). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. During the lifespan of a clay repository, the repository performance is affected by complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow, formation of damage zones, radionuclide transport, waste dissolution, and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) of the repository. These coupled processes may affect radionuclide transport by changing transport paths (e.g., formation and evolution of excavation damaged zone (EDZ)) and altering flow, mineral, and mechanical properties that are related to radionuclide transport. While radionuclide transport in clay formation has been studied using laboratory tests (e,g, Appelo et al. 2010, Garcia-Gutierrez et al., 2008, Maes et al., 2008), short-term field

  17. Host-Guest Complexes of Carboxylated Pillar[n]arenes With Drugs.

    PubMed

    Wheate, Nial J; Dickson, Kristie-Ann; Kim, Ryung Rae; Nematollahi, Alireza; Macquart, René B; Kayser, Veysel; Yu, Guocan; Church, W Bret; Marsh, Deborah J

    2016-12-01

    Pillar[n]arenes are a new family of nanocapsules that have shown application in a number of areas, but because of their poor water solubility their biomedical applications are limited. Recently, a method of synthesizing water-soluble pillar[n]arenes was developed. In this study, carboxylated pillar[n]arenes (WP[n], n = 6 or 7) have been examined for their ability to form host-guest complexes with compounds relevant to drug delivery and biodiagnostic applications. Both pillar[n]arenes form host-guest complexes with memantine, chlorhexidine hydrochloride, and proflavine by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and modeling. Binding is stabilized by hydrophobic effects within the cavities, and hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions at the portals. Encapsulation within WP[6] results in the complete and efficient quenching of proflavine fluorescence, giving rise to "on" and "off" states that have potential in biodiagnostics. The toxicity of the pillar[n]arenes was examined using in vitro growth assays with the OVCAR-3 and HEK293 cell lines. The pillar[n]arenes are relatively nontoxic to cells except at high doses and after prolonged continuous exposure. Overall, the results show that there could be a potentially large range of medical applications for carboxylated pillar[n]arene nanocapsules.

  18. Detection and control of spontaneous heating in coal mine pillars -- A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Timko, R.J.; Derick, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    This US Bureau of Mines study examined spontaneous heating episodes in coal mine pillars in an active underground coal mine. The information obtained from these incidents was then analyzed to learn which sampling methods provided the earliest indication of pillar heating. The objective of this study was to discover if the location of future events of pillar spontaneous heating could be inferred from the available information. The spontaneous heating-prone area in this evaluation involved pillars located just in by the mine portals. Several detection methods were used to determine gas levels outside as well as inside the affected pillars. It was hoped that, by incorporating external and internal sampling methods into an organized program, locations undergoing spontaneous heat could be determined more readily. This study found that by drilling small-diameter boreholes into the pillars, then obtaining gas samples from the affected pillars, the ability to locate early spontaneous heating episodes was improved. However, the ability to accurately predict future spontaneous heat events remains in question.

  19. E-beam patterning and stability study of sub-22nm HSQ pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Su; Tsai, Ming-Jinn

    2011-04-01

    E-beam exposed HSQ resist pillar (island) is commonly used as the hard mask for dry etching. However, HSQ pillar is prone to collapse without any substrate pre-treatment. CD resolution of HSQ pattern also depends on the aging effect. In this work, factors of (1) designed CD (DCD) (2) dose vs L/S ratio (3) beam current (4) underlayer (UL) (5) post-coat-delay (PCD) time before e-beam writing are studied for forming stable and reproducible sub-22 nm HSQ pillar. Three kinds of underlayer are evaluated, i.e. AR3-600, ZEP520A and TDUR-N700. Experimental results are summarized below. A wider dose window of forming sub-22 nm HSQ pillar with looser L/S ratio or smaller designed CD is obtained. CD variation for all pattern density conditions is due to the proximity effect from beam blur. AR3-600 is shown to be the most suitable UL for HSQ pillar. CD of HSQ pillar increases with thicker AR3-600 layer. PCD range for stable CDs of HSQ pillar with DCD of 20 nm is larger than that with 15 nm.

  20. Clay-cement suspensions - rheological and functional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, L.; Izak, P.; Mastalska-Poplawska, J.; Gajek, M.

    2017-01-01

    The piping erosion in soil is highly unexpected in civil engineering. Elimination of such damages is difficult, expensive and time-consuming. One of the possibility is the grouting method. This method is still developed into direction of process automation as well as other useful properties of suspensions. Main way of modernization of the grouting method is connected it with rheology of injection and eventuality of fitting them to specific problems conditions. Very popular and useful became binders based on modified clays (clay-cement suspensions). Important principle of efficiency of the grouting method is using of time-dependent pseudothixotropic properties of the clay-cement suspensions. The pseudo-rheounstability aspect of the suspensions properties should be dedicated and fitted to dynamic changes of soil conditions destructions. Whole process of the modification of the suspension rheology is stimulated by the specific agents. This article contains a description of practical aspects of the rheological parameters managing of the clay-cement suspensions, dedicated to the building damages, hydrotechnic constructions etc.

  1. Pillar cuvettes: capillary-filled, microliter quartz cuvettes with microscale path lengths for optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Holzner, Gregor; Kriel, Frederik Hermanus; Priest, Craig

    2015-05-05

    The goal of most analytical techniques is to reduce the lower limit of detection; however, it is sometimes necessary to do the opposite. High sample concentrations or samples with high molar absorptivity (e.g., dyes and metal complexes) often require multiple dilution steps or laborious sample preparation prior to spectroscopic analysis. Here, we demonstrate dilution-free, one-step UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of high concentrations of platinum(IV) hexachloride in a micropillar array, that is, "pillar cuvette". The cuvette is spontaneously filled by wicking of the liquid sample into the micropillar array. The pillar height (thus, the film thickness) defines the optical path length, which was reduced to between 10 and 20 μm in this study (3 orders of magnitude smaller than in a typical cuvette). Only one small droplet (∼2 μL) of sample is required, and the dispensed volume need not be precise or even known to the analyst for accurate spectroscopy measurements. For opaque pillars, we show that absorbance is linearly related to platinum concentration (the Beer-Lambert Law). For fully transparent or semitransparent pillars, the measured absorbance was successfully corrected for the fractional surface coverage of the pillars and the transmittance of the pillars and reference. Thus, both opaque and transparent pillars can be applied to absorbance spectroscopy of high absorptivity, microliter samples. It is also shown here that the pillar array has a useful secondary function as an integrated (in-cuvette) filter for particulates. For pillar cuvette measurements of platinum solutions spiked with 6 μm diameter polystyrene spheres, filtered and unfiltered samples gave identical spectra.

  2. Self-Assembling Organic Micro-/Nano-Pillars on Gold and Glass Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hai-Feng; Ruan, Wenli; Li, Yingying; Ding, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the formation of a family of organic micro-/nano-pillars prepared from surface-assisted self-assembly processes and factors controlling the growth of the pillars. These acids include cyanuric acid (CA), 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (TMA), 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid (TA) and 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid (PTA). Aqueous solutions mixed with acids and melamine (M) can be fine-tuned to prepare ordered micro-/nano-pillars on substrates, which can be further optimized for their applications.

  3. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and

  4. Energy conserving process for calcining clay

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, D.P.

    1990-08-14

    This patent describes an energy conversing process for calcining a clay. It comprises feeding a dry pulverized clay powder as feed material to a calciner to be calcined therein; passing the clay powder to be calcined through the calciner in direct heat exchange contact with a hot calcining gas passing therethrough whereby the clay powder is sufficiently heated to calcine substantially all the clay powder passing through the calciner and the hot calcining has is somewhat cooled; removing the calcined clay powder from the calciner and discharging the calcining from the calciner; subjecting the calciner discharge gas to electrostatic precipitation to clean the calciner discharge gas prior to venting the calciner discharge gas to the atmosphere whereby at least a substantial portion of calcined clay powder entrained in the calciner discharge gas is removed therefrom; collecting the hot calcined clay powder separated from the gas during electrostatic precipitation and mixing the collected hot calcined clay powder with the clay feed material being supplied to the calciner without substantially cooling the collected hot calcined clay powder prior to mixing with the feed material; and passing the calciner discharge has in heat exchange relationship with at least a portion of a cooling fluid prior to subjecting the calciner discharge gas to electrostatic precipitation.

  5. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, Stacey Leigh

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  6. Hyperspectral analysis of clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaki Rama Suresh, G.; Sreenivas, K.; Sivasamy, R.

    2014-11-01

    A study was carried out by collecting soil samples from parts of Gwalior and Shivpuri district, Madhya Pradesh in order to assess the dominant clay mineral of these soils using hyperspectral data, as 0.4 to 2.5 μm spectral range provides abundant and unique information about many important earth-surface minerals. Understanding the spectral response along with the soil chemical properties can provide important clues for retrieval of mineralogical soil properties. The soil samples were collected based on stratified random sampling approach and dominant clay minerals were identified through XRD analysis. The absorption feature parameters like depth, width, area and asymmetry of the absorption peaks were derived from spectral profile of soil samples through DISPEC tool. The derived absorption feature parameters were used as inputs for modelling the dominant soil clay mineral present in the unknown samples using Random forest approach which resulted in kappa accuracy of 0.795. Besides, an attempt was made to classify the Hyperion data using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm with an overall accuracy of 68.43 %. Results showed that kaolinite was the dominant mineral present in the soils followed by montmorillonite in the study area.

  7. Nanocomposites of irradiated polypropylene with clay are degradable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, L. G. H.; Oliani, W. L.; Lugao, A. B.; Parra, D. F.

    2016-01-01

    In nowadays, polypropylene (PP) based nanocomposites containing organically modified montmorillonite (MMT), have gained great attention in the automobilistic industries, construction, paints, packageing, plastic components of the telecommunication industries. The HMSPP (high melt strength polypropylene) is a polypropylene modified by irradiation process, under acetylene atmosphere, in which irradiation occurs in 60Co gamma source. However, when those materials are submitted to environmental ageing nanocomposites demonstrated high decomposition level after 1 year. This fact can be due to presence the metallic ions present in the montmorillonite. The HMS-PP and the Cloisite 20A (MMT) were mixed in twin-screw extruder using maleic anhydride as compatibilizer. In this work two formulations of nanocomposites at 0.1 and 5 wt% of clay were submitted to the environmental and thermal ageing to analyze the effects of degradation on the HMSPP nanocomposites. The evaluation of thermal properties was analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and the chemical alterations were investigated by Carbonyl Index (CI), through Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) technique. The basal distance was measured by X-ray diffraction (DRX) and the clay elements were analyzed by X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF). The aim of this work was to understand the effects of degradation of the HMS-PP/clay nanocomposites.

  8. Relativity: a pillar of modern physics or a stumbling block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Gurcharn S.

    2011-09-01

    Currently, the theory of Relativity is being regarded as one of the main pillars of Modern Physics, essentially due to its perceived role in high energy physics, particle accelerators, relativistic quantum mechanics, and cosmology. Since the founding assumptions or postulates of Relativity and some of the resulting consequences confound the logic and common sense, a growing number of scientists are now questioning the validity of Relativity. The advent of Relativity has also ruled out the existence of the 19th century notion of ether medium or physical space as the container of physical reality. Thereby, the Newtonian notions of absolute motion, absolute time, and absolute reference frame have been replaced with the Einsteinian notions of relative motion, relative time, and inertial reference frames in relative motion. This relativity dominated viewpoint has effectively abandoned any critical study or advanced research in the detailed properties and processes of physical space for advancement of Fundamental Physics. In this paper both special theory of relativity and general relativity have been critically examined for their current relevance and future potential. We find that even though Relativity appears to be a major stumbling block in the progress of Modern Physics, the issue needs to be finally settled by a viable experiment [Phys. Essays 23, 442 (2010)] that can detect absolute motion and establish a universal reference frame.

  9. Guiding and confinement of interface acoustic waves in solid-fluid pillar-based phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razip Wee, M. F. Mohd; Addouche, Mahmoud; Siow, Kim S.; Zain, A. R. Md; Elayouch, Aliyasin; Chollet, Franck; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2016-12-01

    Pillar-based phononic crystals exhibit some unique wave phenomena due to the interaction between surface acoustic modes of the substrate and local resonances supported by pillars. In this paper, we extend the investigations by taking into account the presence of a liquid medium. We particularly demonstrate that local resonances dramatically decrease the phase velocity of Scholte-Stoneley wave, which leads to a slow wave at the solid/fluid interface. Moreover, we show that increasing the height of pillars introduces a new set of branches of interface modes and drastically affects the acoustic energy localization. Indeed, while some modes display a highly confined pressure between pillars, others exponentially decay in the fluid or only propagate in the solid without disturbing the fluid pressure. These theoretical results, performed by finite element method, highlight a new acoustic wave confinement suitable in various applications such as acoustophoresis, lab on chip and microfluidics.

  10. Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Pillar Arrays Patterned Directly on Metal Alloy Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    V/μm, respectively. The dramatic reduction in turn-on fields exhibited by the high aspect-ratio CPA samples is attributed to the edge effect ,1...the CPA samples occurred primarily from the pillar edges where the local electric field was greatly enhanced by the edge effect . Furthermore, the...influences the electric field at the edges of the pillar structures. We employed finite element electrostatic simulations to quantify this CPA edge

  11. Design and construction of porous metal-organic frameworks based on flexible BPH pillars

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Xiang-Rong; Yang, Guang-sheng; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Su, Zhong-Min; Yuan, Gang; Wang, Xin-Long

    2013-02-15

    Three metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), [Co{sub 2}(BPDC){sub 2}(4-BPH){center_dot}3DMF]{sub n} (1), [Cd{sub 2}(BPDC){sub 2}(4-BPH){sub 2}{center_dot}2DMF]{sub n} (2) and [Ni{sub 2}(BDC){sub 2}(3-BPH){sub 2} (H{sub 2}O){center_dot}4DMF]{sub n} (3) (H{sub 2}BPDC=biphenyl-4,4 Prime -dicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}BDC=terephthalic acid, BPH=bis(pyridinylethylidene)hydrazine and DMF=N,N Prime -dimethylformamide), have been solvothermally synthesized based on the insertion of heterogeneous BPH pillars. Framework 1 has 'single-pillared' MOF-5-like motif with inner cage diameters of up to 18.6 A. Framework 2 has 'double pillared' MOF-5-like motif with cage diameters of 19.2 A while 3 has 'double pillared' 8-connected framework with channel diameters of 11.0 A. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) shows that 3 is a dynamic porous framework. - Graphical abstract: By insertion of flexible BPH pillars based on 'pillaring' strategy, three metal-organic frameworks are obtained showing that the porous frameworks can be constructed in a much greater variety. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Frameworks 1 and 2 have MOF-5 like motif. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cube-like cages in 1 and 2 are quite large, comparable to the IRMOF-10. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Framework 1 is 'single-pillared' mode while 2 is 'double-pillared' mode. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PXRD and gas adsorption analysis show that 3 is a dynamic porous framework.

  12. Preparation of Tunable 3D Pillared Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Networks for High-Performance Capacitance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    puter modeling has predicted that such a 3D pillared VACNT graphene structure can be used for efficient hydrogen storage after being doped with...Pillared Carbon Nanotube Graphene Networks for High-Performance Capacitance Feng Du,†,§ Dingshan Yu,†,§ Liming Dai,†,* S. Ganguli,‡ V. Varshney,‡ and A...nanotubes (CNTs) and two-dimensional (2D) single-atomic layer graphene , have been demonstrated to show superior thermal, electrical, and mechanical

  13. Sorption of the herbicide aminocyclopyrachlor by cation modified clay minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminocyclopyrachlor is a newly registered herbicide for the control of broadleaf weeds, grasses, vines and woody species in non-crops, turf, sod farms, and residential areas. At typical soil pH levels, aminocyclopyrachlor is in the anionic form. Anionic pesticides are generally weakly retained by mo...

  14. Gas flow modelling through clay and claystones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, E.

    2012-12-01

    Large scale gas flow experiments conducted in connection with nuclear waste disposal research have shown the dominant effect of "minor" details such as interfaces, contacts and layer boundaries. Even if the scale of the analysis is highly reduced, in search of homogeneous point-like conditions, a systematic development of preferential paths is very often reported. Small size samples become boundary value problems. Preferential paths, when their thickness is modified by the stress-strain response of the media, under the combined action of stress and fluid pressure changes, become highly conductive features for gas flow. The development of preferential paths for fluid flow has been approached in a simple manner by embedding a discontinuity feature into an otherwise continuous element which models clay or claystone matrix behavior. The joint is activated when tensile strains develop in the continuous element. Then, hydraulic properties (permeability, retention behavior) are modified by means of laws derived from the physics of flow in discontinuities. The outlined idea was incorporated into a full Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical finite element code (CODE_BRIGHT) which has a wide range of capabilities for the modeling of two-phase flow in elasto-viscoplastic porous materials. A particular aspect which required attention is the modeling of expansive and shrinkage behavior induced by suction changes. In this way, healing effects during re-saturation may be simulated. Two experimental programs on clay shale samples, performed under triaxial stress conditions will be discussed. In the first case samples of Opalinus shale were subjected to a series of gas pulse decay tests during the application of stress paths involving a particular sequence of confining stress and shearing up to failure. In the second experimental program, performed on a tertiary mudstone from the Norwegian shelf, attention was paid to the effect of bedding-induced anisotropy. Experimental results will be

  15. Enclosed pillar arrays integrated on a fluidic platform for on-chip separations and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V; Taylor, Lisa; Sepaniak, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Due to the difficulty of reliably producing sealed 3-D structures, few researchers have tackled the challenges of creating pillar beds suitable for miniaturized liquid phase separation systems. Herein, we describe an original processing sequence for the fabrication of enclosed pillar arrays integrated on a fluidic chip which, we believe, will further stimulate interest in this field. Our approach yields a mechanically robust enclosed pillar system that withstands mechanical impacts commonly incurred during processing, sealing and operation, resulting in a design particularly suitable for the research environment. A combination of a wafer-level fabrication sequence with chip-level elastomer bonding allows for chip reusability, an attractive and cost efficient advancement for research applications. The characteristic features in the implemented highly ordered pillar arrays are scalable to submicron dimensions. The proposed fluidic structures are suitable for handling picolitre sample volumes and offer prospects for substantial improvements in separation efficiency and permeability over traditional packed and monolithic columns. Our experimental observations indicate plate heights as low as 0.76 {mu}m for a 10 mm long pillar bed. Theoretical calculations confirm that ordered pillar arrays with submicron pore sizes combine superior analysis speed, picolitre sample volumes, high permeability and reasonably large plate numbers on a small footprint. In addition, we describe a fluidic interface that provides streamlined coupling of the fabricated structures with off-chip fluidic components.

  16. Characterization of dorsal root ganglion neurons cultured on silicon micro-pillar substrates

    PubMed Central

    Repić, Tihana; Madirazza, Katarina; Bektur, Ezgi; Sapunar, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Our study focuses on characterization of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons cultured on silicon micro-pillar substrates (MPS) with the ultimate goal of designing micro-electrode arrays (MEAs) for successful electrophysiological recordings of DRG neurons. Adult and neonatal DRG neurons were cultured on MPS and glass coverslips for 7 days in vitro. DRG neuronal distribution and morphometric analysis, including neurite alignment and length, was performed on MPS areas with different pillar width and spacing. We showed that MPS provide an environment for growth of adult and neonatal DRG neurons as permissive as control glass surfaces. Neonatal DRG neurons were present on MPS areas with narrow pillar spacing, while adult neurons preferred wider pillar spacing. Compared to the control glass surfaces the neonatal and adult DRG neurons in regions with narrow pillar spacing range developed a smaller number of longer neurites. In the same area, neurites were preferentially oriented along three directional axes at 30°, 90° and 150°. MPS architecture influenced growth directionality of all main DRG neuronal subtypes. We can conclude that specific micro-pillar substrate topography affects the morphology of DRG neurons. This knowledge can enable development of MEAs with precisely defined physical features for various neuroscience applications. PMID:28008963

  17. Removal of nitrate by zero-valent iron and pillared bentonite.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfa; Li, Yimin; Meng, Qingling

    2010-02-15

    The pillared bentonite prepared by intercalating poly(hydroxo Al(III)) cations into bentonite interlayers was used together with Fe(0) for removing nitrate in column experiments. The obvious synergetic effect on nitrate removal was exhibited through uniformly mixing the pillared bentonite with Fe(0). In such a mixing manner, the nitrate was 100% removed, and the removal efficiency was much higher than the simple summation of adsorption by the pillared bentonite and reduction by Fe(0). The influencing factors such as bentonite type, amount of the pillared bentonite and initial pH of nitrate solutions were investigated. In this uniform mixture, the pillared bentonite could adsorb nitrate ions, and facilitated the mass transfer of nitrate onto Fe(0) surface, then accelerated the nitrate reduction. The pillared bentonite could also act as the proton-donor, and helped to keep the complete nitrate removal for at least 10h even when the nitrate solution was fed at nearly neutral pH.

  18. Surface properties of bionic micro-pillar arrays with various shapes of tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Zhao, Aiwu; Jiang, Rui; Li, Da; Zhang, Maofeng; Gan, Zibao; Tao, Wenyu; Guo, Hongyan; Mei, Tao

    2012-10-01

    Gecko-inspired micro-pillar arrays with various tip structures including spatular, spherical and concave tips were fabricated by a facile soft-molding method. The tip structures of micro-pillar arrays strongly depend on different curing processes in soft-molding using the same template. The adhesion and the wetting properties of these micro-pillar arrays are investigated by means of triboindenter and optical contact angle measurement. The results suggest that the surface properties are determined by different tip structures of micro-pillars. The spatular tip and concave tip are helpful for the adhesion enhancement and the shape of tip can control the contact angles and stabilities of water droplets on the micro-pillar arrays. In addition, the procedures demonstrate that the present route to fabricate gecko-inspired micro-pillar arrays with various tip structures is reliable and convenient. We believe that this research may pave the road to further understanding the gecko-inspired attachment systems and designing new artificial structures for dry adhesives.

  19. Gas sensor based on ZnO film/silica pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Liang, Yaxiang; Yi, Futing; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Tianchong; Wang, Yuting; Zhou, Yue

    2016-12-01

    Silica submicron pillars are used as substrate for Zinc oxide (ZnO) gas sensor for the first time. The submicron pillars with the large surface ratio can improve the gas sensing performance obviously. Silicon pillars are fabricated by cesium chloride (CsCl) self-assembly lithography and inductively coupled plasma dry etching as substrate, the ZnO film is deposited on the pillars surface by RF magnetron sputtering. With this method, the pillar based gas sensor has the higher gas response, the shorter response and recovery time than the planar one with different working temperatures, different gas concentrations. 300 °C is the best working temperature, for planar gas sensor, the gas response is 22.81 for 1520 ppm ethanol, the response time is 55 s and the recovery time is 169 s. While for the pillar based one, the gas response is 28.20, the response time is 51 s and the recovery time is 92 s.

  20. Beyond DSM-5 and IQ Scores: Integrating the Four Pillars to Forensic Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Sergio V; Barzman, Drew H

    2017-03-01

    The current adult and child forensic psychiatrist is well trained, familiar, and comfortable with the use of the semi-structured Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition, APA 2013 (DSM-5) [In APA, 2003] interview style. The author's assertion is not that this method is invalid or unreliable; rather, that it can be complemented by integrating elements of the defendant's four pillar assessment. Assessing the four pillars expands on the information provided by a semi-structured DSM-5-style interview in psychiatry. The four pillars are the foundation of a person's personality; temperament, cognition (learning abilities or weaknesses), cognitive flexibility (theory of mind) and internal working models of attachment, within the backdrop of the family and of the social and cultural environment in which they have lived. The importance of the study of four pillars is based on the understanding that human behavior and psychopathology as a complex and multifaceted process that includes the level of social-emotional maturity and cognitive abilities (In Delgado et al. Contemporary Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents: Integrating Intersubjectivity and Neuroscience. Springer, Berlin, 2015). The four pillars are not new concepts, rather they had been studied by separate non-clinical disciplines, and had not been integrated to the clinical practice. As far as we know, it wasn't until Delgado et al. (Contemporary Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents: Integrating Intersubjectivity and Neuroscience. Springer, Berlin, 2015) incorporated the four pillars in a user-friendly manner to clinical practice.

  1. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  2. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  3. Membrane behavior of clay liner materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jong Beom

    Membrane behavior represents the ability of porous media to restrict the migration of solutes, leading to the existence of chemico-osmosis, or the flow of liquid in response to a chemical concentration gradient. Membrane behavior is an important consideration with respect to clay soils with small pores and interactive electric diffuse double layers associated with individual particles, such as bentonite. The results of recent studies indicate the existence of membrane behavior in bentonite-based hydraulic barriers used in waste containment applications. Thus, measurement of the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior in such clay soils is becoming increasingly important. Accordingly, this research focused on evaluating the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior for three clay-based materials that typically are considered for use as liners for waste containment applications, such as landfills. The three clay-based liner materials included a commercially available geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) consisting of sodium bentonite sandwiched between two geotextiles, a compacted natural clay known locally as Nelson Farm Clay, and compacted NFC amended with 5% (dry wt.) of a sodium bentonite. The study also included the development and evaluation of a new flexible-wall cell for clay membrane testing that was used subsequently to measure the membrane behaviors of the three clay liner materials. The consolidation behavior of the GCL under isotropic states of stress also was evaluated as a preliminary step in the determination of the membrane behavior of the GCL under different effective consolidation stresses.

  4. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species.

  5. An Evidence-Based Review on medicinal value of clays in traditional Persian medicine.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Montaseri, Hashem; Hosamo, Ammar; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2016-10-07

    The use of earths and clays for medical purposes dates back to antiquity. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in researches on traditional remedies in the hope of discovering new drug. Iran is an ancient country with a medical backbone acquired from the experiences of ancient Persian scholars, who had made a great contribution to the development of the medical sciences. Many medical and pharmaceutical books by early Persian scientists still exist and may have the potential of leading researchers to new drug discoveries. Owing to the emergence of new and antimicrobial-resistant infections, present-day medicine has recently begun focusing on medicinal earths and clays especially as mineral antimicrobials. The current study is, therefore, aimed at gathering information regarding medicinal clays in traditional Persian medicine (TPM). Five main Persian materia medica with the key word 'tin' (clay) and current databases such as PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were searched by key words 'white, green, red, maroon, violet, black, grey and pink clays' and 'pharmacological effects'. Twenty three clays were found in Persian manuscripts. Although their mineralogical compositions are unknown, different pharmacological properties have been attributed to these mineral medicaments. Clay's properties were widely used in medieval times for the treatment of infections to poisoning. They were also used in compound formulations, possibly for their pharmaceutical formulation modifying effects. Modern scientific proofs have also been found of many of the medicinal clays reported in Persian manuscripts. Although many of reported clays are still unknown, their characterization may lead to new medicinal developments. Novel analytical methods available today makes it possible to elucidate the chemical compositions of these minerals as parameters responsible for their medicinal effects.

  6. Facies characteristics, morphology and depositional models of clay-slide deposits in terraced fjord valleys, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Louise; Eilertsen, Raymond S.; Solberg, Inger-Lise; Sveian, Harald; Rokoengen, Kåre

    2007-12-01

    Many bedrock-confined fjord valleys along the Norwegian coast contain thick accumulations of fine-grained sediments that were deposited during and after the last deglaciation. The deposits gradually emerged above sea level due to glacioisostatic uplift, and fjord marine sedimentation was gradually followed by shallow marine and fluvial processes. During emergence terraces and river-cut slopes were formed in the valleys. Subsequent leaching of salt ions from the pore water in the marine deposits by groundwater has led to the development of quick clay. The deposits are subject to river erosion and destructive landslides involving quick clay. Most slides are of prehistoric age. Others are known from modern observations as well as from historic records. Landforms such as distinct slide scars or the hummocky terrain of slide deposits may be strongly modified by secondary processes. In addition, deposits from the most liquid part of quick clay slides may have planar surfaces. Clay-slide deposits on a fluvial or deltaic terrace, therefore, are not always easily recognized from morphology, and only exposures may reveal their internal structures and allow them to be distinguished from overbank flood sediments. Detailed sedimentological work shows that slide deposits in such setting consist of distinct facies containing reworked marine sediments. We propose three facies successions of clay-slide deposits that form a continuum. The dominant components of these succession types are: slightly deformed blocks of laminated clay and silt (A), highly deformed clay and silt with gravel clasts (B) and massive to stratified clay and silt with scattered clasts (C). We suggest that in many cases a basal muddy diamicton is a characteristic, and possibly diagnostic feature. Processes and depositional models are interpreted from the different succession types. The results may be relevant for identifying clay-slide deposits elsewhere and may be useful during general mapping of fjord marine

  7. Freeze-agglomeration: An alternative mechanism for clay film formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oriented clay coatings (argillans, clay cutans, clay films, lamellae) are often interpreted to be caused by illuviation (pervection, lessivage) of fine clay particles. In montane meadow soils (Typic Humaquepts) of the northern Sierra Nevada Range, prominent clay cutans occur on ped faces of a paleos...

  8. Deep proton writing of high aspect ratio SU-8 micro-pillars on glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Rwamucyo, Ben; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-12-01

    Deep proton writing (DPW) is a fabrication technology developed for the rapid prototyping of polymer micro-structures. We use SU-8, a negative resist, spincoated in a layer up to 720 μm-thick in a single step on borosilicate glass, for irradiation with a collimated 12 MeV energy proton beam. Micro-pillars with a slightly conical profile are irradiated in the SU-8 layer. We determine the optimal proton fluence to be 1.02 × 104 μm-2, with which we are able to repeatably achieve micro-pillars with a top-diameter of 138 ± 1 μm and a bottom-diameter of 151 ± 3 μm. The smallest fabricated pillars have a top-diameter of 57 ± 5 μm. We achieved a root-mean-square sidewall surface roughness between 19 nm and 35 nm for the fabricated micro-pillars, measured over an area of 5 × 63.7 μm. We briefly discuss initial testing of two potential applications of the fabricated micro-pillars. Using ∼100 μm-diameter pillars as waveguides for gigascale integration optical interconnect applications, has shown a 4.7 dB improvement in optical multimode fiber-to-fiber coupling as compared to the case where an air-gap is present between the fibers at the telecom wavelength of 1550 nm. The ∼140 μm-diameter pillars were used for mold fabrication with silicone casting. The resulting mold can be used for hydrogel casting, to obtain hydrogel replicas mimicking human tissue for in vitro bio-chemical applications.

  9. Relations between Eastern Four Pillars Theory and Western Measures of Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung Ah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study investigated the validity of personality classification using four pillars theory, a tradition in China and northeastern Asia. Materials and Methods Four pillars analyses were performed for 148 adults on the basis of their birth year, month, day, and hour. Participants completed two personality tests, the Korean version of Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised-Short Version (TCI) and the Korean Inventory of Interpersonal Problems; scores were correlated with four pillars classification elements. Mean difference tests (e.g., t-test, ANOVA) were compared with groups classified by four pillars index. Results There were no significant correlations between personality scale scores and total yin/yang number (i.e., the 8 heavenly or earthly stems), and no significant between-groups results for classifications by yin/yang day stem and the five elements. There were significant but weak (r=0.18-0.29) correlations between the five elements and personality scale scores. For the six gods and personality scales, there were significant but weak (r=0.18-0.25) correlations. Features predicted by four pillars theory were most consistent when participants were grouped according to the yin/yang of the day stem and dominance of yin/yang numbers in the eight heavenly or earthly stems. Conclusion Although the major criteria of four pillars theory were not independently correlated with personality scale scores, correlations emerged when participants were grouped according to the composite yin/yang variable. Our results suggest the utility of four pillars theory (beyond fortune telling or astrology) for classifying personality traits and making behavioral predictions. PMID:25837175

  10. A three-pillar approach to assessing climate impacts on low flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaha, Gregor; Parajka, Juraj; Viglione, Alberto; Koffler, Daniel; Haslinger, Klaus; Schöner, Wolfgang; Zehetgruber, Judith; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a framework for assessing climate impacts on future low flows that combines different sources of information, termed pillars. To illustrate the framework three pillars are chosen: (a) extrapolation of observed low-flow trends into the future, (b) rainfall-runoff projections based on climate scenarios and (c) extrapolation of changing stochastic rainfall characteristics into the future combined with rainfall-runoff modelling. Alternative pillars could be included in the overall framework. The three pillars are combined by expert judgement based on a synoptic view of data, model outputs and process reasoning. The consistency/inconsistency between the pillars is considered an indicator of the certainty/uncertainty of the projections. The viability of the framework is illustrated for four example catchments from Austria that represent typical climate conditions in central Europe. In the Alpine region where winter low flows dominate, trend projections and climate scenarios yield consistently increasing low flows, although of different magnitudes. In the region north of the Alps, consistently small changes are projected by all methods. In the regions in the south and south-east, more pronounced and mostly decreasing trends are projected but there is disagreement in the magnitudes of the projected changes. The process reasons for the consistencies/inconsistencies are discussed. For an Alpine region such as Austria the key to understanding low flows is whether they are controlled by freezing and snowmelt processes, or by the summer moisture deficit associated with evaporation. It is argued that the three-pillar approach offers a systematic framework of combining different sources of information aimed at more robust projections than that obtained from each pillar alone.

  11. Data supporting attempted caveolae-mediated phagocytosis of surface-fixed micro-pillars by human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Moerke, Caroline; Mueller, Petra; Nebe, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    The provided data contains the phagocytic interaction of human MG-63 osteoblasts with micro-particles 6 µm in size as well as geometric micro-pillared topography with micro-pillar sizes 5 µm of length, width, height and spacing respectively related to the research article entitled "Attempted caveolae-mediated phagocytosis of surface-fixed micro-pillars by human osteoblasts" in the Biomaterials journal. [1] Micro-particle treatment was used as positive control triggering phagocytosis by the osteoblasts. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) as major structural component of caveolae [2] plays an important role in the phagocytic process of micro-particles and -pillars. Data related to the experiments in [1] with siRNA-mediated knockdown are presented here as well as micro-particle control experiments, tubulin analysis on the micro-pillared topography and initial cell interaction with the micro-pillars.

  12. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  13. Clay smear: Review of mechanisms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrolijk, Peter J.; Urai, Janos L.; Kettermann, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Clay smear is a collection of fault processes and resulting fault structures that form when normal faults deform layered sedimentary sections. These elusive structures have attracted deep interest from researchers interested in subsurface fluid flow, particularly in the oil and gas industry. In the four decades since the association between clay-smear structures and oil and gas accumulations was introduced, there has been extensive research into the fault processes that create clay smear and the resulting effects of that clay smear on fluid flow. We undertake a critical review of the literature associated with outcrop studies, laboratory and numerical modeling, and subsurface field studies of clay smear and propose a comprehensive summary that encompasses all of these elements. Important fault processes that contribute to clay smear are defined in the context of the ratio of rock strength and in situ effective stresses, the geometric evolution of fault systems, and the composition of the faulted section. We find that although there has been progress in all avenues pursued, progress has been uneven, and the processes that disrupt clay smears are mostly overlooked. We highlight those research areas that we think will yield the greatest benefit and suggest that taking these emerging results within a more process-based framework presented here will lead to a new generation of clay smear models.

  14. Surface geochemistry of the clay minerals

    PubMed Central

    Sposito, Garrison; Skipper, Neal T.; Sutton, Rebecca; Park, Sung-ho; Soper, Alan K.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    1999-01-01

    Clay minerals are layer type aluminosilicates that figure in terrestrial biogeochemical cycles, in the buffering capacity of the oceans, and in the containment of toxic waste materials. They are also used as lubricants in petroleum extraction and as industrial catalysts for the synthesis of many organic compounds. These applications derive fundamentally from the colloidal size and permanent structural charge of clay mineral particles, which endow them with significant surface reactivity. Unraveling the surface geochemistry of hydrated clay minerals is an abiding, if difficult, topic in earth sciences research. Recent experimental and computational studies that take advantage of new methodologies and basic insights derived from the study of concentrated ionic solutions have begun to clarify the structure of electrical double layers formed on hydrated clay mineral surfaces, particularly those in the interlayer region of swelling 2:1 layer type clay minerals. One emerging trend is that the coordination of interlayer cations with water molecules and clay mineral surface oxygens is governed largely by cation size and charge, similarly to a concentrated ionic solution, but the location of structural charge within a clay layer and the existence of hydrophobic patches on its surface provide important modulations. The larger the interlayer cation, the greater the influence of clay mineral structure and hydrophobicity on the configurations of adsorbed water molecules. This picture extends readily to hydrophobic molecules adsorbed within an interlayer region, with important implications for clay–hydrocarbon interactions and the design of catalysts for organic synthesis. PMID:10097044

  15. Uranium in clays of crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.; Caruso, L.

    1985-03-10

    Uraniferous clay aggregates in several granites have been examined in detail with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a high resolution backscattered electron detector (BSE) and an energy dispersive x-ray system (EDS). The same polished sections used for the microscope observations were irradiated with thermal neutrons and the etched lexan detectors were then used to determine the location of uranium with a spatial resolution of a few microns. A set of 100 samples of the following granites were used for this study: Carnmenellis granite of southwestern England, Conway and Mount Osceola granites of central New Hampshire, Sherman granite of Wyoming and Colorado, Granite Mountains granite of Wyoming, several granites from central Maine, and the Graniteville granite of Missouri. These samples contain clay rich regions as large as a few millimeters that appear to consist entirely of clay when examined with the petrographic microscope. The clays are smectite, nontronite, or vermiculite. The fission track detectors show uranium to be present within the regions. Close examination with the BSE and EDS, however, shows in every instance that the host for the uranium is not clay but clay-sized grains of the following minerals: bastnesite group, hematite, siderite, secondary monazite, secondary thorite, and several different Y-bearing niobates. This finding may have severe implications for the long-term retention of uranium and transuranic elements adsorbed on clay. Perhaps the presence of clay is not significant for the long-term retention of radioisotopes. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Using Clay Therapy To Change Negative Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Victoria

    This manual describes a clay therapy program appropriate for use with students having a variety of exceptionalities and in an age range from 6 to 18 years. Organization and staffing are briefly discussed followed by a list of long range goals (affective, motoric, and aesthetic), suggestions for clay therapy implementation to achieve these goals,…

  17. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  18. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  19. Using submarine lava pillars to record mid-ocean ridge eruption dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, Tracy K.P.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Perfit, Michael R.; Ridley, W. Ian; Kurz, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    Submarine lava pillars are hollow, glass-lined, basaltic cylinders that occur at the axis of the mid-ocean ridge, and within the summit calderas of some seamounts. Typically, pillars are ~1-20 m tall and 0.25-2.0 m in diameter, with subhorizontal to horizontal glassy selvages on their exterior walls. Lava pillars form gradually during a single eruption, and are composed of lava emplaced at the eruption onset as well as the last lava remaining after the lava pond has drained. On the deep sea floor, the surface of a basaltic lava flow quenches to glass within 1 s, thereby preserving information about eruption dynamics, as well as chemical and physical properties of lava within a single eruption. Investigation of different lava pillars collected from a single eruption allows us to distinguish surficial lava-pond or lava-lake geochemical processes from those operating in the magma chamber. Morphologic, major-element, petrographic and helium analyses were performed on portions of three lava pillars formed during the April 1991 eruption near 9°50'N at the axis of the East Pacific Rise. Modeling results indicate that the collected portions of pillars formed in ~2-5 h, suggesting a total eruption duration of ~8-20 h. These values are consistent with observed homogeneity in the glass helium concentrations and helium diffusion rates. Major-element compositions of most pillar glasses are homogeneous and identical to the 1991 flow, but slight chemical variations measured in the outermost portions of some pillars may reflect post-eruptive processes rather than those occurring in subaxial magma bodies. Because lava pillars are common at mid-ocean ridges (MORs), the concepts and techniques we present here may have important application to the study of MOR eruptions, thereby providing a basis for quantitative comparisons of volcanic eruptions in geographically and tectonically diverse settings. More research is needed to thoroughly test the hypotheses presented here. (C) 2000

  20. In situ characterization of organo-modified and unmodified montmorillonite aqueous suspensions by UV-visible spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Alin, Jonas; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2015-10-15

    UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy (Tyndall spectra) was applied and tested for its ability to measure organo-modified and unmodified montmorillonite (MMT) clays in aqueous suspensions. A full factorial design of experiments was used to study the influence of pH, NaCl and clay concentrations on the average particle size of the clay agglomerates. The methodology was evaluated by observing results that were consistent with previous research about the unmodified clay's behavior in aqueous suspensions. The results from this evaluation corresponded to accepted theories about the unmodified clay's behavior, indicating that the methodology is precise enough to distinguish the effects of the studied factors on these clay suspensions. The effect of clay concentration was related to the amount of ions per clay particle for the unmodified clay, but was not significant for the organo-modified MMT. The average particle size of the organo-modified MMT in suspension was significantly larger than that of the unmodified clay. Size of the organo-modified MMT agglomerates in suspension decreased in the presence of NaCl and at both high and low pH; this behavior was opposite to that of the unmodified clay. These results demonstrate that the UV-Vis methodology is well-suited for characterizing clay particle size in aqueous suspensions. The technique also is simple, rapid, and low-cost.

  1. Characterization of AlFe-pillared Unye bentonite: A study of the surface acidity and catalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar, Bulent; Cubuk, Osman; Demir, Ersin; Coldur, Fatih; Catir, Mustafa; Topcu, Cihan; Tabak, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    Aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite has been prepared by incorporation of the iron mixed aluminium-polyoxocation into bentonite layers and characterized by the powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, thermal analysis and surface area measurement techniques. The characteristic d001 basal spacing of raw bentonite increased with the pillaring process and reached to 18.05 Å. The siloxane layers of bentonite were perturbed and the positions of Si-O stretching vibrations were altered by pillaring process. However, these pillars in the interlayer gallery spacing enhanced the thermal stability of bentonite. The new micropores were formed by the pillaring process and the specific surface area of raw bentonite increased by ca. 2-fold for aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite. FTIR spectra and thermal analysis curves of pyridine adsorbed samples clearly show that the surface Lewis acidity of aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite is greater than that of raw bentonite. Raw and aluminium-iron-pillared bentonites have been utilized as solid catalysts for benzoylation of benzene with benzoyl chloride. The aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite catalyst showed promising catalytic activity whereas raw bentonite showed no catalytic activity in benzoylation of benzene with benzoyl chloride.

  2. Evolution and Engineering of Precisely Controlled Ge Nanostructures on Scalable Array of Ordered Si Nano-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuguang; Zhou, Tong; Li, Dehui; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2016-06-01

    The scalable array of ordered nano-pillars with precisely controllable quantum nanostructures (QNs) are ideal candidates for the exploration of the fundamental features of cavity quantum electrodynamics. It also has a great potential in the applications of innovative nano-optoelectronic devices for the future quantum communication and integrated photon circuits. Here, we present a synthesis of such hybrid system in combination of the nanosphere lithography and the self-assembly during heteroepitaxy. The precise positioning and controllable evolution of self-assembled Ge QNs, including quantum dot necklace(QDN), QD molecule(QDM) and quantum ring(QR), on Si nano-pillars are readily achieved. Considering the strain relaxation and the non-uniform Ge growth due to the thickness-dependent and anisotropic surface diffusion of adatoms on the pillars, the comprehensive scenario of the Ge growth on Si pillars is discovered. It clarifies the inherent mechanism underlying the controllable growth of the QNs on the pillar. Moreover, it inspires a deliberate two-step growth procedure to engineer the controllable QNs on the pillar. Our results pave a promising avenue to the achievement of desired nano-pillar-QNs system that facilitates the strong light-matter interaction due to both spectra and spatial coupling between the QNs and the cavity modes of a single pillar and the periodic pillars.

  3. Evolution and Engineering of Precisely Controlled Ge Nanostructures on Scalable Array of Ordered Si Nano-pillars

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuguang; Zhou, Tong; Li, Dehui; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2016-01-01

    The scalable array of ordered nano-pillars with precisely controllable quantum nanostructures (QNs) are ideal candidates for the exploration of the fundamental features of cavity quantum electrodynamics. It also has a great potential in the applications of innovative nano-optoelectronic devices for the future quantum communication and integrated photon circuits. Here, we present a synthesis of such hybrid system in combination of the nanosphere lithography and the self-assembly during heteroepitaxy. The precise positioning and controllable evolution of self-assembled Ge QNs, including quantum dot necklace(QDN), QD molecule(QDM) and quantum ring(QR), on Si nano-pillars are readily achieved. Considering the strain relaxation and the non-uniform Ge growth due to the thickness-dependent and anisotropic surface diffusion of adatoms on the pillars, the comprehensive scenario of the Ge growth on Si pillars is discovered. It clarifies the inherent mechanism underlying the controllable growth of the QNs on the pillar. Moreover, it inspires a deliberate two-step growth procedure to engineer the controllable QNs on the pillar. Our results pave a promising avenue to the achievement of desired nano-pillar-QNs system that facilitates the strong light-matter interaction due to both spectra and spatial coupling between the QNs and the cavity modes of a single pillar and the periodic pillars. PMID:27353231

  4. Experimental determination of gamma-ray discrimination in pillar-structured thermal neutron detectors under high gamma-ray flux

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Qinghui; Conway, Adam M.; Voss, Lars F.; Radev, Radoslav P.; Nikolić, Rebecca J.; Dar, Mushtaq A.; Cheung, Chin L.

    2015-08-04

    Silicon pillar structures filled with a neutron converter material (10B) are designed to have high thermal neutron detection efficiency with specific dimensions of 50 μm pillar height, 2 μm pillar diameter and 2 μm spacing between adjacent pillars. In this paper, we have demonstrated such a detector has a high neutron-to-gamma discrimination of 106 with a high thermal neutron detection efficiency of 39% when exposed to a high gamma-ray field of 109 photons/cm2s.

  5. ABIOTIC REDOX TRANSFORMATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AT THE CLAY-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions of clay, water and organic compounds considerably modify the structural and physico-chemical properties of all components and create a unique domain for biological and chemical species in environments. Previous research indicates that the nature and properties of...

  6. Clay-based Formulations to Reduce the Environmental Impact of the Herbicide Terbuthylazine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled release formulations of pesticides are receiving increasing attention as a way to reduce the environmental impact of pesticides after their application to agricultural soils. Natural and modified clay minerals have been proved to be efficient adsorbents for many pesticides and, accordingl...

  7. Estimating the coordinates of pillars and posts in the parking lots for intelligent parking assist system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae Hyung; Kuk, Jung Gap; Kim, Young Il; Cho, Nam Ik

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm for the detection of pillars or posts in the video captured by a single camera implemented on the fore side of a room mirror in a car. The main purpose of this algorithm is to complement the weakness of current ultrasonic parking assist system, which does not well find the exact position of pillars or does not recognize narrow posts. The proposed algorithm is consisted of three steps: straight line detection, line tracking, and the estimation of 3D position of pillars. In the first step, the strong lines are found by the Hough transform. Second step is the combination of detection and tracking, and the third is the calculation of 3D position of the line by the analysis of trajectory of relative positions and the parameters of camera. Experiments on synthetic and real images show that the proposed method successfully locates and tracks the position of pillars, which helps the ultrasonic system to correctly locate the edges of pillars. It is believed that the proposed algorithm can also be employed as a basic element for vision based autonomous driving system.

  8. Dynamic behavior of water droplets on solid surfaces with pillar-type nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woog-Jin; Ha, Man Yeong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Ambrosia, Matthew

    2012-03-27

    In the present study, we investigated the static and dynamic behavior of water droplets on solid surfaces featuring pillar-type nanostructures by using molecular dynamics simulations. We carried out the computation in two stages. As a result of the first computational stage, an initial water cube reached an equilibrium state at which the water droplet showed different shapes depending on the height and the lateral and gap dimensions of the pillars. In the second computational stage, we applied a constant body force to the static water droplet obtained from the first computational stage and evaluated the dynamic behavior of the water droplet as it slid along the pillar-type surface. The dynamic behavior of the water droplet, which could be classified into three different groups, depended on the static state of the water droplet, the pillar characteristics (e.g., height and the lateral and gap dimensions of the pillars), and the magnitude of the applied body force. We obtained the advancing and receding contact angles and the corresponding contact angle hysteresis of the water droplets, which helped classify the water droplets into the three different groups.

  9. Multifaceted role of clay minerals in pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Inderpreet Singh; Kaur, Satvinder; Kaur, Harpreet; Khurana, Rajneet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The desirable physical and physiochemical properties of clay minerals have led them to play a substantial role in pharmaceutical formulations. Clay minerals like kaolin, smectite and palygorskite-sepiolite are among the world's most valuable industrial minerals and of considerable importance. The elemental features of clay minerals which caused them to be used in pharmaceutical formulations are high specific area, sorption capacity, favorable rheological properties, chemical inertness, swelling capacity, reactivity to acids and inconsiderable toxicity. Of course, these are highly cost effectual. This special report on clay minerals provides a bird's eye view of the chemical composition and structure of these minerals and their influence on the release properties of active medicinal agents. Endeavor has been made to rope in myriad applications depicting the wide acceptability of these clay minerals. PMID:28031881

  10. Release kinetics of volatiles from clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Pascal

    2007-03-01

    Smectite clay minerals are known to have interesting sorption properties, but the prediction of the kinetics of desorption of volatile molecules from such clays remains a challenge. The aim of this work is to relate the isothermal rate of desorption of volatile molecules from cation exchanged smectite clays to the chemical structures and geometries of the interacting species (clay platelet surface, type of counter-ion, type of volatile). It is thought that the rate of desorption of the volatiles at a given time is governed by their instantaneous diffusion in the clay and in the gas phase, which in turns is dependent on the volatile's interaction with its chemical and geometrical environment. Therefore, in addition to isothermal desorption rate measurements by thermogravimetry, activation energies of desorption are measured and calculated and the interacting compounds are characterized in terms of their chemical structure and geometry.

  11. Clays and other minerals in prebiotic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Clays and other minerals have been investigated in context with prebiotic processes, mainly in polymerization of amino acids. It was found that peptides adsorbed on the clay, prior to polymerization, influence the reaction. The ratio between the amount of the peptides adsorbed and that of the clay is important for the yield as well as for the degrees of polymerization obtained. Adsorption prior to reaction produces a certain order in the aggregates of the clay particles which might induce better reaction results. Excess of added peptides disturbs this order and causes lesser degrees of polymerization. In addition to adsorption, clays are also able to occlude between their layers substances out of the environment, up to very high concentrations.

  12. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, November 9, 1992--February 8, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    The mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron catalysts have been shown in previous reports of this project to significantly improve yields of heptane-soluble products obtained in the liquefaction of both as received and acid-exchanged Wyodak subbituminous coal and Blind Canyon bituminous coal. In this quarter, the soluble product (LSW) obtained from the noncatalytic low-severity liquefaction of Wyodak coal was used as a feed to determine the activity of iron based catalysts for the hydrogenation and depolymerization steps. Comparison data for liquefaction of the soluble LSW with other catalysts were desired, and these data were obtained for a dispersed form of iron sulfide, prepared via iron hydroxyoxide (PETC method). The iron oxyhydroxide catalyst was directly precipitated on LSW product using either water or ethanol as the solvent. An insight into the functioning of the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay in coal liquefaction was investigated by preparing and studying an iron oxoaluminate structure. An investigation of new methods for the production of tetralin soluble iron oxometallate catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. The hydrogenation activity of iron oxoaluminate was investigated using pyrene and 1-methylnaphthalene as the test compounds, and results were compared with thermal reactions. In order to determine the loss of activity, recovered catalyst was recycled a second time for the hydrotreating of pyrene. Reaction of 1-methylnaphthalene with iron oxoaluminate also gave very high conversion to 1- and 5-methyltetralins and small amount of 2- and 6-methyltetralins. Liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous and Blind Canyon bituminous coal was investigated using an in situ sulfided soluble iron oxoaluminate catalyst.

  13. Effect of the local clay distribution on the effective electrical conductivity of clay rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosenza, P.; Prêt, D.; Zamora, M.

    2015-01-01

    The "local porosity theory" proposed by Hilfer was revisited to develop a "local clay theory" (LCT) that establishes a quantitative relationship between the effective electrical conductivity and clay distribution in clay rocks. This theory is primarily based on a "local simplicity" assumption; under this assumption, the complexity of spatial clay distribution can be captured by two local functions, namely, the local clay distribution and the local percolation probability, which are calculated from a partitioning of a mineral map. The local clay distribution provides information about spatial clay fluctuations, and the local percolation probability describes the spatial fluctuations in the clay connectivity. This LCT was applied to (a) a mineral map made from a Callovo-Oxfordian mudstone sample and (b) (macroscopic) electrical conductivity measurements performed on the same sample. The direct and inverse modeling shows two results. First, the textural and classical model assuming that the electrical anisotropy of clay rock is mainly controlled by the anisotropy of the sole clay matrix provides inconsistent inverted values. Another textural effect, the anisotropy induced by elongated and oriented nonclayey grains, should be considered. Second, the effective conductivity values depend primarily on the choice of the inclusion-based models used in the LCT. The impact of local fluctuations of clay content and connectivity on the calculated effective conductivity is lower.

  14. Interfacial interactions between polyethylene matrix and clay layers in polyethylene/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Zurayk, R.

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene/clay nanocomposites were prepared as blown films using different formulae (clay contents (4 and 6 wt%) and compatibilizer/clay ratio (1/2, 1.0, 2.0)). Structure and mechanical behaviour were tested. It was found that blown film extrusion process decreased the tactoids size and consequently enhanced the exfoliation degree of the clay layers inside the polymer matrix, which is due to the elongational stress during extrusion. Addition of clay had some effects on mechanical behaviour. There was an increase of yield strength (max 32%). Yield strength is related to the interfacial interaction between the polymer and the clay layers in the nanocomposites, which would be enhanced by enhancing the compatibility between polymer and clay layers. Correlation analysis showed good correlation between compatibility and interfacial interaction parameters, and between parameters of interfacial interaction, structure and yield strength.

  15. Compatibility and Impact Resistance of Biodegradable Polymer Blends Using Clays and Natural Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yichen; Yuan, Xue; Zuo, Xianghao; Rafailovich, Miriam

    Montmorillonite clays and Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were modified by surface adsorption of resorcinol di (phenyl phosphate) (RDP) oligomers. Biodegradable poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and poly (butylene adipate-co-butylene terephthalate) (PBAT) polymers were blended together with RDP coated clays and tubes. TEM images of thin sections indicated that even though both RDP coated clay nanotubes and platelets located on the interfacial region between two immiscible polymers, only the platelets, having the larger aspect ratio, were able to reduce the PBAT domain sizes. The ability of clay platelets to partially compatibilize the blend was further confirmed by the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) which showed that the glass transition temperatures of two polymers tend to shift closer. Izod impact testing demonstrated that the rubbery PBAT phase greatly increased the impact strength of the unfilled blend, but addition of only 5% of clay filler decrease the impact strength by nearly 50% while a small increase was observed with nanotubes at that concentration. A simple model is proposed. The clay platelets are observed to cover the interfacial area. Although they are effective at reducing the interfacial tension, they block the entanglements between two polymer phase and increase the overall brittleness. On the other hand, the HNTs are observed to lie perpendicular to the interface, which makes them less effective in reducing interfacial tension, but far more effective at retarding micro-crack propagation.

  16. Phosphates in some missouri refractory clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.B.; Foord, E.E.; Keller, D.J.; Keller, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes in detail phosphate minerals occurring in refractory clays of Missouri and their effect on the refractory degree of the clays. The minerals identified include carbonate-fluorapatite (francolite), crandallite, goyazite, wavellite, variscite and strengite. It is emphasized that these phosphates occur only in local isolated concentrations, and not generally in Missouri refractory clays. The Missouri fireclay region comprises 2 districts, northern and southern, separated by the Missouri River In this region, clay constitutes a major part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Cheltenham Formation. The original Cheltenham mud was an argillic residue derived from leaching and dissolution of pre-Pennsylvanian carbonates. The mud accumulated on a karstic erosion surface truncating the pre-Cheltenham rocks. Fireclays of the northern district consist mainly of poorly ordered kaolinite, with variable but minor amounts of illite, chlorite and fine-grained detrital quartz. Clays of the southern district were subjected to extreme leaching that produced well-ordered kaolinite flint clays. Local desilication formed pockets of diaspora, or more commonly, kaolinite, with oolite-like nubs or burls of diaspore ("burley" clay). The phosphate-bearing materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectral analysis (SEM-EDS) and chemical analysis. Calcian goyazite was identified in a sample of diaspore, and francolite in a sample of flint clay. A veinlet of wavellite occurs in flint clay at one locality, and a veinlet of variscite-strengite at another locality. The Missouri flint-clay-hosted francolite could not have formed in the same manner as marine francolite The evidence suggests that the Cheltenham francolite precipitated from ion complexes in pore water nearly simultaneously with crystallization of kaolinite flint clay from an alumina-silica gel. Calcian goyazite is an early diagenetic addition to its diaspore host

  17. Composite Pillars with a Tunable Interface for Adhesion to Rough Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of synthetic fibrillar dry adhesives for temporary and reversible attachment to hard objects with smooth surfaces have been successfully demonstrated in previous studies. However, surface roughness induces a dramatic reduction in pull-off stresses and necessarily requires revised design concepts. Toward this aim, we introduce cylindrical two-phase single pillars, which are composed of a mechanically stiff stalk and a soft tip layer. Adhesion to smooth and rough substrates is shown to exceed that of conventional pillar structures. The adhesion characteristics can be tuned by varying the thickness of the soft tip layer, the ratio of the Young’s moduli and the curvature of the interface between the two phases. For rough substrates, adhesion values similar to those obtained on smooth substrates were achieved. Our concept of composite pillars overcomes current practical limitations caused by surface roughness and opens up fields of application where roughness is omnipresent. PMID:27997118

  18. Composite Pillars with a Tunable Interface for Adhesion to Rough Substrates.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sarah C L; Arzt, Eduard; Hensel, René

    2017-01-11

    The benefits of synthetic fibrillar dry adhesives for temporary and reversible attachment to hard objects with smooth surfaces have been successfully demonstrated in previous studies. However, surface roughness induces a dramatic reduction in pull-off stresses and necessarily requires revised design concepts. Toward this aim, we introduce cylindrical two-phase single pillars, which are composed of a mechanically stiff stalk and a soft tip layer. Adhesion to smooth and rough substrates is shown to exceed that of conventional pillar structures. The adhesion characteristics can be tuned by varying the thickness of the soft tip layer, the ratio of the Young's moduli and the curvature of the interface between the two phases. For rough substrates, adhesion values similar to those obtained on smooth substrates were achieved. Our concept of composite pillars overcomes current practical limitations caused by surface roughness and opens up fields of application where roughness is omnipresent.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Pillar Structured Solid State Thermal Neutron Detector Efficiency and Gamma Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, A; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C; Nikolic, R

    2008-06-24

    This work reports numerical simulations of a novel three-dimensionally integrated, {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B) and silicon p+, intrinsic, n+ (PIN) diode micropillar array for thermal neutron detection. The inter-digitated device structure has a high probability of interaction between the Si PIN pillars and the charged particles (alpha and {sup 7}Li) created from the neutron - {sup 10}B reaction. In this work, the effect of both the 3-D geometry (including pillar diameter, separation and height) and energy loss mechanisms are investigated via simulations to predict the neutron detection efficiency and gamma discrimination of this structure. The simulation results are demonstrated to compare well with the measurement results. This indicates that upon scaling the pillar height, a high efficiency thermal neutron detector is possible.

  20. Measurement of turbulent wall shear-stress using micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamanickam, E. P.; Nottebrock, B.; Große, S.; Sullivan, J. P.; Schröder, W.

    2013-12-01

    In experimental fluid mechanics, measuring spatially and temporally resolved wall shear-stress (WSS) has proved a challenging problem. The micro-pillar shear-stress sensor (MPS3) has been developed with the goal of filling this gap in measurement techniques. The MPS3 comprises an array of flexible micro-pillars flush mounted on the wall of a wall-bounded flow field. The deflection of these micro-pillars in the presence of a shear field is a direct measure of the WSS. This paper presents the MPS3 development work carried out by RWTH Aachen University and Purdue University. The sensor concept, static and dynamic characterization and data reduction issues are discussed. Also presented are demonstrative experiments where the MPS3 was used to measure the WSS in both water and air. The salient features of the measurement technique, sensor development issues, current capabilities and areas for improvement are highlighted.

  1. Copper pillar and memory characteristics using Al2O3 switching material for 3D architecture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel idea by using copper (Cu) pillar is proposed in this study, which can replace the through-silicon-vias (TSV) technique in future three-dimensional (3D) architecture. The Cu pillar formation under external bias in an Al/Cu/Al2O3/TiN structure is simple and low cost. The Cu pillar is formed in the Al2O3 film under a small operation voltage of <5 V and a high-current-carrying conductor of >70 mA is obtained. More than 100 devices have shown tight distribution of the Cu pillars in Al2O3 film for high current compliance (CC) of 70 mA. Robust read pulse endurances of >106 cycles are observed with read voltages of −1, 1, and 4 V. However, read endurance is failed with read voltages of −1.5, −2, and −4 V. By decreasing negative read voltage, the read endurance is getting worst, which is owing to ruptured Cu pillar. Surface roughness and TiO x N y on TiN bottom electrode are observed by atomic force microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The Al/Cu/Al2O3/TiN memory device shows good bipolar resistive switching behavior at a CC of 500 μA under small operating voltage of ±1 V and good data retention characteristics of >103 s with acceptable resistance ratio of >10 is also obtained. This suggests that high-current operation will help to form Cu pillar and lower-current operation will have bipolar resistive switching memory. Therefore, this new Cu/Al2O3/TiN structure will be benefited for 3D architecture in the future. PMID:25136279

  2. Three dimensional finite element simulations of room and pillar mines in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1996-05-01

    3-D quasistatic finite element codes are being used at Sandia to simulate large room and pillar mines in rock salt. The two examples presented in this paper are of mines supported by US DOE, under the auspices of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve program. One of the mines is presently used as an oil storage facility. These simulations, validated by field measurements and observations, have provided valuable insight into the failure mechanisms of room and pillar mines in rock salt. The calculations provided the basis for further investigation and the ultimate decision to decommission the DOE oil storage facility.

  3. Subwavelength photonic crystal waveguide with trapezoidal shaped dielectric pillars in optical systems

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Xiaochuan; Chen, Ray T.

    2017-02-07

    A method for reducing loss in a subwavelength photonic crystal waveguide bend is disclosed. The method comprising: forming the subwavelength photonic crystal waveguide bend with a series of trapezoidal shaped dielectric pillars centered about a bend radius; wherein each of the trapezoidal shaped dielectric pillars comprise a top width, a bottom width, and a trapezoid height; wherein the length of the bottom width is greater than the length of the top width; and wherein the bottom width is closer to the center of the bend radius of the subwavelength photonic crystal waveguide bend than the top width. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  4. Bis-15-crown-5-ether-pillar[5]arene K(+)-Responsive Channels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei-Xu; Sun, Zhanhu; Zhang, Yan; Legrand, Yves-Marie; Petit, Eddy; Su, Cheng-Yong; Barboiu, Mihail

    2017-03-17

    An artificial selective K(+) channel is formed from the supramolecular organization on bis(benzo-15-crown-5- ether-ureido)-pillar[5]arene compound. This channel achieves a selectivity of SK(+)/Na(+) = 5 for an initial transport rate of kK(+) = 3.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). The cation-file diffusion occurs via selective macrocyclic-filters anchored on inactive supporting pillar[5]arene relays. The sandwich-type binding geometry of the K(+) cation by two 15-crown-5 moieties sites is a key feature influencing channel efficiency.

  5. Synthetic organo- and polymer- clays : preparation, characterization, and materials applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Chemistry

    2000-01-01

    We have over the years developed and patented a general technique for the hydrothermal synthesis of clay minerals in the presence of organic, organometallic, and polymeric intercalants. This review will summarize the details for crystallization of modified hectorites along with their characterization and materials applications. Among the several potential uses of these synthetic materials, there are two important applications concerning catalysis and composites. The fate of the template dictates which of these applications is pertinent. First, if the organic molecule or polymer is used with the intention of acting as templates of pore structure, then the organic template is removed after the modified clay has been crystallized. Upon template removal, the now porous materials are examined for their use as potential catalysts and catalyst supports. We have recently proven a correlation between catalyst pore size in the mesoporous range and the size and concentration of a polymeric template that is used. Preliminary hydrodesulfurization catalytic results have been obtained using these materials. If, on the other hand, intercalants are allowed to remain as a part of the structure, then a distinctive class of organic-inorganic composites becomes possible. When polymeric intercalants are used, especially at high concentrations, the materials have relevance to nanocomposite applications. Work in this area has focused on incorporating polymers at higher than 85 wt.% of the nanocomposite.

  6. Modification and characterization of montmorillonite clay for the extraction of zearalenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Kerri-Ann Alicia

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of organisms belonging to the fungus kingdom. The cost associated with mycotoxin contamination in the USA and Canada is approximately US $5 billion. Zearalenone (ZEN), a resorcylic acid lactone, is produced by various members of the genus Fusarium . These fungi often colonize a variety of foods and feedstuffs including, corn, sorghum, wheat, oats, barley, and other cereal grains. This metabolite has estrogenic effects in farm animals with pigs being the most sensitive. ZEN induces hyperestrogenism and can cause infertility, reduced sex drive, fetal mummification, and abortions. Clays have successfully been used in the animal feed industry as an adsorbent and binders for certain small, water soluble mycotoxins. These mycotoxins are attracted to the electrical imbalance between the layers of the clays caused by isomorphic substitution of structural atoms. The mycotoxins are sequestered in the clay layers and pass harmlessly through the animal. However, ZEN is water insoluble and is not extracted easily with aluminosilicate clays. Therefore the modification of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS) clays with organic cations has been proposed to render the clays hydrophobic and increase the ZEN binding capacity. The goal of this study was to develop a safe and cost effective organophilic material able to bind and extract zearalenone, to investigate the factors most important to extraction, and to investigate the fundamental properties between the clay-surfactant-mycotoxin systems that lead to extraction. The clay was modified by cation exchange reactions with tricaprylmethylammonium (TCMA) chloride and generic corn oil. The organophilic clays were then characterized using XRD, FTIR, and TGA analytical techniques. These techniques were used to determine the change in fundamental clay properties that would lead to the extraction of ZEN. Desorption studies were performed to determine any increase in toxicity that might be

  7. Effect of the presence of an ordered micro-pillar array on the formation of silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Detobel, Frederik; Eghbali, Hamed; De Bruyne, Selm; Terryn, Herman; Gardeniers, Han; Desmet, Gert

    2009-10-30

    We report on the synthesis of siloxane-based monoliths in the presence of a two-dimensional, perfectly ordered array of micro-pillars. Both methyltrimethoxysilane- and tetramethoxysilane-based monoliths were considered. The obtained structures were analyzed using scanning-electron microscopy and can be explained from the general theory of surface-directed phase separation in confined spaces. The formed structures are to a large extent nearly exclusively determined by the ratio between the bulk domain size of the monolith on the one hand and the distance between the micro-pillars on the other hand. When this ratio is small, the presence of the pillars has nearly no effect on the morphology of the produced monoliths. However, when the ratio approaches unity and ascends above it, some new types of monolith morphologies are induced, two of which appear to have interesting properties for use as novel chromatographic supports. One of these structures (obtained when the domain size/inter-pillar distance ratio is around unity) is a 3D network of linear interconnections between the pillars, organized such that all skeleton branches are oriented perpendicular to the micro-pillar surface. A second interesting structure is obtained at even higher values of the domain size/inter-pillar distance ratio. In this case, each individual micro-pillar is uniformly coated with a mesoporous shell.

  8. Development of sequence-tagged site markers linked to the pillar growth type in peach (Prunus persica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], trees showing columnar [also termed pillar or broomy] growth habit are of interest for high density production systems. While the selection of the columnar homozygote (pillar) phenotype (brbr) can be carried out prior to field planting, the intermediate hetero...

  9. Pillar shape modulation in epitaxial BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 vertical nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Aimon, Nicolas M.; Ross, C. A.

    2014-08-01

    Self-assembled epitaxial CoFe2O4-BiFeO3 nanocomposite films, in which pillars of CoFe2O4 grow within a single crystal BiFeO3 matrix, show both ferrimagnetism and ferroelectricity. The pillars typically have a uniform cross-section, but here two methods are demonstrated to produce a width modulation during growth by pulsed laser deposition. This was achieved by growing a blocking layer of BiFeO3 to produce layers of separated pillars or pillars with constrictions, or by changing the temperature during growth to produce bowling-pin shaped pillars. Modulated nanocomposites showed changes in their magnetic anisotropy compared to nanocomposites with uniform width. The magnetic anisotropy was interpreted as a result of magnetoelastic and shape anisotropies.

  10. Physics of band-gap formation and its evolution in the pillar-based phononic crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali Asghar; Adibi, Ali; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-07-07

    In this paper, the interplay of Bragg scattering and local resonance is theoretically studied in a phononic crystal (PnC) structure composed of a silicon membrane with periodic tungsten pillars. The comparison of phononic band gaps (PnBGs) in three different lattice types (i.e., square, triangular, and honeycomb) with different pillar geometries shows that different PnBGs have varying degrees of dependency on the lattice symmetry based on the interplay of the local resonances and the Bragg effect. The details of this interplay is discussed. The significance of locally resonating pillars, specially in the case of tall pillars, on PnBGs is discussed and verified by examining the PnBG position and width in perturbed lattices via Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the PnBGs caused by the local resonance of the pillars are more resilient to the lattice perturbations than those caused by Bragg scattering.

  11. Fabrication of high-aspect ratio Si pillars for atom probe 'lift-out' and field ionization tips.

    PubMed

    Morris, R A; Martens, R L; Zana, I; Thompson, G B

    2009-04-01

    A process for fabricating high-aspect ratio ( approximately 1:20), micron-sized Si [001] pillars using mechanical and chemical size reduction is presented. A dicing saw was used for mechanically patterning an array of square pillars with side lengths of >20mum. These pillars were then reduced in size using an aqueous NaOH and KOH solution heated to 100 degrees C. The chemical etch reduces the pillar size within the time range amenable for focus ion beam milling and/or attachment for atom probe 'lift-out' specimens. The pillars can be formed with either a flat top surface or into <100nm tip points for direct field ionization.

  12. Photochemistry on, and Nature of Adsorbed Species on Colloidal Clay and Model Clay Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-25

    model system for clays, and also acts as a bridge between ionic organic micelle systems and colloidal clays. In the first instance a commercial...hexadecylpyridinium chloride, tend to cluster on the silica surface rather than disperse uniformly around it as with ionic micelles. We have also...alcohol as additives to the clay. Layers of organic material are formed by these additives in montmorillonite layers, and now non- ionic organic

  13. Selective adsorption and chiral amplification of amino acids in vermiculite clay-implications for the origin of biochirality.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Donald G; Fitz, Daniel; Jakschitz, T; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-01-21

    Smectite clays are hydrated layer silicates that, like micas, occur naturally in abundance. Importantly, they have readily modifiable interlayer spaces that provide excellent sites for nanochemistry. Vermiculite is one such smectite clay and in the presence of small chain-length alkyl-NH(3)Cl ions forms sensitive, 1-D ordered model clay systems with expandable nano-pore inter-layer regions. These inter-layers readily adsorb organic molecules. n-Propyl NH(3)Cl vermiculite clay gels were used to determine the adsorption of alanine, lysine and histidine by chiral HPLC. The results show that during reaction with fresh vermiculite interlayers, significant chiral enrichment of either L- and D-enantiomers occurs depending on the amino acid. Chiral enrichment of the supernatant solutions is up to about 1% per pass. In contrast, addition to clay interlayers already reacted with amino acid solutions resulted in little or no change in D/L ratio during the time of the experiment. Adsorption of small amounts of amphiphilic organic molecules in clay inter-layers is known to produce Layer-by-Layer or Langmuir-Blodgett films. Moreover atomistic simulations show that self-organization of organic species in clay interlayers is important. These non-centrosymmetric, chirally active nanofilms may cause clays to act subsequently as chiral amplifiers, concentrating organic material from dilute solution and having different adsorption energetics for D- and L-enantiomers. The additional role of clays in RNA oligomerization already postulated by Ferris and others, together with the need for the organization of amphiphilic molecules and lipids noted by Szostak and others, suggests that such chiral separation by clays in lagoonal environments at normal biological temperatures might also have played a significant role in the origin of biochirality.

  14. The Basics in Pottery: Clay and Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Joan

    1985-01-01

    Art teachers at the middle school or junior high school level usually find themselves in a program teaching ceramics. The most essential tools needed for a ceramics class are discussed. Different kinds of clay are also discussed. (RM)

  15. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, I.; Guenoglu, K.; Canakcii, H.; Mavi, B.

    2011-12-26

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of different fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioactivity. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3''x3'' NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), external hazard index (H{sub ex}), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  16. Natural Radioactivity of Boron Added Clay Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, I.; ćanakciı, H.; Mavi, B.; Günoǧlu, K.

    2011-12-01

    Clay, consisting fine-grained minerals, is an interesting materials and can be used in a variety of diferent fields especially in dermatology application. Using clay such a field it is important to measure its natural radioacitivty. Thus the purpose of this study is to measure 226Ra, 232Th and 40K concentration in clay samples enriched with boron. Three different types of clay samples were prepared where boron is used in different rate. The measurements have been determined using a gamma-ray spectrometry consists of a 3″×3″ NaI(Tl) detector. From the measured activity the radium equivalent activities (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose (AED) have also been obtained.

  17. A bridge between pillared-layer and helical structures: a series of three-dimensional pillared coordination polymers with multiform helical chains.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong-Rong; Wang, En-Bo; An, Hai-Yan; Li, Yang-Guang; Su, Zhong-Min; Sun, Chun-Yan

    2006-08-25

    Rational self-assembly of a long V-shaped 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylate (bptc) ligand and metal salts in the presence of linear bidentate ligand yield a series of novel pillared helical-layer complexes, namely, [Cu2(bptc)(bpy)2] (1), [M3(Hbptc)2(bpy)3(H2O)4].2 H2O (M = Fe(2) and Ni(3)), [Co2(bptc)(bpy)(H2O)].0.5 bpy (4), [Cd2(bptc)(bpy)(H2O)2].H2O (5), [Mn2(bptc)(bpy)1.5(H2O)3] (6) and [M2(bptc)(bpy)0.5(H2O)5].0.5 bpy (M = Mn(7), Mg(8) and Co(9), bpy=4,4'-bipyridine). Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. The structure of 1 consists of two types of chiral layers, one left-handed and the other right-handed, which are connected by bpy pillars to generate a novel 3D open framework featuring four distinct helical chains. Compounds 2 and 3 are isostructural and feature 3D structures formed from the interconnection of arm-shaped helical layers with bpy pillars. Compound 4 is a pillared helical double-layer complex containing four different types of helices, among which the nine-fold interwoven helices constructed from triple-stranded helical motifs are unprecedented. Compound 5 exhibits a novel 3D covalent framework which features nanosized tubular channels. These channels are built from helical layers pillared by bptc ligands. The structure of 6 is constructed from {Mn(bptc)(H2O)}n2n- layers, which consist of left- and right-handed helical chains, pillared by [Mn2(bpy)3(H2O)4]4+ complexes into a 3D framework. To the best of our knowledge, compounds 1-6 are the first examples of pillared helical-layer coordination polymers. Compounds 7-9 are isostructural and exhibit interesting 2D helical double-layer structures, which are constructed from {M(bptc)(H2O)2}n2n- ribbons cross-linked by [M2(bpy)(H2O)6]4+ complexes. Furthermore, the 3D supramolecular structures of 7-9 are similar to the 3D structure of 6, and the 2D structure of 7

  18. Assimilation of Seawater in Basaltic Magmas: Evidence Found in a Lava Pillar From Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffman, P.; Zierenberg, R.; Chadwick, W. W.; Clague, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    A lava pillar formed during the 1998 eruption at Axial Seamount exhibits compositional and textural evidence consistent with the direct assimilation of seawater under magmatic conditions. Glass immediately adjacent to anastomosing microfractures within 1 cm of the inner pillar wall is oxidized and significantly enriched in both Na and Cl (and depleted in Fe and K) with respect to that in selvages from the (unaffected) outer pillar wall. The affected glass contains up to 1 wt. % Cl and is enriched by ca. 2 wt. % Na2O relative to unaffected glass, consistent with a nearly 1:1 (molar) assimilation of NaCl. Glass not adjacent to microfractures in the inner pillar wall is depleted in Na, but enriched in K, with respect to the NaCl-enriched, inner pillar wall glass and the unaffected outer pillar wall glass. The 87Sr/86Sr ratio of the NaCl-enriched glass (ca. 0.704 +/- .001), as determined by LA ICPMS, is slightly elevated with respect to that of unaffected glass (ca. .703) consistent with the incorporation of a seawater-derived fluid. The presence of tiny (< 10 mm) grains of Cu-Fe- and Fe-sulfides as well as elemental Ni, Ag, and Au in the Na-depleted, K-enriched glass of the inner pillar wall implies significant reduction of this glass, presumably by hydrogen generated during seawater assimilation and oxidation of magma adjacent to microfractures. We interpret that the chemical anomalies we see in the glass of the interior pillar wall are caused by nearly instantaneous assimilation of seawater into the magma during pillar growth. Other lava pillars we have examined from Axial Seamount and elsewhere on the Juan de Fuca Ridge do not display similar features, although we have not examined a statistically significant number of samples to ascertain how widespread a process this is for seawater assimilation.

  19. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  20. Clay-mediated reactions of HCN oligomers - The effect of the oxidation state of the clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Alwis, K. W.; Edelson, E. H.; Mount, N.; Hagan, W. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Montmorillonite clays which contain Fe(III) inhibit the oligomerization of aqueous solutions of HCN. The inhibitory effect is due to the rapid oxidation of diaminomaleonitrile, a key intermediate in HCN oligomerization, by the Fe(III) incorporated into the aluminosilicate lattice of the clay. The Fe(III) oxidizes diaminomaleonitrile to diiminosuccinonitrile, a compound which is rapidly hydrolyzed to HCN and oxalic acid derivatives. Diaminomaleonitrile is not oxidized when Fe(III) in the montmorillonite is reduced with hydrazine. The oxidation state of the clay is an important variable in experiments designed to simulate clay catalysis on the primitive earth.

  1. In situ oil shale retort having horizontal voids with side pillars

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, T.E.; Burton, R.S.

    1984-06-12

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale by excavating one or more horizontally extending voids across a retort site, leaving a zone of unfragmented formation having a horizontal free face adjacent such a horizontal void. In one embodiment, such a horizontal void is excavated across less than the entire width of the retort site, leaving ''side pillars'' of unfragmented formation spaced inwardly from adjacent side boundaries of the retort site at opposite sides of such a horizontal void. This reduces the maximum span of the horizontal void, when compared with supporting overburden above the void with one or more interior isolated pillars spaced inwardly from the side boundaries of the retort. The side pillars are explosively expanded. Then such a zone of unfragmented formation is explosively expanded toward such a horizontal void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in the retort. The resulting fragmented mass can have a slightly narrowed region along the sides where the side pillars were present.

  2. Promoting Family Literacy through the Five Pillars of Family and Community Engagement (FACE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Nai-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Family literacy involves factors beyond what is done at home between parents and children. To help preservice teachers develop their understanding of the multiple dimensions of family literacy, this study uses the five pillars of family and community engagement (FACE)--early literacy, family involvement, access to books, expanded learning, and…

  3. Comminuted C2 Articular Pillar Fracture in a Patient With Multiple Sclerosis and Recurrent Falls.

    PubMed

    Sault, Josiah D; Elliott, James M

    2015-12-01

    The patient was a 60-year-old woman, with long-standing balance deficits due to multiple sclerosis, referred to physical therapy by her primary care physician secondary to increasing fall frequency. Following evaluation, the physical therapist escorted the patient to her primary care physician's office, where a computed tomography scan was immediately performed, revealing a comminuted C2 articular pillar fracture.

  4. The effect of polymer fill ratio in pillar structure for piezoelectric energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Shin, Dong-Jin; Chae, Moon-Soon; Koo, Sang-Mo; Ha, Jae-Geun; Koh, Jung-Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Ho; Seo, Chang-Eui; Jeong, Soon-Jong

    2013-07-01

    One method of energy harvesting is to use piezoelectric devices, which are able to interchange electrical energy and mechanical strain or vibration. This study is to experimentally investigate the behavior of a piezoelectric energy harvester that was constructed with an array of pillar structures made of 0.2(PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3)-0.8(PbZr0.475Ti0.525O3) with polymer fill. Additionally, the aim of this study is to optimize the fill ratio of the composite piezoelectric ceramics and polymer structure. 0.2(PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3)-0.8(PbZr0.475Ti0.525O3) ceramics were employed as piezoelectric ceramic pillars, prepared in a rectangular shape. These piezoelectric ceramic pillars were sintered separately and attached to a bottom metallic electrode with poled states. The optimum ratio of ceramic pillar and elastic polymer ratio will be discussed. Piezoelectric properties will be discussed including the piezoelectric constant, piezoelectric voltage constants, and electromechanical coupling coefficient. We will present how the harvested energy depends on the lead resistor.

  5. The Sloan-C Pillars and Boundary Objects As a Framework for Evaluating Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laumakis, Mark; Graham, Charles; Dziuban, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    The authors contend that blended learning represents a boundary object; a construct that brings together constituencies from a variety of backgrounds with each of these cohorts defining the object somewhat differently. The Sloan-C Pillars (learning effectiveness, access, cost effectiveness, student satisfaction, and faculty satisfaction) provide…

  6. Theoretical investigation of pillar[4]quinone as a cathode active material for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Huan, Long; Xie, Ju; Chen, Ming; Diao, Guowang; Zhao, Rongfang; Zuo, Tongfei

    2017-04-01

    The applicability of a novel macrocyclic multi-carbonyl compound, pillar[4]quinone (P4Q), as the cathode active material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) was assessed theoretically. The molecular geometry, electronic structure, Li-binding thermodynamic properties, and the redox potential of P4Q were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) at the M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The results of the calculations indicated that P4Q interacts with Li atoms via three binding modes: Li-O ionic bonding, O-Li···O bridge bonding, and Li···phenyl noncovalent interactions. Calculations also indicated that, during the LIB discharging process, P4Q could yield a specific capacity of 446 mAh g(-1) through the utilization of its many carbonyl groups. Compared with pillar[5]quinone and pillar[6]quinone, the redox potential of P4Q is enhanced by its high structural stability as well as the effect of the solvent. These results should provide the theoretical foundations for the design, synthesis, and application of novel macrocyclic carbonyl compounds as electrode materials in LIBs in the future. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of the proposed charge-discharge mechanism of Pillar[4]quinone as cathode for lithium-ion batteries.

  7. Effect of catenation and basicity of pillared ligands on the water stability of MOFs.

    PubMed

    Jasuja, Himanshu; Walton, Krista S

    2013-11-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have extremely high surface areas and pore volumes, tunable pore sizes and chemical functionalities and are an interesting addition to the field of porous materials. One of the key challenges that needs to be overcome to elevate MOFs to the applied level is their sensitivity to humid environments. The work reported here seeks to address this critical issue by examining two important contributors to MOF stability or instability: basicity (pKa value) of the pillar ligand and catenation of the framework. Catenation is the interpenetration or interweaving of two or more identical and independent frameworks. We demonstrate that, using catenation in combination with a pillaring strategy, it is possible to obtain water stable MOFs even when the pillar ligand has lower basicity (pKa value). This study shows that after 90% relative humidity (RH) exposure, comparing Zn-BDC-DABCO (DMOF) and Zn-BDC-BPY (MOF-508), MOF-508 is stable due to its two-fold interpenetration that prevents significant water adsorption. In contrast, comparing non-catenated isostructural pillared MOFs Zn-TMBDC-DABCO (DMOF-TM) and Zn-TMBDC-BPY (MOF-508-TM), MOF-508-TM is unstable since BPY is less basic (higher pKa) and less rigid than DABCO.

  8. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (<200 nm), illite-smectite and reduced iron phases. The role of clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  9. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui -Hai; Houseworth, Jim; Rutqvist, Jonny; Li, Lianchong; Asahina, Daisuke; Chen, Fei; Birkholzer, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the EDZ, and (3) development of a THM model for the FE tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the purpose of model validation. The overall objective of these activities is to provide an improved understanding of EDZ evolution in clay repositories and the associated coupled processes, and to develop advanced relevant modeling capabilities.

  11. Pier-scour depths affected by clay in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K. Van

    1998-01-01

    This paper briefly presents pier-scour depths measured during 1943-94, that are thought to have been affected by consolidated cohesive materials (clay) in Mississippi. MDOT soil reports were available for 29 measured pier-scour depths thought to be affected by clay. The cohesion and friction angles were approximated for the clay, and using the soil borings where clay was overlain by sand and(or) gravel, the top of the clay stratum was approximated in order to determine the net scour through the clay. Eight additional measured pier-scour depths were thought to be affected by clay, but no MDOT soil reports or borings were available. The net pier-scour depth through the clay is a rough approximation where sand and (or) gravel overlie a clay stratum and, therefore, only represents part of the total pier-scour depth. Limited data indicate the pier-scour depth decreases as shear strength of the clay increases.

  12. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    DOE PAGES

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; ...

    2014-05-16

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of thin ceramic films. Unfortunately, measuring thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these problems based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the pillar’s upper portion is almost fully relaxed, and whenmore » indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behavior. Cohesive finite element simulations are used to analyze and develop, for a given material, a simple relation between the critical load at failure, pillar radius, and fracture toughness. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. Furthermore, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparing the indentation results from the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings formed by physical vapor deposition: titanium nitride, chromium nitride, and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.« less

  13. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; Carassiti, Fabio; Pharr, George Mathews

    2014-05-16

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of thin ceramic films. Unfortunately, measuring thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these problems based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the pillar’s upper portion is almost fully relaxed, and when indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behavior. Cohesive finite element simulations are used to analyze and develop, for a given material, a simple relation between the critical load at failure, pillar radius, and fracture toughness. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. Furthermore, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparing the indentation results from the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings formed by physical vapor deposition: titanium nitride, chromium nitride, and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.

  14. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  15. Change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Saiyouri, N.; Hicher, P. Y.

    2010-06-01

    The compressibility of engineered barrier clays is, to a large extent, controlled by microstructure change due to the presence of chemical ions in clay-water system. This paper aims to investigate the change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water. We use two pure clays (kaolinite and bentonite) in the study. One-dimensional consolidation tests were performed on reconstituted samples, which are prepared with distilled water and three types of heavy metal solutions (Pb(NO3)2, Cu(NO3)2, Zn(NO3)2,). In order to better understand the impact of chemical pore fluid on microstructure of the two clays, following the consolidation test, scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and mercury intrusion pore size distribution measurements (MIP) were conducted. Due to the measurement range of MIP, which is only allowed to measure the minimal pore size 20 Å, BET method by gas sorption, whose measurement pore size range is from 3.5 Å to 500 Å, is used to measure the micropore size distribution. By this method, specific surface area of the soils can be also determined. It can be employed to demonstrate the difference of creep performance between the soils. Furthermore, a series of batch equilibrium tests were conducted to better understand the physical-chemical interactions between the particles of soils and the heavy metal ions. With the further consideration of the interparticle electrical attractive and repulsive force, an attempt has been made to predict the creep behaviour by using the modified Gouy-Chapman double layer theory. The results of calculation were compared with that of tests. The comparison shows that the prediction of compressibility of the clays according to the modified double diffuse layer theory can be reasonably agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Aggregation and stability of anisotropic charged clay colloids in aqueous medium in the presence of salt.

    PubMed

    Ali, Samim; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2016-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite nanoclay is a colloid of layered mineral silicate. When dispersed in water, this mineral swells on absorption of water and exfoliates into platelets with electric double layers on their surfaces. Even at low particle concentration, the aqueous dispersion can exhibit a spontaneous ergodicity breaking phase transition from a free flowing liquid to nonequilibrium, kinetically arrested and disordered states such as gels and glasses. In an earlier publication [Applied Clay Science, 2015, 114, 8592], we showed that the stability of clay gels can be enhanced by adding a salt later to the clay dispersion prepared in deionized water, rather than by adding the clay mineral to a previously mixed salt solution. Here, we directly track the collapsing interface of sedimenting clay gels using an optical method and show that adding salt after dispersing the clay mineral does indeed result in more stable gels even in very dilute dispersions. These weak gels are seen to exhibit a transient collapse after a finite delay time, a phenomenon observed previously in depletion gels. The velocity of the collapse oscillates with the age of the sample. However, the average velocity of collapse increases with sample age up to a peak value before decreasing at higher ages. With increasing salt concentration, the delay time for transient collapse decreases, while the peak value of the collapsing velocity increases. Using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy, rheometry and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, we confirm that morphological changes of the gel network assembly, facilitated by thermal fluctuations, lead to the observed collapse phenomenon. Since clay minerals are used extensively in polymer nanocomposites, as rheological modifiers, stabilizers and gas absorbents, we believe that the results reported in this work are extremely useful for several practical applications and also for understanding geophysical phenomena such as the formation and stability of quicksand

  17. Examination and Manipulation of Clay Aggregates - Initial Inquiry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-06

    and the first conclusions in the examination and testing of clay aggregates composed of montmorillonite clay and a polysaccharide (xanthan gum, also...and the first conclusions in the examination and testing of clay aggregates composed of montmorillonite clay and a polysaccharide (xanthan gum, also...PSU and the X-gum content from 0% to 10% of the mineral content of the clay (by weight). Montmorillonite was used in all the suspensions prepared

  18. Mechanical reinforcement and environmental effects on a nylon-6/clay nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, J. Stebbins

    2000-10-01

    Hybridization, or modifying the organic polymers with inorganic constituents, is one method of achieving mechanical property improvements in polymeric materials while preserving processing characteristics. Toyota Central Research developed, and Ube Industries commercialized, one such hybrid nanocomposite: nylon-6/montmorillonite clay. This dissertation explores mechanisms of reinforcement in these nylon-6/clay nanocomposites and studies their degradation by atmospheric pollutants. A 100% improvement in modulus, 77% improvement in yield stress, and 54°C improvement in heat distortion temperature over nylon-6 were observed in extruded 5 wt% clay nanocomposite sheets. Infrared absorption spectrography and dynamic mechanical analysis were used to investigate the mechanisms of reinforcement in these nanocomposites. The improved mechanical properties, increased heat distortion temperature, reduced diffusion rate, and lower susceptibility to degradation in NO x observed where attributed to constraint of polymer chain motion by interaction with clay lamellae. Changes in the loss tangent peak in the glass transition region of the dynamic mechanical data provide an estimate of the volume of chains constrained by complexation of their mid-chain amide oxygen groups with the charged clay lamellae. X-ray analysis, optical microscopy, and light scattering were used to study changes in crystallization due to this complexation. Photomicrographs indicate that the morphology of the crystallites change from spherulitic to planar with the addition of clay. Decreases in diffusion rates of water and total water absorption were demonstrated in immersion experiments. Complexation of nylon-6 with 5 wt% clay reduces the total absorption of water by over 16%. The plane stress fracture toughness of extruded 5 wt% clay nanocomposite was 46% greater than that of nylon-6. The degradation of the nanocomposites in calcium chloride solution and NOx was examined through post exposure residual

  19. Materials derived from synthetic organo-clay complexes as novel hydrodesulfurization catalyst supports.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Marshall, C. L.; Brenner, J. R.; Song, K.; Chemistry

    1998-01-01

    A series of mesoporous synthetic organo-clay complexes has been prepared by hydrothermal crystallization of gels containing silica, magnesium hydroxide, lithium fluoride, and an organic of choice, followed by calcination to remove the organics. The organic serves to impart structural order to the inorganic network that does not disappear upon its removal. The choice of organic modifier can be used to control the pore structure of the resulting mesoporous materials. Pore size distributions appear in some cases to be related to the type of polymer packing upon clay formation in situ. These materials are being explored as Co Mo hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst supports. Preliminary HDS results show performance commensurate with commercial catalysis for the mesoporous materials when a model heavy oil feed is used (1 wt% S as dibenzothiophene in hexadecane). Temperature programmed reduction experiments of used catalysts suggest a relationship between HDS activity and ease of reduction of the CoMo/clay catalysts. Reactivity of the CoMo clay also correlates with the percentage of mesopore volume remaining after reaction. Losses in mesopore volume are largely recouped by recalcination, suggesting that reversible coke is formed inside the pore structure of clays faster than inside conventional alumina.

  20. Thermal analysis of selected illite and smectite clay minerals. Part I. Illite clay specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, C. M.

    The characterization of illite clay minerals by the use of the technique of differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetry (TG) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) is presented. This presentation is offered not only as a review of the thermal characteristics of this important group of clay materials but suggestions relative to the application of the thermal analysis techniques to contaminated illitic specimens; i.e., mineral mixtures, are included. Two commonly referenced illitic clay specimens, which have been widely distributed, were studied here. These were the American Petroleum Institute Reference Clay Specimen from Fithian, Illinois (API #35) and the Clay Mineral Society's Source Clay Specimen from Silver Hill, Montana (CMS-IMt). These clay specimens were studied using a modern computerized differential thermal analyzer which also contained a DSC mode of operation for peak energy assignment. Representative DTA thermal curves using both DTA and computerized DSC modes are given for both clay specimens. The effect of the variation of heating rate and sample size on the observed peak temperatures and resolution is demonstrated for both illite specimens.

  1. Contamination of basaltic lava by seawater: Evidence found in a lava pillar from Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffman, Peter; Zierenberg, Robert; Chadwick, William W.; Clague, David A.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2010-04-01

    A lava pillar formed during the 1998 eruption at Axial Seamount exhibits compositional and textural evidence for contamination by seawater under magmatic conditions. Glass immediately adjacent to anastomosing microfractures within 1 cm of the inner pillar wall is oxidized and significantly enriched in Na and Cl and depleted in Fe and K with respect to that in glassy selvages from the unaffected outer pillar wall. The affected glass contains up to 1 wt % Cl and is enriched by ˜2 wt % Na2O relative to unaffected glass, consistent with a nearly 1:1 (molar) incorporation of NaCl. Glass bordering the Cl-enriched glass in the inner pillar wall is depleted in Na but enriched in K. The presence of tiny (<10 μm) grains of Cu-Fe sulfides and Fe sulfides as well as elemental Ni, Ag, and Au in the Na-depleted, K-enriched glass of the inner pillar wall implies significant reduction of this glass, presumably by hydrogen generated during seawater contamination and oxidation of lava adjacent to microfractures. We interpret the compositional anomalies we see in the glass of the interior pillar wall as caused by rapid incorporation of seawater into the still-molten lava during pillar growth, probably on the time scale of seconds to minutes. Only one of seven examined lava pillars shows this effect, and we interpret that seawater has to be trapped in contact with molten lava (inside the lava pillar, in this case) to produce the effects we see. Thus, under the right conditions, seawater contamination of lavas during submarine eruptions is one means by which the oceanic crust can sequester Cl during its global flux cycle. However, since very few recent lava flows have been examined in similar detail, the global significance of this process in effecting Earth's Cl budget remains uncertain.

  2. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  3. Fe2O3-pillared rectorite as an efficient and stable Fenton-like heterogeneous catalyst for photodegradation of organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaoke; Gao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yalei; Guo, Yadan

    2010-08-15

    An efficient Fe(2)O(3)-pillared rectorite (Fe-R) clay was successfully developed as a heterogeneous catalyst for photo-Fenton degradation of organic contaminants. X-ray diffraction analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscope analysis clearly showed the existence of the Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles in the Fe-R catalyst. The catalytic activity of the Fe-R catalyst was evaluated by the discoloration and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of an azo-dye rhodamine B (RhB, 100 mg/L) and a typical persistent organic pollutant 4-nitrophenol (4-NP, 50 mg/L) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) under visible light irradiation (lambda > 420 nm). It was found that the discoloration rate of the two contaminants was over 99.3%, and the COD removal rate of the two contaminants was over 87.0%. The Fe-R catalyst showed strong adsorbability for the RhB in the aqueous solution. Moreover, the Fe-R catalyst still showed good stability for the degradation of RhB after five recycles. Zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to examine the photoreaction processes. Finally, a possible photocatalytic mechanism was proposed.

  4. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    A method is given for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and LiF for 2 days with an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by US patent No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, June 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have water-solubility, positive charge, and thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  5. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  6. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  7. Superlensing effect for surface acoustic waves in a pillar-based phononic crystal with negative refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Addouche, Mahmoud Al-Lethawe, Mohammed A. Choujaa, Abdelkrim Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate super resolution imaging for surface acoustic waves using a phononic structure displaying negative refractive index. This phononic structure is made of a monolithic square lattice of cylindrical pillars standing on a semi-infinite medium. The pillars act as acoustic resonator and induce a surface propagating wave with unusual dispersion. We found, under specific geometrical parameters, one propagating mode that exhibits negative refraction effect with negative effective index close to −1. Furthermore, a flat lens with finite number of pillars is designed to allow the focusing of an acoustic point source into an image with a resolution of (λ)/3 , overcoming the Rayleigh diffraction limit.

  8. Effects of leachate on geotechnical characteristics of sandy clay soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, N. S.; Ali, Z. Rahman; Rahim, A. S.; Lihan, T.; Idris, R. M. W.

    2013-11-01

    Leachate is a hazardous liquid that poses negative impacts if leaks out into environments such as soil and ground water systems. The impact of leachate on the downgraded quality in terms of chemical characteristic is more concern rather than the physical or mechanical aspect. The effect of leachate on mechanical behaviour of contaminated soil is not well established and should be investigated. This paper presents the preliminary results of the effects of leachate on the Atterberg limit, compaction and shear strength of leachate-contaminated soil. The contaminated soil samples were prepared by mixing the leachate at ratiosbetween 0% and 20% leachate contents with soil samples. Base soil used was residual soil originated from granitic rock and classified as sandy clay soil (CS). Its specific gravity ranged between 2.5 and 2.64 with clay minerals of kaolinite, muscovite and quartz. The field strength of the studied soil ranged between 156 and 207 kN/m2. The effects of leachate on the Atterberg limit clearly indicated by the decrease in liquid and plastic limit values with the increase in the leachate content. Compaction tests on leachate-contaminated soil caused the dropped in maximum dry density, ρdry and increased in optimum moisture content, wopt when the amount of leachate was increased between 0% and 20%. The results suggested that leachate contamination capable to modify some geotechnical properties of the studied residual soils.

  9. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms. PMID:26218593

  10. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  11. Polymer based nanocomposites with nanofibers and exfoliated clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.; Reneker, Darrell H.

    2005-01-01

    Polymer solutions, containing clay sheets, were electrospun into nanofibers and microfibers that contained clay sheets inside. Controllable removal of polymer by plasma etching from the surface of fibers revealed the arrangement of clay. The shape, flexibility, size distribution and arrangement of clay sheets were observed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The clay sheets were partially aligned in big fibers with normal direction of clay sheets perpendicular to fiber axis. Crumpling of clay sheets inside fibers was observed when the fiber diameter was comparable to the lateral size of clay sheets. Single sheets of clay were observed both by catching clay sheets dispersed in water with electrospun nanofiber mats and by the deliberate removal of most of the polymer in the fibers. Thin, flexible gas barrier films, that are reasonably strong, were assembled from clay sheets and polymer nanofibers. Structure of composite films was characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Continuous film of clay sheets were physically attached to the surface of fiber mats. Spincoating film of polymer and clay sheets was reinforced by electrospun fiber scaffold. Certain alignment of clay sheets was observed in the vicinity of fibers.

  12. Assessing the interactions of a natural antibacterial clay with model Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, S. C.; Williams, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    . Besides being toxic at high concentrations, these species affect the electrophoretic interactions between clay and bacteria surfaces. Additionally, the cation exchange neutralizes the clay surface charge thus modifying further the behavior of particles in suspension. Therefore, we evaluated the clay and bacteria zeta potential (ζ) as an index for possible electrostatic forces and modeled the total interactions using DLVO theory. We suspended the particles in water equilibrated with clay (leachate). Results show that at pH 4, the ζ of clays is -14 mV while it is -3mV for bacteria. The divalent ions and trivalent Aluminum, present in the AMZ leachate, compress the thickness of the double layer (hydration shell) thus decreasing electrostatic repulsion and allowing particles to come closer. The proximity of particles increases the probability of attractive forces to bind clays and cells. In summary, results indicate that a process other than simple chemical transfer from clay to bacteria is operating. The electrostatic attraction and physical proximity may enhance the toxic action of metals and interfere with the membrane properties or processes.

  13. Clay Improvement with Burned Olive Waste Ash

    PubMed Central

    Mutman, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil is concentrated in the Mediterranean basin countries. Since the olive oil industries are incriminated for a high quantity of pollution, it has become imperative to solve this problem by developing optimized systems for the treatment of olive oil wastes. This study proposes a solution to the problem. Burned olive waste ash is evaluated for using it as clay stabilizer. In a laboratory, bentonite clay is used to improve olive waste ash. Before the laboratory, the olive waste is burned at 550°C in the high temperature oven. The burned olive waste ash was added to bentonite clay with increasing 1% by weight from 1% to 10%. The study consisted of the following tests on samples treated with burned olive waste ash: Atterberg Limits, Standard Proctor Density, and Unconfined Compressive Strength Tests. The test results show promise for this material to be used as stabilizer and to solve many of the problems associated with its accumulation. PMID:23766671

  14. Significance of the long-chain organic cation structure in the sorption of the penconazole and metalaxyl fungicides by organo clays.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cruz, M S; Andrades, M S; Sánchez-Martín, M J

    2008-12-15

    Sorption-desorption of two different hydrophobic fungicides, penconazole and metalaxyl, by a series of clay minerals layered and non-layered (montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite, muscovite, sepiolite and palygorskite) modified with the two-chain cationic surfactant, dihexadecyldimetylammonium (DHDDMA) was studied by first time in this work. DHDDMA-clays showed a good capacity to sorb both fungicides from water. Freundlich sorption constants (K(f)) increased 22-268-fold for penconazole and 4-112-fold for metalaxyl in relation to natural clays. High sorption irreversibility was observed for penconazole for all modified clays, while for metalaxyl this occurred only for some of the modified clays. Additionally, a comparative study of the sorption of the fungicides by clay minerals modified with organic cations of different structure was carried out by a statistical approach. Non-layered and layered clay minerals modified with the two-chain alkylammonium organic cation DHDDMA, and with single-chain organic cations octadecyltrimethylammonium (ODTMA) and hexadecylpyridinium (HDPY) were used as sorbents. The study indicated a significant linear regression between the distribution coefficients K(d) of fungicides and the organic carbon (OC) content of the organo clays (r(2)>or=0.80, p<0.001). According to this sorption of fungicides by partition between the aqueous solution and the organic medium created by the alkyl chains of the exchanged ammonium cations regardless of the type and structure of these cations is suggested. However, linear relationships between K(d) values of each pesticide by the different organo clays and their relative OC contents revealed higher increase in sorption for HDPY-clays (penconazole) and for ODTMA-clays (metalaxyl) pointing out different effectiveness of the OC provided by each organic cation. These effects were also supported by the values of K(d) relative to OC, K(d)(oc). The results evidenced the different relative weight of alkyl cations to

  15. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed. PMID:27642456

  16. Method of treating clay to improve its whiteness

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R. H.; Brooks, R. L.; Morris, H. H.

    1985-01-08

    A method of treating a clay to remove therefrom titanium mineral impurities comprising the steps of mixing an aqueous slurry of said clay having a high solids content with an activator and a collector for the titanium mineral impurities; conditioning the aqueous clay slurry at said high solids content for a time sufficient to dissipate therein at least 25 horsepower hours of energy per ton of solids; adding to the conditioned aqueous clay slurry a polyacrylate salt deflocculant; subjecting the conditioned aqueous clay slurry undiluted containing the polyacrylate salt deflocculant to a froth flotation process and removing the titanium impurities with the froth; and recovering clay having a reduced titanium minerals impurities content.

  17. Effect of aging on rheology of ball clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonthai, Tienchai

    2002-01-01

    The behaviors of clay-water suspensions such as deflocculation or rheological properties are not constant but change with time. Aging has been recognized for changing the rheological properties of clay suspensions. This work provided information about the effects of the moisture contents in ball clay lumps and clay air exposure time on their processability. Dynamic oscillatory rheometry using a vane-in-cup geometry was used to characterize the rheological behavior of ball clay suspensions in terms of elastic modulus, viscous modulus and yield stress as a function of aging time. A light scattering size analyzer was used to examine the agglomerate size distribution of ball clay suspensions which affected the rheological behavior. Soluble ion release (both cations and anions) in the filtrate of suspensions was measured by ion chromatography. Low and high lignitic ball clay suspensions were dispersed with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) or sodium polyacrylate at specific gravity 1.3 and 1.6 in two dispersion states: fully deflocculated (minimum viscosity) and under deflocculated. Suspensions prepared using freshly mined ball clays required more dispersant than suspensions prepared using dry ball clays to achieve minimum viscosity due to a difference in agglomerate size distribution. The agglomerate size distribution of suspensions prepared using dry clays was broader than that of suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays. In suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays, there were many uniformly small agglomerates having loose water inside, while in suspensions prepared using dry clays, the capillary effect and bonding between clay particles resulting from drying broke clay aggregates apart into agglomerate structures composed of a few to many clay particles. For suspensions prepared using dry clays after one day suspension aging, the elastic modulus and yield stress decreased due to the change in agglomerate size distribution of suspensions but increased for

  18. Numerical Study of Pillar Shapes in Deterministic Lateral Displacement Microfluidic Arrays for Spherical Particle Separation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianhui; Song, Hui; Shen, Zaiyi; He, Ying; Xu, Xianzhi; Zhang, Yong; Li, Bing Nan

    2015-09-01

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) arrays containing shaped pillars have been found to be more effective in biomedical sample separation. This study aims to numerically investigate the interplay between particles and microfluidic arrays, and to find out the key factors in determining the critical size of a DLD device with shaped pillars. A new formula is thus proposed to estimate the critical size for spherical particle separation in this kind of new DLD microfluidic arrays. The simulation results show that both rectangular and I-shaped arrays have considerably smaller critical sizes. The ratio of sub-channel widths is also found to play an important role in reducing the critical sizes. This paves a valuable way toward designing high-performance DLD microfluidic arrays.

  19. Investigations of surface acidities and pore size distributions of selected pillared layered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, M.A.; Wade, K.L.; Morgan, D.M.; White, J.L.; Schroeder, N.C.

    1996-10-01

    Pillared Layered Materials (PLMs) are being designed for a variety of applications. Currently, PLMs are being prepared in this laboratory for the selective sorption of radionuclides from liquid-nuclear wastes. It is important to have a good understanding of characteristics, such as pore size distributions and surface acidities, in order to tailor there sizes and environments are manipulated by varying the layered materials and pillaring species used for preparing the PLM. A variety of techniques have been employed to study these characteristics. For this study the pore size distributions were derived by determining the sorption of hydrocarbons of various sizes and shapes into the PLMs. The surface acidities were probed by sorbing basic species, such as ammonia and pyridine, and assessing the interactions with the acid sites using FTIR spectroscopy.

  20. Kinetic growth mode of epitaxial GaAs on Si(001) micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschini, Roberto; Bietti, Sergio; Castellano, Andrea; Frigeri, Cesare; Falub, Claudiu V.; Scaccabarozzi, Andrea; Bollani, Monica; von Känel, Hans; Miglio, Leo; Sanguinetti, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional, epitaxial GaAs crystals are fabricated on micro-pillars patterned into Si(001) substrates by exploiting kinetically controlled growth conditions in Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The evolution of crystal morphology during growth is assessed by considering samples with increasing GaAs deposit thickness. Experimental results are interpreted by a kinetic growth model, which takes into account the fundamental aspects of the growth and mutual deposition flux shielding between neighboring crystals. Different substrate pattern geometries with dissimilar lateral sizes and periodicities of the Si micro-pillars are considered and self-similar crystal structures are recognized. It is demonstrated that the top faceting of the GaAs crystals is tunable, which can pave the way to locally engineer compound semiconductor quantum structures on Si(001) substrates.

  1. Experimental evidence of high-frequency complete elastic bandgap in pillar-based phononic slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Adibi, Ali; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-12-08

    We present strong experimental evidence for the existence of a complete phononic bandgap, for Lamb waves, in the high frequency regime (i.e., 800 MHz) for a pillar-based phononic crystal (PnC) membrane with a triangular lattice of gold pillars on top. The membrane is composed of an aluminum nitride film stacked on thin molybdenum and silicon layers. Experimental characterization shows a large attenuation of at least 20 dB in the three major crystallographic directions of the PnC lattice in the frequency range of 760 MHz–820 MHz, which is in agreement with our finite element simulations of the PnC bandgap. The results of experiments are analyzed and the physics behind the attenuation in different spectral windows is explained methodically by assessing the type of Bloch modes and the in-plane symmetry of the displacement profile.

  2. Theoretical study of a novel imino bridged pillar[5]arene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ju; Zuo, Tongfei; Huang, Zhiling; Huan, Long; Gu, Qixin; Gao, Chenxi; Shao, Jingjing

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report a novel imino bridged pillar[5]arene derivative (P5N) for the first time. Four conformers (P5N0, P5N1, P5N12, and P5N13, arising due to the different orientation of Nsbnd H bond of imino bridging group) are obtained by quantum chemical calculations at the CAM-B3LYP/6-31+G(d, p) level of theory. The geometries, energies, electronic structures, and absorption spectra of P5N conformers as well as pillar[5]arene (P5) are discussed in detail. The inclusion complexes of paraquat (Pq) with P5N and P5, respectively, are also obtained at the same level of theory. Compared to P5, P5N exhibits better performance in inclusion complexation toward Pq.

  3. Microscopic Receding Contact Line Dynamics on Pillar and Irregular Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yeong, Yong Han; Milionis, Athanasios; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S.

    2015-01-01

    Receding angles have been shown to have great significance when designing a superhydrophobic surface for applications involving self-cleaning. Although apparent receding angles under dynamic conditions have been well studied, the microscopic receding contact line dynamics are not well understood. Therefore, experiments were performed to measure these dynamics on textured square pillar and irregular superhydrophobic surfaces at micron length scales and at micro-second temporal scales. Results revealed a consistent “slide-snap” motion of the microscopic receding line as compared to the “stick-slip” dynamics reported in previous studies. Interface angles between 40–60° were measured for the pre-snap receding lines on all pillar surfaces. Similar “slide-snap” dynamics were also observed on an irregular nanocomposite surface. However, the sharper features of the surface asperities resulted in a higher pre-snap receding line interface angle (~90°). PMID:25670630

  4. Analysis of roof and pillar failure associated with weak floor at a limestone mine

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael M.; Ellenberger, John L.; Esterhuizen, Gabriel S.; Miller, Tim

    2016-01-01

    A limestone mine in Ohio has had instability problems that have led to massive roof falls extending to the surface. This study focuses on the role that weak, moisture-sensitive floor has in the instability issues. Previous NIOSH research related to this subject did not include analysis for weak floor or weak bands and recommended that when such issues arise they should be investigated further using a more advanced analysis. Therefore, to further investigate the observed instability occurring on a large scale at the Ohio mine, FLAC3D numerical models were employed to demonstrate the effect that a weak floor has on roof and pillar stability. This case study will provide important information to limestone mine operators regarding the impact of weak floor causing the potential for roof collapse, pillar failure, and subsequent subsidence of the ground surface. PMID:27088041

  5. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Kralik, M.; Taylor, B.E.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  6. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals.

    PubMed

    Eberl, D D; Sacuterodonacute, J; Kralik, M; Taylor, B E; Peterman, Z E

    1990-04-27

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  7. Clay Fabric of Gassy Submarine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    28°54󈧑 ° 89°30󈧎" 38 125 11.9 39 559 81 *The Lambert coordinates of Core B- I A: X = 2,594,001; Y = 82,970. The Lambert coordinates of Core B-2... X = 2,585,823: Y = 90,832. Location fluid before critical point drying under equivalent in situ down- hole pressure, was constructed. The detailed...it appeared that Clay Fabric vs. Degassing ime with a specimen size of 7 x 7 x 20 mm the clay fabric in the central portion of a specimen will not

  8. Chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grob, B.; Richarz, W.

    1984-09-01

    The chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay with Cl2 and CO gas mixtures was studied gravimetrically. The effects of the calcination method and of NaCl addition on the reactivity of the clay were examined. Fast reaction rates were achieved only with samples previously exposed to a sulfating treatment. Optimum conditions, with maximum yield and selectivity to A1C13 and minimum SiO2 conversion, were found between 770 and 970 K. At higher temperatures the SiCl4 formed poisons the reactive alumina surface by selective chemisorption with a marked decrease of the reaction rate.

  9. Numerical Modelling of Embankment on Soft Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nujid, M. M.; Taha, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper aims to predict deformation of embankment on soft clay of Muar. The prediction performance focusing on displacement at critical fill height of 5.5 m. The study was based on reported result in 1992. With the aid of computer intelligence, the advanced constitutive soil models could be adopted to analyze the soft clay behavior. The COMSOL Multiphysics (v4.4) has been used to simulate the problem with coupled physics available in the software. The vertical displacements are in good agreement close to published result.

  10. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils.

    PubMed

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; De Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-30

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  11. The mechanics of active clays circulated by salts, acids and bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajo, Alessandro; Loret, Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    A model that accounts for electro-chemo-mechanical couplings in clays, due to the presence of dissolved salts and acids and bases, is developed and applied to simulate experimental data. Chemically sensitive clays are viewed as two-phase multi-species saturated porous media circulated by an electrolyte. To the authors' best knowledge, no other comprehensive project to embody the effects of pH in the elastic-plastic behavior of geomaterials has been attempted so far. The developments are embedded in the framework of the thermodynamics of multi-phase multi-species porous media. This approach serves to structure the model, and to motivate constitutive equations. The present extension capitalizes upon the earlier developments by Gajo et al. [2002. Electro-chemo-mechanical couplings in saturated porous media: elastic-plastic behaviour of heteroionic expansive clays. Int. J. Solids Struct. 39, 4327-4362] and Gajo and Loret [2004. Transient analysis of ionic replacement in elastic-plastic expansive clays. Int. J. Solids Struct. 41(26), 7493-7531], which were devoted to modeling chemo-mechanical couplings at constant pH. Four transfer mechanisms between the solid and fluid phases are delineated in the model: (1) hydration, (2) ion exchange, (3) acidification, (4) alkalinization. Thus all fundamental exchanges at particle level are fully taken into account. Only mineral dissolution is neglected, since experimental observations indicate a negligible role of mineral dissolution for active clays at room temperature. In particular, the newly considered mechanisms of acidification and alkalinization directly affect the electrical charge of clay particles and thus have a key role in the electro-chemo-mechanical couplings. These four mechanisms are seen as controlling both elastic and elasto-plastic behaviors. Depending on concentrations and ionic affinities to the clay mineral, the transfer mechanisms either compete or cooperate to modify the compressibility and strength of the

  12. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  13. Reducing the Cation Exchange Capacity of Lithium Clay to Form Better Dispersed Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Maggie

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites have exhibited superior strength and thermo- oxidative properties as compared to pure polymers for use in air and space craft; however, there has often been difficulty completely dispersing the clay within the matrices of the polymer. In order to improve this process, the cation exchange capacity of lithium clay is first lowered using twenty-four hour heat treatments of no heat, 130 C, 150 C, or 170 C to fixate the lithium ions within the clay layers so that they are unexchangeable. Generally, higher temperatures have generated lower cation exchange capacities. An ion exchange involving dodecylamine, octadecylamine, or dimethyl benzidine (DMBZ) is then employed to actually expand the clay galleries. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy can be used to determine whether the clay has been successfully exfoliated. Finally, resins of DMBZ with clay are then pressed into disks for characterization using dynamic mechanical analyzer and oven- aging techniques in order to evaluate their glass transition, modulus strength, and thermal-oxidative stability in comparison to neat DMBZ. In the future, they may also be tested as composites for flexural and laminar shear strength.

  14. Correlation between critical temperature and strength of small-scale bcc pillars.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A S; Kaufmann, D; Clark, B G; Frick, C P; Gruber, P A; Mönig, R; Kraft, O; Arzt, E

    2009-09-04

    Microcompression tests were performed on focused-ion-beam-machined micropillars of several body-centered-cubic metals (W, Mo, Ta, and Nb) at room temperature. The relationship between yield strength and pillar diameter as well as the deformation morphologies were found to correlate with a parameter specific for bcc metals, i.e., the critical temperature T(c). This finding sheds new light on the phenomenon of small-scale plasticity in largely unexplored non-fcc metals.

  15. Four Pillars for Improving the Quality of Safety-Critical Software-Reliant Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    the use of ISO 9001 /CMMI®,1 the suite of ISO -IEC SC 7 process standards, and standards and practices specific to the certification of safety...Four Pillars for Improving the Quality of Safety-Critical Software- Reliant Systems Studies of safety-critical software-reliant systems...many system level related to operational quality attributes, and 80% of these defects are discovered late in the development life cycle [Redman

  16. Q-factor optimization for TM-like modes in pillar-based photonic crystal cavities with planar slot waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascoli, D.; Gerace, D.; Andreani, L. C.

    2011-02-01

    We propose a design for high Q-factor, pillar-based photonic crystal cavities, with the goal of enhancing radiation-matter interaction in planar slot waveguides. The Q-factor is optimized for transverse-magnetic-like (TM-like) cavity modes, and it is found that a maximum Q ≃ 45000 can be reached by proper design of the pillars defining the cavity region. As an application, we study the Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission rate for a dipole emitter within a thin layer of low index material (slot) grown at the pillars center. The field intensity is enhanced within the slot for TM-like modes, which yields a Purcell factor of the order of 10 4, larger than the corresponding structure without slot. These results directly apply to nanostructures made of a thin active layer of erbium-doped silicon dioxide embedded in silicon pillars, which can be readily fabricated with state-of-the art technology.

  17. Fabrication of MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide through an exfoliation/reassembling and oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiaqi; Liu, Zong-Huai; Qiao, Shanfeng; Ma, Xiangrong; Xu, Naicai

    MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide has been first fabricated by a delamination/reassembling process followed by oxidation reaction and then by heat treatment. The structural evolution of MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide has been characterized by XRD, SEM, DSC-GTA, IR and N 2 adsorption-desorption. MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide shows a relative high thermal stability and mesoporous characteristic. The layered structure with a basal spacing of 0.66 nm could be maintained up to 400 °C. The electrochemical properties of the synthesized MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide have been studied using cyclic voltammetry in a mild aqueous electrolyte. Sample MnO 2-BirMO (300 °C) shows good capacitive behavior and cycling stability, and the specific capacitance value is 206 F g -1.

  18. Rockburst disaster prediction of isolated coal pillar by electromagnetic radiation based on frictional effect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tongbin; Yin, Yanchun; Xiao, Fukun; Tan, Yunliang; Zou, Jianchao

    2014-01-01

    Based on the understanding that charges generated during coal cracking are due to coal particle friction, a microstructure model was developed by considering four different variation laws of friction coefficient. Firstly, the frictional energy release of coal sample during uniaxial compressive tests was investigated and discussed. Then electromagnetic radiation method was used to predict the potential rockburst disaster in isolated coal pillar mining face, Muchengjian Colliery. The results indicate that the friction coefficient of coal particles decreases linearly with the increase of axial loading force. In predicting the strain-type rockburst, the high stress state of coal must be closely monitored. Field monitoring shows that electromagnetic radiation signal became abnormal before the occurrence of rockburst during isolated coal pillar mining. Furthermore, rockburst tends to occur at the early and ending stages of isolated coal pillar extraction. Mine-site investigation shows the occurrence zone of rockburst is consistent with the prediction, proving the reliability of the electromagnetic radiation method to predict strain-type rockburst disaster.

  19. Estimation of long-term stability of mine pillars in underground pit

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, S.; Sugimoto, F.; Yamauchi, M.; Furuzumi, M.

    1996-12-01

    Recently in Japan, unexpected degradation (surface subsidence) at old underground quarry sites, such as `Ohya-Ishi` (pumice tuff) pit field has often occurred. At these quarry sites, the excavation was started 20 or 30 years ago with mechanical chain cutter and the Room and Pillar method, and stopped 7 or more years ago. Therefore, a reliable method has been required for an estimation of long term mechanical properties of the rock and for an observation of a stability of rock-pillars or structures. In this study, creep tests under uniaxial compressive load were carried out on the `Ohya-Ishi`, with the aim of estimating the long term stability of the rock. From these results, a creep mechanism of the rock was discussed using the failure mechanism hypothesis proposed by Bieniawski and by others. On this basis, critical time to failure was predicted by the relationship between the logarithm of life time and stress ratio of the sustained axial creep load. Additionally, outline of the monitoring system of AE/MS activity in the field, which have set by the Ohya Aria Consolidate Public Corporation and the others to predict or to prevent the degradation of those residual pillars, is to be reported.

  20. High-resolution adsorption analysis of pillared zeolites IPC-3PI and MCM-36.

    PubMed

    Zukal, Arnošt; Kubů, Martin

    2014-07-21

    The porous structure of pillared zeolites IPC-3PI and MCM-36 and their precursors IPC-3P and MCM-22P, respectively, has been investigated by means of a high-resolution adsorption analysis. The analysis was based on argon adsorption isotherms measured at 87 K from the relative pressure of 10(-6). The isotherms were processed by means of the t-plot method, which made it possible to distinguish adsorption in micropores from adsorption in mesopores. The pore size distribution was evaluated from argon isotherms using Non-Local Density Functional Theory. The obtained results have shown that the microporous structure of the MWW layers is preserved in both pillared zeolites. In contrast to precursors IPC-3P and MCM-22P, pillared samples are characterized by the formation of a porous structure belonging to the lower mesopore region. The distribution of mesopores in the zeolite IPC-3PI is broader and is shifted to larger widths in comparison with the zeolite MCM-36.

  1. In Situ TEM Investigation of the Mechanical Behavior of Micronanoscaled Metal Pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Zhiwei

    2012-10-01

    In this article, our most recent progress on applying a unique quantitative transmission electron microscope deformation technique on micronanoscaled metal pillars will be reviewed. We found that single-crystal pillars fabricated through focused ion beam always contain high density of defects. However, if the sample size is small enough, then both face-centered-cubic metals and body-centered-cubic metal pillars can experience "mechanical annealing," i.e., a phenomena referring to the reduction of dislocation density in the deforming volume, when dislocation generation is outweighed by dislocation annihilation through the free surface. We also found that when the sample size was reduced below 1 μm or so, stress saturation and deformation mechanism transition occurred in a hexagonal-close-packed Ti alloy. Unlike crystalline materials, metallic glasses do not allow the presence and movement of dislocations or deformation twinning. However, we demonstrated the metallic glasses also follow the well-established tenet for crystalline materials: i.e., smaller is stronger and can reach its theoretical elastic limit under appropriate testing conditions. In addition, for the tested size regime, we found that high-energy electron beam has no obvious effect on the mechanical properties of materials with metallic bond. However, for materials with covalent bond and ionic bond, significant electron beam effects have been confirmed.

  2. A copper based pillared-bilayer metal organic framework: its synthesis, sorption properties and catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Parshamoni, Srinivasulu; Sanda, Suresh; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Konar, Sanjit

    2014-05-21

    A new 2D pillared-bilayer flexible open metal organic framework {[Cu(tdc)(bpe)]n·2n(H2O)·n(MeOH)} (compound 1) [H2tdc = 2,5 thiophenedicarboxylic acid; bpe = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane] has been synthesized through a solvent diffusion technique and structurally characterized. The structure analysis reveals that the tdc ligands formed bilayers with the Cu(II) ions along the b-direction and the layers are further pillared by bpe linkers and resulted in a 2D pillared-bilayer porous framework with a four connected uninodal sq1/Shubnikob tetragonal plane net with the Schälfli symbol {4(4)·6(2)}. The framework is enclosed with large square shaped channels (13.7 × 8.35 Å(2)) along the bc-plane and the channels are occupied by guest solvent molecules. The adsorption studies reveal that compound 1 shows selective adsorption for CO2 over CH4 at room temperature and it also shows hysteretic sorption for a few protic solvents (H2O and EtOH) and a Type-1 isotherm for an aprotic solvent (CH3CN). The catalytic performance of compound 1 for Glaser type homo-coupling reactions has also been reported.

  3. The pillar of metropolitan greatness: The long making of archeological objects in Paris (1711-2001).

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Over three centuries after the 1711 discovery in the choir of Notre-Dame in Paris of a square-section stone bas-relief (the Pillar of the Boatmen) with depictions of several deities, both Gaulish and Roman, the blocks comprising it were analyzed as a symbol of Parisian power, if not autonomy, vis-à-vis the Roman Empire. Variously considered as local, national, or imperial representations, the blocks were a constant object of admiration, interrogation, and speculation among antiquarians of the Republic of Letters. They were also boundary objects - products of the emergence of a Parisian archeology dated from 1711. If this science reflected the tensions and ambiguities of a local regime of knowledge situated in a national context, it also helped to coordinate archeological work between different institutions and actors. This paper would like to assess the specific role played by the Pillar of the Boatmen as a fetish object in this process. To what extent could an archeological artifact influence this reshaping of urban representation, this change of scales? By following the three-century career of the pillar's blocks as composite objects, which some have identified as merely stones or a column, it is possible to understand the multiple dimensions that defined the object as archeological - as an artifact that contributed to the relocating of the historical city center - and the multiple approaches that transform existing remains into knowledgeable objects.

  4. Model of care for a changing healthcare system: are there foundational pillars for design?

    PubMed

    Booker, Catriona; Turbutt, Adam; Fox, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    Currently, healthcare organisations are being challenged to provide optimal clinical services within budget limitations while simultaneously being confronted by aging consumers and labour and skill shortages. Within this dynamic and changing environment, the ability to remain responsive to patient needs while managing these issues poses further challenges. Development or review of the model of care (MOC) may provide a possible solution to support efficiencies in service provision. Although MOC are not readily understood or appreciated as an efficiency strategy, they can be more easily explained by considering several recurring pillars when developing or redesigning an MOC. Generic and recurring foundational pillars include integrated care models, team functioning and communication, leadership, change management and lean thinking. These foundational pillars should be incorporated into the development and application of MOC in order to achieve desired outcomes. However, sustainability requires continuous review to enable improvement and must be integrated into routine business. Moreover, successful review of MOC requires collaboration and commitment by all stakeholders. Leaders are critical to motivating clinicians and stakeholders in the review process. Further, it is imperative that leaders engage stakeholders to commit to support the agreed strategies designed to provide efficient and comprehensive healthcare services. Redesign of MOC can significantly improve patient care by applying the agreed strategies. In the current healthcare environment, these strategies can favourably affect healthcare expenditure and, at the same time, improve the quality of interprofessional health services.

  5. Light-Driven Reversible Shaping of Individual Azopolymeric Micro-Pillars

    PubMed Central

    Pirani, Federica; Angelini, Angelo; Frascella, Francesca; Rizzo, Riccardo; Ricciardi, Serena; Descrovi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    Azopolymers are known to exhibit a strong light responsivity known as athermal photofluidization. Although the underlying physics is still under debate, athermal photofluidization has been demonstrated to trigger mass-migration according to the polarization of a proper illumination light. Here, a polymer blend is proposed wherein a commercial azo-polyelectrolyte is mixed with a passive polymer. The blend is patterned as an array of micro-pillars that are individually exposed to visible laser illumination. Thanks to the interplay between the two blend components, a reversible and controlled deformation of the micro-pillars by periodically tuning the laser polarization in time is demonstrated. A reduced mobility of the azo-compound allows to repeatibly elongate and rotate micro-pillars along specific directions, with no significant material flow outisde the initial volume and no significant degradation of the structure morphology over several cycles. The proposed work suggests new degrees of freedom in controlling the mechanical features of micro-patterned light-responsive materials that can be usefully exploited in many application fields. PMID:27531219

  6. Porous Structures in Stacked, Crumpled and Pillared Graphene-Based 3D Materials

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Creighton, Megan; Chen, Yantao; Hurt, Robert; Külaots, Indrek

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, an atomically thin material with the theoretical surface area of 2600 m2g−1, has great potential in the fields of catalysis, separation, and gas storage if properly assembled into functional 3D materials at large scale. In ideal non-interacting ensembles of non-porous multilayer graphene plates, the surface area can be adequately estimated using the simple geometric law ~ 2600 m2g−1/N, where N is the number of graphene sheets per plate. Some processing operations, however, lead to secondary plate-plate stacking, folding, crumpling or pillaring, which give rise to more complex structures. Here we show that bulk samples of multilayer graphene plates stack in an irregular fashion that preserves the 2600/N surface area and creates regular slot-like pores with sizes that are multiples of the unit plate thickness. In contrast, graphene oxide deposits into films with massive area loss (2600 to 40 m2g−1) due to nearly perfect alignment and stacking during the drying process. Pillaring graphene oxide sheets by co-deposition of colloidal-phase particle-based spacers has the potential to partially restore the large monolayer surface. Surface areas as high as 1000 m2g−1 are demonstrated here through colloidal-phase deposition of graphene oxide with water-dispersible aryl-sulfonated ultrafine carbon black as a pillaring agent. PMID:26478597

  7. Enhancing elastic stress relaxation in SiGe/Si heterostructures by Si pillar necking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, F.; Salvalaglio, M.; Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Y.; Jung, A.; Isella, G.; Erni, R.; Timotijevic, B.; Niedermann, P.; Gröning, P.; Montalenti, F.; von Känel, H.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate that the elastic stress relaxation mechanism in micrometre-sized, highly mismatched heterostructures may be enhanced by employing patterned substrates in the form of necked pillars, resulting in a significant reduction of the dislocation density. Compositionally graded Si1-xGex crystals were grown by low energy plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, resulting in tens of micrometres tall, three-dimensional heterostructures. The patterned Si(001) substrates consist of micrometre-sized Si pillars either with the vertical {110} or isotropically under-etched sidewalls resulting in narrow necks. The structural properties of these heterostructures were investigated by defect etching and transmission electron microscopy. We show that the dislocation density, and hence the competition between elastic and plastic stress relaxation, is highly influenced by the shape of the substrate necks and their proximity to the mismatched epitaxial material. The SiGe dislocation density increases monotonically with the crystal width but is significantly reduced by the substrate under-etching. The drop in dislocation density is interpreted as a direct effect of the enhanced compliance of the under-etched Si pillars, as confirmed by the three-dimensional finite element method simulations of the elastic energy distribution.

  8. Characterization of silica-pillared derivatives from aluminum-containing kanemite.

    PubMed

    Toriya, Sunao; Takei, Takashi; Fuji, Masayoshi; Chikazawa, Masatoshi

    2003-12-15

    A series of aluminum-containing kanemite (Al-kanemite) samples with several Si/Al molar ratios were synthesized. The Al-kanemite samples were pillared with silica. X-ray diffractograms showed that the layered structure of the Al-kanemite samples was maintained at Si/Al= infinity approximately 10 but was broken at Si/Al = 5, 2.5, and 1. 29Si MAS NMR spectra of the Al-kanemite samples, except for that of Si/Al = 1, mainly showed peaks of Q(3) sites, which were attributed to Si(OSi)(3)(OH) groups, although peaks assigned to Si(OAl)(OSi)(2)(OH) were also seen. The 27Al MAS NMR spectra indicated that the Al-kanemite samples had only four-coordinate aluminum atoms. The FTIR spectra of pyridine adsorbed on the pillared Al-kanemite derivatives revealed Lewis acid sites on the surface. The nitrogen adsorption isotherms of the derivatives were classified as type I (Langmuir) absorption isotherms. Using the alpha(s) method, the specific surface areas of the derivatives were 572-756 m(2)g(-1), and the pore sizes were calculated as 1.25-1.83 nm. The pillared Al-kanemite derivatives had slit-shaped micropore structures.

  9. Structure instability forecasting and analysis of giant rock pillars in steeply dipping thick coal seams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xing-ping; Sun, Huan; Shan, Peng-fei; Cai, Ming; Cao, Jian-tao; Cui, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Structure stability analysis of rock masses is essential for forecasting catastrophic structure failure in coal seam mining. Steeply dipping thick coal seams (SDTCS) are common in the Urumqi coalfield, and some dynamical hazards such as roof collapse and mining- induced seismicity occur frequently in the coal mines. The cause of these events is mainly structure instability in giant rock pillars sandwiched between SDTCS. Developing methods to predict these events is important for safe mining in such a complex environment. This study focuses on understanding the structural mechanics model of a giant rock pillar and presents a viewpoint of the stability of a trend sphenoid fractured beam (TSFB). Some stability index parameters such as failure surface dips were measured, and most dips were observed to be between 46° and 51°. We used a digital panoramic borehole monitoring system to measure the TSFB's height (Δ H), which varied from 56.37 to 60.50 m. Next, FLAC3D was used to model the distribution and evolution of vertical displacement in the giant rock pillars; the results confirmed the existence of a TSFB structure. Finally, we investigated the acoustic emission (AE) energy accumulation rate and observed that the rate commonly ranged from 20 to 40 kJ/min. The AE energy accumulation rate could be used to anticipate impeding seismic events related to structure failure. The results presented provide a useful approach for forecasting catastrophic events related to structure instability and for developing hazard prevention technology for mining in SDTCS.

  10. Effect of clay content and speed screw rotation on the crystallization and thermal behaviors of recycled PET/clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    de Giraldi, A L F M; Bizarria, M T M; Silva, A A; Mariano, C; Velasco, J I; d'Avila, M A; Mei, L H I

    2009-06-01

    Nanocomposites of recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate) (rPET) containing 2.5 wt% and 5.0 wt% of montmorillonite modified with organophilic quaternary ammonium salt (DELLITE 67G) were prepared by melt compounding using a co-rotating twin-screw type extruder with two organoclay contents were used: 2.5 wt% and 5.0 wt% and were prepared using two different rotation speeds: 150 and 250 rpm. Thermal characterization (analysis) of the nanocomposites was performed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The results from DSC measurements showed that the addition of organoclay affects recycled PET's crystallization for two screw rotation speeds studies. The nucleating effect of organoclay was investigated. Morphological analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of fully exfoliated clay platelets in samples prepared at 150 rpm.

  11. A novel high performance SemiSJ-CSTBT with p-pillar under the bottom of the trench gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jia; Hong, Chen; Ji, Tan; Shuojin, Lu; Yangjun, Zhu

    2016-08-01

    A novel high performance SemiSJ-CSTBT is proposed with the p-pillar under the bottom of the trench gate. The inserted p-pillar with the neighbouring n-drift region forms a lateral P/N junction, which can adjust the electric distribution in the forward-blocking mode to achieve a higher breakdown voltage compared to the conventional CSTBT. Also, the p-pillar can act as a hole collector at turn-off, which significantly enhances the turn-off speed and obtains a lower turn-off switching loss. Although the turn-off switching loss decreases as the depth of the p-pillar increases, there is no need for a very deep p-pillar. The associated voltage overshoot at turn-off increases dramatically with increasing the depth of p-pillar, which may cause destruction of the devices. Plus, this will add difficulty and cost to the manufacturing process of this new structure. Therefore, the proposed SemiSJ-CSTBT offers considerably better robustness compared to the conventional CSTBT and SJ-CSTBT. The simulation results show that the SemiSJ-CSTBT exhibits an increase in breakdown voltage by 160 V (13%) and a reduction of turn-off switching loss by approximately 15%. Project supported by the National Major Science and Technology Special Project of China (No. 2013ZX02305005-002) and the Major Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51490681).

  12. Non-explosive lava-water interaction in Skaelingar, Iceland and the formation of subaerial lava pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Christle, Kenneth W.

    2013-08-01

    Hollow cylinders of basalt < 2.5 m tall and generally < 1 m in diameter were generated by non-explosive lava-water interactions during the emplacement of the Laki lava flow in Iceland during 1783-1784. We know of only one location within the Laki lava flow where these basalt formations occur: a valley called Skaelingar, located at ~ 64.0°N, 18.5°W, which contains a tributary stream to the Skafta River. Skaelingar was temporarily filled with Laki lava when the main body of the lava flow advancing down the Skafta River valley became blocked, forcing lava to flow upstream into tributary valleys along the north side of the river. After the blockage within the Skafta River valley was removed, the Laki lava mostly drained out of these tributary valleys. We refer to the remaining vertical hollow basalt pipes as lava pillars because they morphologically resemble subaerial lava trees and submarine lava pillars that have been observed at mid-ocean ridges. We propose that the subaerial pillars formed as an inflating lava flow advanced slowly over water-saturated ground, or perhaps into temporarily ponded water, causing heated columns of water to rise between adjacent advancing lava lobes. The subaerial pillars continued to grow in height and diameter as the lava flow inflated. When the lava drained back out of the valley, the lava pillars were left standing. Thus, the Icelandic subaerial pillars represent a non-explosive interaction between lava and water.

  13. Viscoelastic and Mechanical Properties of Thermoset PMR-type Polyimide-Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalla, Mohamed O.; Dean, Derrick; Campbell, Sandi

    2002-01-01

    High temperature thermoset polyimide-clay nanocomposites were prepared by blending 2.5 and 5 wt% of an unmodified Na(+-) montmorillonite (PGV) and two organically modified FGV (PGVCl0COOH, PGVC12) with a methanol solution of PMR-15 precursor. The methanol facilitated the dispersal of the unmodified clay. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed a significant increase in the thermomechanical properties (E' and E") of 2.5 wt% clay loaded nanocomposites in comparison with the neat polyimide. Higher glass transition temperatures were observed for 2.5 wt% nanocomposites compared to the neat polyimide. Flexural properties measurements for the 2.5 wt% nanocomposites showed a significant improvement in the modulus and strength, with no loss in elongation. This trend was not observed for the 5 wt% nanocomposites. An improvement in the CTE was observed for the PGV/PMR-15 nanocomposites, while a decrease was observed for the organically modified samples. This was attributed to potential variations in the interface caused by modifier degradation.

  14. Transport of Organic Solutes in Clay Formations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research is a pilot investigation for the SERDP (Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, DoD) founded project, Impact of Clay-DNAPL Interactions on Transport and Storage of Chlorinated Solvents in Low Permeability Zones, from 2010-2012. The report tries to s...

  15. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  16. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF THREE GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydraulic conductivity of three 2.9 m2 (32 sq ft) geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) was measured. Tests were performed on individual sheets of the GCLs, on overlapped pieces of GCLs, and on composite liners consisting of a punctured geomembrane overlying a GCL. Hyd...

  17. Diffusion in Clay Layers and Groundwater Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a collaborative SERDP-funded study, researchers from the Air Force Institute of Technology, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the University of Michigan developed a numerical model that simulates the enhanced transport of CAHs into and out of low permeability clay ...

  18. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  19. Palaeoceanographic approach to the Kimmeridge Clay Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.G. )

    1988-08-01

    The Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF) is northern Europe's premier source rock and can be understood using a new but relatively simple oceanographic model. This explains or accommodates most current observations about the KCF and its depositional environment and draws upon paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, geochemical, sedimentological, and paleontological evidence.

  20. Calm, Cool, and Comfortable in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The author's fourth-grade students had just finished a drawing unit that focused on the human figure. Projects included charcoal gesture drawings and chalk manikin drawings in chiaroscuro. She wanted to integrate a new medium for students to continue their study of the human figure. Since students are always excited to work with clay, making clay…

  1. Clay Corner: Recreating Chinese Bronze Vessels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    1998-01-01

    Presents a lesson where students make faux Chinese bronze vessels through slab or coil clay construction after they learn about the history, function, and design of these vessels. Utilizes a variety of glaze finishes in order to give the vessels an aged look. Gives detailed guidelines for creating the vessels. (CMK)

  2. Clay particle retention in small constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Braskerud, B C

    2003-09-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) can be used to mitigate non-point source pollution from arable fields. Previous investigations have shown that the relative soil particle retention in small CWs increases when hydraulic load increases. This paper investigates why this phenomenon occurs, even though common retention models predict the opposite, by studying clay and silt particle retention in two Norwegian CWs. Retention was measured with water flow proportional sampling systems in the inlet and outlet of the wetlands, and the texture of the suspended solids was analyzed. The surface area of the CWs was small compared to the watershed area (approximately 0.07%), giving high average hydraulic loads (1.1 and 2.0 md(-1)). One of the watersheds included only old arable land, whereas the other included areas with disturbed topsoil after artificial land leveling. Clay particle retention was 57% for the CW in the first watershed, and 22% for the CW in the disturbed watershed. The different behavior of the wetlands could be due to differences in aggregate size and stability of the particles entering the wetlands. Results showed that increased hydraulic loads did affect CW retention negatively. However, as runoff increased, soil particles/aggregates with higher sedimentation velocities entered the CWs (e.g., the clay particles behaved as silt particles). Hence, clay particle settling velocity is not constant as assumed in many prediction models. The net result was increased retention.

  3. Swelling transition of a clay induced by heating

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, E. L.; Hemmen, H.; Fonseca, D. M.; Coutant, C.; Knudsen, K. D.; Plivelic, T. S.; Bonn, D.; Fossum, J. O.

    2012-01-01

    Clays are of paramount importance for soil stability, but also in applications ranging from oil recovery to composites and hydrogels. Generically, clays are divided into two subclasses: macroscopically swelling, ‘active’ clays that have the capacity for taking up large amounts of water to form stable gels, and ‘passive’ or non-swelling clays; the former stabilize soils whereas the latter are known to lead to landslides. However, it has been unclear so far what mechanisms underlie clay swelling. Here, we report the first observation of a temperature-induced transition from a passive to an active, swelling clay. We propose a simple description of the swelling transition; while net attractive interactions are dominant at low temperatures so that the clay particles remain attached to each other in stacks, at higher temperatures it is energetically favourable for the clay to swell due to the entropy that is gained by counterions which are liberated during swelling. PMID:22943004

  4. HPLC Analysis of Colorants Migrated from Children's Modeling Clays.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Eri; Ozaki, Asako; Ooshima, Tomoko; Yamano, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    A method using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) was developed for the identification of colorants migrated from colored modeling clays, which are popular toys for children. Twelve permitted dyes and 25 non-permitted dyes were analyzed in 20 clays (10 wheat clays, 2 rice clays, 2 corn clays, 3 paper clays and 3 resin clays). As a result, 13 products which were labeled for children's use (under 6 years old) met the specifications of the Japanese Food Sanitation Law, while non-permitted colorants were eluted from 2 products. In additon, unknown colorants were eluted from 3 products for people over 6 years old, although these are not covered by the Japanese regulation. It was suggested that some type of clays contained pigments, which are generally used in printing ink and plastics.

  5. INTERIOR VIEW ON SEVENTH FLOOR AT CORNER OF CLAY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW ON SEVENTH FLOOR AT CORNER OF CLAY AND 15TH STREETS. LARGE SECTIONS OF DEMOLISHED SHEET METAL CORNICE FROM BUILDING EXTERIOR VISIBLE FOREGROUND - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  6. INTERIOR VIEW ON MEZZANINE ALONG EAST (CLAY STREET) FRONT FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW ON MEZZANINE ALONG EAST (CLAY STREET) FRONT FACING OAKLAND CITY HALL. TYPICAL INTERIOR CONDITIONS OF PARTIAL DEMOLITION; WINDOWS, WINDOW FRAMES, SUSPENDED CEILING, AND MOVABLE PARTITION WALLS REMOVED - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  7. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  8. Effect of the solvent on the size of clay nanoparticles in solution as determined using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy methodology.

    PubMed

    Alin, Jonas; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy methodology was developed and utilized for the in situ nanoscale measurement of the size of mineral clay agglomerates in various liquid suspensions. The clays studied were organomodified and unmodified montmorillonite clays (I.44p, Cloisite 93a, and PGN). The methodology was compared and validated against dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis. The method was able to measure clay agglomerates in solvents in situations where DLS analysis was unsuccessful due to the shapes, polydispersity, and high aspect ratios of the clay particles and the complexity of the aggregates, or dispersion medium. The measured clay agglomerates in suspension were found to be in the nanometer range in the more compatible solvents, and their sizes correlated with the Hansen solubility parameter space distance between the clay modifiers and the solvents. Mass detection limits for size determination were in the range from 1 to 9 mg/L. The methodology thus provides simple, rapid, and inexpensive characterization of clays or particles in the nano- or microsize range in low concentrations in various liquid media, including complex mixtures or highly viscous fluids that are difficult to analyze with DLS. In addition, by combining UV-VIS spectroscopy with DLS it was possible to discern flocculation behavior in liquids, which otherwise could result in false size measurements by DLS alone.

  9. Altered phase model for polymer clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Debashis; Pradhan, Shashindra M; Katti, Dinesh R; Katti, Kalpana S; Mohanty, Bedabibhas

    2008-05-20

    This paper describes a multiscale approach used to model polymer clay nanocomposites (PCNs) based on a new altered phase concept. Constant-force steered molecular dynamics (SMD) is used to evaluate nanomechanical properties of the constituents of intercalated clay units in PCNs, which were used in the finite element model. Atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation techniques provided additional input to the finite element method (FEM) model. FEM is used to construct a representative PCN model that simulates the composite response of intercalated clay units and the surrounding polymer matrix. From our simulations we conclude that, in order to accurately predict mechanical response of PCNs, it is necessary to take into account the molecular-level interactions between constituents of PCN, which are responsible for the enhanced nanomechanical properties of PCNs. This conclusion is supported by our previous finding that there is a change in crystallinity of polymeric phase due to the influence of intercalated clay units. The extent of altered polymeric phase is obtained from observations of a zone of the altered polymeric phase surrounding intercalated clay units in the "phase image" of PCN surface, obtained using an atomic force microscope (AFM). An accurate FEM model of PCN is constructed that incorporates the zone of the altered polymer. This model is used to estimate elastic modulus of the altered polymer. The estimated elastic modulus for the altered polymer is 4 to 5 times greater than that of pure polymer. This study indicates that it is necessary to take into account molecular interactions between constituents in nanocomposites due to the presence of altered phases, and furthermore provides us with a new direction for the modeling and design of nanocomposites.

  10. Green Synthesis of Silver Nano-particles by Macrococcus bovicus and Its Immobilization onto Montmorillonite Clay for Antimicrobial Functionality.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed S; Abou-El-Sherbini, Khaled S; Hamzawy, Esmat M A; Amr, Mohey H A; El-Dafrawy, Shady

    2015-08-01

    Macrococcus bovicus was locally isolated from soil and used in the green synthesis of nano-scaling silver (NSAg). It was immobilized on a sodic-montmorillonite clay (MMT1) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-modified montmorillonite (MMT2) which was also calcined at 300 °C (MMT3). The NSAg clays were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray diffractometry, surface area measurement, UV-Vis spectrometry, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and thermogravimetric analysis. NSAg was confirmed to be included in the interparticular cavities of the clay sheets and its mechanical stability was evidenced. The antimicrobial activity of the NSAg-modified clays was investigated against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans using the cup plate and the plate count techniques. The antimicrobial activity of the NSAg clays was confirmed and attributed to the caging of NSAg in MMT cavities. MMT3 was found to inhibit the microbial growth to as high as 65 % as observed from the plate count method. Graphical Abstract Scheme of the biosynthesis of nano-scaling Ag and its immobilization and antimicrobial application.

  11. Clays and clay minerals in Bikaner: Sources, environment pollution and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayatri, Sharma; Anu, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Environmental pollution can also be caused by minerals which include natural as well as human activities. Rapid urbanization, consumerist life style, anthropogenic deeds are increasing environmental pollution day by day. Fluctuation in our ecosystem or polluted environment leads to many diseases and shows adverse effects on living organisms. The main aim of this paper is to highlight the environmental pollution from clays and clay minerals and their mitigation..

  12. Theoretical and experimental investigations on the structures of purified clay and acid-activated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Li, Junfen; Yang, Liming

    2006-07-01

    The purified and acidified montmorillonite clay were characterized by XRD, BET and TPD. These results show that acidified clay is provided with more surface area and acid sites. For NH 3-TPD, molecular NH 3 desorption on purified clay and acidified clay occurs at temperatures with 873 and 1000 K, respectively. It is shown for the existence for strong acid sites. By two reactions of the tetrahydropyranylation of n-propanol and the esterification of cyclo-2-pentene with acetic acid, it is shown that the acidified clay displays better catalytic activity for above two organic reactions. By density-functional theory (DFT) method, we have analyzed the structures of different substituted montmorillonite and the effect sorption behavior of Na + in different montmorillonite models. The result shows that the process of substitution will occur apart from octahedral aluminums. The adsorption of NH 3 on clay surfaces have been investigated using TPD and DFT. This is shown that acid sites locate at round the octahedral aluminums, and substitution of Al 3+ for tetrahedral Si will be favorable to NH 3 adsorption.

  13. FACING NORTH ALONG CLAY STREET, SHOWING BUILDINGS ON THE WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACING NORTH ALONG CLAY STREET, SHOWING BUILDINGS ON THE WEST SIDE OF CLAY STREET, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: JOHN BREUNER AND COMPANY BUILDING (FOREGROUND), HOTEL TOURAINE (MIDDLE), AND THE PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. BUILDING - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  14. Two-dimensional Clay and Graphene Nanosheets for Polymer Nanocomposites and Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yuqiang

    Clay and graphene nanosheets are attractive to materials scientists due to their unique structural and physical properties and potentially low cost. This thesis focuses on the surface modification and structure design of clay and graphene nanosheets, targeting special requirements in polymer nanocomposites and energy storage applications. The high aspect ratio and stiffness of clay and graphene nanosheets make them promising candidates to reinforce polymers. However, it is challenging to achieve a good dispersion of the nanosheets in a polymer matrix. It is demonstrated in this study that organic modifications of clay and graphene nanosheets lead to better filler dispersion in polymer matrices. A prepolymer route was developed to achieve clay exfoliation in a polyurethane-vermiculite system. However, the phase-separated structure of the polyurethane matrix was disrupted. Intragallery catalysis was adopted to promote the clay exfoliation during polymerization. With both catalytic and reactive groups on the clay modifier, the polyurethane-vermiculite nanocomposites showed a significant increase in modulus and improved barrier performance, compared to neat polyurethane. The toughening effect of graphene on thermosetting epoxies and unsaturated polyesters (UPs) was also investigated. Various types of graphene with different structures and surface functionalities were incorporated into the thermosetting resin by in situ polymerization. The toughening effect was observed for epoxy nanocomposites at loading levels of less than 0.1 wt%, and a peak of fracture toughness was observed at 0.02 or 0.04 wt% of graphene loadings for all epoxy-graphene systems. A microcrack-crazing mechanism was proposed to explain the fracture behavior of epoxy-graphene systems based on fractography observations. Similar peak behavior of fracture toughness was not observed in UP system. UP nanocomposites with modified graphene oxide showed better mechanical performance than those with unmodified

  15. Polypropylene Nanocomposites from Porous Clay Materials: Application in Ethylene Scavenger Packaging Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakobna, Kasinee; Magaraphan, Rathanawan; Manuspiya, Hathaikarn

    2007-03-01

    The PCH is interesting material to use as entrapping system owing to its structure provides high surface area with uniform and specific pore size. In this work, the PCH is synthesized within the galleries of Na-bentonite clay by the polymerization of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in the presence of surfactant micelles (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and dodecylamine). In addition, a mesoporous clay with hybrid organic-inorganic PCH (HPCH) is modified via co-condensation reaction of TEOS and methyltriethoxysilane (MTS). Before the preparation of PCHs and HPCHs, the Na-bentonite clay was adjusted pH into 9, 7, 5 and 3. Furthermore, both PCH and HPCH are utilized as ethylene scavenger and blended with polypropylene (PP) for producing ethylene scavenging films in food packaging application. The eight samples of nanocomposites films including PCH-9, 7, 5, 3 and HPCH-9, 7, 5, 3 (numerals denote the pH-adjusted condition of Na-bentonite clay) will be measured oxygen and ethylene permeabilities; however, the present results obtained from PCH-9 and HPCH-9 nanocomposites films revealed that both oxygen and ethylene permeabilities of these films were less than that of PP virgin film. So these materials could be found new application in active packaging.

  16. Measurements of particle orientation in simple shear and channel flows of polypropylene/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykes, Laura

    2005-03-01

    We report studies of flow-induced orientation in dispersions of organically modified montmorillonite clay in polypropylene. The nanocomposite samples were prepared using two methods. Melt blending in a twin-screw extruder led to intercalated samples in which the layered structure of the clay remains intact. An additional step of solid-state shear pulverization leads to samples with a higher degree of exfoliation of individual clay sheets. In situ x-ray scattering was used to probe particle orientation in steady shear using an annular cone and plate shear cell which provides information about particle orientation in the flow-gradient plane. The more highly exfoliated pulverized sample shows significantly lower orientation than the intercalated melt-blended sample. Both samples were also studied in extrusion-fed channel flows. In slit-channel geometries, the dominant shear rate direction is parallel to the x-ray beam, allowing information about orientation in the flow- vorticity plane to be obtained. In fact, little scattering was observed in these configurations, confirming the tendency of clay particles to `lie down' in the shear flow. Superposition of extension via contractions or expansions in slit-channel flows did not reorient particles sufficiently to bring them `into view' in these geometries.

  17. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  18. Characterization of spiral ganglion neurons cultured on silicon micro-pillar substrates for new auditory neuro-electronic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattotti, M.; Micholt, L.; Braeken, D.; Kovačić, D.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. One of the strategies to improve cochlear implant technology is to increase the number of electrodes in the neuro-electronic interface. The objective was to characterize in vitro cultures of spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) cultured on surfaces of novel silicon micro-pillar substrates (MPS). Approach. SGN from P5 rat pups were cultured on MPS with different micro-pillar widths (1-5.6 μm) and spacings (0.6-15 μm) and were compared with control SGN cultures on glass coverslips by immunocytochemistry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Main results. Overall, MPS support SGN growth equally well as the control glass surfaces. Micro-pillars of a particular size-range (1.2-2.4 μm) were optimal in promoting SGN presence, neurite growth and alignment. On this specific micro-pillar size, more SGN were present, and neurites were longer and more aligned. SEM pictures highlight how cells on micro-pillars with smaller spacings grow directly on top of pillars, while at wider spacings (from 3.2 to 15 μm) they grow on the bottom of the surface, losing contact guidance. Further, we found that MPS encourage more monopolar and bipolar SGN morphologies compared to the control condition. Finally, MPS induce longest neurite growth with minimal interaction of S100+ glial cells. Significance. These results indicate that silicon micro-pillar substrates create a permissive environment for the growth of primary auditory neurons promoting neurite sprouting and are a promising technology for future high-density three-dimensional CMOS-based auditory neuro-electronic interfaces.

  19. Chemical disaggregation of kaolinitic claystones (tonsteins and flint clays)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Triplehorn, D.M.; Bohor, B.F.; Betterton, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    The coarse, non-clay fraction of many flint-like kaolinitic claystones often contains mineral grains diagnostic of the claystone's origin and, in the case of tonsteins (altered volcanic ashes), may also provide minerals suitable for radiometric dating. Separation of the non-clay mineral fraction is often difficult because flint clays and flint-like clays resist slaking in water and thus are difficult to disaggregate. Chemical disaggregation of resistant kaolinitic claystones may be achieved by immersion in either hydrazine monohydrate or DMSO for periods ranging from one day to several weeks. Generally, hydrazine monohydrate works more quickly and efficiently than DMSO to disaggregate most kaolinitic claystones and flint clays.

  20. Influence of clay mineral structure and surfactant nature on the adsorption capacity of surfactants by clays.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, M J; Dorado, M C; del Hoyo, C; Rodríguez-Cruz, M S

    2008-01-15

    Adsorption of three surfactants of different nature, Triton X-100 (TX100) (non-ionic), sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) (anionic) and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ODTMA) (cationic) by four layered (montmorillonite, illite, muscovite and kaolinite) and two non-layered (sepiolite and palygorskite) clay minerals was studied. The objective was to improve the understanding of surfactant behaviour in soils for the possible use of these compounds in remediation technologies of contaminated soils by toxic organic compounds. Adsorption isotherms were obtained using surfactant concentrations higher and lower than the critical micelle concentration (cmc). These isotherms showed different adsorption stages of the surfactants by the clay minerals, and were classified in different subgroups of the L-, S- or H-types. An increase in the adsorption of SDS and ODTMA by all clay minerals is observed up to the cmc of the surfactant in the equilibrium solution is reached. However, there was further TX100 adsorption when the equilibrium concentration was well above the cmc. Adsorption constants from Langmuir and Freundlich equations (TX100 and ODTMA) or Freundlich equation (SDS) were used to compare adsorption of different surfactants by clay minerals studied. These constants indicated the surfactant adsorption by clay minerals followed this order ODTMA>TX100>SDS. The adsorption of TX100 and ODTMA was higher by montmorillonite and illite, and the adsorption of SDS was found to be higher by kaolinite and sepiolite. Results obtained show the influence of clay mineral structure and surfactant nature on the adsorption capacity of surfactants by clays, and they indicate the interest to consider the soil mineralogical composition when one surfactant have to be selected in order to establish more efficient strategies for the remediation of soils and water contaminated by toxic organic pollutants.