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Sample records for modified segmental boost

  1. Ventriculogram segmentation using boosted decision trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, John A.; Sheehan, Florence H.

    2004-05-01

    Left ventricular status, reflected in ejection fraction or end systolic volume, is a powerful prognostic indicator in heart disease. Quantitative analysis of these and other parameters from ventriculograms (cine xrays of the left ventricle) is infrequently performed due to the labor required for manual segmentation. None of the many methods developed for automated segmentation has achieved clinical acceptance. We present a method for semi-automatic segmentation of ventriculograms based on a very accurate two-stage boosted decision-tree pixel classifier. The classifier determines which pixels are inside the ventricle at key ED (end-diastole) and ES (end-systole) frames. The test misclassification rate is about 1%. The classifier is semi-automatic, requiring a user to select 3 points in each frame: the endpoints of the aortic valve and the apex. The first classifier stage is 2 boosted decision-trees, trained using features such as gray-level statistics (e.g. median brightness) and image geometry (e.g. coordinates relative to user supplied 3 points). Second stage classifiers are trained using the same features as the first, plus the output of the first stage. Border pixels are determined from the segmented images using dilation and erosion. A curve is then fit to the border pixels, minimizing a penalty function that trades off fidelity to the border pixels with smoothness. ED and ES volumes, and ejection fraction are estimated from border curves using standard area-length formulas. On independent test data, the differences between automatic and manual volumes (and ejection fractions) are similar in size to the differences between two human observers.

  2. A multiview boosting approach to tissue segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Xu, Sheng; Pinto, Peter A.; Turkbey, Baris; Bernardo, Marcelino; Choyke, Peter L.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2014-04-01

    Digitized histopathology images have a great potential for improving or facilitating current assessment tools in cancer pathology. In order to develop accurate and robust automated methods, the precise segmentation of histologic objects such epithelium, stroma, and nucleus is necessary, in the hopes of information extraction not otherwise obvious to the subjective eye. Here, we propose a multivew boosting approach to segment histology objects of prostate tissue. Tissue specimen images are first represented at different scales using a Gaussian kernel and converted into several forms such HSV and La*b*. Intensity- and texture-based features are extracted from the converted images. Adopting multiview boosting approach, we effectively learn a classifier to predict the histologic class of a pixel in a prostate tissue specimen. The method attempts to integrate the information from multiple scales (or views). 18 prostate tissue specimens from 4 patients were employed to evaluate the new method. The method was trained on 11 tissue specimens including 75,832 epithelial and 103,453 stroma pixels and tested on 55,319 epithelial and 74,945 stroma pixels from 7 tissue specimens. The technique showed 96.7% accuracy, and as summarized into a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plot, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.983 (95% CI: 0.983-0.984) was achieved.

  3. A boosted optimal linear learner for retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, E.; Grisan, E.

    2014-03-01

    Ocular fundus images provide important information about retinal degeneration, which may be related to acute pathologies or to early signs of systemic diseases. An automatic and quantitative assessment of vessel morphological features, such as diameters and tortuosity, can improve clinical diagnosis and evaluation of retinopathy. At variance with available methods, we propose a data-driven approach, in which the system learns a set of optimal discriminative convolution kernels (linear learner). The set is progressively built based on an ADA-boost sample weighting scheme, providing seamless integration between linear learner estimation and classification. In order to capture the vessel appearance changes at different scales, the kernels are estimated on a pyramidal decomposition of the training samples. The set is employed as a rotating bank of matched filters, whose response is used by the boosted linear classifier to provide a classification of each image pixel into the two classes of interest (vessel/background). We tested the approach fundus images available from the DRIVE dataset. We show that the segmentation performance yields an accuracy of 0.94.

  4. Modified Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation of Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm and a computer program that implements the algorithm that performs recursive hierarchical segmentation (RHSEG) of data have been developed. While the current implementation is for two-dimensional data having spatial characteristics (e.g., image, spectral, or spectral-image data), the generalized algorithm also applies to three-dimensional or higher dimensional data and also to data with no spatial characteristics. The algorithm and software are modified versions of a prior RHSEG algorithm and software, the outputs of which often contain processing-window artifacts including, for example, spurious segmentation-image regions along the boundaries of processing-window edges.

  5. Fast automatic 3D liver segmentation based on a three-level AdaBoost-guided active shape model

    SciTech Connect

    He, Baochun; Huang, Cheng; Zhou, Shoujun; Hu, Qingmao; Jia, Fucang; Sharp, Gregory; Fang, Chihua; Fan, Yingfang

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: A robust, automatic, and rapid method for liver delineation is urgently needed for the diagnosis and treatment of liver disorders. Until now, the high variability in liver shape, local image artifacts, and the presence of tumors have complicated the development of automatic 3D liver segmentation. In this study, an automatic three-level AdaBoost-guided active shape model (ASM) is proposed for the segmentation of the liver based on enhanced computed tomography images in a robust and fast manner, with an emphasis on the detection of tumors. Methods: The AdaBoost voxel classifier and AdaBoost profile classifier were used to automatically guide three-level active shape modeling. In the first level of model initialization, fast automatic liver segmentation by an AdaBoost voxel classifier method is proposed. A shape model is then initialized by registration with the resulting rough segmentation. In the second level of active shape model fitting, a prior model based on the two-class AdaBoost profile classifier is proposed to identify the optimal surface. In the third level, a deformable simplex mesh with profile probability and curvature constraint as the external force is used to refine the shape fitting result. In total, three registration methods—3D similarity registration, probability atlas B-spline, and their proposed deformable closest point registration—are used to establish shape correspondence. Results: The proposed method was evaluated using three public challenge datasets: 3Dircadb1, SLIVER07, and Visceral Anatomy3. The results showed that our approach performs with promising efficiency, with an average of 35 s, and accuracy, with an average Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.94 ± 0.02, 0.96 ± 0.01, and 0.94 ± 0.02 for the 3Dircadb1, SLIVER07, and Anatomy3 training datasets, respectively. The DSC of the SLIVER07 testing and Anatomy3 unseen testing datasets were 0.964 and 0.933, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed automatic approach

  6. Fast automatic 3D liver segmentation based on a three-level AdaBoost-guided active shape model.

    PubMed

    He, Baochun; Huang, Cheng; Sharp, Gregory; Zhou, Shoujun; Hu, Qingmao; Fang, Chihua; Fan, Yingfang; Jia, Fucang

    2016-05-01

    A robust, automatic, and rapid method for liver delineation is urgently needed for the diagnosis and treatment of liver disorders. Until now, the high variability in liver shape, local image artifacts, and the presence of tumors have complicated the development of automatic 3D liver segmentation. In this study, an automatic three-level AdaBoost-guided active shape model (ASM) is proposed for the segmentation of the liver based on enhanced computed tomography images in a robust and fast manner, with an emphasis on the detection of tumors. The AdaBoost voxel classifier and AdaBoost profile classifier were used to automatically guide three-level active shape modeling. In the first level of model initialization, fast automatic liver segmentation by an AdaBoost voxel classifier method is proposed. A shape model is then initialized by registration with the resulting rough segmentation. In the second level of active shape model fitting, a prior model based on the two-class AdaBoost profile classifier is proposed to identify the optimal surface. In the third level, a deformable simplex mesh with profile probability and curvature constraint as the external force is used to refine the shape fitting result. In total, three registration methods-3D similarity registration, probability atlas B-spline, and their proposed deformable closest point registration-are used to establish shape correspondence. The proposed method was evaluated using three public challenge datasets: 3Dircadb1, SLIVER07, and Visceral Anatomy3. The results showed that our approach performs with promising efficiency, with an average of 35 s, and accuracy, with an average Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.94 ± 0.02, 0.96 ± 0.01, and 0.94 ± 0.02 for the 3Dircadb1, SLIVER07, and Anatomy3 training datasets, respectively. The DSC of the SLIVER07 testing and Anatomy3 unseen testing datasets were 0.964 and 0.933, respectively. The proposed automatic approach achieves robust, accurate, and fast liver

  7. Comparison of AdaBoost and support vector machines for detecting Alzheimer's disease through automated hippocampal segmentation.

    PubMed

    Morra, Jonathan H; Tu, Zhuowen; Apostolova, Liana G; Green, Amity E; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    We compared four automated methods for hippocampal segmentation using different machine learning algorithms: 1) hierarchical AdaBoost, 2) support vector machines (SVM) with manual feature selection, 3) hierarchical SVM with automated feature selection (Ada-SVM), and 4) a publicly available brain segmentation package (FreeSurfer). We trained our approaches using T1-weighted brain MRIs from 30 subjects [10 normal elderly, 10 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 10 Alzheimer's disease (AD)], and tested on an independent set of 40 subjects (20 normal, 20 AD). Manually segmented gold standard hippocampal tracings were available for all subjects (training and testing). We assessed each approach's accuracy relative to manual segmentations, and its power to map AD effects. We then converted the segmentations into parametric surfaces to map disease effects on anatomy. After surface reconstruction, we computed significance maps, and overall corrected p-values, for the 3-D profile of shape differences between AD and normal subjects. Our AdaBoost and Ada-SVM segmentations compared favorably with the manual segmentations and detected disease effects as well as FreeSurfer on the data tested. Cumulative p-value plots, in conjunction with the false discovery rate method, were used to examine the power of each method to detect correlations with diagnosis and cognitive scores. We also evaluated how segmentation accuracy depended on the size of the training set, providing practical information for future users of this technique.

  8. Evaluation of a Modified BOOST Tool in the Acute Care Setting: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Denise A

    Several readmission risk prediction tools exist but have had varying success in identifying patients at risk for readmission. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a tool available within Project BOOST, Better Outcomes by Optimizing Safe Transitions, from the Society of Hospital Medicine. The tool was modified within the institution to include risk stratification scores in order to better identify the highest-risk patients. The modified risk tool may assist in predicting the risk of readmission in those patients with heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who are discharged home.

  9. Modified cuckoo search algorithm in microscopic image segmentation of hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shouvik; Chatterjee, Sankhadeep; Dey, Nilanjan; Ashour, Amira S; Ashour, Ahmed S; Shi, Fuqian; Mali, Kalyani

    2017-10-01

    Microscopic image analysis is one of the challenging tasks due to the presence of weak correlation and different segments of interest that may lead to ambiguity. It is also valuable in foremost meadows of technology and medicine. Identification and counting of cells play a vital role in features extraction to diagnose particular diseases precisely. Different segments should be identified accurately in order to identify and to count cells in a microscope image. Consequently, in the current work, a novel method for cell segmentation and identification has been proposed that incorporated marking cells. Thus, a novel method based on cuckoo search after pre-processing step is employed. The method is developed and evaluated on light microscope images of rats' hippocampus which used as a sample for the brain cells. The proposed method can be applied on the color images directly. The proposed approach incorporates the McCulloch's method for lévy flight production in cuckoo search (CS) algorithm. Several objective functions, namely Otsu's method, Kapur entropy and Tsallis entropy are used for segmentation. In the cuckoo search process, the Otsu's between class variance, Kapur's entropy and Tsallis entropy are employed as the objective functions to be optimized. Experimental results are validated by different metrics, namely the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR), mean square error, feature similarity index and CPU running time for all the test cases. The experimental results established that the Kapur's entropy segmentation method based on the modified CS required the least computational time compared to Otsu's between-class variance segmentation method and the Tsallis entropy segmentation method. Nevertheless, Tsallis entropy method with optimized multi-threshold levels achieved superior performance compared to the other two segmentation methods in terms of the PSNR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Modified Segmental Osteotomy for Relocation of Malpositioned Implant: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, André Luis Fernandes; Borba, Alexandre Meireles; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Porto, Alessandra Nogueira; Freitas, Diogo Loureiro; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining a good cosmetic and proper mastication in oral rehabilitation with dental implants are directly linked to the correct positioning of the implant in the alveolar bone. The malposition of the implant is a challenge in rehabilitation, which can often compromise the entire process. In cases of severely malpositioned implants, one has the option to remove it or leave it submerged under bone and gums. Another option is the modified segmental osteotomy that aims repositioning osseointegrated implant with the surrounding bone. The objective of this case report is to present a case where an implant was severely malpositioned after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion, requiring a modified segmental osteotomy technique to reposition it. PMID:26464556

  11. Chitosan boosts the antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare essential oil in modified atmosphere packaged pork.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Antonello; Mazzarrino, Giovanni; Chaves-López, Clemencia; Rossi, Chiara; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Guerrieri, Oana; Serio, Annalisa

    2016-10-01

    The potential of chitosan as a possible booster of the antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare EO (OEO) against spoilage bacteria and Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in fresh pork meat. Pork fillets were inoculated with 3 L. monocytogenes strains, dipped either in Origanum vulgare (oregano) Essential Oil (OEO) at 2 and 4%, or in chitosan 1% alone or added with 2 and 4% OEO, then packed under modified atmosphere (70% O2, 20% CO2, 10% N2) and stored at 4 °C for 15 days. OEO did not reduce L. monocytogenes growth, while 2 Log decrease was obtained after 2 days of storage in treatments with chitosan alone or with OEO, with growth inhibition up to day 15 in samples with chitosan and OEO 4%. When OEO was combined with chitosan, total viable counts and spoilage bacteria were reduced and contained over time, particularly Pseudomonas (2.0 Log CFU/g at day 15) and Brochothrix thermosphacta (undetectable). All the treatments applied extended meat shelf-life with respect to control, whose commercial shelf-life was 10 days. Chitosan treatments enhanced L* and maintained a* values almost stable during storage. Chitosan and OEO singly applied reduced lipid oxidation (0.62-0.75 mg malondialdehyde/Kg meat) compared to control (0.99 mg malondialdehyde/Kg meat). Finally, chitosan treated samples were not recognized with respect to the control, whereas OEO gave bitter taste; chitosan with OEO instead mitigated the effect of OEO addition to meat. Chitosan combined with OEO boosts its antimicrobial activity and shows a potential for application in industrial production of fresh pork in MAP, to achieve shelf-life extension, control of L. monocytogenes growth, stability of color and protective effect from oxidation, with low sensory impact.

  12. Multiparametric brainstem segmentation using a modified multivariate mixture of Gaussians☆

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Christian; Lutti, Antoine; Helms, Gunther; Frackowiak, Richard; Ashburner, John

    2013-01-01

    The human brainstem is a densely packed, complex but highly organised structure. It not only serves as a conduit for long projecting axons conveying motor and sensory information, but also is the location of multiple primary nuclei that control or modulate a vast array of functions, including homeostasis, consciousness, locomotion, and reflexive and emotive behaviours. Despite its importance, both in understanding normal brain function as well as neurodegenerative processes, it remains a sparsely studied structure in the neuroimaging literature. In part, this is due to the difficulties in imaging the internal architecture of the brainstem in vivo in a reliable and repeatable fashion. A modified multivariate mixture of Gaussians (mmMoG) was applied to the problem of multichannel tissue segmentation. By using quantitative magnetisation transfer and proton density maps acquired at 3 T with 0.8 mm isotropic resolution, tissue probability maps for four distinct tissue classes within the human brainstem were created. These were compared against an ex vivo fixated human brain, imaged at 0.5 mm, with excellent anatomical correspondence. These probability maps were used within SPM8 to create accurate individual subject segmentations, which were then used for further quantitative analysis. As an example, brainstem asymmetries were assessed across 34 right-handed individuals using voxel based morphometry (VBM) and tensor based morphometry (TBM), demonstrating highly significant differences within localised regions that corresponded to motor and vocalisation networks. This method may have important implications for future research into MRI biomarkers of pre-clinical neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:24179820

  13. Modified simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy for an unresectable huge refractory pelvic tumor diagnosed as a rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nomiya, Takuma; Akamatsu, Hiroko; Harada, Mayumi; Ota, Ibuki; Hagiwara, Yasuhito; Ichikawa, Mayumi; Miwa, Misako; Kawashiro, Shouhei; Hagiwara, Motohisa; Chin, Masahiro; Hashizume, Eiji; Nemoto, Kenji

    2014-12-28

    A clinical trial of radiotherapy with modified simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique against huge tumors was conducted. A 58-year-old male patient who had a huge pelvic tumor diagnosed as a rectal adenocarcinoma due to familial adenomatous polyposis was enrolled in this trial. The total dose of 77 Gy (equivalent dose in 2 Gy/fraction) and 64.5 Gy was delivered to the center of the tumor and the surrounding area respectively, and approximately 20% dose escalation was achieved with the modified SIB technique. The tumor with an initial maximum size of 15 cm disappeared 120 d after the start of the radiotherapy. Performance status of the patient improved from 4 to 0. Radiotherapy with modified SIB may be effective for patients with a huge tumor in terms of tumor shrinkage/disappearance, improvement of QOL, and prolongation of survival.

  14. Modified Multiple-Choice Items for Alternate Assessments: Reliability, Difficulty, and Differential Boost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettler, Ryan J.; Rodriguez, Michael C.; Bolt, Daniel M.; Elliott, Stephen N.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Federal policy on alternate assessment based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS) inspired this research. Specifically, an experimental study was conducted to determine whether tests composed of modified items would have the same level of reliability as tests composed of original items, and whether these modified items helped reduce…

  15. A modified fuzzy C-means method for segmenting MR images using non-local information.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Hongmiao; Li, Chungang; Sun, Lining; Mutic, Sasa; Ji, Songbai; Hu, Yanle

    2016-04-29

    In recent years, MR images have been increasingly used in therapeutic applications such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). However, images with low contrast values and noises present challenges for image segmentation. The objective of this study is to develop a robust method based on fuzzy C-means (FCM) method which can segment MR images polluted with Gaussian noise. A modified FCM algorithm accommodating non-local pixel information via Hausdorff distance was developed for segmenting MR images. The membership and objective functions were modified accordingly. Segmentations with different weights of the Hausdorff distance were compared. Segmentation tests using synthetic and MR images showed that the proposed algorithm was better at resolving boundaries and more robust to Gaussian noise. By segmenting a sample MR image of a tumor, we further showed the capability of the method in capturing the centroid of the target region. The modified FCM algorithm with neighboring information can be used to segment blurry images with potential applications in segmenting motion MR images in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT).

  16. Graphene-like boron nitride modified bismuth phosphate materials for boosting photocatalytic degradation of enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhigang; Chen, Xiaoliu; Di, Jun; Liu, Yiling; Yin, Sheng; Xia, Jiexiang; Li, Huaming

    2017-04-15

    A novel graphene-like BN modified BiPO4 material was prepared for the first time via a simple solvothermal process with the assistance of reactable ionic liquid 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium dihydrogen phosphate ([Omim]H2PO4). The as-prepared photocatalyst was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, Raman, XPS, TEM, DRS, BET, PL, EIS and ESR to investigate the structure, morphology, optical property, surface area, electrical property and active species. The photocatalytic activities of graphene-like BN/BiPO4 materials were evaluated by the degradation of antibiotic enrofloxacin (ENR) under UV light irradiation and the 1wt% graphene-like BN/BiPO4 displayed the best activity among the BN/BiPO4 composites. The enhanced photocatalytic activity for the removal of enrofloxacin was attributed to higher separation efficiency of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, and the generated more O2(-) and OH radicals when the BN was modified on BiPO4. Moreover, a probable degradation mechanism was proposed for the improved photocatalytic activity of BN modified BiPO4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. AGE-modified albumin containing infusion solutions boosts septicaemia and inflammation in experimental peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Humpert, Per M.; Lukic, Ivan K.; Thorpe, Suzanne R.; Hofer, Stefan; Awad, Ezzat M.; Andrassy, Martin; Deemer, Elizabeth K.; Kasper, Michael; Schleicher, Erwin; Schwaninger, Markus; Weigand, Markus A.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika

    2009-01-01

    HSA preparations for i.v. use are administered in critically ill patients. Although increasing intravascular osmotic pressure seems to be a pathophysiologically orientated treatment, clinical trials do not indicate a benefit for mortality in HSA-treated patients. Instead, there is evidence for inflammatory reactions upon infusion of different HSA batches. A neglected issue concerning the safety and quality of these therapeutics is processing-related post-transcriptional protein modifications, such as AGEs. We therefore tested the hypothesis that commercially available infusion solutions contain AGEs and studied whether these protein modifications influence outcome and inflammation in a murine model of sepsis induced by CLP. Screening of different HSA and Ig preparations in this study revealed an up to approximate tenfold difference in the amount of AGE modifications. Application of clinically relevant concentrations of CML-modified HSA in CLP led to increased inflammation and enhanced mortality in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking the RAGE. Lethality was paralleled by increased activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB, NF-κB-dependent gene expression, and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the peritoneal cavity. This study implies that infusion solutions containing a high load of the AGE-modified protein have the potential to activate RAGE/NF-κB-mediated inflammatory reactions, causing increased mortality in experimental peritonitis. PMID:19401390

  18. A modified hierarchical graph cut based video segmentation approach for high frame rate video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xuezhang; Chakravarty, Sumit; She, Qi; Wang, Boyu

    2013-03-01

    Video object segmentation entails selecting and extracting objects of interest from a video sequence. Video Segmentation of Objects (VSO) is a critical task which has many applications, such as video edit, video decomposition and object recognition. The core of VSO system consists of two major problems of computer vision, namely object segmentation and object tracking. These two difficulties need to be solved in tandem in an efficient manner to handle variations in shape deformation, appearance alteration and background clutter. Along with segmentation efficiency computational expense is also a critical parameter for algorithm development. Most existing methods utilize advanced tracking algorithms such as mean shift and particle filter, applied together with object segmentation schemes like Level sets or graph methods. As video is a spatiotemporal data, it gives an extensive opportunity to focus on the regions of high spatiotemporal variation. We propose a new algorithm to concentrate on the high variations of the video data and use modified hierarchical processing to capture the spatiotemporal variation. The novelty of the research presented here is to utilize a fast object tracking algorithm conjoined with graph cut based segmentation in a hierarchical framework. This involves modifying both the object tracking algorithm and the graph cut segmentation algorithm to work in an optimized method in a local spatial region while also ensuring all relevant motion has been accounted for. Using an initial estimate of object and a hierarchical pyramid framework the proposed algorithm tracks and segments the object of interest in subsequent frames. Due to the modified hierarchal framework we can perform local processing of the video thereby enabling the proposed algorithm to target specific regions of the video where high spatiotemporal variations occur. Experiments performed with high frame rate video data shows the viability of the proposed approach.

  19. Vaccine strategies against Babesia bovis based on prime-boost immunizations in mice with modified vaccinia Ankara vector and recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Del Médico Zajac, María Paula; Zanetti, Flavia Adriana; Molinari, María Paula; Gravisaco, María José; Calamante, Gabriela; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2014-08-06

    In this study, a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vector expressing a chimeric multi-antigen was obtained and evaluated as a candidate vaccine in homologous and heterologous prime-boost immunizations with a recombinant protein cocktail. The chimeric multi-antigen comprises immunodominant B and T cell regions of three Babesia bovis proteins. Humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity induced by different immunization schemes. The best vaccination scheme was achieved with a prime of protein cocktail and a boost with the recombinant virus. This scheme induced high level of specific IgG antibodies and secreted IFN and a high degree of activation of IFNγ(+) CD4(+) and CD8(+) specific T cells. This is the first report in which a novel vaccine candidate was constructed based on a rationally designed multi-antigen and evaluated in a prime-boost regime, optimizing the immune response necessary for protection against bovine babesiosis.

  20. Thermal relics in modified cosmologies: Bounds on evolution histories of the early Universe and cosmological boosts for PAMELA

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, R.; Fornengo, N.; Pato, M.; Pieri, L.; Masiero, A.

    2010-06-15

    Alternative cosmologies, based on extensions of general relativity, predict modified thermal histories in the early Universe during the pre-big bang nucleosynthesis era, an epoch which is not directly constrained by cosmological observations. When the expansion rate is enhanced with respect to the standard case, thermal relics typically decouple with larger relic abundances. The correct value of the relic abundance is therefore obtained for larger annihilation cross sections, as compared to standard cosmology. A direct consequence is that indirect detection rates are enhanced. Extending previous analyses of ours, we derive updated astrophysical bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross sections and use them to constrain alternative cosmologies in the pre-big bang nucleosynthesis era. We also determine the characteristics of these alternative cosmologies in order to provide the correct value of relic abundance for a thermal relic for the (large) annihilation cross section required to explain the PAMELA results on the positron fraction, therefore providing a ''cosmological boost'' solution to the dark matter interpretation of the PAMELA data.

  1. Modifying Surface Chemistry of Metal Oxides for Boosting Dissolution Kinetics in Water by Liquid Cell Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Geng, Jiguo; Wang, Kuan; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Wenqiang; Zhang, Zhenhua; Xie, Shaohua; Dai, Hongxing; Chen, Fu-Rong; Sui, Manling

    2017-08-22

    Dissolution of metal oxides is fundamentally important for understanding mineral evolution and micromachining oxide functional materials. In general, dissolution of metal oxides is a slow and inefficient chemical reaction. Here, by introducing oxygen deficiencies to modify the surface chemistry of oxides, we can boost the dissolution kinetics of metal oxides in water, as in situ demonstrated in a liquid environmental transmission electron microscope (LETEM). The dissolution rate constant significantly increases by 16-19 orders of magnitude, equivalent to a reduction of 0.97-1.11 eV in activation energy, as compared with the normal dissolution in acid. It is evidenced from the high-resolution TEM imaging, electron energy loss spectra, and first-principle calculations where the dissolution route of metal oxides is dynamically changed by local interoperability between altered water chemistry and surface oxygen deficiencies via electron radiolysis. This discovery inspires the development of a highly efficient electron lithography method for metal oxide films in ecofriendly water, which offers an advanced technique for nanodevice fabrication.

  2. Automatic segmentation of Leishmania parasite in microscopic images using a modified CV level set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi, Maria; Rabbani, Hossein; Talebi, Ardeshir; Sarrafzadeh, Omid; Ensafi, Shahab

    2015-12-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that affects liver, spleen and bone marrow. According to World Health Organization report, definitive diagnosis is possible just by direct observation of the Leishman body in the microscopic image taken from bone marrow samples. We utilize morphological and CV level set method to segment Leishman bodies in digital color microscopic images captured from bone marrow samples. Linear contrast stretching method is used for image enhancement and morphological method is applied to determine the parasite regions and wipe up unwanted objects. Modified global and local CV level set methods are proposed for segmentation and a shape based stopping factor is used to hasten the algorithm. Manual segmentation is considered as ground truth to evaluate the proposed method. This method is tested on 28 samples and achieved 10.90% mean of segmentation error for global model and 9.76% for local model.

  3. Comparison of segmental spinal movement control in adolescents with and without idiopathic scoliosis using modified pressure biofeedback unit.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Ji; Lin, Shi-Xiang; Wu, Shyi-Kuen; Tsai, Mei-Wun; Lee, Shwn-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Postural rehabilitation emphasizing on motor control training of segmental spinal movements has been proposed to effectively reduce the scoliotic spinal deformities in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). However, information regarding the impairments of segmental spinal movement control involving segmental spinal stabilizers in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis remains limited. Examination of segmental spinal movement control may provide a window for investigating the features of impaired movement control specific to spinal segments that may assist in the development of physiotherapeutic management of AIS. To compare segmental spinal movement control in adolescents with and without idiopathic scoliosis using modified pressure biofeedback unit. Segmental spinal movement control was assessed in twenty adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis (AISG) and twenty healthy adolescents (CG) using a modified pressure biofeedback unit. Participants performed segmental spinal movements that primarily involved segmental spinal stabilizing muscles with graded and sustained muscle contraction against/off a pressure cuff from baseline to target pressures and then maintained for 1 min. Pressure data during the 1-minute maintenance phase were collected for further analysis. Pressure deviation were calculated and compared between groups. The AISG had significantly greater pressure deviations for all segmental spinal movements of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine than the CG. Pressure biofeedback unit was feasible for assessing segmental spinal movement control in AIS. AISG exhibited poorer ability to grade and sustain muscle activities for local movements of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, suggesting motor control training of segmental spinal movements involving segmental spinal stabilizing muscles on frontal, sagittal, and transverse planes were required.

  4. The feasibility of a modified shoe for multi-segment foot motion analysis: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Halstead, J; Keenan, A M; Chapman, G J; Redmond, A C

    2016-01-01

    The majority of multi-segment kinematic foot studies have been limited to barefoot conditions, because shod conditions have the potential for confounding surface-mounted markers. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a shoe modified with a webbed upper can accommodate multi-segment foot marker sets without compromising kinematic measurements under barefoot and shod conditions. Thirty participants (15 controls and 15 participants with midfoot pain) underwent gait analysis in two conditions; barefoot and wearing a shoe (shod) in a random order. The shod condition employed a modified shoe (rubber plimsoll) with a webbed upper, allowing skin mounted reflective markers to be visualised through slits in the webbed material. Three dimensional foot kinematics were captured using the Oxford multi-segment foot model whilst participants walked at a self-selected speed. The foot pain group showed greater hindfoot eversion and less hindfoot dorsiflexion than controls in the barefoot condition and these differences were maintained when measured in the shod condition. Differences between the foot pain and control participants were also observed for walking speed in the barefoot and in the shod conditions. No significant differences between foot pain and control groups were demonstrated at the forefoot in either condition. Subtle differences between pain and control groups, which were found during barefoot walking are retained when wearing the modified shoe. The novel properties of the modified shoe offers a potential solution for the use of passive infrared based motion analysis for shod applications, for instance to investigate the kinematic effect of foot orthoses.

  5. Three-Year Durability of Immune Responses Induced by HIV-DNA and HIV-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara and Effect of a Late HIV-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Boost in Tanzanian Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Agricola; Munseri, Patricia J; Nilsson, Charlotta; Bakari, Muhammad; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Tecleab, Teghesti; Liakina, Valentina; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Robb, Merlin L; Earl, Patricia L; Moss, Bernard; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Ferrari, Guido; Sandstrom, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel

    2017-01-27

    We explored the duration of immune responses and the effect of a late third HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost in HIV-DNA primed and HIV-MVA boosted Tanzanian volunteers. Twenty volunteers who had previously received three HIV-DNA and two HIV-MVA immunizations were given a third HIV-MVA immunization 3 years after the second HIV-MVA boost. At the time of the third HIV-MVA, 90% of the vaccinees had antibodies to HIV-1 subtype C gp140 (median titer 200) and 85% to subtype B gp160 (median titer 100). The majority of vaccinees had detectable antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies, 70% against CRF01_AE virus-infected cells (median titer 239) and 84% against CRF01_AE gp120-coated cells (median titer 499). A high proportion (74%) of vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses, 63% to Gag and 42% to Env, 3 years after the second HIV-MVA boost. After the third HIV-MVA, there was an increase in Env-binding antibodies and ADCC-mediating antibodies relative to the response seen at the time of the third HIV-MVA vaccination, p < .0001 and p < .05, respectively. The frequency of IFN-γ ELISpot responses increased to 95% against Gag or Env and 90% to both Gag and Env, p = .064 and p = .002, respectively. In conclusion, the HIV-DNA prime/HIV-MVA boost regimen elicited potent antibody and cellular immune responses with remarkable durability, and a third HIV-MVA immunization significantly boosted both antibody and cellular immune responses relative to the levels detected at the time of the third HIV-MVA, but not to higher levels than after the second HIV-MVA.

  6. Ancient architecture point cloud data segmentation based on modified fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianghong; Li, Deren; Wang, Yanmin

    2008-12-01

    Segmentation of Point cloud data is a key but difficult problem for architecture 3D reconstruction. Because compared to reverse engineering, there are more noise in ancient architecture point cloud data of edge because of mirror reflection and the traditional methods are hard that is not fuzzy in the preceding part of this paper, these methods can't embody the case of the points of borderline belonging two regions and it is difficult to satisfy demands of segmentation of ancient architecture point cloud data. Ancient architecture is mostly composed of columniation, plinth, arch, girder and tile on specifically order. Each of the component's surfaces is regular and smooth and belongingness of borderline points is very blurry. According to the character the author proposed a modified Fuzzy C-means clustering (MFCM) algorithm, which is used to add geometrical information during clustering. In addition this method improves belongingness constraints to avoid influence of noise on the result of segmentation. The algorithm is used in the project "Digital surveying of ancient architecture--- Forbidden City". Experiments show that the method is a good anti-noise, accuracy and adaptability and greater degree of human intervention is reduced. After segmentation internal point and point edge can be districted according membership of every point, so as to facilitate the follow-up to the surface feature extraction and model identification, and effective support for the three-dimensional model of the reconstruction of ancient buildings is provided.

  7. [Automatic segmentation of clustered breast cancer cells based on modified watershed algorithm and concavity points searching].

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhen; Pu, Lixin; Dong, Fangjie

    2013-08-01

    As a common malignant tumor, breast cancer has seriously affected women's physical and psychological health even threatened their lives. Breast cancer has even begun to show a gradual trend of high incidence in some places in the world. As a kind of common pathological assist diagnosis technique, immunohistochemical technique plays an important role in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Usually, Pathologists isolate positive cells from the stained specimen which were processed by immunohistochemical technique and calculate the ratio of positive cells which is a core indicator of breast cancer in diagnosis. In this paper, we present a new algorithm which was based on modified watershed algorithm and concavity points searching to identify the positive cells and segment the clustered cells automatically, and then realize automatic counting. By comparison of the results of our experiments with those of other methods, our method can exactly segment the clustered cells without losing any geometrical cell features and give the exact number of separating cells.

  8. A modified fuzzy C-means algorithm for bias field estimation and segmentation of MRI data.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed N; Yamany, Sameh M; Mohamed, Nevin; Farag, Aly A; Moriarty, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel algorithm for fuzzy segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and estimation of intensity inhomogeneities using fuzzy logic. MRI intensity inhomogeneities can be attributed to imperfections in the radio-frequency coils or to problems associated with the acquisition sequences. The result is a slowly varying shading artifact over the image that can produce errors with conventional intensity-based classification. Our algorithm is formulated by modifying the objective function of the standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm to compensate for such inhomogeneities and to allow the labeling of a pixel (voxel) to be influenced by the labels in its immediate neighborhood. The neighborhood effect acts as a regularizer and biases the solution toward piecewise-homogeneous labelings. Such a regularization is useful in segmenting scans corrupted by salt and pepper noise. Experimental results on both synthetic images and MR data are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Preferential Targeting of Conserved Gag Regions after Vaccination with a Heterologous DNA Prime-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Boost HIV-1 Vaccine Regimen.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Asli; Podola, Lilli; Mann, Philipp; Missanga, Marco; Haule, Antelmo; Sudi, Lwitiho; Nilsson, Charlotta; Kaluwa, Bahati; Lueer, Cornelia; Mwakatima, Maria; Munseri, Patricia J; Maboko, Leonard; Robb, Merlin L; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Kijak, Gustavo; Marovich, Mary; McCormack, Sheena; Joseph, Sarah; Lyamuya, Eligius; Wahren, Britta; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Hoelscher, Michael; Bakari, Muhammad; Kroidl, Arne; Geldmacher, Christof

    2017-09-15

    Prime-boost vaccination strategies against HIV-1 often include multiple variants for a given immunogen for better coverage of the extensive viral diversity. To study the immunologic effects of this approach, we characterized breadth, phenotype, function, and specificity of Gag-specific T cells induced by a DNA-prime modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-boost vaccination strategy, which uses mismatched Gag immunogens in the TamoVac 01 phase IIa trial. Healthy Tanzanian volunteers received three injections of the DNA-SMI vaccine encoding a subtype B and AB-recombinant Gagp37 and two vaccinations with MVA-CMDR encoding subtype A Gagp55 Gag-specific T-cell responses were studied in 42 vaccinees using fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells. After the first MVA-CMDR boost, vaccine-induced gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ(+)) Gag-specific T-cell responses were dominated by CD4(+) T cells (P < 0.001 compared to CD8(+) T cells) that coexpressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) (66.4%) and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (63.7%). A median of 3 antigenic regions were targeted with a higher-magnitude median response to Gagp24 regions, more conserved between prime and boost, compared to those of regions within Gagp15 (not primed) and Gagp17 (less conserved; P < 0.0001 for both). Four regions within Gagp24 each were targeted by 45% to 74% of vaccinees upon restimulation with DNA-SMI-Gag matched peptides. The response rate to individual antigenic regions correlated with the sequence homology between the MVA- and DNA Gag-encoded immunogens (P = 0.04, r(2) = 0.47). In summary, after the first MVA-CMDR boost, the sequence-mismatched DNA-prime MVA-boost vaccine strategy induced a Gag-specific T-cell response that was dominated by polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells and that targeted multiple antigenic regions within the conserved Gagp24 protein.IMPORTANCE Genetic diversity is a major challenge for the design of vaccines against variable viruses. While including multiple variants for a given

  10. A fully automated algorithm under modified FCM framework for improved brain MR image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Karan; Sinha, Nitesh; Singh, Pankaj K; Mishra, Amit K

    2009-09-01

    Automated brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) segmentation is a complex problem especially if accompanied by quality depreciating factors such as intensity inhomogeneity and noise. This article presents a new algorithm for automated segmentation of both normal and diseased brain MRI. An entropy driven homomorphic filtering technique has been employed in this work to remove the bias field. The initial cluster centers are estimated using a proposed algorithm called histogram-based local peak merger using adaptive window. Subsequently, a modified fuzzy c-mean (MFCM) technique using the neighborhood pixel considerations is applied. Finally, a new technique called neighborhood-based membership ambiguity correction (NMAC) has been used for smoothing the boundaries between different tissue classes as well as to remove small pixel level noise, which appear as misclassified pixels even after the MFCM approach. NMAC leads to much sharper boundaries between tissues and, hence, has been found to be highly effective in prominently estimating the tissue and tumor areas in a brain MR scan. The algorithm has been validated against MFCM and FMRIB software library using MRI scans from BrainWeb. Superior results to those achieved with MFCM technique have been observed along with the collateral advantages of fully automatic segmentation, faster computation and faster convergence of the objective function.

  11. Comparison of segmental spinal movement control in adolescents with and without idiopathic scoliosis using modified pressure biofeedback unit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shyi-Kuen; Tsai, Mei-Wun; Lee, Shwn-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Background Postural rehabilitation emphasizing on motor control training of segmental spinal movements has been proposed to effectively reduce the scoliotic spinal deformities in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). However, information regarding the impairments of segmental spinal movement control involving segmental spinal stabilizers in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis remains limited. Examination of segmental spinal movement control may provide a window for investigating the features of impaired movement control specific to spinal segments that may assist in the development of physiotherapeutic management of AIS. Objectives To compare segmental spinal movement control in adolescents with and without idiopathic scoliosis using modified pressure biofeedback unit. Methods Segmental spinal movement control was assessed in twenty adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis (AISG) and twenty healthy adolescents (CG) using a modified pressure biofeedback unit. Participants performed segmental spinal movements that primarily involved segmental spinal stabilizing muscles with graded and sustained muscle contraction against/off a pressure cuff from baseline to target pressures and then maintained for 1 min. Pressure data during the 1-minute maintenance phase were collected for further analysis. Pressure deviation were calculated and compared between groups. Results The AISG had significantly greater pressure deviations for all segmental spinal movements of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine than the CG. Conclusion Pressure biofeedback unit was feasible for assessing segmental spinal movement control in AIS. AISG exhibited poorer ability to grade and sustain muscle activities for local movements of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, suggesting motor control training of segmental spinal movements involving segmental spinal stabilizing muscles on frontal, sagittal, and transverse planes were required. PMID:28753636

  12. Segments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a market taxonomy for higher education, including what it reveals about the structure of the market, the model's technical attributes, and its capacity to explain pricing behavior. Details the identification of the principle seams separating one market segment from another and how student aspirations help to organize the market, making…

  13. StructBoost: Boosting Methods for Predicting Structured Output Variables.

    PubMed

    Chunhua Shen; Guosheng Lin; van den Hengel, Anton

    2014-10-01

    Boosting is a method for learning a single accurate predictor by linearly combining a set of less accurate weak learners. Recently, structured learning has found many applications in computer vision. Inspired by structured support vector machines (SSVM), here we propose a new boosting algorithm for structured output prediction, which we refer to as StructBoost. StructBoost supports nonlinear structured learning by combining a set of weak structured learners. As SSVM generalizes SVM, our StructBoost generalizes standard boosting approaches such as AdaBoost, or LPBoost to structured learning. The resulting optimization problem of StructBoost is more challenging than SSVM in the sense that it may involve exponentially many variables and constraints. In contrast, for SSVM one usually has an exponential number of constraints and a cutting-plane method is used. In order to efficiently solve StructBoost, we formulate an equivalent 1-slack formulation and solve it using a combination of cutting planes and column generation. We show the versatility and usefulness of StructBoost on a range of problems such as optimizing the tree loss for hierarchical multi-class classification, optimizing the Pascal overlap criterion for robust visual tracking and learning conditional random field parameters for image segmentation.

  14. Micromorphology and phase behavior of cationic polyurethane segmented copolymer modified with hydroxysilane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihua; Shen, Yiding; Fei, Guiqiang; Li, Xiaorui; Liang, Yong

    2008-08-01

    A series of cationic waterborne polyurethane dispersions (SiPU) modified with hydroxysilane (HPMS) were successfully synthesized based on poly(oxytetramethylene) glycols (PTMG) and isophorone isocyanate (IPDI), and the films were obtained by casting the dispersions on tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) plates. Effects of HPMS content on micromorphology, particle size of the dispersions were studied, as well as thermal properties, phase behavior and surface structure of the films. The particles had the morphology of a solid sphere, with particle size varying from 17.1 nm to 114.4 nm corresponding to the increase of HPMS concentration, which can be attributed to the increase of interfacial tension. XPS spectra indicated the surface migration of Si element in the process of film forming, and the SiPU surface was mainly composed of soft segments. DSC analysis, together with TG-DTG-DTA results demonstrated the HPMS soft segment merged with the transition region of PU matrix, forming part of polyurethane backbone, but an improved microphase separation was observed when HPMS concentration greater than 15%. It was also found that incorporation of flexible HPMS prevented the degradation of polyurethane backbone, resulting in the increase of thermal stability in ultimate copolymer.

  15. Enhanced repair of segmental bone defects in rabbit radius by porous tantalum scaffolds modified with the RGD peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Li, Qijia; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Hui; Shi, Wei; Gan, Hongquan; Song, Huiping; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2017-03-01

    Fast and stable repair of segmental bone defects remains a challenge for clinical orthopedic surgery. In recent years, porous tantalum has been widely applied in clinical orthopedics for low modulus of elasticity, with three-dimensional microstructures similar to cancellous bone and excellent biocompatibility. To further improve bone the repairing ability of porous tantalum, the cyclo(-RGDfK-) peptide was coated on the surface of porous tantalum scaffolds. A model of 15 mm segmental defect was made at the midshaft of right radius in New Zealand White rabbits. In the experimental group, defects were implanted (press-fit) using porous tantalum scaffolds modified with cyclo(-RGDfK-) peptide. Control animals were implanted with non-modified porous tantalum scaffolds or xenogeneic cancellous bone scaffolds, respectively. No implant was provided for the blank group. Bone repair was assessed by X-ray and histological observations at 4, 8, and 16 weeks post-operation, with biomechanical tests and micro-computed tomography performed at 16 weeks post-surgery. The results showed that bone formation was increased at the interface and inside the inner pores of modified porous tantalum scaffolds than those of non-modified porous tantalum scaffolds; biomechanical properties in the modified porous tantalum group were superior to those of the non-modified porous tantalum and xenogeneic cancellous bone groups, while new bone volume fractions using micro-computed tomography analysis were similar between the modified porous tantalum and xenogeneic cancellous bone groups. Our findings suggested that modified porous tantalum scaffolds had enhanced repairing ability in segmental bone defect in rabbit radius, and may serve as a potential material for repairing large bone defects.

  16. Encoding and selecting features for boosted multispectral face recognition: matching SWIR versus color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothapati, Sirisha; Schmid, Natalia A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a methodology for cross matching color face images and Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) face images reliably and accurately. We first adopt a recently designed Boosted and Improved Local Gabor Pattern (ILGP) encoding and matching technique to encode face images in both visible and SWIR spectral bands. We then apply newly developed feature selection methods to prune irrelevant information in encoded data and to improve performance of the Boosted ILGP. The two newly developed feature selection methods are: (1) Genuine segment score-based thresholding and (2) AdaBoost inspired methods. We further compare the performance of the original Boosted ILGP face recognition method with the performance of the modified method that involves one of the proposed feature selection approaches. Under a general parameter set up, significant performance improvement is observed.

  17. Gene cuisine or Frankenfood? The theory of reasoned action as an audience segmentation strategy for messages about genetically modified foods.

    PubMed

    Silk, Kami J; Weiner, Judith; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2005-12-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are currently a controversial topic about which the lay public in the United States knows little. Formative research has demonstrated that the lay public is uncertain and concerned about GM foods. This study (N = 858) extends focus group research by using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) to examine attitudes and subjective norms related to GM foods as a theoretical strategy for audience segmentation. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four unique audiences based on their attitude and subjective norm toward GM foods (ambivalent-biotech, antibiotech, biotech-normer, and biotech individual). Results are discussed in terms of the theoretical and practical significance for audience segmentation.

  18. A Modified Brain MR Image Segmentation and Bias Field Estimation Model Based on Local and Global Information

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wang; Luan, Kuan; Liang, Hong; Ma, Xingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Because of the poor radio frequency coil uniformity and gradient-driven eddy currents, there is much noise and intensity inhomogeneity (bias) in brain magnetic resonance (MR) image, and it severely affects the segmentation accuracy. Better segmentation results are difficult to achieve by traditional methods; therefore, in this paper, a modified brain MR image segmentation and bias field estimation model based on local and global information is proposed. We first construct local constraints including image neighborhood information in Gaussian kernel mapping space, and then the complete regularization is established by introducing nonlocal spatial information of MR image. The weighting between local and global information is automatically adjusted according to image local information. At the same time, bias field information is coupled with the model, and it makes the model reduce noise interference but also can effectively estimate the bias field information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has strong robustness to noise and bias field is well corrected. PMID:27660649

  19. Broad and potent cellular and humoral immune responses after a second late HIV-modified vaccinia virus ankara vaccination in HIV-DNA-primed and HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara-boosted Swedish vaccinees.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Hejdeman, Bo; Bråve, Andreas; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Hallengärd, David; Currier, Jeffrey R; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Hasselrot, Klara; Earl, Patricia L; Polonis, Victoria R; Marovich, Mary A; Robb, Merlin L; Sandström, Eric; Wahren, Britta; Biberfeld, Gunnel

    2014-03-01

    We have previously shown that an HIV vaccine regimen including three HIV-DNA immunizations and a single HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost was safe and highly immunogenic in Swedish volunteers. A median 38 months after the first HIV-MVA vaccination, 24 volunteers received 10(8) plaque-forming units of HIV-MVA. The vaccine was well tolerated. Two weeks after this HIV-MVA vaccination, 18 (82%) of 22 evaluable vaccinees were interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) reactive: 18 to Gag and 10 (45%) to Env. A median minimal epitope count of 4 to Gag or Env was found in a subset of 10 vaccinees. Intracellular cytokine staining revealed CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cell responses in 23 (95%) of 24 vaccinees, 19 to Gag and 19 to Env. The frequency of HIV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses was equally high (75%). A high proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses to Gag was polyfunctional with production of three or more cytokines (40% and 60%, respectively). Of the Env-specific CD4(+) T cells 40% were polyfunctional. Strong lymphoproliferative responses to Aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-treated subtype A, B, C, and A_E virus were demonstrable in 21 (95%) of 22 vaccinees. All vaccinees developed binding antibodies to Env and Gag. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assay against subtype B and CRF01_AE viruses. The neutralizing antibody response rates were influenced by the vaccine dose and/or mode of delivery used at the previous HIV-MVA vaccination. Thus, a second late HIV-MVA boost induced strong and broad cellular immune responses and improved antibody responses. The data support further exploration of this vaccine concept.

  20. Broad and Potent Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses After a Second Late HIV-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Vaccination in HIV-DNA-Primed and HIV-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara-Boosted Swedish Vaccinees

    PubMed Central

    Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Hejdeman, Bo; Bråve, Andreas; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Hallengärd, David; Currier, Jeffrey R.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Hasselrot, Klara; Earl, Patricia L.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Marovich, Mary A.; Robb, Merlin L.; Sandström, Eric; Wahren, Britta; Biberfeld, Gunnel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that an HIV vaccine regimen including three HIV-DNA immunizations and a single HIV-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost was safe and highly immunogenic in Swedish volunteers. A median 38 months after the first HIV-MVA vaccination, 24 volunteers received 108 plaque-forming units of HIV-MVA. The vaccine was well tolerated. Two weeks after this HIV-MVA vaccination, 18 (82%) of 22 evaluable vaccinees were interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) reactive: 18 to Gag and 10 (45%) to Env. A median minimal epitope count of 4 to Gag or Env was found in a subset of 10 vaccinees. Intracellular cytokine staining revealed CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cell responses in 23 (95%) of 24 vaccinees, 19 to Gag and 19 to Env. The frequency of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses was equally high (75%). A high proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to Gag was polyfunctional with production of three or more cytokines (40% and 60%, respectively). Of the Env-specific CD4+ T cells 40% were polyfunctional. Strong lymphoproliferative responses to Aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-treated subtype A, B, C, and A_E virus were demonstrable in 21 (95%) of 22 vaccinees. All vaccinees developed binding antibodies to Env and Gag. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assay against subtype B and CRF01_AE viruses. The neutralizing antibody response rates were influenced by the vaccine dose and/or mode of delivery used at the previous HIV-MVA vaccination. Thus, a second late HIV-MVA boost induced strong and broad cellular immune responses and improved antibody responses. The data support further exploration of this vaccine concept. PMID:24090081

  1. Individual tooth region segmentation using modified watershed algorithm with morphological characteristic.

    PubMed

    Na, Sung Dae; Lee, Gihyoun; Lee, Jyung Hyun; Kim, Myoung Nam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for individual tooth segmentation was proposed. The proposed method is composed of enhancement and extraction of boundary and seed of watershed algorithm using trisection areas by morphological characteristic of teeth. The watershed algorithm is one of the conventional methods for tooth segmentation; however, the method has some problems. First, molar region detection ratio is reduced because of oral structure features that is low intensities in molar region. Second, inaccurate segmentation occurs in incisor region owing to specular reflection. To solve the problems, the trisection method using morphological characteristic was proposed, where three tooth areas are made using ratio of entire tooth to each tooth. Moreover, the enhancement is to improve the intensity of molar using the proposed method. In addition, boundary and seed of watershed are extracted using trisection areas applied other parameters each area. Finally, individual tooth segmentation was performed using extracted boundary and seed. Furthermore, the proposed method was compared with conventional methods to confirm its efficiency. As a result, the proposed method was demonstrated to have higher detection ratio, better over segmentation, and overlap segmentation than conventional methods.

  2. Immunity, safety and protection of an Adenovirus 5 prime--Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara boost subunit vaccine against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in calves.

    PubMed

    Bull, Tim J; Vrettou, Christina; Linedale, Richard; McGuinnes, Catherine; Strain, Sam; McNair, Jim; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hope, Jayne C

    2014-10-29

    Vaccination is the most cost effective control measure for Johne's disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) but currently available whole cell killed formulations have limited efficacy and are incompatible with the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis by tuberculin skin test. We have evaluated the utility of a viral delivery regimen of non-replicative human Adenovirus 5 and Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara recombinant for early entry MAP specific antigens (HAV) to show protection against challenge in a calf model and extensively screened for differential immunological markers associated with protection. We have shown that HAV vaccination was well tolerated, could be detected using a differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) test, showed no cross-reactivity with tuberculin and provided a degree of protection against challenge evidenced by a lack of faecal shedding in vaccinated animals that persisted throughout the 7 month infection period. Calves given HAV vaccination had significant priming and boosting of MAP derived antigen (PPD-J) specific CD4+, CD8+ IFN-γ producing T-cell populations and, upon challenge, developed early specific Th17 related immune responses, enhanced IFN-γ responses and retained a high MAP killing capacity in blood. During later phases post MAP challenge, PPD-J antigen specific IFN-γ and Th17 responses in HAV vaccinated animals corresponded with improvements in peripheral bacteraemia. By contrast a lack of IFN-γ, induction of FoxP3+ T cells and increased IL-1β and IL-10 secretion were indicative of progressive infection in Sham vaccinated animals. We conclude that HAV vaccination shows excellent promise as a new tool for improving control of MAP infection in cattle.

  3. Induction of HIV immunity in the genital tract after intranasal delivery of a MVA vector: enhanced immunogenicity after DNA prime-modified vaccinia virus Ankara boost immunization schedule.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, M Magdalena; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Nájera, José Luis; Esteban, Mariano

    2004-05-15

    Vaccines intended to prevent mucosal transmission of HIV should be able to induce multiple immune effectors in the host including Abs and cell-mediated immune responses at mucosal sites. The aim of this study was to characterize and to enhance the immunogenicity of a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing HIV-1 Env IIIB Ag (MVAenv) inoculated in BALB/c mice by mucosal routes. Intravaginal inoculation of MVAenv was not immunogenic, whereas intranasally it induced a significant immune response to the HIV Ag. Intranasal codelivery of MVAenv plus cholera toxin (CT) significantly enhanced the cellular and humoral immune response against Env in the spleen and genitorectal draining lymph nodes, respectively. Heterologous DNAenv prime-MVAenv boost by intranasal immunization, together with CT, produced a cellular immune response in the spleen 10-fold superior to that in the absence of CT. A key finding of these studies was that both MVAenv/MVAenv and DNAenv/MVAenv schemes, plus CT, induced a specific mucosal CD8(+) T cell response in genital tissue and draining lymph nodes. In addition, both immunizations also generated systemic Abs, and more importantly, mucosal IgA and IgG Abs in vaginal washings. Specific secretion of beta-chemokines was also generated by both immunizations, with a stronger response in mice immunized by the DNA-CT/MVA-CT regimen. Our findings are of relevance in the area of vaccine development and support the optimization of protocols of immunization based on MVA as vaccine vectors to induce mucosal immune responses against HIV.

  4. Segmentation and Tracking of Lymphocytes Based on Modified Active Contour Models in Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiwen

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes an improved active contour model for segmenting and tracking accurate boundaries of the single lymphocyte in phase-contrast microscopic images. Active contour models have been widely used in object segmentation and tracking. However, current external-force-inspired methods are weak at handling low-contrast edges and suffer from initialization sensitivity. In order to segment low-contrast boundaries, we combine the region information of the object, extracted by morphology gray-scale reconstruction, and the edge information, extracted by the Laplacian of Gaussian filter, to obtain an improved feature map to compute the external force field for the evolution of active contours. To alleviate initial location sensitivity, we set the initial contour close to the real boundaries by performing morphological image processing. The proposed method was tested on live lymphocyte images acquired through the phase-contrast microscope from the blood samples of mice, and comparative experimental results showed the advantages of the proposed method in terms of the accuracy and the speed. Tracking experiments showed that the proposed method can accurately segment and track lymphocyte boundaries in microscopic images over time even in the presence of low-contrast edges, which will provide a good prerequisite for the quantitative analysis of lymphocyte morphology and motility. PMID:26089973

  5. The "nugget design": A modified segmental gracilis free flap for small-sized defect reconstruction on the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Tremp, M; Oranges, C M; Wang, W J; Wettstein, R; Zhang, Y X; Schaefer, D J; Kalbermatten, D F

    2017-09-01

    Little attention has been given to the segmental free gracilis muscle flap supplied by secondary proximal pedicles. We introduce a technical refinement for small-sized three-dimensional defect reconstruction on the foot. Between November 2013 and August 2016, three patients with a mean age of 66 years (range 47-70 years) were included. A segmental gracilis free flap supplied by the most proximal secondary pedicle was harvested according to a modified "nugget design" to treat small-sized defects on the lower extremity requiring dead space reconstruction. Minor and major complications, sensitivity with Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test, soft tissue stability and patient satisfaction at final follow-up were recorded. In one case, a segmental gracilis muscle was used for dorsal foot reconstruction after debridement of metatarsal phalanx I with osteomyelitis. In two cases, the segmental gracilis free muscle was harvested for defect reconstruction on the right plantar foot after excision of a melanoma. The first patient required revision after partial failure of the initial segmental gracilis free muscle flap. Overall, good results in foot function and a high degree of patient satisfaction was achieved (Likert scale 9.7, range 9-10) after a mean follow-up of 13 months (range 3-24 months). Taken from the very proximal dorsal part of the gracilis muscle supplied by the most proximal secondary pedicle and leaving the vast majority of the muscle intact preserves the option to harvest a normal gracilis flap. This technique is especially suitable for small, three-dimensional defects on the lower extremity. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccine approaches using Modified Vaccinia Ankara and soluble protein to induce neutralizing antibodies by the human cytomegalovirus pentamer complex in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Scharf, Louise; Contreras, Heidi; Gao, Han; Meng, Zhuo; Nguyen, Jenny; Barry, Peter A; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Diamond, Don J

    2017-01-01

    Since neutralizing antibodies (NAb) targeting the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) pentamer complex (PC) potently block HCMV host cell entry, anti-PC NAb induction is thought to be important for a vaccine formulation to prevent HCMV infection. By developing a vaccine strategy based on soluble PC protein and using a previously generated Modified Vaccinia Ankara vector co-expressing all five PC subunits (MVA-PC), we compared HCMV NAb induction by homologous immunization using prime-boost vaccine regimen employing only PC protein or MVA-PC and heterologous immunization using prime-boost combinations of PC protein and MVA-PC. Utilizing a recently isolated anti-PC NAb, we produced highly pure soluble PC protein that displayed conformational and linear neutralizing epitopes, interfered with HCMV entry, and was recognized by antibodies induced by HCMV during natural infection. Mice vaccinated by different immunization routes with the purified PC protein in combination with a clinically approved adjuvant formulation elicited high-titer and durable HCMV NAb. While MVA-PC and soluble PC protein either alone or in combination elicited robust HCMV NAb, significantly different potencies of these vaccine approaches were observed in dependence on immunization schedule. Using only two immunizations, vaccination with MVA-PC alone or prime-boost combinations of MVA-PC and PC protein was significantly more effective in stimulating HCMV NAb than immunization with PC protein alone. In contrast, with three immunizations, NAb induced by soluble PC protein either alone or combined with two boosts of MVA-PC increased to levels that exceeded NAb titer stimulated by MVA-PC alone. These results provide insights into the potency of soluble protein and MVA to elicit NAb by the HCMV PC via homologous and heterologous prime-boost immunization, which may contribute to develop clinically deployable vaccine strategies to prevent HCMV infection.

  7. Comparison of homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccine approaches using Modified Vaccinia Ankara and soluble protein to induce neutralizing antibodies by the human cytomegalovirus pentamer complex in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Scharf, Louise; Contreras, Heidi; Gao, Han; Meng, Zhuo; Nguyen, Jenny; Barry, Peter A.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2017-01-01

    Since neutralizing antibodies (NAb) targeting the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) pentamer complex (PC) potently block HCMV host cell entry, anti-PC NAb induction is thought to be important for a vaccine formulation to prevent HCMV infection. By developing a vaccine strategy based on soluble PC protein and using a previously generated Modified Vaccinia Ankara vector co-expressing all five PC subunits (MVA-PC), we compared HCMV NAb induction by homologous immunization using prime-boost vaccine regimen employing only PC protein or MVA-PC and heterologous immunization using prime-boost combinations of PC protein and MVA-PC. Utilizing a recently isolated anti-PC NAb, we produced highly pure soluble PC protein that displayed conformational and linear neutralizing epitopes, interfered with HCMV entry, and was recognized by antibodies induced by HCMV during natural infection. Mice vaccinated by different immunization routes with the purified PC protein in combination with a clinically approved adjuvant formulation elicited high-titer and durable HCMV NAb. While MVA-PC and soluble PC protein either alone or in combination elicited robust HCMV NAb, significantly different potencies of these vaccine approaches were observed in dependence on immunization schedule. Using only two immunizations, vaccination with MVA-PC alone or prime-boost combinations of MVA-PC and PC protein was significantly more effective in stimulating HCMV NAb than immunization with PC protein alone. In contrast, with three immunizations, NAb induced by soluble PC protein either alone or combined with two boosts of MVA-PC increased to levels that exceeded NAb titer stimulated by MVA-PC alone. These results provide insights into the potency of soluble protein and MVA to elicit NAb by the HCMV PC via homologous and heterologous prime-boost immunization, which may contribute to develop clinically deployable vaccine strategies to prevent HCMV infection. PMID:28813507

  8. Modified watershed technique and post-processing for segmentation of skin lesions in dermoscopy images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanzheng; Moss, Randy H; Chen, Xiaohe; Stanley, R Joe; Stoecker, William V; Celebi, M Emre; Malters, Joseph M; Grichnik, James M; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Rabinovitz, Harold S; Menzies, Scott W; Szalapski, Thomas M

    2011-03-01

    In previous research, a watershed-based algorithm was shown to be useful for automatic lesion segmentation in dermoscopy images, and was tested on a set of 100 benign and malignant melanoma images with the average of three sets of dermatologist-drawn borders used as the ground truth, resulting in an overall error of 15.98%. In this study, to reduce the border detection errors, a neural network classifier was utilized to improve the first-pass watershed segmentation; a novel "edge object value (EOV) threshold" method was used to remove large light blobs near the lesion boundary; and a noise removal procedure was applied to reduce the peninsula-shaped false-positive areas. As a result, an overall error of 11.09% was achieved.

  9. Design and analysis of a modified segmented cladding fiber with large mode area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shaoshuo; Ning, Tigang; Li, Jing; Zheng, Jingjing; Wen, Xiaodong; Pei, Li

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel segmented cladding fiber structure for large mode area properties. In this structure a thin ring is placed between the high index core and nonuniform cladding. It is called Single-Ring Segmented-Cladding Fiber (SR-SCF). The novel fiber offers the possibility of single-mode(SM) operation from 1 μm to 1.7 μm with a large core diameter. With illustrations, the fiber has a better SM operation than segmented-cladding fiber (SCF) is demonstrated. A large effective area of 1000 μm2 is achieved. The SM operation with very high suppression of the higher order modes can arise by 76%. Moreover, mode spacing between the adjacent modes (LP01 and LP11) is also improved significantly. Besides, the bending property is analyzed. It is found that the fiber is insensitive to bending angle ranging from -180° to 180° at bending radius of 30 cm. The proposed fiber will play an important role in developing high power fiber laser, fiber amplifier and high power delivery application.

  10. A modified possibilistic fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm for bias field estimation and segmentation of brain MR image.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ze-Xuan; Sun, Quan-Sen; Xia, De-Shen

    2011-07-01

    A modified possibilistic fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is presented for fuzzy segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) images that have been corrupted by intensity inhomogeneities and noise. By introducing a novel adaptive method to compute the weights of local spatial in the objective function, the new adaptive fuzzy clustering algorithm is capable of utilizing local contextual information to impose local spatial continuity, thus allowing the suppression of noise and helping to resolve classification ambiguity. To estimate the intensity inhomogeneity, the global intensity is introduced into the coherent local intensity clustering algorithm and takes the local and global intensity information into account. The segmentation target therefore is driven by two forces to smooth the derived optimal bias field and improve the accuracy of the segmentation task. The proposed method has been successfully applied to 3 T, 7 T, synthetic and real MR images with desirable results. Comparisons with other approaches demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is robust to initialization, thereby allowing fully automatic applications.

  11. The presence of non-segmental vitiligo modifies intracellular cytokine subsets in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, M G; Del Duca, S C; Virili, C; Gargano, L; Centanni, M

    2010-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and vitiligo often occur in association and seem to be characterized by a prevalent Th1-driven autoimmune process. The aim of this study is to analyze selected intracellular Τh1 and Th2 cytokines in patients with Hashimoto?s thyroiditis when associated with non-segmental vitiligo. We analyzed intracellular interleukin-2, interferon-gamma (Τh1) and interleukin-4 (Th2), in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 23 patients with isolated Hashimoto?s thyroiditis (group A) and of 11 patients with Hashimoto?s thyroiditis associated with non-segmental vitiligo (group B). Peripheral blood lymphocytes were stimulated and incubated with specific monoclonal antibodies. Intracellular cytokines were assayed by flow cytometric analysis. Interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma positive cells were increased in almost all patients but the median values were similar in patients with isolated Hashimoto?s thyroiditis and in those with concurrent vitiligo. In contrast, the number of patients with increased interleukin-4 positive cells was higher in patients with thyroiditis and vitiligo (9/11) than in those with isolated thyroiditis (2/23; p<0.0001). The median values of IL-4 positive cells in the two groups confirmed this difference (A: 5.8 percent, vs B: 20.6 percent; p=0.0011). Increased interleukin-4 positive lymphocytes characterize Hashimoto?s thyroiditis when associated with non-segmental vitiligo, suggesting a modified balance from highly prevalent Th1 to mixed Th1/Th2 subset.

  12. Modified SSCP method using sequential electrophoresis of multiple nucleic acid segments

    DOEpatents

    Gatti, Richard A.

    2002-10-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening large, complex, polyexonic eukaryotic genes such as the ATM gene for mutations and polymorphisms by an improved version of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis that allows electrophoresis of two or three amplified segments in a single lane. The present invention also is directed to new mutations and polymorphisms in the ATM gene that are useful in performing more accurate screening of human DNA samples for mutations and in distinguishing mutations from polymorphisms, thereby improving the efficiency of automated screening methods.

  13. A modified radiographic method for estimating segmental colonic transit time in subjects with rapid gut transit.

    PubMed

    Pai, C G; Kurian, G

    1999-07-01

    In this study on Indian subjects, the single X-ray method was assessed for its reliability in measuring the transit of particulate matter through the colon, and if inaccurate a suitable and simple alternative was to be devised. Radio-opaque markers were serially followed in 20 normal male volunteers. This was done by three 12 hourly radiographs and by stool collection to determine the transit time through the colon and its segments. It was compared with similar parameters calculated from the same data using one radiograph and three combinations of two radiographs each. The mean +/- SD colonic transit time determined by using three X-rays was 18.0 +/- 6.6 h which agreed well with the mean mouth-to-anus transit time of 24.2 +/- 6.8 h (mean +/- SDdiff = -6.2 +/- 2.9). When two of the three X-rays were used in various combinations, the best results were obtained with the method including radiographs at 12 and 36 h. Parameters calculated from a single radiograph done 36 h after the ingestion of makers showed lesser agreement with the results of the three radiograph method. Therefore in subjects with rapid gut transit, the simplified method for estimating the colonic and segmental transit times using a single X-ray is inaccurate. Using two radiographs enhances the accuracy.

  14. Alphavirus Replicon DNA Expressing HIV Antigens Is an Excellent Prime for Boosting with Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) or with HIV gp140 Protein Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Maria L.; Ljungberg, Karl; Tatoud, Roger; Weber, Jonathan; Esteban, Mariano; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP) vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA) and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF) adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose. PMID:25643354

  15. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Maria L; Ljungberg, Karl; Tatoud, Roger; Weber, Jonathan; Esteban, Mariano; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP) vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA) and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF) adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  16. A hybrid flower pollination algorithm based modified randomized location for multi-threshold medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Zhou, Yongquan; Zhao, Chengyan; Wu, Haizhou

    2015-01-01

    Multi-threshold image segmentation is a powerful image processing technique that is used for the preprocessing of pattern recognition and computer vision. However, traditional multilevel thresholding methods are computationally expensive because they involve exhaustively searching the optimal thresholds to optimize the objective functions. To overcome this drawback, this paper proposes a flower pollination algorithm with a randomized location modification. The proposed algorithm is used to find optimal threshold values for maximizing Otsu's objective functions with regard to eight medical grayscale images. When benchmarked against other state-of-the-art evolutionary algorithms, the new algorithm proves itself to be robust and effective through numerical experimental results including Otsu's objective values and standard deviations.

  17. Adaptive Replanning to Account for Lumpectomy Cavity Change in Sequential Boost After Whole-Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaojian; Qiao, Qiao; DeVries, Anthony; Li, Wenhui; Currey, Adam; Kelly, Tracy; Bergom, Carmen; Wilson, J. Frank; Li, X. Allen

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficiency of standard image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to account for lumpectomy cavity (LC) variation during whole-breast irradiation (WBI) and propose an adaptive strategy to improve dosimetry if IGRT fails to address the interfraction LC variations. Methods and Materials: Daily diagnostic-quality CT data acquired during IGRT in the boost stage using an in-room CT for 19 breast cancer patients treated with sequential boost after WBI in the prone position were retrospectively analyzed. Contours of the LC, treated breast, ipsilateral lung, and heart were generated by populating contours from planning CTs to boost fraction CTs using an auto-segmentation tool with manual editing. Three plans were generated on each fraction CT: (1) a repositioning plan by applying the original boost plan with the shift determined by IGRT; (2) an adaptive plan by modifying the original plan according to a fraction CT; and (3) a reoptimization plan by a full-scale optimization. Results: Significant variations were observed in LC. The change in LC volume at the first boost fraction ranged from a 70% decrease to a 50% increase of that on the planning CT. The adaptive and reoptimization plans were comparable. Compared with the repositioning plans, the adaptive plans led to an improvement in target coverage for an increased LC case (1 of 19, 7.5% increase in planning target volume evaluation volume V{sub 95%}), and breast tissue sparing for an LC decrease larger than 35% (3 of 19, 7.5% decrease in breast evaluation volume V{sub 50%}; P=.008). Conclusion: Significant changes in LC shape and volume at the time of boost that deviate from the original plan for WBI with sequential boost can be addressed by adaptive replanning at the first boost fraction.

  18. Finger Vein Segmentation from Infrared Images Based on a Modified Separable Mumford Shah Model and Local Entropy Thresholding.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Marios; Dermatas, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for finger vein pattern extraction from infrared images is presented. This method involves four steps: preprocessing which performs local normalization of the image intensity, image enhancement, image segmentation, and finally postprocessing for image cleaning. In the image enhancement step, an image which will be both smooth and similar to the original is sought. The enhanced image is obtained by minimizing the objective function of a modified separable Mumford Shah Model. Since, this minimization procedure is computationally intensive for large images, a local application of the Mumford Shah Model in small window neighborhoods is proposed. The finger veins are located in concave nonsmooth regions and, so, in order to distinct them from the other tissue parts, all the differences between the smooth neighborhoods, obtained by the local application of the model, and the corresponding windows of the original image are added. After that, veins in the enhanced image have been sufficiently emphasized. Thus, after image enhancement, an accurate segmentation can be obtained readily by a local entropy thresholding method. Finally, the resulted binary image may suffer from some misclassifications and, so, a postprocessing step is performed in order to extract a robust finger vein pattern.

  19. Sequential Immunization with gp140 Boosts Immune Responses Primed by Modified Vaccinia Ankara or DNA in HIV-Uninfected South African Participants

    PubMed Central

    Churchyard, Gavin; Mlisana, Koleka; Karuna, Shelly; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Williamson, Carolyn; Morris, Lynn; Tomaras, Georgia D.; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Gu, Niya; Yu, Chenchen; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Hermanus, Tandile; Allen, Mary; Pensiero, Michael; Barnett, Susan W.; Gray, Glenda; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Montefiori, David C.; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background The safety and immunogenicity of SAAVI DNA-C2 (4 mg IM), SAAVI MVA-C (2.9 x 109 pfu IM) and Novartis V2-deleted subtype C gp140 (100 mcg) with MF59 adjuvant in various vaccination regimens was evaluated in HIV-uninfected adults in South Africa. Methods Participants at three South African sites were randomized (1:1:1:1) to one of four vaccine regimens: MVA prime, sequential gp140 protein boost (M/M/P/P); concurrent MVA/gp140 (MP/MP); DNA prime, sequential MVA boost (D/D/M/M); DNA prime, concurrent MVA/gp140 boost (D/D/MP/MP) or placebo. Peak HIV specific humoral and cellular responses were measured. Results 184 participants were enrolled: 52% were female, all were Black/African, median age was 23 years (range, 18–42 years) and 79% completed all vaccinations. 159 participants reported at least one adverse event, 92.5% were mild or moderate. Five, unrelated, serious adverse events were reported. The M/M/P/P and D/D/MP/MP regimens induced the strongest peak neutralizing and binding antibody responses and the greatest CD4+ T-cell responses to Env. All peak neutralizing and binding antibody responses decayed with time. The MVA, but not DNA, prime contributed to the humoral and cellular immune responses. The D/D/M/M regimen was poorly immunogenic overall but did induce modest CD4+ T-cell responses to Gag and Pol. CD8+ T-cell responses to any antigen were low for all regimens. Conclusions The SAAVI DNA-C2, SAAVI MVA-C and Novartis gp140 with MF59 adjuvant in various combinations were safe and induced neutralizing and binding antibodies and cellular immune responses. Sequential immunization with gp140 boosted immune responses primed by MVA or DNA. The best overall immune responses were seen with the M/M/P/P regimen. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01418235 PMID:27583368

  20. Segmentation of White Blood Cells From Microscopic Images Using a Novel Combination of K-Means Clustering and Modified Watershed Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ghane, Narjes; Vard, Alireza; Talebi, Ardeshir; Nematollahy, Pardis

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of white blood cells (WBCs) is the first step to diagnose some particular diseases such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome, leukemia, and other blood-related diseases that are usually done by pathologists using an optical microscope. This process is time-consuming, extremely tedious, and expensive and needs experienced experts in this field. Thus, a computer-aided diagnosis system that assists pathologists in the diagnostic process can be so effective. Segmentation of WBCs is usually a first step in developing a computer-aided diagnosis system. The main purpose of this paper is to segment WBCs from microscopic images. For this purpose, we present a novel combination of thresholding, k-means clustering, and modified watershed algorithms in three stages including (1) segmentation of WBCs from a microscopic image, (2) extraction of nuclei from cell’s image, and (3) separation of overlapping cells and nuclei. The evaluation results of the proposed method show that similarity measures, precision, and sensitivity respectively were 92.07, 96.07, and 94.30% for nucleus segmentation and 92.93, 97.41, and 93.78% for cell segmentation. In addition, statistical analysis presents high similarity between manual segmentation and the results obtained by the proposed method. PMID:28553582

  1. Segmentation of White Blood Cells From Microscopic Images Using a Novel Combination of K-Means Clustering and Modified Watershed Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Narjes; Vard, Alireza; Talebi, Ardeshir; Nematollahy, Pardis

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of white blood cells (WBCs) is the first step to diagnose some particular diseases such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome, leukemia, and other blood-related diseases that are usually done by pathologists using an optical microscope. This process is time-consuming, extremely tedious, and expensive and needs experienced experts in this field. Thus, a computer-aided diagnosis system that assists pathologists in the diagnostic process can be so effective. Segmentation of WBCs is usually a first step in developing a computer-aided diagnosis system. The main purpose of this paper is to segment WBCs from microscopic images. For this purpose, we present a novel combination of thresholding, k-means clustering, and modified watershed algorithms in three stages including (1) segmentation of WBCs from a microscopic image, (2) extraction of nuclei from cell's image, and (3) separation of overlapping cells and nuclei. The evaluation results of the proposed method show that similarity measures, precision, and sensitivity respectively were 92.07, 96.07, and 94.30% for nucleus segmentation and 92.93, 97.41, and 93.78% for cell segmentation. In addition, statistical analysis presents high similarity between manual segmentation and the results obtained by the proposed method.

  2. Safety and Immunogenicity of PENNVAX®-G DNA Prime Administered by Biojector® 2000 or CELLECTRA® Electroporation Device with Modified Vaccinia Ankara-CMDR Boost.

    PubMed

    Ake, Julie A; Schuetz, Alexandra; Pegu, Poonam; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Eller, Michael A; Kibuuka, Hannah; Sawe, Fredrick; Maboko, Leonard; Polonis, Victoria; Karasavva, Nicos; Weiner, David; Sekiziyivu, Arthur; Kosgei, Josphat; Missanga, Marco; Kroidl, Arne; Mann, Philipp; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Eller, Leigh Anne; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Dorsey-Spitz, Julie; Milazzo, Mark; Ouedraogo, G Laissa; Rizvi, Farrukh; Yan, Jian; Khan, Amir S; Peel, Sheila; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Michael, Nelson L; Ngauy, Viseth; Marovich, Mary; Robb, Merlin L

    2017-09-02

    We report the first-in-human safety and immunogenicity evaluation of PENNVAX®-G DNA/ MVA-CMDR prime-boost HIV vaccine, with intramuscular DNA delivery by either Biojector® 2000 needle free injection system (Biojector) or by CELLECTRA® electroporation device. Healthy, HIV-uninfected adults were randomized to receive 4 mg PENNVAX®-G DNA delivered IM by Biojector or electroporation at baseline and week 4 followed by IM injection of 108 pfu MVA-CMDR at week 12 and 24. The open label Part A was conducted in the US, followed by a double-blind, placebo controlled Part B in East Africa. Solicited and unsolicited adverse events were recorded and immune responses measured. 88/100 enrolled participants completed all study injections, which were generally safe and well tolerated, with more immediate, but transient, pain in the electroporation group. Cellular responses were observed in 57% of vaccine recipients tested and were CD4 predominant. High rates of binding antibody responses to CRF01_AE antigens, including gp70 V1V2 scaffold, were observed. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell assay and moderate antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity was demonstrated. The PVG/MVA-CMDR HIV-1 vaccine regimen is safe and immunogenic. Substantial differences in safety or immunogenicity between modes of DNA delivery were not observed. NCT01260727, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01260727.

  3. Minimally modified low-density lipoprotein induces monocyte adhesion to endothelial connecting segment-1 by activating β1 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Peggy T.; Elices, Mariano J.; Fang, Zhuang T.; Ugarova, Tatiana P.; Strahl, Dana; Territo, Mary C.; Frank, Joy S.; Kovach, Nicholas L.; Cabanas, Carlos; Berliner, Judith A.; Vora, Devendra K.

    1999-01-01

    We have shown previously that treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with minimally modified low-density lipoprotein (MM-LDL) induces monocyte but not neutrophil binding. This monocyte binding was not mediated by endothelial E-selectin, P-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-I, or intercellular adhesion molecule-I, suggesting an alternative monocyte-specific adhesion molecule. We now show that moncytic α4β1 integrins mediate binding to MM-LDL-treated endothelial cells. We present data suggesting that the expression of the connecting segment-1 (CS-1) domain of fibronectin (FN) is induced on the apical surface of HAEC by MM-LDL and is the endothelial α4β1 ligand in MM-LDL-treated cells. Although the levels of CS-1 mRNA and protein were not increased, we show that MM-LDL treatment causes deposition of FN on the apical surface by activation of β1integrins, particularly those associated with α5 integrins.Activation of β1 by antibody 8A2 also induced CS-1-mediated monocyte binding. Confocal microscopy demonstrated the activated β1 and CS-1colocalize in concentrated filamentous patches on the apical surface of HAEC. Both anti-CS-1 and an antibody to activated β1 showed increased staining on the luminal endothelium of human coronary lesions with active monocyte entry. These results suggest the importance of these integrin ligand interactions in human atherosclerosis. J. Clin. Invest. 103:613–625 (1999) PMID:10074478

  4. LDA boost classification: boosting by topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, La; Qiao, Guo; Qimin, Cao; Qitao, Li

    2012-12-01

    AdaBoost is an efficacious classification algorithm especially in text categorization (TC) tasks. The methodology of setting up a classifier committee and voting on the documents for classification can achieve high categorization precision. However, traditional Vector Space Model can easily lead to the curse of dimensionality and feature sparsity problems; so it affects classification performance seriously. This article proposed a novel classification algorithm called LDABoost based on boosting ideology which uses Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) to modeling the feature space. Instead of using words or phrase, LDABoost use latent topics as the features. In this way, the feature dimension is significantly reduced. Improved Naïve Bayes (NB) is designed as the weaker classifier which keeps the efficiency advantage of classic NB algorithm and has higher precision. Moreover, a two-stage iterative weighted method called Cute Integration in this article is proposed for improving the accuracy by integrating weak classifiers into strong classifier in a more rational way. Mutual Information is used as metrics of weights allocation. The voting information and the categorization decision made by basis classifiers are fully utilized for generating the strong classifier. Experimental results reveals LDABoost making categorization in a low-dimensional space, it has higher accuracy than traditional AdaBoost algorithms and many other classic classification algorithms. Moreover, its runtime consumption is lower than different versions of AdaBoost, TC algorithms based on support vector machine and Neural Networks.

  5. Prime-boost vaccination with chimpanzee adenovirus and modified vaccinia Ankara encoding TRAP provides partial protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Kenyan adults

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Nick J.; Roberts, Rachel; Mwacharo, Jedidah; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly; Hodgson, Susanne H.; Njuguna, Patricia; Viebig, Nicola K.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gitau, Evelyn; Douglas, Sandy; Illingworth, Joe; Marsh, Kevin; Lawrie, Alison; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B.; Ewer, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity to the liver stage of the malaria parasite can be conferred by vaccine-induced T cells, but no subunit vaccination approach based on cellular immunity has shown efficacy in field studies. We randomly allocated 121 healthy adult male volunteers in Kilifi, Kenya, to vaccination with the recombinant viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), both encoding the malaria peptide sequence ME-TRAP (the multiple epitope string and thrombospondin-related adhesion protein), or to vaccination with rabies vaccine as a control. We gave antimalarials to clear parasitemia and conducted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis on blood samples three times a week to identify infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. On Cox regression, vaccination reduced the risk of infection by 67% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33 to 83%; P = 0.002] during 8 weeks of monitoring. T cell responses to TRAP peptides 21 to 30 were significantly associated with protection (hazard ratio,0.24; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.75; P = 0.016). PMID:25947165

  6. Prime-boost vaccination with chimpanzee adenovirus and modified vaccinia Ankara encoding TRAP provides partial protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Kenyan adults.

    PubMed

    Ogwang, Caroline; Kimani, Domtila; Edwards, Nick J; Roberts, Rachel; Mwacharo, Jedidah; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly; Hodgson, Susanne H; Njuguna, Patricia; Viebig, Nicola K; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gitau, Evelyn; Douglas, Sandy; Illingworth, Joe; Marsh, Kevin; Lawrie, Alison; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Ewer, Katie; Urban, Britta C; S Hill, Adrian V; Bejon, Philip

    2015-05-06

    Protective immunity to the liver stage of the malaria parasite can be conferred by vaccine-induced T cells, but no subunit vaccination approach based on cellular immunity has shown efficacy in field studies. We randomly allocated 121 healthy adult male volunteers in Kilifi, Kenya, to vaccination with the recombinant viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), both encoding the malaria peptide sequence ME-TRAP (the multiple epitope string and thrombospondin-related adhesion protein), or to vaccination with rabies vaccine as a control. We gave antimalarials to clear parasitemia and conducted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis on blood samples three times a week to identify infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. On Cox regression, vaccination reduced the risk of infection by 67% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33 to 83%; P = 0.002] during 8 weeks of monitoring. T cell responses to TRAP peptides 21 to 30 were significantly associated with protection (hazard ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.75; P = 0.016).

  7. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  8. A prime/boost DNA/Modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine expressing recombinant Leishmania DNA encoding TRYP is safe and immunogenic in outbred dogs, the reservoir of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Carson, Connor; Antoniou, Maria; Ruiz-Argüello, Maria Begoña; Alcami, Antonio; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Messaritakis, Ippokratis; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Courtenay, Orin

    2009-02-11

    Previous studies demonstrated safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) prime/boost vaccines expressing tryparedoxin peroxidase (TRYP) and Leishmania homologue of the mammalian receptor for activated C kinase (LACK) against Leishmania major challenge in mice, which was consistent with results from TRYP protein/adjuvant combinations in non-human primates. This study aimed to conduct safety and immunogenicity trials of these DNA/MVA vaccines in dogs, the natural reservoir host of Leishmania infantum, followed-up for 4 months post-vaccination. In a cohort of 22 uninfected outbred dogs, blinded randomised administration of 1000 microg (high dose) or 100 microg (low dose) DNA prime (day 0) and 1x10(8)pfu MVA boost (day 28) was shown to be safe and showed no clinical side effects. High dose DNA/MVA vaccinated TRYP dogs produced statistically higher mean levels of the type-1 pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma than controls in whole blood assays (WBA) stimulated with the recombinant vaccine antigen TRYP, up to the final sampling at day 126, and in the absence of challenge with Leishmania. TRYP vaccinated dogs also demonstrated significantly higher TRYP-specific total IgG and IgG2 subtype titres than in controls, and positive in vivo intradermal reactions at day 156 in the absence of natural infection, observed in 6/8 TRYP vaccinated dogs. No significant increases in IFN-gamma in LACK-stimulated WBA, or in LACK-specific IgG levels, were detected in LACK vaccinated dogs compared to controls, and only 2/9 LACK vaccinated dogs demonstrated DTH responses at day 156. In all groups, IgG1 subclass responses and antigen-specific stimulation of IL-10 were similar to controls demonstrating an absence of Th2/T(reg) response, as expected in the absence of in vivo restimulation or natural/experimental challenge with Leishmania. These collective results indicate significant antigen-specific type-1 responses and in vivo memory phase cellular immune

  9. Mono-component feature extraction for mechanical fault diagnosis using modified empirical wavelet transform via data-driven adaptive Fourier spectrum segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jun; Chen, Jinglong; Zi, Yanyang; Li, Yueming; He, Zhengjia

    2016-05-01

    Due to the multi-modulation feature in most of the vibration signals, the extraction of embedded fault information from condition monitoring data for mechanical fault diagnosis still is not a relaxed task. Despite the reported achievements, Wavelet transform follows the dyadic partition scheme and would not allow a data-driven frequency partition. And then Empirical Wavelet Transform (EWT) is used to extract inherent modulation information by decomposing signal into mono-components under an orthogonal basis and non-dyadic partition scheme. However, the pre-defined segment way of Fourier spectrum without dependence on analyzed signals may result in inaccurate mono-component identification. In this paper, the modified EWT (MEWT) method via data-driven adaptive Fourier spectrum segment is proposed for mechanical fault identification. First, inner product is calculated between the Fourier spectrum of analyzed signal and Gaussian function for scale representation. Then, adaptive spectrum segment is achieved by detecting local minima of the scale representation. Finally, empirical modes can be obtained by adaptively merging mono-components based on their envelope spectrum similarity. The adaptively extracted empirical modes are analyzed for mechanical fault identification. A simulation experiment and two application cases are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method and the results show its outstanding performance.

  10. Online Bagging and Boosting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunji C.

    2005-01-01

    Bagging and boosting are two of the most well-known ensemble learning methods due to their theoretical performance guarantees and strong experimental results. However, these algorithms have been used mainly in batch mode, i.e., they require the entire training set to be available at once and, in some cases, require random access to the data. In this paper, we present online versions of bagging and boosting that require only one pass through the training data. We build on previously presented work by presenting some theoretical results. We also compare the online and batch algorithms experimentally in terms of accuracy and running time.

  11. Hypersonic Boost Glider

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1957-04-15

    Hypersonic Boost Glider in 11 Inch Hypersonic Tunnel L57-1681 In 1957 Langley tested its HYWARDS design in the 11 Inch Hypersonic Tunnel. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 369.

  12. Oxygen boost pump study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An oxygen boost pump is described which can be used to charge the high pressure oxygen tank in the extravehicular activity equipment from spacecraft supply. The only interface with the spacecraft is the +06 6.205 Pa supply line. The breadboard study results and oxygen tank survey are summarized and the results of the flight-type prototype design and analysis are presented.

  13. Can you boost your metabolism?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can ward off weight gain as you age. Alternative Names Weight-loss boost metabolism; Obesity - boost metabolism; ... Does glycogen availability influence the motivation to eat, energy intake or food choice? Sports Med . 2011;41( ...

  14. Boosted apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp

    Boosted black holes play an important role in General Relativity (GR), especially in relation to the binary black hole problem. Solving Einstein vac- uum equations in the strong field regime had long been the holy grail of numerical relativity until the significant breakthroughs made in 2005 and 2006. Numerical relativity plays a crucial role in gravitational wave detection by providing numerically generated gravitational waveforms that help search for actual signatures of gravitational radiation exciting laser interferometric de- tectors such as LIGO, VIRGO and GEO600 here on Earth. Binary black holes orbit each other in an ever tightening adiabatic inspiral caused by energy loss due to gravitational radiation emission. As the orbits shrinks, the holes speed up and eventually move at relativistic speeds in the vicinity of each other (separated by ~ 10M or so where 2M is the Schwarzschild radius). As such, one must abandon the Newtonian notion of a point mass on a circular orbit with tangential velocity and replace it with the concept of black holes, cloaked behind spheroidal event horizons that become distorted due to strong gravity, and further appear distorted because of Lorentz effects from the high orbital velocity. Apparent horizons (AHs) are 2-dimensional boundaries that are trapped surfaces. Conceptually, one can think of them as 'quasi-local' definitions for a black hole horizon. This will be explained in more detail in chapter 2. Apparent horizons are especially important in numerical relativity as they provide a computationally efficient way of describing and locating a black hole horizon. For a stationary spacetime, apparent horizons are 2-dimensional cross-sections of the event horizon, which is itself a 3-dimensional null surface in spacetime. Because an AH is a 2-dimensional cross-section of an event horizon, its area remains invariant under distortions due to Lorentz boosts although its shape changes. This fascinating property of the AH can be

  15. Comprehensive profiling and characterization of quassinoids from the seeds of Brucea javanica via segment and exposure strategy coupled with modified mass defect filter.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Lai, Chang-Jiang-Sheng; Zeng, Su-Ling; Li, Ping; Liu, E-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Quassinoids, the predominant constituents in the seeds of Brucea javanica (BJ), have gained an increasing interest over the past decades since the discovery of their extensive biological activities. In the present study, a method based on the segment and exposure strategy coupled with two mass spectrometer data acquisition techniques was firstly developed and validated for comprehensive profiling of quassinoids in the seeds of BJ via high-performance liquid chromatography tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF/MS). The segment and exposure strategy could significantly improve the detection efficiency for trace quassinoids in the seeds of BJ. Furthermore, the five-point screening approach based on modified mass defect filter (MDF) and the visual isotopic ion technique could rapidly screen the precursor ions of interest. The fragmentation behavior of quassinoids was systematically investigated, and a total of 148 quassinoids including 86 potentially new ones were unambiguously or tentatively identified in the seeds of BJ. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the integrated strategy reported in this study has considerable potential for rapid screening of natural compounds especially for the trace ones in herbal medicines.

  16. Reconstruction of the segmental mandibular defect using a retroauricular or modified face-lift incision with an intraoral approach in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Shik; Jittreetat, Tatsanachat; Nam, Woong; Sannikorn, Pakdee; Choi, Eun Chang; Koh, Yoon Woo

    2015-05-01

    This is the first report of mandibular reconstruction using the retroauricular (RA) or the modified face-lift (MFL) approach in head and neck cancer. This approach may have advantages over the conventional approach, especially in its superior aesthetic results. The fibular osseous or osteocutaneous free flap is a widely accepted option for the reconstruction of mandibular defects. Recently, we devised an RA or an MFL approach for neck dissection (ND) using an endoscopic or robotic surgical system. Here, we performed the reconstruction of a segmental mandibular defect with a fibular free flap using the RA or the MFL approach. A total of five patients underwent mandibular reconstruction with the RA or MFL approach for mandibular discontinuity, which developed after the surgical extirpation of head and neck cancer. We performed ND, segmental mandibulectomy, and the reconstruction of the mandibular defect via RA or MFL incisions. An osseous free flap was used for the reconstruction in two patients and the osteocutaneous free flap was used in three patients. The mean operation times for mandibulectomy and ND were 82 (range 45-120) min and 156 (range 140-180) min, respectively. No significant complications were noted. All flaps survived successfully.

  17. A modified Seeded Region Growing algorithm for vessel segmentation in breast MRI images for investigating the nature of potential lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotsos, D.; Vassiou, K.; Kostopoulos, S.; Lavdas, El; Kalatzis, I.; Asvestas, P.; Arvanitis, D. L.; Fezoulidis, I. V.; Cavouras, D.

    2014-03-01

    The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as an alternative protocol for screening of breast cancer has been intensively investigated during the past decade. Preliminary research results have indicated that gadolinium-agent administrative MRI scans may reveal the nature of breast lesions by analyzing the contrast-agent's uptake time. In this study, we attempt to deduce the same conclusion, however, from a different perspective by investigating, using image processing, the vascular network of the breast at two different time intervals following the administration of gadolinium. Twenty cases obtained from a 3.0-T MRI system (SIGNA HDx; GE Healthcare) were included in the study. A new modification of the Seeded Region Growing (SRG) algorithm was used to segment vessels from surrounding background. Delineated vessels were investigated by means of their topology, morphology and texture. Results have shown that it is possible to estimate the nature of the lesions with approximately 94.4% accuracy, thus, it may be claimed that the breast vascular network does encodes useful, patterned, information, which can be used for characterizing breast lesions.

  18. Reassortment of NS Segments Modifies Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Interaction with Avian Hosts and Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Henning; Wang, Zhongfang; Lenz, Eva; Pleschka, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) of subtypes H5 and H7 have caused numerous outbreaks in diverse poultry species and rising numbers of human infections. Both HPAIV subtypes support a growing concern of a pandemic outbreak, specifically via the avian-human link. Natural reassortment of both HPAIV subtypes is a possible event with unpredictable outcome for virulence and host specificity of the progeny virus for avian and mammalian species. NS reassortment of H5N1 HPAIV viruses in the background of A/FPV/Rostock/1934 (H7N1) HPAIV has been shown to change virus replication kinetics and host cell responses in mammalian cells. However, not much is known about the virus-host interaction of such viruses in avian species. In the present study, we show that the NS segment of A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (FPV NS VN, H5N1) HPAIV significantly altered the characteristics of the H7 prototype HPAIV in tracheal organ cultures (TOC) of chicken and turkey in vitro, with decreased replication efficiency accompanied by increased induction of type I interferon (IFN) and apoptosis. Furthermore, species-specific differences between chicken and turkey were demonstrated. Interestingly, NS-reassortant FPV NS VN showed an overall highly pathogenic phenotype, with increased virulence and replication potential compared to the wild-type virus after systemic infection of chicken and turkey embryos. Our data demonstrate that single reassortment of an H5-type NS into an H7-type HPAIV significantly changed virus replication abilities and influenced the avian host cell response without prior adaptation. PMID:23468508

  19. Immune responses in mice induced by prime-boost schemes of the Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1)-based DNA, protein and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara vaccines.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jun; Li, Xun; Liu, Zhongxiang; Xue, Caifang; Bujard, Hermann; Cui, Liwang

    2006-09-11

    The apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) of malaria parasites is a leading vaccine candidate. Its expression in merozoites and sporozoites and its importance for erythrocyte and hepatocyte invasion underline the significance of both humoral and cellular immunities against this antigen in malaria protection. We have generated a DNA construct and a recombinant poxvirus (rMVA) for expressing the Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 ectodomain, produced recombinant AMA1 protein (rAMA1) and evaluated their antigenicity in mice using single and combinatory vaccine schemes. Our results showed that although vaccinations of mice by either DNA or rMVA alone did not yield high antibody responses, they had primed significant numbers of rAMA1-responsive splenocytes. Under heterologous prime-boost schemes, priming with DNA followed by boosting with rMVA or rAMA1 protein resulted in a significant increase in antibody titers. In addition, the antibody titers to AMA1 appeared to be correlated with the levels of inhibition of merozoite invasion of erythrocytes in vitro. Furthermore, different prime-boost schemes resulted in different AMA1-specific antibody isotype (IgG1/IgG2a) ratios, providing us with an indication about Th1 or Th2 responses the vaccination regimens have induced. This study has yielded useful information for further in vivo evaluation of the suitability and effectiveness of the heterologous prime-boost strategy in AMA1 vaccination.

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Semi-automated Segmentation Tool and a Modified Ellipsoid Formula for Volumetric Analysis of the Kidney in Non-contrast T2-Weighted MR Images.

    PubMed

    Seuss, Hannes; Janka, Rolf; Prümmer, Marcus; Cavallaro, Alexander; Hammon, Rebecca; Theis, Ragnar; Sandmair, Martin; Amann, Kerstin; Bäuerle, Tobias; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Volumetric analysis of the kidney parenchyma provides additional information for the detection and monitoring of various renal diseases. Therefore the purposes of the study were to develop and evaluate a semi-automated segmentation tool and a modified ellipsoid formula for volumetric analysis of the kidney in non-contrast T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR)-images. Three readers performed semi-automated segmentation of the total kidney volume (TKV) in axial, non-contrast-enhanced T2-weighted MR-images of 24 healthy volunteers (48 kidneys) twice. A semi-automated threshold-based segmentation tool was developed to segment the kidney parenchyma. Furthermore, the three readers measured renal dimensions (length, width, depth) and applied different formulas to calculate the TKV. Manual segmentation served as a reference volume. Volumes of the different methods were compared and time required was recorded. There was no significant difference between the semi-automatically and manually segmented TKV (p = 0.31). The difference in mean volumes was 0.3 ml (95% confidence interval (CI), -10.1 to 10.7 ml). Semi-automated segmentation was significantly faster than manual segmentation, with a mean difference = 188 s (220 vs. 408 s); p < 0.05. Volumes did not differ significantly comparing the results of different readers. Calculation of TKV with a modified ellipsoid formula (ellipsoid volume × 0.85) did not differ significantly from the reference volume; however, the mean error was three times higher (difference of mean volumes -0.1 ml; CI -31.1 to 30.9 ml; p = 0.95). Applying the modified ellipsoid formula was the fastest way to get an estimation of the renal volume (41 s). Semi-automated segmentation and volumetric analysis of the kidney in native T2-weighted MR data delivers accurate and reproducible results and was significantly faster than manual segmentation. Applying a modified ellipsoid formula quickly provides an accurate kidney volume.

  1. Exercise boosts immune response.

    PubMed

    Sander, Ruth

    2012-06-29

    Ageing is associated with a decline in normal functioning of the immune system described as 'immunosenescence'. This contributes to poorer vaccine response and increased incidence of infection and malignancy seen in older people. Regular exercise can enhance vaccination response, increase T-cells and boost the function of the natural killer cells in the immune system. Exercise also lowers levels of the inflammatory cytokines that cause the 'inflamm-ageing' that is thought to play a role in conditions including cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes; Alzheimer's disease; osteoporosis and some cancers.

  2. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.

  3. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits.more » By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.« less

  4. Boosted Beta Regression

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Matthias; Wickler, Florian; Maloney, Kelly O.; Mitchell, Richard; Fenske, Nora; Mayr, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1). Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures. PMID:23626706

  5. Robust boosting via convex optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätsch, Gunnar

    2001-12-01

    In this work we consider statistical learning problems. A learning machine aims to extract information from a set of training examples such that it is able to predict the associated label on unseen examples. We consider the case where the resulting classification or regression rule is a combination of simple rules - also called base hypotheses. The so-called boosting algorithms iteratively find a weighted linear combination of base hypotheses that predict well on unseen data. We address the following issues: o The statistical learning theory framework for analyzing boosting methods. We study learning theoretic guarantees on the prediction performance on unseen examples. Recently, large margin classification techniques emerged as a practical result of the theory of generalization, in particular Boosting and Support Vector Machines. A large margin implies a good generalization performance. Hence, we analyze how large the margins in boosting are and find an improved algorithm that is able to generate the maximum margin solution. o How can boosting methods be related to mathematical optimization techniques? To analyze the properties of the resulting classification or regression rule, it is of high importance to understand whether and under which conditions boosting converges. We show that boosting can be used to solve large scale constrained optimization problems, whose solutions are well characterizable. To show this, we relate boosting methods to methods known from mathematical optimization, and derive convergence guarantees for a quite general family of boosting algorithms. o How to make Boosting noise robust? One of the problems of current boosting techniques is that they are sensitive to noise in the training sample. In order to make boosting robust, we transfer the soft margin idea from support vector learning to boosting. We develop theoretically motivated regularized algorithms that exhibit a high noise robustness. o How to adapt boosting to regression problems

  6. Project BOOST implementation: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark V; Li, Jing; Hansen, Luke O; Forth, Victoria; Budnitz, Tina; Greenwald, Jeffrey L; Howell, Eric; Halasyamani, Lakshmi; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Coleman, Eric A

    2014-07-01

    Enhancing care coordination and reducing hospital readmissions have been a focus of multiple quality improvement (QI) initiatives. Project BOOST (Better Outcomes by Optimizing Safe Transitions) aims to enhance the discharge transition from hospital to home. Previous research indicates that QI initiatives originating externally often face difficulties gaining momentum or effecting lasting change in a hospital. We performed a qualitative evaluation of Project BOOST implementation by examining the successes and failures experienced by six pilot sites. We also evaluated the unique physician mentoring component of this program. Finally, we examined the impact of intensification of the physician mentoring model on adoption of BOOST interventions in two later Illinois cohorts (27 hospitals). Qualitative analysis of six pilot hospitals used a process of methodological triangulation and analysis of the BOOST enrollment applications, the listserv, and content from telephone interviews. Evaluation of BOOST implementation at Illinois hospitals occurred via mid-year and year-end surveys. The identified common barriers included inadequate understanding of the current discharge process, insufficient administrative support, lack of protected time or dedicated resources, and lack of frontline staff buy-in. Facilitators of implementation included the mentor, a small beginning, teamwork, and proactive engagement of the patient. Notably, hospitals viewed their mentors as essential facilitators of change. Sites consistently commented that the individualized mentoring was extremely helpful and provided significant accountability and stimulated creativity. In the Illinois cohorts, the improved mentoring model showed more complete implementation of BOOST interventions. The implementation of Project BOOST was well received by hospitals, although sites faced substantial barriers consistent with other QI research reports. The unique mentorship element of Project BOOST proved extremely

  7. Maximizing boosted top identification by minimizing N-subjettiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse; van Tilburg, Ken

    2012-02-01

    N -subjettiness is a jet shape designed to identify boosted hadronic objects such as top quarks. Given N subjet axes within a jet, N-subjettiness sums the angular distances of jet constituents to their nearest subjet axis. Here, we generalize and improve on N -subjettiness by minimizing over all possible subjet directions, using a new variant of the k-means clustering algorithm. On boosted top benchmark samples from the BOOST2010 workshop, we demonstrate that a simple cut on the 3-subjettiness to 2-subjettiness ratio yields 20% (50%) tagging efficiency for a 0.23% (4.1%) fake rate, making N -subjettiness a highly effective boosted top tagger. N-subjettiness can be modified by adjusting an angular weighting exponent, and we find that the jet broadening measure is preferred for boosted top searches. We also explore multivariate techniques, and show that additional improvements are possible using a modified Fisher discriminant. Finally, we briefly mention how our minimization procedure can be extended to the entire event, allowing the event shape N-jettiness to act as a fixed N cone jet algorithm.

  8. AveBoost2: Boosting for Noisy Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2004-01-01

    AdaBoost is a well-known ensemble learning algorithm that constructs its constituent or base models in sequence. A key step in AdaBoost is constructing a distribution over the training examples to create each base model. This distribution, represented as a vector, is constructed to be orthogonal to the vector of mistakes made by the pre- vious base model in the sequence. The idea is to make the next base model's errors uncorrelated with those of the previous model. In previous work, we developed an algorithm, AveBoost, that constructed distributions orthogonal to the mistake vectors of all the previous models, and then averaged them to create the next base model s distribution. Our experiments demonstrated the superior accuracy of our approach. In this paper, we slightly revise our algorithm to allow us to obtain non-trivial theoretical results: bounds on the training error and generalization error (difference between training and test error). Our averaging process has a regularizing effect which, as expected, leads us to a worse training error bound for our algorithm than for AdaBoost but a superior generalization error bound. For this paper, we experimented with the data that we used in both as originally supplied and with added label noise-a small fraction of the data has its original label changed. Noisy data are notoriously difficult for AdaBoost to learn. Our algorithm's performance improvement over AdaBoost is even greater on the noisy data than the original data.

  9. Boosted ellipsoid ARTMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, Georgios C.; Georgiopoulos, Michael; Verzi, Steven J.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2002-03-01

    Ellipsoid ARTMAP (EAM) is an adaptive-resonance-theory neural network architecture that is capable of successfully performing classification tasks using incremental learning. EAM achieves its task by summarizing labeled input data via hyper-ellipsoidal structures (categories). A major property of EAM, when using off-line fast learning, is that it perfectly learns its training set after training has completed. Depending on the classification problems at hand, this fact implies that off-line EAM training may potentially suffer from over-fitting. For such problems we present an enhancement to the basic Ellipsoid ARTMAP architecture, namely Boosted Ellipsoid ARTMAP (bEAM), that is designed to simultaneously improve the generalization properties and reduce the number of created categories for EAM's off-line fast learning. This is being accomplished by forcing EAM to be tolerant about occasional misclassification errors during fast learning. An additional advantage provided by bEAM's desing is the capability of learning inconsistent cases, that is, learning identical patterns with contradicting class labels. After we present the theory behind bEAM's enhancements, we provide some preliminary experimental results, which compare the new variant to the original EAM network, Probabilistic EAM and three different variants of the Restricted Coulomb Energy neural network on the square-in-a-square classification problem.

  10. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, Albert Andreas Maria

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero.

  11. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, A.A.M.

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero. 20 figs.

  12. Yoga May Boost Aging Brains

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_167693.html Yoga May Boost Aging Brains Changes seen in areas involved with attention and ... may have greater "thickness" in areas of the brain involved in memory and attention, a small study ...

  13. Immunogenicity of a novel Clade B HIV-1 vaccine combination: Results of phase 1 randomized placebo controlled trial of an HIV-1 GM-CSF-expressing DNA prime with a modified vaccinia Ankara vaccine boost in healthy HIV-1 uninfected adults.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Susan P; Grunenberg, Nicole A; Sanchez, Brittany J; Seaton, Kelly E; Ferrari, Guido; Moody, M Anthony; Frahm, Nicole; Montefiori, David C; Hay, Christine M; Goepfert, Paul A; Baden, Lindsey R; Robinson, Harriet L; Yu, Xuesong; Gilbert, Peter B; McElrath, M Juliana; Huang, Yunda; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2017-01-01

    A phase 1 trial of a clade B HIV vaccine in HIV-uninfected adults evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a DNA prime co-expressing GM-CSF (Dg) followed by different numbers and intervals of modified vaccinia Ankara Boosts (M). Both vaccines produce virus-like particles presenting membrane-bound Env. Four US sites randomized 48 participants to receiving 1/10th the DNA dose as DgDgMMM given at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, or full dose DgDgM_M or DgDgMM_M regimens, given at 0, 2, 4, and 8 months, and 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 months, respectively. Peak immunogenicity was measured 2 weeks post-last vaccination. All regimens were well tolerated and safe. Full dose DgDgM_M and DgDgMM_M regimens generated Env-specific IgG to HIV-1 Env in >90%, IgG3 in >80%, and IgA in <20% of participants. Responses to gp140 and gp41 targets were more common and of higher magnitude than to gp120 and V1V2. The gp41 antibody included reactivity to the conserved immunodominant region with specificities known to mediate virus capture and phagocytosis and did not cross-react with a panel of intestinal flora antigens. The 3rd dose of MVA increased the avidity of elicited antibody (7.5% to 39%), the ADCC response to Bal gp120 (14% to 64%), and the one-year durability of the IgG3 responses to gp41 by 4-fold (13% vs. 3.5% retention of peak response). The co-expressed GM-CSF did not enhance responses over those in trials testing this vaccine without GM-CSF. This DNA/MVA prime-boost regimen induced durable, functional humoral responses that included ADCC, high antibody avidity, and Env IgG1 and IgG3 binding responses to the immunodominant region of gp41. The third, spaced MVA boost improved the overall quality of the antibody response. These products without co-expressed GM-CSF but combined with protein boosts will be considered for efficacy evaluation. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571960.

  14. Immunogenicity of a novel Clade B HIV-1 vaccine combination: Results of phase 1 randomized placebo controlled trial of an HIV-1 GM-CSF-expressing DNA prime with a modified vaccinia Ankara vaccine boost in healthy HIV-1 uninfected adults

    PubMed Central

    Grunenberg, Nicole A.; Sanchez, Brittany J.; Seaton, Kelly E.; Ferrari, Guido; Moody, M. Anthony; Frahm, Nicole; Montefiori, David C.; Hay, Christine M.; Goepfert, Paul A.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Robinson, Harriet L.; Yu, Xuesong; Gilbert, Peter B.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Huang, Yunda; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2017-01-01

    Background A phase 1 trial of a clade B HIV vaccine in HIV-uninfected adults evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a DNA prime co-expressing GM-CSF (Dg) followed by different numbers and intervals of modified vaccinia Ankara Boosts (M). Both vaccines produce virus-like particles presenting membrane-bound Env. Methods Four US sites randomized 48 participants to receiving 1/10th the DNA dose as DgDgMMM given at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, or full dose DgDgM_M or DgDgMM_M regimens, given at 0, 2, 4, and 8 months, and 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 months, respectively. Peak immunogenicity was measured 2 weeks post-last vaccination. Results All regimens were well tolerated and safe. Full dose DgDgM_M and DgDgMM_M regimens generated Env-specific IgG to HIV-1 Env in >90%, IgG3 in >80%, and IgA in <20% of participants. Responses to gp140 and gp41 targets were more common and of higher magnitude than to gp120 and V1V2. The gp41 antibody included reactivity to the conserved immunodominant region with specificities known to mediate virus capture and phagocytosis and did not cross-react with a panel of intestinal flora antigens. The 3rd dose of MVA increased the avidity of elicited antibody (7.5% to 39%), the ADCC response to Bal gp120 (14% to 64%), and the one-year durability of the IgG3 responses to gp41 by 4-fold (13% vs. 3.5% retention of peak response). The co-expressed GM-CSF did not enhance responses over those in trials testing this vaccine without GM-CSF. Conclusion This DNA/MVA prime-boost regimen induced durable, functional humoral responses that included ADCC, high antibody avidity, and Env IgG1 and IgG3 binding responses to the immunodominant region of gp41. The third, spaced MVA boost improved the overall quality of the antibody response. These products without co-expressed GM-CSF but combined with protein boosts will be considered for efficacy evaluation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571960 PMID:28727817

  15. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  16. SemiBoost: boosting for semi-supervised learning.

    PubMed

    Mallapragada, Pavan Kumar; Jin, Rong; Jain, Anil K; Liu, Yi

    2009-11-01

    Semi-supervised learning has attracted a significant amount of attention in pattern recognition and machine learning. Most previous studies have focused on designing special algorithms to effectively exploit the unlabeled data in conjunction with labeled data. Our goal is to improve the classification accuracy of any given supervised learning algorithm by using the available unlabeled examples. We call this as the Semi-supervised improvement problem, to distinguish the proposed approach from the existing approaches. We design a metasemi-supervised learning algorithm that wraps around the underlying supervised algorithm and improves its performance using unlabeled data. This problem is particularly important when we need to train a supervised learning algorithm with a limited number of labeled examples and a multitude of unlabeled examples. We present a boosting framework for semi-supervised learning, termed as SemiBoost. The key advantages of the proposed semi-supervised learning approach are: 1) performance improvement of any supervised learning algorithm with a multitude of unlabeled data, 2) efficient computation by the iterative boosting algorithm, and 3) exploiting both manifold and cluster assumption in training classification models. An empirical study on 16 different data sets and text categorization demonstrates that the proposed framework improves the performance of several commonly used supervised learning algorithms, given a large number of unlabeled examples. We also show that the performance of the proposed algorithm, SemiBoost, is comparable to the state-of-the-art semi-supervised learning algorithms.

  17. Representing Arbitrary Boosts for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Charles P.

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a derivation for the matrix representation of an arbitrary boost, a Lorentz transformation without rotation, suitable for undergraduate students with modest backgrounds in mathematics and relativity. The derivation uses standard vector and matrix techniques along with the well-known form for a special Lorentz transformation. (BT)

  18. Cost-Sensitive Boosting: Fitting an Additive Asymmetric Logistic Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiu-Jie; Mao, Yao-Bin; Wang, Zhi-Quan; Xiang, Wen-Bo

    Conventional machine learning algorithms like boosting tend to equally treat misclassification errors that are not adequate to process certain cost-sensitive classification problems such as object detection. Although many cost-sensitive extensions of boosting by directly modifying the weighting strategy of correspond original algorithms have been proposed and reported, they are heuristic in nature and only proved effective by empirical results but lack sound theoretical analysis. This paper develops a framework from a statistical insight that can embody almost all existing cost-sensitive boosting algorithms: fitting an additive asymmetric logistic regression model by stage-wise optimization of certain criterions. Four cost-sensitive versions of boosting algorithms are derived, namely CSDA, CSRA, CSGA and CSLB which respectively correspond to Discrete AdaBoost, Real AdaBoost, Gentle AdaBoost and LogitBoost. Experimental results on the application of face detection have shown the effectiveness of the proposed learning framework in the reduction of the cumulative misclassification cost.

  19. Pilot of the BOOST-A™: An online transition planning program for adolescents with autism.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Megan; Murray, Nina; Ciccarelli, Marina; Falkmer, Torbjörn; Falkmer, Marita

    2017-07-19

    Many adolescents with autism face difficulties with the transition from high school into post-school activities. The Better OutcOmes & Successful Transitions for Autism (BOOST-A™) is an online transition planning program which supports adolescents on the autism spectrum to prepare for leaving school. This study describes the development of the BOOST-A™ and aimed to determine the feasibility and viability of the program. Two pilot studies were conducted. In Pilot A, the BOOST-A™ was trialled by six adolescents on the autism spectrum, their parents, and the professionals who worked with them, to determine its feasibility. In Pilot B, 88 allied health professionals (occupational therapists, speech pathologists, and psychologists) reviewed the BOOST-A™ to determine its viability. Participants rated the BOOST-A™ as a feasible tool for transition planning. The majority of allied health professionals agreed that it was a viable program. Based on participant feedback, the BOOST-A™ was modified to improve usability and feasibility. The BOOST-A™ is a viable and feasible program that has the potential to assist adolescents with autism in preparing for transitioning out of high school. Future research will determine the effectiveness of the BOOST-A™ with adolescents across Australia. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  20. Will farmers intend to cultivate Provitamin A genetically modified (GM) cassava in Nigeria? Evidence from a k-means segmentation analysis of beliefs and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Oparinde, Adewale; Abdoulaye, Tahirou; Mignouna, Djana Babatima; Bamire, Adebayo Simeon

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of market segments within a population remains critical to agricultural systems and policy processes for targeting new innovations. Patterns in attitudes and intentions toward cultivating Provitamin A GM cassava are examined through the use of a combination of behavioural theory and k-means cluster analysis method, investigating the interrelationship among various behavioural antecedents. Using a state-level sample of smallholder cassava farmers in Nigeria, this paper identifies three distinct classes of attitude and intention denoted as low opposition, medium opposition and high opposition farmers. It was estimated that only 25% of the surveyed population of farmers was highly opposed to cultivating Provitamin A GM cassava.

  1. Will farmers intend to cultivate Provitamin A genetically modified (GM) cassava in Nigeria? Evidence from a k-means segmentation analysis of beliefs and attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Abdoulaye, Tahirou; Mignouna, Djana Babatima; Bamire, Adebayo Simeon

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of market segments within a population remains critical to agricultural systems and policy processes for targeting new innovations. Patterns in attitudes and intentions toward cultivating Provitamin A GM cassava are examined through the use of a combination of behavioural theory and k-means cluster analysis method, investigating the interrelationship among various behavioural antecedents. Using a state-level sample of smallholder cassava farmers in Nigeria, this paper identifies three distinct classes of attitude and intention denoted as low opposition, medium opposition and high opposition farmers. It was estimated that only 25% of the surveyed population of farmers was highly opposed to cultivating Provitamin A GM cassava. PMID:28700605

  2. Interferometric resolution boosting for spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2004-05-25

    Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) is a technique for enhancing the performance of spectrographs for wide bandwidth high resolution spectroscopy and Doppler radial velocimetry. By placing a small angle-independent interferometer near the slit of a spectrograph, periodic fiducials are embedded on the recorded spectrum. The multiplication of the stellar spectrum times the sinusoidal fiducial net creates a moir{acute e} pattern, which manifests high detailed spectral information heterodyned down to detectably low spatial frequencies. The latter can more accurately survive the blurring, distortions and CCD Nyquist limitations of the spectrograph. Hence lower resolution spectrographs can be used to perform high resolution spectroscopy and radial velocimetry. Previous demonstrations of {approx}2.5x resolution boost used an interferometer having a single fixed delay. We report new data indicating {approx}6x Gaussian resolution boost (140,000 from a spectrograph with 25,000 native resolving power), taken by using multiple exposures at widely different interferometer delays.

  3. Reweighting with Boosted Decision Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Machine learning tools are commonly used in modern high energy physics (HEP) experiments. Different models, such as boosted decision trees (BDT) and artificial neural networks (ANN), are widely used in analyses and even in the software triggers [1]. In most cases, these are classification models used to select the “signal” events from data. Monte Carlo simulated events typically take part in training of these models. While the results of the simulation are expected to be close to real data, in practical cases there is notable disagreement between simulated and observed data. In order to use available simulation in training, corrections must be introduced to generated data. One common approach is reweighting — assigning weights to the simulated events. We present a novel method of event reweighting based on boosted decision trees. The problem of checking the quality of reweighting step in analyses is also discussed.

  4. In vivo efficacy and off-target effects of locked nucleic acid (LNA) and unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) modified siRNA and small internally segmented interfering RNA (sisiRNA) in mice bearing human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Mook, Orf; Vreijling, Jeroen; Wengel, Suzy L; Wengel, Jesper; Zhou, Chuanzheng; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti; Baas, Frank; Fluiter, Kees

    2010-07-01

    The clinical use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is hampered by poor uptake by tissues and instability in circulation. In addition, off-target effects pose a significant additional problem for therapeutic use of siRNA. Chemical modifications of siRNA have been reported to increase stability and reduce off-target effects enabling possible therapeutic use of siRNA. Recently a large scale direct comparison of the impact of 21 different types of novel chemical modifications on siRNA efficiency and cell viability was published.1 It was found that several types of chemical modifications could enhance siRNA activity beyond that of an unmodified siRNA in vitro. In addition, a novel siRNA design, termed small internally segmented interfering RNA (sisiRNA), composed of an intact antisense strand and segmented guide strand stabilized using LNA was shown to be effective in cell based assays. In the present study we examined the in vivo efficacy of the LNA and UNA modified siRNA and sisiRNA in a mouse model bearing human tumor xenografts. We studied the biodistribution and efficacy of target knockdown in the mouse model. In addition we used whole genome profiling to assess the off-target effects in the liver of the mouse and the tumor xenografts. We report that LNA and UNA modified siRNA and sisiRNA improve the efficacy in target knockdown as compared with unmodified siRNA in the tumor xenografts without formulation. However, the level of off-target gene regulation in both the tumor and the liver correlated with the increase in efficacy in target knockdown, unless the seed region of the siRNA was modified.

  5. Active Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system observes and understands a scene/image by making a series of fixations. Every fixation point lies inside a particular region of arbitrary shape and size in the scene which can either be an object or just a part of it. We define as a basic segmentation problem the task of segmenting that region containing the fixation point. Segmenting the region containing the fixation is equivalent to finding the enclosing contour- a connected set of boundary edge fragments in the edge map of the scene - around the fixation. This enclosing contour should be a depth boundary. We present here a novel algorithm that finds this bounding contour and achieves the segmentation of one object, given the fixation. The proposed segmentation framework combines monocular cues (color/intensity/texture) with stereo and/or motion, in a cue independent manner. The semantic robots of the immediate future will be able to use this algorithm to automatically find objects in any environment. The capability of automatically segmenting objects in their visual field can bring the visual processing to the next level. Our approach is different from current approaches. While existing work attempts to segment the whole scene at once into many areas, we segment only one image region, specifically the one containing the fixation point. Experiments with real imagery collected by our active robot and from the known databases 1 demonstrate the promise of the approach. PMID:20686671

  6. EVENT SEGMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Swallow, Khena M.

    2012-01-01

    One way to understand something is to break it up into parts. New research indicates that segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful events is a core component of ongoing perception, with consequences for memory and learning. Behavioral and neuroimaging data suggest that event segmentation is automatic and that people spontaneously segment activity into hierarchically organized parts and sub-parts. This segmentation depends on the bottom-up processing of sensory features such as movement, and on the top-down processing of conceptual features such as actors’ goals. How people segment activity affects what they remember later; as a result, those who identify appropriate event boundaries during perception tend to remember more and learn more proficiently. PMID:22468032

  7. A strategy to boost the cell performance of CdSexTe1-x quantum dot sensitized solar cells over 8% by introducing Mn modified CdSe coating layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoshuai; Wei, Huiyun; Luo, Yanhong; Wu, Huijue; Li, Dongmei; Zhong, Xinhua; Meng, Qingbo

    2016-01-01

    CdSexTe1-x alloyed colloidal quantum dots show great potential application on quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) due to its relatively wide light absorption range and high chemical stability. In this respect, a thin Mn modified CdSe layer is introduced into TiO2/CdSexTe1-x alloyed QDs surface via a simple chemical bath deposition method (CBD) in order to further improve the cell performance. The power conversion efficiency of CdSexTe1-x QDSCs has been improved to 8.14%. Detailed investigation on the influence of this modification toward the TiO2/CdSexTe1-x interface on the cell performance reveals that introduction of Mn into CdSe QDs is found to facilitate the Mn-doped CdSe deposition and improve the light absorption of the device. In the meantime, the existence of the (Mn-)CdSe layer can also work as a passivation layer to reduce charge recombination.

  8. Poly-Alizarin red S/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode for the boost up of electrocatalytic activity towards the investigation of dopamine and simultaneous resolution in the presence of 5-HT: A voltammetric study.

    PubMed

    Reddaiah, K; Madhusudana Reddy, T; Venkata Ramana, D K; Subba Rao, Y

    2016-05-01

    Poly-Alizarin red S/multiwalled carbon nanotube film on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (poly-AzrS/MWCNT/GCE) was synthesized by electrochemical process and was used for the sensitive and selective determination of dopamine (DA) by employing voltammetric techniques. The electrocatalytic response of the modified electrode was found to exhibit admirable activity. The simultaneous determination of dopamine in the presence of serotonin (5-HT) was found to exhibit very good response at poly-AzrS/MWCNTs/GCE. The effect of pH, scan rate, accumulation time and concentration of dopamine was studied at the developed poly-AzrS/MWCNTs/GCE. The poly-AzrS/MWCNTs/GCE exhibited an efficient electron mediating behavior together with well resolved peaks for dopamine, in 0.1 mol/dm(3) phosphate buffer (PBS) solution of pH 7.0. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were found to be as 1.89 × 10(-7) mol/dm(3) and 6.312 × 10(-7) mol/dm(3) respectively with a dynamic range from 1 × 10(-6) to 1.8 × 10(-5) mol/dm(3). The interfacial electron transfer behavior of DA was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); the studies showed that the charge transfer rate was enhanced at poly-AzrS/MWCNTs/GCE when compared with bare GCE and poly-AzrS/GCE.

  9. Geometry Guided Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Stanley M.; Liang, Tajen

    1989-03-01

    Our overall goal is to develop an image understanding system for automatically interpreting dental radiographs. This paper describes the module that integrates the intrinsic image data to form the region adjacency graph that represents the image. The specific problem is to develop a robust method for segmenting the image into small regions that do not overlap anatomical boundaries. Classical algorithms for finding homogeneous regions (i.e., 2 class segmentation or connected components) will not always yield correct results since blurred edges can cause adjacent anatomical regions to be labeled as one region. This defect is a problem in this and other applications where an object count is necessary. Our solution to the problem is to guide the segmentation by intrinsic properties of the constituent objects. The module takes a set of intrinsic images as arguments. A connected components-like algorithm is performed, but the connectivity relation is not 4- or 8-neighbor connectivity in binary images; the connectivity is defined in terms of the intrinsic image data. We shall describe both the classical method and the modified segmentation procedures, and present experiments using both algorithms. Our experiments show that for the dental radiographs a segmentation using gray level data in conjunction with edges of the surfaces of teeth give a robust and reliable segmentation.

  10. Functional outcome of en bloc resection of a giant cell tumour of the distal radius and arthrodesis of the wrist and distal ulna using an ipsilateral double barrel segmental ulna bone graft combined with a modified Sauve-Kapandji procedure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zhong, J; Li, D; Sun, C; Zhao, H; Gao, Y

    2017-05-01

    Giant cell tumour of the distal radius is a locally aggressive lesion. In this study, we performed a wrist arthrodesis reconstruction with an ipsilateral double barrel segmental ulnar bone graft combined with a modified Sauve-Kapandji procedure for a giant cell tumour of the distal radius. From January 2007 to September 2013, we followed eight patients for a mean duration of 36 months. One patient developed a recurrence and was treated by amputation; the other seven patients achieved radiological union in about 8 months. There was no wrist instability, deformation or dislocation; the mean range of motion of the forearm achieved 75° of supination and 70° of pronation. The patients could recover reasonable grip strength. This new operative procedure can excise the tumour with a low rate of recurrence, fewer functional deficits and fewer complications than reported for other procedures. IV, therapeutic.

  11. Where boosted significances come from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plehn, Tilman; Schichtel, Peter; Wiegand, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    In an era of increasingly advanced experimental analysis techniques it is crucial to understand which phase space regions contribute a signal extraction from backgrounds. Based on the Neyman-Pearson lemma we compute the maximum significance for a signal extraction as an integral over phase space regions. We then study to what degree boosted Higgs strategies benefit ZH and tt¯H searches and which transverse momenta of the Higgs are most promising. We find that Higgs and top taggers are the appropriate tools, but would profit from a targeted optimization towards smaller transverse momenta. MadMax is available as an add-on to MadGraph 5.

  12. Electric rockets get a boost

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1995-12-01

    This article reports that xenon-ion thrusters are expected to replace conventional chemical rockets in many nonlaunch propulsion tasks, such as controlling satellite orbits and sending space probes on long exploratory missions. The space age dawned some four decades ago with the arrival of powerful chemical rockets that could propel vehicles fast enough to escape the grasp of earth`s gravity. Today, chemical rocket engines still provide the only means to boost payloads into orbit and beyond. The less glamorous but equally important job of moving vessels around in space, however, may soon be assumed by a fundamentally different rocket engine technology that has been long in development--electric propulsion.

  13. Stochastic approximation boosting for incomplete data problems.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Joseph; Laake, Petter

    2009-12-01

    Boosting is a powerful approach to fitting regression models. This article describes a boosting algorithm for likelihood-based estimation with incomplete data. The algorithm combines boosting with a variant of stochastic approximation that uses Markov chain Monte Carlo to deal with the missing data. Applications to fitting generalized linear and additive models with missing covariates are given. The method is applied to the Pima Indians Diabetes Data where over half of the cases contain missing values.

  14. A Modified Posterolateral Approach for Radiofrequency Denervation of the Medial Branch of the Cervical Segmental Nerve in Cervical Facet Joint Pain Based on Anatomical Considerations.

    PubMed

    van Eerd, Maarten; Lataster, Arno; Sommer, Micha; Patijn, Jacob; van Kleef, Maarten

    2016-10-13

    The cervical facet joints, also called the zygapophyseal joints, are a potential source of neck pain (cervical facet joint pain). The cervical facet joints are innervated by the cervical medial branches (CMBs) of the cervical segmental nerves. Cervical facet joint pain has been shown to respond to multisegmental radiofrequency denervation of the cervical medial branches. This procedure is performed under fluoroscopic guidance. Currently, three approaches are described and used. Those three techniques of radiofrequency treatment of the CMBs, classified on the base of the needle trajectory toward the anatomical planes, are as follows: the posterolateral technique, the posterior technique, and the lateral technique. We describe the three techniques with their advantages and disadvantages. Anatomical studies providing a topographic anatomy of the course of the CMBs are reviewed. We developed a novel approach based on the observed strengths and weaknesses of the three currently used approaches and based on recent anatomical findings. With this fluoroscopic-guided approach, there is always bone (the facet column) in front of the needle, which makes it safer, and the insertion point is easier to determine without the risk of positioning the radiofrequency needle too dorsally.

  15. Recursive bias estimation and L2 boosting

    SciTech Connect

    Hengartner, Nicolas W; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre; Matzner - Lober, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a general iterative bias correction procedure for regression smoothers. This bias reduction schema is shown to correspond operationally to the L{sub 2} Boosting algorithm and provides a new statistical interpretation for L{sub 2} Boosting. We analyze the behavior of the Boosting algorithm applied to common smoothers S which we show depend on the spectrum of I - S. We present examples of common smoother for which Boosting generates a divergent sequence. The statistical interpretation suggest combining algorithm with an appropriate stopping rule for the iterative procedure. Finally we illustrate the practical finite sample performances of the iterative smoother via a simulation study.

  16. Comparison of different prime-boost regimes with DNA and recombinant Orf virus based vaccines expressing glycoprotein D of pseudorabies virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, E M A; Rijsewijk, F A M; Moonen-Leusen, H W; Bianchi, A T J; Rziha, H-J

    2010-02-17

    Both DNA and Orf virus (ORFV; Parapox virus) based vaccines have shown promise as alternatives for conventional vaccines in pigs against pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection causing Aujeszky's disease. In the present study we evaluated the efficacy of different prime-boost regimes in pigs in terms of immunogenicity and protection against challenge infection with PRV. The different prime-boost regimes consisted of the homologous prime-boost regimes (DNA followed by DNA or ORFV followed by ORFV) and the heterologous prime-boost regimes (DNA followed by ORFV and ORFV followed by DNA), all based on glycoprotein D (gD) of PRV. Moreover, we compared the efficacy of the different prime-boost regimes with the efficacy of a conventional modified live vaccine (MLV). The different prime-boost regimes resulted in different levels of immunity and protection against challenge infection. Most effective was the regime of priming with DNA vaccine followed by boosting with the ORFV based vaccine. This regime resulted in strong antibody responses, comparable to the antibody responses obtained after prime-boost vaccination with a conventional MLV vaccine. Also with regard to protection, the prime DNA-boost ORFV regime performed better than the other prime-boost regimes. This study demonstrates the potential of a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy against PRV based on a single antigen, and that in the natural host, the pig.

  17. Series Connected Buck-Boost Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A Series Connected Buck-Boost Regulator (SCBBR) that switches only a fraction of the input power, resulting in relatively high efficiencies. The SCBBR has multiple operating modes including a buck, a boost, and a current limiting mode, so that an output voltage of the SCBBR ranges from below the source voltage to above the source voltage.

  18. Boost-phase discrimination research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Feiereisen, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The final report describes the combined work of the Computational Chemistry and Aerothermodynamics branches within the Thermosciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center directed at understanding the signatures of shock-heated air. Considerable progress was made in determining accurate transition probabilities for the important band systems of NO that account for much of the emission in the ultraviolet region. Research carried out under this project showed that in order to reproduce the observed radiation from the bow shock region of missiles in their boost phase it is necessary to include the Burnett terms in the constituent equation, account for the non-Boltzmann energy distribution, correctly model the NO formation and rotational excitation process, and use accurate transition probabilities for the NO band systems. This work resulted in significant improvements in the computer code NEQAIR that models both the radiation and fluid dynamics in the shock region.

  19. Boosted KZ and LLL Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Shanxiang; Ling, Cong

    2017-09-01

    There exists two issues among popular lattice reduction (LR) algorithms that should cause our concern. The first one is Korkine Zolotarev (KZ) and Lenstra Lenstra Lovasz (LLL) algorithms may increase the lengths of basis vectors. The other is KZ reduction suffers much worse performance than Minkowski reduction in terms of providing short basis vectors, despite its superior theoretical upper bounds. To address these limitations, we improve the size reduction steps in KZ and LLL to set up two new efficient algorithms, referred to as boosted KZ and LLL, for solving the shortest basis problem (SBP) with exponential and polynomial complexity, respectively. Both of them offer better actual performance than their classic counterparts, and the performance bounds for KZ are also improved. We apply them to designing integer-forcing (IF) linear receivers for multi-input multi-output (MIMO) communications. Our simulations confirm their rate and complexity advantages.

  20. Boosting human learning by hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Dezso; Janacsek, Karolina; Polner, Bertalan; Kovacs, Zoltan Ambrus

    2013-04-01

    Human learning and memory depend on multiple cognitive systems related to dissociable brain structures. These systems interact not only in cooperative but also sometimes competitive ways in optimizing performance. Previous studies showed that manipulations reducing the engagement of frontal lobe-mediated explicit attentional processes could lead to improved performance in striatum-related procedural learning. In our study, hypnosis was used as a tool to reduce the competition between these 2 systems. We compared learning in hypnosis and in the alert state and found that hypnosis boosted striatum-dependent sequence learning. Since frontal lobe-dependent processes are primarily affected by hypnosis, this finding could be attributed to the disruption of the explicit attentional processes. Our result sheds light not only on the competitive nature of brain systems in cognitive processes but also could have important implications for training and rehabilitation programs, especially for developing new methods to improve human learning and memory performance.

  1. Speeding up Boosting decision trees training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chao; Wei, Zhenzhong

    2015-10-01

    To overcome the drawback that Boosting decision trees perform fast speed in the test time while the training process is relatively too slow to meet the requirements of applications with real-time learning, we propose a fast decision trees training method by pruning those noneffective features in advance. And basing on this method, we also design a fast Boosting decision trees training algorithm. Firstly, we analyze the structure of each decision trees node, and prove that the classification error of each node has a bound through derivation. Then, by using the error boundary to prune non-effective features in the early stage, we greatly accelerate the decision tree training process, and would not affect the training results at all. Finally, the decision tree accelerated training method is integrated into the general Boosting process forming a fast boosting decision trees training algorithm. This algorithm is not a new variant of Boosting, on the contrary, it should be used in conjunction with existing Boosting algorithms to achieve more training acceleration. To test the algorithm's speedup performance and performance combined with other accelerated algorithms, the original AdaBoost and two typical acceleration algorithms LazyBoost and StochasticBoost were respectively used in conjunction with this algorithm into three fast versions, and their classification performance was tested by using the Lsis face database which contained 12788 images. Experimental results reveal that this fast algorithm can achieve more than double training speedup without affecting the results of the trained classifier, and can be combined with other acceleration algorithms. Key words: Boosting algorithm, decision trees, classifier training, preliminary classification error, face detection

  2. Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self-Esteem

    MedlinePlus

    ... desktop! more... Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Article Chapters Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem print full article print this chapter email this ...

  3. Riemann curvature of a boosted spacetime geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero; Scudellaro, Paolo; Tramontano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    The ultrarelativistic boosting procedure had been applied in the literature to map the metric of Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime into a metric describing de Sitter spacetime plus a shock-wave singularity located on a null hypersurface. This paper evaluates the Riemann curvature tensor of the boosted Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric by means of numerical calculations, which make it possible to reach the ultrarelativistic regime gradually by letting the boost velocity approach the speed of light. Thus, for the first time in the literature, the singular limit of curvature, through Dirac’s δ distribution and its derivatives, is numerically evaluated for this class of spacetimes. Moreover, the analysis of the Kretschmann invariant and the geodesic equation shows that the spacetime possesses a “scalar curvature singularity” within a 3-sphere and it is possible to define what we here call “boosted horizon”, a sort of elastic wall where all particles are surprisingly pushed away, as numerical analysis demonstrates. This seems to suggest that such “boosted geometries” are ruled by a sort of “antigravity effect” since all geodesics seem to refuse to enter the “boosted horizon” and are “reflected” by it, even though their initial conditions are aimed at driving the particles toward the “boosted horizon” itself. Eventually, the equivalence with the coordinate shift method is invoked in order to demonstrate that all δ2 terms appearing in the Riemann curvature tensor give vanishing contribution in distributional sense.

  4. Boosting Wigner's nj-symbols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziale, Simone

    2017-03-01

    We study the SL (2 ,ℂ ) Clebsch-Gordan coefficients appearing in the Lorentzian EPRL spin foam amplitudes for loop quantum gravity. We show how the amplitudes decompose into SU(2) nj- symbols at the vertices and integrals over boosts at the edges. The integrals define edge amplitudes that can be evaluated analytically using and adapting results in the literature, leading to a pure state sum model formulation. This procedure introduces virtual representations which, in a manner reminiscent of virtual momenta in Feynman amplitudes, are off-shell of the simplicity constraints present in the theory, but with the integrands that peak at the on-shell values. We point out some properties of the edge amplitudes which are helpful for numerical and analytical evaluations of spin foam amplitudes, and suggest among other things a simpler model useful for calculations of certain lowest order amplitudes. As an application, we estimate the large spin scaling behaviour of the simpler model, on a closed foam with all 4-valent edges and Euler characteristic χ , to be Nχ -5 E +V /2. The paper contains a review and an extension of the results on SL (2 ,ℂ ) Clebsch-Gordan coefficients among unitary representations of the principal series that can be useful beyond their application to quantum gravity considered here.

  5. Boosting for detection of gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Pashova, H; LeBlanc, M; Kooperberg, C

    2013-01-30

    In genetic association studies, it is typically thought that genetic variants and environmental variables jointly will explain more of the inheritance of a phenotype than either of these two components separately. Traditional methods to identify gene-environment interactions typically consider only one measured environmental variable at a time. However, in practice, multiple environmental factors may each be imprecise surrogates for the underlying physiological process that actually interacts with the genetic factors. In this paper, we develop a variant of L(2) boosting that is specifically designed to identify combinations of environmental variables that jointly modify the effect of a gene on a phenotype. Because the effect modifiers might have a small signal compared with the main effects, working in a space that is orthogonal to the main predictors allows us to focus on the interaction space. In a simulation study that investigates some plausible underlying model assumptions, our method outperforms the least absolute shrinkage and selection and Akaike Information Criterion and Bayesian Information Criterion model selection procedures as having the lowest test error. In an example for the Women's Health Initiative-Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology study, the dedicated boosting method was able to pick out two single-nucleotide polymorphisms for which effect modification appears present. The performance was evaluated on an independent test set, and the results are promising. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Boosting for detection of gene-environment interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pashova, H.; LeBlanc, M.; Kooperberg, C.

    2013-01-01

    In genetic association studies, it is typically thought that genetic variants and environmental variables jointly will explain more of the inheritance of a phenotype than either of these two components separately. Traditional methods to identify gene-environment interactions typically consider only one measured environmental variable at a time. However, in practice, multiple environmental factors may each be imprecise surrogates for the underlying physiological process that actually interacts with the genetic factors. In this paper we develop a variant of L2 boosting that is specifically designed to identify combinations of environmental variables that jointly modify the effect of a gene on a phenotype. Because the effect modifiers might have a small signal compared to the main effects, working in a space that is orthogonal to the main predictors allows us to focus on the interaction space. In a simulation study that investigates some plausible underlying model assumptions our method outperforms the lasso, and AIC and BIC model selection procedures as having the lowest test error. In an example for the WHI-PAGE study, the dedicated boosting method was able to pick out two single nucleotide polymorphisms for which effect modification appears present. The performance was evaluated on an independent test set and the results are promising. PMID:22764060

  7. Nonlinear program based optimization of boost and buck-boost converter designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, S.; Lee, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    The facility of an Augmented Lagrangian (ALAG) multiplier based nonlinear programming technique is demonstrated for minimum-weight design optimizations of boost and buck-boost power converters. Certain important features of ALAG are presented in the framework of a comprehensive design example for buck-boost power converter design optimization. The study provides refreshing design insight of power converters and presents such information as weight and loss profiles of various semiconductor components and magnetics as a function of the switching frequency.

  8. Nonlinear program based optimization of boost and buck-boost converter designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, S.; Lee, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    The facility of an Augmented Lagrangian (ALAG) multiplier based nonlinear programming technique is demonstrated for minimum-weight design optimizations of boost and buck-boost power converters. Certain important features of ALAG are presented in the framework of a comprehensive design example for buck-boost power converter design optimization. The study provides refreshing design insight of power converters and presents such information as weight and loss profiles of various semiconductor components and magnetics as a function of the switching frequency.

  9. Boosting Manufacturing through Modular Chemical Process Intensification

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2017-01-06

    Manufacturing USA's Rapid Advancement in Process Intensification Deployment Institute will focus on developing breakthrough technologies to boost domestic energy productivity and energy efficiency by 20 percent in five years through manufacturing processes.

  10. Boosting Manufacturing through Modular Chemical Process Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    2016-12-09

    Manufacturing USA's Rapid Advancement in Process Intensification Deployment Institute will focus on developing breakthrough technologies to boost domestic energy productivity and energy efficiency by 20 percent in five years through manufacturing processes.

  11. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilets, L.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  12. Relativistic projection and boost of solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilets, L.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics on the relativistic projection and boost of solitons: The center of mass problem; momentum eigenstates; variation after projection; and the nucleon as a composite. (LSP).

  13. Centaur liquid oxygen boost pump vibration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Centaur LOX boost pump was subjected to both the simulated Titan Centaur proof flight and confidence demonstration vibration test levels. For each test level, both sinusoidal and random vibration tests were conducted along each of the three orthogonal axes of the pump and turbine assembly. In addition to these tests, low frequency longitudinal vibration tests for both levels were conducted. All tests were successfully completed without damage to the boost pump.

  14. Boosted Jets at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Jets are collimated streams of high-energy particles ubiquitous at any particle collider experiment and serve as proxy for the production of elementary particles at short distances. As the Large Hadron Collider at CERN continues to extend its reach to ever higher energies and luminosities, an increasingly important aspect of any particle physics analysis is the study and identification of jets, electroweak bosons, and top quarks with large Lorentz boosts. In addition to providing a unique insight into potential new physics at the tera-electron volt energy scale, high energy jets are a sensitive probe of emergent phenomena within the Standard Model of particle physics and can teach us an enormous amount about quantum chromodynamics itself. Jet physics is also invaluable for lower-level experimental issues including triggering and background reduction. It is especially important for the removal of pile-up, which is radiation produced by secondary proton collisions that contaminates every hard proton collision event in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. In this talk, I will review the myriad ways that jets and jet physics are being exploited at the Large Hadron Collider. This will include a historical discussion of jet algorithms and the requirements that these algorithms must satisfy to be well-defined theoretical objects. I will review how jets are used in searches for new physics and ways in which the substructure of jets is being utilized for discriminating backgrounds from both Standard Model and potential new physics signals. Finally, I will discuss how jets are broadening our knowledge of quantum chromodynamics and how particular measurements performed on jets manifest the universal dynamics of weakly-coupled conformal field theories.

  15. Gene expression suggests double-segmental and single-segmental patterning mechanisms during posterior segment addition in the beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    In the model arthropod Drosophila, all segments are patterned simultaneously in the blastoderm. In most other arthropods, however, posterior segments are added sequentially from a posterior segment addition zone. Posterior addition of single segments likely represents the ancestral mode of arthropod segmentation, although in Drosophila, segments are patterned in pairs by the pair-rule genes. It has been shown that in the new model insect, the beetle Tribolium, a segmentation clock operates that apparently patterns all segments in pairs as well. Here, I report on the expression of the segment polarity gene H15/midline in Tribolium. In the anterior embryo, segmental stripes of H15 appear in pairs, but in the posterior of the embryo stripes appear in a single-segmental periodicity. This implies that either two completely different segmentation-mechanisms may act in the germ band of Tribolium, that the segmentation clock changes its periodicity during development, or that the speed in which posterior segments are patterned changes. In any case, the data suggest the presence of another (or modified), yet undiscovered, mechanism of posterior segment addition in one of the best-understood arthropod models. The finding of a hitherto unrecognized segmentation mechanism in Tribolium may have major implications for the understanding of the origin of segmentation mechanisms, including the origin of pair rule patterning. It also calls for (re)-investigation of posterior segment addition in Tribolium and other previously studied arthropod models.

  16. Heterologous Prime-Boost HIV-1 Vaccination Regimens in Pre-Clinical and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Scott A.; Surman, Sherri L.; Sealy, Robert; Jones, Bart G.; Slobod, Karen S.; Branum, Kristen; Lockey, Timothy D.; Howlett, Nanna; Freiden, Pamela; Flynn, Patricia; Hurwitz, Julia L.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there are more than 30 million people infected with HIV-1 and thousands more are infected each day. Vaccination is the single most effective mechanism for prevention of viral disease, and after more than 25 years of research, one vaccine has shown somewhat encouraging results in an advanced clinical efficacy trial. A modified intent-to-treat analysis of trial results showed that infection was approximately 30% lower in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group. The vaccine was administered using a heterologous prime-boost regimen in which both target antigens and delivery vehicles were changed during the course of inoculations. Here we examine the complexity of heterologous prime-boost immunizations. We show that the use of different delivery vehicles in prime and boost inoculations can help to avert the inhibitory effects caused by vector-specific immune responses. We also show that the introduction of new antigens into boost inoculations can be advantageous, demonstrating that the effect of ‘original antigenic sin’ is not absolute. Pre-clinical and clinical studies are reviewed, including our own work with a three-vector vaccination regimen using recombinant DNA, virus (Sendai virus or vaccinia virus) and protein. Promising preliminary results suggest that the heterologous prime-boost strategy may possibly provide a foundation for the future prevention of HIV-1 infections in humans. PMID:20407589

  17. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  18. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directly employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.

  19. Tracking down hyper-boosted top quarks

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele

    2015-06-05

    The identification of hadronically decaying heavy states, such as vector bosons, the Higgs, or the top quark, produced with large transverse boosts has been and will continue to be a central focus of the jet physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At a future hadron collider working at an order-of-magnitude larger energy than the LHC, these heavy states would be easily produced with transverse boosts of several TeV. At these energies, their decay products will be separated by angular scales comparable to individual calorimeter cells, making the current jet substructure identification techniques for hadronic decay modes not directlymore » employable. In addition, at the high energy and luminosity projected at a future hadron collider, there will be numerous sources for contamination including initial- and final-state radiation, underlying event, or pile-up which must be mitigated. We propose a simple strategy to tag such "hyper-boosted" objects that defines jets with radii that scale inversely proportional to their transverse boost and combines the standard calorimetric information with charged track-based observables. By means of a fast detector simulation, we apply it to top quark identification and demonstrate that our method efficiently discriminates hadronically decaying top quarks from light QCD jets up to transverse boosts of 20 TeV. Lastly, our results open the way to tagging heavy objects with energies in the multi-TeV range at present and future hadron colliders.« less

  20. Centrifugal compressor design for electrically assisted boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Yang, M.; Martinez-Botas, R. F.; Zhuge, W. L.; Qureshi, U.; Richards, B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrically assisted boost is a prominent method to solve the issues of transient lag in turbocharger and remains an optimized operation condition for a compressor due to decoupling from turbine. Usually a centrifugal compressor for gasoline engine boosting is operated at high rotational speed which is beyond the ability of an electric motor in market. In this paper a centrifugal compressor with rotational speed as 120k RPM and pressure ratio as 2.0 is specially developed for electrically assisted boost. A centrifugal compressor including the impeller, vaneless diffuser and the volute is designed by meanline method followed by 3D detailed design. Then CFD method is employed to predict as well as analyse the performance of the design compressor. The results show that the pressure ratio and efficiency at design point is 2.07 and 78% specifically.

  1. Boost breaking in the EFT of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacrétaz, Luca V.; Noumi, Toshifumi; Senatore, Leonardo

    2017-02-01

    If time-translations are spontaneously broken, so are boosts. This symmetry breaking pattern can be non-linearly realized by either just the Goldstone boson of time translations, or by four Goldstone bosons associated with time translations and boosts. In this paper we extend the Effective Field Theory of Multifield Inflation to consider the case in which the additional Goldstone bosons associated with boosts are light and coupled to the Goldstone boson of time translations. The symmetry breaking pattern forces a coupling to curvature so that the mass of the additional Goldstone bosons is predicted to be equal to √2H in the vast majority of the parameter space where they are light. This pattern therefore offers a natural way of generating self-interacting particles with Hubble mass during inflation. After constructing the general effective Lagrangian, we study how these particles mix and interact with the curvature fluctuations, generating potentially detectable non-Gaussian signals.

  2. Behavior of Werner states under relativistic boosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palge, Veiko; Dunningham, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    We study the structure of maps that Lorentz boosts induce on the spin degree of freedom of a system consisting of two massive spin- 1 / 2 particles. We consider the case where the spin state is described by the Werner state and the momenta are discrete. Transformations on the spins are systematically investigated in various boost scenarios by calculating the orbit and concurrence of the bipartite spin state with different kinds of product and entangled momenta. We confirm the general conclusion that Lorentz boosts cause non-trivial behavior of bipartite spin entanglement. Visualization of the evolution of the spin state is shown to be valuable in explaining the pattern of concurrence. The idealized model provides a basis of explanation in terms of which phenomena in systems involving continuous momenta can be understood.

  3. A TEG Efficiency Booster with Buck-Boost Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongfei; Sun, Kai; Zhang, Junjun; Xing, Yan

    2013-07-01

    A thermoelectric generator (TEG) efficiency booster with buck-boost conversion and power management is proposed as a TEG battery power conditioner suitable for a wide TEG output voltage range. An inverse-coupled inductor is employed in the buck-boost converter, which is used to achieve smooth current with low ripple on both the TEG and battery sides. Furthermore, benefiting from the magnetic flux counteraction of the two windings on the coupled inductor, the core size and power losses of the filter inductor are reduced, which can achieve both high efficiency and high power density. A power management strategy is proposed for this power conditioning system, which involves maximum power point tracking (MPPT), battery voltage control, and battery current control. A control method is employed to ensure smooth switching among different working modes. A modified MPPT control algorithm with improved dynamic and steady-state characteristics is presented and applied to the TEG battery power conditioning system to maximize energy harvesting. A 500-W prototype has been built, and experimental tests carried out on it. The power efficiency of the prototype at full load is higher than 96%, and peak efficiency of 99% is attained.

  4. Boosted food web productivity through ocean acidification collapses under warming.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Silvan U; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Ferreira, Camilo M; Ullah, Hadayet; Connell, Sean D

    2017-10-01

    Future climate is forecast to drive bottom-up (resource driven) and top-down (consumer driven) change to food web dynamics and community structure. Yet, our predictive understanding of these changes is hampered by an over-reliance on simplified laboratory systems centred on single trophic levels. Using a large mesocosm experiment, we reveal how future ocean acidification and warming modify trophic linkages across a three-level food web: that is, primary (algae), secondary (herbivorous invertebrates) and tertiary (predatory fish) producers. Both elevated CO2 and elevated temperature boosted primary production. Under elevated CO2 , the enhanced bottom-up forcing propagated through all trophic levels. Elevated temperature, however, negated the benefits of elevated CO2 by stalling secondary production. This imbalance caused secondary producer populations to decline as elevated temperature drove predators to consume their prey more rapidly in the face of higher metabolic demand. Our findings demonstrate how anthropogenic CO2 can function as a resource that boosts productivity throughout food webs, and how warming can reverse this effect by acting as a stressor to trophic interactions. Understanding the shifting balance between the propagation of resource enrichment and its consumption across trophic levels provides a predictive understanding of future dynamics of stability and collapse in food webs and fisheries production. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Boosting Access to Government Rocket Science

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    September–October 2014 8 with MSFC, through an SAA signed in 2012, using Marshall’s expertise and resources to perform wind tunnel testing on various...Defense AT&L: September–October 2014 6 Boosting Access to Government Rocket Science John F. Rice Defense AT&L: September–October 2014 6 Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Boosting Access to Government Rocket Science 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  6. A Monovalent Chimpanzee Adenovirus Ebola Vaccine Boosted with MVA.

    PubMed

    Ewer, Katie; Rampling, Tommy; Venkatraman, Navin; Bowyer, Georgina; Wright, Danny; Lambe, Teresa; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Payne, Ruth; Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Strecker, Thomas; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Krähling, Verena; Tully, Claire M; Edwards, Nick J; Bentley, Emma M; Samuel, Dhanraj; Labbé, Geneviève; Jin, Jing; Gibani, Malick; Minhinnick, Alice; Wilkie, Morven; Poulton, Ian; Lella, Natalie; Roberts, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Bliss, Carly; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Powlson, Jonathan; Berrie, Eleanor; Tedder, Richard; Roman, Francois; De Ryck, Iris; Nicosia, Alfredo; Sullivan, Nancy J; Stanley, Daphne A; Mbaya, Olivier T; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Schwartz, Richard M; Siani, Loredana; Colloca, Stefano; Folgori, Antonella; Di Marco, Stefania; Cortese, Riccardo; Wright, Edward; Becker, Stephan; Graham, Barney S; Koup, Richard A; Levine, Myron M; Volkmann, Ariane; Chaplin, Paul; Pollard, Andrew J; Draper, Simon J; Ballou, W Ripley; Lawrie, Alison; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2016-04-28

    The West African outbreak of Ebola virus disease that peaked in 2014 has caused more than 11,000 deaths. The development of an effective Ebola vaccine is a priority for control of a future outbreak. In this phase 1 study, we administered a single dose of the chimpanzee adenovirus 3 (ChAd3) vaccine encoding the surface glycoprotein of Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) to 60 healthy adult volunteers in Oxford, United Kingdom. The vaccine was administered in three dose levels--1×10(10) viral particles, 2.5×10(10) viral particles, and 5×10(10) viral particles--with 20 participants in each group. We then assessed the effect of adding a booster dose of a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) strain, encoding the same Ebola virus glycoprotein, in 30 of the 60 participants and evaluated a reduced prime-boost interval in another 16 participants. We also compared antibody responses to inactivated whole Ebola virus virions and neutralizing antibody activity with those observed in phase 1 studies of a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccine expressing a ZEBOV glycoprotein (rVSV-ZEBOV) to determine relative potency and assess durability. No safety concerns were identified at any of the dose levels studied. Four weeks after immunization with the ChAd3 vaccine, ZEBOV-specific antibody responses were similar to those induced by rVSV-ZEBOV vaccination, with a geometric mean titer of 752 and 921, respectively. ZEBOV neutralization activity was also similar with the two vaccines (geometric mean titer, 14.9 and 22.2, respectively). Boosting with the MVA vector increased virus-specific antibodies by a factor of 12 (geometric mean titer, 9007) and increased glycoprotein-specific CD8+ T cells by a factor of 5. Significant increases in neutralizing antibodies were seen after boosting in all 30 participants (geometric mean titer, 139; P<0.001). Virus-specific antibody responses in participants primed with ChAd3 remained positive 6 months after vaccination (geometric mean titer, 758) but

  7. Heterologous Packaging Signals on Segment 4, but Not Segment 6 or Segment 8, Limit Influenza A Virus Reassortment.

    PubMed

    White, Maria C; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C

    2017-06-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) RNA packaging signals serve to direct the incorporation of IAV gene segments into virus particles, and this process is thought to be mediated by segment-segment interactions. These packaging signals are segment and strain specific, and as such, they have the potential to impact reassortment outcomes between different IAV strains. Our study aimed to quantify the impact of packaging signal mismatch on IAV reassortment using the human seasonal influenza A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2) and pandemic influenza A/Netherlands/602/2009 (H1N1) viruses. Focusing on the three most divergent segments, we constructed pairs of viruses that encoded identical proteins but differed in the packaging signal regions on a single segment. We then evaluated the frequency with which segments carrying homologous versus heterologous packaging signals were incorporated into reassortant progeny viruses. We found that, when segment 4 (HA) of coinfecting parental viruses was modified, there was a significant preference for the segment containing matched packaging signals relative to the background of the virus. This preference was apparent even when the homologous HA constituted a minority of the HA segment population available in the cell for packaging. Conversely, when segment 6 (NA) or segment 8 (NS) carried modified packaging signals, there was no significant preference for homologous packaging signals. These data suggest that movement of NA and NS segments between the human H3N2 and H1N1 lineages is unlikely to be restricted by packaging signal mismatch, while movement of the HA segment would be more constrained. Our results indicate that the importance of packaging signals in IAV reassortment is segment dependent.IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses (IAVs) can exchange genes through reassortment. This process contributes to both the highly diverse population of IAVs found in nature and the formation of novel epidemic and pandemic IAV strains. Our study sought to determine the

  8. Livewire based single still image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Rong; Liu, Xiaomao; Yue, Hao; Zhu, Hao; Tian, Dandan; Chen, Shu; Li, Yiquan; Tian, Jinwen

    2011-11-01

    In the application of the video contactless measurement, the quality of the image taken from underwater is not very well. It is well known that automatic image segmental method cannot provide acceptable segmentation result with low quality single still image. Snake algorithm can provide better result in this case with the aiding of human. However, sometimes the segmental result of Snake may far from the initial segmental contour drawn by user. Livewire algorithm can keep the location of the seed points that user selected nailed from the beginning to the end. But the contour may have burrs when the image's noise is quite high and the contrast is low. In this paper, we modified the cost function of Livewire algorithm and proposed a new segmentation method that can be used for single still image segmentation with high noise and low contrast.

  9. The Attentional Boost Effect with Verbal Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Spataro, Pietro; Picklesimer, Milton

    2014-01-01

    Study stimuli presented at the same time as unrelated targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli presented with distractors. This attentional boost effect (ABE) has been found with pictorial (Swallow & Jiang, 2010) and more recently verbal materials (Spataro, Mulligan, & Rossi-Arnaud, 2013). The present experiments…

  10. Cleanouts boost Devonian shale gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-04

    Cleaning shale debris from the well bores is an effective way to boost flow rates from old open hole Devonian shale gas wells, research on six West Virginia wells begun in 1985 has shown. Officials involved with the study say the Appalachian basin could see 20 year recoverable gas reserves hiked by 315 bcf if the process is used on a wide scale.

  11. Schools Enlisting Defense Industry to Boost STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Defense contractors Northrop Grumman Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. are joining forces in an innovative partnership to develop high-tech simulations to boost STEM--or science, technology, engineering, and mathematics--education in the Baltimore County schools. The Baltimore County partnership includes the local operations of two major military…

  12. Energy Boost. Q & A with Steve Kiesner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Jay W.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with the director of national accounts for the Edison Electric Institute in Washington, DC about the association, its booklet on energy conservation within education facilities, and ways in which educational facilities can reduce costs by boosting energy conservation. (EV)

  13. The Attentional Boost Effect and Context Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Smith, S. Adam; Spataro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli co-occurring with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli co-occurring with distractors--the attentional boost effect (ABE). The ABE is of interest because it is an exception to the usual finding that divided attention during encoding impairs memory. The effect has been demonstrated in tests of item memory but it is…

  14. Niacin to Boost Your HDL "Good" Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    Niacin can boost 'good' cholesterol Niacin is a B vitamin that may raise your HDL ("good") cholesterol. But side effects might outweigh benefits for most ... been used to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol — the "good" cholesterol that helps remove low-density ...

  15. The Attentional Boost Effect with Verbal Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Spataro, Pietro; Picklesimer, Milton

    2014-01-01

    Study stimuli presented at the same time as unrelated targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli presented with distractors. This attentional boost effect (ABE) has been found with pictorial (Swallow & Jiang, 2010) and more recently verbal materials (Spataro, Mulligan, & Rossi-Arnaud, 2013). The present experiments…

  16. Boosting fire drill participation in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Prosper, Darryl

    2015-01-01

    In a health system with over 100 sites in a geographically dispersed region, boosting fire drill participation to meet government requirements, according to the author, is a constant effort, both to achieve and to maintain. In this article, he describes a comprehensive approach that entails engagement of executive, site committees and local fire authorities, as well as comprehensive training and awareness campaigns.

  17. The Attentional Boost Effect and Context Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Smith, S. Adam; Spataro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli co-occurring with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli co-occurring with distractors--the attentional boost effect (ABE). The ABE is of interest because it is an exception to the usual finding that divided attention during encoding impairs memory. The effect has been demonstrated in tests of item memory but it is…

  18. Concomitant GRID boost for Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lijun; Kwok, Young; Chin, Lawrence S.; Simard, J. Marc; Regine, William F.

    2005-11-15

    We developed an integrated GRID boost technique for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The technique generates an array of high dose spots within the target volume via a grid of 4-mm shots. These high dose areas were placed over a conventional Gamma Knife plan where a peripheral dose covers the full target volume. The beam weights of the 4-mm shots were optimized iteratively to maximize the integral dose inside the target volume. To investigate the target volume coverage and the dose to the adjacent normal brain tissue for the technique, we compared the GRID boosted treatment plans with conventional Gamma Knife treatment plans using physical and biological indices such as dose-volume histogram (DVH), DVH-derived indices, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probabilities (TCP), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). We found significant increase in the target volume indices such as mean dose (5%-34%; average 14%), TCP (4%-45%; average 21%), and EUD (2%-22%; average 11%) for the GRID boost technique. No significant change in the peripheral dose coverage for the target volume was found per RTOG protocol. In addition, the EUD and the NTCP for the normal brain adjacent to the target (i.e., the near region) were decreased for the GRID boost technique. In conclusion, we demonstrated a new technique for Gamma Knife radiosurgery that can escalate the dose to the target while sparing the adjacent normal brain tissue.

  19. Schools Enlisting Defense Industry to Boost STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Defense contractors Northrop Grumman Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. are joining forces in an innovative partnership to develop high-tech simulations to boost STEM--or science, technology, engineering, and mathematics--education in the Baltimore County schools. The Baltimore County partnership includes the local operations of two major military…

  20. Extending statistical boosting. An overview of recent methodological developments.

    PubMed

    Mayr, A; Binder, H; Gefeller, O; Schmid, M

    2014-01-01

    Boosting algorithms to simultaneously estimate and select predictor effects in statistical models have gained substantial interest during the last decade. This review highlights recent methodological developments regarding boosting algorithms for statistical modelling especially focusing on topics relevant for biomedical research. We suggest a unified framework for gradient boosting and likelihood-based boosting (statistical boosting) which have been addressed separately in the literature up to now. The methodological developments on statistical boosting during the last ten years can be grouped into three different lines of research: i) efforts to ensure variable selection leading to sparser models, ii) developments regarding different types of predictor effects and how to choose them, iii) approaches to extend the statistical boosting framework to new regression settings. Statistical boosting algorithms have been adapted to carry out unbiased variable selection and automated model choice during the fitting process and can nowadays be applied in almost any regression setting in combination with a large amount of different types of predictor effects.

  1. Mediterranean Diet Plus Olive Oil a Boost to Heart Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163557.html Mediterranean Diet Plus Olive Oil a Boost to Heart Health? It enhances ... HealthDay News) -- A Mediterranean diet high in virgin olive oil may boost the protective effects of "good" ...

  2. Segmentation and segment connection of obstructed colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved, Mario; Truyen, Roel; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2004-05-01

    Segmentation of colon CT images is the main factor that inhibits automation of virtual colonoscopy. There are two main reasons that make efficient colon segmentation difficult. First, besides the colon, the small bowel, lungs, and stomach are also gas-filled organs in the abdomen. Second, peristalsis or residual feces often obstruct the colon, so that it consists of multiple gas-filled segments. In virtual colonoscopy, it is very useful to automatically connect the centerlines of these segments into a single colon centerline. Unfortunately, in some cases this is a difficult task. In this study a novel method for automated colon segmentation and connection of colon segments' centerlines is proposed. The method successfully combines features of segments, such as centerline and thickness, with information on main colon segments. The results on twenty colon cases show that the method performs well in cases of small obstructions of the colon. Larger obstructions are mostly also resolved properly, especially if they do not appear in the sigmoid part of the colon. Obstructions in the sigmoid part of the colon sometimes cause improper classification of the small bowel segments. If a segment is too small, it is classified as the small bowel segment. However, such misclassifications have little impact on colon analysis.

  3. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunisation of Chinese cynomolgus macaques using DNA and recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing HIV-1 virus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is renewed interest in the development of poxvirus vector-based HIV vaccines due to the protective effect observed with repeated recombinant canarypox priming with gp120 boosting in the recent Thai placebo-controlled trial. This study sought to investigate whether a heterologous prime-boost-boost vaccine regimen in Chinese cynomolgus macaques with a DNA vaccine and recombinant poxviral vectors expressing HIV virus-like particles bearing envelopes derived from the most prevalent clades circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, focused the antibody response to shared neutralising epitopes. Methods Three Chinese cynomolgus macaques were immunised via intramuscular injections using a regimen composed of a prime with two DNA vaccines expressing clade A Env/clade B Gag followed by boosting with recombinant fowlpox virus expressing HIV-1 clade D Gag, Env and cholera toxin B subunit followed by the final boost with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing HIV-1 clade C Env, Gag and human complement protein C3d. We measured the macaque serum antibody responses by ELISA, enumerated T cell responses by IFN-γ ELISpot and assessed seroneutralisation of HIV-1 using the TZM-bl β-galactosidase assay with primary isolates of HIV-1. Results This study shows that large and complex synthetic DNA sequences can be successfully cloned in a single step into two poxvirus vectors: MVA and FPV and the recombinant poxviruses could be grown to high titres. The vaccine candidates showed appropriate expression of recombinant proteins with the formation of authentic HIV virus-like particles seen on transmission electron microscopy. In addition the b12 epitope was shown to be held in common by the vaccine candidates using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. The vaccine candidates were safely administered to Chinese cynomolgus macaques which elicited modest T cell responses at the end of the study but only one out of the three macaques elicited an HIV-specific antibody

  4. Anatomy packing with hierarchical segments: an algorithm for segmentation of pulmonary nodules in CT images.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Chi-Hsuan; Lor, Kuo-Lung; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2015-05-14

    This paper proposes a semantic segmentation algorithm that provides the spatial distribution patterns of pulmonary ground-glass nodules with solid portions in computed tomography (CT) images. The proposed segmentation algorithm, anatomy packing with hierarchical segments (APHS), performs pulmonary nodule segmentation and quantification in CT images. In particular, the APHS algorithm consists of two essential processes: hierarchical segmentation tree construction and anatomy packing. It constructs the hierarchical segmentation tree based on region attributes and local contour cues along the region boundaries. Each node of the tree corresponds to the soft boundary associated with a family of nested segmentations through different scales applied by a hierarchical segmentation operator that is used to decompose the image in a structurally coherent manner. The anatomy packing process detects and localizes individual object instances by optimizing a hierarchical conditional random field model. Ninety-two histopathologically confirmed pulmonary nodules were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed APHS algorithm. Further, a comparative study was conducted with two conventional multi-label image segmentation algorithms based on four assessment metrics: the modified Williams index, percentage statistic, overlapping ratio, and difference ratio. Under the same framework, the proposed APHS algorithm was applied to two clinical applications: multi-label segmentation of nodules with a solid portion and surrounding tissues and pulmonary nodule segmentation. The results obtained indicate that the APHS-generated boundaries are comparable to manual delineations with a modified Williams index of 1.013. Further, the resulting segmentation of the APHS algorithm is also better than that achieved by two conventional multi-label image segmentation algorithms. The proposed two-level hierarchical segmentation algorithm effectively labelled the pulmonary nodule and its surrounding

  5. Radiotherapy Boost for the Dominant Intraprostatic Cancer Lesion-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    von Eyben, Finn Edler; Kiljunen, Timo; Kangasmaki, Aki; Kairemo, Kalevi; von Eyben, Rie; Joensuu, Timo

    2016-06-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer can be performed with a high dose of 86 Gy; however, one-tenth or more of the patients will develop recurrence. Prostate cancer is mainly multifocal, but a dominant intraprostatic lesion (DIL) is often the site of local recurrence after EBRT. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify whether functional imaging might identify the DIL and whether a RT boost to the DIL might be increased to an ultrahigh dose level of ≥ 90 Gy without increased toxicity. Of 62 selected studies, 13 reported the size of the DIL. The mean of the median DIL volumes was 2.4 cm(3) (95% confidence interval, 0.9-4.4 cm(3)). Eighteen diagnostic studies with 1205 patients evaluated the diagnostic accuracy using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for intraprostatic cancer lesions. Evaluating 14,654 prostate segments, the diagnostic accuracy was 77%. Eleven therapeutic studies with 988 patients reported a RT boost for the DIL. The summary boost dose for the DIL was a mean of 89 Gy in 5 studies using intensity modulated RT (calculated as the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions) and a mean of 141 Gy in 4 studies using a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (P = .018, t test). In 1 therapeutic study, 239 patients had a 98% 10-year disease-free survival rate. Many of our therapeutic studies used a boost dose to the DIL of > 90 Gy. The reported boost for DIL is effective and safe.

  6. Hierarchical morphological segmentation for image sequence coding.

    PubMed

    Salembier, P; Pardas, M

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with a hierarchical morphological segmentation algorithm for image sequence coding. Mathematical morphology is very attractive for this purpose because it efficiently deals with geometrical features such as size, shape, contrast, or connectivity that can be considered as segmentation-oriented features. The algorithm follows a top-down procedure. It first takes into account the global information and produces a coarse segmentation, that is, with a small number of regions. Then, the segmentation quality is improved by introducing regions corresponding to more local information. The algorithm, considering sequences as being functions on a 3-D space, directly segments 3-D regions. A 3-D approach is used to get a segmentation that is stable in time and to directly solve the region correspondence problem. Each segmentation stage relies on four basic steps: simplification, marker extraction, decision, and quality estimation. The simplification removes information from the sequence to make it easier to segment. Morphological filters based on partial reconstruction are proven to be very efficient for this purpose, especially in the case of sequences. The marker extraction identifies the presence of homogeneous 3-D regions. It is based on constrained flat region labeling and morphological contrast extraction. The goal of the decision is to precisely locate the contours of regions detected by the marker extraction. This decision is performed by a modified watershed algorithm. Finally, the quality estimation concentrates on the coding residue, all the information about the 3-D regions that have not been properly segmented and therefore coded. The procedure allows the introduction of the texture and contour coding schemes within the segmentation algorithm. The coding residue is transmitted to the next segmentation stage to improve the segmentation and coding quality. Finally, segmentation and coding examples are presented to show the validity and interest of

  7. Factorization for substructures of boosted Higgs jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Joshua; Li, Hsiang-nan; Li, Zhao; Yuan, C.-P.

    2017-08-01

    We present a perturbative QCD factorization formula for substructures of an energetic Higgs jet, taking the energy profile resulting from the H → b b bar decay as an example. The formula is written as a convolution of a hard Higgs decay kernel with two b-quark jet functions and a soft function that links the colors of the two b quarks. We derive an analytical expression to approximate the energy profile within a boosted Higgs jet, which significantly differs from those of ordinary QCD jets. This formalism also extends to boosted W and Z bosons in their hadronic decay modes, allowing an easy and efficient discrimination of fat jets produced from different processes.

  8. Gradient Boosting for Conditional Random Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-23

    Information Processing Systems 26 ( NIPS ’13), pages 647–655. 2013. [4] J. Friedman. Greedy function approximation: a gradient boosting machine. Annals of...and phrases and their compositionality. In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26 ( NIPS ’13), pages 3111–3119. 2013. [15] A. Quattoni, M...Collins, and T. Darrell. Conditional random fields for object recognition. In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 17 ( NIPS ’04), pages

  9. Voltage-Boosting Driver For Switching Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trump, Ronald C.

    1990-01-01

    Driver circuit assures availability of 10- to 15-V gate-to-source voltage needed to turn on n-channel metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) acting as switch in switching voltage regulator. Includes voltage-boosting circuit efficiently providing gate voltage 10 to 15 V above supply voltage. Contains no exotic parts and does not require additional power supply. Consists of NAND gate and dual voltage booster operating in conjunction with pulse-width modulator part of regulator.

  10. Voltage-Boosting Driver For Switching Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trump, Ronald C.

    1990-01-01

    Driver circuit assures availability of 10- to 15-V gate-to-source voltage needed to turn on n-channel metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) acting as switch in switching voltage regulator. Includes voltage-boosting circuit efficiently providing gate voltage 10 to 15 V above supply voltage. Contains no exotic parts and does not require additional power supply. Consists of NAND gate and dual voltage booster operating in conjunction with pulse-width modulator part of regulator.

  11. Kill: boosting HIV-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Lydie

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that purging the latent HIV reservoir in virally suppressed individuals will require both the induction of viral replication from its latent state and the elimination of these reactivated HIV-infected cells ('Shock and Kill' strategy). Boosting potent HIV-specific CD8 T cells is a promising way to achieve an HIV cure. Recent studies provided the rationale for developing immune interventions to increase the numbers, function and location of HIV-specific CD8 T cells to purge HIV reservoirs. Multiple approaches are being evaluated including very early suppression of HIV replication in acute infection, adoptive cell transfer, therapeutic vaccination or use of immunomodulatory molecules. New assays to measure the killing and antiviral function of induced HIV-specific CD8 T cells have been developed to assess the efficacy of these new approaches. The strategies combining HIV reactivation and immunobased therapies to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells can be tested in in-vivo and in-silico models to accelerate the design of new clinical trials. New immunobased strategies are explored to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells able to purge the HIV-infected cells with the ultimate goal of achieving spontaneous control of viral replication without antiretroviral treatment.

  12. Boosted Random Ferns for Object Detection.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Michael; Andrade-Cetto, Juan; Sanfeliu, Alberto; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we introduce the Boosted Random Ferns (BRFs) to rapidly build discriminative classifiers for learning and detecting object categories. At the core of our approach we use standard random ferns, but we introduce four main innovations that let us bring ferns from an instance to a category level, and still retain efficiency. First, we define binary features on the histogram of oriented gradients-domain (as opposed to intensity-), allowing for a better representation of intra-class variability. Second, both the positions where ferns are evaluated within the sliding window, and the location of the binary features for each fern are not chosen completely at random, but instead we use a boosting strategy to pick the most discriminative combination of them. This is further enhanced by our third contribution, that is to adapt the boosting strategy to enable sharing of binary features among different ferns, yielding high recognition rates at a low computational cost. And finally, we show that training can be performed online, for sequentially arriving images. Overall, the resulting classifier can be very efficiently trained, densely evaluated for all image locations in about 0.1 seconds, and provides detection rates similar to competing approaches that require expensive and significantly slower processing times. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by thorough experimentation in publicly available datasets in which we compare against state-of-the-art, and for tasks of both 2D detection and 3D multi-view estimation.

  13. Boost breaking in the EFT of inflation

    DOE PAGES

    Delacrétaz, Luca V.; Noumi, Toshifumi; Senatore, Leonardo

    2017-02-17

    If time-translations are spontaneously broken, so are boosts. This symmetry breaking pattern can be non-linearly realized by either just the Goldstone boson of time translations, or by four Goldstone bosons associated with time translations and boosts. Here in this paper we extend the Effective Field Theory of Multifield Inflation to consider the case in which the additional Goldstone bosons associated with boosts are light and coupled to the Goldstone boson of time translations. The symmetry breaking pattern forces a coupling to curvature so that the mass of the additional Goldstone bosons is predicted to be equal to √2H in themore » vast majority of the parameter space where they are light. This pattern therefore offers a natural way of generating self-interacting particles with Hubble mass during inflation. After constructing the general effective Lagrangian, we study how these particles mix and interact with the curvature fluctuations, generating potentially detectable non-Gaussian signals.« less

  14. The reconstruction of jets, missing ET and boosted heavy particles with ATLAS in Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    The reconstruction of jets, missing ET and boosted heavy particles decaying hadronically has proved to be of extreme importance in Run 1 of the LHC, and has great potential to uncover new physics with Run 2 data. The excellent ATLAS detector capabilities, in particular its high-resolution longitudinally segmented calorimeter and inner detector, have enabled the development of complex clustering and calibration algorithms for the reconstruction of such quantities. In this talk the performance of the tools determined using Run 2 data are presented.

  15. Temporally consistent segmentation of point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Jason L.; Osteen, Philip R.; Daniilidis, Kostas

    2014-06-01

    We consider the problem of generating temporally consistent point cloud segmentations from streaming RGB-D data, where every incoming frame extends existing labels to new points or contributes new labels while maintaining the labels for pre-existing segments. Our approach generates an over-segmentation based on voxel cloud connectivity, where a modified k-means algorithm selects supervoxel seeds and associates similar neighboring voxels to form segments. Given the data stream from a potentially mobile sensor, we solve for the camera transformation between consecutive frames using a joint optimization over point correspondences and image appearance. The aligned point cloud may then be integrated into a consistent model coordinate frame. Previously labeled points are used to mask incoming points from the new frame, while new and previous boundary points extend the existing segmentation. We evaluate the algorithm on newly-generated RGB-D datasets.

  16. Improving semi-automated segmentation by integrating learning with active sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Jing; Okada, Kazunori; Brown, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Interactive segmentation algorithms such as GrowCut usually require quite a few user interactions to perform well, and have poor repeatability. In this study, we developed a novel technique to boost the performance of the interactive segmentation method GrowCut involving: 1) a novel "focused sampling" approach for supervised learning, as opposed to conventional random sampling; 2) boosting GrowCut using the machine learned results. We applied the proposed technique to the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) brain tumor segmentation, and evaluated on a dataset of ten cases from a multiple center pharmaceutical drug trial. The results showed that the proposed system has the potential to reduce user interaction while maintaining similar segmentation accuracy.

  17. Boosting capacitive blue-energy and desalination devices with waste heat.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Mathijs; Härtel, Andreas; van Roij, René

    2014-12-31

    We show that sustainably harvesting "blue" energy from the spontaneous mixing process of fresh and salty water can be boosted by varying the water temperature during a capacitive mixing process. Our modified Poisson-Boltzmann calculations predict a strong temperature dependence of the electrostatic potential of a charged electrode in contact with an adjacent aqueous 1:1 electrolyte. We propose to exploit this dependence to boost the efficiency of capacitive blue engines, which are based on cyclically charging and discharging nanoporous supercapacitors immersed in salty and fresh water, respectively [D. Brogioli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 058501 (2009)]. We show that the energy output of blue engines can be increased by a factor of order 2 if warm (waste-heated) fresh water is mixed with cold sea water. Moreover, the underlying physics can also be used to optimize the reverse process of capacitive desalination of water.

  18. Design and real time implementation of single phase boost power factor correction converter.

    PubMed

    Bouafassa, Amar; Rahmani, Lazhar; Mekhilef, Saad

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a real time implementation of the single-phase power factor correction (PFC) AC-DC boost converter. A combination of higher order sliding mode controller based on super twisting algorithm and predictive control techniques are implemented to improve the performance of the boost converter. Due to the chattering effects, the higher order sliding mode control (HOSMC) is designed. Also, the predictive technique is modified taking into account the large computational delays. The robustness of the controller is verified conducting simulation in MATLAB, the results show good performances in both steady and transient states. An experiment is conducted through a test bench based on dSPACE 1104. The experimental results proved that the proposed controller enhanced the performance of the converter under different parameters variations.

  19. Boosting Capacitive Blue-Energy and Desalination Devices with Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Mathijs; Härtel, Andreas; van Roij, René

    2014-12-01

    We show that sustainably harvesting "blue" energy from the spontaneous mixing process of fresh and salty water can be boosted by varying the water temperature during a capacitive mixing process. Our modified Poisson-Boltzmann calculations predict a strong temperature dependence of the electrostatic potential of a charged electrode in contact with an adjacent aqueous 1 :1 electrolyte. We propose to exploit this dependence to boost the efficiency of capacitive blue engines, which are based on cyclically charging and discharging nanoporous supercapacitors immersed in salty and fresh water, respectively [D. Brogioli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 058501 (2009)]. We show that the energy output of blue engines can be increased by a factor of order 2 if warm (waste-heated) fresh water is mixed with cold sea water. Moreover, the underlying physics can also be used to optimize the reverse process of capacitive desalination of water.

  20. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  1. Station Tour: Russian Segment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1...

  2. Boost matrix converters in clean energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Ekrem

    This dissertation describes an investigation of novel power electronic converters, based on the ultra-sparse matrix topology and characterized by the minimum number of semiconductor switches. The Z-source, Quasi Z-source, Series Z-source and Switched-inductor Z-source networks were originally proposed for boosting the output voltage of power electronic inverters. These ideas were extended here on three-phase to three-phase and three-phase to single-phase indirect matrix converters. For the three-phase to three-phase matrix converters, the Z-source networks are placed between the three-switch input rectifier stage and the output six-switch inverter stage. A brief shoot-through state produces the voltage boost. An optimal pulse width modulation technique was developed to achieve high boosting capability and minimum switching losses in the converter. For the three-phase to single-phase matrix converters, those networks are placed similarly. For control purposes, a new modulation technique has been developed. As an example application, the proposed converters constitute a viable alternative to the existing solutions in residential wind-energy systems, where a low-voltage variable-speed generator feeds power to the higher-voltage fixed-frequency grid. Comprehensive analytical derivations and simulation results were carried out to investigate the operation of the proposed converters. Performance of the proposed converters was then compared between each other as well as with conventional converters. The operation of the converters was experimentally validated using a laboratory prototype.

  3. Boosting family income to promote child development.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Greg J; Magnuson, Katherine; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Families who live in poverty face disadvantages that can hinder their children's development in many ways, write Greg Duncan, Katherine Magnuson, and Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal. As they struggle to get by economically, and as they cope with substandard housing, unsafe neighborhoods, and inadequate schools, poor families experience more stress in their daily lives than more affluent families do, with a host of psychological and developmental consequences. Poor families also lack the resources to invest in things like high-quality child care and enriched learning experiences that give more affluent children a leg up. Often, poor parents also lack the time that wealthier parents have to invest in their children, because poor parents are more likely to be raising children alone or to work nonstandard hours and have inflexible work schedules. Can increasing poor parents' incomes, independent of any other sort of assistance, help their children succeed in school and in life? The theoretical case is strong, and Duncan, Magnuson, and Votruba-Drzal find solid evidence that the answer is yes--children from poor families that see a boost in income do better in school and complete more years of schooling, for example. But if boosting poor parents' incomes can help their children, a crucial question remains: Does it matter when in a child's life the additional income appears? Developmental neurobiology strongly suggests that increased income should have the greatest effect during children's early years, when their brains and other systems are developing rapidly, though we need more evidence to prove this conclusively. The authors offer examples of how policy makers could incorporate the findings they present to create more effective programs for families living in poverty. And they conclude with a warning: if a boost in income can help poor children, then a drop in income--for example, through cuts to social safety net programs like food stamps--can surely harm them.

  4. Vessel segmentation in screening mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordang, J. J.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2015-03-01

    Blood vessels are a major cause of false positives in computer aided detection systems for the detection of breast cancer. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to construct a framework for the segmentation of blood vessels in screening mammograms. The proposed framework is based on supervised learning using a cascade classifier. This cascade classifier consists of several stages where in each stage a GentleBoost classifier is trained on Haar-like features. A total of 30 cases were included in this study. In each image, vessel pixels were annotated by selecting pixels on the centerline of the vessel, control samples were taken by annotating a region without any visible vascular structures. This resulted in a total of 31,000 pixels marked as vascular and over 4 million control pixels. After training, the classifier assigns a vesselness likelihood to the pixels. The proposed framework was compared to three other vessel enhancing methods, i) a vesselness filter, ii) a gaussian derivative filter, and iii) a tubeness filter. The methods were compared in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristics curves, the Az values. The Az value of the cascade approach is 0:85. This is superior to the vesselness, Gaussian, and tubeness methods, with Az values of 0:77, 0:81, and 0:78, respectively. From these results, it can be concluded that our proposed framework is a promising method for the detection of vessels in screening mammograms.

  5. Can role models boost entrepreneurial attitudes?

    PubMed Central

    Fellnhofer, Katharina; Puumalainen, Kaisu

    2017-01-01

    This multi-country study used role models to boost perceptions of entrepreneurial feasibility and desirability. The results of a structural equation model based on a sample comprising 426 individuals who were primarily from Austria, Finland and Greece revealed a significant positive influence on perceived entrepreneurial desirability and feasibility. These findings support the argument for embedding entrepreneurial role models in entrepreneurship education courses to promote entrepreneurial activities. This direction is not only relevant for the academic community but also essential for nascent entrepreneurs, policymakers and society at large. PMID:28458611

  6. Precision Jet Substructure from Boosted Event Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feige, Ilya; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Stewart, Iain W.; Thaler, Jesse

    2012-08-01

    Jet substructure has emerged as a critical tool for LHC searches, but studies so far have relied heavily on shower Monte Carlo simulations, which formally approximate QCD at the leading-log level. We demonstrate that systematic higher-order QCD computations of jet substructure can be carried out by boosting global event shapes by a large momentum Q and accounting for effects due to finite jet size, initial-state radiation (ISR), and the underlying event (UE) as 1/Q corrections. In particular, we compute the 2-subjettiness substructure distribution for boosted Z→qq¯ events at the LHC at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log order. The calculation is greatly simplified by recycling known results for the thrust distribution in e+e- collisions. The 2-subjettiness distribution quickly saturates, becoming Q independent for Q≳400GeV. Crucially, the effects of jet contamination from ISR/UE can be subtracted out analytically at large Q without knowing their detailed form. Amusingly, the Q=∞ and Q=0 distributions are related by a scaling by e up to next-to-leading-log order.

  7. Domain adaptive boosting method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jie; Miao, Zhenjiang

    2015-03-01

    Differences of data distributions widely exist among datasets, i.e., domains. For many pattern recognition, nature language processing, and content-based analysis systems, a decrease in performance caused by the domain differences between the training and testing datasets is still a notable problem. We propose a domain adaptation method called domain adaptive boosting (DAB). It is based on the AdaBoost approach with extensions to cover the domain differences between the source and target domains. Two main stages are contained in this approach: source-domain clustering and source-domain sample selection. By iteratively adding the selected training samples from the source domain, the discrimination model is able to achieve better domain adaptation performance based on a small validation set. The DAB algorithm is suitable for the domains with large scale samples and easy to extend for multisource adaptation. We implement this method on three computer vision systems: the skin detection model in single images, the video concept detection model, and the object classification model. In the experiments, we compare the performances of several commonly used methods and the proposed DAB. Under most situations, the DAB is superior.

  8. Non-boost-invariant dissipative hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael; Tinti, Leonardo

    2016-12-01

    The one-dimensional non-boost-invariant evolution of the quark-gluon plasma, presumably produced during the early stages of heavy-ion collisions, is analyzed within the frameworks of viscous and anisotropic hydrodynamics. We neglect transverse dynamics and assume homogeneous conditions in the transverse plane but, differently from Bjorken expansion, we relax longitudinal boost invariance in order to study the rapidity dependence of various hydrodynamical observables. We compare the results obtained using several formulations of second-order viscous hydrodynamics with a recent approach to anisotropic hydrodynamics, which treats the large initial pressure anisotropy in a nonperturbative fashion. The results obtained with second-order viscous hydrodynamics depend on the particular choice of the second-order terms included, which suggests that the latter should be included in the most complete way. The results of anisotropic hydrodynamics and viscous hydrodynamics agree for the central hot part of the system, however, they differ at the edges where the approach of anisotropic hydrodynamics helps to control the undesirable growth of viscous corrections observed in standard frameworks.

  9. Centaur boost pump turbine icing investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine if ice formation in the Centaur vehicle liquid oxygen boost pump turbine could prevent rotation of the pump and whether or not this phenomenon could have been the failure mechanism for the Titan/Centaur vehicle TC-1. The investigation consisted of a series of tests done in the LeRC Space Power Chamber Facility to evaluate evaporative cooling behavior patterns in a turbine as a function of the quantity of water trapped in the turbine and as a function of the vehicle ascent pressure profile. It was found that evaporative freezing of water in the turbine housing, due to rapid depressurization within the turbine during vehicle ascent, could result in the formation of ice that would block the turbine and prevent rotation of the boost pump. But for such icing conditions to exist it would be necessary to have significant quantities of water in the turbine and/or its components, and the turbine housing temperature would have to be colder than 40 F at vehicle liftoff.

  10. Color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Kimberley A.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Rogers, Steven K.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1994-03-01

    The most difficult stage of automated target recognition is segmentation. Current segmentation problems include faces and tactical targets; previous efforts to segment these objects have used intensity and motion cues. This paper develops a color preprocessing scheme to be used with the other segmentation techniques. A neural network is trained to identify the color of a desired object, eliminating all but that color from the scene. Gabor correlations and 2D wavelet transformations will be performed on stationary images; and 3D wavelet transforms on multispectral data will incorporate color and motion detection into the machine visual system. The paper will demonstrate that color and motion cues can enhance a computer segmentation system. Results from segmenting faces both from the AFIT data base and from video taped television are presented; results from tactical targets such as tanks and airplanes are also given. Color preprocessing is shown to greatly improve the segmentation in most cases.

  11. Duplication of coding segments in genetic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, T.

    1996-12-31

    Research into the utility of non-coding segments, or introns, in genetic-based encodings has shown that they expedite the evolution of solutions in domains by protecting building blocks against destructive crossover. We consider a genetic programming system where non-coding segments can be removed, and the resultant chromosomes returned into the population. This parsimonious repair leads to premature convergence, since as we remove the naturally occurring non-coding segments, we strip away their protective backup feature. We then duplicate the coding segments in the repaired chromosomes, and place the modified chromosomes into the population. The duplication method significantly improves the learning rate in the domain we have considered. We also show that this method can be applied to other domains.

  12. Choice-Based Segmentation as an Enrollment Management Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents an approach to enrollment management based on target marketing strategies developed from a choice-based segmentation methodology. Students are classified into "switchable" or "non-switchable" segments based on their probability of selecting specific majors. A modified multinomial logit choice model is used to identify…

  13. Behavior Analysis in Distance Education by Boosting Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zang, Wei; Lin, Fuzong

    2006-01-01

    Student behavior analysis is an active research topic in distance education in recent years. In this article, we propose a new method called Boosting to investigate students' behaviors. The Boosting Algorithm can be treated as a data mining method, trying to infer from a large amount of training data the essential factors and their relations that…

  14. Boosted one dimensional fermionic superfluids on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sayonee; Mukerjee, Subroto; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2017-09-01

    We study the effect of a boost (Fermi sea displaced by a finite momentum) on one dimensional systems of lattice fermions with short-ranged interactions. In the absence of a boost such systems with attractive interactions possess algebraic superconducting order. Motivated by physics in higher dimensions, one might naively expect a boost to weaken and ultimately destroy superconductivity. However, we show that for one dimensional systems the effect of the boost can be to strengthen the algebraic superconducting order by making correlation functions fall off more slowly with distance. This phenomenon can manifest in interesting ways, for example, a boost can produce a Luther-Emery phase in a system with both charge and spin gaps by engendering the destruction of the former.

  15. Boost type PWM HVDC transmission system

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, B.T.; Wang, X. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-10-01

    This paper reports that conventional HVdc is built around the mercury arc rectifier or the thyristor which requires line commutation. The advances of fast, high power GTO's and future devices such as MCT's with turn off capabilities, are bringing PWM techniques within the range of HVdc applications. By combining PWM techniques to the boost type bridge topology, one has an alternate system of HVdc Transmission. On the ac side, the converter station has active controls over: the voltage amplitude, the voltage angle and the frequency. On the dc side, parallel connections facilitate multi-terminal load sharing by simple local controls so that redundant communication channels are not required. Bidirectional power through each station is accomplished by the reversal of the direction of dc current flow. These claims have been substantiated by experimental results from laboratory size multi-terminal models.

  16. Orbiter aborts from boost: Presimulation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backman, H. D.; Brechka, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    A description of a hybrid simulation of the 040C orbiter aborting from boost to specified landing site is provided. The simulation starts when the abort is initiated and continues until a terminal energy state (associated with the selected landing site) is reached. At abort it is assumed that all SRM's are jettisoned with the external tank remaining with the orbiter. The simulation described has six degrees of freedom with the vehicle simulated as a rigid body. A conventional form of autopilot is provided to control engine gimbaling during powered flight. An ideal form of an autopilot is provided to test conventional autopilot function and provide pseudo RCS function during coasting flight. The simulation is proposed to provide means for studies of abort guidance function and to gain information concerning ability to control the abort trajectory.

  17. Inflammation boosts bacteriophage transfer between Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Diard, Médéric; Bakkeren, Erik; Cornuault, Jeffrey K; Moor, Kathrin; Hausmann, Annika; Sellin, Mikael E; Loverdo, Claude; Aertsen, Abram; Ackermann, Martin; De Paepe, Marianne; Slack, Emma; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2017-03-17

    Bacteriophage transfer (lysogenic conversion) promotes bacterial virulence evolution. There is limited understanding of the factors that determine lysogenic conversion dynamics within infected hosts. A murine Salmonella Typhimurium (STm) diarrhea model was used to study the transfer of SopEΦ, a prophage from STm SL1344, to STm ATCC14028S. Gut inflammation and enteric disease triggered >55% lysogenic conversion of ATCC14028S within 3 days. Without inflammation, SopEΦ transfer was reduced by up to 10(5)-fold. This was because inflammation (e.g., reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, hypochlorite) triggers the bacterial SOS response, boosts expression of the phage antirepressor Tum, and thereby promotes free phage production and subsequent transfer. Mucosal vaccination prevented a dense intestinal STm population from inducing inflammation and consequently abolished SopEΦ transfer. Vaccination may be a general strategy for blocking pathogen evolution that requires disease-driven transfer of temperate bacteriophages.

  18. Boosting jet power in black hole spacetimes.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, David; Lehner, Luis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Hirschmann, Eric W; Liebling, Steven L; Motl, Patrick M; Garrett, Travis

    2011-08-02

    The extraction of rotational energy from a spinning black hole via the Blandford-Znajek mechanism has long been understood as an important component in models to explain energetic jets from compact astrophysical sources. Here we show more generally that the kinetic energy of the black hole, both rotational and translational, can be tapped, thereby producing even more luminous jets powered by the interaction of the black hole with its surrounding plasma. We study the resulting Poynting jet that arises from single boosted black holes and binary black hole systems. In the latter case, we find that increasing the orbital angular momenta of the system and/or the spins of the individual black holes results in an enhanced Poynting flux.

  19. Giving top quark effective operators a boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Moore, Liam; Nordström, Karl; Russell, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the prospects to systematically improve generic effective field theory-based searches for new physics in the top sector during LHC run 2 as well as the high luminosity phase. In particular, we assess the benefits of high momentum transfer final states on top EFT-fit as a function of systematic uncertainties in comparison with sensitivity expected from fully-resolved analyses focusing on t t bar production. We find that constraints are typically driven by fully-resolved selections, while boosted top quarks can serve to break degeneracies in the global fit. This demystifies and clarifies the importance of high momentum transfer final states for global fits to new interactions in the top sector from direct measurements.

  20. Boosting jet power in black hole spacetimes

    PubMed Central

    Neilsen, David; Lehner, Luis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Hirschmann, Eric W.; Liebling, Steven L.; Motl, Patrick M.; Garrett, Travis

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of rotational energy from a spinning black hole via the Blandford–Znajek mechanism has long been understood as an important component in models to explain energetic jets from compact astrophysical sources. Here we show more generally that the kinetic energy of the black hole, both rotational and translational, can be tapped, thereby producing even more luminous jets powered by the interaction of the black hole with its surrounding plasma. We study the resulting Poynting jet that arises from single boosted black holes and binary black hole systems. In the latter case, we find that increasing the orbital angular momenta of the system and/or the spins of the individual black holes results in an enhanced Poynting flux. PMID:21768341

  1. Boosted top quarks and jet structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schätzel, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is the first particle accelerator that provides high enough energy to produce large numbers of boosted top quarks. The decay products of these top quarks are confined to a cone in the top quark flight direction and can be clustered into a single jet. Top quark reconstruction then amounts to analysing the structure of the jet and looking for subjets that are kinematically compatible with top quark decay. Many techniques have been developed in this context to identify top quarks in a large background of non-top jets. This article reviews the results obtained using data recorded in the years 2010-2012 by the experiments ATLAS and CMS. Studies of Standard Model top quark production and searches for new massive particles that decay to top quarks are presented.

  2. Hydrodynamic approach to boost invariant free streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, E.

    2015-08-01

    We consider a family of exact boost invariant solutions of the transport equation for free-streaming massless particles, where the one-particle distribution function is defined in terms of a function of a single variable. The evolution of second and third moments of the one-particle distribution function [the second moment being the energy momentum tensor (EMT) and the third moment the nonequilibrium current (NEC)] depends only on two moments of that function. Given those two moments, we show how to build a nonlinear hydrodynamic theory which reproduces the early time evolution of the EMT and the NEC. The structure of these theories may give insight on nonlinear hydrodynamic phenomena on short time scales.

  3. Boosting for multi-graph classification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia; Pan, Shirui; Zhu, Xingquan; Cai, Zhihua

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we formulate a novel graph-based learning problem, multi-graph classification (MGC), which aims to learn a classifier from a set of labeled bags each containing a number of graphs inside the bag. A bag is labeled positive, if at least one graph in the bag is positive, and negative otherwise. Such a multi-graph representation can be used for many real-world applications, such as webpage classification, where a webpage can be regarded as a bag with texts and images inside the webpage being represented as graphs. This problem is a generalization of multi-instance learning (MIL) but with vital differences, mainly because instances in MIL share a common feature space whereas no feature is available to represent graphs in a multi-graph bag. To solve the problem, we propose a boosting based multi-graph classification framework (bMGC). Given a set of labeled multi-graph bags, bMGC employs dynamic weight adjustment at both bag- and graph-levels to select one subgraph in each iteration as a weak classifier. In each iteration, bag and graph weights are adjusted such that an incorrectly classified bag will receive a higher weight because its predicted bag label conflicts to the genuine label, whereas an incorrectly classified graph will receive a lower weight value if the graph is in a positive bag (or a higher weight if the graph is in a negative bag). Accordingly, bMGC is able to differentiate graphs in positive and negative bags to derive effective classifiers to form a boosting model for MGC. Experiments and comparisons on real-world multi-graph learning tasks demonstrate the algorithm performance.

  4. The attentional boost effect and context memory.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Neil W; Smith, S Adam; Spataro, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Stimuli co-occurring with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli co-occurring with distractors-the attentional boost effect (ABE). The ABE is of interest because it is an exception to the usual finding that divided attention during encoding impairs memory. The effect has been demonstrated in tests of item memory but it is unclear if context memory is likewise affected. Some accounts suggest enhanced perceptual encoding or associative binding, predicting an ABE on context memory, whereas other evidence suggests a more abstract, amodal basis of the effect. In Experiment 1, context memory was assessed in terms of an intramodal perceptual detail, the font and color of the study word. Experiment 2 examined context memory cross-modally, assessing memory for the modality (visual or auditory) of the study word. Experiments 3 and 4 assessed context memory with list discrimination, in which 2 study lists are presented and participants must later remember which list (if either) a test word came from. In all experiments, item (recognition) memory was also assessed and consistently displayed a robust ABE. In contrast, the attentional-boost manipulation did not enhance context memory, whether defined in terms of visual details, study modality, or list membership. There was some evidence that the mode of responding on the detection task (motoric response as opposed to covert counting of targets) may impact context memory but there was no evidence of an effect of target detection, per se. In sum, the ABE did not occur in context memory with verbal materials. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. PDE Based Unsharp Masking, Crispening and High Boost Filtering of Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rajeev; Gupta, J. R. P.; Parthasarthy, Harish; Srivastava, Subodh

    A partial differential equation (PDE) based technique is proposed and implemented to perform unsharp masking, crispening and high boost filtering of digital images. The traditional concept of unsharp masking and crispening of edges which uses Laplacian as intermediate step for smoothening the image has been extended and modified using the idea of Perona and Malik [1] which overcomes the disadvantages of Laplacian method. For descretization, finite differences scheme has been used. The scheme has been implemented using MATLAB 7.0 and performance is tested for various gray images of different resolutions and the obtained results justify the applicability of proposed scheme.

  6. The reach for charged Higgs bosons with boosted bottom and boosted top jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Zack; Pedersen, Keith

    2017-01-01

    At moderate values of tan(β) , a supersymmetric charged Higgs boson H+/- is expected to be difficult to find due its small cross section and large backgrounds. Using the new μx boosted bottom jet tag, and measured boosted top tagging rates from the CERN LHC, we examine the reach for TeV-scale charged Higgs bosons at 14 TeV and 100 TeV colliders in top-Higgs associated production, where the charged Higgs decays to a boosted top and bottom quark pair. We conclude that the cross section for charged Higgs bosons is indeed too small to observe at the LHC in the moderate tan(β) ``wedge region,'' but it will be possible to probe charged Higgs bosons at nearly all tan(β) up to 6 TeV at a 100 TeV collider. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under award No. DE-SC0008347.

  7. Impact assisted segmented cutterhead

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.; Ruzzi, Peter L.

    1992-01-01

    An impact assisted segmented cutterhead device is provided for cutting various surfaces from coal to granite. The device comprises a plurality of cutting bit segments deployed in side by side relationship to form a continuous cutting face and a plurality of impactors individually associated with respective cutting bit segments. An impactor rod of each impactor connects that impactor to the corresponding cutting bit segment. A plurality of shock mounts dampening the vibration from the associated impactor. Mounting brackets are used in mounting the cutterhead to a base machine.

  8. Series-Connected Buck Boost Regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2005-01-01

    A series-connected buck boost regulator (SCBBR) is an electronic circuit that bucks a power-supply voltage to a lower regulated value or boosts it to a higher regulated value. The concept of the SCBBR is a generalization of the concept of the SCBR, which was reported in "Series-Connected Boost Regulators" (LEW-15918), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 7 (July 1997), page 42. Relative to prior DC-voltage-regulator concepts, the SCBBR concept can yield significant reductions in weight and increases in power-conversion efficiency in many applications in which input/output voltage ratios are relatively small and isolation is not required, as solar-array regulation or battery charging with DC-bus regulation. Usually, a DC voltage regulator is designed to include a DC-to-DC converter to reduce its power loss, size, and weight. Advances in components, increases in operating frequencies, and improved circuit topologies have led to continual increases in efficiency and/or decreases in the sizes and weights of DC voltage regulators. The primary source of inefficiency in the DC-to-DC converter portion of a voltage regulator is the conduction loss and, especially at high frequencies, the switching loss. Although improved components and topology can reduce the switching loss, the reduction is limited by the fact that the converter generally switches all the power being regulated. Like the SCBR concept, the SCBBR concept involves a circuit configuration in which only a fraction of the power is switched, so that the switching loss is reduced by an amount that is largely independent of the specific components and circuit topology used. In an SCBBR, the amount of power switched by the DC-to-DC converter is only the amount needed to make up the difference between the input and output bus voltage. The remaining majority of the power passes through the converter without being switched. The weight and power loss of a DC-to-DC converter are determined primarily by the amount of power

  9. Hospital benefit segmentation.

    PubMed

    Finn, D W; Lamb, C W

    1986-12-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic to both health care practitioners and researchers. The authors explore the relative importance that health care consumers attach to various benefits available in a major metropolitan area hospital. The purposes of the study are to test, and provide data to illustrate, the efficacy of one approach to hospital benefit segmentation analysis.

  10. Semi-automatic Segmentation for Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, S. Sara; Chng, Nick; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report and characterize a semi-automatic prostate segmentation method for prostate brachytherapy. Based on anatomical evidence and requirements of the treatment procedure, a warped and tapered ellipsoid was found suitable as the a priori 3D shape of the prostate. By transforming the acquired endorectal transverse images of the prostate into ellipses, the shape fitting problem was cast into a convex problem which can be solved efficiently. The average whole gland error between volumes created from manual and semi-automatic contours from 21 patients was 6.63±0.9%. For use in brachytherapy treatment planning, the resulting contours were modified, if deemed necessary, by radiation oncologists prior to treatment. The average whole gland volume error between the volumes computed from semi-automatic contours and those computed from modified contours, from 40 patients, was 5.82±4.15%. The amount of bias in the physicians’ delineations when given an initial semi-automatic contour was measured by comparing the volume error between 10 prostate volumes computed from manual contours with those of modified contours. This error was found to be 7.25±0.39% for the whole gland. Automatic contouring reduced subjectivity, as evidenced by a decrease in segmentation inter- and intra-observer variability from 4.65% and 5.95% for manual segmentation to 3.04% and 3.48% for semi-automatic segmentation, respectively. We characterized the performance of the method relative to the reference obtained from manual segmentation by using a novel approach that divides the prostate region into nine sectors. We analyzed each sector independently as the requirements for segmentation accuracy depend on which region of the prostate is considered. The measured segmentation time is 14±1 seconds with an additional 32±14 seconds for initialization. By assuming 1–3 minutes for modification of the contours, if necessary, a total segmentation time of less than 4 minutes is required

  11. Image segmentation using neural tree networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaddar, Sumitro; Mammone, Richard J.

    1993-06-01

    We present a technique for Image Segmentation using Neural Tree Networks (NTN). We also modify the NTN architecture to let is solve multi-class classification problems with only binary fan-out. We have used a realistic case study of segmenting the pole, coil and painted coil regions of light bulb filaments (LBF). The input to the network is a set of maximum, minimum and average of intensities in radial slices of a circular window around a pixel, taken from a front-lit and a back-lit image of an LBF. Training is done with a composite image drawn from images of many LBFs. Each node of the NTN is a multi-layer perceptron and has one output for each segment class. These outputs are treated as probabilities to compute a confidence value for the segmentation of that pixel. Segmentation results with high confidence values are deemed to be correct and not processed further, while those with moderate and low confidence values are deemed to be outliers by this node and passed down the tree to children nodes. These tend to be pixels in boundary of different regions. The results are favorably compared with a traditional segmentation technique applied to the LBF test case.

  12. Climbazole boosts activity of retinoids in skin.

    PubMed

    Adamus, J; Feng, L; Hawkins, S; Kalleberg, K; Lee, J-M

    2017-08-01

    To explore whether climbazole enhances retinoid-associated biological activities in vitro and in vivo. Primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) were treated from six to 48 h with either retinoids (retinol, retinyl propionate, retinyl palmitate) alone or in combination with climbazole, and then assessed for cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 (CRABP2) mRNA expression by RT-qPCR. Next, skin equivalent (SE) cultures were topically treated with retinol or retinyl propionate, with or without climbazole, and then measured for biological changes in retinoid biomarkers. Lastly, an IRB-approved clinical study was conducted on the outer forearm of 16 subjects to ascertain the effects of low (0.02%) or high (0.1%) levels of retinol, retinyl propionate (0.5%), climbazole (0.5%) or a combination of retinol (0.02%)/climbazole (0.5%). Indicators of retinoid activities were measured after 3 weeks. Treatment of HDFs with retinol or retinyl propionate was unaffected by climbazole but alone, resulted in a significantly (P < 0.01) higher sustained CRABP2 mRNA expression than those treated with retinyl palmitate or vehicle control. In SEs, climbazole combined with either retinol or retinyl propionate boosted retinoid related activity greater than the retinoid only, reflected by a dose-response, downregulation of loricrin (LOR) and induction of keratin 4 (KRT4) proteins. In vivo, retinol (0.1%) and retinyl propionate (0.5%) significantly increased most evaluated biomarkers, as expected. Low-dose retinol or climbazole alone did not increase these biomarkers; however, in combination, significant (P < 0.05) increases in retinoid and ageing biomarkers were detected. Climbazole boosted retinoid activity both in the SE model, after a combined topic treatment with either retinol or retinyl propionate, and in vivo, in combination with a low level of retinol. Based upon the evidence presented here, we suggest that the topical skin application of climbazole in combination with retinoids could

  13. Synthesis and UV-Curing Behaviors of Urethane Acrylic Oligomers Modified by the Incorporation of Silicone Diols into the Soft Segments for a 3D Multi-Chip Package Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Tae-Hyung; Park, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2015-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-curable urethane acrylic oligomers were synthesized and then modified by the incorporation of silicone diols with different molecular weights to improve thermal stability for temporary bonding and debonding adhesives in a three-dimensional multi-chip package process. The UV-curing behaviors were investigated using photo-differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance, and gel fraction, while the UV-curing kinetics was also studied. In addition, the thermal stability of the samples was checked using thermogravimetric analysis. UV-curing and thermal stability were more affected by the molecular weight of the silicone diols than by UV dose due to both the flexibility and the steric hindrance of the synthesized oligomer structures.

  14. Probabilistic boosting trees for automatic bone removal from CT angiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militzer, Arne; Vega-Higuera, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    In CT angiography images, osseous structures occluding vessels pose difficulties for physicians during diagnosis. Simple thresholding techniques for removing bones fail due to overlapping CT values of vessels filled with contrast agent and osseous tissue, while manual delineation is slow and tedious. Thus, we propose to automatically segment bones using a trainable classifier to label image patches as bone or background. The image features provided to the classifier are based on grey value statistics and gradients. In contrast to most existing methods, osseous tissue segmentation in our algorithm works without any prior knowledge of the body region depicted in the image. This is achieved by using a probabilistic boosting tree, which is capable of automatically decomposing the input space. The whole system works by partitioning the image using a watershed transform, classifying image regions as bone or background and refining the result by means of a graph-based procedure. Additionally, an intuitive way of manually refining the segmentation result is incorporated. The system was evaluated on 15 CTA datasets acquired from various body regions, showing an average correct recognition of bone regions of 80% at a false positive rate of 0.025% of the background voxels.

  15. Boosted Regression Tree Models to Explain Watershed ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Boosted regression tree (BRT) models were developed to quantify the nonlinear relationships between landscape variables and nutrient concentrations in a mesoscale mixed land cover watershed during base-flow conditions. Factors that affect instream biological components, based on the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI), were also analyzed. Seasonal BRT models at two spatial scales (watershed and riparian buffered area [RBA]) for nitrite-nitrate (NO2-NO3), total Kjeldahl nitrogen, and total phosphorus (TP) and annual models for the IBI score were developed. Two primary factors — location within the watershed (i.e., geographic position, stream order, and distance to a downstream confluence) and percentage of urban land cover (both scales) — emerged as important predictor variables. Latitude and longitude interacted with other factors to explain the variability in summer NO2-NO3 concentrations and IBI scores. BRT results also suggested that location might be associated with indicators of sources (e.g., land cover), runoff potential (e.g., soil and topographic factors), and processes not easily represented by spatial data indicators. Runoff indicators (e.g., Hydrological Soil Group D and Topographic Wetness Indices) explained a substantial portion of the variability in nutrient concentrations as did point sources for TP in the summer months. The results from our BRT approach can help prioritize areas for nutrient management in mixed-use and heavily impacted watershed

  16. Boosting nitrification by membrane-attached biofilm.

    PubMed

    Wu, C Y; Ushiwaka, S; Horii, H; Yamagiwa, K

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification is a key step for reliable biological nitrogen removal. In order to enhance nitrification in the activated sludge (AS) process, membrane-attached biofilm (MAB) was incorporated in a conventional activated sludge tank. Simultaneous organic carbon removal and nitrification of the MAB incorporated activated sludge (AS + MAB) process was investigated with continuous wastewater treatment. The effluent TOC concentration of AS and the AS + MAB processes were about 6.3 mg/L and 7.9 mg/L, respectively. The TOC removal efficiency of both AS and AS + MAB were above 95% during the wastewater treatment, indicating excellent organic carbon removal performance in both processes. Little nitrification occurred in the AS process. On the contrary, successful nitrification was obtained with the AS + MAB process with nitrification efficiency of about 90%. The volumetric and surface nitrification rates were about 0.14 g/Ld and 6.5 g/m2d, respectively. The results clearly demonstrated that nitrification in the conventional AS process was boosted by MAB. Furthermore, the microfaunal population in the AS + MAB process was different from that in the AS process. The high concentration of rotifers in the AS + MAB process was expected to decrease the generation of excess sludge in the process.

  17. Designing boosting ensemble of relational fuzzy systems.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Rafał

    2010-10-01

    A method frequently used in classification systems for improving classification accuracy is to combine outputs of several classifiers. Among various types of classifiers, fuzzy ones are tempting because of using intelligible fuzzy if-then rules. In the paper we build an AdaBoost ensemble of relational neuro-fuzzy classifiers. Relational fuzzy systems bond input and output fuzzy linguistic values by a binary relation; thus, fuzzy rules have additional, comparing to traditional fuzzy systems, weights - elements of a fuzzy relation matrix. Thanks to this the system is better adjustable to data during learning. In the paper an ensemble of relational fuzzy systems is proposed. The problem is that such an ensemble contains separate rule bases which cannot be directly merged. As systems are separate, we cannot treat fuzzy rules coming from different systems as rules from the same (single) system. In the paper, the problem is addressed by a novel design of fuzzy systems constituting the ensemble, resulting in normalization of individual rule bases during learning. The method described in the paper is tested on several known benchmarks and compared with other machine learning solutions from the literature.

  18. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence.

    PubMed

    Albers, Suki; Czech, Andreas

    2016-01-19

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage-either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE) in the 5'- and 3'-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification.

  19. Acetonitrile boosts conductivity of imidazolium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Voroshylova, Iuliia V; Kalugin, Oleg N; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2012-07-05

    We apply a new methodology in the force field generation (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.2011, 13, 7910) to study binary mixtures of five imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) with acetonitrile (ACN). Each RTIL is composed of tetrafluoroborate (BF(4)) anion and dialkylimidazolium (MMIM) cations. The first alkyl group of MIM is methyl, and the other group is ethyl (EMIM), butyl (BMIM), hexyl (HMIM), octyl (OMIM), and decyl (DMIM). Upon addition of ACN, the ionic conductivity of RTILs increases by more than 50 times. It significantly exceeds an impact of most known solvents. Unexpectedly, long-tailed imidazolium cations demonstrate the sharpest conductivity boost. This finding motivates us to revisit an application of RTIL/ACN binary systems as advanced electrolyte solutions. The conductivity correlates with a composition of ion aggregates simplifying its predictability. Addition of ACN exponentially increases diffusion and decreases viscosity of the RTIL/ACN mixtures. Large amounts of ACN stabilize ion pairs, although they ruin greater ion aggregates.

  20. New ways to boost molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Elmar; Vriend, Gert

    2015-05-15

    We describe a set of algorithms that allow to simulate dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, a common benchmark) with the AMBER all-atom force field at 160 nanoseconds/day on a single Intel Core i7 5960X CPU (no graphics processing unit (GPU), 23,786 atoms, particle mesh Ewald (PME), 8.0 Å cutoff, correct atom masses, reproducible trajectory, CPU with 3.6 GHz, no turbo boost, 8 AVX registers). The new features include a mixed multiple time-step algorithm (reaching 5 fs), a tuned version of LINCS to constrain bond angles, the fusion of pair list creation and force calculation, pressure coupling with a "densostat," and exploitation of new CPU instruction sets like AVX2. The impact of Intel's new transactional memory, atomic instructions, and sloppy pair lists is also analyzed. The algorithms map well to GPUs and can automatically handle most Protein Data Bank (PDB) files including ligands. An implementation is available as part of the YASARA molecular modeling and simulation program from www.YASARA.org. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Suki; Czech, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage—either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE) in the 5′- and 3′-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification. PMID:26797637

  2. FPGA Implementation of Discrete-Time Neuronal Network for Dynamic Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Ken'ichi; Musashi, Mio; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    We have developed a discrete-time dynamical system for dynamic image segmentation. It consists of a global inhibitor and modified chaotic neurons that can generate oscillatory responses. Dynamic image segmentation is performed using its oscillatory responses. This letter presents an implementation of our system in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) device and a successful result of dynamic image segmentation.

  3. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  4. Keypoint Transfer Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Toews, M.; Langs, G.; Wells, W.; Golland, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present an image segmentation method that transfers label maps of entire organs from the training images to the novel image to be segmented. The transfer is based on sparse correspondences between keypoints that represent automatically identified distinctive image locations. Our segmentation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) keypoint matching, (ii) voting-based keypoint labeling, and (iii) keypoint-based probabilistic transfer of organ label maps. We introduce generative models for the inference of keypoint labels and for image segmentation, where keypoint matches are treated as a latent random variable and are marginalized out as part of the algorithm. We report segmentation results for abdominal organs in whole-body CT and in contrast-enhanced CT images. The accuracy of our method compares favorably to common multi-atlas segmentation while offering a speed-up of about three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, keypoint transfer requires no training phase or registration to an atlas. The algorithm’s robustness enables the segmentation of scans with highly variable field-of-view. PMID:26221677

  5. Keypoint Transfer Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wachinger, C; Toews, M; Langs, G; Wells, W; Golland, P

    2015-01-01

    We present an image segmentation method that transfers label maps of entire organs from the training images to the novel image to be segmented. The transfer is based on sparse correspondences between keypoints that represent automatically identified distinctive image locations. Our segmentation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) keypoint matching, (ii) voting-based keypoint labeling, and (iii) keypoint-based probabilistic transfer of organ label maps. We introduce generative models for the inference of keypoint labels and for image segmentation, where keypoint matches are treated as a latent random variable and are marginalized out as part of the algorithm. We report segmentation results for abdominal organs in whole-body CT and in contrast-enhanced CT images. The accuracy of our method compares favorably to common multi-atlas segmentation while offering a speed-up of about three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, keypoint transfer requires no training phase or registration to an atlas. The algorithm's robustness enables the segmentation of scans with highly variable field-of-view.

  6. A wrapper-based approach to image segmentation and classification.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Michael E; Jain, Anil K

    2005-12-01

    The traditional processing flow of segmentation followed by classification in computer vision assumes that the segmentation is able to successfully extract the object of interest from the background image. It is extremely difficult to obtain a reliable segmentation without any prior knowledge about the object that is being extracted from the scene. This is further complicated by the lack of any clearly defined metrics for evaluating the quality of segmentation or for comparing segmentation algorithms. We propose a method of segmentation that addresses both of these issues, by using the object classification subsystem as an integral part of the segmentation. This will provide contextual information regarding the objects to be segmented, as well as allow us to use the probability of correct classification as a metric to determine the quality of the segmentation. We view traditional segmentation as a filter operating on the image that is independent of the classifier, much like the filter methods for feature selection. We propose a new paradigm for segmentation and classification that follows the wrapper methods of feature selection. Our method wraps the segmentation and classification together, and uses the classification accuracy as the metric to determine the best segmentation. By using shape as the classification feature, we are able to develop a segmentation algorithm that relaxes the requirement that the object of interest to be segmented must be homogeneous in some low-level image parameter, such as texture, color, or grayscale. This represents an improvement over other segmentation methods that have used classification information only to modify the segmenter parameters, since these algorithms still require an underlying homogeneity in some parameter space. Rather than considering our method as, yet, another segmentation algorithm, we propose that our wrapper method can be considered as an image segmentation framework, within which existing image segmentation

  7. An effective strategy to boost the robustness of metal-organic frameworks via introduction of size-matching ligand braces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Gao, Wen-Yang; Luan, Jian; Wojtas, Lukasz; Ma, Shengqian

    2016-01-31

    Framework fragility upon the removal of guest solvent molecules has remained an issue for a substantial amount of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). To address this issue, in this work we illustrate a strategy for the introduction of size-matching ligands as braces that are deliberately anchored onto the open metal sites to support and segment the pores thereby boosting the framework robustness. This is exemplified by employing 4,4'-bipyridine as a brace to bridge two trigonal prismatic clusters of Co3(μ3-O)(COO)6, generating a robust MOF that exhibits permanent porosity and selective gas adsorption behaviors.

  8. Segmented ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for large-area, high-power ion engines comprise dividing a single engine into a combination of smaller discharge chambers (or segments) configured to operate as a single large-area engine. This segmented ion thruster (SIT) approach enables the development of 100-kW class argon ion engines for operation at a specific impulse of 10,000 s. A combination of six 30-cm diameter ion chambers operating as a single engine can process over 100 kW. Such a segmented ion engine can be operated from a single power processor unit.

  9. A Lengthy, Stable Marriage May Boost Stroke Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... 162542.html A Lengthy, Stable Marriage May Boost Stroke Survival Lifelong singles fared the worst, study finds ... 14, 2016 WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients may have better odds of surviving if ...

  10. Adding in Prescription for Partner Boosts STD Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Prescription for Partner Boosts STD Care Lower chlamydia, gonorrhea rates seen when one person can obtain ... States that let doctors prescribe drugs to treat chlamydia or gonorrhea in both partners when only one ...

  11. Cutting Salt a Health Boost for Kidney Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163628.html Cutting Salt a Health Boost for Kidney Patients Blood pressure ... Encouraging people with kidney disease to reduce their salt intake may help improve blood pressure and cut ...

  12. Xanax, Valium May Boost Pneumonia Risk in Alzheimer's Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Xanax, Valium May Boost Pneumonia Risk in Alzheimer's Patients Researchers suspect people may breathe saliva or ... 10, 2017 MONDAY, April 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Alzheimer's patients given sedatives such as Valium or Xanax ...

  13. Does a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Does a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk? Study showed 3 or more servings daily ... a slight rise in the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Experts who reviewed the study stressed that ...

  14. Did El Nino Weather Give Zika a Boost?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162611.html Did El Nino Weather Give Zika a Boost? Climate phenomenon could have helped infection- ... might have aided the explosive spread of the Zika virus throughout South America, a new study reports. ...

  15. Lung-Sparing Surgery May Boost Mesothelioma Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162720.html Lung-Sparing Surgery May Boost Mesothelioma Survival Treatment nearly ... 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery that preserves the lung, when combined with other therapies, appears to extend ...

  16. Kidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167715.html Kidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat And, the ... abnormal heart rhythm, a new report suggests. Chronic kidney disease can as much as double a patient's risk ...

  17. High-temperature alloys: Single-crystal performance boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys are lightweight and have attractive properties for high-temperature applications. A new growth method that enables single-crystal production now boosts their mechanical performance.

  18. '12-Step' Strategy Boosts Success of Teen Drug Abuse Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167650.html '12-Step' Strategy Boosts Success of Teen Drug Abuse Program Messages from recovering peers made an impact, study finds To use the sharing features on this ...

  19. Autism Greatly Boosts Kids' Injury Risk, Especially for Drowning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Boosts Kids' Injury Risk, Especially for Drowning Swimming lessons are essential -- even before other therapies, researcher says ... 2 and 3 years of age -- need swimming lessons as soon as possible, even before they start ...

  20. Solid state light source driver establishing buck or boost operation

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Fred

    2017-08-29

    A solid state light source driver circuit that operates in either a buck convertor or a boost convertor configuration is provided. The driver circuit includes a controller, a boost switch circuit and a buck switch circuit, each coupled to the controller, and a feedback circuit, coupled to the light source. The feedback circuit provides feedback to the controller, representing a DC output of the driver circuit. The controller controls the boost switch circuit and the buck switch circuit in response to the feedback signal, to regulate current to the light source. The controller places the driver circuit in its boost converter configuration when the DC output is less than a rectified AC voltage coupled to the driver circuit at an input node. The controller places the driver circuit in its buck converter configuration when the DC output is greater than the rectified AC voltage at the input node.

  1. An improved method for pancreas segmentation using SLIC and interactive region merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liyuan; Yang, Huamin; Shi, Weili; Miao, Yu; Li, Qingliang; He, Fei; He, Wei; Li, Yanfang; Zhang, Huimao; Mori, Kensaku; Jiang, Zhengang

    2017-03-01

    Considering the weak edges in pancreas segmentation, this paper proposes a new solution which integrates more features of CT images by combining SLIC superpixels and interactive region merging. In the proposed method, Mahalanobis distance is first utilized in SLIC method to generate better superpixel images. By extracting five texture features and one gray feature, the similarity measure between two superpixels becomes more reliable in interactive region merging. Furthermore, object edge blocks are accurately addressed by re-segmentation merging process. Applying the proposed method to four cases of abdominal CT images, we segment pancreatic tissues to verify the feasibility and effectiveness. The experimental results show that the proposed method can make segmentation accuracy increase to 92% on average. This study will boost the application process of pancreas segmentation for computer-aided diagnosis system.

  2. Comparative dosimetric evaluation of the simultaneous integrated boost with photon intensity modulation in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Fogliata, Antonella; Bolsi, Alessandra; Cozzi, Luca; Bernier, Jacques

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate, at planning and dosimetric level, the potential benefits of the simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) concept with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using a comparative analysis on physical dose distributions corrected for radiobiological models. The concept of SIB at the end of the treatment has been analysed as an alternative acceleration scheme. Physical dose distributions were computed on a commercial planning system (Varian Cadplan-Helios) for five patients presenting with advanced head and neck carcinomas. Treatment plans were designed using five IMRT beams. Three fractionation strategies were compared in the study: the standard sequential irradiation SEQ of elective and boost volumes, the pure SIB, and a modified SIB (SEQ/SIB), where the actual SIB follows a first phase of conventional fractionation to the elective volume. All physical dose distributions were corrected using a linear quadratic biological model, taking into account also repopulation and time at repopulation onset. Objective quantities, derived from biological dose volume histograms, were used for the analysis. Physical doses equivalent to 50 and 80 Gy (in fractions of 2 Gy) to elective volume and boost were calculated for the SIB and SEQ/SIB regimes. With SIB 54 and 72 Gy dose levels have to be delivered in 30 fractions, while in the SEQ/SIB scheme 36 Gy are delivered in 20 sessions to the elective volume, and further 18 and 35.5 Gy during the last 10 fractions are delivered to elective volume and boost, respectively (for a total physical dose of 71.5 Gy). The comparison showed: (1) the boost target homogeneity resulted in generally acceptable and comparable among sequential and modified SIB schemes, while it was statistically worse for the pure SIB approach; (2) the fraction of elective target volume not included in the boost volume was characterised by a higher level of dose heterogeneity; (3) the spinal cord never reached tolerance

  3. Modulating Calcium Signals to Boost AON Exon Skipping for DMD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    changing DMD treatment. We have assessed whether dantrolene, an already FDA-approved drug , can boost efficacy of AON exon skipping in the context of...RNA Seq analysis to identify mechanisms of activity and specificity in order to guide discovery of second-generation skipping drugs or combinations...for DMD. Here, we will assess whether dantrolene, an FDA-approved drug already demonstrated to boost efficacy of AON exon skipping in the context of

  4. SCALING OF THE ANOMALOUS BOOST IN RELATIVISTIC JET BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional interaction of a relativistic jet and an external medium. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations show an anomalous boost of the jet fluid in the boundary layer, as previously reported. We describe the boost mechanism using an ideal relativistic fluid and magnetohydrodynamic theory. The kinetic model is also examined for further understanding. Simple scaling laws for the maximum Lorentz factor are derived, and verified by the simulations.

  5. Modified cyanobacteria

    DOEpatents

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  6. Image segmentation survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The methodologies and capabilities of image segmentation techniques are reviewed. Single linkage schemes, hybrid linkage schemes, centroid linkage schemes, histogram mode seeking, spatial clustering, and split and merge schemes are addressed.

  7. CPCs with segmented absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Keita, M.; Robertson, H.S. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the most promising means of improving the performance of solar thermal collectors is to reduce the energy lost by the hot absorber. One way to do this, not currently part of the technology, is to recognize that since the absorber is usually not irradiated uniformly, it is therefore possible to construct an absorber of thermally isolated segments, circulate the fluid in sequence from low to high irradiance segments, and reduce loss by improving effective concentration. This procedure works even for ideal concentrators, without violating Winston's theorem. Two equivalent CPC collectors with single and segmented absorber were constructed and compared under actual operating conditions. The results showed that the daily thermal efficiency of the collector with segmented absorber is higher (about 13%) than that of the collector with nonsegmented absorber.

  8. Multi-atlas learner fusion: An efficient segmentation approach for large-scale data.

    PubMed

    Asman, Andrew J; Huo, Yuankai; Plassard, Andrew J; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-12-01

    We propose multi-atlas learner fusion (MLF), a framework for rapidly and accurately replicating the highly accurate, yet computationally expensive, multi-atlas segmentation framework based on fusing local learners. In the largest whole-brain multi-atlas study yet reported, multi-atlas segmentations are estimated for a training set of 3464 MR brain images. Using these multi-atlas estimates we (1) estimate a low-dimensional representation for selecting locally appropriate example images, and (2) build AdaBoost learners that map a weak initial segmentation to the multi-atlas segmentation result. Thus, to segment a new target image we project the image into the low-dimensional space, construct a weak initial segmentation, and fuse the trained, locally selected, learners. The MLF framework cuts the runtime on a modern computer from 36 h down to 3-8 min - a 270× speedup - by completely bypassing the need for deformable atlas-target registrations. Additionally, we (1) describe a technique for optimizing the weak initial segmentation and the AdaBoost learning parameters, (2) quantify the ability to replicate the multi-atlas result with mean accuracies approaching the multi-atlas intra-subject reproducibility on a testing set of 380 images, (3) demonstrate significant increases in the reproducibility of intra-subject segmentations when compared to a state-of-the-art multi-atlas framework on a separate reproducibility dataset, (4) show that under the MLF framework the large-scale data model significantly improve the segmentation over the small-scale model under the MLF framework, and (5) indicate that the MLF framework has comparable performance as state-of-the-art multi-atlas segmentation algorithms without using non-local information.

  9. GPS Control Segment Improvements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    Systems Center GPS Control Segment Improvements Mr. Tim McIntyre GPS Product Support Manager GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division Peterson...hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment Improvements 5a. CONTRACT

  10. Squaring a Circular Segment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Consider a circular segment (the smaller portion of a circle cut off by one of its chords) with chord length c and height h (the greatest distance from a point on the arc of the circle to the chord). Is there a simple formula involving c and h that can be used to closely approximate the area of this circular segment? Ancient Chinese and Egyptian…

  11. Squaring a Circular Segment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Consider a circular segment (the smaller portion of a circle cut off by one of its chords) with chord length c and height h (the greatest distance from a point on the arc of the circle to the chord). Is there a simple formula involving c and h that can be used to closely approximate the area of this circular segment? Ancient Chinese and Egyptian…

  12. Segmented pyroelector detector

    DOEpatents

    Stotlar, S.C.; McLellan, E.J.

    1981-01-21

    A pyroelectric detector is described which has increased voltage output and improved responsivity over equivalent size detectors. The device comprises a plurality of edge-type pyroelectric detectors which have a length which is much greater than the width of the segments between the edge-type electrodes. External circuitry connects the pyroelectric detector segments in parallel to provide a single output which maintains 50 ohm impedance characteristics.

  13. Materials development for precision segmented reflector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Willis, Paul B.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements developed to guide the selection of current and future materials for precision segmented reflectors are presented along with a list of desirable properties. Some potential candidate materials including modified fiber reinforced organic matrix composites as well as carbon/carbon composites, graphite/glass composites, and metal matrix composites are identified. It is noted that in the near term, it is likely that modified fiber reinforced organic matrix composites have good applicability. In the longer term, materials such as carbon/carbon composites, graphite/glass composites and metal matrix composites may provide the best mix of properties.

  14. Our intraoperative boost radiotherapy experience and applications

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Semra; Alan, Ömür; Yalçın, Orhan; Türkmen, Aygen; Dizdar, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present our experience since November 2013, and case selection criteria for intraoperative boost radiotherapy (IObRT) that significantly reduces the local recurrence rate after breast conserving surgery in patients with breast cancer. Material and Methods: Patients who were suitable for IObRT were identified within the group of patients who were selected for breast conserving surgery at our breast council. A MOBETRON (mobile linear accelerator for IObRT) was used for IObRt during surgery. Results: Patients younger than 60 years old with <3 cm invasive ductal cancer in one focus (or two foci within 2 cm), with a histologic grade of 2–3, and a high possibility of local recurrence were admitted for IObRT application. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed and advancement flaps were prepared according to the size and inclination of the conus following evaluation of tumor size and surgical margins by pathology. Distance to the thoracic wall was measured, and a radiation oncologist and radiation physicist calculated the required dose. Anesthesia was regulated with slower ventilation frequency, without causing hypoxia. The skin and incision edges were protected, the field was radiated (with 6 MeV electron beam of 10 Gy) and the incision was closed. In our cases, there were no major postoperative surgical or early radiotherapy related complications. Conclusion: The completion of another stage of local therapy with IObRT during surgery positively effects sequencing of other treatments like chemotherapy, hormonotherapy and radiotherapy, if required. IObRT increases disease free and overall survival, as well as quality of life in breast cancer patients. PMID:26985156

  15. The segment polarity network is a robust developmental module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Dassow, George; Meir, Eli; Munro, Edwin M.; Odell, Garrett M.

    2000-07-01

    All insects possess homologous segments, but segment specification differs radically among insect orders. In Drosophila, maternal morphogens control the patterned activation of gap genes, which encode transcriptional regulators that shape the patterned expression of pair-rule genes. This patterning cascade takes place before cellularization. Pair-rule gene products subsequently `imprint' segment polarity genes with reiterated patterns, thus defining the primordial segments. This mechanism must be greatly modified in insect groups in which many segments emerge only after cellularization. In beetles and parasitic wasps, for instance, pair-rule homologues are expressed in patterns consistent with roles during segmentation, but these patterns emerge within cellular fields. In contrast, although in locusts pair-rule homologues may not control segmentation, some segment polarity genes and their interactions are conserved. Perhaps segmentation is modular, with each module autonomously expressing a characteristic intrinsic behaviour in response to transient stimuli. If so, evolution could rearrange inputs to modules without changing their intrinsic behaviours. Here we suggest, using computer simulations, that the Drosophila segment polarity genes constitute such a module, and that this module is resistant to variations in the kinetic constants that govern its behaviour.

  16. An automatic cells detection and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ligong; Le, T. Hoang Ngan; Savvides, Marios

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an end-to-end framework for automatically detecting and segmenting blood cells including normal red blood cells (RBCs), connected RBCs, abnormal RBCs (i.e. tear drop, burr cell, helmet, etc.) and white blood cells (WBCs). Our proposed system contains several components to solve different problems regarding RBCs and WBCs. We first design a novel blood cell color representation which is able to emphasize the RBCs and WBCs in separate channels. Template matching technique is then employed to individually detect RBCs and WBCs in our proposed representation. In order to automatically segment the RBCs and nuclei from WBCs, we develop an adaptive level set-based segmentation method which makes use of both local and global information. The detected and segmented RBCs, however, can be a single RBC, a connected RBC or an abnormal RBC. Therefore, we first separate and reconstruct RBCs from the connected RBCs by our suggested modified template matching. Shape matching by inner distance is later used to classify the abnormal RBCs from the normal RBCs. Our proposed method has been tested and evaluated on different images from ALL-IDB,10 WebPath,24 UPMC,23 Flicker datasets, and the one used by Mohamed et al.14 The precision and recall of RBCs detection are 98.43% and 94.99% respectively, whereas those of WBCs detection are 99.12% and 99.12%. The F-measure of our proposed WBCs segmentation gets up to 95.8%.

  17. Rediscovering market segmentation.

    PubMed

    Yankelovich, Daniel; Meer, David

    2006-02-01

    In 1964, Daniel Yankelovich introduced in the pages of HBR the concept of nondemographic segmentation, by which he meant the classification of consumers according to criteria other than age, residence, income, and such. The predictive power of marketing studies based on demographics was no longer strong enough to serve as a basis for marketing strategy, he argued. Buying patterns had become far better guides to consumers' future purchases. In addition, properly constructed nondemographic segmentations could help companies determine which products to develop, which distribution channels to sell them in, how much to charge for them, and how to advertise them. But more than 40 years later, nondemographic segmentation has become just as unenlightening as demographic segmentation had been. Today, the technique is used almost exclusively to fulfill the needs of advertising, which it serves mainly by populating commercials with characters that viewers can identify with. It is true that psychographic types like "High-Tech Harry" and "Joe Six-Pack" may capture some truth about real people's lifestyles, attitudes, self-image, and aspirations. But they are no better than demographics at predicting purchase behavior. Thus they give corporate decision makers very little idea of how to keep customers or capture new ones. Now, Daniel Yankelovich returns to these pages, with consultant David Meer, to argue the case for a broad view of nondemographic segmentation. They describe the elements of a smart segmentation strategy, explaining how segmentations meant to strengthen brand identity differ from those capable of telling a company which markets it should enter and what goods to make. And they introduce their "gravity of decision spectrum", a tool that focuses on the form of consumer behavior that should be of the greatest interest to marketers--the importance that consumers place on a product or product category.

  18. Exploiting individual primary visual cortex geometry to boost steady state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, M Isabel; Blangero, Annabelle; Kelly, Simon P

    2013-06-01

    The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is an electroencephalographic response to flickering stimuli generated partly in primary visual area V1. The typical 'cruciform' geometry and retinotopic organization of V1 is such that certain neighboring visual regions project to neighboring cortical regions of opposite orientation. Here, we explored ways to exploit this organization in order to boost scalp SSVEP amplitude via oscillatory summation. We manipulated flicker-phase offsets among angular segments of a large annular stimulus in three ways, and compared the resultant SSVEP power to a conventional condition with no temporal phase offsets. (1) We divided the annulus into standard octants for all subjects, and flickered upper horizontal octants with opposite temporal phase to the lower horizontal ones, and left vertical octants opposite to the right vertical ones; (2) we individually adjusted the boundaries between the eight contiguous segments of the standard octants condition to coincide with cruciform-consistent, early-latency topographical shifts in pattern-pulse multifocal visual-evoked potentials (PPMVEP) derived for each of 32 equal-sized segments; (3) we assigned phase offsets to stimulus segments following an automatic algorithm based on the relative amplitudes of vertically- and horizontally-oriented PPMVEP components. The three flicker-phase manipulations resulted in a significant enhancement of normalized SSVEP power of (1) 202%, (2) 383%, and (3) 300%, respectively. We have thus demonstrated a means to obtain more reliable measures of visual evoked activity purely through consideration of cortical geometry. This principle stands to impact both basic and clinical research using SSVEPs.

  19. Fast tip-tilt segment alignment for segmented mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvarč, Jure

    2016-07-01

    A method for fast identification of segments and alignment of the segmented mirrors has been developed and applied for the deformable mirror of the WHT AO system (NAOMI) and for the GTC 36-segment primary mirror. By moving each segment by a known but different amount and in a different direction it is possible to identify many segments simultaneously using a pattern-matching algorithm which finds spots that have moved by a segment-specific vector from one image to another. The method does not need any special optical setup. The applicability of the method for the segmented primary mirrors of future telescopes is discussed.

  20. External beam boost versus interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the adjuvant radiotherapy following breast-conserving therapy in early-stage breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison

    PubMed Central

    Melchert, Corinna; Kovács, György

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the dosimetric data of local tumor's bed dose escalation (boost) with photon beams (external beam radiation therapy – EBRT) versus high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BT) after breast-conserving treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods We analyzed the treatment planning data of 136 irradiated patients, treated between 2006 and 2013, who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation (WBI; 50.4 Gy) and boost (HDR-BT: 10 Gy in one fraction [n = 36]; EBRT: 10 Gy in five fractions [n = 100]). Organs at risk (OAR; heart, ipsilateral lung, skin, most exposed rib segment) were delineated. Dosimetric parameters were calculated with the aid of dose-volume histograms (DVH). A non-parametric test was performed to compare the two different boost forms. Results There was no difference for left-sided cancers regarding the maximum dose to the heart (HDR-BT 29.8% vs. EBRT 29.95%, p = 0.34). The maximum doses to the other OAR were significantly lower for HDR-BT (Dmax lung 47.12% vs. 87.7%, p < 0.01; rib 61.17% vs. 98.5%, p < 0.01; skin 57.1% vs. 94.75%, p < 0.01; in the case of right-sided breast irradiation, dose of the heart 6.00% vs. 16.75%, p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared to EBRT, local dose escalation with HDR-BT presented a significant dose reduction to the investigated OAR. Only left-sided irradiation showed no difference regarding the maximum dose to the heart. Reducing irradiation exposure to OAR could result in a reduction of long-term side effects. Therefore, from a dosimetric point of view, an interstitial boost complementary to WBI via EBRT seems to be more advantageous in the adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:27648082

  1. How Vein Sealing Boosts Fracture Opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüchter, Jens-Alexander

    2015-04-01

    an increase in the fracture opening rates. (4) At constant strain rates, the rate of fracture opening increases with increasing strain. These results suggest that vein sealing boosts the rate of fracture opening, and contributes to development of low-aspect ratio veins.

  2. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Boosted Fast Flux Loop Project Staff

    2009-09-01

    The Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) project was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Originally called the Gas Test Loop (GTL) project, the activity included (1) determination of requirements that must be met for the GTL to be responsive to potential users, (2) a survey of nuclear facilities that may successfully host the GTL, (3) conceptualizing designs for hardware that can support the needed environments for neutron flux intensity and energy spectrum, atmosphere, flow, etc. needed by the experimenters, and (4) examining other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation and disposal, environmental concerns, needs for additional infrastructure, and requirements for interfacing with the host facility. A revised project plan included requesting an interim decision, termed CD-1A, that had objectives of' establishing the site for the project at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a research program that would resolve the most pressing technical questions regarding GTL feasibility, including issues relating to the use of booster fuel in the ATR. Major research tasks were (1) hydraulic testing to establish flow conditions through the booster fuel, (2) mini-plate irradiation tests and post-irradiation examination to alleviate concerns over corrosion at the high heat fluxes planned, (3) development and demonstration of booster fuel fabrication techniques, and (4) a review of the impact of the GTL on the ATR safety basis. A revised cooling concept for the apparatus was conceptualized, which resulted in renaming the project to the BFFL. Before the subsequent CD-1 approval request could be made, a decision was made in April 2006

  3. Scorpion image segmentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, E.; Aibinu, A. M.; Sadiq, B. A.; Bello Salau, H.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Death as a result of scorpion sting has been a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite the high rate of death as a result of scorpion sting, little report exists in literature of intelligent device and system for automatic detection of scorpion. This paper proposed a digital image processing approach based on the floresencing characteristics of Scorpion under Ultra-violet (UV) light for automatic detection and identification of scorpion. The acquired UV-based images undergo pre-processing to equalize uneven illumination and colour space channel separation. The extracted channels are then segmented into two non-overlapping classes. It has been observed that simple thresholding of the green channel of the acquired RGB UV-based image is sufficient for segmenting Scorpion from other background components in the acquired image. Two approaches to image segmentation have also been proposed in this work, namely, the simple average segmentation technique and K-means image segmentation. The proposed algorithm has been tested on over 40 UV scorpion images obtained from different part of the world and results obtained show an average accuracy of 97.7% in correctly classifying the pixel into two non-overlapping clusters. The proposed 1system will eliminate the problem associated with some of the existing manual approaches presently in use for scorpion detection.

  4. Robust vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Susanne; Kühnel, Caroline; Boskamp, Tobias; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2008-03-01

    In the context of cardiac applications, the primary goal of coronary vessel analysis often consists in supporting the diagnosis of vessel wall anomalies, such as coronary plaque and stenosis. Therefore, a fast and robust segmentation of the coronary tree is a very important but challenging task. We propose a new approach for coronary artery segmentation. Our method is based on an earlier proposed progressive region growing. A new growth front monitoring technique controls the segmentation and corrects local leakage by retrospective detection and removal of leakage artifacts. While progressively reducing the region growing threshold for the whole image, the growing process is locally analyzed using criteria based on the assumption of tubular, gradually narrowing vessels. If a voxel volume limit or a certain shape constraint is exceeded, the growing process is interrupted. Voxels affected by a failed segmentation are detected and deleted from the result. To avoid further processing at these positions, a large neighborhood is blocked for growing. Compared to a global region growing without local correction, our new local growth control and the adapted correction can deal with contrast decrease even in very small coronary arteries. Furthermore, our algorithm can efficiently handle noise artifacts and partial volume effects near the myocardium. The enhanced segmentation of more distal vessel parts was tested on 150 CT datasets. Furthermore, a comparison between the pure progressive region growing and our new approach was conducted.

  5. Cooperative processes in image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research into the role of cooperative, or relaxation, processes in image segmentation is surveyed. Cooperative processes can be employed at several levels of the segmentation process as a preprocessing enhancement step, during supervised or unsupervised pixel classification and, finally, for the interpretation of image segments based on segment properties and relations.

  6. Segmented heterochromia in scalp hair.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kyeong Han; Kim, Daehwan; Sohn, Seonghyang; Lee, Won Soo

    2003-12-01

    Segmented heterochromia of scalp hair is characterized by the irregularly alternating segmentation of hair into dark and light bands and is known to be associated with iron deficiency anemia. The authors report the case of an 11-year-old boy with segmented heterochromia associated with iron deficiency anemia. After 11 months of iron replacement, the boy's segmented heterochromic hair recovered completely.

  7. Cooperative processes in image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research into the role of cooperative, or relaxation, processes in image segmentation is surveyed. Cooperative processes can be employed at several levels of the segmentation process as a preprocessing enhancement step, during supervised or unsupervised pixel classification and, finally, for the interpretation of image segments based on segment properties and relations.

  8. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Here again, a basic segmental plan for the head has been sought among chordates. We convened a symposium that brought together leading researchers dealing with this problem, in a number of different evolutionary and developmental contexts. Here we give an overview of the outcome and the status of the field in this modern era of Evo-Devo. We emphasize the fact that the head segmentation problem is not fully resolved, and we discuss new directions in the search for hints for a way out of this maze. PMID:20607135

  9. Segmented annular combustor

    DOEpatents

    Reider, Samuel B.

    1979-01-01

    An industrial gas turbine engine includes an inclined annular combustor made up of a plurality of support segments each including inner and outer walls of trapezoidally configured planar configuration extents and including side flanges thereon interconnected by means of air cooled connector bolt assemblies to form a continuous annular combustion chamber therebetween and wherein an air fuel mixing chamber is formed at one end of the support segments including means for directing and mixing fuel within a plenum and a perforated header plate for directing streams of air and fuel mixture into the combustion chamber; each of the outer and inner walls of each of the support segments having a ribbed lattice with tracks slidably supporting porous laminated replaceable panels and including pores therein for distributing combustion air into the combustion chamber while cooling the inner surface of each of the panels by transpiration cooling thereof.

  10. [Pulmonary segmental mediolytic arteriopathy].

    PubMed

    Müller, A M; Kullmann, H J

    2006-03-01

    Segmental mediolytic arteriopathy (SMA) is defined as non-inflammatory arteriopathy with mediolysis due to segmental loss of media and consecutive formation of vascular gaps. Up to now, less than 40 cases of visceral and cerebral SMA and, to our knowledge, only one case of pulmonary SMA have been reported. We present the history of a 21 year old female patient, admitted to hospital with hemoptysis, but without other symptoms. Apart from two lesions in the sixth and tenth pulmonary segment, documented by CT and interpreted as colliquations, there were no other clinical and laboratory findings. Repeated bronchoscopy supplied no further information. Histomorphology of the resected lesion revealed SMA without evidence of vasculitis. Wegener's disease could be excluded. The aetiology of the disease is still unknown. Acute vasospasm (due to inappropriate reactions to catecholamine or endothelial dysfunction), as well as SMA as a precursor or subtype of fibromuscular dysplasia, are two theories still under discussion.

  11. Segmental curvilinear distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libin; Shang, Hongtao; Feng, Zhihong; Liu, Chen; Ye, Wenmin; Ma, Qin; Wu, Wei; Liu, Yanpu

    2012-10-01

    Curvilinear distraction is currently under investigation to reconstruct curved maxillofacial bone defects. However, previous studies have revealed the discrepancy between the contour of the regenerated bone in the distraction gap and the curvilinear pathway of the transport disc. We hypothesize that the discrepancy is because of the conflict of the distraction vector and the strain vector during the consolidation. In curvilinear distraction osteogenesis, the distraction vector varies, while the strain vector during the consolidation phase is fixed-linear, from the beginning to the end of the distraction pathway. Here we bring forward a solution of segmental curvilinear distraction osteogenesis to divide the curvilinear distraction into several segments, with respective consolidation for each distraction gap. If this hypothesis is verified, the segmental distraction curvilinear distraction will benefit the reconstruction of complicated long-range maxillofacial bone defects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved semi-supervised online boosting for object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yicui; Qi, Lin; Tan, Shukun

    2016-10-01

    The advantage of an online semi-supervised boosting method which takes object tracking problem as a classification problem, is training a binary classifier from labeled and unlabeled examples. Appropriate object features are selected based on real time changes in the object. However, the online semi-supervised boosting method faces one key problem: The traditional self-training using the classification results to update the classifier itself, often leads to drifting or tracking failure, due to the accumulated error during each update of the tracker. To overcome the disadvantages of semi-supervised online boosting based on object tracking methods, the contribution of this paper is an improved online semi-supervised boosting method, in which the learning process is guided by positive (P) and negative (N) constraints, termed P-N constraints, which restrict the labeling of the unlabeled samples. First, we train the classification by an online semi-supervised boosting. Then, this classification is used to process the next frame. Finally, the classification is analyzed by the P-N constraints, which are used to verify if the labels of unlabeled data assigned by the classifier are in line with the assumptions made about positive and negative samples. The proposed algorithm can effectively improve the discriminative ability of the classifier and significantly alleviate the drifting problem in tracking applications. In the experiments, we demonstrate real-time tracking of our tracker on several challenging test sequences where our tracker outperforms other related on-line tracking methods and achieves promising tracking performance.

  13. Ionene modified small polymeric beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Linear ionene polyquaternary cationic polymeric segments are bonded by means of the Menshutkin reaction (quaternization) to biocompatible, extremely small, porous particles containing halide or tertiary amine sites which are centers for attachment of the segments. The modified beads in the form of emulsions or suspensions offer a large, positively-charged surface area capable of irreversibly binding polyanions such as heparin, DNA, RNA or bile acids to remove them from solution or of reversibly binding monoanions such as penicillin, pesticides, sex attractants and the like for slow release from the suspension.

  14. A Comprehensive Texture Segmentation Framework for Segmentation of Capillary Non-Perfusion Regions in Fundus Fluorescein Angiograms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yalin; Kwong, Man Ting; MacCormick, Ian J. C.; Beare, Nicholas A. V.; Harding, Simon P.

    2014-01-01

    Capillary non-perfusion (CNP) in the retina is a characteristic feature used in the management of a wide range of retinal diseases. There is no well-established computation tool for assessing the extent of CNP. We propose a novel texture segmentation framework to address this problem. This framework comprises three major steps: pre-processing, unsupervised total variation texture segmentation, and supervised segmentation. It employs a state-of-the-art multiphase total variation texture segmentation model which is enhanced by new kernel based region terms. The model can be applied to texture and intensity-based multiphase problems. A supervised segmentation step allows the framework to take expert knowledge into account, an AdaBoost classifier with weighted cost coefficient is chosen to tackle imbalanced data classification problems. To demonstrate its effectiveness, we applied this framework to 48 images from malarial retinopathy and 10 images from ischemic diabetic maculopathy. The performance of segmentation is satisfactory when compared to a reference standard of manual delineations: accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are 89.0%, 73.0%, and 90.8% respectively for the malarial retinopathy dataset and 80.8%, 70.6%, and 82.1% respectively for the diabetic maculopathy dataset. In terms of region-wise analysis, this method achieved an accuracy of 76.3% (45 out of 59 regions) for the malarial retinopathy dataset and 73.9% (17 out of 26 regions) for the diabetic maculopathy dataset. This comprehensive segmentation framework can quantify capillary non-perfusion in retinopathy from two distinct etiologies, and has the potential to be adopted for wider applications. PMID:24747681

  15. A comprehensive texture segmentation framework for segmentation of capillary non-perfusion regions in fundus fluorescein angiograms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yalin; Kwong, Man Ting; Maccormick, Ian J C; Beare, Nicholas A V; Harding, Simon P

    2014-01-01

    Capillary non-perfusion (CNP) in the retina is a characteristic feature used in the management of a wide range of retinal diseases. There is no well-established computation tool for assessing the extent of CNP. We propose a novel texture segmentation framework to address this problem. This framework comprises three major steps: pre-processing, unsupervised total variation texture segmentation, and supervised segmentation. It employs a state-of-the-art multiphase total variation texture segmentation model which is enhanced by new kernel based region terms. The model can be applied to texture and intensity-based multiphase problems. A supervised segmentation step allows the framework to take expert knowledge into account, an AdaBoost classifier with weighted cost coefficient is chosen to tackle imbalanced data classification problems. To demonstrate its effectiveness, we applied this framework to 48 images from malarial retinopathy and 10 images from ischemic diabetic maculopathy. The performance of segmentation is satisfactory when compared to a reference standard of manual delineations: accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are 89.0%, 73.0%, and 90.8% respectively for the malarial retinopathy dataset and 80.8%, 70.6%, and 82.1% respectively for the diabetic maculopathy dataset. In terms of region-wise analysis, this method achieved an accuracy of 76.3% (45 out of 59 regions) for the malarial retinopathy dataset and 73.9% (17 out of 26 regions) for the diabetic maculopathy dataset. This comprehensive segmentation framework can quantify capillary non-perfusion in retinopathy from two distinct etiologies, and has the potential to be adopted for wider applications.

  16. Application of an enhanced fuzzy algorithm for MR brain tumor image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemanth, D. Jude; Vijila, C. Kezi Selva; Anitha, J.

    2010-02-01

    Image segmentation is one of the significant digital image processing techniques commonly used in the medical field. One of the specific applications is tumor detection in abnormal Magnetic Resonance (MR) brain images. Fuzzy approaches are widely preferred for tumor segmentation which generally yields superior results in terms of accuracy. But most of the fuzzy algorithms suffer from the drawback of slow convergence rate which makes the system practically non-feasible. In this work, the application of modified Fuzzy C-means (FCM) algorithm to tackle the convergence problem is explored in the context of brain image segmentation. This modified FCM algorithm employs the concept of quantization to improve the convergence rate besides yielding excellent segmentation efficiency. This algorithm is experimented on real time abnormal MR brain images collected from the radiologists. A comprehensive feature vector is extracted from these images and used for the segmentation technique. An extensive feature selection process is performed which reduces the convergence time period and improve the segmentation efficiency. After segmentation, the tumor portion is extracted from the segmented image. Comparative analysis in terms of segmentation efficiency and convergence rate is performed between the conventional FCM and the modified FCM. Experimental results show superior results for the modified FCM algorithm in terms of the performance measures. Thus, this work highlights the application of the modified algorithm for brain tumor detection in abnormal MR brain images.

  17. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  18. (In)Direct detection of boosted dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Cui, Yanou; Necib, Lina; Thaler, Jesse

    2016-05-01

    We present a new multi-component dark matter model with a novel experimental signature that mimics neutral current interactions at neutrino detectors. In our model, the dark matter is composed of two particles, a heavier dominant component that annihilates to produce a boosted lighter component that we refer to as boosted dark matter. The lighter component is relativistic and scatters off electrons in neutrino experiments to produce Cherenkov light. This model combines the indirect detection of the dominant component with the direct detection of the boosted dark matter. Directionality can be used to distinguish the dark matter signal from the atmospheric neutrino background. We discuss the viable region of parameter space in current and future experiments.

  19. Medical image segmentation using 3D MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V.; Marchuk, V.; Semenishchev, E.; Cen, Yigang; Agaian, S.

    2017-05-01

    Precise segmentation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image can be a very useful computer aided diagnosis (CAD) tool in clinical routines. Accurate automatic extraction a 3D component from images obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a challenging segmentation problem due to the small size objects of interest (e.g., blood vessels, bones) in each 2D MRA slice and complex surrounding anatomical structures. Our objective is to develop a specific segmentation scheme for accurately extracting parts of bones from MRI images. In this paper, we use a segmentation algorithm to extract the parts of bones from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data sets based on modified active contour method. As a result, the proposed method demonstrates good accuracy in a comparison between the existing segmentation approaches on real MRI data.

  20. Conditional Random Field (CRF)-Boosting: Constructing a Robust Online Hybrid Boosting Multiple Object Tracker Facilitated by CRF Learning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ehwa; Gwak, Jeonghwan; Jeon, Moongu

    2017-01-01

    Due to the reasonably acceptable performance of state-of-the-art object detectors, tracking-by-detection is a standard strategy for visual multi-object tracking (MOT). In particular, online MOT is more demanding due to its diverse applications in time-critical situations. A main issue of realizing online MOT is how to associate noisy object detection results on a new frame with previously being tracked objects. In this work, we propose a multi-object tracker method called CRF-boosting which utilizes a hybrid data association method based on online hybrid boosting facilitated by a conditional random field (CRF) for establishing online MOT. For data association, learned CRF is used to generate reliable low-level tracklets and then these are used as the input of the hybrid boosting. To do so, while existing data association methods based on boosting algorithms have the necessity of training data having ground truth information to improve robustness, CRF-boosting ensures sufficient robustness without such information due to the synergetic cascaded learning procedure. Further, a hierarchical feature association framework is adopted to further improve MOT accuracy. From experimental results on public datasets, we could conclude that the benefit of proposed hybrid approach compared to the other competitive MOT systems is noticeable. PMID:28304366

  1. Planning of Ir-192 seed implants for boost irradiation to the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicker, R.D.; Schmidt-Ullrich, R.; Schiller, B.

    1985-12-01

    The conservative management of early stage breast cancer with tumor excision and irradiation of the breast is becoming increasingly accepted as an alternative to modified radical mastectomy. The radiotherapy typically consists of 45 to 50 Gy delivered with external beam irradiation, followed by boost irradiation of 15 to 20 Gy to the tumor bed using electron beams or interstitial implantation. Pathological evaluation of the excised tumor, clinical assessment, and mammography are used to determine the tissue volume potentially containing a residual tumor burden and therefore requiring boost irradiation. In this paper we describe planning and implantation procedures for Quimby-type breast implants using Ir-192 seeds encapsulated in nylon tubing. This system deviates in several important respects from the requirements of the standard brachytherapy systems. For double-plane implants, optimized values of the interplanar spacing are given for a range of implant sizes, along with the corresponding target dose rates for 1.0 mCi seeds. We also describe a modification of the angiocatheter implantation technique, which allows the radioactive sources to be secured in place by a magnetic cap and washer, thus greatly facilitating the removal of the sources at the end of treatment.

  2. Self-boosting vaccines and their implications for herd immunity.

    PubMed

    Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Lavine, Jennie S; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2012-12-04

    Advances in vaccine technology over the past two centuries have facilitated far-reaching impact in the control of many infections, and today's emerging vaccines could likewise open new opportunities in the control of several diseases. Here we consider the potential, population-level effects of a particular class of emerging vaccines that use specific viral vectors to establish long-term, intermittent antigen presentation within a vaccinated host: in essence, "self-boosting" vaccines. In particular, we use mathematical models to explore the potential role of such vaccines in situations where current immunization raises only relatively short-lived protection. Vaccination programs in such cases are generally limited in their ability to raise lasting herd immunity. Moreover, in certain cases mass vaccination can have the counterproductive effect of allowing an increase in severe disease, through reducing opportunities for immunity to be boosted through natural exposure to infection. Such dynamics have been proposed, for example, in relation to pertussis and varicella-zoster virus. In this context we show how self-boosting vaccines could open qualitatively new opportunities, for example by broadening the effective duration of herd immunity that can be achieved with currently used immunogens. At intermediate rates of self-boosting, these vaccines also alleviate the potential counterproductive effects of mass vaccination, through compensating for losses in natural boosting. Importantly, however, we also show how sufficiently high boosting rates may introduce a new regime of unintended consequences, wherein the unvaccinated bear an increased disease burden. Finally, we discuss important caveats and data needs arising from this work.

  3. [Segmental testicular infarction].

    PubMed

    Ripa Saldías, L; Guarch Troyas, R; Hualde Alfaro, A; de Pablo Cárdenas, A; Ruiz Ramo, M; Pinós Paul, M

    2006-02-01

    We report the case of a 47 years old man previously diagnosed of left hidrocele. After having a recent mild left testicular pain, an ultrasonografic study revealed a solid hipoecoic testicular lesion rounded by a big hidrocele, suggesting a testicular neoplasm. Radical inguinal orchiectomy was made and pathologic study showed segmental testicular infarction. No malignancy was found. We review the literature of the topic.

  4. Segmentation and Impoverished Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Judith J.; Friedman, Samuel R.

    1986-01-01

    The following characteristics of jobs held by impoverished youth who applied for a job training program were examined: (1) benefits; (2) skills; (3) career ladders; and (4) unionization. Results imply that segmentation models are not fruitful as guides to labor market experiences of youth at the bottom of wage scale. Other studies were also…

  5. Cast segment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diem, H. G.; Studhalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation program to determine feasibility of fabricating segmented rocket engine thrust chambers using low cost, lightweight castings extends state of the art in areas of casting size and complexity, and in ability to provide thin sections and narrow, deep, cooling channels. Related developments are discussed.

  6. Semisupervised segmentation of MRI stroke studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Windham, Joe P.; Robbins, Linda

    1997-04-01

    Fast, accurate, and reproducible image segmentation is vital to the diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of many medical situations. We present development and application of a semi-supervised method for segmenting normal and abnormal brain tissues from magnetic resonance images (MRI) of stroke patients. The method does not require manual drawing of the tissue boundaries. It is therefore faster and more reproducible than conventional methods. The steps of the new method are as follows: (1) T2- and T1-weighted MR images are co-registered using a head and hat approach. (2) Intracranial brain volume is segmented from the skull, scalp, and background using a multi-resolution edge tracking algorithm. (3) Additive noise is suppressed (image is restored) using a non-linear edge-preserving filter which preserves partial volume information on average. (4) Image nonuniformities are corrected using a modified lowpass filtering approach. (5) The resulting images are segmented using a self organizing data analysis technique which is similar in principle to the K-means clustering but includes a set of additional heuristic merging and splitting procedures to generate a meaningful segmentation. (6) Segmented regions are labeled white matter, gray matter, CSF, partial volumes of normal tissues, zones of stroke, or partial volumes between stroke and normal tissues. (7) Previous steps are repeated for each slice of the brain and the volume of each tissue type is estimated from the results. Details and significance of each step are explained. Experimental results using a simulation, a phantom, and selected clinical cases are presented.

  7. Mammogram segmentation using maximal cell strength updation in cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Anitha, J; Peter, J Dinesh

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer among women. Mammogram is one of the most effective tools for early detection of the breast cancer. Various computer-aided systems have been introduced to detect the breast cancer from mammogram images. In a computer-aided diagnosis system, detection and segmentation of breast masses from the background tissues is an important issue. In this paper, an automatic segmentation method is proposed to identify and segment the suspicious mass regions of mammogram using a modified transition rule named maximal cell strength updation in cellular automata (CA). In coarse-level segmentation, the proposed method performs an adaptive global thresholding based on the histogram peak analysis to obtain the rough region of interest. An automatic seed point selection is proposed using gray-level co-occurrence matrix-based sum average feature in the coarse segmented image. Finally, the method utilizes CA with the identified initial seed point and the modified transition rule to segment the mass region. The proposed approach is evaluated over the dataset of 70 mammograms with mass from mini-MIAS database. Experimental results show that the proposed approach yields promising results to segment the mass region in the mammograms with the sensitivity of 92.25% and accuracy of 93.48%.

  8. A methodology for boost-glide transport technology planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repic, E. M.; Olson, G. A.; Milliken, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A systematic procedure is presented by which the relative economic value of technology factors affecting design, configuration, and operation of boost-glide transport can be evaluated. Use of the methodology results in identification of first-order economic gains potentially achievable by projected advances in each of the definable, hypersonic technologies. Starting with a baseline vehicle, the formulas, procedures and forms which are integral parts of this methodology are developed. A demonstration of the methodology is presented for one specific boost-glide system.

  9. Quantum AdaBoost algorithm via cluster state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    The principle and theory of quantum computation are investigated by researchers for many years, and further applied to improve the efficiency of classical machine learning algorithms. Based on physical mechanism, a quantum version of AdaBoost (Adaptive Boosting) training algorithm is proposed in this paper, of which purpose is to construct a strong classifier. In the proposed scheme with cluster state in quantum mechanism is to realize the weak learning algorithm, and then update the corresponding weight of examples. As a result, a final classifier can be obtained by combining efficiently weak hypothesis based on measuring cluster state to reweight the distribution of examples.

  10. Buck-boost converter feedback controller design via evolutionary search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareswaran, K.; Devi, V.; Nadeem, S. K.; Sreedevi, V. T.; Palani, S.

    2010-11-01

    Buck-boost converters are switched power converters. The model of the converter system varies from the ON state to the OFF state and hence traditional methods of controller design based on approximate transfer function models do not yield good dynamic response at different operating points of the converter system. This article attempts to design a feedback controller for a buck-boost type dc-dc converter using a genetic algorithm. The feedback controller design is perceived as an optimisation problem and a robust controller is estimated through an evolutionary search. Extensive simulation and experimental results provided in the article show the effectiveness of the new approach.

  11. Boosted Objects: A Probe of Beyond the Standard Model Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Abdesselam, A.; Kuutmann, E.Bergeaas; Bitenc, U.; Brooijmans, G.; Butterworth, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.; Buarque Franzosi, D.; Buckingham, R.; Chapleau, B.; Dasgupta, M.; Davison, A.; Dolen, J.; Ellis, S.; Fassi, F.; Ferrando, J.; Frandsen, M.T.; Frost, J.; Gadfort, T.; Glover, N.; Haas, A.; Halkiadakis, E.; /more authors..

    2012-06-12

    We present the report of the hadronic working group of the BOOST2010 workshop held at the University of Oxford in June 2010. The first part contains a review of the potential of hadronic decays of highly boosted particles as an aid for discovery at the LHC and a discussion of the status of tools developed to meet the challenge of reconstructing and isolating these topologies. In the second part, we present new results comparing the performance of jet grooming techniques and top tagging algorithms on a common set of benchmark channels. We also study the sensitivity of jet substructure observables to the uncertainties in Monte Carlo predictions.

  12. Broken boost invariance in the Glasma via finite nuclei thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipp, Andreas; Müller, David

    2017-08-01

    We simulate the creation and evolution of non-boost-invariant Glasma in the early stages of heavy ion collisions within the color glass condensate framework. This is accomplished by extending the McLerran-Venugopalan model to include a parameter for the Lorentz-contracted but finite width of the nucleus in the beam direction. We determine the rapidity profile of the Glasma energy density, which shows deviations from the boost-invariant result. Varying the parameters both broad and narrow profiles can be produced. We compare our results to experimental data from RHIC and find surprising agreement.

  13. Early boost and slow consolidation in motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Hotermans, Christophe; Peigneux, Philippe; Maertens de Noordhout, Alain; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Motorskill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories suggest that this off-line improvement takes time and appears only after several hours. Here we show an early transient and short-lived boost in performance, emerging as early as 5-30 min after training but no longer observed 4 h later. This early boost is predictive of the performance achieved 48 h later, suggesting its functional relevance for memory processes.

  14. Segmentation in Tardigrada and diversification of segmental patterns in Panarthropoda.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frank W; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-10-31

    The origin and diversification of segmented metazoan body plans has fascinated biologists for over a century. The superphylum Panarthropoda includes three phyla of segmented animals-Euarthropoda, Onychophora, and Tardigrada. This superphylum includes representatives with relatively simple and representatives with relatively complex segmented body plans. At one extreme of this continuum, euarthropods exhibit an incredible diversity of serially homologous segments. Furthermore, distinct tagmosis patterns are exhibited by different classes of euarthropods. At the other extreme, all tardigrades share a simple segmented body plan that consists of a head and four leg-bearing segments. The modular body plans of panarthropods make them a tractable model for understanding diversification of animal body plans more generally. Here we review results of recent morphological and developmental studies of tardigrade segmentation. These results complement investigations of segmentation processes in other panarthropods and paleontological studies to illuminate the earliest steps in the evolution of panarthropod body plans.

  15. OKVAR-Boost: a novel boosting algorithm to infer nonlinear dynamics and interactions in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Lim, Néhémy; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Michailidis, George; d'Alché-Buc, Florence

    2013-06-01

    Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks remains a central challenge in computational systems biology, despite recent advances facilitated by benchmark in silico challenges that have aided in calibrating their performance. A number of approaches using either perturbation (knock-out) or wild-type time-series data have appeared in the literature addressing this problem, with the latter using linear temporal models. Nonlinear dynamical models are particularly appropriate for this inference task, given the generation mechanism of the time-series data. In this study, we introduce a novel nonlinear autoregressive model based on operator-valued kernels that simultaneously learns the model parameters, as well as the network structure. A flexible boosting algorithm (OKVAR-Boost) that shares features from L2-boosting and randomization-based algorithms is developed to perform the tasks of parameter learning and network inference for the proposed model. Specifically, at each boosting iteration, a regularized Operator-valued Kernel-based Vector AutoRegressive model (OKVAR) is trained on a random subnetwork. The final model consists of an ensemble of such models. The empirical estimation of the ensemble model's Jacobian matrix provides an estimation of the network structure. The performance of the proposed algorithm is first evaluated on a number of benchmark datasets from the DREAM3 challenge and then on real datasets related to the In vivo Reverse-Engineering and Modeling Assessment (IRMA) and T-cell networks. The high-quality results obtained strongly indicate that it outperforms existing approaches. The OKVAR-Boost Matlab code is available as the archive: http://amis-group.fr/sourcecode-okvar-boost/OKVARBoost-v1.0.zip. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Acute Toxicity From Breast Cancer Radiation Using Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszynski, Andrzej P; Olson, Anna K; Rong, Yi; Kimple, Randall J; Yadav, Poonam

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate 2 simultaneous integrated boost treatment planning techniques using helical tomotherapy for breast conserving therapy with regard to acute skin toxicity and dosimetry. Thirty-two patients were studied. The original approach was for 16 patients and incorporated a directional block of the ipsilateral lung and breast. An additional 16 patients were planned for using a modified approach that incorporates a full block of the ipsilateral lung exclusive of 4 cm around the breast. Dose-volume histograms of targets and critical structures were evaluated. Skin toxicity monitoring was performed throughout treatment and follow-up using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Treatment was well tolerated with patients receiving a median dose of 59.36 Gy. Of the 16 patients in both groups, 8 had grade 2 erythema immediately after radiation. On 3-week follow-up, 10 and 7 patients in the original and modified groups showed grade 1 erythema. On 3- and 6-month follow-up, both groups had minimal erythema, with all patients having either grade 0 or 1 symptoms. No grade 2 or 3 toxicities were reported. Mean treatment time was 7.5 and 10.4 minutes using the original and modified methods. Adequate dose coverage was achieved using both methods (V95 = 99.5% and 98%). Mean dose to the heart was 10.5 and 1.8 Gy, respectively (P < .01). For right-sided tumors, the original and modified plans yielded a mean of 8.8 and 1.1 Gy (P < .01) versus 11.7 and 2.4 Gy for left-sided tumors (P < .01). The mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was also significantly lower in the modified plans (11.8 vs. 5.0 Gy, P < .01). Tomotherapy is capable of delivering homogeneous treatment plans to the whole breast and lumpectomy cavity using simultaneous integrated boost treatment. Using the treatment methods described herein, extremely low doses to critical structures can be achieved without compromising acute skin toxicity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Segmentation of stereo terrain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Debra A.; Privitera, Claudio M.; Blackmon, Theodore T.; Zbinden, Eric; Stark, Lawrence W.

    2000-06-01

    We have studied four approaches to segmentation of images: three automatic ones using image processing algorithms and a fourth approach, human manual segmentation. We were motivated toward helping with an important NASA Mars rover mission task -- replacing laborious manual path planning with automatic navigation of the rover on the Mars terrain. The goal of the automatic segmentations was to identify an obstacle map on the Mars terrain to enable automatic path planning for the rover. The automatic segmentation was first explored with two different segmentation methods: one based on pixel luminance, and the other based on pixel altitude generated through stereo image processing. The third automatic segmentation was achieved by combining these two types of image segmentation. Human manual segmentation of Martian terrain images was used for evaluating the effectiveness of the combined automatic segmentation as well as for determining how different humans segment the same images. Comparisons between two different segmentations, manual or automatic, were measured using a similarity metric, SAB. Based on this metric, the combined automatic segmentation did fairly well in agreeing with the manual segmentation. This was a demonstration of a positive step towards automatically creating the accurate obstacle maps necessary for automatic path planning and rover navigation.

  18. Recombinant poxvirus boosting of DNA-primed rhesus monkeys augments peak but not memory T lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sampa; Barouch, Dan H; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Lord, Carol I; Krivulka, Georgia R; Yu, Faye; Beddall, Margaret H; Gorgone, Darci A; Lifton, Michelle A; Miura, Ayako; Philippon, Valerie; Manson, Kelledy; Markham, Phillip D; Parrish, John; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Schmitz, Jörn E; Gelman, Rebecca S; Shiver, John W; Montefiori, David C; Panicali, Dennis; Letvin, Norman L

    2004-07-27

    Although a consensus has emerged that an HIV vaccine should elicit a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, the characteristics of an effective vaccine-induced T lymphocyte response remain unclear. We explored this issue in the simian human immunodeficiency virus/rhesus monkey model in the course of assessing the relative immunogenicity of vaccine regimens that included a cytokine-augmented plasmid DNA prime and a boost with DNA or recombinant pox vectors. Recombinant vaccinia virus, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), and recombinant fowlpox were comparable in their immunogenicity. Moreover, whereas the magnitude of the peak vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses in the recombinant pox virus-boosted monkeys was substantially greater than that seen in the monkeys immunized with plasmid DNA alone, the magnitudes of recombinant pox boosted CTL responses decayed rapidly and were comparable to those of the DNA-alone-vaccinated monkeys by the time of viral challenge. Consistent with these comparable memory T cell responses, the clinical protection seen in all groups of experimentally vaccinated monkeys was similar. This study, therefore, indicates that the steady-state memory, rather than the peak effector vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses, may be the critical immune correlate of protection for a CTL-based HIV vaccine.

  19. Adaptive Control of Fast-Scale Bifurcation in Peak Current Controlled Buck-Boost Inverter via One-Cycle Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Dong, Shuai; Guan, Weimin; Yi, Chuanzhi; He, Bo

    In this paper, one-cycle compensation (OCC) method is proposed to realize adaptive control of fast-scale bifurcation in the peak current controlled buck-boost inverter because the proposed control method can adjust the slope of the integrator’s output voltage automatically through extracting a sinusoidal signal from the absolute value of the reference voltage. In order to reveal their underlying mechanisms of fast-scale bifurcations, a modified averaged model which can capture the sample-and-hold effect is derived in detail to describe the fast-scale dynamics of the buck-boost inverter. Based on the proposed model, a theoretical analysis is performed to identify both the fast-scale period-doubling bifurcation and the fast-scale Hopf one by judging in what way the poles loci move. It has been shown that the OCC method can be used not only to discover the unknown dynamical behaviors (i.e. fast-scale Hopf bifurcation), but also to enlarge the stable region in peak current controlled buck-boost inverter. In addition, the critical bifurcation angles and the parameter behavior boundary are given to verify the effectiveness of the adaptive bifurcation control method. Finally, PSpice circuit experiments are performed to verify the above theoretical and numerical results.

  20. Heterologous Prime-Boost Immunisation Regimens Against Infectious Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli [92], Human T-cell leukemia / lymphoma virus type1 ( HTLV -1) [93] and Chlamydophila abortus [94]. 6. Conclusion...T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma virus type1 ( HTLV -1) NYVAC DNA HTLV -1 env prime NYVAC- HTLV -1 env+gag boost Specific Ab, challenge, lymphocyte

  1. Early Boost and Slow Consolidation in Motor Skill Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotermans, Christophe; Peigneux, Philippe; de Noordhout, Alain Maertens; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Motor skill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories suggest that this off-line improvement takes time and appears only after several hours. Here we show an early transient and short-lived boost in performance, emerging as early as…

  2. Real-World Connections Can Boost Journalism Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrier, Kathy; Bott, Don; McGuire, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Describes various ways scholastic journalism advisers have attempted to make real-world connections to boost their journalism programs: critiques of student publications by invited guest speakers (professional journalists); regional workshops where professionals offer short presentations; local media offering programming or special sections aimed…

  3. Boost glycemic control in teen diabetics through 'family focused teamwork'.

    PubMed

    2003-09-01

    While family conflict during the teenaged years is typical, it can have long-term health consequences when it involves an adolescent with diabetes. However, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston have developed a low-cost intervention that aims to remove conflict from disease management responsibilities--and a new study shows that it can boost glycemic control as well.

  4. Repetitive peptide boosting progressively enhances functional memory CTLs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Induction of functional memory CTLs holds promise for fighting critical infectious diseases through vaccination, but so far, no effective regime has been identified. We show here that memory CTLs can be enhanced progressively to high levels by repetitive intravenous boosting with peptide and adjuvan...

  5. Early Boost and Slow Consolidation in Motor Skill Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotermans, Christophe; Peigneux, Philippe; de Noordhout, Alain Maertens; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Motor skill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories suggest that this off-line improvement takes time and appears only after several hours. Here we show an early transient and short-lived boost in performance, emerging as early as…

  6. Graph ensemble boosting for imbalanced noisy graph stream classification.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shirui; Wu, Jia; Zhu, Xingquan; Zhang, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    Many applications involve stream data with structural dependency, graph representations, and continuously increasing volumes. For these applications, it is very common that their class distributions are imbalanced with minority (or positive) samples being only a small portion of the population, which imposes significant challenges for learning models to accurately identify minority samples. This problem is further complicated with the presence of noise, because they are similar to minority samples and any treatment for the class imbalance may falsely focus on the noise and result in deterioration of accuracy. In this paper, we propose a classification model to tackle imbalanced graph streams with noise. Our method, graph ensemble boosting, employs an ensemble-based framework to partition graph stream into chunks each containing a number of noisy graphs with imbalanced class distributions. For each individual chunk, we propose a boosting algorithm to combine discriminative subgraph pattern selection and model learning as a unified framework for graph classification. To tackle concept drifting in graph streams, an instance level weighting mechanism is used to dynamically adjust the instance weight, through which the boosting framework can emphasize on difficult graph samples. The classifiers built from different graph chunks form an ensemble for graph stream classification. Experiments on real-life imbalanced graph streams demonstrate clear benefits of our boosting design for handling imbalanced noisy graph stream.

  7. Culture First: Boosting Program Strength through Cultural Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Scott

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, cultural instruction has been touted as a way to help foreign language programs boost student learning outcomes, enrollments, and many other measures of program strength. In order to investigate the relationship between cultural instruction and program strength in a university-level German program, students in first- and…

  8. Mimotope vaccine efficacy gets a "boost" from native tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-04-01

    Tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-targeting mimotope peptides exert more prominent immunostimulatory functions than unmodified TAAs, with the caveat that some T-cell clones exhibit a relatively low affinity for TAAs. Combining mimotope-based vaccines with native TAAs in a prime-boost setting significantly improves antitumor immunity.

  9. Congress OKs $2 Billion Boost for the NIH.

    PubMed

    2017-07-01

    President Donald Trump last week signed a $1.1 trillion spending bill for fiscal year 2017, including a welcome $2 billion boost for the NIH that will support former Vice President Joe Biden's Cancer Moonshot initiative, among other priorities. However, researchers who rely heavily on NIH grant funding remain concerned about proposed cuts for 2018. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Balance-Boosting Footwear Tips for Older People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Learn About Feet » Tips for Healthy Feet Balance-Boosting Footwear Tips for Older People Balance in all aspects of life is a good ... mental equilibrium isn't the only kind of balance that's important in life. Good physical balance can ...

  11. Boost compensator for use with internal combustion engine with supercharger

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, T.

    1988-04-12

    A boost compensator for controlling the position of a control rack of a fuel injection pump to supply fuel to an internal combustion with a supercharger in response to a boost pressure to be applied to the engine is described. The control rack is movable in a first direction increasing an amount of fuel to be supplied by the fuel injection pump to the engine and in a second direction, opposite to the first direction, decreasing the amount of fuel. The boost compensator comprises: a push rod disposed for forward and rearward movement in response to the boost pressure; a main lever disposed for angular movement about a first pivot; an auxiliary lever disposed for angular movement about a second pivot; return spring means associated with the first portion of the auxiliary lever for resiliently biasing same in one direction about the second pivot; and abutment means mounted on the second portion of the auxiliary lever and engageable with the second portion of the main lever.

  12. Segmental arterial mediolysis.

    PubMed

    Chao, Christine P

    2009-09-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory arteriopathy, which is characterized by dissecting aneurysms resulting from lysis of the outer media of the arterial wall. The most common presentation is abdominal pain and hemorrhage in the elderly. Computed tomography (CT) and angiography imaging findings overlap with various vasculitides and include segmental changes of aneurysm and stenosis. A key distinguishing feature is the presence of dissections, the principle morphologic expression of SAM. Differentiation and exclusion of an inflammatory arteritis is crucial in appropriate management, as immunosuppressants generally used for treatment of vasculitis may be ineffective or even worsen the vasculopathy. Although the disease can be self-limiting without treatment or with conservative medical therapy, the acute process carries a 50% mortality rate and may necessitate urgent surgical and/or endovascular therapy. Prompt recognition and diagnosis are therefore of utmost importance in appropriate management of this rare entity.

  13. Three-dimensional segmentation of bone structures in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Guenther; Knoll, Christian J.; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Albalat, Salvador E.

    1999-05-01

    This work is concerned with the implementation of a fully 3D-consistent, automatic segmentation of bone structures in CT images. The morphological watersheds algorithm has been chosen as the base of the low-level segmentation. The over- segmentation, a phenomenon normally involved with this transformation, has been sorted out successfully by inserting modifying modules that act already within the algorithm. When dealing with a maxillofacial image, this approach also includes the possibility to provide two different divisions of the image: a fine-grained tessellation geared to the following high-level segmentation and a more coarse-grained one for the segmentation of the teeth. In the knowledge-based high-level segmentation, probabilistic considerations make use of specific properties of the 3D low-level regions to find the most probable tissue for each region. Low-level regions that cannot be classified with the necessary certainty are passed to a second stage, where--embedded in their respective environment--they are compared with structural patterns deduced from anatomical knowledge. The tooth segmentation takes the coarse-grained tessellation as its starting point. The few regions making up each tooth are grouped to 3D envelopes--one envelope per tooth. Matched filtering detects the bases of these envelopes. After a refinement they are fitted into the fine- grained, high-level segmented image.

  14. Status of mirror segment production for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, H. M.; Burge, J. H.; Davis, J. M.; Kim, D. W.; Kingsley, J. S.; Law, K.; Loeff, A.; Lutz, R. D.; Merrill, C.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Tuell, M. T.; Weinberger, S. N.; West, S. C.

    2016-07-01

    The Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab at the University of Arizona is responsible for production of the eight 8.4 m segments for the primary mirror of the Giant Magellan Telescope, including one spare off-axis segment. We report on the successful casting of Segment 4, the center segment. Prior to generating the optical surface of Segment 2, we carried out a major upgrade of our 8.4 m Large Optical Generator. The upgrade includes new hardware and software to improve accuracy, safety, reliability and ease of use. We are currently carrying out an upgrade of our 8.4 m polishing machine that includes improved orbital polishing capabilities. We added and modified several components of the optical tests during the manufacture of Segment 1, and we have continued to improve the systems in preparation for Segments 2-8. We completed two projects that were prior commitments before GMT Segment 2: casting and polishing the combined primary and tertiary mirrors for the LSST, and casting and generating a 6.5 m mirror for the Tokyo Atacama Observatory.

  15. Analysis, control and design of a non-inverting buck-boost converter: A bump-less two-level T-S fuzzy PI control.

    PubMed

    Almasi, Omid Naghash; Fereshtehpoor, Vahid; Khooban, Mohammad Hassan; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a new modified fuzzy Two-Level Control Scheme (TLCS) is proposed to control a non-inverting buck-boost converter. Each level of fuzzy TLCS consists of a tuned fuzzy PI controller. In addition, a Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) fuzzy switch proposed to transfer the fuzzy PI controllers to each other in the control system. The major difficulty in designing fuzzy TLCS which degrades its performance is emerging unwanted drastic oscillations in the converter output voltage during replacing the controllers. Thereby, the fuzzy PI controllers in each level of TLCS structure are modified to eliminate these oscillations and improve the system performance. Some simulations and digital signal processor based experiments are conducted on a non-inverting buck-boost converter to support the effectiveness of the proposed TLCS in controlling the converter output voltage. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Passive ranging of boost-phase missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawks, Michael; Perram, Glen

    2007-04-01

    The depth of absorption bands in observed spectra of distant, bright sources can be used to estimate range to the source. Previous efforts in this area relied on Beer's Law to estimate range from observations of infrared CO II bands, with disappointing results. A modified approach is presented that uses band models and observations of the O II absorption band near 762 nm. This band is spectrally isolated from other atmospheric bands, which enables direct estimation of molecular absorption from observed intensity. Range is estimated by comparing observed values of band-average absorption, (see manuscript), against predicted curves derived from either historical data or model predictions. Accuracy of better than 0.5% has been verified in short-range (up to 3km) experiments using a Fourier transform interferometer at 1cm -1 resolution. A conceptual design is described for a small, affordable passive ranging sensor suitable for use on tactical aircraft for missile attack warning and time-to-impact estimation. Models are used to extrapolate experimental results (using 1 cm -1 resolution data) to analyze expected performance of this filter-based system.

  17. Boosting antibody developability through rational sequence optimization

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Daniel; Schulz, Patrick; Litzenburger, Tobias; Spitz, Julia; Hoerer, Stefan; Blech, Michaela; Enenkel, Barbara; Studts, Joey M; Garidel, Patrick; Karow, Anne R

    2015-01-01

    The application of monoclonal antibodies as commercial therapeutics poses substantial demands on stability and properties of an antibody. Therapeutic molecules that exhibit favorable properties increase the success rate in development. However, it is not yet fully understood how the protein sequences of an antibody translates into favorable in vitro molecule properties. In this work, computational design strategies based on heuristic sequence analysis were used to systematically modify an antibody that exhibited a tendency to precipitation in vitro. The resulting series of closely related antibodies showed improved stability as assessed by biophysical methods and long-term stability experiments. As a notable observation, expression levels also improved in comparison with the wild-type candidate. The methods employed to optimize the protein sequences, as well as the biophysical data used to determine the effect on stability under conditions commonly used in the formulation of therapeutic proteins, are described. Together, the experimental and computational data led to consistent conclusions regarding the effect of the introduced mutations. Our approach exemplifies how computational methods can be used to guide antibody optimization for increased stability. PMID:25759214

  18. FMNL formins boost lamellipodial force generation

    PubMed Central

    Kage, Frieda; Winterhoff, Moritz; Dimchev, Vanessa; Mueller, Jan; Thalheim, Tobias; Freise, Anika; Brühmann, Stefan; Kollasser, Jana; Block, Jennifer; Dimchev, Georgi; Geyer, Matthias; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim; Brakebusch, Cord; Stradal, Theresia E. B.; Carlier, Marie-France; Sixt, Michael; Käs, Josef; Faix, Jan; Rottner, Klemens

    2017-01-01

    Migration frequently involves Rac-mediated protrusion of lamellipodia, formed by Arp2/3 complex-dependent branching thought to be crucial for force generation and stability of these networks. The formins FMNL2 and FMNL3 are Cdc42 effectors targeting to the lamellipodium tip and shown here to nucleate and elongate actin filaments with complementary activities in vitro. In migrating B16-F1 melanoma cells, both formins contribute to the velocity of lamellipodium protrusion. Loss of FMNL2/3 function in melanoma cells and fibroblasts reduces lamellipodial width, actin filament density and -bundling, without changing patterns of Arp2/3 complex incorporation. Strikingly, in melanoma cells, FMNL2/3 gene inactivation almost completely abolishes protrusion forces exerted by lamellipodia and modifies their ultrastructural organization. Consistently, CRISPR/Cas-mediated depletion of FMNL2/3 in fibroblasts reduces both migration and capability of cells to move against viscous media. Together, we conclude that force generation in lamellipodia strongly depends on FMNL formin activity, operating in addition to Arp2/3 complex-dependent filament branching. PMID:28327544

  19. ABL beam control segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelchner, Bryan L.; Dauk, Ronald C.

    1998-09-01

    The U.S. Air Force Airborne Laser consists of four primary subsystem segments; aircraft, battle management and C4I, laser device, and beam control segment (BCS). The BCS performs two major function, beam control and fire control, using three primary products, turret assembly, beam transfer assembly, and fire control hardware and software. The fire control sequence involves slewing the turret to the target coordinates as received from the battle management segment, centering the target in the acquisition sensor, acquiring the plume in the coarse track sensor, acquiring the hard body of the missile with the track illuminator laser, and establishing active tracking of the nose of the target theater ballistic missile. The beam control sequence begins after established active nose track by firing another beacon illuminator laser (BILL) to establish the aim point on the missile for the high energy laser. The resulting spot on the missile is imaged in the wavefront sensor and compared with the outgoing sample of the BILL. By applying the conjugate of the wavefront difference from the beacon to a deformable mirror then the atmosphere serves to correct the arriving wavefront on target. At this point the HEL is fired along the same path with similar wavefront correction, and dwells on target until the missile skin is weakened and rips open or buckles.

  20. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  1. Phase structure in segmented polyurethanes having fatty acid-based soft segments

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovi?, Zoran S.; Hong, DooPyo; Javni, Ivan; Erina, Natalia; Zhang, Fan; Ilavsk?, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Structural studies on two segmented polyurethanes prepared form the modified oleic acid soft segments and butane diol/diphenylmethane diisocyanate hard segments, were carried out. Polyurethanes were thermoplastic elastomers with soft segment concentration (SSC) of 50% (TPU-50) and 70% (TPU-70). Dynamic mechanical analysis revealed the co-continuous morphology in TPU-50 and dispersed hard domains in the soft matrix in TPU-70. AFM revealed the micron size globules in TPU-70 ascribed to hard segment-rich spherulites and alternating small soft and hard domains in TPU- 50, with lateral dimensions of about 15 nm with local modulus deviations from 40 to 50 MPa, consistent with co-continuous morphology. The dispersed hard domains in the soft matrix for TPU-70, and co-continuous phases in TPU-50 morphology was confirmed. USAXS showed the domain spacing for TPU-50 was about 13.3 nm and about 11.3 nm for TPU-70. USAXS revealed that the interface between phase-separated domains exhibit a surface-fractal-like behavior.

  2. Benefit of Radiation Boost After Whole-Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo; Borghesi, Simona; Saieva, Calogero; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Iannalfi, Alberto; Greto, Daniela; Paiar, Fabiola; Scoccianti, Silvia; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Bianchi, Simonetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Biti, Giampaolo

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether a boost to the tumor bed after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) to the whole breast affects local control and disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,138 patients with pT1 to pT2 breast cancer underwent adjuvant RT at the University of Florence. We analyzed only patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year (range, 1-20 years), with negative surgical margins. The median age of the patient population was 52.0 years (+-7.9 years). The breast cancer relapse incidence probability was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and differences between patient subgroups were compared by the log rank test. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the risk of breast cancer relapse. Results: On univariate survival analysis, boost to the tumor bed reduced breast cancer recurrence (p < 0.0001). Age and tamoxifen also significantly reduced breast cancer relapse (p = 0.01 and p = 0.014, respectively). On multivariate analysis, the boost and the medium age (45-60 years) were found to be inversely related to breast cancer relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 0.27; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.14-0.52, and HR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.37-0.99, respectively). The effect of the boost was more evident in younger patients (HR, 0.15 and 95% CI, 0.03-0.66 for patients <45 years of age; and HR, 0.31 and 95% CI, 0.13-0.71 for patients 45-60 years) on multivariate analyses stratified by age, although it was not a significant predictor in women older than 60 years. Conclusion: Our results suggest that boost to the tumor bed reduces breast cancer relapse and is more effective in younger patients.

  3. Segmenting the Adult Education Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aurand, Tim

    1994-01-01

    Describes market segmentation and how the principles of segmentation can be applied to the adult education market. Indicates that applying segmentation techniques to adult education programs results in programs that are educationally and financially satisfying and serve an appropriate population. (JOW)

  4. Market Segmentation for Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the advantages and limitations of market segmentation as strategy for the marketing of information services made available by nonprofit organizations, particularly libraries. Market segmentation is defined, a market grid for libraries is described, and the segmentation of information services is outlined. A 16-item reference list is…

  5. Segmenting the Adult Education Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aurand, Tim

    1994-01-01

    Describes market segmentation and how the principles of segmentation can be applied to the adult education market. Indicates that applying segmentation techniques to adult education programs results in programs that are educationally and financially satisfying and serve an appropriate population. (JOW)

  6. Market Segmentation for Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the advantages and limitations of market segmentation as strategy for the marketing of information services made available by nonprofit organizations, particularly libraries. Market segmentation is defined, a market grid for libraries is described, and the segmentation of information services is outlined. A 16-item reference list is…

  7. Functional Segments in Tongue Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Maureen; Epstein, Melissa A.; Iskarous, Khalil

    2004-01-01

    The tongue is a deformable object, and moves by compressing or expanding local functional segments. For any single phoneme, these functional tongue segments may move in similar or opposite directions, and may reach target maximum synchronously or not. This paper will discuss the independence of five proposed segments in the production of speech.…

  8. Functional Segments in Tongue Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Maureen; Epstein, Melissa A.; Iskarous, Khalil

    2004-01-01

    The tongue is a deformable object, and moves by compressing or expanding local functional segments. For any single phoneme, these functional tongue segments may move in similar or opposite directions, and may reach target maximum synchronously or not. This paper will discuss the independence of five proposed segments in the production of speech.…

  9. 14 CFR 29.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Systems § 29.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... failure of all engines. (b) Each alternate system may be a duplicate power portion or a manually operated... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control...

  10. 14 CFR 29.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Systems § 29.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... failure of all engines. (b) Each alternate system may be a duplicate power portion or a manually operated... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control...

  11. 14 CFR 27.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Systems § 27.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... failure of all engines. (b) Each alternate system may be a duplicate power portion or a manually operated... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control...

  12. 14 CFR 27.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Systems § 27.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... failure of all engines. (b) Each alternate system may be a duplicate power portion or a manually operated... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control...

  13. Modified SEAGULL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.; Kuehn, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    Original version of program incorporated into program SRGULL (LEW-15093) for use on National Aero-Space Plane project, its duty being to model forebody, inlet, and nozzle portions of vehicle. However, real-gas chemistry effects in hypersonic flow fields limited accuracy of that version, because it assumed perfect-gas properties. As a result, SEAGULL modified according to real-gas equilibrium-chemistry methodology. This program analyzes two-dimensional, hypersonic flows of real gases. Modified version of SEAGULL maintains as much of original program as possible, and retains ability to execute original perfect-gas version.

  14. Segmentation of Unstructured Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Smitha

    1996-01-01

    Datasets generated by computer simulations and experiments in Computational Fluid Dynamics tend to be extremely large and complex. It is difficult to visualize these datasets using standard techniques like Volume Rendering and Ray Casting. Object Segmentation provides a technique to extract and quantify regions of interest within these massive datasets. This thesis explores basic algorithms to extract coherent amorphous regions from two-dimensional and three-dimensional scalar unstructured grids. The techniques are applied to datasets from Computational Fluid Dynamics and from Finite Element Analysis.

  15. SEGMENTAL CLAVICLE FRACTURE

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Evander Azevedo

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to present an unusual case of segmental clavicle fracture associated with ipsilateral rib fracture. Although the clavicle is very superficial, undetected cases of both types of fracture may occur, because these patients usually suffer multiple trauma. The case of a patient with a fracture of the diaphysis and lateral extremity of the clavicle is described: the patient was treated surgically and an excellent result was achieved. Similar cases in the literature are reviewed and their management is discussed. PMID:27047835

  16. Modified Lorentz transformations in deformed special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesi, G.; Greselin, M.; Deleidi, L.; Peruzza, R. A.

    2017-05-01

    We have extended a recent approach to Deformed Special Relativity based on deformed dispersion laws, entailing modified Lorentz transformations and, at the same time, noncommutative geometry and intrinsically discrete space-time. In so doing we have obtained the explicit form of the modified Lorentz transformations for a special class of modified momentum-energy relations often found in literature and arising from quantum gravity and elementary particle physics. Actually, our theory looks as a very simple and natural extension of special relativity to include a momentum cutoff at the Planck scale. In particular, the new Lorentz transformations do imply that for high boost speed (V ˜ c) the deformed Lorentz factor does not diverge as in ordinary relativity, but results to be upper bounded by a large finite value of the order of the ratio between the Planck mass and the particle mass. We have also predicted that a generic boost leaves unchanged Planck energy and momentum, which result invariant with respect to any reference frame. Finally, through matrix deformation functions, we have extended our theory to more general cases with dispersion laws containing momentum-energy mixed terms.

  17. Spacecraft boost and abort guidance and control systems requirement study, boost dynamics and control analysis study. Exhibit A: Boost dynamics and control anlaysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. E.; Price, J. B.; Lemon, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    The simulation developments for use in dynamics and control analysis during boost from liftoff to orbit insertion are reported. Also included are wind response studies of the NR-GD 161B/B9T delta wing booster/delta wing orbiter configuration, the MSC 036B/280 inch solid rocket motor configuration, the MSC 040A/L0X-propane liquid injection TVC configuration, the MSC 040C/dual solid rocket motor configuration, and the MSC 049/solid rocket motor configuration. All of the latest math models (rigid and flexible body) developed for the MSC/GD Space Shuttle Functional Simulator, are included.

  18. Neural cell image segmentation method based on support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Shiwei; Ren, Kan

    2015-10-01

    In the analysis of neural cell images gained by optical microscope, accurate and rapid segmentation is the foundation of nerve cell detection system. In this paper, a modified image segmentation method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed to reduce the adverse impact caused by low contrast ratio between objects and background, adherent and clustered cells' interference etc. Firstly, Morphological Filtering and OTSU Method are applied to preprocess images for extracting the neural cells roughly. Secondly, the Stellate Vector, Circularity and Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) features are computed to train SVM model. Finally, the incremental learning SVM classifier is used to classify the preprocessed images, and the initial recognition areas identified by the SVM classifier are added to the library as the positive samples for training SVM model. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve much better segmented results than the classic segmentation algorithms.

  19. MR PROSTATE SEGMENTATION VIA DISTRIBUTED DISCRIMINATIVE DICTIONARY (DDD) LEARNING.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanrong; Zhan, Yiqiang; Gao, Yaozong; Jiang, Jianguo; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    Segmenting prostate from MR images is important yet challenging. Due to non-Gaussian distribution of prostate appearances in MR images, the popular active appearance model (AAM) has its limited performance. Although the newly developed sparse dictionary learning method[1, 2] can model the image appearance in a non-parametric fashion, the learned dictionaries still lack the discriminative power between prostate and non-prostate tissues, which is critical for accurate prostate segmentation. In this paper, we propose to integrate deformable model with a novel learning scheme, namely the Distributed Discriminative Dictionary (DDD) learning, which can capture image appearance in a non-parametric and discriminative fashion. In particular, three strategies are designed to boost the tissue discriminative power of DDD. First, minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance (mRMR) feature selection is performed to constrain the dictionary learning in a discriminative feature space. Second, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is employed to assemble residuals from different dictionaries for optimal separation between prostate and non-prostate tissues. Third, instead of learning the global dictionaries, we learn a set of local dictionaries for the local regions (each with small appearance variations) along prostate boundary, thus achieving better tissue differentiation locally. In the application stage, DDDs will provide the appearance cues to robustly drive the deformable model onto the prostate boundary. Experiments on 50 MR prostate images show that our method can yield a Dice Ratio of 88% compared to the manual segmentations, and have 7% improvement over the conventional AAM.

  20. Learning to Rank Atlases for Multiple-Atlas Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Sanroma, Gerard; Wu, Guorong; Gao, Yaozong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, multiple-atlas segmentation (MAS) has achieved a great success in the medical imaging area. The key assumption is that multiple atlases have greater chances of correctly labeling a target image than a single atlas. However, the problem of atlas selection still remains unexplored. Traditionally, image similarity is used to select a set of atlases. Unfortunately, this heuristic criterion is not necessarily related to the final segmentation performance. To solve this seemingly simple but critical problem, we propose a learning-based atlas selection method to pick up the best atlases that would lead to a more accurate segmentation. Our main idea is to learn the relationship between the pairwise appearance of observed instances (i.e., a pair of atlas and target images) and their final labeling performance (e.g., using the Dice ratio). In this way, we select the best atlases based on their expected labeling accuracy. Our atlas selection method is general enough to be integrated with any existing MAS method. We show the advantages of our atlas selection method in an extensive experimental evaluation in the ADNI, SATA, IXI, and LONI LPBA40 datasets. As shown in the experiments, our method can boost the performance of three widely used MAS methods, outperforming other learning-based and image-similarity-based atlas selection methods. PMID:24893367

  1. Learning to rank atlases for multiple-atlas segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sanroma, Gerard; Wu, Guorong; Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, multiple-atlas segmentation (MAS) has achieved a great success in the medical imaging area. The key assumption is that multiple atlases have greater chances of correctly labeling a target image than a single atlas. However, the problem of atlas selection still remains unexplored. Traditionally, image similarity is used to select a set of atlases. Unfortunately, this heuristic criterion is not necessarily related to the final segmentation performance. To solve this seemingly simple but critical problem, we propose a learning-based atlas selection method to pick up the best atlases that would lead to a more accurate segmentation. Our main idea is to learn the relationship between the pairwise appearance of observed instances (i.e., a pair of atlas and target images) and their final labeling performance (e.g., using the Dice ratio). In this way, we select the best atlases based on their expected labeling accuracy. Our atlas selection method is general enough to be integrated with any existing MAS method. We show the advantages of our atlas selection method in an extensive experimental evaluation in the ADNI, SATA, IXI, and LONI LPBA40 datasets. As shown in the experiments, our method can boost the performance of three widely used MAS methods, outperforming other learning-based and image-similarity-based atlas selection methods.

  2. Segmented Target Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhi, Abdul Rahman; Frank, Nathan; Gueye, Paul; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A proposed segmented target would improve decay energy measurements of neutron-unbound nuclei. Experiments like this have been performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) located at Michigan State University. Many different nuclei are produced in such experiments, some of which immediately decay into a charged particle and neutron. The charged particles are bent by a large magnet and measured by a suite of charged particle detectors. The neutrons are measured by the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and Large Multi-Institutional Scintillation Array (LISA). With the current target setup, a nucleus in a neutron-unbound state is produced with a radioactive beam impinged upon a beryllium target. The resolution of these measurements is very dependent on the target thickness since the nuclear interaction point is unknown. In a segmented target using alternating layers of silicon detectors and Be-targets, the Be-target in which the nuclear reaction takes place would be determined. Thus the experimental resolution would improve. This poster will describe the improvement over the current target along with the status of the design. Work supported by Augustana College and the National Science Foundation grant #0969173.

  3. Segmental arterial mediolysis.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Anil Kumar; Iqbal, Shams I; Liu, Raymond W; Rachamreddy, Niranjan; Kalva, Sanjeeva P

    2014-06-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an uncommon, nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory, large- to medium-sized arteriopathy first described in 1976. It is characterized histologically by vacuolization and lysis of the outer arterial media leading to dissecting aneurysms and vessel rupture presenting clinically with self-limiting abdominal pain or catastrophic hemorrhages in the abdomen. Patients of all ages are affected with a greater incidence at the fifth and sixth decades. There is a slight male predominance. Imaging findings overlap with inflammatory vasculitis, collagen vascular disease, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The presence of segmental dissections involving the celiac, mesenteric, and/or renal arteries is the key distinguishing features of SAM. Inflammatory markers, genetic tests for collagen vascular disorders, and hypercoagulable studies are negative. Anti-inflammatory agents and immunosuppressants are not effective. A mortality rate of 50 % has been attributed to the acute presentation with aneurysmal rupture necessitating urgent surgical or endovascular treatments; in the absence of the acute presentation, SAM is a self-limiting disease and is treated conservatively. There are no established guidelines on medical therapy, although optimal control of blood pressure is considered the main cornerstone of medical therapy. The long-term prognosis is not known.

  4. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Resolution Boosting and Doppler Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J

    2003-12-01

    Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) is a rapidly advancing technique for wide bandwidth spectroscopy and radial velocimetry. By placing a small angle-independent interferometer near the slit of an existing spectrograph system, periodic fiducials are embedded on the recorded spectrum. The multiplication of the stellar spectrum times the sinusoidal fiducial net creates a moire pattern, which manifests high detailed spectral information heterodyned down to low spatial frequencies. The latter can more accurately survive the blurring, distortions and CCD Nyquist limitations of the spectrograph. Hence lower resolution spectrographs can be used to perform high resolution spectroscopy and radial velocimetry (under a Doppler shift the entire moir{acute e} pattern shifts in phase). A demonstration of {approx}2x resolution boosting (100,000 from 50,000) on the Lick Obs. echelle spectrograph is shown. Preliminary data indicating {approx}8x resolution boost (170,000 from 20,000) using multiple delays has been taken on a linear grating spectrograph.

  5. Development of a high speed parallel hybrid boost bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    The analysis, design, and testing of the hybrid boost bearing are discussed. The hybrid boost bearing consists of a fluid film bearing coupled in parallel with a rolling element bearing. This coupling arrangement makes use of the inherent advantages of both the fluid film and rolling element bearing and at the same time minimizes their disadvantages and limitations. The analytical optimization studies that lead to the final fluid film bearing design are reported. The bearing consisted of a centrifugally-pressurized planar fluid film thrust bearing with oil feed through the shaft center. An analysis of the test ball bearing is also presented. The experimental determination of the hybrid bearing characteristics obtained on the basis of individual bearing component tests and a combined hybrid bearing assembly is discussed and compared to the analytically determined performance characteristics.

  6. IMM tracking of a theater ballistic missile during boost phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Robert G.; San Jose, Anthony

    1998-09-01

    Since the SCUD launches in the Gulf War, theater ballistic missile (TBM) systems have become a growing concern for the US military. Detection, tracking and engagement during boost phase or shortly after booster cutoff are goals that grow in importance with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. This paper addresses the performance of tracking algorithms for TBMs during boost phase and across the transition to ballistic flight. Three families of tracking algorithms are examined: alpha-beta-gamma trackers, Kalman-based trackers, and the interactive multiple model (IMM) tracker. In addition, a variation on the IMM to include prior knowledge of a booster cutoff parameter is examined. Simulated data is used to compare algorithms. Also, the IMM tracker is run on an actual ballistic missile trajectory. Results indicate that IMM trackers show significant advantage in tracking through the model transition represented by booster cutoff.

  7. Enhanced solvent recovery process boosts PTA production, saves energy

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-16

    Two producers of purified terephthalic acid (PTA) have licensed a new enhanced solvent-recovery process. The process uses a proprietary solvent that boosts the capacity of the acetic acid recovery system while reducing energy usage. Because acid recovery is usually the limiting step in PTA production, increasing it can boost PTA capacity 5--10%. The solvent recovery enhancement (SRE) technology is licensed by Glitsch Technology Corp. (GTC), Houston, The GT-SRE process can be applied in grassroots or existing plants. The GT-SRE process replaces the water used in high and low-pressure absorbers with a phosphine oxide-based solvent. The solvent is most selective to acetic acid, but is also selective to methyl acetate and, to a lesser extent, paraxylene. This selectivity increases recovery of these components from vent streams.

  8. High Efficient Universal Buck Boost Solar Array Regulator SAR Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmelmann, Stefan; Knorr, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    The high efficient universal Buck Boost Solar Array Regulator (SAR) module concept is applicable for a wide range of input and output voltages. The single point failure tolerant SAR module contains 3 power converters for the transfer of the SAR power to the battery dominated power bus. The converters are operating parallel in a 2 out of 3 redundancy and are driven by two different controllers. The output power of one module can be adjusted up to 1KW depending on the requirements. The maximum power point tracker (MPPT) is placed on a separate small printed circuit board and can be used if no external tracker signal is delivered. Depending on the mode and load conditions an efficiency of more than 97% is achievable. The stable control performance is achieved by implementing the magnetic current sense detection. The sensed power coil current is used in Buck and Boost control mode.

  9. Boosting bonsai trees for handwritten/printed text discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricquebourg, Yann; Raymond, Christian; Poirriez, Baptiste; Lemaitre, Aurélie; Coüasnon, Bertrand

    2013-12-01

    Boosting over decision-stumps proved its efficiency in Natural Language Processing essentially with symbolic features, and its good properties (fast, few and not critical parameters, not sensitive to over-fitting) could be of great interest in the numeric world of pixel images. In this article we investigated the use of boosting over small decision trees, in image classification processing, for the discrimination of handwritten/printed text. Then, we conducted experiments to compare it to usual SVM-based classification revealing convincing results with very close performance, but with faster predictions and behaving far less as a black-box. Those promising results tend to make use of this classifier in more complex recognition tasks like multiclass problems.

  10. Boost capacity, slash LWBS rate with POD triage system.

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    With bottlenecks boosting ED wait times as well as the LWBS rate, Methodist Hospital of Sacramento decided to boost its triage capacity by taking over six beds that were being used for fast-track patients, and by taking advantage of waiting-room space for patients who don't need to be placed in beds. Within a month of implementing the new approach, the LWBS rate dropped to less than 2%, and door-to-doc time was slashed by 20 minutes. Under the POD system, providers have 15 minutes to determine whether patients should be discharged, sent back to the waiting room while tests are conducted, or placed in an ED bed where they can be monitored. To implement the approach, no alterations in physician staffing were needed, but the hospital added a triage nurse and a task nurse to manage patient flow of the triage POD.

  11. High Temperature Boost (HTB) Power Processing Unit (PPU) Formulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Bradley, Arthur T.; Iannello, Christopher J.; Carr, Gregory A.; Mohammad, Mojarradi M.; Hunter, Don J.; DelCastillo, Linda; Stell, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    This technical memorandum is to summarize the Formulation Study conducted during fiscal year 2012 on the High Temperature Boost (HTB) Power Processing Unit (PPU). The effort is authorized and supported by the Game Changing Technology Division, NASA Office of the Chief Technologist. NASA center participation during the formulation includes LaRC, KSC and JPL. The Formulation Study continues into fiscal year 2013. The formulation study has focused on the power processing unit. The team has proposed a modular, power scalable, and new technology enabled High Temperature Boost (HTB) PPU, which has 5-10X improvement in PPU specific power/mass and over 30% in-space solar electric system mass saving.

  12. Black brane entropy and hydrodynamics: The boost-invariant case

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Ivan; Heller, Michal P.; Spalinski, Michal

    2009-12-15

    The framework of slowly evolving horizons is generalized to the case of black branes in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spaces in arbitrary dimensions. The results are used to analyze the behavior of both event and apparent horizons in the gravity dual to boost-invariant flow. These considerations are motivated by the fact that at second order in the gradient expansion the hydrodynamic entropy current in the dual Yang-Mills theory appears to contain an ambiguity. This ambiguity, in the case of boost-invariant flow, is linked with a similar freedom on the gravity side. This leads to a phenomenological definition of the entropy of black branes. Some insights on fluid/gravity duality and the definition of entropy in a time-dependent setting are elucidated.

  13. A Unified Framework for Brain Segmentation in MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, S.; Yusof, R.; Karimian, A.; Riazi, A. H.; Bennamoun, M.

    2015-01-01

    Brain MRI segmentation is an important issue for discovering the brain structure and diagnosis of subtle anatomical changes in different brain diseases. However, due to several artifacts brain tissue segmentation remains a challenging task. The aim of this paper is to improve the automatic segmentation of brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We proposed an automatic hybrid image segmentation method that integrates the modified statistical expectation-maximization (EM) method and the spatial information combined with support vector machine (SVM). The combined method has more accurate results than what can be achieved with its individual techniques that is demonstrated through experiments on both real data and simulated images. Experiments are carried out on both synthetic and real MRI. The results of proposed technique are evaluated against manual segmentation results and other methods based on real T1-weighted scans from Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) and simulated images from BrainWeb. The Kappa index is calculated to assess the performance of the proposed framework relative to the ground truth and expert segmentations. The results demonstrate that the proposed combined method has satisfactory results on both simulated MRI and real brain datasets. PMID:26089978

  14. Robust and accurate star segmentation algorithm based on morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Lei, Liu; Guangjun, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Star tracker is an important instrument of measuring a spacecraft's attitude; it measures a spacecraft's attitude by matching the stars captured by a camera and those stored in a star database, the directions of which are known. Attitude accuracy of star tracker is mainly determined by star centroiding accuracy, which is guaranteed by complete star segmentation. Current algorithms of star segmentation cannot suppress different interferences in star images and cannot segment stars completely because of these interferences. To solve this problem, a new star target segmentation algorithm is proposed on the basis of mathematical morphology. The proposed algorithm utilizes the margin structuring element to detect small targets and the opening operation to suppress noises, and a modified top-hat transform is defined to extract stars. A combination of three different structuring elements is utilized to define a new star segmentation algorithm, and the influence of three different structural elements on the star segmentation results is analyzed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can suppress different interferences and segment stars completely, thus providing high star centroiding accuracy.

  15. Automated Segmentation and Retrieval System for CT Head Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hau-Lee; Ahmad Fauzi, Mohammad Faizal; Komiya, Ryoichi

    In this paper, automatic segmentation and retrieval of medical images are presented. For the segmentation, different unsupervised clustering techniques are employed to partition the Computed Tomography (CT) brain images into three regions, which are the abnormalities, cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) and brain matters. The novel segmentation method proposed is a dual level segmentation approach. The first level segmentation, which purpose is to acquire abnormal regions, uses the combination of fuzzy c-means (FCM) and k-means clustering. The second level segmentation performs either the expectation-maximization (EM) technique or the modified FCM with population-diameter independent (PDI) to segment the remaining intracranial area into CSF and brain matters. The system automatically determines which algorithm to be utilized in order to produce optimum results. The retrieval of the medical images is based on keywords such as "no abnormal region", "abnormal region(s) adjacent to the skull" and "abnormal region(s) not adjacent to the skull". Medical data from collaborating hospital are experimented and promising results are observed.

  16. Support for context effects on segmentation and segments depends on the context.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Christopher C; Newman, Rochelle S; Idsardi, William J

    2017-04-01

    Listeners must adapt to differences in speech rate across talkers and situations. Speech rate adaptation effects are strong for adjacent syllables (i.e., proximal syllables). For studies that have assessed adaptation effects on speech rate information more than one syllable removed from a point of ambiguity in speech (i.e., distal syllables), the difference in strength between different types of ambiguity is stark. Studies of word segmentation have shown large shifts in perception as a result of distal rate manipulations, while studies of segmental perception have shown only weak, or even nonexistent, effects. However, no study has standardized methods and materials to study context effects for both types of ambiguity simultaneously. Here, a set of sentences was created that differed as minimally as possible except for whether the sentences were ambiguous to the voicing of a consonant or ambiguous to the location of a word boundary. The sentences were then rate-modified to slow down the distal context speech rate to various extents, dependent on three different definitions of distal context that were adapted from previous experiments, along with a manipulation of proximal context to assess whether proximal effects were comparable across ambiguity types. The results indicate that the definition of distal influenced the extent of distal rate effects strongly for both segments and segmentation. They also establish the presence of distal rate effects on word-final segments for the first time. These results were replicated, with some caveats regarding the perception of individual segments, in an Internet-based sample recruited from Mechanical Turk.

  17. The Voltage Boost Enabled by Luminescence Extraction in Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapati, Vidya; Steiner, Myles A.; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2016-11-21

    A new physical principle has emerged to produce record voltages and efficiencies in photovoltaic cells, 'luminescence extraction.' This is exemplified by the mantra 'a good solar cell should also be a good LED.' Luminescence extraction is the escape of internal photons out of the front surface of a solar cell. Basic thermodynamics says that the voltage boost should be related to concentration ratio, C, of a resource by ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{C}. In light trapping, (i.e. when the solar cell is textured and has a perfect back mirror) the concentration ratio of photons C={4n2}, so one would expect a voltage boost of ..delta..V=kT ln{4n2} over a solar cell with no texture and zero back reflectivity, where n is the refractive index. Nevertheless, there has been ambiguity over the voltage benefit to be expected from perfect luminescence extraction. Do we gain an open circuit voltage boost of ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{n2}, ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{2n2}, or ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{4n2}? What is responsible for this voltage ambiguity ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{4}=36mVolts? We show that different results come about, depending on whether the photovoltaic cell is optically thin or thick to its internal luminescence. In realistic intermediate cases of optical thickness the voltage boost falls in between; ln{n2}q..delta..V/kT)<;ln{4n2}.

  18. The Voltage Boost Enabled by Luminescence Extraction in Solar Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Ganapati, Vidya; Steiner, Myles A.; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few years, the application of the physical principle, i.e., 'luminescence extraction,' has produced record voltages and efficiencies in photovoltaic cells. Luminescence extraction is the use of optical design, such as a back mirror or textured surfaces, to help internal photons escape out of the front surface of a solar cell. The principle of luminescence extraction is exemplified by the mantra 'a good solar cell should also be a good LED.' Basic thermodynamics says that the voltage boost should be related to concentration ratio C of a resource by ΔV = (kT/q) ln{C}. In light trapping (i.e., when the solar cell is textured and has a perfect back mirror), the concentration ratio of photons C = {4n2}; therefore, one would expect a voltage boost of ΔV = (kT/q) ln{4n2} over a solar cell with no texture and zero back reflectivity, where n is the refractive index. Nevertheless, there has been ambiguity over the voltage benefit to be expected from perfect luminescence extraction. Do we gain an open-circuit voltage boost of ΔV = (kT/q) ln{n2}, ΔV = (kT/q) ln{2 n2}, or ΔV = (kT/q) ln{4 n2}? What is responsible for this voltage ambiguity ΔV = (kT/q) ln{4}more » $${\\asymp}$$ 36 mV? Finally, we show that different results come about, depending on whether the photovoltaic cell is optically thin or thick to its internal luminescence. In realistic intermediate cases of optical thickness, the voltage boost falls in between: ln{n2} < (qΔV/kT) < ln{4n 2}.« less

  19. G and C boost and abort study summary, exhibit B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backman, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    A six degree of freedom simulation of rigid vehicles was developed to study space shuttle vehicle boost-abort guidance and control techniques. The simulation was described in detail as an all digital program and as a hybrid program. Only the digital simulation was implemented. The equations verified in the digital simulation were adapted for use in the hybrid simulation. Study results were obtained from four abort cases using the digital program.

  20. Trunk segment numbers and sequential segmentation in myriapods.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    Sequential segmentation from a posterior "proliferative zone" is considered to be the primitive mechanism of segmentation in arthropods. Several studies of embryonic and post-embryonic development and gene expression suggest that this occurs in all major arthropod taxa. Sequential segmentation is often associated with the idea of posterior production of body units that accumulate along the main body axis. However, the precise mechanism of sequential segmentation has not been identified yet, and, while searching for the genetic circuitry able to generate a first periodic pattern in the embryo, we can at least outline the distinctive role in segmentation of a proliferative zone. A perusal of myriapod segmentation patterns suggests that these patterns result from multi-layered developmental processes, where gene expression and epigenetic mechanisms interact in a nonstrictly hierarchical way. The posterior zone is possibly a zone of periodic signal production, but, in general, the resulting segmental pattern is not completely attributable to the activity of the signal generator. In this sense, a posterior proliferative zone would be more a "segmental organizer" than a "segment generator."

  1. Improvement in Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation of Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    2006-01-01

    A further modification has been made in the algorithm and implementing software reported in Modified Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation of Data (GSC- 14681-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 6 (June 2006), page 51. That software performs recursive hierarchical segmentation of data having spatial characteristics (e.g., spectral-image data). The output of a prior version of the software contained artifacts, including spurious segmentation-image regions bounded by processing-window edges. The modification for suppressing the artifacts, mentioned in the cited article, was addition of a subroutine that analyzes data in the vicinities of seams to find pairs of regions that tend to lie adjacent to each other on opposite sides of the seams. Within each such pair, pixels in one region that are more similar to pixels in the other region are reassigned to the other region. The present modification provides for a parameter ranging from 0 to 1 for controlling the relative priority of merges between spatially adjacent and spatially non-adjacent regions. At 1, spatially-adjacent-/spatially- non-adjacent-region merges have equal priority. At 0, only spatially-adjacent-region merges (no spectral clustering) are allowed. Between 0 and 1, spatially-adjacent- region merges have priority over spatially- non-adjacent ones.

  2. The influence of the boost in breast-conserving therapy on cosmetic outcome in the EORTC "boost versus no boost" trial. EORTC Radiotherapy and Breast Cancer Cooperative Groups. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vrieling, C; Collette, L; Fourquet, A; Hoogenraad, W J; Horiot, J C; Jager, J J; Pierart, M; Poortmans, P M; Struikmans, H; Van der Hulst, M; Van der Schueren, E; Bartelink, H

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of a radiotherapy boost on the cosmetic outcome after 3 years of follow-up in patients treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT). In EORTC trial 22881/10882, 5569 Stage I and II breast cancer patients were treated with tumorectomy and axillary dissection, followed by tangential irradiation of the breast to a dose of 50 Gy in 5 weeks, at 2 Gy per fraction. Patients having a microscopically complete tumor excision were randomized between no boost and a boost of 16 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by a panel, scoring photographs of 731 patients taken soon after surgery and 3 years later, and by digitizer measurements, measuring the displacement of the nipple of 3000 patients postoperatively and of 1141 patients 3 years later. There was no difference in the cosmetic outcome between the two treatment arms after surgery, before the start of radiotherapy. At 3-year follow-up, both the panel evaluation and the digitizer measurements showed that the boost had a significant adverse effect on the cosmetic result. The panel evaluation at 3 years showed that 86% of patients in the no-boost group had an excellent or good global result, compared to 71% of patients in the boost group (p = 0.0001). The digitizer measurements at 3 years showed a relative breast retraction assessment (pBRA) of 7.6 pBRA in the no-boost group, compared to 8.3 pBRA in the boost group, indicating a worse cosmetic result in the boost group at follow-up (p = 0.04). These results showed that a boost dose of 16 Gy had a negative, but limited, impact on the cosmetic outcome after 3 years.

  3. Boosted learned kernels for data-driven vesselness measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisan, E.

    2017-03-01

    Common vessel centerline extraction methods rely on the computation of a measure providing the likeness of the local appearance of the data to a curvilinear tube-like structure. The most popular techniques rely on empirically designed (hand crafted) measurements as the widely used Hessian vesselness, the recent oriented flux tubeness or filters (e.g. the Gaussian matched filter) that are developed to respond to local features, without exploiting any context information nor the rich structural information embedded in the data. At variance with the previously proposed methods, we propose a completely data-driven approach for learning a vesselness measure from expert-annotated dataset. For each data point (voxel or pixel), we extract the intensity values in a neighborhood region, and estimate the discriminative convolutional kernel yielding a positive response for vessel data and negative response for non-vessel data. The process is iterated within a boosting framework, providing a set of linear filters, whose combined response is the learned vesselness measure. We show the results of the general-use proposed method on the DRIVE retinal images dataset, comparing its performance against the hessian-based vesselness, oriented flux antisymmetry tubeness, and vesselness learned with a probabilistic boosting tree or with a regression tree. We demonstrate the superiority of our approach that yields a vessel detection accuracy of 0.95, with respect to 0.92 (hessian), 0.90 (oriented flux) and 0.85 (boosting tree).

  4. Action Classification by Joint Boosting Using Spatiotemporal and Depth Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikemura, Sho; Fujiyoshi, Hironobu

    This paper presents a method for action classification by using Joint Boosting with depth information obtained by TOF camera. Our goal is to classify action of a customer who takes the goods from each of the upper, middle and lower shelf in the supermarkets and convenience stores. Our method detects of human region by using Pixel State Analysis (PSA) from the depth image stream obtained by TOF camera, and extracts the PSA features captured from human-motion and the depth features (peak value of depth) captured from the information of human-height. We employ Joint Boosting, which is a multi-class classification of boosting method, to perform the action classification. Since the proposed method employs spatiotemporal and depth feature, it is possible to perform the detection of action for taking the goods and the classification of the height of the shelf simultaneously. Experimental results show that our method using PSA feature and peak value of depth achieved a classification rate of 93.2%. It also had a 3.1% higher performance than that of the CHLAC feature, and 2.8% higher performance than that of the ST-patch feature.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  6. Asia-Pacific Region Water Boosted Rocket Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hidayat, A.; Sofyan, E.; Sinha, H. S. S.; Herudi, K.; Kubota, T.; Sukkarieh, S.; Arban, J. L.; Chung, D. M.; Medagangoda, I.; Mohd, Z. B.; Pitan, S.; Chin, C.; Sarkar, F. R.

    2010-05-01

    Space Education and Awareness Working Group, which is one of four working groups of Asia-Pacific Regional Space Agency Forum, had organized water boosted rocket competition in Japan in 2005, in Indonesia in 2006, and in 2007 in India. One junior high school student (12-15 years old) and one leader from 9 and 13 Asian/Pacific countries attended the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd water rocket events, respectively. The 4th event is planned in Vietnam, in December 2008. The manuscript introduces the structure and activities of Space Education and Awareness Working Group, which is working under Asia-Pacific Regional Space Agency Forum sponsored by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, and Technology of Japan; and application of water-boosted rocket to other field is described. Details of the water boosted rocket events, such as the purpose, competition rules, and the schedules are provided. Finally we discuss the issues to be taken into account for the future event.

  7. Chagas Parasite Detection in Blood Images Using AdaBoost

    PubMed Central

    Uc-Cetina, Víctor; Brito-Loeza, Carlos; Ruiz-Piña, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The Chagas disease is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Visual detection of such parasite through microscopic inspection is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper, we provide an AdaBoost learning solution to the task of Chagas parasite detection in blood images. We give details of the algorithm and our experimental setup. With this method, we get 100% and 93.25% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively. A ROC comparison with the method most commonly used for the detection of malaria parasites based on support vector machines (SVM) is also provided. Our experimental work shows mainly two things: (1) Chagas parasites can be detected automatically using machine learning methods with high accuracy and (2) AdaBoost + SVM provides better overall detection performance than AdaBoost or SVMs alone. Such results are the best ones known so far for the problem of automatic detection of Chagas parasites through the use of machine learning, computer vision, and image processing methods. PMID:25861375

  8. Adaboost and Support Vector Machines for White Matter Lesion Segmentation in MR Images.

    PubMed

    Quddus, Azhar; Fieguth, Paul; Basir, Otman

    2005-01-01

    The use of two powerful classification techniques (boosting and SVM) is explored for the segmentation of white-matter lesions in the MRI scans of human brain. Simple features are generated from Proton Density (PD) scans. Radial Basis Function (RBF) based Adaboost technique and Support Vector Machines (SVM) are employed for this task. The classifiers are trained on severe, moderate and mild cases. The segmentation is performed in T1 acquisition space rather than standard space (with more slices). Hence, the proposed approach requires less time for manual verification. The results indicate that the proposed approach can handle MR field inhomogeneities quite well and is completely independent from manual selection process so that it can be run under batch mode. Segmentation performance comparison with manual detection is also provided.

  9. Robust thin-film generator based on segmented contact-electrification for harvesting wind energy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xian Song; Zhu, Guang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-06-11

    Collecting and converting energy from ambient air flow promise to be a viable approach in developing self-powered autonomous electronics. Here, we report an effective and robust triboelectric generator that consists of an undulating thin-film membrane and an array of segmented fine-sized electrode pairs on a single substrate. Sequential processes of contact electrification and electrostatic induction generate alternating flows of free electrons when the membrane interacts with ambient air flow. Based on an optimum rational design, the segmented electrodes play an essential role in boosting the output current, leading to an enhancement of over 500% compared to the structure without the segmentation. The thin-film based generator can simultaneously and continuously light up tens of commercial light-emitting diodes. Moreover, it possesses exceptional durability, providing constant electric output after millions of operation cycles. This work offers a truly practical solution that opens the avenue to take advantage of wind energy by using the triboelectric effect.

  10. Region based stellate features combined with variable selection using AdaBoost learning in mammographic computer-aided detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hoe; Choi, Jae Young; Ro, Yong Man

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a new method is developed for extracting so-called region-based stellate features to correctly differentiate spiculated malignant masses from normal tissues on mammograms. In the proposed method, a given region of interest (ROI) for feature extraction is divided into three individual subregions, namely core, inner, and outer parts. The proposed region-based stellate features are then extracted to encode the different and complementary stellate pattern information by computing the statistical characteristics for each of the three different subregions. To further maximize classification performance, a novel variable selection algorithm based on AdaBoost learning is incorporated for choosing an optimal subset of variables of region-based stellate features. In particular, we develop a new variable selection metric (criteria) that effectively determines variable importance (ranking) within the conventional AdaBoost framework. Extensive and comparative experiments have been performed on the popular benchmark mammogram database (DB). Results show that our region-based stellate features (extracted from automatically segmented ROIs) considerably outperform other state-of-the-art features developed for mammographic spiculated mass detection or classification. Our results also indicate that combining region-based stellate features with the proposed variable selection strategy has an impressive effect on improving spiculated mass classification and detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An on-line learning tracking of non-rigid target combining multiple-instance boosting and level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingming; Cai, Jingju

    2013-10-01

    Visual tracking algorithms based on online boosting generally use a rectangular bounding box to represent the position of the target, while actually the shape of the target is always irregular. This will cause the classifier to learn the features of the non-target parts in the rectangle region, thereby the performance of the classifier is reduced, and drift would happen. To avoid the limitations of the bounding-box, we propose a novel tracking-by-detection algorithm involving the level set segmentation, which ensures the classifier only learn the features of the real target area in the tracking box. Because the shape of the target only changes a little between two adjacent frames and the current level set algorithm can avoid the re-initialization of the signed distance function, it only takes a few iterations to converge to the position of the target contour in the next frame. We also make some improvement on the level set energy function so that the zero level set would have less possible to converge to the false contour. In addition, we use gradient boost to improve the original multi-instance learning (MIL) algorithm like the WMILtracker, which greatly speed up the tracker. Our algorithm outperforms the original MILtracker both on speed and precision. Compared with the WMILtracker, our algorithm runs at a almost same speed, but we can avoid the drift caused by background learning, so the precision is better.

  12. Modifiability Tactics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    about purchasing paper copies of SEI reports, please visit the publications portion of our Web site (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/ publications /pubweb.html...architects need to understand how architectural tactics and patterns relate and how to use them effectively. In this report, we explore the relation ...architecture transformations that support the achievement of modifiability [Bass 2003]. In this report, we relate coupling and cohesion to tactics

  13. Automatic identification of epileptic seizures from EEG signals using linear programming boosting.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ahnaf Rashik; Subasi, Abdulhamit

    2016-11-01

    Computerized epileptic seizure detection is essential for expediting epilepsy diagnosis and research and for assisting medical professionals. Moreover, the implementation of an epilepsy monitoring device that has low power and is portable requires a reliable and successful seizure detection scheme. In this work, the problem of automated epilepsy seizure detection using singe-channel EEG signals has been addressed. At first, segments of EEG signals are decomposed using a newly proposed signal processing scheme, namely complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition with adaptive noise (CEEMDAN). Six spectral moments are extracted from the CEEMDAN mode functions and train and test matrices are formed afterward. These matrices are fed into the classifier to identify epileptic seizures from EEG signal segments. In this work, we implement an ensemble learning based machine learning algorithm, namely linear programming boosting (LPBoost) to perform classification. The efficacy of spectral features in the CEEMDAN domain is validated by graphical and statistical analyses. The performance of CEEMDAN is compared to those of its predecessors to further inspect its suitability. The effectiveness and the appropriateness of LPBoost are demonstrated as opposed to the commonly used classification models. Resubstitution and 10 fold cross-validation error analyses confirm the superior algorithm performance of the proposed scheme. The algorithmic performance of our epilepsy seizure identification scheme is also evaluated against state-of-the-art works in the literature. Experimental outcomes manifest that the proposed seizure detection scheme performs better than the existing works in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and Cohen's Kappa coefficient. It can be anticipated that owing to its use of only one channel of EEG signal, the proposed method will be suitable for device implementation, eliminate the onus of clinicians for analyzing a large bulk of data manually, and

  14. Detection and measurement of fetal anatomies from ultrasound images using a constrained probabilistic boosting tree.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Gustavo; Georgescu, Bogdan; Good, Sara; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2008-09-01

    We propose a novel method for the automatic detection and measurement of fetal anatomical structures in ultrasound images. This problem offers a myriad of challenges, including: difficulty of modeling the appearance variations of the visual object of interest, robustness to speckle noise and signal dropout, and large search space of the detection procedure. Previous solutions typically rely on the explicit encoding of prior knowledge and formulation of the problem as a perceptual grouping task solved through clustering or variational approaches. These methods are constrained by the validity of the underlying assumptions and usually are not enough to capture the complex appearances of fetal anatomies. We propose a novel system for fast automatic detection and measurement of fetal anatomies that directly exploits a large database of expert annotated fetal anatomical structures in ultrasound images. Our method learns automatically to distinguish between the appearance of the object of interest and background by training a constrained probabilistic boosting tree classifier. This system is able to produce the automatic segmentation of several fetal anatomies using the same basic detection algorithm. We show results on fully automatic measurement of biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC), abdominal circumference (AC), femur length (FL), humerus length (HL), and crown rump length (CRL). Notice that our approach is the first in the literature to deal with the HL and CRL measurements. Extensive experiments (with clinical validation) show that our system is, on average, close to the accuracy of experts in terms of segmentation and obstetric measurements. Finally, this system runs under half second on a standard dual-core PC computer.

  15. Synthesis of biodegradable polymer-mesoporous silica composite microspheres for DNA prime-protein boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jenny; Huang, Yi; Danquah, Michael K; Wang, Huanting; Forde, Gareth M

    2010-03-18

    DNA vaccines or proteins are capable of inducing specific immunity; however, the translation to the clinic has generally been problematic, primarily due to the reduced magnitude of immune response and poor pharmacokinetics. Herein we demonstrate a composite microsphere formulation, composed of mesoporous silica spheres (MPS) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), enables the controlled delivery of a prime-boost vaccine via the encapsulation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) and protein in different compartments. Method with modified dual-concentric-feeding needles attached to a 40 kHz ultrasonic atomizer was studied. These needles focus the flow of two different solutions, which passed through the ultrasonic atomizer. The process synthesis parameters, which are important to the scale-up of composite microspheres, were also studied. These parameters include polymer concentration, feed flowrate, and volumetric ratio of polymer and pDNA-PEI/MPS-BSA. This fabrication technique produced composite microspheres with mean D[4,3] ranging from 6 to 34 microm, depending upon the microsphere preparation. The resultant physical morphology of composite microspheres was largely influenced by the volumetric ratio of pDNA-PEI/MPS-BSA to polymer, and this was due to the precipitation of MPS at the surface of the microspheres. The encapsulation efficiencies were predominantly in the range of 93-98% for pDNA and 46-68% for MPS. In the in vitro studies, the pDNA and protein showed different release kinetics in a 40 day time frame. The dual-concentric-feeding in ultrasonic atomization was shown to have excellent reproducibility. It was concluded that this fabrication technique is an effective method to prepare formulations containing a heterologous prime-boost vaccine in a single delivery system.

  16. Musical expertise boosts implicit learning of both musical and linguistic structures.

    PubMed

    Francois, Clément; Schön, Daniele

    2011-10-01

    Musical training is known to modify auditory perception and related cortical organization. Here, we show that these modifications may extend to higher cognitive functions and generalize to processing of speech. Previous studies have shown that adults and newborns can segment a continuous stream of linguistic and nonlinguistic stimuli based only on probabilities of occurrence between adjacent syllables or tones. In the present experiment, we used an artificial (sung) language learning design coupled with an electrophysiological approach. While behavioral results were not clear cut in showing an effect of expertise, Event-Related Potentials data showed that musicians learned better than did nonmusicians both musical and linguistic structures of the sung language. We discuss these findings in terms of practice-related changes in auditory processing, stream segmentation, and memory processes.

  17. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  18. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  19. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  20. Bone image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liew, H L; Clement, J G; Thomas, C D

    1999-05-01

    Characteristics of microscopic structures in bone cross sections carry essential clues in age determination in forensic science and in the study of age-related bone developments and bone diseases. Analysis of bone cross sections represents a major area of research in bone biology. However, traditional approaches in bone biology have relied primarily on manual processes with very limited number of bone samples. As a consequence, it is difficult to reach reliable and consistent conclusions. In this paper we present an image processing system that uses microstructural and relational knowledge present in the bone cross section for bone image segmentation. This system automates the bone image analysis process and is able to produce reliable results based on quantitative measurements from a large number of bone images. As a result, using large databases of bone images to study the correlation between bone structural features and age-related bone developments becomes feasible.

  1. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  2. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  3. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  4. Multiple-Segment Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James; May, Edward; Eklund, Wayne

    1994-01-01

    Multiple-segment climbing robots developed to perform such tasks as inspection, sandblasting, welding, and painting on towers and other structures. Look and move like caterpillars. Video camera mounted on one of segments rotated to desired viewing angle. Used in remote inspection of structure, to view motion of robot and/or provides video feedback for control of motion, and/or to guide operation of head mounted on foremost segment with motorized actuators.

  5. Digital microscopy for boosting database integration and analysis in TMA studies.

    PubMed

    Krenacs, Tibor; Ficsor, Levente; Varga, Sebestyen Viktor; Angeli, Vivien; Molnar, Bela

    2010-01-01

    The enormous amount of clinical, pathological, and staining data to be linked, analyzed, and correlated in a tissue microarray (TMA) project makes digital slides ideal to be integrated into TMA database systems. With the help of a computer and dedicated software tools, digital slides offer dynamic access to microscopic information at any magnification with easy navigation, annotation, measurement, and archiving features. Advanced slide scanners work both in transmitted light and fluorescent modes to support biomarker testing with immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, computer-driven integrated systems are available for creating TMAs, digitalizing TMA slides, linking sample and staining data, and analyzing their results. Digital signals permit image segmentation along color, intensity, and size for automated object quantification where digital slides offer superior imaging features and batch processing. In this chapter, the workflow and the advantages of digital TMA projects are demonstrated through the project-based MIRAX system developed by 3DHISTECH and supported by Zeiss.The enhanced features of digital slides compared with those of still images can boost integration and intelligence in TMA database management systems, offering essential support for high-throughput biomarker testing, for example, in tumor progression/prognosis, drug discovery, and target therapy research.

  6. High volume ULE segment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Thomas; Edwards, Mary; Fox, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    It is expected that many of the next generation large ground based telescopes will utilize a segmented design for the primary mirror and, in some cases, the secondary mirror. Corning Incorporated (Corning) presents a process to manufacture segment mirror blanks from Corning ULE titania silicate glass in segment sizes ranging from 1.0 m to 1.8 m flat to flat. This paper will review ULE properties and describe the facilities, equipment, resources, and processes required to produce a few hundred to a few thousand mirror segment blanks for extremely large telescope (ELT) applications.

  7. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Lalit M.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images. PMID:20177565

  8. Asteroid Redirect Mission: Robotic Segment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This concept animation illustrates the robotic segment of NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission. The Asteroid Redirect Vehicle, powered by solar electric propulsion, travels to a large asteroid to robot...

  9. Compatibility of segmented thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J.; Ursell, T.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that power generation efficiency improves when materials with appropriate properties are combined either in a cascaded or segmented fashion across a temperature gradient. Past methods for determining materials used in segmentation weremainly concerned with materials that have the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. However, the example of SiGe segmented with Bi2Te3 and/or various skutterudites shows a marked decline in device efficiency even though SiGe has the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. The origin of the incompatibility of SiGe with other thermoelectric materials leads to a general definition of compatibility and intrinsic efficiency. The compatibility factor derived as = (Jl+zr - 1) a is a function of only intrinsic material properties and temperature, which is represented by a ratio of current to conduction heat. For maximum efficiency the compatibility factor should not change with temperature both within a single material, and in the segmented leg as a whole. This leads to a measure of compatibility not only between segments, but also within a segment. General temperature trends show that materials are more self compatible at higher temperatures, and segmentation is more difficult across a larger -T. The compatibility factor can be used as a quantitative guide for deciding whether a material is better suited for segmentation orcascading. Analysis of compatibility factors and intrinsic efficiency for optimal segmentation are discussed, with intent to predict optimal material properties, temperature interfaces, and/or currentheat ratios.

  10. Automated medical image segmentation techniques.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Lalit M

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images.

  11. Compatibility of segmented thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J.; Ursell, T.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that power generation efficiency improves when materials with appropriate properties are combined either in a cascaded or segmented fashion across a temperature gradient. Past methods for determining materials used in segmentation weremainly concerned with materials that have the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. However, the example of SiGe segmented with Bi2Te3 and/or various skutterudites shows a marked decline in device efficiency even though SiGe has the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. The origin of the incompatibility of SiGe with other thermoelectric materials leads to a general definition of compatibility and intrinsic efficiency. The compatibility factor derived as = (Jl+zr - 1) a is a function of only intrinsic material properties and temperature, which is represented by a ratio of current to conduction heat. For maximum efficiency the compatibility factor should not change with temperature both within a single material, and in the segmented leg as a whole. This leads to a measure of compatibility not only between segments, but also within a segment. General temperature trends show that materials are more self compatible at higher temperatures, and segmentation is more difficult across a larger -T. The compatibility factor can be used as a quantitative guide for deciding whether a material is better suited for segmentation orcascading. Analysis of compatibility factors and intrinsic efficiency for optimal segmentation are discussed, with intent to predict optimal material properties, temperature interfaces, and/or currentheat ratios.

  12. Comparative genomic hybridization: Detection of segmental aneusomies

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, J.E.; Magrane, G.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been used successfully to detect whole chromosome and segmental aneusomies. However, its sensitivity for detection of segmental aneusomies is still not well known. We present here an analysis of CGH sensitivity with emphasis on detection of abnormalities commonly found during pre-and neo-natal diagnosis. CGH is performed by hybridizing green and red fluorescing test and normal DNA samples, respectively, to normal metaphase spreads and measuring green:red fluorescence ratios along all chromosomes. The ratios are normalized such that 2 copies of a normal chromosome region in the test sample gives a ratio of 1.0. Alterations in test vs. control gene copy number range from 1.5 [trisomy] to 0.5 [monosomy]. Clinical samples analyzed included Wolf Hirschhorn (4p-), Cri du Chat (5p-) and DiGeorge (22q-). In addition, 7 cell lines with chromosome 21 segmental aneusomies were analyzed. These included 3 with terminal duplications, 1 with a terminal deletion, 1 with an interstitial deletion and 2 with interstitial amplifications. The DiGeorge deletion was the only deletion not deleted by CGH. This is not surprising as standard G banding does not routinely detect this 1-2 megabase deletion. The 4p- and 5p- monosomies were detected and breakpoints correctly assigned prospectively. Proximal alterations involving 21q22.11 are unambiguously defined. Specifically, two interstitial aneusomies involving this region are detected. Studies involving late prophase chromosome normal spreads gave identical breakpoints. Thus, analysis of extended chromosomes did not improve the sensitivity of the technique. Taken together, these data suggest that CGH can detect segmental aneusomies greater than 8 megabases in extent. Smaller aneusomies can, at times, be detected. Work is now underway to modify the analysis software to increase sensitivity and to decrease the amount of material needed for analysis.

  13. Testing for Genetically Modified Foods Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ann; Sajan, Samin

    2005-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a Nobel Prize-winning technique that amplifies a specific segment of DNA and is commonly used to test for the presence of genetic modifications. Students use PCR to test corn meal and corn-muffin mixes for the presence of a promoter commonly used in genetically modified foods, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S…

  14. Testing for Genetically Modified Foods Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ann; Sajan, Samin

    2005-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a Nobel Prize-winning technique that amplifies a specific segment of DNA and is commonly used to test for the presence of genetic modifications. Students use PCR to test corn meal and corn-muffin mixes for the presence of a promoter commonly used in genetically modified foods, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S…

  15. Segmenting Words from Natural Speech: Subsegmental Variation in Segmental Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rytting, C. Anton; Brew, Chris; Fosler-Lussier, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Most computational models of word segmentation are trained and tested on transcripts of speech, rather than the speech itself, and assume that speech is converted into a sequence of symbols prior to word segmentation. We present a way of representing speech corpora that avoids this assumption, and preserves acoustic variation present in speech. We…

  16. Potent Functional Antibody Responses Elicited by HIV-I DNA Priming and Boosting with Heterologous HIV-1 Recombinant MVA in Healthy Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, Agricola; Nilsson, Charlotta; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Marovich, Mary A.; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Ferrari, Guido; Polonis, Victoria R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA) virus boosting (HIVIS03). The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC) was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely) reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK) cells from PBMC (p=0.006), indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080) PMID:25874723

  17. Enhanced needle localization in ultrasound using beam steering and learning-based segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Charles R; Ng, Gary; Parthasarathy, Vijay

    2015-04-01

    Segmentation of needles in ultrasound images remains a challenging problem. In this paper, we introduce a machine learning-based method for needle segmentation in 2D beam-steered ultrasound images. We used a statistical boosting approach to train a pixel-wise classifier for needle segmentation. The Radon transform was then used to find the needle position and orientation from the segmented image. We validated our method with data from ex vivo specimens and clinical nerve block procedures, and compared the results to those obtained using previously reported needle segmentation methods. Results show improved localization success and accuracy using the proposed method. For the ex vivo datasets, assuming that the needle orientation was known a priori, the needle was successfully localized in 86.2% of the images, with a mean targeting error of 0.48mm. The robustness of the proposed method to a lack of a priori knowledge of needle orientation was also demonstrated. For the clinical datasets, assuming that the needle orientation was closely aligned with the beam steering angle selected by the physician, the needle was successfully localized in 99.8% of the images, with a mean targeting error 0.19mm. These results indicate that the learning-based segmentation method may allow for increased targeting accuracy and enhanced visualization during ultrasound-guided needle procedures.

  18. Video Object Discovery and Co-Segmentation with Extremely Weak Supervision.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Hua, Gang; Sukthankar, Rahul; Xue, Jianru; Niu, Zhenxing; Zheng, Nanning

    2017-10-01

    We present a spatio-temporal energy minimization formulation for simultaneous video object discovery and co-segmentation across multiple videos containing irrelevant frames. Our approach overcomes a limitation that most existing video co-segmentation methods possess, i.e., they perform poorly when dealing with practical videos in which the target objects are not present in many frames. Our formulation incorporates a spatio-temporal auto-context model, which is combined with appearance modeling for superpixel labeling. The superpixel-level labels are propagated to the frame level through a multiple instance boosting algorithm with spatial reasoning, based on which frames containing the target object are identified. Our method only needs to be bootstrapped with the frame-level labels for a few video frames (e.g., usually 1 to 3) to indicate if they contain the target objects or not. Extensive experiments on four datasets validate the efficacy of our proposed method: 1) object segmentation from a single video on the SegTrack dataset, 2) object co-segmentation from multiple videos on a video co-segmentation dataset, and 3) joint object discovery and co-segmentation from multiple videos containing irrelevant frames on the MOViCS dataset and XJTU-Stevens, a new dataset that we introduce in this paper. The proposed method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art in all of these experiments.

  19. The Importance of Marketing Segmentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Gillian

    2011-01-01

    The rationale behind marketing segmentation is to allow businesses to focus on their consumers' behaviors and purchasing patterns. If done effectively, marketing segmentation allows an organization to achieve its highest return on investment (ROI) in turn for its marketing and sales expenses. If an organization markets its products or services to…

  20. Automatic segmentation of the colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Christopher L.; Ge, Yaorong; Vining, David J.

    1999-05-01

    Virtual colonoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that enables detection of colorectal polyps and cancer. Normally, a patient's bowel is prepared with colonic lavage and gas insufflation prior to computed tomography (CT) scanning. An important step for 3D analysis of the image volume is segmentation of the colon. The high-contrast gas/tissue interface that exists in the colon lumen makes segmentation of the majority of the colon relatively easy; however, two factors inhibit automatic segmentation of the entire colon. First, the colon is not the only gas-filled organ in the data volume: lungs, small bowel, and stomach also meet this criteria. User-defined seed points placed in the colon lumen have previously been required to spatially isolate only the colon. Second, portions of the colon lumen may be obstructed by peristalsis, large masses, and/or residual feces. These complicating factors require increased user interaction during the segmentation process to isolate additional colon segments. To automate the segmentation of the colon, we have developed a method to locate seed points and segment the gas-filled lumen with no user supervision. We have also developed an automated approach to improve lumen segmentation by digitally removing residual contrast-enhanced fluid resulting from a new bowel preparation that liquefies and opacifies any residual feces.

  1. Segmentation: Slicing the Urban Pie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Explains market segmentation and defines undifferentiated, concentrated, and differentiated marketing strategies. Describes in detail the marketing planning process at the Metropolitan Community Colleges. Focuses on the development and implementation of an ongoing recruitment program designed for the market segment composed of business employees.…

  2. Market Segmentation: An Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Peter H.

    A concept-based introduction to market segmentation is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses. The material can be used in many disciplines including engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of market segmentation is primarily a transportation planning technique by…

  3. Market segmentation using perceived constraints

    Treesearch

    Jinhee Jun; Gerard Kyle; Andrew Mowen

    2008-01-01

    We examined the practical utility of segmenting potential visitors to Cleveland Metroparks using their constraint profiles. Our analysis identified three segments based on their scores on the dimensions of constraints: Other priorities--visitors who scored the highest on 'other priorities' dimension; Highly Constrained--visitors who scored relatively high on...

  4. Segmentation: Slicing the Urban Pie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Explains market segmentation and defines undifferentiated, concentrated, and differentiated marketing strategies. Describes in detail the marketing planning process at the Metropolitan Community Colleges. Focuses on the development and implementation of an ongoing recruitment program designed for the market segment composed of business employees.…

  5. Guided energy-minimizing model for segmentation of vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binias, Bartosz

    2016-06-01

    Active contours or snakes, are a group of image segmentation methods based on the idea of energy-minimizng curves. In this paper classical snake model with added Balloon Force is modified, granting it the capability of performing object segmentation task on data with unlimited number of channels. Thanks to introduction of novel component, named the Guiding Energy, into the classical active contour energy functional, the method is now capable of focusing on the objects which posses a specified features provided to the model.

  6. Optimal segmentation and packaging process

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Meservey, Richard H.; Landon, Mark D.

    1999-01-01

    A process for improving packaging efficiency uses three dimensional, computer simulated models with various optimization algorithms to determine the optimal segmentation process and packaging configurations based on constraints including container limitations. The present invention is applied to a process for decontaminating, decommissioning (D&D), and remediating a nuclear facility involving the segmentation and packaging of contaminated items in waste containers in order to minimize the number of cuts, maximize packaging density, and reduce worker radiation exposure. A three-dimensional, computer simulated, facility model of the contaminated items are created. The contaminated items are differentiated. The optimal location, orientation and sequence of the segmentation and packaging of the contaminated items is determined using the simulated model, the algorithms, and various constraints including container limitations. The cut locations and orientations are transposed to the simulated model. The contaminated items are actually segmented and packaged. The segmentation and packaging may be simulated beforehand. In addition, the contaminated items may be cataloged and recorded.

  7. STC: A Simple to Complex Framework for Weakly-supervised Semantic Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yunchao; Liang, Xiaodan; Chen, Yunpeng; Shen, Xiaohui; Cheng, Ming-Ming; Feng, Jiashi; Zhao, Yao; Yan, Shuicheng

    2016-12-06

    Recently, significant improvement has been made on semantic object segmentation due to the development of deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs). Training such a DCNN usually relies on a large number of images with pixel-level segmentation masks, and annotating these images is very costly in terms of both finance and human effort. In this paper, we propose a simple to complex (STC) framework in which only image-level annotations are utilized to learn DCNNs for semantic segmentation. Specifically, we first train an initial segmentation network called Initial-DCNN with the saliency maps of simple images (i.e., those with a single category of major object(s) and clean background). These saliency maps can be automatically obtained by existing bottom-up salient object detection techniques, where no supervision information is needed. Then, a better network called Enhanced-DCNN is learned with supervision from the predicted segmentation masks of simple images based on the Initial-DCNN as well as the image-level annotations. Finally, more pixel-level segmentation masks of complex images (two or more categories of objects with cluttered background), which are inferred by using Enhanced-DCNN and image-level annotations, are utilized as the supervision information to learn the Powerful-DCNN for semantic segmentation. Our method utilizes 40K simple images from Flickr.com and 10K complex images from PASCAL VOC for step-wisely boosting the segmentation network. Extensive experimental results on PASCAL VOC 2012 segmentation benchmark well demonstrate the superiority of the proposed STC framework compared with other state-of-the-arts.

  8. The LOFT ground segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Antonelli, A.; Argan, A.; Barret, D.; Binko, Pavel; Brandt, S.; Cavazzuti, E.; Courvoisier, T.; den Herder, J. W.; Feroci, M.; Ferrigno, C.; Giommi, P.; Götz, D.; Guy, L.; Hernanz, M.; in't Zand, J. J. M.; Klochkov, D.; Kuulkers, Erik; Motch, C.; Lumb, D.; Papitto, A.; Pittori, Carlotta; Rohlfs, R.; Santangelo, A.; Schmid, C.; Schwope, A. D.; Smith, P. J.; Webb, N. A.; Wilms, J.; Zane, S.

    2014-07-01

    LOFT, the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing, was one of the ESA M3 mission candidates that completed their assessment phase at the end of 2013. LOFT is equipped with two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD performs pointed observations of several targets per orbit (~90 minutes), providing roughly ~80 GB of proprietary data per day (the proprietary period will be 12 months). The WFM continuously monitors about 1/3 of the sky at a time and provides data for about ~100 sources a day, resulting in a total of ~20 GB of additional telemetry. The LOFT Burst alert System additionally identifies on-board bright impulsive events (e.g., Gamma-ray Bursts, GRBs) and broadcasts the corresponding position and trigger time to the ground using a dedicated system of ~15 VHF receivers. All WFM data are planned to be made public immediately. In this contribution we summarize the planned organization of the LOFT ground segment (GS), as established in the mission Yellow Book1. We describe the expected GS contributions from ESA and the LOFT consortium. A review is provided of the planned LOFT data products and the details of the data flow, archiving and distribution. Despite LOFT was not selected for launch within the M3 call, its long assessment phase ( >2 years) led to a very solid mission design and an efficient planning of its ground operations.

  9. Evolution of segmented strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.

    2016-11-01

    I explain how to evolve segmented strings in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spaces of any dimension in terms of forward-directed null displacements. The evolution is described entirely in terms of discrete hops which do not require a continuum spacetime. Moreover, the evolution rule is purely algebraic, so it can be defined not only on ordinary real de Sitter and anti-de Sitter but also on the rational points of the quadratic equations that define these spaces. For three-dimensional anti-de Sitter space, a simpler evolution rule is possible that descends from the Wess-Zumino-Witten equations of motion. In this case, one may replace three-dimensional anti-de Sitter space by a noncompact discrete subgroup of S L (2 ,R ) whose structure is related to the Pell equation. A discrete version of the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole can be constructed as a quotient of this subgroup. This discrete black hole avoids the firewall paradox by a curious mechanism: even for large black holes, there are no points inside the horizon until one reaches the singularity.

  10. A randomized clinical trial comparing ritonavir-boosted lopinavir versus maraviroc each with tenofovir plus emtricitabine for post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Leal, Lorna; León, Agathe; Torres, Berta; Inciarte, Alexy; Lucero, Constanza; Mallolas, Josep; Laguno, Montserrat; Martínez-Rebollar, María; González-Cordón, Ana; Manzardo, Christian; Rojas, Jhon; Pich, Judit; Arnaiz, Joan A; Gatell, Josep M; García, Felipe

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) non-completion at day 28, comparing ritonavir-boosted lopinavir versus maraviroc, both with tenofovir disoproxil/emtricitabine as the backbone. We conducted a prospective, open, randomized clinical trial. Individuals attending the emergency room because of potential sexual exposure to HIV and who met criteria for receiving PEP were randomized to one of two groups: tenofovir disoproxil/emtricitabine (245/200 mg) once daily plus either ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (400/100 mg) or maraviroc (300 mg) twice daily. Five follow-up visits were scheduled for days 1, 10, 28, 90 and 180. The primary endpoint was PEP non-completion at day 28. Secondary endpoints were adherence, adverse events and rate of seroconversions. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01533272. One-hundred-and-seventeen individuals were randomized to receive ritonavir-boosted lopinavir and 120 to maraviroc (n = 237). PEP non-completion at day 28 was 38% (n = 89), with significant differences between arms [ritonavir-boosted lopinavir 44% (n = 51) versus maraviroc 32% (n = 38), P = 0.05]. We performed a modified ITT analysis including only those patients who attended on day 1 (n = 182). PEP non-completion in this subgroup was also significantly higher in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir arm (27% versus 13%, P = 0.004). The proportion of patients with low adherence was similar between arms (52% versus 47%, P = 0.56). Adverse events were reported by 111 patients and were significantly more common in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir arm (72% versus 51%, P = 0.003). No seroconversions were observed during the study. PEP non-completion and adverse events were both significantly higher in patients allocated to ritonavir-boosted lopinavir. These data suggest that maraviroc is a well-tolerated antiretroviral that can be used in this setting. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University

  11. Medical image segmentation using level set and watershed transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fuping; Tian, Jie

    2003-07-01

    One of the most popular level set algorithms is the so-called fast marching method. In this paper, a medical image segmentation algorithm is proposed based on the combination of fast marching method and watershed transformation. First, the original image is smoothed using nonlinear diffusion filter, then the smoothed image is over-segmented by the watershed algorithm. Last, the image is segmented automatically using the modified fast marching method. Due to introducing over-segmentation, the arrival time the seeded point to the boundary of region should be calculated. For other pixels inside the region of the seeded point, the arrival time is not calculated because of the region homogeneity. So the algorithm"s speed improves greatly. Moreover, the speed function is redefined based on the statistical similarity degree of the nearby regions. We also extend our algorithm to 3D circumstance and segment medical image series. Experiments show that the algorithm can fast and accurately obtain segmentation results of medical images.

  12. An efficient neural network based method for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Torbati, Nima; Ayatollahi, Ahmad; Kermani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to propose a new neural network based method for medical image segmentation. Firstly, a modified self-organizing map (SOM) network, named moving average SOM (MA-SOM), is utilized to segment medical images. After the initial segmentation stage, a merging process is designed to connect the objects of a joint cluster together. A two-dimensional (2D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used to build the input feature space of the network. The experimental results show that MA-SOM is robust to noise and it determines the input image pattern properly. The segmentation results of breast ultrasound images (BUS) demonstrate that there is a significant correlation between the tumor region selected by a physician and the tumor region segmented by our proposed method. In addition, the proposed method segments X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) head images much better than the incremental supervised neural network (ISNN) and SOM-based methods.

  13. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    PubMed

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-05-04

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract.

  14. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    PubMed Central

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the “boosting effect” of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying “boost factor” is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  15. Vasopressin Boosts Placebo Analgesic Effects in Women: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique; Miller, Franklin G.; Grillon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Social cues and interpersonal interactions strongly contribute to evoke placebo effects that are pervasive in medicine and depend upon the activation of endogenous modulatory systems. Here we explore the possibility to boost placebo effects by targeting pharmacologically the vasopressin system, characterized by a sexually dimorphic response and involved in the regulation of human and nonhuman social behaviors. Methods We enrolled 109 healthy participants and studied the effects of intranasal administration of Avp1a and Avp1b arginine vasopressin receptor agonists against 1) no-treatment, 2) oxytocin, and 3) saline, in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel design trial using a well-established model of placebo analgesia while controlling for sex differences. Results Vasopressin agonists boosted placebo effects in women but had no effect in men. The effects of vasopressin on expectancy-induced analgesia were significantly larger than those observed in the no-treatment (p<004), oxytocin (p<0.001) and saline (p<0.015) groups. Moreover, women with lower dispositional anxiety and cortisol levels showed the largest vasopressin-induced modulation of placebo effects, suggesting a moderating interplay between pre-existing psychological factors and cortisol changes. Conclusions This is the first study that demonstrates that arginine vasopressin boosts placebo effects and that the effect of vasopressin depends upon a significant sex by treatment interaction. These findings are novel and might open up new avenues for clinically relevant research due to the therapeutic potentials of vasopressin and oxytocin as well as the possibility to systematically control for influences of placebo responses in clinical trials. PMID:26321018

  16. Cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrators: performance boosts by geometric effects.

    PubMed

    Videira, Jose J H; Bilotti, Emiliano; Chatten, Amanda J

    2016-07-11

    This paper presents an investigation of the geometric effects within a cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). Photon concentration of a cylindrical LSC increases linearly with cylinder length up to 2 metres. Raytrace modelling on the shading effects of circles on their neighbours demonstrates effective incident light trapping in a cylindrical LSC array at angles of incidence between 60-70 degrees. Raytrace modelling with real-world lighting conditions shows optical efficiency boosts when the suns angle of incidence is within this angle range. On certain days, 2 separate times of peak optical efficiency can be attained over the course of sunrise-solar noon.

  17. Single-Phase Boost Rectifier with Snubber Energy Recovery Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neba, Yasuhiko; Ishizaka, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Itoh, Ryozo

    Single-phase boost rectifier with snubber energy recovery feature operating under the current-mode control with a turn-on at constant clock time is studied. In this rectifier, the resonant circuit consisting of small inductor and capacitor is added in DC circuit. The snubber energy is transferred to an additional resonant capacitor and can next be transferred to the load circuit when an insulated-gate bipolar transistor as the active power device is turned off. The experimental prototype is implemented to investigate the operation. The experimental results confirm that the proposed snubber energy recovery scheme has the feasibility.

  18. Conceptual Design and Analysis of an MXER Tether Boost Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Kirk; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Momentum-exchange / electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems show great promise for use in propellantless orbital transfer. Work conducted at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) and TUI (Tethers Unlimited, Inc.) over the last two years has updated and refined a tether conceptual design that could be used to boost payloads from LEO (Low Earth Orbit) to GTO (Geostationary Transfer Orbit) or on a trans-lunar trajectory. Efficient configurations have been created that can be packaged, assembled, deployed, and maintained, improving their operational potential and flexibility.

  19. Boosting alternating decision trees modeling of disease trait information.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Yu; Lin, Jennifer; Zhou, Xiaobo; Wong, Stephen T C

    2005-12-30

    We applied the alternating decision trees (ADTrees) method to the last 3 replicates from the Aipotu, Danacca, Karangar, and NYC populations in the Problem 2 simulated Genetic Analysis Workshop dataset. Using information from the 12 binary phenotypes and sex as input and Kofendrerd Personality Disorder disease status as the outcome of ADTrees-based classifiers, we obtained a new quantitative trait based on average prediction scores, which was then used for genome-wide quantitative trait linkage (QTL) analysis. ADTrees are machine learning methods that combine boosting and decision trees algorithms to generate smaller and easier-to-interpret classification rules. In this application, we compared four modeling strategies from the combinations of two boosting iterations (log or exponential loss functions) coupled with two choices of tree generation types (a full alternating decision tree or a classic boosting decision tree). These four different strategies were applied to the founders in each population to construct four classifiers, which were then applied to each study participant. To compute average prediction score for each subject with a specific trait profile, such a process was repeated with 10 runs of 10-fold cross validation, and standardized prediction scores obtained from the 10 runs were averaged and used in subsequent expectation-maximization Haseman-Elston QTL analyses (implemented in GENEHUNTER) with the approximate 900 SNPs in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium provided for each population. Our QTL analyses on the basis of four models (a full alternating decision tree and a classic boosting decision tree paired with either log or exponential loss function) detected evidence for linkage (Z >or= 1.96, p < 0.01) on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, and 9. Moreover, using average iteration and abundance scores for the 12 phenotypes and sex as their relevancy measurements, we found all relevant phenotypes for all four populations except phenotype b for the Karangar population

  20. LSM: perceptually accurate line segment merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Naila; Khan, Nazar

    2016-11-01

    Existing line segment detectors tend to break up perceptually distinct line segments into multiple segments. We propose an algorithm for merging such broken segments to recover the original perceptually accurate line segments. The algorithm proceeds by grouping line segments on the basis of angular and spatial proximity. Then those line segment pairs within each group that satisfy unique, adaptive mergeability criteria are successively merged to form a single line segment. This process is repeated until no more line segments can be merged. We also propose a method for quantitative comparison of line segment detection algorithms. Results on the York Urban dataset show that our merged line segments are closer to human-marked ground-truth line segments compared to state-of-the-art line segment detection algorithms.

  1. Implementation and Evaluation of the Modified Feeling Great Program for Oncology Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, C. Nadeane

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Designed to reduce anxiety and boost self-concept, The Modified Feeling Great Program (MFGP) consisted of a series of mental training exercises used to improve the quality of life for 6-17 year old children (N=20) with cancer. More specifically, the children were taught how to relax, look for highlights (good things that happen to them),…

  2. Implementation and Evaluation of the Modified Feeling Great Program for Oncology Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, C. Nadeane

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Designed to reduce anxiety and boost self-concept, The Modified Feeling Great Program (MFGP) consisted of a series of mental training exercises used to improve the quality of life for 6-17 year old children (N=20) with cancer. More specifically, the children were taught how to relax, look for highlights (good things that happen to them),…

  3. A Segmental Framework for Representing Signs Phonetically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert E.; Liddell, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    The arguments for dividing the signing stream in signed languages into sequences of phonetic segments are compelling. The visual records of instances of actually occurring signs provide evidence of two basic types of segments: postural segments and trans-forming segments. Postural segments specify an alignment of articulatory features, both manual…

  4. A Segmental Framework for Representing Signs Phonetically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert E.; Liddell, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    The arguments for dividing the signing stream in signed languages into sequences of phonetic segments are compelling. The visual records of instances of actually occurring signs provide evidence of two basic types of segments: postural segments and trans-forming segments. Postural segments specify an alignment of articulatory features, both manual…

  5. Effect of the average soft-segment length on the morphology and properties of segmented polyurethane nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Finnigan, Bradley; Halley, Peter; Jack, Kevin; McDowell, Alasdair; Truss, Rowan; Casey, Phil; Knott, Robert; Martin, Darren

    2008-04-02

    Two organically modified layered silicates (with small and large diameters) were incorporated into three segmented polyurethanes with various degrees of microphase separation. Microphase separation increased with the molecular weight of the poly(hexamethylene oxide) soft segment. The molecular weight of the soft segment did not influence the amount of polyurethane intercalating the interlayer spacing. Small-angle neutron scattering and differential scanning calorimetry data indicated that the layered silicates did not affect the microphase morphology of any host polymer, regardless of the particle diameter. The stiffness enhancement on filler addition increased as the microphase separation of the polyurethane decreased, presumably because a greater number of urethane linkages were available to interact with the filler. For comparison, the small nanofiller was introduced into a polyurethane with a poly(tetramethylene oxide) soft segment, and a significant increase in the tensile strength and a sharper upturn in the stress-strain curve resulted. No such improvement occurred in the host polymers with poly(hexamethylene oxide) soft segments. It is proposed that the nanocomposite containing the more hydrophilic and mobile poly(tetramethylene oxide) soft segment is capable of greater secondary bonding between the polyurethane chains and the organosilicate surface, resulting in improved stress transfer to the filler and reduced molecular slippage.

  6. Final Technical Report for the BOOST2013 Workshop. Hosted by the University of Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Kenneth

    2015-02-20

    BOOST 2013 was the 5th International Joint Theory/Experiment Workshop on Phenomenology, Reconstruction and Searches for Boosted Objects in High Energy Hadron Collisions. It was locally organized and hosted by the Experimental High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona and held at Flagstaff, Arizona on August 12-16, 2013. The workshop provided a forum for theorists and experimentalists to present and discuss the latest findings related to the reconstruction of boosted objects in high energy hadron collisions and their use in searches for new physics. This report gives the outcomes of the BOOST 2013 Workshop.

  7. AlignerBoost: A Generalized Software Toolkit for Boosting Next-Gen Sequencing Mapping Accuracy Using a Bayesian-Based Mapping Quality Framework.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Grice, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Accurate mapping of next-generation sequencing (NGS) reads to reference genomes is crucial for almost all NGS applications and downstream analyses. Various repetitive elements in human and other higher eukaryotic genomes contribute in large part to ambiguously (non-uniquely) mapped reads. Most available NGS aligners attempt to address this by either removing all non-uniquely mapping reads, or reporting one random or "best" hit based on simple heuristics. Accurate estimation of the mapping quality of NGS reads is therefore critical albeit completely lacking at present. Here we developed a generalized software toolkit "AlignerBoost", which utilizes a Bayesian-based framework to accurately estimate mapping quality of ambiguously mapped NGS reads. We tested AlignerBoost with both simulated and real DNA-seq and RNA-seq datasets at various thresholds. In most cases, but especially for reads falling within repetitive regions, AlignerBoost dramatically increases the mapping precision of modern NGS aligners without significantly compromising the sensitivity even without mapping quality filters. When using higher mapping quality cutoffs, AlignerBoost achieves a much lower false mapping rate while exhibiting comparable or higher sensitivity compared to the aligner default modes, therefore significantly boosting the detection power of NGS aligners even using extreme thresholds. AlignerBoost is also SNP-aware, and higher quality alignments can be achieved if provided with known SNPs. AlignerBoost's algorithm is computationally efficient, and can process one million alignments within 30 seconds on a typical desktop computer. AlignerBoost is implemented as a uniform Java application and is freely available at https://github.com/Grice-Lab/AlignerBoost.

  8. Multiatlas Segmentation as Nonparametric Regression

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Suyash P.; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel theoretical framework to model and analyze the statistical characteristics of a wide range of segmentation methods that incorporate a database of label maps or atlases; such methods are termed as label fusion or multiatlas segmentation. We model these multiatlas segmentation problems as nonparametric regression problems in the high-dimensional space of image patches. We analyze the nonparametric estimator’s convergence behavior that characterizes expected segmentation error as a function of the size of the multiatlas database. We show that this error has an analytic form involving several parameters that are fundamental to the specific segmentation problem (determined by the chosen anatomical structure, imaging modality, registration algorithm, and label-fusion algorithm). We describe how to estimate these parameters and show that several human anatomical structures exhibit the trends modeled analytically. We use these parameter estimates to optimize the regression estimator. We show that the expected error for large database sizes is well predicted by models learned on small databases. Thus, a few expert segmentations can help predict the database sizes required to keep the expected error below a specified tolerance level. Such cost-benefit analysis is crucial for deploying clinical multiatlas segmentation systems. PMID:24802528

  9. Direct volume estimation without segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, X.; Wang, Z.; Islam, A.; Bhaduri, M.; Chan, I.; Li, S.

    2015-03-01

    Volume estimation plays an important role in clinical diagnosis. For example, cardiac ventricular volumes including left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) are important clinical indicators of cardiac functions. Accurate and automatic estimation of the ventricular volumes is essential to the assessment of cardiac functions and diagnosis of heart diseases. Conventional methods are dependent on an intermediate segmentation step which is obtained either manually or automatically. However, manual segmentation is extremely time-consuming, subjective and highly non-reproducible; automatic segmentation is still challenging, computationally expensive, and completely unsolved for the RV. Towards accurate and efficient direct volume estimation, our group has been researching on learning based methods without segmentation by leveraging state-of-the-art machine learning techniques. Our direct estimation methods remove the accessional step of segmentation and can naturally deal with various volume estimation tasks. Moreover, they are extremely flexible to be used for volume estimation of either joint bi-ventricles (LV and RV) or individual LV/RV. We comparatively study the performance of direct methods on cardiac ventricular volume estimation by comparing with segmentation based methods. Experimental results show that direct estimation methods provide more accurate estimation of cardiac ventricular volumes than segmentation based methods. This indicates that direct estimation methods not only provide a convenient and mature clinical tool for cardiac volume estimation but also enables diagnosis of cardiac diseases to be conducted in a more efficient and reliable way.

  10. Multiatlas segmentation as nonparametric regression.

    PubMed

    Awate, Suyash P; Whitaker, Ross T

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel theoretical framework to model and analyze the statistical characteristics of a wide range of segmentation methods that incorporate a database of label maps or atlases; such methods are termed as label fusion or multiatlas segmentation. We model these multiatlas segmentation problems as nonparametric regression problems in the high-dimensional space of image patches. We analyze the nonparametric estimator's convergence behavior that characterizes expected segmentation error as a function of the size of the multiatlas database. We show that this error has an analytic form involving several parameters that are fundamental to the specific segmentation problem (determined by the chosen anatomical structure, imaging modality, registration algorithm, and label-fusion algorithm). We describe how to estimate these parameters and show that several human anatomical structures exhibit the trends modeled analytically. We use these parameter estimates to optimize the regression estimator. We show that the expected error for large database sizes is well predicted by models learned on small databases. Thus, a few expert segmentations can help predict the database sizes required to keep the expected error below a specified tolerance level. Such cost-benefit analysis is crucial for deploying clinical multiatlas segmentation systems.

  11. Hyperdynamics boost factor achievable with an ideal bias potential

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Chen; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-08-20

    Hyperdynamics is a powerful method to significantly extend the time scales amenable to molecular dynamics simulation of infrequent events. One outstanding challenge, however, is the development of the so-called bias potential required by the method. In this work, we design a bias potential using information about all minimum energy pathways (MEPs) out of the current state. While this approach is not suitable for use in an actual hyperdynamics simulation, because the pathways are generally not known in advance, it allows us to show that it is possible to come very close to the theoretical boost limit of hyperdynamics while maintainingmore » high accuracy. We demonstrate this by applying this MEP-based hyperdynamics (MEP-HD) to metallic surface diffusion systems. In most cases, MEP-HD gives boost factors that are orders of magnitude larger than the best existing bias potential, indicating that further development of hyperdynamics bias potentials could have a significant payoff. Lastly, we discuss potential practical uses of MEP-HD, including the possibility of developing MEP-HD into a true hyperdynamics.« less

  12. Boosting the Light: X-ray Physics in Confinement

    ScienceCinema

    Rhisberger, Ralf [HASYLAB/ DESY

    2016-07-12

    Remarkable effects are observed if light is confined to dimensions comparable to the wavelength of the light. The lifetime of atomic resonances excited by the radiation is strongly reduced in photonic traps, such as cavities or waveguides. Moreover, one observes an anomalous boost of the intensity scattered from the resonant atoms. These phenomena results from the strong enhancement of the photonic density of states in such geometries. Many of these effects are currently being explored in the regime of vsible light due to their relevance for optical information processing. It is thus appealing to study these phenomena also for much shorter wavelengths. This talk illuminates recent experiments where synchrotron x-rays were trapped in planar waveguides to resonantly excite atomos ([57]Fe nuclei_ embedded in them. In fact, one observes that the radiative decay of these excited atoms is strongly accelerated. The temporal acceleration of the decay goes along with a strong boost of the radiation coherently scattered from the confined atmos. This can be exploited to obtain a high signal-to-noise ratio from tiny quantities of material, leading to manifold applications in the investigation of nanostructured materials. One application is the use of ultrathin probe layers to image the internal structure of magnetic layer systems.

  13. Hyperdynamics boost factor achievable with an ideal bias potential

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-08-20

    Hyperdynamics is a powerful method to significantly extend the time scales amenable to molecular dynamics simulation of infrequent events. One outstanding challenge, however, is the development of the so-called bias potential required by the method. In this work, we design a bias potential using information about all minimum energy pathways (MEPs) out of the current state. While this approach is not suitable for use in an actual hyperdynamics simulation, because the pathways are generally not known in advance, it allows us to show that it is possible to come very close to the theoretical boost limit of hyperdynamics while maintaining high accuracy. We demonstrate this by applying this MEP-based hyperdynamics (MEP-HD) to metallic surface diffusion systems. In most cases, MEP-HD gives boost factors that are orders of magnitude larger than the best existing bias potential, indicating that further development of hyperdynamics bias potentials could have a significant payoff. Lastly, we discuss potential practical uses of MEP-HD, including the possibility of developing MEP-HD into a true hyperdynamics.

  14. Boosting Antimicrobial Peptides by Hydrophobic Oligopeptide End Tags*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtchen, Artur; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Mörgelin, Matthias; Davoudi, Mina; Alenfall, Jan; Chalupka, Anna; Malmsten, Martin

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach for boosting antimicrobial peptides through end tagging with hydrophobic oligopeptide stretches is demonstrated. Focusing on two peptides derived from kininogen, GKHKNKGKKNGKHNGWK (GKH17) and HKHGHGHGKHKNKGKKN (HKH17), tagging resulted in enhanced killing of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and fungal Candida albicans. Microbicidal potency increased with tag length, also in plasma, and was larger for Trp and Phe stretches than for aliphatic ones. The enhanced microbicidal effects correlated to a higher degree of bacterial wall rupture. Analogously, tagging promoted peptide binding to model phospholipid membranes and liposome rupture, particularly for anionic and cholesterol-void membranes. Tagged peptides displayed low toxicity, particularly in the presence of serum, and resisted degradation by human leukocyte elastase and by staphylococcal aureolysin and V8 proteinase. The biological relevance of these findings was demonstrated ex vivo and in vivo in porcine S. aureus skin infection models. The generality of end tagging for facile boosting of antimicrobial peptides without the need for post-synthesis modification was also demonstrated. PMID:19398550

  15. Playing tag with ANN: boosted top identification with pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Leandro G.; Backović, Mihailo; Cliche, Mathieu; Lee, Seung J.; Perelstein, Maxim

    2015-07-01

    Many searches for physics beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) rely on top tagging algorithms, which discriminate between boosted hadronic top quarks and the much more common jets initiated by light quarks and gluons. We note that the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) effectively takes a "digital image" of each jet, with pixel intensities given by energy deposits in individual HCAL cells. Viewed in this way, top tagging becomes a canonical pattern recognition problem. With this motivation, we present a novel top tagging algorithm based on an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), one of the most popular approaches to pattern recognition. The ANN is trained on a large sample of boosted tops and light quark/gluon jets, and is then applied to independent test samples. The ANN tagger demonstrated excellent performance in a Monte Carlo study: for example, for jets with p T in the 1100-1200 GeV range, 60% top-tag efficiency can be achieved with a 4% mis-tag rate. We discuss the physical features of the jets identified by the ANN tagger as the most important for classification, as well as correlations between the ANN tagger and some of the familiar top-tagging observables and algorithms.

  16. Boosting the Light: X-ray Physics in Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Rhisberger, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    Remarkable effects are observed if light is confined to dimensions comparable to the wavelength of the light. The lifetime of atomic resonances excited by the radiation is strongly reduced in photonic traps, such as cavities or waveguides. Moreover, one observes an anomalous boost of the intensity scattered from the resonant atoms. These phenomena results from the strong enhancement of the photonic density of states in such geometries. Many of these effects are currently being explored in the regime of vsible light due to their relevance for optical information processing. It is thus appealing to study these phenomena also for much shorter wavelengths. This talk illuminates recent experiments where synchrotron x-rays were trapped in planar waveguides to resonantly excite atomos ([57]Fe nuclei_ embedded in them. In fact, one observes that the radiative decay of these excited atoms is strongly accelerated. The temporal acceleration of the decay goes along with a strong boost of the radiation coherently scattered from the confined atmos. This can be exploited to obtain a high signal-to-noise ratio from tiny quantities of material, leading to manifold applications in the investigation of nanostructured materials. One application is the use of ultrathin probe layers to image the internal structure of magnetic layer systems.

  17. Boosting the Light: X-ray Physics in Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Rhisberger, Ralf

    2006-03-01

    Remarkable effects are observed if light is confined to dimensions comparable to the wavelength of the light. The lifetime of atomic resonances excited by the radiation is strongly reduced in photonic traps, such as cavities or waveguides. Moreover, one observes an anomalous boost of the intensity scattered from the resonant atoms. These phenomena results from the strong enhancement of the photonic density of states in such geometries. Many of these effects are currently being explored in the regime of vsible light due to their relevance for optical information processing. It is thus appealing to study these phenomena also for much shorter wavelengths. This talk illuminates recent experiments where synchrotron x-rays were trapped in planar waveguides to resonantly excite atomos ([57]Fe nuclei_ embedded in them. In fact, one observes that the radiative decay of these excited atoms is strongly accelerated. The temporal acceleration of the decay goes along with a strong boost of the radiation coherently scattered from the confined atmos. This can be exploited to obtain a high signal-to-noise ratio from tiny quantities of material, leading to manifold applications in the investigation of nanostructured materials. One application is the use of ultrathin probe layers to image the internal structure of magnetic layer systems.

  18. Preparation for antiretroviral interruption by boosting the immune system.

    PubMed

    Yves, Lévy

    2008-03-01

    In this review we report how recent insights into control of HIV replication in HIV-1-infected patients might provide a rationale for boosting the immune system prior to combined antiretroviral therapy interruption; and recent results of therapeutic immunization studies followed by combined antiretroviral therapy interruption. Interruption of antiretroviral therapy is not without risk in HIV-infected patients. Baseline HIV-specific immunity does not prevent viral rebound and the loss of CD4 T cells. Recent findings in 'HIV controllers' and long-term nonprogressors showed that the immune system may contain HIV replication. These studies may help to define the objectives of therapeutic immunization. This strategy is aimed to contain viral replication or lower the viral 'set point' in patients who did not achieve this equilibrium on their own. From a clinical standpoint, the challenge is, therefore, to transform chronic treated patients into long-term nonprogressors following combined antiretroviral therapy discontinuation. In the last 2 years several studies of therapeutic immunization showed that preparation of the immune system by boosting specific immune responses may help patients to contain viral replication following combined antiretroviral therapy discontinuation. Although some of these results are encouraging, further studies are needed to confirm these results and to identify patients who may benefit from this strategy.

  19. Boosting the power factor with resonant states: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thébaud, S.; Adessi, Ch.; Pailhès, S.; Bouzerar, G.

    2017-08-01

    A particularly promising pathway to enhance the efficiency of thermoelectric materials lies in the use of resonant states, as suggested by experimentalists and theorists alike. In this paper, we go over the mechanisms used in the literature to explain how resonant levels affect the thermoelectric properties, and we suggest that the effects of hybridization are crucial yet ill understood. In order to get a good grasp of the physical picture and to draw guidelines for thermoelectric enhancement, we use a tight-binding model containing a conduction band hybridized with a flat band. We find that the conductivity is suppressed in a wide energy range near the resonance, but that the Seebeck coefficient can be boosted for strong enough hybridization, thus allowing for a significant increase of the power factor. The Seebeck coefficient can also display a sign change as the Fermi level crosses the resonance. Our results suggest that in order to boost the power factor, the hybridization strength must not be too low, the resonant level must not be too close to the conduction (or valence) band edge, and the Fermi level must be located around, but not inside, the resonant peak.

  20. Accounting for segment correlations in segmented gamma-ray scans

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, G.A.; Prettyman, T.H.; Piquette, E.C.

    1994-08-01

    In a typical segmented gamma-ray scanner (SGS), the detector`s field of view is collimated so that a complete horizontal slice or segment of the desired thickness is visible. Ordinarily, the collimator is not deep enough to exclude gamma rays emitted from sample volumes above and below the segment aligned with the collimator. This can lead to assay biases, particularly for certain radioactive-material distributions. Another consequence of the collimator`s low aspect ratio is that segment assays at the top and bottom of the sample are biased low because the detector`s field of view is not filled. This effect is ordinarily countered by placing the sample on a low-Z pedestal and scanning one or more segment thicknesses below and above the sample. This takes extra time, however, We have investigated a number of techniques that both account for correlated segments and correct for end effects in SGS assays. Also, we have developed an algorithm that facilitates estimates of assay precision. Six calculation methods have been compared by evaluating the results of thousands of simulated, assays for three types of gamma-ray source distribution and ten masses. We will report on these computational studies and their experimental verification.

  1. A unified methodology based on sparse field level sets and boosting algorithms for false positives reduction in lung nodules detection.

    PubMed

    Saien, Soudeh; Moghaddam, Hamid Abrishami; Fathian, Mohsen

    2017-08-09

    This work aims to develop a unified methodology for the false positives reduction in lung nodules computer-aided detection schemes. The 3D region of each detected nodule candidate is first reconstructed using the sparse field method for accurately segmenting the objects. This technique enhances the level set modeling by restricting the computations to a narrow band near the evolving curve. Then, a set of 2D and 3D relevant features are extracted for each segmented candidate. Subsequently, a hybrid undersampling/boosting algorithm called RUSBoost is applied to analyze the features and discriminate real nodules from non-nodules. The performance of the proposed scheme was evaluated by using 70 CT images, randomly selected from the Lung Image Database Consortium and containing 198 nodules. Applying RUSBoost classifier exhibited a better performance than some commonly used classifiers. It effectively reduced the average number of FPs to only 3.9 per scan based on a fivefold cross-validation. The practical implementation, applicability for different nodule types and adaptability in handling the imbalanced data classification insure the improvement in lung nodules detection by utilizing this new approach.

  2. Brain anatomical structure segmentation by hybrid discriminative/generative models.

    PubMed

    Tu, Z; Narr, K L; Dollar, P; Dinov, I; Thompson, P M; Toga, A W

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a hybrid discriminative/generative model for brain anatomical structure segmentation is proposed. The learning aspect of the approach is emphasized. In the discriminative appearance models, various cues such as intensity and curvatures are combined to locally capture the complex appearances of different anatomical structures. A probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) framework is adopted to learn multiclass discriminative models that combine hundreds of features across different scales. On the generative model side, both global and local shape models are used to capture the shape information about each anatomical structure. The parameters to combine the discriminative appearance and generative shape models are also automatically learned. Thus, low-level and high-level information is learned and integrated in a hybrid model. Segmentations are obtained by minimizing an energy function associated with the proposed hybrid model. Finally, a grid-face structure is designed to explicitly represent the 3-D region topology. This representation handles an arbitrary number of regions and facilitates fast surface evolution. Our system was trained and tested on a set of 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes and the results obtained are encouraging.

  3. Automatic segmentation of mandible in panoramic x-ray

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Amir Hossein; Kasaei, Shohreh; Mehdizadeh, Mojdeh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. As the panoramic x-ray is the most common extraoral radiography in dentistry, segmentation of its anatomical structures facilitates diagnosis and registration of dental records. This study presents a fast and accurate method for automatic segmentation of mandible in panoramic x-rays. In the proposed four-step algorithm, a superior border is extracted through horizontal integral projections. A modified Canny edge detector accompanied by morphological operators extracts the inferior border of the mandible body. The exterior borders of ramuses are extracted through a contour tracing method based on the average model of mandible. The best-matched template is fetched from the atlas of mandibles to complete the contour of left and right processes. The algorithm was tested on a set of 95 panoramic x-rays. Evaluating the results against manual segmentations of three expert dentists showed that the method is robust. It achieved an average performance of >93% in Dice similarity, specificity, and sensitivity. PMID:26587551

  4. An adaptive multi-feature segmentation model for infrared image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingting; Han, Jin; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2016-04-01

    Active contour models (ACM) have been extensively applied to image segmentation, conventional region-based active contour models only utilize global or local single feature information to minimize the energy functional to drive the contour evolution. Considering the limitations of original ACMs, an adaptive multi-feature segmentation model is proposed to handle infrared images with blurred boundaries and low contrast. In the proposed model, several essential local statistic features are introduced to construct a multi-feature signed pressure function (MFSPF). In addition, we draw upon the adaptive weight coefficient to modify the level set formulation, which is formed by integrating MFSPF with local statistic features and signed pressure function with global information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can make up for the inadequacy of the original method and get desirable results in segmenting infrared images.

  5. Ensemble segmentation using efficient integer linear programming.

    PubMed

    Alush, Amir; Goldberger, Jacob

    2012-10-01

    We present a method for combining several segmentations of an image into a single one that in some sense is the average segmentation in order to achieve a more reliable and accurate segmentation result. The goal is to find a point in the "space of segmentations" which is close to all the individual segmentations. We present an algorithm for segmentation averaging. The image is first oversegmented into superpixels. Next, each segmentation is projected onto the superpixel map. An instance of the EM algorithm combined with integer linear programming is applied on the set of binary merging decisions of neighboring superpixels to obtain the average segmentation. Apart from segmentation averaging, the algorithm also reports the reliability of each segmentation. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated on manually annotated images from the Berkeley segmentation data set and on the results of automatic segmentation algorithms.

  6. Type 2 segmental glomangioma - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Camila Raposo; de Oliveira Filho, Jayme; Matsumoto, Julliene Lika; Cignachi, Stela; Tebet, Ana Carolina Franco; Nasser, Kássila da Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Glomus tumors originate from modified perivascular muscle cells. The most common form is the solitary one. The multiple form may be associated with dominant genetic inheritance. We report a case of a patient with hemangiomatous lesions on the calcaneus and wrist since birth. In 6 years, there was progression of lesions throughout the body. Multiple glomangiomas are asymptomatic and more common in childhood. They can be confused with other vascular malformations. Histopathological diagnosis is essential. The case shows a type 2 segmental manifestation that can be explained by genetic mutation leading to the loss of heterozygosity. As the child grows, the lesions may disseminate due to mutation in distant parts of the skin. Literature shows few reports. The treatment is conservative. PMID:26312686

  7. Metrology of IXO Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing

    2011-01-01

    For future x-ray astrophysics mission that demands optics with large throughput and excellent angular resolution, many telescope concepts build around assembling thin mirror segments in a Wolter I geometry, such as that originally proposed for the International X-ray Observatory. The arc-second resolution requirement posts unique challenges not just for fabrication, mounting but also for metrology of these mirror segments. In this paper, we shall discuss the metrology of these segments using normal incidence metrological method with interferometers and null lenses. We present results of the calibration of the metrology systems we are currently using, discuss their accuracy and address the precision in measuring near-cylindrical mirror segments and the stability of the measurements.

  8. Texture segmentation by genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Song, Andy; Ciesielski, Vic

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a texture segmentation method using genetic programming (GP), which is one of the most powerful evolutionary computation algorithms. By choosing an appropriate representation texture, classifiers can be evolved without computing texture features. Due to the absence of time-consuming feature extraction, the evolved classifiers enable the development of the proposed texture segmentation algorithm. This GP based method can achieve a segmentation speed that is significantly higher than that of conventional methods. This method does not require a human expert to manually construct models for texture feature extraction. In an analysis of the evolved classifiers, it can be seen that these GP classifiers are not arbitrary. Certain textural regularities are captured by these classifiers to discriminate different textures. GP has been shown in this study as a feasible and a powerful approach for texture classification and segmentation, which are generally considered as complex vision tasks.

  9. Reduplication facilitates early word segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ota, Mitsuhiko; Skarabela, Barbora

    2017-02-06

    This study explores the possibility that early word segmentation is aided by infants' tendency to segment words with repeated syllables ('reduplication'). Twenty-four nine-month-olds were familiarized with passages containing one novel reduplicated word and one novel non-reduplicated word. Their central fixation times in response to these as well as new reduplicated and non-reduplicated words introduced at test showed that familiarized reduplicated words were segmented better than familiarized non-reduplicated words. These results demonstrate that infants are predisposed to segment words with repeated phonological elements, and suggest that register-specific words in infant-directed speech may have evolved in response to this learning bias.

  10. Morphing of Segmented Bimorph Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Bastaits, Renaud; Preumont, André

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric turbulence compensation for the next generation of terrestrial telescopes (30-40 m diameter) will require deformable mirrors of increasing size and a number of actuators reaching several thousands. However, the mere extrapolation of existing designs leads to complicated and extremely expensive mirrors. This article discusses an alternative solution based on the use of segmented identical hexagonal bimorph mirrors. This allows to indefinitely increase the degree of correction while maintaining the first mechanical resonance at the level of a single segment, and shows an increase in price only proportional to the number of segments. Extensive simulations using random turbulent screens show that the segmentation produces only moderate reductions of the Strehl number, compared to a monolithic bimorph mirror with the same number of actuators (S = 0.86 instead of S = 0.89 in this study).

  11. Image Segmentation Using Affine Wavelets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-12

    2-4 2.7 Artificial Neural Network Radial Basis Function Classifiers . . . 2-5 2.7.1 Localized Receptive Fields...used a radial 1-3 basis function artificial neural network, which accomplishes the segmentation based on the multiresolution features. 1.7 Objectives...as the features? "* Can the Radial Basis Function (RBF) artificial neural network be trained to au- tonomously segment SAR and FLIR imagery using the

  12. Non-Orthogonal Iris Segmentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-09

    pixels ( eyelashes , eyelids, etc.). For example, if all three quality bounds are close in proximity, the iris pattern that was segmented...iris pattern that was segmented by the algorithm contains eyelashes and additional extraneous information. If all automatically generated “test” mask...orthogonal iris images (see Figs. 25-28). This is primarily explained by the increased presence of eyelashes in the non-orthogonal iris masks. As the angle

  13. Length Scales of Magmatic Segments at Intermediate and Fast Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulahanis, B.; Carbotte, S. M.; Klein, E. M.; Smith, D. K.; Cannat, M.

    2014-12-01

    A synthesis of observations from fast and magmatically-robust intermediate spreading ridges suggest that fine-scale tectonic segments, previously classified as 3rd order, correspond with principle magmatic segments along these ridges, each with their own magmatic plumbing system in the crust and shallow mantle. In this study, we use multi-beam sonar data available for fast and intermediate spreading ridges to determine the length distribution of these segments for comparison with the primary segmentation of the ridge axis found at slower spreading ridges. A study of intermediate, slow and ultraslow-spreading ridges using global satellite-derived bathymetry indicates a dominant segment length of 53 km [Briais and Rabinowicz, J. Geophys. Res. 2002]. However, satellite-derived bathymetry cannot be used to identify fine-scale tectonic segmentation of fast and magmatically-robust intermediate spreading ridges due to the subdued low-relief expression of ridge-axis discontinuities along these spreading rates. This study focuses on the well-mapped regions of the East Pacific Rise between 13.35°S and 18°N, and the Galapagos Spreading Center between 85° and 95.38° W. We reexamine tectonic segmentation of the ridge axis previously identified in the literature and modify the locations of ridge-axis discontinuities defining segment ends in regions where modern multi-beam bathymetric data coverage has improved relative to that available in early studies. Discontinuities of first, second, and third order are used to define tectonic segment lengths. Initial results show a mean segment length of 42 km (standard deviation of 27 km) and a median of 33 km, with 85 segments studied, similar to the segment length distributions observed at slower spreading ridges. To further evaluate the hypothesis of principle magmatic segments, we also examine the relationship between fine-scale tectonic segmentation and properties of the crustal magmatic system imaged in prior seismic studies of

  14. Neural network for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourikhine, Alexei N.; Prasad, Lakshman; Schlei, Bernd R.

    2000-10-01

    Image analysis is an important requirement of many artificial intelligence systems. Though great effort has been devoted to inventing efficient algorithms for image analysis, there is still much work to be done. It is natural to turn to mammalian vision systems for guidance because they are the best known performers of visual tasks. The pulse- coupled neural network (PCNN) model of the cat visual cortex has proven to have interesting properties for image processing. This article describes the PCNN application to the processing of images of heterogeneous materials; specifically PCNN is applied to image denoising and image segmentation. Our results show that PCNNs do well at segmentation if we perform image smoothing prior to segmentation. We use PCNN for obth smoothing and segmentation. Combining smoothing and segmentation enable us to eliminate PCNN sensitivity to the setting of the various PCNN parameters whose optimal selection can be difficult and can vary even for the same problem. This approach makes image processing based on PCNN more automatic in our application and also results in better segmentation.

  15. The Envisat-1 ground segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Ray; Ashton, Martin

    1995-03-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1 and ERS-2) missions will be followed by the Polar Orbit Earth Mission (POEM) program. The first of the POEM missions will be Envisat-1. ESA has completed the design phase of the ground segment. This paper presents the main elements of that design. The main part of this paper is an overview of the Payload Data Segment (PDS) which is the core of the Envisat-1 ground segment, followed by two further sections which describe in more detail the facilities to be offered by the PDS for archiving and for user servcies. A further section describes some future issues for ground segment development. Logica was the prime contractor of a team of 18 companies which undertook the ESA financed architectural design study of the Envisat-1 ground segment. The outputs of the study included detailed specifications of the components that will acquire, process, archive and disseminate the payload data, together with the functional designs of the flight operations and user data segments.

  16. Quark and gluon production from a boost-invariantly expanding color electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taya, Hidetoshi

    2017-07-01

    Particle production from an expanding classical color electromagnetic field is extensively studied, motivated by the early stage dynamics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. We develop a formalism at one-loop order to compute the particle spectra by canonically quantizing quark, gluon, and ghost fluctuations under the presence of such an expanding classical color background field; the canonical quantization is done in the τ -η coordinates in order to take into account manifestly the expanding geometry. As a demonstration, we model the expanding classical color background field by a boost-invariantly expanding homogeneous color electric field with lifetime T , for which we obtain analytically the quark and gluon production spectra by solving the equations of motion of QCD nonperturbatively with respect to the color electric field. In this paper we study (i) the finite lifetime effect, which is found to modify significantly the particle spectra from those expected from the Schwinger formula; (ii) the difference between the quark and gluon production; and (iii) the quark mass dependence of the production spectra. Implications of these results to ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions are also discussed.

  17. Discriminative boosted forest with convolutional neural network-based patch descriptor for object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Tao; Li, Tao; Ye, Mao; Li, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    Object detection with intraclass variations is challenging. The existing methods have not achieved the optimal combinations of classifiers and features, especially features learned by convolutional neural networks (CNNs). To solve this problem, we propose an object-detection method based on improved random forest and local image patches represented by CNN features. First, we compute CNN-based patch descriptors for each sample by modified CNNs. Then, the random forest is built whose split functions are defined by patch selector and linear projection learned by linear support vector machine. To improve the classification accuracy, the split functions in each depth of the forest make up a local classifier, and all local classifiers are assembled in a layer-wise manner by a boosting algorithm. The main contributions of our approach are summarized as follows: (1) We propose a new local patch descriptor based on CNN features. (2) We define a patch-based split function which is optimized with maximum class-label purity and minimum classification error over the samples of the node. (3) Each local classifier is assembled by minimizing the global classification error. We evaluate the method on three well-known challenging datasets: TUD pedestrians, INRIA pedestrians, and UIUC cars. The experiments demonstrate that our method achieves state-of-the-art or competitive performance.

  18. Genetic and management approaches to boost UK wheat yields by ameliorating water deficits.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Ian C; Whalley, W R; Ober, Eric S; Parry, M A J

    2011-11-01

    Faced with the challenge of increasing global food production, there is the need to exploit all approaches to increasing crop yields. A major obstacle to boosting yields of wheat (an important staple in many parts of the world) is the availability and efficient use of water, since there is increasing stress on water resources used for agriculture globally, and also in parts of the UK. Improved soil and crop management and the development of new genotypes may increase wheat yields when water is limiting. Technical and scientific issues concerning management options such as irrigation and the use of growth-promoting rhizobacteria are explored, since these may allow the more efficient use of irrigation. Fundamental understanding of how crops sense and respond to multiple abiotic stresses can help improve the effective use of irrigation water. Experiments are needed to test the hypothesis that modifying wheat root system architecture (by increasing root proliferation deep in the soil profile) will allow greater soil water extraction thereby benefiting productivity and yield stability. Furthermore, better knowledge of plant and soil interactions and how below-ground and above-ground processes communicate within the plant can help identify traits and ultimately genes (or alleles) that will define genotypes that yield better under dry conditions. Developing new genotypes will take time and, therefore, these challenges need to be addressed now.

  19. SUMOylation of ATRIP potentiates DNA damage signaling by boosting multiple protein interactions in the ATR pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Shyi; Ouyang, Jian; Mori, Eiichiro; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Maréchal, Alexandre; Hallet, Alexander; Chen, David J; Zou, Lee

    2014-07-01

    The ATR (ATM [ataxia telangiectasia-mutated]- and Rad3-related) checkpoint is a crucial DNA damage signaling pathway. While the ATR pathway is known to transmit DNA damage signals through the ATR-Chk1 kinase cascade, whether post-translational modifications other than phosphorylation are important for this pathway remains largely unknown. Here, we show that protein SUMOylation plays a key role in the ATR pathway. ATRIP, the regulatory partner of ATR, is modified by SUMO2/3 at K234 and K289. An ATRIP mutant lacking the SUMOylation sites fails to localize to DNA damage and support ATR activation efficiently. Surprisingly, the ATRIP SUMOylation mutant is compromised in the interaction with a protein group, rather than a single protein, in the ATR pathway. Multiple ATRIP-interacting proteins, including ATR, RPA70, TopBP1, and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 complex, exhibit reduced binding to the ATRIP SUMOylation mutant in cells and display affinity for SUMO2 chains in vitro, suggesting that they bind not only ATRIP but also SUMO. Fusion of a SUMO2 chain to the ATRIP SUMOylation mutant enhances its interaction with the protein group and partially suppresses its localization and functional defects, revealing that ATRIP SUMOylation promotes ATR activation by providing a unique type of protein glue that boosts multiple protein interactions along the ATR pathway. © 2014 Wu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Achromatic shearing phase sensor for generating images indicative of measure(s) of alignment between segments of a segmented telescope's mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Walker, Chanda Bartlett (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An achromatic shearing phase sensor generates an image indicative of at least one measure of alignment between two segments of a segmented telescope's mirrors. An optical grating receives at least a portion of irradiance originating at the segmented telescope in the form of a collimated beam and the collimated beam into a plurality of diffraction orders. Focusing optics separate and focus the diffraction orders. Filtering optics then filter the diffraction orders to generate a resultant set of diffraction orders that are modified. Imaging optics combine portions of the resultant set of diffraction orders to generate an interference pattern that is ultimately imaged by an imager.

  1. An automated framework for 3D serous pigment epithelium detachment segmentation in SD-OCT images.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhuli; Chen, Haoyu; Shi, Fei; Wang, Lirong; Zhu, Weifang; Xiang, Dehui; Yan, Chenglin; Li, Liang; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-02-22

    Pigment epithelium detachment (PED) is an important clinical manifestation of multiple chorioretinal diseases, which can cause loss of central vision. In this paper, an automated framework is proposed to segment serous PED in SD-OCT images. The proposed framework consists of four main steps: first, a multi-scale graph search method is applied to segment abnormal retinal layers; second, an effective AdaBoost method is applied to refine the initial segmented regions based on 62 extracted features; third, a shape-constrained graph cut method is applied to segment serous PED, in which the foreground and background seeds are obtained automatically; finally, an adaptive structure elements based morphology method is applied to remove false positive segmented regions. The proposed framework was tested on 25 SD-OCT volumes from 25 patients diagnosed with serous PED. The average true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and positive predictive value (PPV) are 90.08%, 0.22%, 91.20% and 92.62%, respectively. The proposed framework can provide clinicians with accurate quantitative information, including shape, size and position of the PED region, which can assist clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Segmentation of 3D holographic images using bivariate jointly distributed region snake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshpanah, Mehdi; Javidi, Bahram

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the bivariate jointly distributed region snake method in segmentation of microorganisms in Single Exposure On- Line (SEOL) holographic microscopy images. 3D images of the microorganisms are digitally reconstructed and numerically focused from any arbitrary depth from a single recorded digital hologram without mechanical scanning. Living organisms are non-rigid and they vary in shape and size. Moreover, they often do not exhibit clear edges in digitally reconstructed SEOL holographic images. Thus, conventional segmentation techniques based on the edge map may fail to segment these images. However, SEOL holographic microscopy provides both magnitude and phase information of the sample specimen, which could be helpful in the segmentation process. In this paper, we present a statistical framework based on the joint probability distribution of magnitude and phase information of SEOL holographic microscopy images and maximum likelihood estimation of image probability density function parameters. An optimization criterion is computed by maximizing the likelihood function of the target support hypothesis. In addition, a simple stochastic algorithm has been adapted for carrying out the optimization, while several boosting techniques have been employed to enhance its performance. Finally, the proposed method is applied for segmentation of biological microorganisms in SEOL holographic images and the experimental results are presented.

  3. AlignerBoost: A Generalized Software Toolkit for Boosting Next-Gen Sequencing Mapping Accuracy Using a Bayesian-Based Mapping Quality Framework

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qi; Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate mapping of next-generation sequencing (NGS) reads to reference genomes is crucial for almost all NGS applications and downstream analyses. Various repetitive elements in human and other higher eukaryotic genomes contribute in large part to ambiguously (non-uniquely) mapped reads. Most available NGS aligners attempt to address this by either removing all non-uniquely mapping reads, or reporting one random or "best" hit based on simple heuristics. Accurate estimation of the mapping quality of NGS reads is therefore critical albeit completely lacking at present. Here we developed a generalized software toolkit "AlignerBoost", which utilizes a Bayesian-based framework to accurately estimate mapping quality of ambiguously mapped NGS reads. We tested AlignerBoost with both simulated and real DNA-seq and RNA-seq datasets at various thresholds. In most cases, but especially for reads falling within repetitive regions, AlignerBoost dramatically increases the mapping precision of modern NGS aligners without significantly compromising the sensitivity even without mapping quality filters. When using higher mapping quality cutoffs, AlignerBoost achieves a much lower false mapping rate while exhibiting comparable or higher sensitivity compared to the aligner default modes, therefore significantly boosting the detection power of NGS aligners even using extreme thresholds. AlignerBoost is also SNP-aware, and higher quality alignments can be achieved if provided with known SNPs. AlignerBoost’s algorithm is computationally efficient, and can process one million alignments within 30 seconds on a typical desktop computer. AlignerBoost is implemented as a uniform Java application and is freely available at https://github.com/Grice-Lab/AlignerBoost. PMID:27706155

  4. Boosting oncolytic adenovirus potency with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic force.

    PubMed

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Holm, Per Sonne; Holzmüller, Regina; Anton, Martina; Thalhammer, Stefan; Adigüzel, Denis; Döblinger, Markus; Plank, Christian

    2010-08-02

    Oncolytic adenoviruses rank among the most promising innovative agents in cancer therapy. We examined the potential of boosting the efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl520 by associating it with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic-field-guided infection in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells in vitro and upon intratumoral injection in vivo. The virus was complexed by self-assembly with core-shell nanoparticles having a magnetite core of about 10 nm and stabilized by a shell containing 68 mass % lithium 3-[2-(perfluoroalkyl)ethylthio]propionate) and 32 mass % 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine. Optimized virus binding, sufficiently stable in 50% fetal calf serum, was found at nanoparticle-to-virus ratios of 5 fg of Fe per physical virus particle (VP) and above. As estimated from magnetophoretic mobility measurements, 3,600 to 4,500 magnetite nanocrystallites were associated per virus particle. Ultrastructural analysis by electron and atomic force microscopy showed structurally intact viruses surrounded by magnetic particles that occasionally bridged several virus particles. Viral uptake into cells at a given virus dose was enhanced 10-fold compared to nonmagnetic virus when infections were carried out under the influence of a magnetic field. Increased virus internalization resulted in a 10-fold enhancement of the oncolytic potency in terms of the dose required for killing 50% of the target cells (IC(50) value) and an enhancement of 4 orders of magnitude in virus progeny formation at equal input virus doses compared to nonmagnetic viruses. Furthermore, the full oncolytic effect developed within two days postinfection compared with six days in a nonmagnetic virus as a reference. Plotting target cell viability versus internalized virus particles for magnetic and nonmagnetic virus showed that the inherent oncolytic productivity of the virus remained unchanged upon association with magnetic nanoparticles. Hence, we conclude that the mechanism of boosting the

  5. Direct current stimulation boosts synaptic gain and cooperativity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Asif; Lafon, Belen; Parra, Lucas C; Bikson, Marom

    2017-06-01

    Direct current stimulation (DCS) polarity specifically modulates synaptic efficacy during a continuous train of presynaptic inputs, despite synaptic depression. DCS polarizes afferent axons and postsynaptic neurons, boosting cooperativity between synaptic inputs. Polarization of afferent neurons in upstream brain regions may modulate activity in the target brain region during transcranial DCS (tDCS). A statistical theory of coincident activity predicts that the diffuse and weak profile of current flow can be advantageous in enhancing connectivity between co-active brain regions. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) produces sustained and diffuse current flow in the brain with effects that are state dependent and outlast stimulation. A mechanistic explanation for tDCS should capture these spatiotemporal features. It remains unclear how sustained DCS affects ongoing synaptic dynamics and how modulation of afferent inputs by diffuse stimulation changes synaptic activity at the target brain region. We tested the effect of acute DCS (10-20 V m(-1) for 3-5 s) on synaptic dynamics with constant rate (5-40 Hz) and Poisson-distributed (4 Hz mean) trains of presynaptic inputs. Across tested frequencies, sustained synaptic activity was modulated by DCS with polarity-specific effects. Synaptic depression attenuates the sensitivity to DCS from 1.1% per V m(-1) to 0.55%. DCS applied during synaptic activity facilitates cumulative neuromodulation, potentially reversing endogenous synaptic depression. We establish these effects are mediated by both postsynaptic membrane polarization and afferent axon fibre polarization, which boosts cooperativity between synaptic inputs. This potentially extends the locus of neuromodulation from the nominal target to afferent brain regions. Based on these results we hypothesized the polarization of afferent neurons in upstream brain regions may modulate activity in the target brain region during tDCS. A multiscale model of

  6. Enhanced algorithm performance for land cover classification from remotely sensed data using bagging and boosting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chan, J.C.-W.; Huang, C.; DeFries, R.

    2001-01-01

    Two ensemble methods, bagging and boosting, were investigated for improving algorithm performance. Our results confirmed the theoretical explanation [1] that bagging improves unstable, but not stable, learning algorithms. While boosting enhanced accuracy of a weak learner, its behavior is subject to the characteristics of each learning algorithm.

  7. Boost Your High: Cigarette Smoking to Enhance Alcohol and Drug Effects among Southeast Asian American Youth.

    PubMed

    Lipperman-Kreda, Sharon; Lee, Juliet P

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined: 1) whether using cigarettes to enhance the effects of other drugs (here referred to as "boosting") is a unique practice related to blunts (i.e., small cheap cigars hollowed out and filled with cannabis) or marijuana use only; 2) the prevalence of boosting among drug-using young people; and 3) the relationship between boosting and other drug-related risk behaviors. We present data collected from 89 Southeast Asian American youth and young adults in Northern California (35 females). 72% respondents reported any lifetime boosting. Controlling for gender, results of linear regression analyses show a significant positive relationship between frequency of boosting to enhance alcohol high and number of drinks per occasion. Boosting was also found to be associated with use of blunts but not other forms of marijuana and with the number of blunts on a typical day. The findings indicate that boosting may be common among drug-using Southeast Asian youths. These findings also indicate a need for further research on boosting as an aspect of cigarette uptake and maintenance among drug- and alcohol-involved youths.

  8. Prime-boost vaccine strategy against viral infections: Mechanisms and benefits.

    PubMed

    Kardani, Kimia; Bolhassani, Azam; Shahbazi, Sepideh

    2016-01-20

    The essential goal of vaccination is to generate potent and long-term protection against diseases. Among different vaccine modalities, prime-boost vaccine strategies could enhance cellular and also humoral immunity in several animal models. These strategies have been applied for the development of vaccines against important infectious diseases such as HIV, SIV, HCV, HSV, and HBV indicating promising results even in clinical trials. Several factors including selection of antigen, type of vector, delivery route, dose, adjuvant, boosting regimen, the order of vector injection, and the intervals between different vaccinations influence the outcome of prime-boost immunization approaches. The reported data suggest that the prime-boost strategy as a combination of vaccines (i.e., heterologous prime-boost) may be better than a single vaccine for protection against infectious diseases. Indeed, in many cases, heterologous prime-boost can be more immunogenic than homologous prime-boost strategy. This review discusses the recent advances in prime-boost immunization strategies as well as their benefits and mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Medical image segmentation by MDP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yisu; Chen, Wufan

    2011-11-01

    MDP (Dirichlet Process Mixtures) model is applied to segment medical images in this paper. Segmentation can been automatically done without initializing segmentation class numbers. The MDP model segmentation algorithm is used to segment natural images and MR (Magnetic Resonance) images in the paper. To demonstrate the accuracy of the MDP model segmentation algorithm, many compared experiments, such as EM (Expectation Maximization) image segmentation algorithm, K-means image segmentation algorithm and MRF (Markov Field) image segmentation algorithm, have been done to segment medical MR images. All the methods are also analyzed quantitatively by using DSC (Dice Similarity Coefficients). The experiments results show that DSC of MDP model segmentation algorithm of all slices exceed 90%, which show that the proposed method is robust and accurate.

  10. Communicative functions integrate segments in prosodies and prosodies in segments.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Klaus J

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes a new look at the traditionally established divide between sounds and prosodies, viewing it as a useful heuristics in language descriptions that focus on the segmental make- up of words. It pleads for a new approach that bridges this reified compartmentalization of speech in a more global communicative perspective. Data are presented from a German perception experiment in the framework of the Semantic Differential that shows interdependence of f0 contours and the spectral characteristics of a following fricative segment, for the expression of semantic functions along the scales questioning - asserting, excited - calm, forceful - not forceful, contrary - agreeable. The results lead to the conclusion that segments shape prosodies and are shaped by them in varying ways in the coding of semantic functions. This implies that the analysis of sentence prosodies needs to integrate the manifestation of segments, just as the analysis of segments needs to consider their prosodic embedding. In communicative interaction, speakers set broad prosodic time windows of varying sizes, and listeners respond to them. So, future phonetic research needs to concentrate on speech analysis in such windows.

  11. Study Task for Determining the Effects of Boost-Phase Environments on Densified Propellants Thermal Conditions for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberbusch, Mark S.; Meyer, Michael L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermodynamic study has been conducted that investigated the effects of the boost-phase environment on densified propellant thermal conditions for expendable launch vehicles. Two thermodynamic models were developed and utilized to bound the expected thermodynamic conditions inside the cryogenic liquid hydrogen and oxygen propellant tanks of an Atlas IIAS/Centaur launch vehicle during the initial phases of flight. The ideal isentropic compression model was developed to predict minimum pressurant gas requirements. The thermal equilibrium model was developed to predict the maximum pressurant gas requirements. The models were modified to simulate the required flight tank pressure profiles through ramp pressurization, liquid expulsion, and tank venting. The transient parameters investigated were: liquid temperature, liquid level, and pressurant gas consumption. Several mission scenarios were analyzed using the thermodynamic models, and the results indicate that flying an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle with densified propellants is feasible and beneficial but may require some minor changes to the vehicle.

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer pathways in hydrogen-evolving reduced graphene oxide-boosted hybrid nano-bio catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Dimitrijevic, Nada M; Chang, Angela Y; Schaller, Richard D; Liu, Yuzi; Rajh, Tijana; Rozhkova, Elena A

    2014-08-26

    Photocatalytic production of clean hydrogen fuels using water and sunlight has attracted remarkable attention due to the increasing global energy demand. Natural and synthetic dyes can be utilized to sensitize semiconductors for solar energy transformation using visible light. In this study, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and a membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) were employed as building modules to harness visible light by a Pt/TiO2 nanocatalyst. Introduction of the rGO boosts the nano-bio catalyst performance that results in hydrogen production rates of approximately 11.24 mmol of H2 (μmol protein)(-1) h(-1). Photoelectrochemical measurements show a 9-fold increase in photocurrent density when TiO2 electrodes were modified with rGO and bR. Electron paramagnetic resonance and transient absorption spectroscopy demonstrate an interfacial charge transfer from the photoexcited rGO to the semiconductor under visible light.

  13. Automated classification of lung bronchovascular anatomy in CT using AdaBoost

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Robert A.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Abtin, Fereidoun; Kim, Hyun J.; Brown, Kathleen; Batra, Poonam; Roback, Donald; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Brown, Matthew S.

    2007-01-01

    Lung CAD systems require the ability to classify a variety of pulmonary structures as part of the diagnostic process. The purpose of this work was to develop a methodology for fully automated voxel-by-voxel classification of airways, fissures, nodules, and vessels from chest CT images using a single feature set and classification method. Twenty-nine thin section CT scans were obtained from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). Multiple radiologists labeled voxels corresponding to the following structures: airways (trachea to 6th generation), major and minor lobar fissures, nodules, and vessels (hilum to peripheral), and normal lung parenchyma. The labeled data was used in conjunction with a supervised machine learning approach (AdaBoost) to train a set of ensemble classifiers. Each ensemble classifier was trained to detect voxels part of a specific structure (either airway, fissure, nodule, vessel, or parenchyma). The feature set consisted of voxel attenuation and a small number of features based on the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix (used to differentiate structures by shape). When each ensemble classifier was composed of 20 weak classifiers, the AUC values for the airway, fissure, nodule, vessel, and parenchyma classifiers were 0.984 ± 0.011, 0.949 ± 0.009, 0.945 ± 0.018, 0.953 ± 0.016, and 0.931± 0.015 respectively. The strong results suggest that this could be an effective input to higher-level anatomical based segmentation models with the potential to improve CAD performance. PMID:17482500

  14. Contextual information-aided kidney segmentation in CT sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Enwei; Liang, Yanmei; Fan, Hailun

    2013-03-01

    Based on the continuity of adjacent slices in a medical image sequence, a slice-based 3-D segmentation framework is constructed to extract the intact kidney by processing all slices automatically in the whole sequence. The framework includes four sections: initial segmentation, selection of the most reliable initial segmentation, location and modification of leakage. The crucial section of the proposed framework is selecting the most reliable initial segmentation image, which will be regarded as the reference image to evaluate the continuity of the following slice. Leakage location is carried out based on the contextual features, and the local iterative thresholding (LIT) is used to modify the leakage. As test examples of the framework, abdominal computed tomography (CT) images in enhanced phases are processed to segment kidney automatically. The total of 392 CT images in 7 sequences from 3 patients are selected as training images to determine the parameters in the database, and other 898 CT images in 21 sequences from 7 patients are used as test images to evaluate the effectiveness of the method. An average of three dimensional Dice similarity coefficient (3-D DSC) of 94.7% and average symmetric surface distance (ASSD) of 0.91 mm are obtained, which indicate that the intact kidney can be perfectly extracted with hardly any leakage automatically.

  15. Phase Sensor for Aligning a Segmented Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, Philip; Walker, Chanda Barlett

    2006-01-01

    A phase sensor has been developed for use in aligning a segmented telescope mirror to within a fraction of a wavelength in piston. (As used here, piston signifies displacement of a mirror segment along the optical axis of the telescope.) Such precise alignment is necessary in order to realize the full benefit of the large aperture achievable through segmentation. This phase sensor is achromatic. It is based on two-wavelength shearing interferometry, and can be modified to utilize an extended or broad-band (e.g., white) light source. The sensor optics include a ruled diffraction grating and an imaging lens. The sensor can measure the piston shift between segments as well as aberrations of the segments. It can measure the surface error of an individual segment, making it possible to compensate for the error with optimal amount(s) of piston and/or tilt. The precise capture range of the sensor depends partly on the telescope design; the largest relative piston shifts measurable by use of this sensor are of the order of 100 m. The accuracy of the sensor also depends partly on the telescope design; in general, the accuracy is sufficient to enable alignment to within approximately half a wavelength. The interferometric image is digitized and processed by a simple algorithm in real time, and the output of the algorithm can be used to maintain alignment in real time, even in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The sensor is robust. Through calibration, it can be made insensitive to (and, hence, tolerant of) misalignments and aberrations of its own optics, most aberrations of the telescope as a whole (in contradistinction to aberrations of individual segments), and most aberrations introduced by atmospheric turbulence

  16. 3D ultrasound image segmentation using wavelet support vector machines

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Hamed; Fei, Baowei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is clinically used in prostate biopsy and therapy. Segmentation of the prostate on TRUS images has many applications. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) segmentation method for TRUS images of the prostate is presented for 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy. Methods: This segmentation method utilizes a statistical shape, texture information, and intensity profiles. A set of wavelet support vector machines (W-SVMs) is applied to the images at various subregions of the prostate. The W-SVMs are trained to adaptively capture the features of the ultrasound images in order to differentiate the prostate and nonprostate tissue. This method consists of a set of wavelet transforms for extraction of prostate texture features and a kernel-based support vector machine to classify the textures. The voxels around the surface of the prostate are labeled in sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes. The weight functions are defined for each labeled voxel on each plane and on the model at each region. In the 3D segmentation procedure, the intensity profiles around the boundary between the tentatively labeled prostate and nonprostate tissue are compared to the prostate model. Consequently, the surfaces are modified based on the model intensity profiles. The segmented prostate is updated and compared to the shape model. These two steps are repeated until they converge. Manual segmentation of the prostate serves as the gold standard and a variety of methods are used to evaluate the performance of the segmentation method. Results: The results from 40 TRUS image volumes of 20 patients show that the Dice overlap ratio is 90.3% ± 2.3% and that the sensitivity is 87.7% ± 4.9%. Conclusions: The proposed method provides a useful tool in our 3D ultrasound image-guided prostate biopsy and can also be applied to other applications in the prostate. PMID:22755682

  17. Defined three-dimensional microenvironments boost induction of pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Okawa, Yuya; Ranga, Adrian; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Tabata, Yoji; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), numerous approaches have been explored to improve the original protocol, which is based on a two-dimensional (2D) cell-culture system. Surprisingly, nothing is known about the effect of a more biologically faithful 3D environment on somatic-cell reprogramming. Here, we report a systematic analysis of how reprogramming of somatic cells occurs within engineered 3D extracellular matrices. By modulating microenvironmental stiffness, degradability and biochemical composition, we have identified a previously unknown role for biophysical effectors in the promotion of iPSC generation. We find that the physical cell confinement imposed by the 3D microenvironment boosts reprogramming through an accelerated mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and increased epigenetic remodelling. We conclude that 3D microenvironmental signals act synergistically with reprogramming transcription factors to increase somatic plasticity.

  18. Emerging applications for the Peacekeeper Post Boost Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Jack

    1992-07-01

    The use of the Peacekeeper Post Boost Vehicle (PBV) is considered for applications beyond its original use as stage IV of the ICBM system. The PBV is described in the context of the Peacekeeper mission, and the axial engine and attitude-control engines are illustrated. The capability of the PBV is found to make the engine appropriate for use as a liquid-plume generator for the Space Pallet Satellite Experiment. The PBV could also be used as a system basis for transporting large payloads into LEO, and a PBV-based platform could remain in orbit to serve as an earth/payload communication link. The PBV offers technologies and capabilities required for such missions as a plume generator, space-experiment module, or as a transfer vehicle for Space Station logistics and resupply.

  19. Metabolic engineering of resveratrol and other longevity boosting compounds.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y; Chen, H; Yu, O

    2010-09-16

    Resveratrol, a compound commonly found in red wine, has attracted many attentions recently. It is a diphenolic natural product accumulated in grapes and a few other species under stress conditions. It possesses a special ability to increase the life span of eukaryotic organisms, ranging from yeast, to fruit fly, to obese mouse. The demand for resveratrol as a food and nutrition supplement has increased significantly in recent years. Extensive work has been carried out to increase the production of resveratrol in plants and microbes. In this review, we will discuss the biosynthetic pathway of resveratrol and engineering methods to heterologously express the pathway in various organisms. We will outline the shortcuts and limitations of common engineering efforts. We will also discuss briefly the features and engineering challenges of other longevity boosting compounds.

  20. Aerodynamics of a turbojet-boosted launch vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, W. J.; Riebe, G. D.; Taylor, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    Results from analytical and experimental studies of the aerodynamic characteristics of a turbojet-boosted launch vehicle are presented. The success of this launch vehicle concept depends upon several novel applications of aerodynamic technology, particularly in the area of takeoff lift and minimum transonic drag requirements. The take-off mode stresses leading edge vortex lift generated in parallel by a complex arrangement of low aspect ratio booster and orbiter wings. Wind-tunnel tests on a representative model showed that this low-speed lift is sensitive to geometric arrangements of the booster-orbiter combination and is not predictable by standard analytic techniques. Transonic drag was also experimentally observed to be very sensitive to booster location; however, these drag levels were accurately predicted by standard farfield wave drag theory.

  1. Writing about testing worries boosts exam performance in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Gerardo; Beilock, Sian L

    2011-01-14

    Two laboratory and two randomized field experiments tested a psychological intervention designed to improve students' scores on high-stakes exams and to increase our understanding of why pressure-filled exam situations undermine some students' performance. We expected that sitting for an important exam leads to worries about the situation and its consequences that undermine test performance. We tested whether having students write down their thoughts about an upcoming test could improve test performance. The intervention, a brief expressive writing assignment that occurred immediately before taking an important test, significantly improved students' exam scores, especially for students habitually anxious about test taking. Simply writing about one's worries before a high-stakes exam can boost test scores.

  2. Distributed control system for parallel-connected DC boost converters

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith, Steven

    2017-08-15

    The disclosed invention is a distributed control system for operating a DC bus fed by disparate DC power sources that service a known or unknown load. The voltage sources vary in v-i characteristics and have time-varying, maximum supply capacities. Each source is connected to the bus via a boost converter, which may have different dynamic characteristics and power transfer capacities, but are controlled through PWM. The invention tracks the time-varying power sources and apportions their power contribution while maintaining the DC bus voltage within the specifications. A central digital controller solves the steady-state system for the optimal duty cycle settings that achieve a desired power supply apportionment scheme for a known or predictable DC load. A distributed networked control system is derived from the central system that utilizes communications among controllers to compute a shared estimate of the unknown time-varying load through shared bus current measurements and bus voltage measurements.

  3. An update on Shankhpushpi, a cognition-boosting Ayurvedic medicine.

    PubMed

    Sethiya, Neeraj Kumar; Nahata, Alok; Mishra, Sri Hari; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2009-11-01

    Shankhpushpi is an Ayurvedic drug used for its action on the central nervous system, especially for boosting memory and improving intellect. Quantum of information gained from Ayurvedic and other Sanskrit literature revealed the existence of four different plant species under the name of Shankhpushpi, which is used in various Ayurvedic prescriptions described in ancient texts, singly or in combination with other herbs. The sources comprise of entire herbs with following botanicals viz., Convulvulus pluricaulis Choisy. (Convulvulaceae), Evolvulus alsinoides Linn. (Convulvulaceae), Clitoria ternatea Linn. (Papilionaceae) and Canscora decussata Schult. (Gentianaceae). A review on the available scientific information in terms of pharmacognostical characteristics, chemical constituents, pharmacological activities, preclinical and clinical applications of controversial sources of Shankhpushpi is prepared with a view to review scientific work undertaken on Shankhpushpi. It may provide parameters of differentiation and permit appreciation of variability of drug action by use of different botanical sources.

  4. Boosting association rule mining in large datasets via Gibbs sampling.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guoqi; Rao, Calyampudi Radhakrishna; Sun, Xiaoying; Wu, Yuehua

    2016-05-03

    Current algorithms for association rule mining from transaction data are mostly deterministic and enumerative. They can be computationally intractable even for mining a dataset containing just a few hundred transaction items, if no action is taken to constrain the search space. In this paper, we develop a Gibbs-sampling-induced stochastic search procedure to randomly sample association rules from the itemset space, and perform rule mining from the reduced transaction dataset generated by the sample. Also a general rule importance measure is proposed to direct the stochastic search so that, as a result of the randomly generated association rules constituting an ergodic Markov chain, the overall most important rules in the itemset space can be uncovered from the reduced dataset with probability 1 in the limit. In the simulation study and a real genomic data example, we show how to boost association rule mining by an integrated use of the stochastic search and the Apriori algorithm.

  5. Adaptive guidance for an aero-assisted boost vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Price, Douglas B.

    1988-01-01

    An adaptive guidance system incorporating dynamic pressure constraint is studied for a single stage to low earth orbit (LEO) aero-assist booster with thrust gimbal angle as the control variable. To derive an adaptive guidance law, cubic spline functions are used to represent the ascent profile. The booster flight to LEO is divided into initial and terminal phases. In the initial phase, the ascent profile is continuously updated to maximize the performance of the boost vehicle enroute. A linear feedback control is used in the terminal phase to guide the aero-assisted booster onto the desired LEO. The computer simulation of the vehicle dynamics considers a rotating spherical earth, inverse square (Newtonian) gravity field and an exponential model for the earth's atmospheric density. This adaptive guidance algorithm is capable of handling large deviations in both atmospheric conditions and modeling uncertainties, while ensuring maximum booster performance.

  6. Audiovisual attention boosts letter-speech sound integration.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Maria; Alho, Kimmo; Takegata, Rika; Makkonen, Tommi; Kujala, Teija

    2013-10-01

    We studied attention effects on the integration of written and spoken syllables in fluent adult readers by using event-related brain potentials. Auditory consonant-vowel syllables, including consonant and frequency changes, were presented in synchrony with written syllables or their scrambled images. Participants responded to longer-duration auditory targets (auditory attention), longer-duration visual targets (visual attention), longer-duration auditory and visual targets (audiovisual attention), or counted backwards mentally. We found larger negative responses for spoken consonant changes when they were accompanied by written syllables than when they were accompanied by scrambled text. This effect occurred at an early latency (∼ 140 ms) during audiovisual attention and later (∼ 200 ms) during visual attention. Thus, audiovisual attention boosts the integration of speech sounds and letters. Copyright © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  7. A mechatronic power boosting design for piezoelectric generators

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haili; Liang, Junrui Ge, Cong

    2015-10-05

    It was shown that the piezoelectric power generation can be boosted by using the synchronized switch power conditioning circuits. This letter reports a self-powered and self-sensing mechatronic design in substitute of the auxiliary electronics towards a compact and universal synchronized switch solution. The design criteria are derived based on the conceptual waveforms and a two-degree-of-freedom analytical model. Experimental result shows that, compared to the standard bridge rectifier interface, the mechatronic design leads to an extra 111% increase of generated power from the prototyped piezoelectric generator under the same deflection magnitude excitation. The proposed design has introduced a valuable physical insight of electromechanical synergy towards the improvement of piezoelectric power generation.

  8. Prediction and control of limit cycling motions in boosting rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Brett

    An investigation concerning the prediction and control of observed limit cycling behavior in a boosting rocket is considered. The suspected source of the nonlinear behavior is the presence of Coulomb friction in the nozzle pivot mechanism. A classical sinusoidal describing function analysis is used to accurately recreate and predict the observed oscillatory characteristic. In so doing, insight is offered into the limit cycling mechanism and confidence is gained in the closed-loop system design. Nonlinear simulation results are further used to support and verify the results obtained from describing function theory. Insight into the limit cycling behavior is, in turn, used to adjust control system parameters in order to passively control the oscillatory tendencies. Tradeoffs with the guidance and control system stability/performance are also noted. Finally, active control of the limit cycling behavior, using a novel feedback algorithm to adjust the inherent nozzle sticking-unsticking characteristics, is considered.

  9. Buck-Buck- Boost Regulatr (B3R)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourra, Olivier; Fernandez, Arturo; Landstroem, Sven; Tonicello, Ferdinando

    2011-10-01

    In a satellite, the main function of a Power Conditioning Unit (PCU) is to manage the energy coming from several power sources (usually solar arrays and battery) and to deliver it continuously to the users in an appropriate form during the overall mission. The objective of this paper is to present an electronic switching DC-DC converter called Buck-Buck-Boost Regulator (B3R) that could be used as a modular and recurrent solution in a PCU for regulated or un- regulated 28Vsatellite power bus classes. The power conversion stages of the B3R topology are first described. Then theoretical equations and practical tests illustrate how the converter operates in term of power conversion, control loops performances and efficiency. The paper finally provides some examples of single point failure tolerant implementation using the B3R.

  10. Link prediction boosted psychiatry disorder classification for functional connectivity network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; Mei, Xue; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Jiashuang

    2017-02-01

    Functional connectivity network (FCN) is an effective tool in psychiatry disorders classification, and represents cross-correlation of the regional blood oxygenation level dependent signal. However, FCN is often incomplete for suffering from missing and spurious edges. To accurate classify psychiatry disorders and health control with the incomplete FCN, we first `repair' the FCN with link prediction, and then exact the clustering coefficients as features to build a weak classifier for every FCN. Finally, we apply a boosting algorithm to combine these weak classifiers for improving classification accuracy. Our method tested by three datasets of psychiatry disorder, including Alzheimer's Disease, Schizophrenia and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The experimental results show our method not only significantly improves the classification accuracy, but also efficiently reconstructs the incomplete FCN.

  11. Boosting thermoelectric efficiency using time-dependent control

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hangbo; Thingna, Juzar; Hänggi, Peter; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric efficiency is defined as the ratio of power delivered to the load of a device to the rate of heat flow from the source. Till date, it has been studied in presence of thermodynamic constraints set by the Onsager reciprocal relation and the second law of thermodynamics that severely bottleneck the thermoelectric efficiency. In this study, we propose a pathway to bypass these constraints using a time-dependent control and present a theoretical framework to study dynamic thermoelectric transport in the far from equilibrium regime. The presence of a control yields the sought after substantial efficiency enhancement and importantly a significant amount of power supplied by the control is utilised to convert the wasted-heat energy into useful-electric energy. Our findings are robust against nonlinear interactions and suggest that external time-dependent forcing, which can be incorporated with existing devices, provides a beneficial scheme to boost thermoelectric efficiency. PMID:26464021

  12. A mechatronic power boosting design for piezoelectric generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haili; Liang, Junrui; Ge, Cong

    2015-10-01

    It was shown that the piezoelectric power generation can be boosted by using the synchronized switch power conditioning circuits. This letter reports a self-powered and self-sensing mechatronic design in substitute of the auxiliary electronics towards a compact and universal synchronized switch solution. The design criteria are derived based on the conceptual waveforms and a two-degree-of-freedom analytical model. Experimental result shows that, compared to the standard bridge rectifier interface, the mechatronic design leads to an extra 111% increase of generated power from the prototyped piezoelectric generator under the same deflection magnitude excitation. The proposed design has introduced a valuable physical insight of electromechanical synergy towards the improvement of piezoelectric power generation.

  13. Syntactic priming during sentence comprehension: evidence for the lexical boost.

    PubMed

    Traxler, Matthew J; Tooley, Kristen M; Pickering, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Syntactic priming occurs when structural information from one sentence influences processing of a subsequently encountered sentence (Bock, 1986; Ledoux et al., 2007). This article reports 2 eye-tracking experiments investigating the effects of a prime sentence on the processing of a target sentence that shared aspects of syntactic form. The experiments were designed to determine the degree to which lexical overlap between prime and target sentences produced larger effects, comparable to the widely observed "lexical boost" in production experiments (Pickering & Branigan, 1998; Pickering & Ferreira, 2008). The current experiments showed that priming effects during online comprehension were in fact larger when a verb was repeated across the prime and target sentences (see also Tooley et al., 2009). The finding of larger priming effects with lexical repetition supports accounts under which syntactic form representations are connected to individual lexical items (e.g., Tomasello, 2003; Vosse & Kempen, 2000, 2009).

  14. Measuring Intuition: Nonconscious Emotional Information Boosts Decision Accuracy and Confidence.

    PubMed

    Lufityanto, Galang; Donkin, Chris; Pearson, Joel

    2016-05-01

    The long-held popular notion of intuition has garnered much attention both academically and popularly. Although most people agree that there is such a phenomenon as intuition, involving emotionally charged, rapid, unconscious processes, little compelling evidence supports this notion. Here, we introduce a technique in which subliminal emotional information is presented to subjects while they make fully conscious sensory decisions. Our behavioral and physiological data, along with evidence-accumulator models, show that nonconscious emotional information can boost accuracy and confidence in a concurrent emotion-free decision task, while also speeding up response times. Moreover, these effects were contingent on the specific predictive arrangement of the nonconscious emotional valence and motion direction in the decisional stimulus. A model that simultaneously accumulates evidence from both physiological skin conductance and conscious decisional information provides an accurate description of the data. These findings support the notion that nonconscious emotions can bias concurrent nonemotional behavior-a process of intuition.

  15. Usefulness of effective field theory for boosted Higgs production

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.; Lewis, I. M.; Zeng, Mao

    2015-04-07

    The Higgs + jet channel at the LHC is sensitive to the effects of new physics both in the total rate and in the transverse momentum distribution at high pT. We examine the production process using an effective field theory (EFT) language and discussing the possibility of determining the nature of the underlying high-scale physics from boosted Higgs production. The effects of heavy color triplet scalars and top partner fermions with TeV scale masses are considered as examples and Higgs-gluon couplings of dimension-5 and dimension-7 are included in the EFT. As a byproduct of our study, we examine the region of validity of the EFT. Dimension-7 contributions in realistic new physics models give effects in the high pT tail of the Higgs signal which are so tiny that they are likely to be unobservable.

  16. Traction drive for cryogenic boost pump. [hydrogen oxygen rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, S.; Connelly, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Two versions of a Nasvytis multiroller traction drive were tested in liquid oxygen for possible application as cryogenic boost pump speed reduction drives for advanced hydrogen-oxygen rocket engines. The roller drive, with a 10.8:1 reduction ratio, was successfully run at up to 70,000 rpm input speed and up to 14.9 kW (20 hp) input power level. Three drive assemblies were tested for a total of about three hours of which approximately one hour was at nominal full speed and full power conditions. Peak efficiency of 60 percent was determined. There was no evidence of slippage between rollers for any of the conditions tested. The ball drive, a version using balls instead of one row of rollers, and having a 3.25:1 reduction ratio, failed to perform satisfactorily.

  17. Integrated segmentation of cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajemba, Peter; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Scott, Richard; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2011-03-01

    Automatic segmentation of cellular structures is an essential step in image cytology and histology. Despite substantial progress, better automation and improvements in accuracy and adaptability to novel applications are needed. In applications utilizing multi-channel immuno-fluorescence images, challenges include misclassification of epithelial and stromal nuclei, irregular nuclei and cytoplasm boundaries, and over and under-segmentation of clustered nuclei. Variations in image acquisition conditions and artifacts from nuclei and cytoplasm images often confound existing algorithms in practice. In this paper, we present a robust and accurate algorithm for jointly segmenting cell nuclei and cytoplasm using a combination of ideas to reduce the aforementioned problems. First, an adaptive process that includes top-hat filtering, Eigenvalues-of-Hessian blob detection and distance transforms is used to estimate the inverse illumination field and correct for intensity non-uniformity in the nuclei channel. Next, a minimum-error-thresholding based binarization process and seed-detection combining Laplacian-of-Gaussian filtering constrained by a distance-map-based scale selection is used to identify candidate seeds for nuclei segmentation. The initial segmentation using a local maximum clustering algorithm is refined using a minimum-error-thresholding technique. Final refinements include an artifact removal process specifically targeted at lumens and other problematic structures and a systemic decision process to reclassify nuclei objects near the cytoplasm boundary as epithelial or stromal. Segmentation results were evaluated using 48 realistic phantom images with known ground-truth. The overall segmentation accuracy exceeds 94%. The algorithm was further tested on 981 images of actual prostate cancer tissue. The artifact removal process worked in 90% of cases. The algorithm has now been deployed in a high-volume histology analysis application.

  18. Heterogeneous computing for vertebra detection and segmentation in x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Lecron, Fabian; Mahmoudi, Sidi Ahmed; Benjelloun, Mohammed; Mahmoudi, Saïd; Manneback, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The context of this work is related to the vertebra segmentation. The method we propose is based on the active shape model (ASM). An original approach taking advantage of the edge polygonal approximation was developed to locate the vertebra positions in a X-ray image. Despite the fact that segmentation results show good efficiency, the time is a key variable that has always to be optimized in a medical context. Therefore, we present how vertebra extraction can efficiently be performed in exploiting the full computing power of parallel (GPU) and heterogeneous (multi-CPU/multi-GPU) architectures. We propose a parallel hybrid implementation of the most intensive steps enabling to boost performance. Experimentations have been conducted using a set of high-resolution X-ray medical images, showing a global speedup ranging from 3 to 22, by comparison with the CPU implementation. Data transfer times between CPU and GPU memories were included in the execution times of our proposed implementation.

  19. Implementation of Carrier-Based Simple Boost Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) for Z-Source Inverter (ZSI) using Field Programming Gate Array (FPGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, M.; Rasin, Z.; Jidin, A.

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, the research on the Z-source inverter (ZSI) has received a wide acceptance due to its attractive solution for example in the renewable energy interface that requires voltage boost capability. The conventional inverter circuit based on the SPWM technique for example does not able to fully utilize its DC input voltage to produce a greater output voltage. The ZSI shoot-through implementation in high switching frequency requires a processor with fast sampling and high precision. In simulation, this can be easily carried out with the available advanced engineering software. In the hardware implementation however, the processor used is not only handle the switching, but also needs to read the data obtained by the sensor, voltage and current control, information display etc. This limits the capacity that can be used to implement the switching fast sampling with high precision. The aims of this work are to implement high precision of carrier-based simple boost PWM for ZSI using FPGA and to verify its real time hardware implementation. The high precision of PWM control algorithm based on the FPGA platform is verified by comparing the simulation results with the experimental results for different modulation index and boost factor, and a good agreement is concluded. It is observed that the application of FPGA reduces complexity, increases speed and the design of the switching technique can be altered without having to modify the hardware implementation.

  20. Esophageal Cancer Dose Escalation Using a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Palmer, Matthew B.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Liao Zhongxing; Swisher, Steven G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Allen, Pamela K.; Settle, Steven H.; Gomez, Daniel; Likhacheva, Anna; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that 75% of radiation therapy (RT) failures in patients with unresectable esophageal cancer are in the gross tumor volume (GTV). We performed a planning study to evaluate if a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique could selectively deliver a boost dose of radiation to the GTV in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using four different approaches (two-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [2D-CRT] to 50.4 Gy, 2D-CRT to 64.8 Gy, intensity-modulated RT [IMRT] to 50.4 Gy, and SIB-IMRT to 64.8 Gy) and optimized for 10 patients with distal esophageal cancer. All plans were constructed to deliver the target dose in 28 fractions using heterogeneity corrections. Isodose distributions were evaluated for target coverage and normal tissue exposure. Results: The 50.4 Gy IMRT plan was associated with significant reductions in mean cardiac, pulmonary, and hepatic doses relative to the 50.4 Gy 2D-CRT plan. The 64.8 Gy SIB-IMRT plan produced a 28% increase in GTV dose and comparable normal tissue doses as the 50.4 Gy IMRT plan; compared with the 50.4 Gy 2D-CRT plan, the 64.8 Gy SIB-IMRT produced significant dose reductions to all critical structures (heart, lung, liver, and spinal cord). Conclusions: The use of SIB-IMRT allowed us to selectively increase the dose to the GTV, the area at highest risk of failure, while simultaneously reducing the dose to the normal heart, lung, and liver. Clinical implications warrant systematic evaluation.