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Sample records for modified tobacco plants

  1. Transgenic tobacco expressing a modified spider peptide inhibits the growth of plant pathogens and insect larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding lycotoxin I, an amphipathic pore-forming peptide, was modified to increase oral toxicity to insects. One of the most active modified genes was then constitutively expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and transformants were evaluated for insect and disease resistance. Pathogenic...

  2. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE BY TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in the plant tissues. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of tobacco plants in phytoremediation, a technology that employs plants to degrade,...

  3. Hybrid Rubisco of tomato large subunits and tobacco small subunits is functional in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Webb, James; Huang, Yi-Hong; Lin, Li; Tang, Ri-Sheng; Liu, Aimin

    2011-03-01

    Biogenesis of functional ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in plants requires specific assembly in the chloroplast of the imported, cytosol-synthesized small subunits (SS) with the chloroplast-made large subunits (LS). Accumulating evidence indicates that chloroplasts (plastids) generally have a low tolerance for assembling foreign or modified Rubisco. To explore Rubisco engineering, we created two lines of transplastomic tobacco plants whose rbcL gene was replaced by tomato-derived rbcL: plant LLS2 with Rubisco composed of tobacco SS and Q437R LS and plant LLS4 with a hybrid Rubisco of tobacco SS and tomato LS (representing four substitutions of Y226F, A230T, S279T and Q437R from tobacco LS). Plant LLS2 exhibited similar phenotypes as the wild type. Plant LLS4 showed lower chlorophyll and Rubisco levels particularly in young emerging leaves, lower photosynthesis rates and biomass during early stages of development, but was able to reach reproductive maturity and somewhat wild type-like phenotype under ambient CO₂ condition. In vitro assays detected similar carboxylase activity and RuBP affinity in LLS2 and LLS4 plants as in wild type. Our studies demonstrated that tomato LS was sufficiently assembled with tobacco SS into functional Rubisco. The hybrid Rubisco of tomato LS and tobacco SS can drive photosynthesis that supports photoautotrophic growth and reproduction of tobacco plants under ambient CO₂ and light conditions. We discuss the effect of these residue substitutions on Rubisco activity and the possible attribution of chlorophyll deficiency to the in planta photosynthesis performance in the hybrid Rubisco plants.

  4. Infection of Plants by Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry; Maratos, Marina; Farabaugh, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Provides three exercises that introduce high school and college students to a common strain of the tobacco mosaic virus and the study of some basic biological processes. Activities involve inoculation of plants and observing and recording symptom development in infected plants. (DDR)

  5. Structural Characterization of Modified Lignin in Transgenic Tobacco Plants in Which the Activity of 4-Coumarate:Coenzyme A Ligase Is Depressed.

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, S.; Hishiyama, S.; Tomimura, Y.; Katayama, Y.; Omori, S.

    1997-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants in which the activity of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase is very low contain a novel lignin in their xylem. Details of changes in hydroxycinnamic acids bound to cell walls and in the structure of the novel lignin were identified by base hydrolysis, alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation, pyrolysis-gas chromatography, and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. In the brownish tissue of the transgenic plants, the levels of three hydroxycinnamic acids, p-coumaric, ferulic, and sinapic, which were bound to cell walls, were apparently increased as a result of down-regulation of the expression of the gene for 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase. Some of these hydroxycinnamic acids were linked to cell walls via ester and ether linkages. The accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acids also induced an increase in the level of condensed units in the novel lignin of the brownish tissue. Our data indicate that the behavior of some of the incorporated hydroxycinnamic acids resembles lignin monomers in the brownish tissue, and their accumulation results in dramatic changes in the biosynthesis of lignin in transgenic plants. PMID:12223748

  6. Enzymatic transamination of pyridoxamine in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Zhang, JianYun; Wu, Mei; Wu, Qiong; Huang, LongQuan

    2013-11-01

    Vitamin B6 (VB6) comprises a group of pyridine compounds that are involved in a surprisingly high diversity of biochemical reactions. Humans and animals depend largely on plants for their VB6 nutrition. Many studies have focused on biosynthesis of VB6 and comparatively little is known about VB6 metabolic conversion in plants. Recently, we have found that an efficient conversion pathway between pyridoxal (PL) and pyridoxamine (PM) is present in tobacco, but the catalytic enzyme remains an unsolved mystery. In this study, enzymes catalyzing the transamination of PM were purified from tobacco leaves and characterized. Our results suggest that a specific PM-pyruvate aminotranferase dominates the reversible transamination of PM in tobacco, and also show that the apo form of glutamic-oxaloacetic aminotranferase from tobacco, but not the holoenzyme, is able to catalyze the analogous transamination reaction between PM and either oxaloacetate or α-ketoglutarate. PM-pyruvate aminotranferase is involved in a degradation pathway for VB6 compounds in bacteria. Therefore, our study raises questions about whether the degradation pathway of VB6 exists in plants.

  7. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS: DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT KINETIC MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in plant tissues. This research determined the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. Three hydroponics growth studies were completed u...

  8. Allergenicity assessment of genetically-modified tobacco expressing salt tolerance cbl gene.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Tuteja, Narendra; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2014-09-01

    It is mandatory to assess the allergenic potential of genetically modified (GM) crops before their commercialization. Recently, a transgene [Calcineurin B-like (CBL) protein] has been introduced into tobacco plant to make the crop salt resistance. Therefore, it was felt necessary to assess the allergenic potential of the cbl gene product, which was introduced and expressed in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plant and compared the allergenic effects with the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that there was no significant sequence homology with known allergens. Also, no difference between the protein digestibility profiles of GM and WT tobacco was found. Rapid digestion of CBL protein (Mol Wt 35 kDa) by simulated gastric fluid (SGF) indicated reduced chances of this protein to induce allergenicity. In addition, BALB/c mice sensitized by intraperitoneal administration of WT and GM tobacco protein showed comparable levels of clinical score, specific IgE, IgG1, histamine level, similar effect on different organs as well as IgE binding proteins. These findings indicate that insertion of cbl gene in tobacco did not cause any additional allergic risk to consumer and the GM and native tobacco proteins behave similarly in both in vitro and in vivo situations even after genetic modification.

  9. 77 FR 20026 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Modified Risk Tobacco Product Applications; Availability; Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... grants FDA authority to regulate the manufacture, marketing, and distribution of tobacco products to... that, prior to marketing tobacco products for use to reduce harm or the risk of tobacco-related disease... introduction or delivery for introduction into interstate commerce of any modified risk tobacco product...

  10. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  11. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  12. 75 FR 2879 - Use of Tobacco Marketing Descriptors to Convey Modified Risk; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Use of Tobacco Marketing Descriptors to Convey Modified Risk... for interested parties to share information, research, and ideas on tobacco product marketing.... The Tobacco Control Act granted FDA important new authority to regulate the manufacture,...

  13. Endogenous Methyl Salicylate in Pathogen-Inoculated Tobacco Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Seskar, Mirjana; Shulaev, Vladimir; Raskin, Ilya

    1998-01-01

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivar Xanthi-nc (genotype NN) produces high levels of salicylic acid (SA) after inoculation with the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Gaseous methyl salicylate (MeSA), a major volatile produced in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants, was recently shown to be an airborne defense signal. Using an assay developed to measure the MeSA present in tissue, we have shown that in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants the level of MeSA increases dramatically, paralleling increases in SA. MeSA accumulation was also observed in upper, noninoculated leaves. In TMV-inoculated tobacco shifted from 32 to 24°C, the MeSA concentration increased from nondetectable levels to 2318 ng/g fresh weight 12 h after the temperature shift, but subsequently decreased with the onset of the hypersensitive response. Similar results were observed in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola, in which MeSA levels were highest just before the hypersensitive response-induced tissue desiccation. Transgenic NahG plants unable to accumulate SA also did not accumulate MeSA after TMV inoculation, and did not show increased resistance to TMV following MeSA treatment. Based on the spatial and temporal kinetics of its accumulation, we conclude that tissue MeSA may play a role similar to that of volatile MeSA in the pathogen-induced defense response.

  14. [Tobacco plant parts similarity analysis based on near-infrared spectroscopy and SIMCA algorithm].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Xia; Ma, Xiang; Zhang, Ye-Hui; Li, Jun-Hui; Zhao, Long-Lian; Xu, Li; Wen, Ya-Dong; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Lu-Da

    2011-04-01

    The appearance features of tobacco reflect its inner quality. Many factors, such as different plant parts, variety and maturity, provide standard and foundation for tobacco production processing. According to the different position of tobacco plant parts, tobacco plants leaves can be divided into five parts as tip, upper-middle, middle, lower-middle and priming leaf respectively. Five hundred tobacco leaf samples (100 each for one of five tobacco plant parts) from Yunnan province in 2008 were collected using near infrared spectroscopy, which all belong to tobacco varieties of K326. The similarity analysis of tobacco plant parts was carried out using mathematical model of SIMCA similarity analysis. The conclusion showed that the tobacco plant parts similarity results based on near-infrared spectroscopy corresponded to the relative tobacco plant parts in Yunnan province. The farther two tobacco plant parts were away from each other, the lower the similarity of corresponding parts was. And the similarity results of adjacent tobacco plant parts were different. The study discussed a method of confirming PC numbers and realized the quantitative similarity analysis between classes. It is instructive in replacement or adjustment of tobacco leaf blending and evaluation of tobacco industrial grading.

  15. [Effect of constitutive expression of ARGOS-LIKE gene on dimensions of cells and organs of transgenic tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Khiazev, A V; Safiullina, M G; Cemeris, A V

    2013-05-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress the ARGOS-LIKE (ARL) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana have been developed. The transgenic plants possessed increased dimensions of leaves and stem, whereas the magnitude of flowers was modified to a lesser degree. The increase in the organ dimensions was a result of stimulation of cell expansion; the cell quantity in the organ was even decreased. Ectopic expression of the ARL gene was promoted in order to increase in the level of mRNA of tobacco expansine NtEXPA5. It has been shown that the ARL gene of A. thaliana can be used to obtain transgenic plants with increased sizes of the leaves and stem.

  16. Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor on non-target soil organisms.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Maureen; Brownbridge, Michael; Stilwell, Wendy B; Gerard, Emily M; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Barraclough, Emma I; Christeller, John T

    2007-01-01

    Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express the protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor (BSTI) were examined in laboratory assays against three earthworm and one collembolan species. BSTI is a serine protease inhibitor that can bind to the digestive trypsins of insects feeding on modified plants, resulting in reduced growth and survival. Protease inhibitors are active against a broad range of insects, so may have a large impact on non-target organisms. Survival and fecundity of the collembolan Folsomia candida were unaffected by consumption of artificial diet containing BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf or powdered freeze-dried BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf that was added to soil. Similarly, mortality and growth of earthworms Aporrectodea caliginosa and Lumbricus rubellus did not differ significantly between soil augmented with BSTI-expressing tobacco leaves or unmodified control leaves. The redworm Eisenia fetida gained less weight when provided with BSTI-expressing leaves in one assay, but when the experiment was repeated, there was no significant difference between treatments. BSTI-expressing tobacco and unmodified control leaves decomposed at the same rate, indicating that the inhibitor had no effect on the overall function of the decomposer community of micro-flora and fauna in soil.

  17. 76 FR 36544 - Scientific Evaluation of Modified Risk Tobacco Product Applications; Public Workshop; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... produced by the consumption of that tobacco product, that may affect a disease or health-related condition... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Scientific Evaluation of Modified Risk Tobacco Product... of public workshop; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for...

  18. Localization of arginine decarboxylase in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Cristina; Cordeiro, Alexandra; Alcázar, Rubén; Borrell, Antoni; Culiañez-Macià, Francisco A.; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Altabella, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    The lack of knowledge about the tissue and subcellular distribution of polyamines (PAs) and the enzymes involved in their metabolism remains one of the main obstacles in our understanding of the biological role of PAs in plants. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis in plants. We have characterized a cDNA coding for ADC from Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1. The deduced ADC polypeptide had 721 amino acids and a molecular mass of 77 kDa. The ADC cDNA was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the ADC fusion protein obtained was used to produce polyclonal antibodies. Using immunological methods, we demonstrate the presence of the ADC protein in all plant organs analysed: flowers, seeds, stems, leaves and roots. Moreover, depending on the tissue, the protein is localized in two different subcellular compartments, the nucleus and the chloroplast. In photosynthetic tissues, ADC is located mainly in chloroplasts, whereas in non-photosynthetic tissues the protein appears to be located in nuclei. The different compartmentation of ADC may be related to distinct functions of the protein in different cell types.

  19. [Nitrogen uptake and allocation characteristics of flue-cured tobacco in Nanxiong tobacco-planting area of Guangdong Province].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Xiao; Liu, Hua-Bing; Ke, You-Song; Wu, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Xiao-Quan; Qiu, Miao-Wen; Zhao, Wei-Cai; Yang, Tie-Zhao

    2011-06-01

    By the method of field in situ culture and 15N isotopic tracer technique, and taking flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum) cultivar K326 as test material, a field experiment was conducted in the Nanxiong tobacco-planting area of Guangdong Province to study the characteristics of soil nitrogen (N) mineralization, the patterns of N accumulation and allocation in tobacco plants, and the allocation of plant-absorbed fertilizer N applied in current growth season. In the study area, the amount of soil mineralized N increased with tobacco growth, peaked at 75 days after transplanting, and decreased thereafter. The soil mineralized N at each tobacco growth stage was significantly higher in the control than in the N fertilization treatment. The N accumulation in tobacco plant organs was in the order of leaf > stalk > root. Tobacco plants mainly absorbed fertilizer N at rosette stage and topping stage, and mainly absorbed soil N at mature stage. The absorbed N in tobacco whole growth period was mainly derived from soil N, and the absorbed soil N and its proportion to the total absorbed N increased evidently with extending growth stage and ascending leaf position. The fertilizer N use efficiency per plant and the residual rate and loss rate of applied fertilizer N were 30. 8%, 32. 3% , and 36. 9% , respectively. In the study area, soil N mineralization rate was relatively high, and soil N had greater effects on the quality of upper tobacco leaves. Under the application rate of 150 kg N x hm(-2), the residual amount and loss amount of applied fertilizer N were relatively high.

  20. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    1997-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  1. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    1998-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  2. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1998-10-20

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 67 figs.

  3. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1997-11-18

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 31 figs.

  4. Composition of hydroponic medium affects thorium uptake by tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Soudek, Petr; Kufner, Daniel; Petrová, Sárka; Mihaljevič, Martin; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2013-08-01

    The ability of thorium uptake as well as responses to heavy metal stress were tested in tobacco cultivar La Burley 21. Thorium was accumulated preferentially in the root system. The presence of citric, tartaric and oxalic acids in hydroponic medium increased thorium accumulation in all plant organs. On the other hand, the addition of diamines and polyamines, the important antioxidants in plants, resulted in decrease of thorium accumulation, especially in the root system. Negative correlation was found between putrescine concentration and thorium accumulation. Nevertheless, the most important factor influencing the accumulation of thorium was the absence of phosphate ions in a hydroponic medium that caused more than 10-fold increase of thorium uptake in all plant parts. Accumulation and distribution of thorium was followed in six cultivars and 14 selected transformants. Cultivar La Barley 21 represented an average between the tested genotypes, having a very good distribution ratio between roots, stems and leaves.

  5. Peroxidase-induced wilting in transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S. ); Rothstein, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases are a family of isoenzymes found in all higher plants. However, little is known concerning their role in growth, development or response to stress. Plant peroxidases are heme-containing monomeric glycoproteins that utilize either H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or O{sub 2} to oxidize a wide variety of molecules. To obtain more information on possible in planta functions of peroxidases, the authors have used a cDNA clone for the primary isoenzyme form of peroxidase to synthesize high levels of this enzyme in transgenic plants. They were able to obtain Nicotiana tabacum and N. sylvestris transformed plants with peroxidase activity that is 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA. The elevated peroxidase activity was a result of increased levels of two anionic peroxidases in N. tabacum, which apparently differ in post-translational modification. Transformed plants of both species have the unique phenotype of chronic severe wilting through loss of turgor in leaves, which was initiated a the time of flowering. The peroxidase-induced wilting was shown not to be an effect of diminished water uptake through the roots, decreased conductance of water through the xylem, or increased water loss through the leaf surface of stomata. Possible explanations for the loss of turgor, and the significance of these types of experiments in studying isoenzyme families, are discussed.

  6. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  7. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  8. Tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    ... from poor households are frequently employed in tobacco farming to provide family income. These children are especially ... 19% of the world's population, meet the best practice for pictorial warnings, which includes the warnings in ...

  9. Lung cancer biomarkers for the assessment of modified risk tobacco products: an oxidative stress perspective.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Frazer J; Luettich, Karsta; Gregg, Evan O

    2013-05-01

    Manufacturers have developed prototype cigarettes yielding reduced levels of some tobacco smoke toxicants, when tested using laboratory machine smoking under standardised conditions. For the scientific assessment of modified risk tobacco products, tests that offer objective, reproducible data, which can be obtained in a much shorter time than the requirements of conventional epidemiology are needed. In this review, we consider whether biomarkers of biological effect related to oxidative stress can be used in this role. Based on published data, urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine, thymidine glycol, F2-isoprostanes, serum dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbic acid ratio and carotenoid concentrations show promise, while 4-hydroxynonenal requires further qualification.

  10. Are genetically modified plants useful and safe?

    PubMed

    Weil, Jacques-Henry

    2005-01-01

    So far, plants have been genetically modified essentially to achieve resistance to herbicides, or to pathogens (mainly insects, or viruses), but resistance to abiotic stresses (such as cold, heat, drought, or salt) is also being studied. Genetically modified (GM) plants with improved nutritional qualities have more recently been developed, such as plants containing higher proportions of unsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) in their oil (to prevent cardio-vascular diseases), or containing beta-carotene as in the golden rice (to prevent vitamin A deficiency). Possible risks for human health (such as the production of allergenic proteins), or for the environment (such as the appearance of superweeds as a result from gene flow), should be carefully studied, and a science-based assessment of benefits vs. risks should be made on a case by case basis, both for GM plants and for plants obtained by conventional breeding methods.

  11. Genetically Modified Plants: Public and Scientific Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The potential of genetically modified plants to meet the requirements of growing population is not being recognized at present. This is a consequence of concerns raised by the public and the critics about their applications and release into the environment. These include effect on human health and environment, biosafety, world trade monopolies, trustworthiness of public institutions, integrity of regulatory agencies, loss of individual choice, and ethics as well as skepticism about the real potential of the genetically modified plants, and so on. Such concerns are enormous and prevalent even today. However, it should be acknowledged that most of them are not specific for genetically modified plants, and the public should not forget that the conventionally bred plants consumed by them are also associated with similar risks where no information about the gene(s) transfer is available. Moreover, most of the concerns are hypothetical and lack scientific background. Though a few concerns are still to be disproved, it is viewed that, with proper management, these genetically modified plants have immense potential for the betterment of mankind. In the present paper, an overview of the raised concerns and wherever possible reasons assigned to explain their intensity or unsuitability are reviewed. PMID:25937981

  12. Photosynthetic Gas Exchange and Discrimination against 13CO2 and C18O16O in Tobacco Plants Modified by an Antisense Construct to Have Low Chloroplastic Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T. G.; Flanagan, L. B.; Coleman, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    The physiological role of chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase (CA) was examined by antisense suppression of chloroplastic CA (on average 8% of wild type) in Nicotiana tabacum. Photosynthetic gas-exchange characteristics of low-CA and wild-type plants were measured concurrently with short-term, on-line stable isotope discrimination at varying vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and light intensity. Low-CA and wild-type plants were indistinguishable in the responses of assimilation, transpiration, stomatal conductance, and intercellular CO2 concentration to changing VPD or light intensity. At saturating light intensity, low-CA plants had lower discrimination against 13CO2 than wild-type plants by 1.2 to 1.8[per mille (thousand) sign]. Consequently, tissue of the low-CA plants was higher in 13C than the control plants. It was calculated that low-CA plants had chloroplast CO2 concentrations 13 to 22 [mu]mol mol-1 lower than wild-type plants. Discrimination against C18O16O in low-CA plants was 20% of that of the wild type, confirming a role of chloroplastic CA in the mechanism of discrimination against C18O16O ([delta]C18O16O). As VPD increased, stomatal closure caused a reduction in chloroplastic C02 concentration, and since VPD and chloroplastic CO2 concentration act in opposing directions on [delta]C18O16O, no effect of VPD was seen on [delta]C18O16O. PMID:12226395

  13. A multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of five tobacco viruses in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Cheng, Julong; Huang, Ting; Zheng, Xuan; Wu, Yunfeng

    2012-07-01

    Tobacco viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco etch virus (TEV), Potato virus Y (PVY) and Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV) are major viruses infecting tobacco and can cause serious crop losses. A multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay was developed to detect simultaneously and differentiate all five viruses. The system used specific primer sets for each virus producing five distinct fragments 237, 273, 347, 456 and 547 bp, representing TMV, CMV subgroup I, TEV, PVY(O) and TVBMV, respectively. These primers were used for detection of the different viruses by single PCR and multiplex PCR and the results were confirmed by DNA sequencing analysis. The protocol was used to detect viruses from different parts of China. The simultaneous and sensitive detection of different viruses using the multiplex PCR is more efficient and economical than other conventional methods for tobacco virus detection. This multiplex PCR provides a rapid and reliable method for the detection and identification of major tobacco viruses, and will be useful for epidemiological studies.

  14. Production of Haploid Tobacco Plants Using Anther Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert A.; Belzer, Norbert F.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a tobacco haploid experiment in which students learn the cytogenetic technique of metaphase analysis of chromosomes and experience the basic principles of haploidy, diploidy, and polyploidy. (YDS)

  15. Isoprene emission protects photosynthesis but reduces plant productivity during drought in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette C; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Possell, Malcolm; Vickers, Claudia E; Purnell, Anna; Mullineaux, Philip M; Davies, William J; Dodd, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Isoprene protects the photosynthetic apparatus of isoprene-emitting plants from oxidative stress. The role of isoprene in the response of plants to drought is less clear. Water was withheld from transgenic isoprene-emitting and non-emitting tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, to examine: the response of isoprene emission to plant water deficit; a possible relationship between concentrations of the drought-induced phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and isoprene; and whether isoprene affected foliar reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation levels. Isoprene emission did not affect whole-plant water use, foliar ABA concentration or leaf water potential under water deficit. Compared with well-watered controls, droughted non-emitting plants significantly increased ROS content (31-46%) and lipid peroxidation (30-47%), concomitant with decreased operating and maximum efficiencies of photosystem II photochemistry and lower leaf and whole-plant water use efficiency (WUE). Droughted isoprene-emitting plants showed no increase in ROS content or lipid peroxidation relative to well-watered controls, despite isoprene emission decreasing before leaf wilting. Although isoprene emission protected the photosynthetic apparatus and enhanced leaf and whole-plant WUE, non-emitting plants had 8-24% more biomass under drought, implying that isoprene emission incurred a yield penalty.

  16. Toxicity and DNA damage in tobacco and potato plants growing on soil polluted with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Gichner, Tomás; Patková, Zdenka; Száková, Jirina; Demnerová, Katerina

    2006-11-01

    Heterezygous tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. xanthi) and potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Korela) plants were cultivated on soil from the site Strimice which is highly polluted with heavy metals and on nonpolluted soil from the recreational site Jezerí, both in North Bohemia, Czech Republic. The total content, the content of bioavailable, easily mobile, and potentially mobile components of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in the tested soils, and the accumulation of these metals in the above-ground biomass and roots of tested plants were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry or flameless atomic absorption spectrometry. The average tobacco leaf area and potato plant height were significantly reduced in plants growing on the polluted soil. We have measured the DNA damage in nuclei of leaves of both plant species using the Comet assay. A small but significant increase in DNA damage was noted in plants growing on the polluted soil versus controls. As the tobacco and potato plants with increased DNA damage were severely injured (inhibited growth, distorted leaves), this increase may be associated with necrotic or apoptotic DNA fragmentation. No increase in the frequency of somatic mutation was detected in tobacco plants growing on the polluted soil. Thus, the polluted soil probably induced toxic but not genotoxic effects on tobacco and potato plants.

  17. [Effects of biochar on the micro-ecology of tobacco-planting soil and physiology of flue-cured tobacco].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Chen, Wei; Lin, Ye-chun; Cheng, Jian-zhong; Pan, Wen-jie

    2015-12-01

    Biochar is one of the research hotspots in the field of the agroforestry waste utilization. A field experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of different amounts of tobacco stem biochar (0, 1, 10, 50 t · hm⁻²) on soil micro-ecology and physiological properties of flue-cured tobacco. The results showed that soil water content (SWC) increased at all tobacco growth stages as the amounts of biochar applications increased. There were significant differences of SWC between the treatment of 50 t · hm⁻² and other treatments at the period of tobacco vigorous growth. As the application of biochar increased, the total soil porosity and capillary porosity increased, while soil bacteria, actinomyces, fungi amount increased firstly and then decreased. The amount of soil bacteria, actinomyces, fungi reached the maximum at the treatment of 10 t · hm⁻². Soil respiration rate (SRR) at earlier stage increased with the increase of biochar application. Compared with the control, SSR under biochar treatments increased by 7.9%-36.9%, and there were significant differences of SRR between high biochar application treatments (50 t · hm⁻² and 10 t · hm⁻²) and the control. Biochar improved leaf water potential, carotenoid and chlorophyll contents. Meanwhile, the dry mass of root, shoot and total dry mass under biochar application were higher than that of the control. These results indicated that the biochar played active roles in improving tobacco-planting soil micro-ecology and regulating physiological properties of flue-cured tobacco.

  18. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR THE UPTAKE, TRANSLOCATION, AND ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple mathematical model is being developed to describe the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. The model defines a plant as a set of compartments, consisting of mass balance differential equations and plant-specific physiological paramet...

  19. A Genetically Modified Tobacco Mosaic Virus that can Produce Gold Nanoparticles from a Metal Salt Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Love, Andrew J.; Makarov, Valentine V.; Sinitsyna, Olga V.; Shaw, Jane; Yaminsky, Igor V.; Kalinina, Natalia O.; Taliansky, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    We genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to surface display a characterized peptide with potent metal ion binding and reducing capacity (MBP TMV), and demonstrate that unlike wild type TMV, this construct can lead to the formation of discrete 10–40 nm gold nanoparticles when mixed with 3 mM potassium tetrachloroaurate. Using a variety of analytical physicochemical approaches it was found that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and stable. Given that the MBP TMV can produce metal nanomaterials in the absence of chemical reductants, it may have utility in the green production of metal nanomaterials. PMID:26617624

  20. Genetically modified plants and human health

    PubMed Central

    Key, Suzie; Ma, Julian K-C; Drake, Pascal MW

    2008-01-01

    Summary Genetically modified (or GM) plants have attracted a large amount of media attention in recent years and continue to do so. Despite this, the general public remains largely unaware of what a GM plant actually is or what advantages and disadvantages the technology has to offer, particularly with regard to the range of applications for which they can be used. From the first generation of GM crops, two main areas of concern have emerged, namely risk to the environment and risk to human health. As GM plants are gradually being introduced into the European Union there is likely to be increasing public concern regarding potential health issues. Although it is now commonplace for the press to adopt ‘health campaigns’, the information they publish is often unreliable and unrepresentative of the available scientific evidence. We consider it important that the medical profession should be aware of the state of the art, and, as they are often the first port of call for a concerned patient, be in a position to provide an informed opinion. This review will examine how GM plants may impact on human health both directly – through applications targeted at nutrition and enhancement of recombinant medicine production – but also indirectly, through potential effects on the environment. Finally, it will examine the most important opposition currently facing the worldwide adoption of this technology: public opinion. PMID:18515776

  1. Humans Have Antibodies against a Plant Virus: Evidence from Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruolan; Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Roberts, Andrew M.; Friedland, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a widespread plant pathogen, is found in tobacco (including cigarettes and smokeless tobacco) as well as in many other plants. Plant viruses do not replicate or cause infection in humans or other mammals. This study was done to determine whether exposure to tobacco products induces an immune response to TMV in humans. Using a sandwich ELISA assay, we detected serum anti-TMV antibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, IgA, and IgM) in all subjects enrolled in the study (20 healthy smokers, 20 smokeless-tobacco users, and 20 non-smokers). Smokers had a higher level of serum anti-TMV IgG antibodies than non-smokers, while the serum level of anti-TMV IgA from smokeless tobacco users was lower than smokers and non-smokers. Using bioinformatics, we also found that the human protein TOMM40L (an outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog – like translocase) contains a strong homology of six contiguous amino acids to the TMV coat protein, and TOMM40L peptide exhibited cross-reactivity with anti-TMV antibodies. People who smoke cigarettes or other tobacco products experience a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Our results showing molecular mimicry between TMV and human TOMM40L raise the question as to whether TMV has a potential role in smokers against Parkinson’s disease development. The potential mechanisms of molecular mimicry between plant viruses and human disease should be further explored. PMID:23573274

  2. Expression of a functional human adenosine deaminase in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Singhabahu, Sanjeewa; George, John; Bringloe, David

    2013-06-01

    An inherited disorder, adenosine deaminase deficiency is a form of severe combined immunodeficiency, which is ultimately caused by an absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway. The absence of ADA-activity in sufferers eventually results in a dysfunctional immune system due to the build-up of toxic metabolites. To date, this has been treated with mixed success, using PEG-ADA, made from purified bovine ADA coupled to polyethylene glycol. It is likely, however, that an enzyme replacement therapy protocol based on recombinant human ADA would be a more effective treatment for this disease. Therefore, as a preliminary step to produce biologically active human ADA in transgenic tobacco plants a human ADA cDNA has been inserted into a plant expression vector under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter and both human and TMV 5' UTR control regions. Plant vector expression constructs have been used to transform tobacco plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Genomic DNA, RNA and protein blot analyses have demonstrated the integration of the cDNA construct into the plant nuclear genome and the expression of recombinant ADA mRNA and protein in transgenic tobacco leaves. Western blot analysis has also revealed that human and recombinant ADA have a similar size of approximately 41 kDa. ADA-specific activities of between 0.001 and 0.003 units per mg total soluble protein were measured in crude extracts isolated from transformed tobacco plant leaves.

  3. Identification of moisture content in tobacco plant leaves using outlier sample eliminating algorithms and hyperspectral data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Qinglin

    2016-02-26

    Fast identification of moisture content in tobacco plant leaves plays a key role in the tobacco cultivation industry and benefits the management of tobacco plant in the farm. In order to identify moisture content of tobacco plant leaves in a fast and nondestructive way, a method involving Mahalanobis distance coupled with Monte Carlo cross validation(MD-MCCV) was proposed to eliminate outlier sample in this study. The hyperspectral data of 200 tobacco plant leaf samples of 20 moisture gradients were obtained using FieldSpc(®) 3 spectrometer. Savitzky-Golay smoothing(SG), roughness penalty smoothing(RPS), kernel smoothing(KS) and median smoothing(MS) were used to preprocess the raw spectra. In addition, Mahalanobis distance(MD), Monte Carlo cross validation(MCCV) and Mahalanobis distance coupled to Monte Carlo cross validation(MD-MCCV) were applied to select the outlier sample of the raw spectrum and four smoothing preprocessing spectra. Successive projections algorithm (SPA) was used to extract the most influential wavelengths. Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) was applied to build the prediction models based on preprocessed spectra feature in characteristic wavelengths. The results showed that the preferably four prediction model were MD-MCCV-SG (Rp(2) = 0.8401 and RMSEP = 0.1355), MD-MCCV-RPS (Rp(2) = 0.8030 and RMSEP = 0.1274), MD-MCCV-KS (Rp(2) = 0.8117 and RMSEP = 0.1433), MD-MCCV-MS (Rp(2) = 0.9132 and RMSEP = 0.1162). MD-MCCV algorithm performed best among MD algorithm, MCCV algorithm and the method without sample pretreatment algorithm in the eliminating outlier sample from 20 different moisture gradients of tobacco plant leaves and MD-MCCV can be used to eliminate outlier sample in the spectral preprocessing.

  4. Uptake of Cadmium by Flue-Cured Tobacco Plants: Exploring Bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, I.; Robarge, W. P.; Vann, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific understanding of cadmium (Cd) cycling in North Carolina tobacco plants and soils has lagged, even as production of flue-cured tobacco remains an important part of the NC economy ($903 million in 2014). Cd is considered a tobacco contaminant. When tobacco is burned, Cd can exist as a fine aerosol and subsequent inhalation is linked to cancer. Tobacco root exudates enhance Cd uptake, even though the Cd concentration in NC soils is <0.1 mg/kg. Quantifying Cd concentrations in tobacco plants is crucial to understanding Cd bioavailability and implementing soil remediation efforts. The objective of this study was to develop a Cd mass balance for flue-cured tobacco grown under field conditions in NC. Whole plant samples were collected at transplanting and every 2 weeks thereafter until harvest. Individual plants were segregated into root, stalk and individual leaves (n = 15 whole plants/sampling date; composite samples were taken early in the growing season). After recording dry mass, samples were analyzed using ion-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry or ion-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lower leaves contained the highest Cd concentrations ( 7-10 mg/kg). Leaves occupying the upper 50% of the plant had Cd concentrations of 2 mg/kg. Uptake rate was greatest from day 27 to 66 ( 21.5 μg Cd/day). Selective Cd uptake appears evident between day 27 and 43, but overall the relative rate of Cd uptake was similar to other trace metals and micronutrients. Cd distribution within the plants mirrored the distribution of calcium, a macronutrient. Of the 8 mg of soil extractable Cd (0.075 mg/kg) in the rooting zone, 15.0% (1203 μg) is removed by uptake. Of this 15%, 64.2% (772.2 μg) is exported at harvest, and 35.8% (430.8 μg; lower leaves, roots, stalks) is returned to the soil. This study must be replicated to account for seasonal and soil variations. These results do inform selection of tobacco strains that limit uptake of trace metals, particularly Cd.

  5. Spectral reflectance, chlorophyll fluorescence and virological investigations of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Hristova, Dimitrina; Iliev, Ilko; Yanev, Tony

    Application of multispectral remote sensing techniques to plant condition monitoring has been adopted for various purposes. Remote sensing is a reliable tool for detecting signs of vege-tation stress and diseases. Spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence are functions of tissue optical properties and biological status of the plants, and illumination conditions. The mean reflectance spectrum depends on the relative composition of all the pigments in the leaf including chlorophylls, carotenoids etc. Chlorophyll fluorescence results from the primary re-actions of photosynthesis and during the last decade it finds widening application as a means for revelation of stress and diseases. The changes in chlorophyll function take place before the alteration in chlorophyll content to occur so that changes in the fluorescence signal arise before any visible signs are apparent. The aim of our investigations was to study the development and spreading out of a viral infection on the leaves of two cultivars tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We applied two remote sensing tech-niques (spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements) for evaluation of the changes in the optical properties of the plants in accordance to their physiological status. The serological analyses via the Double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) were made with appropriate kits (Leowe, Germany) for quantitative assessment of the concentration of viruses in the plants. The tobacco plants were grown in green house under controlled conditions. The first cultivar Nevrocop 1146 is known as resistive to the TMV, i.e. it shows hypersensitive response. The second cultivar named Krumovgrad is normally sen-sitive to the TMV. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, up to one leaf from 20 plants for each cultivar were inoculated with TMV. The leaves opposite to the infected ones formed the group of control (untreated) leaves. The

  6. Metabolic flux analysis in complex isotopolog space. Recycling of glucose in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Ettenhuber, Christian; Radykewicz, Tanja; Kofer, Waltraud; Koop, Hans-Ulrich; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2005-02-01

    Tobacco plants grown in vitro were supplied with a mixture of [U-13C6]glucose and unlabelled sucrose via the root system. After 20 days, leaves were harvested and extracted with water. Glucose was isolated from the extract and was analysed by 13C NMR spectroscopy. All 13C signals appeared as complex multiplets due to 13C-13C coupling. The abundance of 21 isotopologous glucose species was determined from the 13C NMR signal integrals by numerical deconvolution using a genetic algorithm. The relative fractions of specific isotopologs in the overall excess of 13C-labelled specimens establish flux contributions via glycolysis/glucogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, citric acid cycle and Calvin cycle including 13CO2 refixation. The fluxes were modelled and reconstructed in silico by a novel rule-based approach yielding the contributions of circular pathways and the degree of multiple cycling events. The data indicate that the vast majority of the proffered [U-13C6]glucose molecules had been modified by catabolism and subsequent glucogenesis from catabolic fragments, predominantly via passage through the citric acid cycle and the pentose phosphate pathway.

  7. Dynamic metabonomic responses of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingtao; Zhang, Yong; Du, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shiyun; Tang, Huiru

    2011-04-01

    Metabolic responses are important for plant adaptation to osmotic stresses. To understand the dosage and duration dependence of salinity effects on plant metabolisms, we analyzed the metabonome of tobacco plants and its dynamic responses to salt treatments using NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that the tobacco metabonome was dominated by 40 metabolites including organic acids/bases, amino acids, carbohydrates and choline, pyrimidine, and purine metabolites. A dynamic trajectory was clearly observable for the tobacco metabonomic responses to the dosage of salinity. Short-term low-dose salt stress (50 mM NaCl, 1 day) caused metabolic shifts toward gluconeogenesis with depletion of pyrimidine and purine metabolites. Prolonged salinity with high-dose salt (500 mM NaCl) induced progressive accumulation of osmolytes, such as proline and myo-inositol, and changes in GABA shunt. Such treatments also promoted the shikimate-mediated secondary metabolisms with enhanced biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Therefore, salinity caused systems alterations in widespread metabolic networks involving transamination, TCA cycle, gluconeogenesis/glycolysis, glutamate-mediated proline biosynthesis, shikimate-mediated secondary metabolisms, and the metabolisms of choline, pyrimidine, and purine. These findings provided new insights for the tobacco metabolic adaptation to salinity and demonstrated the NMR-based metabonomics as a powerful approach for understanding the osmotic effects on plant biochemistry.

  8. Tobacco plants over-expressing the sweet orange tau glutathione transferases (CsGSTUs) acquire tolerance to the diphenyl ether herbicide fluorodifen and to salt and drought stresses.

    PubMed

    Lo Cicero, Luca; Madesis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Lo Piero, Angela Roberta

    2015-08-01

    The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are members of a superfamily of enzymes with pivotal role in the detoxification of both xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. In this work, the generation and characterization of transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing tau glutathione transferases from Citrus sinensis (CsGSTU1 and CsGSTU2) and several cross-mutate forms of these genes are reported. Putative transformed plants were verified for the presence of the transgenes and the relative quantification of transgene copy number was evaluated by Taqman real time PCR. The analysis of gene expression revealed that transformed plants exhibit high levels of CsGSTU transcription suggesting that the insertion of the transgenes occurred in transcriptional active regions of the tobacco genome. In planta studies demonstrate that transformed tobacco plants gain tolerance against fluorodifen. Simultaneously, the wild type CsGSTU genes were in vitro expressed and their kinetic properties were determined using fluorodifen as substrate. The results show that CsGSTU2 follows a Michaelis-Menten hyperbolic kinetic, whereas CsGSTU1 generates a sigmoid plot typical of the regulatory enzymes, thus suggesting that when working at sub-lethal fluorodifen concentrations CsGSTU2 can counteract the herbicide injury more efficiently than the CsGSTU1. Moreover, the transgenic tobacco plant over-expressing CsGSTs exhibited both drought and salinity stress tolerance. However, as we show that CsGSTUs do not function as glutathione peroxidase in vitro, the protective effect against salt and drought stress is not due to a direct scavenging activity of the oxidative stress byproducts. The transgenic tobacco plants, which are described in the present study, can be helpful for phytoremediation of residual xenobiotics in the environment and overall the over-expression of CsGSTUs can be helpful to develop genetically modified crops with high resistance to abiotic stresses.

  9. Delay of Disease Development in Transgenic Plants that Express the Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell Abel, Patricia; Nelson, Richard S.; de, Barun; Hoffmann, Nancy; Rogers, Stephen G.; Fraley, Robert T.; Beachy, Roger N.

    1986-05-01

    A chimeric gene containing a cloned cDNA of the coat protein (CP) gene of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was introduced into tobacco cells on a Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens from which tumor inducing genes had been removed. Plants regenerated from transformed cells expressed TMV mRNA and CP as a nuclear trait. Seedlings from self-fertilized transgenic plants were inoculated with TMV and observed for development of disease symptoms. The seedlings that expressed the CP gene were delayed in symptom development and 10 to 60 percent of the transgenic plants failed to develop symptoms for the duration of the experiments. Increasing the concentration of TMV in the inoculum shortened the delay in appearance of symptoms. The results of these experiments indicate that plants can be genetically transformed for resistance to virus disease development.

  10. Viral RNA trafficking is inhibited in replicase-mediated resistant transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, L; Lucas, W J; Ding, B; Zaitlin, M

    1996-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Turkish Samsun NN) plants expressing a truncated replicase gene sequence from RNA-2 of strain Fny of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) are resistant to systemic CMV disease. This is due to suppression of virus replication and cell-to-cell movement in the inoculated leaves of these plants. In this study, microinjection protocols were used to directly examine cell-to-cell trafficking of CMV viral RNA in these resistant plants. CMV RNA fluorescently labeled with the nucleotide-specific TOTO-1 iodide dye, when coinjected with unlabeled CMV 3a movement protein (MP), moved rapidly into the surrounding mesophyll cells in mature tobacco leaves of vector control and untransformed plants. Such trafficking required the presence of functional CMV 3a MP. In contrast, coinjection of CMV 3a MP and CMV TOTO-RNA failed to move in transgenic resistant plants expressing the CMV truncated replicase gene. Furthermore, coinjection of 9.4-kDa fluorescein-conjugated dextran (F-dextran) along with unlabeled CMV 3a MP resulted in cell-to-cell movement of the F-dextran in control plants, but not in the transgenic plants. Similar results were obtained with viral RNA when the 30-kDa MP of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was coinjected with TMV TOTO-RNA into replicase-resistant transgenic tobacco expressing the 54-kDa gene sequence of TMV. However, in these transgenic plants, the TMV-MP was still capable of mediating cell-to-cell movement of itself and the 9.4-kDa F-dextran. These results indicate that an inhibition of cell-to-cell viral RNA trafficking is correlated with replicase-mediated resistance. This raises the possibility that the RNA-2 product is potentially involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell movement of viral infectious material during CMV replication. PMID:8901636

  11. Suppressed expression of the apoplastic ascorbate oxidase gene increases salt tolerance in tobacco and Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuko; Bhuiyan, Md Nazmul H; Waditee, Rungaroon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Esaka, Muneharu; Oba, Kazuko; Jagendorf, André T; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2005-07-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the ascorbate oxidase (AAO) gene in sense and antisense orientations, and an Arabidopsis mutant in which the T-DNA was inserted into a putative AAO gene, were used to examine the potential roles of AAO for salt-stress tolerance in plants. AAO activities in the transgenic tobacco plants expressing the gene in sense and antisense orientations were, respectively, about 16-fold and 0.2-fold of those in the wild type. Under normal growth conditions, no significant differences in phenotypes were observed, except for a delay in flowering time in the antisense plants. However, at high salinity, the percentage germination, photosynthetic activity, and seed yields were higher in antisense plants, with progressively lower levels in the wild type and the sense plants. The redox state of apoplastic ascorbate in sense plants was very low even under normal growth conditions. Upon salt stress, the redox state of symplastic and apoplastic ascorbate decreased among the three types of plants, but was lowest in the sense plants. The hydrogen peroxide contents in the symplastic and apoplastic spaces were higher in sense plants, progressively lower in the wild type, followed by the antisense plants. The Arabidopsis T-DNA inserted mutant exhibited very low ascorbate oxidase activity, and its phenotype was similar to that of antisense tobacco plants. These results suggest that the suppressed expression of apoplastic AAO under salt-stress conditions leads to a relatively low level of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and a high redox state of symplastic and apoplastic ascorbate which, in turn, permits a higher seed yield.

  12. Expression of peanut Iron Regulated Transporter 1 in tobacco and rice plants confers improved iron nutrition.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hongchun; Guo, Xiaotong; Kobayashi, Takanori; Kakei, Yusuke; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nozoye, Tomoko; Zhang, Lixia; Shen, Hongyun; Qiu, Wei; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Zuo, Yuanmei

    2014-07-01

    Iron (Fe) limitation is a widespread agricultural problem in calcareous soils and severely limits crop production. Iron Regulated Transporter 1 (IRT1) is a key component for Fe uptake from the soil in dicot plants. In this study, the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) AhIRT1 was introduced into tobacco and rice plants using an Fe-deficiency-inducible artificial promoter. Induced expression of AhIRT1 in tobacco plants resulted in accumulation of Fe in young leaves under Fe deficient conditions. Even under Fe-excess conditions, the Fe concentration was also markedly enhanced, suggesting that the Fe status did not affect the uptake and translocation of Fe by AhIRT1 in the transgenic plants. Most importantly, the transgenic tobacco plants showed improved tolerance to Fe limitation in culture in two types of calcareous soils. Additionally, the induced expression of AhIRT1 in rice plants also resulted in high tolerance to low Fe availability in calcareous soils.

  13. Production of an active recombinant thrombomodulin derivative in transgenic tobacco plants and suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, Helga; Schiermeyer, Andreas; Soeur, Raphael; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2005-06-01

    Thrombomodulin is a membrane-bound protein that plays an active role in the blood coagulation system by binding thrombin and initiating the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Solulin is a recombinant soluble derivative of human thrombomodulin. It is used for the treatment of thrombotic disorders. To evaluate the production of this pharmaceutical protein in plants, expression vectors were generated using four different N-terminal signal peptides. Immunoblot analysis of transiently transformed tobacco leaves showed that intact Solulin could be detected using three of these signal peptides. Furthermore transgenic tobacco plants and BY2 cells producing Solulin were generated. Immunoblot experiments showed that Solulin accumulated to maximum levels of 115 and 27 microg g(-1) plant material in tobacco plants and BY2 cells, respectively. Activity tests performed on the culture supernatant of transformed BY2 cells showed that the secreted Solulin was functional. In contrast, thrombomodulin activity was not detected in total soluble protein extracts from BY2 cells, probably due to inhibitory effects of substances in the cell extract. N-terminal sequencing was carried out on partially purified Solulin from the BY2 culture supernatant. The sequence was identical to that of Solulin produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells, confirming correct processing of the N-terminal signal peptide. We have demonstrated that plants and plant cell cultures can be used as alternative systems for the production of an active recombinant thrombomodulin derivative.

  14. Characterization of Antisense Transformed Plants Deficient in the Tobacco Anionic Peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrimini, L. M.; Gingas, V.; Finger, F.; Rothstein, S.; Liu, TTY.

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of the biological compounds that they metabolize, plant peroxidases have long been implicated in plant growth, cell wall biogenesis, lignification, and host defenses. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that underexpress anionic peroxidase were generated using antisense RNA. The antisense RNA was found to be specific for the anionic isoenzyme and highly effective, reducing endogenous transcript levels and total peroxidase activity by as much as 1600-fold. Antisense-transformed plants appeared normal at initial observation; however, growth studies showed that plants with reduced peroxidase activity grow taller and flower sooner than control plants. In contrast, previously transformed plants overproducing anionic peroxidase were shorter and flowered later than controls. Axillary buds were more developed in antisense-transformed plants and less developed in plants overproducing this enzyme. It was found that the lignin content in leaf, stem, and root was unchanged in antisense-transformed plants, which does not support a role for anionic peroxidase in the lignification of secondary xylem vessels. However, studies of wounded tissue show some reduction in wound-induced deposition of lignin-like polymers. The data support a possible role for tobacco anionic peroxidase in host defenses but not without a reduction in growth potential. PMID:12223765

  15. [Soil nutrients spatial variability and soil fertility suitability in Qujing tobacco-planting area].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zhou, Ji-heng; Yang, Rong-sheng; Zhang, Zheng-yan; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Yi-yang; Huang, Kua-ke; Li, Wei

    2011-04-01

    By adopting GPS technique, 2088 sampling sites were installed in the tobacco-planting area of Qujing City, Yunnan Province, with 0-20 cm soil samples collected to determine their main nutrients contents. The overall characteristics and spatial variability of the tobacco soil nutrients were analyzed by classic statistics and geo-statistics, and the soil fertility suitability in planting tobacco was evaluated by the methods of fuzzy mathematics. In the study area, soil pH and soil organic matter, available S, and water-soluble Cl contents were appropriate, soil total N and alkalihydrolyzable N contents were too high, soil available K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mo, and Mn contents were abundant, soil available P content was at medium level, while soil total P and K and available B contents were insufficient. All the nutrient indices presented anisotropic distribution, among which, the spatial variability of soil available P and B was mainly caused by random factors, and that of other nutrients was caused by the co-effects of structural and random factors. The spatial distribution map of soil fertility suitability index (SFI) showed that there was no the excellent grade region for tobacco-planting, good grade region accounted for 8.0%, general grade region accounted for 51.6%, moderate grade region accounted for 39.0%, and low grade region accounted for 1.4%.

  16. Comparative analysis of the plant mRNA-destabilizing element, DST, in mammalian and tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Feldbrügge, M; Arizti, P; Sullivan, M L; Zamore, P D; Belasco, J G; Green, P J

    2002-05-01

    The labile SAUR transcripts from higher plants contain a conserved DST sequence in their 3'-untranslated regions. Two copies of a DST sequence from soybean are sufficient to destabilize reporter transcripts in cultured tobacco cells whereas variants bearing mutations in the conserved ATAGAT or GTA regions are inactive. To investigate the potential for conserved recognition components in mammalian and plant cells, we examined the function of this instability determinant in mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts and tobacco BY2 cells. In fibroblasts, a tetrameric DST element from soybean accelerated deadenylation and decay of a reporter transcript. However, a version mutated in the ATAGAT region was equally effective in this regard, and a tetrameric DST element from Arabidopsis was inactive. In contrast, the soybean DST element was more active as an mRNA instability element than the mutant version and the Arabidopsis element, when tested as tetramers in tobacco cells. Hence, the plant DST element is not recognized in animal cells with the same sequence requirements as in plant cells. Therefore, its mode of recognition appears to be plant-specific.

  17. 3-D nasal cultures: Systems toxicological assessment of a candidate modified-risk tobacco product.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Anita R; Mathis, Carole; Martin, Florian; Leroy, Patrice; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Trivedi, Keyur; Grandolfo, Davide; Cabanski, Maciej; Guedj, Emmanuel; Merg, Celine; Frentzel, Stefan; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-01-01

    In vitro toxicology approaches have evolved from a focus on molecular changes within a cell to understanding of toxicity-related mechanisms in systems that can mimic the in vivo environment. The recent development of three dimensional (3-D) organotypic nasal epithelial culture models offers a physiologically robust system for studying the effects of exposure through inhalation. Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with nasal inflammation; thus, the nasal epithelium is relevant for evaluating the pathophysiological impact of CS exposure. The present study investigated further the application of in vitro human 3-D nasal epithelial culture models for toxicological assessment of inhalation exposure. Aligned with 3Rs strategy, this study aimed to explore the relevance of a human 3-D nasal culture model to assess the toxicological impact of aerosols generated from a candidate modified risk tobacco product (cMRTP), the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, as compared with smoke generated from reference cigarette 3R4F. A series of experimental repetitions, where multiple concentrations of THS2.2 aerosol and 3R4F smoke were applied, were conducted to obtain reproducible measurements to understand the cellular/molecular changes that occur following exposure. In agreement with "Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century - a Vision and a Strategy", this study implemented a systems toxicology approach and found that for all tested concentrations the impact of 3R4F smoke was substantially greater than that of THS2.2 aerosol in terms of cytotoxicity levels, alterations in tissue morphology, secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators, impaired ciliary function, and increased perturbed transcriptomes and miRNA expression profiles.

  18. [The influence of selected plants on the tobacco smoking-induced effects in the oral cavity--review].

    PubMed

    Kedziora, Agata; Raś, Katarzyna; Grzech-Leśniak, Kinga; Wyganowska-Swiatkowska, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a culprit of many pathological lesions on the oral mucosa. In this literature review we focused on various therapeutic options for tobacco induced mucosal pathologies. Many active ingredients of Aloe vera, Chamomile, Curcuma longa and Calendula show potent anti-inflammatory and regenerative activity, making plant derived drugs a reasonable option for traditional pharmaceuticals.

  19. Efficient virus-induced gene silencing in plants using a modified geminivirus DNA1 component.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changjun; Xie, Yan; Zhou, Xueping

    2009-04-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is currently recognized as a powerful reverse genetics tool for application in functional genomics. DNA1, a satellite-like and single-stranded DNA molecule associated with begomoviruses (Family Geminiviridae), has been shown to replicate autonomously but requires the helper virus for its dissemination. We developed a VIGS vector based on the DNA1 component of tobacco curly shoot virus (TbCSV), a monopartite begomovirus, by inserting a multiple cloning site between the replication-associated protein open reading frame and the A-rich region for subsequent insertion of DNA fragments of genes targeted for silencing. When a host gene (sulphur, Su) or transgene (green fluorescent protein, GFP) was inserted into the modified DNA1 vector and co-agroinoculated with TbCSV, efficient silencing of the cognate gene was observed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. More interestingly, we demonstrated that this modified DNA1 could effectively suppress GFP in transgenic N. benthamiana or endogenous Su in tobacco plants when co-agroinoculated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), another monopartite begomovirus that does not induce any viral symptoms. A gene-silencing system in Nicotiana spp., Solanum lycopersicum and Petunia hybrida plants was then established using TYLCCNV and the modified DNA1 vector. The system can be used to silence genes involved in meristem and flower development. The modified DNA1 vector was used to silence the AtTOM homologous genes (NbTOM1 and NbTOM3) in N. benthamiana. Silencing of NbTOM1 or NbTOM3 can reduce tobamovirus multiplication to a lower level, and silencing of both genes simultaneously can completely inhibit tobamovirus multiplication. Previous studies have reported that DNA1 is associated with both monopartite and bipartite begomoviruses, as well as curtoviruses. This vector system can therefore be applied for the study, analysis and discovery of gene function in a variety of important crop plants.

  20. PDH45 overexpressing transgenic tobacco and rice plants provide salinity stress tolerance via less sodium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Nath, Manoj; Garg, Bharti; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress negatively affects the crop productivity worldwide, including that of rice. Coping with these losses is a major concern for all countries. The pea DNA helicase, PDH45 is a unique member of helicase family involved in the salinity stress tolerance. However, the exact mechanism of the PDH45 in salinity stress tolerance is yet to be established. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of PDH45-mediated salinity stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco and rice lines along with wild type (WT) plants using CoroNa Green dye based sodium localization in root and shoot sections. The results showed that under salinity stress root and shoot of PDH45 overexpressing transgenic tobacco and rice accumulated less sodium (Na(+)) as compared to their respective WT. The present study also reports salinity tolerant (FL478) and salinity susceptible (Pusa-44) varieties of rice accumulated lowest and highest Na(+) level, respectively. All the varieties and transgenic lines of rice accumulate differential Na(+) ions in root and shoot. However, roots accumulate high Na(+) as compared to the shoots in both tobacco and rice transgenic lines suggesting that the Na(+) transport in shoot is somehow inhibited. It is proposed that the PDH45 is probably involved in the deposition of apoplastic hydrophobic barriers and consequently inhibit Na(+) transport to shoot and therefore confers salinity stress tolerance to PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines. This study concludes that tobacco (dicot) and rice (monocot) transgenic plants probably share common salinity tolerance mechanism mediated by PDH45 gene.

  1. Overexpression of monoubiquitin improves photosynthesis in transgenic tobacco plants following high temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengxia; Gong, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Yanan; Wang, Guokun; Guo, Qifang; Wang, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system (Ub/26S) is implicated in abiotic stress responses in plants. In this paper, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing Ta-Ub2 from wheat were used to study the functions of Ub in the improvement of photosynthesis under high temperature (45°C) stress. We observed higher levels of Ub conjugates in transgenic plants under high temperature stress conditions compared to wild type (WT) as a result of the constitutive overexpression of Ta-Ub2, suggesting increased protein degradation by the 26S proteasome system under high temperature stress. Overexpressing Ub increased the photosynthetic rate (Pn) of transgenic tobacco plants, consistent with the improved ATPase activity in the thylakoid membrane and enhanced efficiency of PSII photochemistry. The higher D1 protein levels following high temperature stress in transgenic plants than WT were also observed. These findings imply that Ub may be involved in tolerance of photosynthesis to high temperature stress in plants. Compared with WT, the transgenic plants showed lower protein carbonylation and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, less reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, but higher antioxidant enzyme activity under high temperature stress. These findings suggest that the improved antioxidant capacity of transgenic plants may be one of the most important mechanisms underlying Ub-regulated high temperature tolerance.

  2. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  3. Tryptamine-induced resistance in tryptophan decarboxylase transgenic poplar and tobacco plants against their specific herbivores.

    PubMed

    Gill, Rishi I S; Ellis, Brian E; Isman, Murray B

    2003-04-01

    The presence of amines and their derivatives in plant tissues is known to influence insect feeding and reproduction. The enzyme tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of tryptophan to tryptamine, which is both a bioactive amine and a precursor of other indole derivatives. Transgenic poplar and tobacco plants ectopically expressing TDC1 accumulated elevated levels of tryptamine without affecting plant growth and development. This accumulation was consistently associated with adverse effects on feeding behavior and physiology of Malacosoma disstria Hub. (forest tent caterpillar, FTC) and Manduca sexta L. (tobacco hornworm, THW). Behavior studies with FTC and THW larvae showed that acceptability of the leaf tissue to larvae was inversely related to foliar tryptamine levels. Physiological studies with FTC and THW larvae showed that consumption of leaf tissue from the transgenic lines is deleterious to larvae growth, apparently due to a postingestive mechanism. Thus, ectopic expression of TDC1 can allow sufficient tryptamine to accumulate in poplar and tobacco leaf tissue to suppress significantly the growth of insect pests that normally feed on these plants.

  4. Delayed Leaf Senescence in Tobacco Plants Transformed with tmr, a Gene for Cytokinin Production in Agrobacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, CM; Scofield, SR; Bevan, MW; Dyer, TA

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether enhanced levels of endogenous cytokinins could influence plant development, particularly leaf senescence. Tobacco plants were transformed with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens gene tmr, under the control of the soybean heat shock promoter HS6871. This gene encodes the enzyme isopentenyl transferase, which catalyzes the initial step in cytokinin biosynthesis. After heat shock, the cytokinin level increased greatly and the level of tmr mRNA, undetectable at 20[deg]C, rose and remained high for up to 8 hours. The levels of cytokinin and tmr mRNA were substantially lower by 24 hours. Transformed plants grown at 20[deg]C were shorter, had larger side shoots, and remained green for longer than untransformed plants. The differences were more pronounced after several heat shocks of whole plants or defined areas of leaves. Our results demonstrated that plant morphology and leaf senescence can be manipulated by changing the endogenous level of cytokinins. PMID:12324608

  5. The Small Subunit of Snapdragon Geranyl Diphosphate Synthase Modifies the Chain Length Specificity of Tobacco Geranylgeranyl Diphosphate Synthase in Planta[W

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Irina; Nagegowda, Dinesh A.; Kish, Christine M.; Gutensohn, Michael; Maeda, Hiroshi; Varbanova, Marina; Fridman, Eyal; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Hanada, Atsushi; Kamiya, Yuji; Krichevsky, Alexander; Citovsky, Vitaly; Pichersky, Eran; Dudareva, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    Geranyl diphosphate (GPP), the precursor of many monoterpene end products, is synthesized in plastids by a condensation of dimethylallyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) in a reaction catalyzed by homodimeric or heterodimeric GPP synthase (GPPS). In the heterodimeric enzymes, a noncatalytic small subunit (GPPS.SSU) determines the product specificity of the catalytic large subunit, which may be either an active geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) or an inactive GGPPS-like protein. Here, we show that expression of snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) GPPS.SSU in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants increased the total GPPS activity and monoterpene emission from leaves and flowers, indicating that the introduced catalytically inactive GPPS.SSU found endogenous large subunit partner(s) and formed an active snapdragon/tobacco GPPS in planta. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and in vitro enzyme analysis of individual and hybrid proteins revealed that two of four GGPPS-like candidates from tobacco EST databases encode bona fide GGPPS that can interact with snapdragon GPPS.SSU and form a functional GPPS enzyme in plastids. The formation of chimeric GPPS in transgenic plants also resulted in leaf chlorosis, increased light sensitivity, and dwarfism due to decreased levels of chlorophylls, carotenoids, and gibberellins. In addition, these transgenic plants had reduced levels of sesquiterpene emission, suggesting that the export of isoprenoid intermediates from the plastids into the cytosol was decreased. These results provide genetic evidence that GPPS.SSU modifies the chain length specificity of phylogenetically distant GGPPS and can modulate IPP flux distribution between GPP and GGPP synthesis in planta. PMID:20028839

  6. Effect of drought and combined drought and heat stress on polyamine metabolism in proline-over-producing tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Cvikrová, Milena; Gemperlová, Lenka; Martincová, Olga; Vanková, Radomira

    2013-12-01

    The roles of proline and polyamines (PAs) in the drought stress responses of tobacco plants were investigated by comparing the responses to drought alone and drought in combination with heat in the upper and lower leaves and roots of wild-type tobacco plants and transformants that constitutively over-express a modified gene for the proline biosynthetic enzyme Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CSF129A; EC 2.7.2.11/1.2.1.41). In both genotypes, drought stress coincided with a decrease in relative water content (RWC) that was much less severe in the upper leaves than elsewhere in the plant. The drought also increased proline levels in both genotypes. A brief period of heat stress (2 h at 40 °C) at the end of the drought period did not significantly influence the proline levels in the upper leaves and roots but caused a further increase in the lower leaves of both genotypes. The rate at which these elevated proline levels returned to normal during the post-stress recovery period was slower in the transformants and plants that had been subjected to the combined stress. In both genotypes, drought stress significantly reduced the levels of spermidine (Spd) and putrescine (Put) in the leaves and roots relative to those for controls, and increased the levels of spermine (Spm) and diaminopropane (Dap, formed by the oxidative deamination of Spd and Spm). Spd levels may have declined due to its consumption in Spm biosynthesis and/or oxidation by polyamine oxidase (PAO; EC 1.5.3.11) to form Dap, which became more abundant during drought stress. During the rewatering period, the plants' Put and Spd levels recovered quickly and the activity of the PA biosynthesis enzymes in their leaves and roots increased substantially; this increase was more pronounced in transformants than WT plants. The high levels of Spm observed in drought stressed plants persisted even after the 24 h recovery and rewatering phase. The malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of the lower leaves of WTs

  7. Deregulation of apoplastic polyamine oxidase affects development and salt response of tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Gémes, Katalin; Mellidou, Ιfigeneia; Karamanoli, Katerina; Beris, Despoina; Park, Ky Young; Matsi, Theodora; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Constantinidou, Helen-Isis; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A

    2017-04-01

    Polyamine (PA) homeostasis is associated with plant development, growth and responses to biotic/abiotic stresses. Apoplastic PA oxidase (PAO) catalyzes the oxidation of PAs contributing to cellular homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and PAs. In tobacco, PAs decrease with plant age, while apoplastic PAO activity increases. Our previous results with young transgenic tobacco plants with enhanced/reduced apoplastic PAO activity (S-ZmPAO/AS-ZmPAO, respectively) established the importance of apoplastic PAO in controlling tolerance to short-term salt stress. However, it remains unclear if the apoplastic PAO pathway is important for salt tolerance at later stages of plant development. In this work, we examined whether apoplastic PAO controls also plant development and tolerance of adult plants during long-term salt stress. The AS-ZmPAO plants contained higher Ca(2+) during salt stress, showing also reduced chlorophyll content index (CCI), leaf area and biomass but taller phenotype compared to the wild-type plants during salt. On the contrary, the S-ZmPAO had more leaves with slightly greater size compared to the AS-ZmPAO and higher antioxidant genes/enzyme activities. Accumulation of proline in the roots was evident at prolonged stress and correlated negatively with PAO deregulation as did the transcripts of genes mediating ethylene biosynthesis. In contrast to the strong effect of apoplastic PAO to salt tolerance in young plants described previously, the effect it exerts at later stages of development is rather moderate. However, the different phenotypes observed in plants deregulating PAO reinforce the view that apoplastic PAO exerts multifaceted roles on plant growth and stress responses. Our data suggest that deregulation of the apoplastic PAO can be further examined as a potential approach to breed plants with enhanced/reduced tolerance to abiotic stress with minimal associated trade-offs.

  8. A novel approach to assess the population health impact of introducing a Modified Risk Tobacco Product.

    PubMed

    Weitkunat, Rolf; Lee, Peter N; Baker, Gizelle; Sponsiello-Wang, Zheng; González-Zuloeta Ladd, Angela M; Lüdicke, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Based on the Food and Drug Administration's Modified Risk Tobacco Product (MRTP) Application draft guideline, Philip Morris International (PMI) has developed a Population Health Impact Model to estimate the reduction in the number of deaths over a period following the introduction of an MRTP. Such a model is necessary to assess the effect that its introduction would have on population health, given the lack of epidemiological data available prior to marketing authorization on any risks from MRTPs. The model is based on publicly available data on smoking prevalence and on the relationships between smoking-related disease-specific mortality and various aspects of the smoking of conventional cigarettes (CCs), together with an estimate of exposure from the MRTP relative to that from CCs, and allows the exploration of possible scenarios regarding the effect of MRTP introduction on the prevalence of CC and MRTP use, individually and in combination. By comparing mortality attributable in a scenario where the MRTP is introduced with one where it is not, the model can estimate the mortality attributable to CCs and the MRTP, as well as the reduction in the deaths attributable to the introduction of the MRTP.

  9. Hyperspectral remote sensing applications for monitoring and stress detection in cultural plants: viral infections in tobacco plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Petrov, Nikolai; Maneva, Svetla

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to reveal the presence of viral infections in two varieties of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) as well as to discriminate the levels of the disease using hyperspectral leaf reflectance. Data sets were collected from two tobacco cultivars, Xanthi and Rustica, known as most widespread in Bulgaria. Experimental plants were grown in a greenhouse under controlled conditions. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf plants of cultivar Xanthi were inoculated with Potato virus Y (PVY) while the Rustica plants were inoculated with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). These two viruses are worldwide distributed and cause significant yield losses in many economically important crops. In the course of time after inoculation the concentration of the viruses in plant leaves was assessed by erological analysis via DAS-ELISA and RT-PCR techniques. Hyperspectral reflectance data were collected by a portable fibreoptics spectrometer in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges (450-850 nm). As control plants healthy untreated tobacco plants were used. The significance of the differences between reflectance spectra of control and infected leaves was analyzed by means of Student's t-criterion at p<0.05. The analyses were performed at ten wavebands selected to cover the green (520-580 nm), red (640-680 nm), red edge (690-720 nm) and near infrared (720-780 nm) spectral ranges. Changes in SRC were found for both viral treatments and comparative analysis showed that the influence of PVY was stronger. The discrimination of disease intensity was achieved by derivative analysis of the red edge position.

  10. Is chloroplast movement in tobacco plants influenced systemically after local illumination or burning stress?

    PubMed

    Naus, Jan; Rolencová, Monika; Hlavácková, Vladimíra

    2008-10-01

    Chloroplast movement has been studied in many plants mainly in relation to the local light, mechanical or stress effects. Here we investigated possible systemic responses of chloroplast movement to local light or burning stress in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun). Chloroplast movement was measured using two independent methods: one with a SPAD 502 Chlorophyll meter and another by collimated transmittance at a selected wavelength (676 nm). A sensitive periodic movement of chloroplasts was used in high or low (2 000 or 50 micromol/m(2) per s photosynthetically active radiation, respectively) cold white light with periods of 50 or 130 min. Measurements were carried out in the irradiated area, in the non-irradiated area of the same leaf or in the leaf located on the stem below the irradiated or burned one. No significant changes in systemic chloroplast movement in non-irradiated parts of the leaf and in the non-treated leaf were detected. Our data indicate that chloroplast movement in tobacco is dependent dominantly on the intensity and spectral composition of the incident light and on the local stimulation and state of the target tissue. No systemic signal was strong enough to evoke a detectable systemic response in chloroplast movement in distant untreated tissues of tobacco plants.

  11. Tobacco overexpressing β-ocimene induces direct and indirect responses against aphids in receiver tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Pasquale; Iodice, Luigi; Maffei, Massimo E; Bossi, Simone; Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Guerrieri, Emilio

    2015-01-15

    In the last decade plant-to-plant communication has received an increasing attention, particularly for the role of Volatile Organic Compounds as possible elicitors of plant defense. The role of β-ocimene as an interspecific elicitor of plant defense has been recently assessed in multitrophic systems including different plant species (Solanaceae, Poaceae, legumes) and different pest species including chewer insects and phytophagous mites. Both chewer insects and phytophagous mites are known to elicit specific plant defensive pathways which are different (at least in part) from those elicited by sap feeders. The aim of this research was to fill this gap of knowledge and to assess the role of β-ocimene as an elicitor of plant defense against aphid pests, which are sap feeders. For this purpose we used as transgenic tobacco plant releasing an odour plume enriched in this compound as emitter and a tomato plant as receiver. We selected the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae and its natural enemy, the parasitoid Aphidius ervi, as the targets of plant induced defense. Tomato plant defense induced by β-ocimene was assessed by characterizing the aphid performance in terms of fixing behaviour, development and reproduction (direct plant defense) and the parasitoid performance in terms of attraction towards tomato plants (indirect plant defense). The characterization of tomato response to β-ocimene was completed by the identification of Volatile Organic Compounds as released by conditioned tomato plants. Tomato plants that were exposed to the volatiles of transgenic tobacco enriched in β-ocimene resulted in less suitable for the aphids in respect to control ones (direct defense). On tomato plants "elicited" by β-ocimene we recorded: a significant lower number of aphids settled; a significant lower number newborn nymphs; a significant lower weight of aphids feeding. In addition, tomato plants "elicited" by β-ocimene resulted became more attractive towards the parasitoid A. ervi

  12. Tobacco mosaic virus infection results in an increase in recombination frequency and resistance to viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens in the progeny of infected tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Kathiria, Palak; Sidler, Corinne; Golubov, Andrey; Kalischuk, Melanie; Kawchuk, Lawrence M; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-08-01

    Our previous experiments showed that infection of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) leads to an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of infected plants also had an increased rate of rearrangements in resistance gene-like loci. Here, we report that tobacco plants infected with TMV exhibited an increase in HRF in two consecutive generations. Analysis of global genome methylation showed the hypermethylated genome in both generations of plants, whereas analysis of methylation via 5-methyl cytosine antibodies demonstrated both hypomethylation and hypermethylation. Analysis of the response of the progeny of infected plants to TMV, Pseudomonas syringae, or Phytophthora nicotianae revealed a significant delay in symptom development. Infection of these plants with TMV or P. syringae showed higher levels of induction of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 gene expression and higher levels of callose deposition. Our experiments suggest that viral infection triggers specific changes in progeny that promote higher levels of HRF at the transgene and higher resistance to stress as compared with the progeny of unstressed plants. However, data reported in these studies do not establish evidence of a link between recombination frequency and stress resistance.

  13. Review: Genetically modified plants for the promotion of human health.

    PubMed

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Saito, Kazuki

    2006-12-01

    Plants are attractive biological resources because of their ability to produce a huge variety of chemical compounds, and the familiarity of production in even the most rural settings. Genetic engineering gives plants additional characteristics and value for cultivation and post-harvest. Genetically modified (GM) plants of the "first generation" were conferred with traits beneficial to producers, whereas GM plants in subsequent "generations" are intended to provide beneficial traits for consumers. Golden Rice is a promising example of a GM plant in the second generation, and has overcome a number of obstacles for practical use. Furthermore, consumer-acceptable plants with health-promoting properties that are genetically modified using native genes are being developed. The emerging technology of metabolomics will also support the commercial realization of GM plants by providing comprehensive analyzes of plant biochemical components.

  14. Modifying plants for biofuel and biomaterial production.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Agnelo; Lupoi, Jason S; Hoang, Nam V; Healey, Adam; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A; Henry, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    The productivity of plants as biofuel or biomaterial crops is established by both the yield of plant biomass per unit area of land and the efficiency of conversion of the biomass to biofuel. Higher yielding biofuel crops with increased conversion efficiencies allow production on a smaller land footprint minimizing competition with agriculture for food production and biodiversity conservation. Plants have traditionally been domesticated for food, fibre and feed applications. However, utilization for biofuels may require the breeding of novel phenotypes, or new species entirely. Genomics approaches support genetic selection strategies to deliver significant genetic improvement of plants as sources of biomass for biofuel manufacture. Genetic modification of plants provides a further range of options for improving the composition of biomass and for plant modifications to assist the fabrication of biofuels. The relative carbohydrate and lignin content influences the deconstruction of plant cell walls to biofuels. Key options for facilitating the deconstruction leading to higher monomeric sugar release from plants include increasing cellulose content, reducing cellulose crystallinity, and/or altering the amount or composition of noncellulosic polysaccharides or lignin. Modification of chemical linkages within and between these biomass components may improve the ease of deconstruction. Expression of enzymes in the plant may provide a cost-effective option for biochemical conversion to biofuel.

  15. Principal Component Analysis of Chlorophyll Content in Tobacco, Bean and Petunia Plants Exposed to Different Tropospheric Ozone Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiak, Klaudia; Zbierska, Janina; Budka, Anna; Kayzer, Dariusz

    2014-06-01

    Three plant species were assessed in this study - ozone-sensitive and -resistant tobacco, ozone-sensitive petunia and bean. Plants were exposed to ambient air conditions for several weeks in two sites differing in tropospheric ozone concentrations in the growing season of 2009. Every week chlorophyll contents were analysed. Cumulative ozone effects on the chlorophyll content in relation to other meteorological parameters were evaluated using principal component analysis, while the relation between certain days of measurements of the plants were analysed using multivariate analysis of variance. Results revealed variability between plant species response. However, some similarities were noted. Positive relations of all chlorophyll forms to cumulative ozone concentration (AOT 40) were found for all the plant species that were examined. The chlorophyll b/a ratio revealed an opposite position to ozone concentration only in the ozone-resistant tobacco cultivar. In all the plant species the highest average chlorophyll content was noted after the 7th day of the experiment. Afterwards, the plants usually revealed various responses. Ozone-sensitive tobacco revealed decrease of chlorophyll content, and after few weeks of decline again an increase was observed. Probably, due to the accommodation for the stress factor. While during first three weeks relatively high levels of chlorophyll contents were noted in ozone-resistant tobacco. Petunia revealed a slow decrease of chlorophyll content and the lowest values at the end of the experiment. A comparison between the plant species revealed the highest level of chlorophyll contents in ozone-resistant tobacco.

  16. TcCYS4, a cystatin from cocoa, reduces necrosis triggered by MpNEP2 in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Santana, L S; Costa, M G C; Pirovani, N M; Almeida, A F; Alvim, F C; Pirovani, C P

    2014-09-26

    In Brazil, most cocoa bean production occurs in Southern Bahia. Witches' broom disease arrived in this area in 1989 and has since caused heavy losses in production. The disease is caused by the basidiomycete fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, a hemibiotrophic fungus that produces the necrosis and ethylene-inducting protein (MpNEP2) during infection; this protein can activate cysteine proteases and induce programmed cell death. Cysteine proteases can be modulated by cystatin. In this study, we overexpressed TcCYS4, a cocoa cystatin, in tobacco plants and evaluated the effect on MpNEP2 in model plants. Tccys4 cDNA was cloned into the pCAMBIA 1390 vector and inserted into the tobacco plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transgene expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. Transcript and protein levels in Tcccys4:tobacco lines were 8.9- and 1.5-fold higher than in wild-type plants (wt). Tcccys4:tobacco lines showed no change in growth compared to wt plants. CO2 net assimilation (A) increased in Tcccys4:tobacco lines compared to wt plants. Only one line showed statistically significant stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration rate (E) changes. MpNEP2 was infiltered into the foliar mesophyll of Tcccys4:tobacco lines and wt plants, and necrotic lesions were attenuated in lines highly expressing Tccys4. Our results suggest that cocoa cystatin TcCYS4 affects MpNEP2 activity related to the progression of programmed cell death in tobacco plants. This may occur through the action of cystatin to inhibit cysteine proteases activated by MpNEP2 in plant tissues. Further studies are necessary to examine cystatin in the Theobroma cacao-M. perniciosa pathosystem.

  17. Role of transpiration and metabolism in translocation and accumulation of cadmium in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiwei; Wang, Haiyun; Ma, Yibing; Wang, Haohao; Shi, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Tobacco plants grown in pots and in hydroponic culture accumulated cadmium (Cd) particularly: the Cd content of tobacco leaves exceeded 100 mg/kg and the enrichment factor (the ratio of Cd in leaves to that in soil) was more than 4. These high levels of accumulation identify tobacco as a hyperaccumulator of Cd. Two transpiration inhibitors (paraffin or CaCl2) and shade decreased the Cd content of tobacco leaves, and the decrease showed a linear relationship with the leaf transpiration rate. A metabolism inhibitor, namely 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), and low temperature (4 °C) also lowered the Cd content of tobacco leaves, but the inhibitory effect of low temperature was greater. In the half number of leaves that were shaded, the Cd content decreased to 26.5% of that in leaves that were not shaded in the same tobacco plants. These results suggests that translocation of Cd from the medium to the leaves is driven by the symplastic and the apoplastic pathways. Probably, of the two crucial steps in the translocation of Cd in tobacco plants, one, namely uptake from the medium to the xylem, is energy-dependent whereas the other, namely the transfer from the xylem to the leaves, is driven mainly by transpiration.

  18. Translocation of metal ions from soil to tobacco roots and their concentration in the plant parts.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cleber Pinto; de Almeida, Thiago E; Zittel, Rosimara; de Oliveira Stremel, Tatiana R; Domingues, Cinthia E; Kordiak, Januário; de Campos, Sandro Xavier

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study on the translocation factors (TFs) and bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), and arsenic (As) ions in roots, stems, and leaves of tobacco. The results revealed that during the tobacco growth, the roots are able to increase the sensitiveness of the physiological control, reducing the translocation of the metals Ni (0.38) and Pb (0.48) to the leaves. Cd and Zn presented factors TF and BCF >1 in the three tissues under analysis, which indicates the high potential for transportation and accumulation of these metals in all plant tissues. The TF values for Cr (0.65) and As (0.63) revealed low translocation of these ions to the aerial parts, indicating low mobility of ions from the roots. Therefore, tobacco can be considered an efficient accumulator of Ni, Cr, As and Pb in roots and Cd and Zn in all plant parts.

  19. Natural products - modifying metabolite pathways in plants.

    PubMed

    Staniek, Agata; Bouwmeester, Harro; Fraser, Paul D; Kayser, Oliver; Martens, Stefan; Tissier, Alain; van der Krol, Sander; Wessjohann, Ludger; Warzecha, Heribert

    2013-10-01

    The diversity of plant natural product (PNP) molecular structures is reflected in the variety of biochemical and genetic pathways that lead to their formation and accumulation. Plant secondary metabolites are important commodities, and include fragrances, colorants, and medicines. Increasing the extractable amount of PNP through plant breeding, or more recently by means of metabolic engineering, is a priority. The prerequisite for any attempt at metabolic engineering is a detailed knowledge of the underlying biosynthetic and regulatory pathways in plants. Over the past few decades, an enormous body of information about the biochemistry and genetics of biosynthetic pathways involved in PNPs production has been generated. In this review, we focus on the three large classes of plant secondary metabolites: terpenoids (or isoprenoids), phenylpropanoids, and alkaloids. All three provide excellent examples of the tremendous efforts undertaken to boost our understanding of biosynthetic pathways, resulting in the first successes in plant metabolic engineering. We further consider what essential information is still missing, and how future research directions could help achieve the rational design of plants as chemical factories for high-value products.

  20. Environmental tobacco exposure is associated with vaccine modified measles in junior high school students.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shuichi; Sato, Kazuki; Watanabe, Hiroko; Nezu, Yoko; Nishimuta, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine modified measles (VMM) affects individuals with attenuated vaccine induced immunity. An outbreak of measles occurred in a junior high school, starting from an unvaccinated eighth-grade student who developed natural measles and affected a majority of students who were immunized with a low potent strain of measles vaccine (TD97). To determine whether environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure was associated with the development of VMM in this population, a questionnaire was used asking whether students had VMM symptoms during the outbreak and the smoking status of family members. VMM was defined in the study population as occurrence of fever and/or erythema, along with documented history of measles vaccination. A total of 513 students (85.9%) responded. Overall, the presence of in-house smokers did not differ between VMM students (49.3%) and non-VMM students (50.2%). However, in the ninth grade, presence of an in-house smoker was significantly higher in the family of VMM students (54.0%) than in non-VMM students (36.6%) (P = 0.044). Urinary cotinine levels were also measured in selected students (n = 37). Among families with at least one smoker, urinary cotinine levels were significantly higher in VMM students than in non-VMM students (P = 0.032). Furthermore, a multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that a high urinary cotinine level (>10 ng/mg creatinine; 13.5 percentile) was associated with the development of VMM. Our findings suggest that a high level of ETS exposure may be associated with an increased risk of VMM in a population with attenuated vaccine induced immunity against measles.

  1. Expression and Chloroplast Targeting of Cholesterol Oxidase in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, David R.; Grebenok, Robert J.; Ohnmeiss, Thomas E.; Greenplate, John T.; Purcell, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase represents a novel type of insecticidal protein with potent activity against the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman). We transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with the cholesterol oxidase choM gene and expressed cytosolic and chloroplast-targeted versions of the ChoM protein. Transgenic leaf tissues expressing cholesterol oxidase exerted insecticidal activity against boll weevil larvae. Our results indicate that cholesterol oxidase can metabolize phytosterols in vivo when produced cytosolically or when targeted to chloroplasts. The transgenic plants exhibiting cytosolic expression accumulated low levels of saturated sterols known as stanols, and displayed severe developmental aberrations. In contrast, the transgenic plants expressing chloroplast-targeted cholesterol oxidase maintained a greater accumulation of stanols, and appeared phenotypically and developmentally normal. These results are discussed within the context of plant sterol distribution and metabolism. PMID:11457962

  2. Plant mediated green synthesis: modified approaches.

    PubMed

    Das, Ratul Kumar; Brar, Satinder Kaur

    2013-11-07

    Plant mediated green synthesis of different metallic nanoparticles has emerged as one of the options for implementation of green chemistry principles, and successfully made an important contribution towards green nanotechnology. However, beyond the synthesis and application aspects, the science of green synthesis has carried some wrong perceptions in an unforeseen fashion. In this review, some of the key issues related to the green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles employing plants as reducing/capping agents have been addressed. Random selection of plants and its overall impact on the different aspects of green synthesis have been discussed. Emphasis is given to the setting of some standard selection criteria to be adopted for selecting a plant for use in green synthesis. How selection of a plant can positively or negatively influence both procedure and products of a green synthesis process is the prime concern of this article. In addition to selection, the key issue of biocompatibility associated with green synthesized metallic nanoparticles has been considered. Both selection of plant and biocompatibility were reconsidered for their minute details in terms of synthesis, analysis and data interpretation in the green synthesis approach. The key factors capable of fine tuning the core meaning of "green" in the synthesis of any metallic nanoparticles were taken into consideration. This article is an effort towards keeping the core meaning of green synthesis.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of {gamma}-thionin-like soybean SE60 in E. coli and tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yeonhee Choi, Yang Do; Lee, Jong Seob

    2008-10-17

    The SE60, a low molecular weight, sulfur-rich protein in soybean, is known to be homologous to wheat {gamma}-purothionin. To elucidate the functional role of SE60, we expressed SE60 cDNA in Escherichia coli and in tobacco plants. A single protein band was detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after anti-FLAG affinity purification of the protein from transformed E. coli. While the control E. coli cells harboring pFLAG-1 showed standard growth with Isopropyl {beta}-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, E. coli cells expressing the SE60 fusion protein did not grow at all, suggesting that SE60 has toxic effects on E. coli growth. Genomic integration and the expression of transgene in the transgenic tobacco plants were confirmed by Southern and Northern blot analysis, respectively. The transgenic plants demonstrated enhanced resistance against the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that SE60 has antimicrobial activity and play a role in the defense mechanism in soybean plants.

  4. Decreased SBPase activity alters growth and development in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Lawson, T; Bryant, B; Lefebvre, S; Lloyd, J C; Raines, C A

    2006-01-01

    The effects of reduced SBPase activity on growth and development were examined in a set of transgenic tobacco plants produced using an antisense construct driven by the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, small subunit promoter. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation rates and carbohydrate levels in source leaves were decreased in the antisense plants. Growth rate and total shoot biomass were reduced in the SBPase antisense plants, even in plants where SBPase activity was reduced by only 25%. Floral biomass also decreased in response to reductions in SBPase activity and the onset of flowering was delayed by 5-10 d. This is the first demonstration of a link between reproductive biomass and reductions in Calvin cycle enzyme activity using antisense plants. Furthermore, unexpected changes in the growth and development of the antisense plants were evident. Small reductions in SBPase activity (above 50% wild type) resulted in shorter plants with only a small decrease in stem biomass and specific leaf area. In contrast, plants with larger reductions in SBPase activity had an increase in specific leaf area and attained heights similar to that of the wild-type plants but with a much reduced stem biomass, largely due to a decrease in xylem tissue. This bi-modal response of growth to reductions in SBPase activity has similarities to changes in leaf and stem anatomy and morphology that accompany light acclimation.

  5. Extremely low frequency weak magnetic fields enhance resistance of NN tobacco plants to tobacco mosaic virus and elicit stress-related biochemical activities.

    PubMed

    Trebbi, Grazia; Borghini, Francesco; Lazzarato, Lisa; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Calzoni, G Lorenzo; Betti, Lucietta

    2007-04-01

    Increasing evidence has accumulated concerning the biological effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) in different plant models. In the present study, effects of ELF-MFs in tobacco plants reacting to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) with a hypersensitive response (HR) were evaluated. Plants were exposed for 8 or 24 h (either before or after TMV inoculation) to a static MF, at either -17 or 13 microT, combined with a 10 Hz sinusoidal MF with different intensities (25.6 or 28.9 microT). The working variables were the area and number of hypersensitive lesions in leaves. Following ELF-MFs exposure, an increased resistance was detected, particularly after an 8-h treatment, as shown by the decrease in lesion area and number. Moreover, two enzyme activities involved in resistance mechanisms were analyzed: ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL). Uninoculated leaves previously exposed to ELF-MFs in general showed a significant increase relative to controls in ODC and PAL activities, in particular for 13 microT static MF plus 28.9 microT, 10 Hz sinusoidal MF (24 h) treatment. In conclusion, ELF-MFs seem to influence the HR of tobacco to TMV, as shown by the increased resistance and changes in ODC and PAL activities, indicating the reliability of the present plant model in the study of bioelectromagnetic interactions.

  6. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  7. Involvement of ethylene in alleviation of Cd toxicity by NaCl in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Binglin; Shang, Shenghua; Jabeen, Zahra; Zhang, Guoping

    2014-03-01

    The possible involvement of ethylene in alleviating cadmium (Cd) toxicity by NaCl was investigated because our previous experiments showed that a low concentration of NaCl could alleviate Cd toxicity of tobacco plants. Tobacco plants exposed to the treatment of a combination of Cd-NaCl exhibited more vigorous growth than did those exposed to the treatment of Cd stress alone, as reflected by greater biomass, longer roots, taller shoots, larger SPAD values and higher photosynthetic rates. The results also indicated that it is Na(+), rather than Cl(-), that alleviates Cd toxicity. Cd-NaCl treatments enhanced and inhibited ethylene production in roots and in leaves, respectively, in comparison with the plants exposed to Cd alone. However, the exogenous application of ethylene did not improve root growth under Cd exposure, indicating that ethylene is not directly involved in the rooting process. It may be assumed that the addition of NaCl into the solution containing Cd regulates root growth by mediating ethylene synthesis.

  8. Overexpression of the synthetic chimeric native-T-phylloplanin-GFP genes optimized for monocot and dicot plants renders enhanced resistance to blue mold disease in tobacco (N. tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak K; Raha, Sumita; Hall, James T; Maiti, Indu B

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the natural plant resistance and to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of phylloplanin against blue mold, we have expressed a synthetic chimeric native-phylloplanin-GFP protein fusion in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. KY14, a cultivar that is highly susceptible to infection by Peronospora tabacina. The coding sequence of the tobacco phylloplanin gene along with its native signal peptide was fused with GFP at the carboxy terminus. The synthetic chimeric gene (native-phylloplanin-GFP) was placed between the modified Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter with duplicated enhancer domains and the terminator sequence from the rbcSE9 gene. The chimeric gene, expressed in transgenic tobacco, was stably inherited in successive plant generations as shown by molecular characterization, GFP quantification, and confocal fluorescent microscopy. Transgenic plants were morphologically similar to wild-type plants and showed no deleterious effects due to transgene expression. Blue mold-sensitivity assays of tobacco lines were performed by applying P. tabacina sporangia to the upper leaf surface. Transgenic lines expressing the fused synthetic native-phyllopanin-GFP gene in the leaf apoplast showed resistance to infection. Our results demonstrate that in vivo expression of a synthetic fused native-phylloplanin-GFP gene in plants can potentially achieve natural protection against microbial plant pathogens, including P. tabacina in tobacco.

  9. Genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine enhances thermotolerance of photosystem II in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Wen, Xiaogang; Gong, Hongmei; Lu, Qingtao; Yang, Zhipan; Tang, Yunlai; Liang, Zheng; Lu, Congming

    2007-02-01

    Genetically engineered tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) with the ability to accumulate glycinebetaine was established. The wild type and transgenic plants were exposed to heat treatment (25-50 degrees C) for 4 h in the dark and under growth light intensity (300 mumol m(-2) s(-1)). The analyses of oxygen-evolving activity and chlorophyll fluorescence demonstrated that photosystem II (PSII) in transgenic plants showed higher thermotolerance than in wild type plants in particular when heat stress was performed in the light, suggesting that the accumulation of glycinebetaine leads to increased tolerance to heat-enhanced photoinhibition. This increased tolerance was associated with an improvement on thermostability of the oxygen-evolving complex and the reaction center of PSII. The enhanced tolerance was caused by acceleration of the repair of PSII from heat-enhanced photoinhibition. Under heat stress, there was a significant accumulation of H(2)O(2), O (2) (-) and catalytic Fe in wild type plants but this accumulation was much less in transgenic plants. Heat stress significantly decreased the activities of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monodehydroascorbate reductase in wild type plants whereas the activities of these enzymes either decreased much less or maintained or even increased in transgenic plants. In addition, heat stress increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in wild type plants but this increase was much greater in transgenic plants. Furthermore, transgenic plants also showed higher content of ascorbate and reduced glutathione than that of wild type plants under heat stress. The results suggest that the increased thermotolerance induced by accumulation of glycinebetaine in vivo was associated with the enhancement of the repair of PSII from heat-enhanced photo inhibition, which might be due to less accumulation of reactive oxygen species in transgenic plants.

  10. Constitutive expression of mammalian nitric oxide synthase in tobacco plants triggers disease resistance to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hyun Jin; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Koo, Sung Cheol; Lee, Ju Huck; Park, Chan Young; Choi, Man Soo; Kang, Chang Ho; Baek, Dongwon; Cheong, Yong Hwa; Yun, Dae-Jin; Chung, Woo Sik; Cho, Moo Je; Kim, Min Chul

    2012-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known for its role in the activation of plant defense responses. To examine the involvement and mode of action of NO in plant defense responses, we introduced calmodulin-dependent mammalian neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which controls the CaMV35S promoter, into wild-type and NahG tobacco plants. Constitutive expression of nNOS led to NO production and triggered spontaneous induction of leaf lesions. Transgenic plants accumulated high amounts of H(2)O(2), with catalase activity lower than that in the wild type. nNOS transgenic plants contained high levels of salicylic acid (SA), and they induced an array of SA-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and/or ethylene (ET)-related genes. Consequently, NahG co-expression blocked the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-associated genes in transgenic plants, implying SA is involved in NO-mediated induction of SAR genes. The transgenic plants exhibited enhanced resistance to a spectrum of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Our results suggest a highly ranked regulatory role for NO in SA-, JA-, and/or ET-dependent pathways that lead to disease resistance.

  11. Long-term protection against tobacco mosaic virus induced by the marine alga oligo-sulphated-galactan Poly-Ga in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jeannette; Castro, Jorge; González, Alberto; Barrientos, Herna; Matsuhiro, Betty; Arce, Patricio; Zuñiga, Gustavo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the antiviral effect of the oligo-sulphated galactan Poly-Ga, the leaves of tobacco plants Xhanti(NN) were sprayed with water (control), with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, for increasing numbers of treatments or cultivated for increasing times after treatment. Control and treated plants were infected with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the numbers of necrotic lesions were measured in infected leaves. The number of necrotic lesions decreased with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, with increasing numbers of treatments and with increasing time after treatment, indicating a long-term protection against TMV that mimicks vaccination. In addition, control Xhanti(nn) plants and plants treated with Poly-Ga and cultivated for increasing times after treatment were infected with TMV in the middle part of the plant, and the levels of TMV-capsid protein (CP) transcripts were measured in apical leaves. TMV-CP transcripts decreased in distant leaves, indicating that Poly-Ga induces systemic protection against TMV. The activities of the defence enzymes phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) and the amounts of several phenylpropanoid compounds (PPCs) were measured in control and treated plants without infection. A progressive increase in PAL activity was observed with increasing time after treatment, together with the accumulation of free and conjugated PPCs. In contrast, LOX activity remained unchanged. Interestingly, the increase in PAL activity showed a linear correlation with the decrease in necrotic lesions and the decrease in TMV-CP transcript level. Thus, Poly-Ga induced systemic and long-term protection against TMV in tobacco plants that is determined, at least in part, by a sustained activation of PAL and the accumulation of PPCs with potential antiviral activity.

  12. [Safety assessment of foods derived from genetically modified plants].

    PubMed

    Pöting, A; Schauzu, M

    2010-06-01

    The placing of genetically modified plants and derived food on the market falls under Regulation (EC) No. 1829/2003. According to this regulation, applicants need to perform a safety assessment according to the Guidance Document of the Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which is based on internationally agreed recommendations. This article gives an overview of the underlying legislation as well as the strategy and scientific criteria for the safety assessment, which should generally be based on the concept of substantial equivalence and carried out in relation to an unmodified conventional counterpart. Besides the intended genetic modification, potential unintended changes also have to be assessed with regard to potential adverse effects for the consumer. All genetically modified plants and derived food products, which have been evaluated by EFSA so far, were considered to be as safe as products derived from the respective conventional plants.

  13. Use of buckwheat seed protease inhibitor gene for improvement of tobacco and potato plant resistance to biotic stress.

    PubMed

    Khadeeva, N V; Kochieva, E Z; Tcherednitchenko, M Yu; Yakovleva, E Yu; Sydoruk, K V; Bogush, V G; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A

    2009-03-01

    The possibility to use agrobacterial transformation of leaf discs to produce resistance to bacterial infections in tobacco and potato plants by introduction of a single gene encoding the serine proteinase inhibitor BWI-1a (ISP) from buckwheat seeds is shown. All studied PCR-positive transgenic plants exhibited antibacterial activity in biotests. It was shown that the presence of just a single gene of serine proteinase inhibitor provides sufficient protection at least against two bacterial phytopathogens, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Clavibacter michiganensis sbsp. michiganensis. The biotest including tobacco plant infection by the white wings butterfly in the green house has also demonstrated the existence of protective effect in transgenic tobacco plants. Significant genotypic variations in the protection efficiency were found between members of different genera of the same family (potato and tobacco) as well as between different lines of the same species. Northern blot analysis of four transgenic potato lines and three tobacco lines transformed by a vector plasmid containing the ISP gene of serine proteinases BWI-1a from buckwheat seeds has shown the presence of the expected size mRNA transcript.

  14. Chloride regulates leaf cell size and water relations in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Franco-Navarro, Juan D; Brumós, Javier; Rosales, Miguel A; Cubero-Font, Paloma; Talón, Manuel; Colmenero-Flores, José M

    2016-02-01

    Chloride (Cl(-)) is a micronutrient that accumulates to macronutrient levels since it is normally available in nature and actively taken up by higher plants. Besides a role as an unspecific cell osmoticum, no clear biological roles have been explicitly associated with Cl(-) when accumulated to macronutrient concentrations. To address this question, the glycophyte tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Habana) has been treated with a basal nutrient solution supplemented with one of three salt combinations containing the same cationic balance: Cl(-)-based (CL), nitrate-based (N), and sulphate+phosphate-based (SP) treatments. Under non-saline conditions (up to 5 mM Cl(-)) and no water limitation, Cl(-) specifically stimulated higher leaf cell size and led to a moderate increase of plant fresh and dry biomass mainly due to higher shoot expansion. When applied in the 1-5 mM range, Cl(-) played specific roles in regulating leaf osmotic potential and turgor, allowing plants to improve leaf water balance parameters. In addition, Cl(-) also altered water relations at the whole-plant level through reduction of plant transpiration. This was a consequence of a lower stomatal conductance, which resulted in lower water loss and greater photosynthetic and integrated water-use efficiency. In contrast to Cl(-), these effects were not observed for essential anionic macronutrients such as nitrate, sulphate, and phosphate. We propose that the abundant uptake and accumulation of Cl(-) responds to adaptive functions improving water homeostasis in higher plants.

  15. Exploration of horizontal gene transfer between transplastomic tobacco and plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Monier, Jean-Michel; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-10-01

    The likelihood of gene transfer from transgenic plants to bacteria is dependent on the transgene copy number and on the presence of homologous sequences for recombination. The large number of chloroplast genomes in a plant cell as well as the prokaryotic origin of the transgene may thus significantly increase the likelihood of gene transfer from transplastomic plants to bacteria. In order to assess the probability of such a transfer, bacterial isolates, screened for their ability to colonize decaying tobacco plant tissue and possessing DNA sequence similarity to the chloroplastic genes accD and rbcL flanking the transgene (aadA), were tested for their ability to take up extracellular DNA (broad host-range pBBR1MCS-3-derived plasmid, transplastomic plant DNA and PCR products containing the genes accD-aadA-rbcL) by natural or electrotransformation. The results showed that among the 16 bacterial isolates tested, six were able to accept foreign DNA and acquire the spectinomycin resistance conferred by the aadA gene on plasmid, but none of them managed to integrate transgenic DNA in their chromosome. Our results provide no indication that the theoretical gene transfer-enhancing properties of transplastomic plants cause horizontal gene transfer at rates above those found in other studies with nuclear transgenes.

  16. Expression of a calmodulin methylation mutant affects the growth and development of transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D M; Besl, L; Oh, S H; Masterson, R V; Schell, J; Stacey, G

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic plants were constructed that express two foreign calmodulins (VU-1 and VU-3 calmodulins) derived from a cloned synthetic calmodulin gene. VU-1 calmodulin, similar to endogenous plant calmodulin, possesses a lysine residue at position 115 and undergoes posttranslational methylation. VU-3 calmodulin is a site-directed mutant of VU-1 calmodulin that is identical in sequence except for the substitution of an arginine at position 115 and thus is incapable of methylation. Both calmodulin genes, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, were expressed in transgenic tobacco. Foreign calmodulin protein accumulated in plant tissues to levels equivalent to that of the endogenous calmodulin. All transformed lines of VU-1 plants were indistinguishable from untransformed controls with respect to growth and development. However, all transformed lines of VU-3 plants were characterized by decreased stem internode growth, reduced seed production, and reduced seed and pollen viability. The data suggest that these phenotypes are the result of the expression of the calmodulin mutant rather than the position of transferred DNA insertion or the overall alteration of calmodulin levels. Analyses of the activity of the purified transgenic calmodulins suggest that calmodulin-dependent NAD kinase is among the potential targets that may have altered regulation in VU-3 transgenic plants. Images PMID:1325656

  17. Colocalization of barley lectin and sporamin in vacuoles of transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, M.R.; Borkhsenious, O.N.; Raikhel, N.V. ); Matsuoka, K.; Nakamura, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Various targeting motifs have been identified for plant proteins delivered to the vacuole. For barley (Hordeum vulgare) lectin, a typical Gramineae lectin and defense-related protein, the vacuolar information is contained in a carboxyl-terminal propeptide. In contrast, the vacuolar targeting information of sporamin, a storage protein from the tuberous roots of the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), is encoded in an amino-terminal propeptide. Both proteins were expressed simultaneously in transgenic tobacco plants to enable analysis of their posttranslational processing and subcellular localization by pulse-chase labeling and electron-microscopic immunocytochemical methods. The pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that processing and delivery to the vacuole are not impaired by the simultaneous expression of barley lectin and sporamin. Both proteins were targeted quantitatively to the vacuole, indication that the carboxyl-terminal and amino-terminal propeptided are equally recognized by the vacuolar protein-sorting machinery. Double-labeling experiments showed that barley lectin and sporamin accumulate in the same vacuole of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf and root cells. 35 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Contribution of AM inoculation and cattle manure to lead and cadmium phytoremediation by tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fa Yuan; Shi, Zhao Yong; Xu, Xiao Feng; Wang, Xu Gang; Li, You Jun

    2013-04-01

    Lead and cadmium are both highly toxic pollutants and pose potential risks to the environment and human health. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) inoculation and organic amendments may make a potential contribution to phytoremediation of these toxic metals, but their effects remain unclear. We conducted a pot culture experiment to study the contribution of AM inoculation and/or cattle manure to phytoremediation of two soils artificially polluted with 0, 350, 500 and 1000 mg Pb per kg soil or 0, 1, 10, 100 mg Cd per kg soil using tobacco plants. Results showed that AM colonization was greatly reduced when exposed to more heavy metals especially Cd, whereas organic amendment alleviated metal stress and showed protective effects. In general, AM inoculation and cattle manure, singly or in combination, all significantly increased tobacco growth and Pb and Cd accumulation in shoots and roots, while decreased DTPA-extractable Pb and Cd concentrations in soil, and combination treatments (MN) produced the most pronounced positive effects. Improved plant P nutrition, higher soil pH and lower available metal concentrations contributed by AM inoculation and/or organic amendment may be the main strategies to alleviate metal toxicity and enhance phytoremediation efficiency. Our results indicate that AM fungi and organic manure play a synergistic positive role both in phytoextraction and phytostabilization of Cd and Pb.

  19. Posttranslationally modified small-peptide signals in plants.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell signaling is essential for many processes in plant growth and development, including coordination of cellular responses to developmental and environmental cues. Cumulative studies have demonstrated that peptide signaling plays a greater-than-anticipated role in such intercellular communication. Some peptides act as signals during plant growth and development, whereas others are involved in defense responses or symbiosis. Peptides secreted as signals often undergo posttranslational modification and proteolytic processing to generate smaller peptides composed of approximately 10 amino acid residues. Such posttranslationally modified small-peptide signals constitute one of the largest groups of secreted peptide signals in plants. The location of the modification group incorporated into the peptides by specific modification enzymes and the peptide chain length defined by the processing enzymes are critical for biological function and receptor interaction. This review covers 20 years of research into posttranslationally modified small-peptide signals in plants.

  20. Effects of tobacco ethylene receptor mutations on receptor kinase activity, plant growth and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Liu, Jun; Lei, Gang; Liu, Yun-Feng; Li, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Jian-Jun; Hao, Yu-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Lin, Qing; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2009-09-01

    Ethylene receptor is the first component of ethylene signaling that regulates plant growth, development and stress responses. Previously, we have demonstrated that tobacco subfamily 2 ethylene receptor NTHK1 had Ser/Thr kinase activity, and overexpression of NTHK1 caused large rosette, reduced ethylene sensitivity, and increased salt sensitivity in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Here we found that N-box mutation in the NTHK1 kinase domain abolished the kinase activity and led to disruption of NTHK1 roles in conferring reduced ethylene sensitivity and salt sensitive response in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. However, N-box mutation had partial effects on NTHK1 regulation of rosette growth and expression of salt- and ethylene-responsive genes AtNAC2, AtERF1 and AtCor6.6. Mutation of conserved residues in the H box did not affect kinase activity, seedling growth, ethylene sensitivity or salt-induced epinasty in transgenic plants but did influence NTHK1 function in control of specific salt- and ethylene-responsive gene expression. Compared with NTHK1, the tobacco subfamily 1 ethylene receptor NtETR1 had His kinase activity and played a weak role in regulation of rosette growth, triple response and salt response. Mutation of the conserved His residue in the NtETR1 H box eliminated phosphorylation and altered the effect of Ntetr1-1 on reporter gene activity. These results imply that the Ser/Thr kinase activity of NTHK1 is differentially required for various responses, and NTHK1 plays a larger role than NtETR1.

  1. [Morphological analysis of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra)].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Safiullina, M G; Kniazev, A V; Chemeris, A V

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra), which encodes alpha-expansin, were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increased size of epidermic and mesophyll cells of leaves. However, the size of leaves remained normal. Overexpression of the PnEXPA3 gene provided stimulatory effect only on the stem length. Other morphological traits of the transgenic plants remained unchanged.

  2. [Effects of soil, climate, and their interaction on some neutral volatile aroma components in flue-cured tobacco leaves from high quality tobacco planting regions of Hunan Province].

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiao-Hua; Xie, Peng-Fei; Peng, Xin-Hui; Yi, Jian-Hua; Zhou, Ji-Heng; Zhou, Qing-Ming; Pu, Wen-Xuan; Dai, Yuan-Gang

    2010-08-01

    A pot experiment with the soils from Yongzhou, Liuyang, and Sangzhi, the high-quality tobacco planting regions of Hunan Province, was conducted to study the effects of climate, soil, and their interaction on some neutral volatile aroma components in flue-cured tobacco leaves. The contents of test neutral volatile aroma components in the flue-cured tobacco leaves were of medium variation, and the variation intensity was decreased in the order of dihydroactinolide, damascenone, furfural, total megastigmatrienone, and beta-ionone. Climate, soil, and their interaction affected the neutral volatile aroma components in different degrees. The furfural content was most affected by climate, the damascenone content was most affected by climate and by soil, the total megastigmatrienone and beta-ionone contents were most affected by the interaction of soil and climate, while the dihydroactinolide content was less affected by soil, climate, and their interaction. The contribution of climate, soil, and their interaction to the contents of the five aroma components was 40.82%, 20.67%, and 38.51%, respectively. During different growth periods of tobacco, different climate factors had different effects on the neutral volatile aroma components. The rainfall, cloudiness, and mean air temperature at rooting stage, the diurnal temperature amplitude, sunshine time, and evaporation at vigorous growth stage, and the rainfall, evaporation, and mean air temperature at maturing stage were the top three climate factors affecting the contents of the neutral volatile aroma components in flue-tobacco leaves. For the soil factors, the available potassium, available phosphorus, and pH were the top three factors affecting the contents of the five components.

  3. Effects of root-zone acidity on utilization of nitrate and ammonium in tobacco plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. 'Coker 319') plants were grown for 28 days in flowing nutrient culture containing either 1.0 mM NO3- or 1.0 mM NH4+ as the nitrogen source in a complete nutrient solution. Acidities of the solutions were controlled at pH 6.0 or 4.0 for each nitrogen source. Plants were sampled at intervals of 6 to 8 days for determination of dry matter and nitrogen accumulation. Specific rates of NO3- or NH4+ uptake (rate of uptake per unit root mass) were calculated from these data. Net photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area were measured on attached leaves by infrared gas analysis. When NO3- [correction of NO-] was the sole nitrogen source, root growth and nitrogen uptake rate were unaffected by pH of the solution, and photosynthetic activity of leaves and accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in the whole plant were similar. When NH4+ was the nitrogen source, photosynthetic rate of leaves and accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in the whole plant were not statistically different from NO3(-) -fed plants when acidity of the solution was controlled at pH 6.0. When acidity for NH4(+) -fed plants was increased to pH 4.0, however, specific rate of NH4+ uptake decreased by about 50% within the first 6 days of treatment. The effect of acidity on root function was associated with a decreased rate of accumulation of nitrogen in shoots that was accompanied by a rapid cessation of leaf development between days 6 and 13. The decline in leaf growth rate of NH4(+) -fed plants at pH 4.0 was followed by reductions in photosynthetic rate per unit leaf area. These responses of NH4(+) -fed plants to increased root-zone acidity are characteristic of the sequence of responses that occur during onset of nitrogen stress.

  4. Characterization of photosystem II photochemistry in transgenic tobacco plants with lowered Rubisco activase content.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Zhang, Aihong; Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2010-11-15

    Rubisco activase plays an important role in the regulation of CO(2) assimilation. However, it is unknown how activase regulates photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry. To investigate the effects of Rubisco activase on PSII photochemistry, we obtained transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with 50% (i7), 25% (i28), and 5% (i46) activase levels as compared to wild type plants by using a gene encoding tobacco activase for the RNAi construct. Both CO(2) assimilation and PSII activity were significantly reduced only in transgenic i28 and i46 plants, suggesting that activase deficiency led to decreased PSII activity. Flash-induced fluorescence kinetics indicated that activase deficiency resulted in a slow electron transfer between Q(A) (primary quinine electron acceptor of PSII) and Q(B) (secondary quinone electron acceptor of PSII). Thermoluminescence measurements revealed that activase deficiency induced a shift of S(2)Q(A)(-) and S(2)Q(B)(-) recombinations to higher temperatures in parallel, and a decrease in the intensities of the thermoluminescence emissions. Activase deficiency also dampened the period-four oscillation of the thermoluminescence B-band. Protein gel blot analysis showed that activase deficiency resulted in a significant decrease in the content of D1, D2, CP43, CP47, and PsbO proteins. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that activase deficiency induced a significant decrease in the number of grana stacks per chloroplast and discs per grana stack. Our results suggest that activase plays an important role in maintaining PSII function and chloroplast development.

  5. USE OF MODELING APPROACHES TO UNDERSTAND POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED PLANTS ON PLANT COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model development is of interest to ecologists, regulators and developers, since it may assist theoretical understanding, decision making in experimental design, product development and risk assessment. In order to predict the potential impacts of genetically modified (GM) plants...

  6. Molecular control of transgene escape from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, V; Koivu, K; Kanerva, A; Pehu, E

    2001-02-05

    Potential risks of gene escape from transgenic crops through pollen and seed dispersal are being actively discussed and have slowed down full utilization of gene technology in crop improvement. To ban the transgene flow, barren zones and 'terminator' technology were developed as GMO risk management technologies in transgenic crops. Unfortunately, the technologies have not protected reliably the transgene migration to wild relatives. The present study offers a novel molecular technique to eliminate gene flow from transgenic plants to wild relatives by recoverable block of function (RBF). The RBF consists of a blocking sequence linked to the gene of interest and a recovering sequence, all in one transformable construct. The blocking sequence blocks a certain molecular or physiological function of the host plant. Action of the blocking sequence leads to the death of the host plant or to an alteration in its phenotype resulting in inability for sexual reproduction in nature. The recovering construct recovers the blocked function of the host plant. The recovering construct is regulated externally by a specific chemical or physical treatment of the plants and does not act under natural conditions. In nature, hybrids of the transgenic plants with its wild relatives carrying the RBF will die or be unable to reproduce because of the blocking construct action. A working model of RBF is described in this report as one example of the RBF concept. This RBF example is based on barnase (the blocking construct) and barstar (the recovering construct) gene expression in tobacco under sulfhydryl endopeptidase (SH-EP) and a heat shock (HS) promoter, respectively.

  7. Light-dependent regulation of chlorophyll b biosynthesis in chlorophyllide a oxygenase overexpressing tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Gopal K; Biswal, Ajaya K; Reddy, Vanga S; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2005-01-14

    Chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO) that converts chlorophyllide a to chlorophyllide b was overexpressed in tobacco to increase chlorophyll (Chl) b biosynthesis and alter the Chl a/b ratio. Transgenic plants along with their wild-type cultivars were grown in low and high light intensities. In low light there was 20% increase in chlorophyll b contents in transgenic plants, which resulted in 16% reduction in the Chl a/b ratio. In high light, total Chl contents were 31% higher in transgenic plants than those of wild type. The increase in Chl a was 19% and that of Chl b was 72% leading to 31% decline of Chl a/b ratio. The increase in Chl b contents was accompanied by enhanced CAO expression that was highly pronounced in low light. As compared to low light, in high light Lhcb1 and Chl a/b transcripts abundance was significantly increased in transgenic plants suggesting a close relationship between Chl b synthesis and cab gene expression. However, there was a small increase in expression of LHCII proteins, which did not correspond to 72% increase in Chl b content in transgenic line, implying that LHCPII has the ability to bind more Chl b molecules.

  8. Expression of a chitinase gene from Metarhizium anisopliae in tobacco plants confers resistance against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kern, Marcelo Fernando; Maraschin, Simone de Faria; Vom Endt, Débora; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Pasquali, Giancarlo

    2010-04-01

    The chit1 gene from the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, encoding the endochitinase CHIT42, was placed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, and the resulting construct was transferred to tobacco. Seventeen kanamycin-resistant transgenic lines were recovered, and the presence of the transgene was confirmed by polymerase chain reactions and Southern blot hybridization. The number of chit1 copies was determined to be varying from one to four. Copy number had observable effects neither on plant growth nor development. Substantial heterogeneity concerning production of the recombinant chitinase, and both general and specific chitinolytic activities were detected in leaf extracts from primary transformants. The highest chitinase activities were found in plants harboring two copies of chit1 inserts at different loci. Progeny derived from self-pollination of the primary transgenics revealed a stable inheritance pattern, with transgene segregation following a mendelian dihybrid ratio. Two selected plants expressing high levels of CHIT42 were consistently resistant to the soilborne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, suggesting a direct relationship between enzyme activity and reduction of foliar area affected by fungal lesions. To date, this is the first report of resistance to fungal attack in plants mediated by a recombinant chitinase from an entomopathogenic and acaricide fungus.

  9. Enhanced Whitefly Resistance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Expressing Double Stranded RNA of v-ATPase A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Nidhi; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verma, Praveen C.; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa; Tuli, Rakesh; Singh, Pradhyumna K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA) designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi), thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA) coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. Conclusions/Significance Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops. PMID:24595215

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa YC0136, a Plant Growth–Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Tobacco Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Liu, Kai; Li, Yuhuan; Wang, Chengqiang; Hou, Qihui; Xu, Wenfeng; Fan, Lingchao; Zhao, Jian; Gou, Jianyu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paenibacillus polymyxa strain YC0136 is a plant growth–promoting rhizobacterium with antimicrobial activity, which was isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of P. polymyxa YC0136. Several genes with antifungal and antibacterial activity were discovered. PMID:28183774

  11. Overexpression of the Wheat Expansin Gene TaEXPA2 Improved Seed Production and Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanhui; Han, Yangyang; Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Shan; Kong, Xiangzhu; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Expansins are cell wall proteins that are grouped into two main families, α-expansins and β-expansins, and they are implicated in the control of cell extension via the disruption of hydrogen bonds between cellulose and matrix glucans. TaEXPA2 is an α-expansin gene identified in wheat. Based on putative cis-regulatory elements in the TaEXPA2 promoter sequence and the expression pattern induced when polyethylene glycol (PEG) is used to mimic water stress, we hypothesized that TaEXPA2 is involved in plant drought tolerance and plant development. Through transient expression of 35S::TaEXPA2-GFP in onion epidermal cells, TaEXPA2 was localized to the cell wall. Constitutive expression of TaEXPA2 in tobacco improved seed production by increasing capsule number, not seed size, without having any effect on plant growth patterns. The transgenic tobacco exhibited a significantly greater tolerance to water-deficiency stress than did wild-type (WT) plants. We found that under drought stress, the transgenic plants maintained a better water status. The accumulated content of osmotic adjustment substances, such as proline, in TaEXPA2 transgenic plants was greater than that in WT plants. Transgenic plants also displayed greater antioxidative competence as indicated by their lower malondialdehyde (MDA) content, relative electrical conductivity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation than did WT plants. This result suggests that the transgenic plants suffer less damage from ROS under drought conditions. The activities of some antioxidant enzymes as well as expression levels of several genes encoding key antioxidant enzymes were higher in the transgenic plants than in the WT plants under drought stress. Collectively, our results suggest that ectopic expression of the wheat expansin gene TaEXPA2 improves seed production and drought tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants.

  12. The Expression of a Xylanase Targeted to ER-Protein Bodies Provides a Simple Strategy to Produce Active Insoluble Enzyme Polymers in Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Llop-Tous, Immaculada; Ortiz, Miriam; Torrent, Margarita; Ludevid, M. Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Background Xylanases deserve particular attention due to their potential application in the feed, pulp bleaching and paper industries. We have developed here an efficient system for the production of an active xylanase in tobacco plants fused to a proline-rich domain (Zera) of the maize storage protein γ-zein. Zera is a self-assembling domain able to form protein aggregates in vivo packed in newly formed endoplasmic reticulum-derived organelles known as protein bodies (PBs). Methodology/Principal Findings Tobacco leaves were transiently transformed with a binary vector containing the Zera-xylanase coding region, which was optimized for plant expression, under the control of the 35S CaMV promoter. The fusion protein was efficiently expressed and stored in dense PBs, resulting in yields of up to 9% of total protein. Zera-xylanase was post-translationally modified with high-mannose-type glycans. Xylanase fused to Zera was biologically active not only when solubilized from PBs but also in its insoluble form. The resistance of insoluble Zera-xylanase to trypsin digestion demonstrated that the correct folding of xylanase in PBs was not impaired by Zera oligomerization. The activity of insoluble Zera-xylanase was enhanced when substrate accessibility was facilitated by physical treatments such as ultrasound. Moreover, we found that the thermostability of the enzyme was improved when Zera was fused to the C-terminus of xylanase. Conclusion/Significance In the present work we have successfully produced an active insoluble aggregate of xylanase fused to Zera in plants. Zera-xylanase chimeric protein accumulates within ER-derived protein bodies as active aggregates that can easily be recovered by a simple density-based downstream process. The production of insoluble active Zera-xylanase protein in tobacco outlines the potential of Zera as a fusion partner for producing enzymes of biotechnological relevance. Zera-PBs could thus become efficient and low-cost bioreactors for

  13. Homogalacturonan-modifying enzymes: structure, expression, and roles in plants

    PubMed Central

    Sénéchal, Fabien; Wattier, Christopher; Rustérucci, Christine; Pelloux, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the changes affecting the plant cell wall is a key element in addressing its functional role in plant growth and in the response to stress. Pectins, which are the main constituents of the primary cell wall in dicot species, play a central role in the control of cellular adhesion and thereby of the rheological properties of the wall. This is likely to be a major determinant of plant growth. How the discrete changes in pectin structure are mediated is thus a key issue in our understanding of plant development and plant responses to changes in the environment. In particular, understanding the remodelling of homogalacturonan (HG), the most abundant pectic polymer, by specific enzymes is a current challenge in addressing its fundamental role. HG, a polymer that can be methylesterified or acetylated, can be modified by HGMEs (HG-modifying enzymes) which all belong to large multigenic families in all species sequenced to date. In particular, both the degrees of substitution (methylesterification and/or acetylation) and polymerization can be controlled by specific enzymes such as pectin methylesterases (PMEs), pectin acetylesterases (PAEs), polygalacturonases (PGs), or pectate lyases-like (PLLs). Major advances in the biochemical and functional characterization of these enzymes have been made over the last 10 years. This review aims to provide a comprehensive, up to date summary of the recent data concerning the structure, regulation, and function of these fascinating enzymes in plant development and in response to biotic stresses. PMID:25056773

  14. An antiviral RISC isolated from Tobacco rattle virus-infected plants

    PubMed Central

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Omarov, Rustem T.; Scholthof, Herman B.

    2011-01-01

    The RNAi model predicts that during antiviral defense a RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is programmed with viral short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to target the cognate viral RNA for degradation. We show that infection of Nicotiana benthamiana with Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) activates an antiviral nuclease that specifically cleaves TRV RNA in vitro. In agreement with known RISC properties, the nuclease activity was inhibited by NaCl and EDTA and stimulated by divalent metal cations; a novel property was its preferential targeting of elongated RNA molecules. Intriguingly, the specificity of the TRV RISC could be re-programmed by exogenous addition of RNA (containing siRNAs) from plants infected with an unrelated virus, resulting in a newly acquired ability of RISC to target this heterologous genome in vitro. Evidently the virus-specific nuclease complex from N. benthamiana represents a genuine RISC that functions as a readily employable and reprogrammable antiviral defense unit. PMID:21272908

  15. Over-expression of Arabidopsis CAP causes decreased cell expansion leading to organ size reduction in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Barrero, Roberto A; Umeda, Masaaki; Yamamura, Saburo; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2003-04-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAP) are multifunctional proteins involved in Ras-cAMP signalling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. It has recently been demonstrated that over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic arabidopsis plants causes severe morphological defects owing to loss of actin filaments. To test the generality of the function of AtCAP1 in plants, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing an arabidopsis CAP (AtCAP1) under the regulation of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter were produced. Over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic tobacco plants led to growth abnormalities, in particular a reduction in the size of leaves. Morphological alterations in leaves were the result of reduced elongation of epidermal and mesophyll cells.

  16. [The creation of transgenic tobacco plants expressing fragments of the ARGOS and NtEXPA4 genes in antisense orientation].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Postrigan', B N; Chemeris, A V

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the fragments of the ARGOS and NtEXPA4 genes in antisense orientation have been created. Eleven lines of transgenic plants were investigated and five of them were characterized by a decrease in the sizes of the leaves and flowers as compared to control. Stalk sizes decreased when only the NtEXPA4 gene fragment was used. The organ size of the experimental plants decreased because of a reduction in the level of both cell division and cell expansion. Two lines of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the part of the ARGOS gene in antisense orientation were characterized by a reduction in the level of the NtEXPA1 and NtEXPA4 gene expression.

  17. A plasma-membrane linker for the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kimiyo; Sano, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We previously screened genes that were transcriptionally activated during the early stage of wound response in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum), and isolated a particular clone, which encoded a membrane-located protein, designated as NtC7. Upon overexpression in tobacco plants, NtC7 conferred a marked tolerance to osmotic stress, suggesting it to be involved in maintenance of osmotic adjustments. In this study, we searched for proteins which interact with NtC7 by the yeast two-hybrid screening, and isolated a clone encoding phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, designated as NtPI-PLC. Physical interaction between NtC7 and C2 domain of NtPI-PLC was confirmed by the pull-down assay. Expression of fused protein to green-fluorescence protein in onion epidermal cell layers indicated both proteins to predominantly localize to the plasma membrane. Their interaction in planta was shown by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation, which exhibited a clear fluorescence of reconstituted yellow fluorescence protein. Transcripts of NtC7 and NtPI-PLC were markedly increased 30 to 60 min after wounding. PI-PLC is one of key enzymes in metabolism of inositol phospholipids, which function in signal transduction and also in response to stresses including osmotic changes. It was shown to localize to plasma-membrane and, to a lesser extent, to cytosol. However, molecular mechanism of membrane localization has remained to be determined, because of the apparent lack of domains for membrane association. The present results suggest that one of such mechanisms is tethering NtPI-PLC to the plasma membrane through interaction with NtC7, which possesses a transmembrane domain at the C-terminus.

  18. Molecular sensing of bacteria in plants. The highly conserved RNA-binding motif RNP-1 of bacterial cold shock proteins is recognized as an elicitor signal in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Felix, Georg; Boller, Thomas

    2003-02-21

    To detect microbial infection multicellular organisms have evolved sensing systems for pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Here, we identify bacterial cold shock protein (CSP) as a new such PAMP that acts as a highly active elicitor of defense responses in tobacco. Tobacco cells perceive a conserved domain of CSP and synthetic peptides representing 15 amino acids of this domain-induced responses at subnanomolar concentrations. Central to the elicitor-active domain is the RNP-1 motif KGFGFITP, a motif conserved also in many RNA- and DNA-binding proteins of eukaryotes. Csp15-Nsyl, a peptide representing the domain with highest homology to csp15 in a protein of Nicotiana sylvestris exhibited only weak activity in tobacco cells. Crystallographic and genetic data from the literature show that the RNP-1 domain of bacterial CSPs resides on a protruding loop and exposes a series of aromatic and basic side chains to the surface that are essential for the nucleotide-binding activity of CSPs. Similarly, these side chains were also essential for elicitor activity and replacement of single residues in csp15 with Ala strongly reduced or abolished activity. Most strikingly, csp15-Ala10, a peptide with the RNP-1 motif modified to KGAGFITP, lacked elicitor activity but acted as a competitive antagonist for CSP-related elicitors. Bacteria commonly have a small family of CSP-like proteins including both cold-inducible and noninducible members, and Csp-related elicitor activity was detected in extracts from all bacteria tested. Thus, the CSP domain containing the RNP-1 motif provides a structure characteristic for bacteria in general, and tobacco plants have evolved a highly sensitive chemoperception system to detect this bacterial PAMP.

  19. Modified artificial diet for rearing of tobacco budworm, Helicoverpa armigera, using the Taguchi method and Derringer's desirability function.

    PubMed

    Assemi, H; Rezapanah, M; Vafaei-Shoushtari, R; Mehrvar, A

    2012-01-01

    With the aim to improve the mass rearing feasibility of tobacco budworm, Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), design of experimental methodology using Taguchi orthogonal array was applied. To do so, the effect of 16 ingredients of an artificial diet including bean, wheat germ powder, Nipagin, ascorbic acid, formaldehyde, oil, agar, distilled water, ascorbate, yeast, chloramphenicol, benomyl, penicillin, temperature, humidity, and container size on some biological characteristics of H. armigera was evaluated. The selected 16 factors were considered at two levels (32 experiments) in the experimental design. Among the selected factors, penicillin, container size, formaldehyde, chloramphenicol, wheat germ powder, and agar showed significant effect on the mass rearing performance. Derringer's desirability function was used for simultaneous optimization of mass rearing of tobacco budworm, H. armigera, on a modified artificial diet. Derived optimum operating conditions obtained by Derringer's desirability function and Taguchi methodology decreased larval period from 19 to 15.5 days (18.42 % improvement), decreased the pupal period from 12.29 to 11 days (10.49 % improvement), increased the longevity of adults from 14.51 to 21 days (44.72 % improvement), increased the number of eggs/female from 211.21 to 260, and increased egg hatchability from 54.2% to 72% (32.84 % improvement). The proposed method facilitated a systematic mathematical approach with a few well-defined experimental sets.

  20. Modified Artificial Diet for Rearing of Tobacco Budworm, Helicoverpa armigera, using the Taguchi Method and Derringer's Desirability Function

    PubMed Central

    Assemi, H.; Rezapanah, M.; Vafaei-Shoushtari, R.

    2012-01-01

    With the aim to improve the mass rearing feasibility of tobacco budworm, Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), design of experimental methodology using Taguchi orthogonal array was applied. To do so, the effect of 16 ingredients of an artificial diet including bean, wheat germ powder, Nipagin, ascorbic acid, formaldehyde, oil, agar, distilled water, ascorbate, yeast, chloramphenicol, benomyl, penicillin, temperature, humidity, and container size on some biological characteristics of H. armigera was evaluated. The selected 16 factors were considered at two levels (32 experiments) in the experimental design. Among the selected factors, penicillin, container size, formaldehyde, chloramphenicol, wheat germ powder, and agar showed significant effect on the mass rearing performance. Derringer's desirability function was used for simultaneous optimization of mass rearing of tobacco budworm, H. armigera, on a modified artificial diet. Derived optimum operating conditions obtained by Derringer's desirability function and Taguchi methodology decreased larval period from 19 to 15.5 days (18.42 % improvement), decreased the pupal period from 12.29 to 11 days (10.49 % improvement), increased the longevity of adults from 14.51 to 21 days (44.72 % improvement), increased the number of eggs/female from 211.21 to 260, and increased egg hatchability from 54.2% to 72% (32.84 % improvement). The proposed method facilitated a systematic mathematical approach with a few well-defined experimental sets. PMID:23425103

  1. Ascorbate oxidase-dependent changes in the redox state of the apoplast modulate gene transcript accumulation leading to modified hormone signaling and orchestration of defense processes in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Pignocchi, Cristina; Kiddle, Guy; Hernández, Iker; Foster, Simon J; Asensi, Amparo; Taybi, Tahar; Barnes, Jeremy; Foyer, Christine H

    2006-06-01

    The role of the redox state of the apoplast in hormone responses, signaling cascades, and gene expression was studied in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with modified cell wall-localized ascorbate oxidase (AO). High AO activity specifically decreased the ascorbic acid (AA) content of the apoplast and altered plant growth responses triggered by hormones. Auxin stimulated shoot growth only when the apoplastic AA pool was reduced in wild-type or AO antisense lines. Oxidation of apoplastic AA in AO sense lines was associated with loss of the auxin response, higher mitogen-activated protein kinase activities, and susceptibility to a virulent strain of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The total leaf glutathione pool, the ratio of reduced glutathione to glutathione disulfide, and glutathione reductase activities were similar in the leaves of all lines. However, AO sense leaves exhibited significantly lower dehydroascorbate reductase and ascorbate peroxidase activities than wild-type and antisense leaves. The abundance of mRNAs encoding antioxidant enzymes was similar in all lines. However, the day/night rhythms in the abundance of transcripts encoding the three catalase isoforms were changed in response to the AA content of the apoplast. Other transcripts influenced by AO included photorespiratory genes and a plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel-associated gene. We conclude that the redox state of the apoplast modulates plant growth and defense responses by regulating signal transduction cascades and gene expression patterns. Hence, AO activity, which modulates the redox state of the apoplastic AA pool, strongly influences the responses of plant cells to external and internal stimuli.

  2. [Effects of different planting patterns on the senescence characteristics of flue-cured tobacco roots and leaves].

    PubMed

    Yang, Tie-zhao; Yang, Zhi-xiao; Ke, You-song; Wu, Wen-bin; Zhang, Xio-quan; Qiu, Miao-wen

    2009-12-01

    With flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivar K326 as test material, a field experiment was conducted at Nanxiong area of Guangdong Province in 2008 to study the effects of four planting patterns, i.e., single-row ridge + film mulching at early stage, single-row ridge + film mulching at early and late stages, double-row concave ridge + film mulching at early stage, and double-row concave ridge + film mulching at early and late stages, on the senescence characteristics of its roots and leaves, and the economic traits of its leaves. Comparing with other three planting patterns, double-row concave ridge + film Aulching at early and late stages promoted the root growth of test cultivar during its whole growth period, with the root vigor increased significantly. Meanwhile, the leaf chlorophyll content and protective enzymes (SOD and POD) activities were higher, and the MDA content was lower. The leaf yield, output value, average price, and the proportion of superior leaves were also higher. Double-row concave ridge + film mulching at early and late stages alleviated the senescence characteristics of roots and leaves, and improved the economic traits of flue-cured tobacco leaves, being the efficient planting pattern to product high-quality flue-cured tobacco leaves in Nanxiong tobacco-growing area of Guangdong Province.

  3. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation. PMID:25941315

  4. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation.

  5. Photosynthesis is improved by exogenous calcium in heat-stressed tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Meng, Qing wei; Brestic, Marian; Olsovska, Katarina; Yang, Xinghong

    2011-11-15

    Effects of exogenous calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) (20 mM) on photosynthetic gas exchange, photosystem II photochemistry, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes in tobacco plants under high temperature stress (43°C for 2 h) were investigated. Heat stress resulted in a decrease in net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), stomatal conductance as well as the apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of photosynthesis. Heat stress also caused a decrease of the maximal photochemical efficiency of primary photochemistry (F(v)/F(m)). On the other hand, CaCl(2) application improved P(n), AQY, and CE as well as F(v)/F(m) under high temperature stress. Heat stress reduced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), peroxidase (POD), whereas the activities of these enzymes either decreased less or increased in plants pretreated with CaCl(2); glutathione reductase (GR) activity increased under high temperature, and it increased more in plants pretreated with CaCl(2). There was an obvious accumulation of H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) under high temperature, but CaCl(2) application decreased the contents of H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) under heat stress conditions. Heat stress induced the level of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), while CaCl(2) pretreatment enhanced it. These results suggested that photosynthesis was improved by CaCl(2) application in heat-stressed plants and such an improvement was associated with an improvement in stomatal conductance and the thermostability of oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), which might be due to less accumulation of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Rapid and proven production of transplastomic tobacco plants by restoration of pigmentation and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Sebastian M J; Huang, Fong-Chin; Eibl, Christian; Koop, Hans-Ulrich; Golds, Timothy J

    2003-09-01

    Tobacco chloroplast transformation is typically achieved using dominant, selectable antibiotic resistance genes such as aadA, nptII and aphA-6. An improvement would be the combination of such a marker with a visual screening system for the early and conclusive detection of plastid transformants. As such, we investigated the use of three photosynthesis-deficient plastid mutants, DeltapetA, Deltaycf3 and DeltarpoA, for the development of a phenotypic selection system. Mutant plants were used as an alternative to the wild-type as source tissue for transformation, re-introducing deleted plastid sequences and using the aphA-6 gene as a selection marker. The reconstitution of the deleted genes in transformed regenerants resulted in shoots with a visually distinct phenotype comparable to the wild-type. This transformation/selection system overcomes the common problems associated with plastid transformation, e.g. the recovery of spontaneous mutants or nuclear insertions. In addition to the benefits offered by phenotypic selection, phenotype reconstitution leads to restoration of photosynthesis, which we assume drives reconstituted plants rapidly towards homoplasmy. As such, repeated cycles of regeneration in the presence of an antibiotic selection agent are no longer required.

  7. Accumulation of plant antenna complexes is regulated by post-transcriptional mechanisms in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Flachmann, R; Kühlbrandt, W

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing antisense RNA directed against the multigene family of the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII) were raised and analyzed biochemically and physiologically. A partial 5' terminal sequence with 509 nucleotides complementary to cab (chlorophyll a/b binding protein) genes reduced the amount of transcript to almost undectectable levels. We demonstrated for endogenous genes that a 5' terminal sequence with only 52 to 105 nucleotides complementary to the transit sequence of cab can be equally efficient in gene repression. Chlorophyll content and chlorophyll a-to-chlorophyll b ratios of thylakoid membranes isolated from transgenic plants were unchanged in comparison with the wild type. Photosynthetic oxygen evolution and in vivo-measured chlorophyll fluorescence of the transformants showed that LHCII accumulates to normal levels. The reduced level of cab mRNA did not correlate with the amount of LHCII in thylakoids. This indicates that transcriptional regulation is not the rate-limiting step in the biogenesis of the LHCII apoprotein. The antenna size of photosystem II is therefore modulated by yet undiscovered posttranscriptional mechanisms. PMID:7756826

  8. Engineering of benzylglucosinolate in tobacco provides proof-of-concept for dead-end trap crops genetically modified to attract Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth).

    PubMed

    Møldrup, Morten E; Geu-Flores, Fernando; de Vos, Martin; Olsen, Carl E; Sun, Joel; Jander, Georg; Halkier, Barbara A

    2012-05-01

    Glucosinolates are biologically active natural products characteristic of crucifers, including oilseed rape, cabbage vegetables and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Crucifer-specialist insect herbivores, like the economically important pest Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth), frequently use glucosinolates as oviposition stimuli. This suggests that the transfer of a glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway to a non-crucifer would stimulate oviposition on an otherwise non-attractive plant. Here, we demonstrate that stable genetic transfer of the six-step benzylglucosinolate pathway from A. thaliana to Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) results in the production of benzylglucosinolate without causing morphological alterations. Benzylglucosinolate-producing tobacco plants were more attractive for oviposition by female P. xylostella moths than wild-type tobacco plants. As newly hatched P. xylostella larvae were unable to survive on tobacco, these results represent a proof-of-concept strategy for rendering non-host plants attractive for oviposition by specialist herbivores with the long-term goal of generating efficient dead-end trap crops for agriculturally important pests.

  9. Phenotypic Changes in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Vacuole-Targeted Thermotoga maritima BglB Related to Elevated Levels of Liberated Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh Anh; Lee, Dae-Seok; Jung, Jakyun; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermostable β-glucosidase BglB of Thermotoga maritima was modified by adding a short C-terminal tetrapeptide (AFVY, which transports phaseolin to the vacuole, to its C-terminal sequence). The modified β-glucosidase BglB was transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants. We observed a range of significant phenotypic changes in the transgenic plants compared to the wild-type (WT) plants. The transgenic plants had faster stem growth, earlier flowering, enhanced root systems development, an increased biomass biosynthesis rate, and higher salt stress tolerance in young plants compared to WT. In addition, programed cell death was enhanced in mature plants. Furthermore, the C-terminal AFVY tetrapeptide efficiently sorted T. maritima BglB into the vacuole, which was maintained in an active form and could perform its glycoside hydrolysis function on hormone conjugates, leading to elevated hormone [abscisic acid (ABA), indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), and cytokinin] levels that likely contributed to the phenotypic changes in the transgenic plants. The elevation of cytokinin led to upregulation of the transcription factor WUSCHELL, a homeodomain factor that regulates the development, division, and reproduction of stem cells in the shoot apical meristems. Elevation of IAA led to enhanced root development, and the elevation of ABA contributed to enhanced tolerance to salt stress and programed cell death. These results suggest that overexpressing vacuole-targeted T. maritima BglB may have several advantages for molecular farming technology to improve multiple targets, including enhanced production of the β-glucosidase BglB, increased biomass, and shortened developmental stages, that could play pivotal roles in bioenergy and biofuel production. PMID:26618153

  10. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M.; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. PMID:27329752

  11. Grape Marc Extract-Induced Defense Reactions and Protection against Phytophthora parasitica Are Impaired in NahG Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Benouaret, Razik; Goupil, Pascale

    2015-08-05

    Grape marc extract (GME) acts as an elicitor of plant defense responses. This study analyzed GME-induced plant defense reactions in NahG transgenic tobacco. Leaf infiltration of NahG leaves revealed HR-like reactions with reduced lesions and weak deployment of autofluorescent compounds in the surrounding infiltrated tissues. The β-1,3-glucanase PR2-, endochitinase PR3-, and osmotin PR5-target transcript levels were strongly lowered in NahG leaves, and the mutant failed to accumulate the antimicrobial PR1 transcripts. GME-induced protection against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae (Ppn) was evaluated on tobacco leaves. The antimicrobial properties of GME against Ppn were evidenced using a range of in vitro tests. GME-sprayed wild-type leaves showed reduced infection areas, whereas GME failed to induce a protective effect against Ppn in NahG leaves. The results suggest that GME-induced plant defense reactions in tobacco plants was mediated by salicylic acid (SA) and that GME-induced protection against Ppn could be the combined result of antimicrobial and defense actions.

  12. Monocot regulatory protein Opaque-2 is localized in the nucleus of maize endosperm and transformed tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Varagona, M J; Schmidt, R J; Raikhel, N V

    1991-01-01

    Protein targeting to the nucleus has been studied extensively in animal and yeast systems; however, nothing is known about nuclear targeting in plants. The Opaque-2 (O2) gene produces a regulatory protein that is responsible for inducing transcription of the alpha-zein class of storage proteins in maize kernels. The cloned O2 gene encodes a protein that contains a leucine zipper DNA binding domain that can interact with zein gene promoters. We have used immunolocalization to show that the O2 protein is present in nuclei in the maize endosperm tissues known to produce alpha-zeins. In addition, neither embryo tissue from wild-type kernels nor endosperm from kernels harboring a null o2 allele contain the O2 protein. Analysis of a transposable, element-induced o2 allele, o2-m20, revealed that sectors of endosperm cells contained the nuclear-localized O2 protein, indicating excision of the transposable element. To study further the nuclear transport of the O2 protein, we have transformed this gene, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into tobacco. Plants were shown to have detectable levels of steady-state O2 mRNA and O2 protein. Immunolocalization of O2 protein in transformed tobacco plants indicated that the O2 protein was transported into tobacco nuclei. Therefore, we have developed a system to study nuclear targeting in plants and have established that the nuclear transport machinery is similar in monocots and dicots. PMID:1840902

  13. Monocot regulatory protein Opaque-2 is localized in the nucleus of maize endosperm and transformed tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Varagona, M J; Schmidt, R J; Raikhel, N V

    1991-02-01

    Protein targeting to the nucleus has been studied extensively in animal and yeast systems; however, nothing is known about nuclear targeting in plants. The Opaque-2 (O2) gene produces a regulatory protein that is responsible for inducing transcription of the alpha-zein class of storage proteins in maize kernels. The cloned O2 gene encodes a protein that contains a leucine zipper DNA binding domain that can interact with zein gene promoters. We have used immunolocalization to show that the O2 protein is present in nuclei in the maize endosperm tissues known to produce alpha-zeins. In addition, neither embryo tissue from wild-type kernels nor endosperm from kernels harboring a null o2 allele contain the O2 protein. Analysis of a transposable, element-induced o2 allele, o2-m20, revealed that sectors of endosperm cells contained the nuclear-localized O2 protein, indicating excision of the transposable element. To study further the nuclear transport of the O2 protein, we have transformed this gene, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into tobacco. Plants were shown to have detectable levels of steady-state O2 mRNA and O2 protein. Immunolocalization of O2 protein in transformed tobacco plants indicated that the O2 protein was transported into tobacco nuclei. Therefore, we have developed a system to study nuclear targeting in plants and have established that the nuclear transport machinery is similar in monocots and dicots.

  14. Efficient Gene Silencing Mediated by Tobacco Rattle Virus in an Emerging Model Plant Physalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaohua; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis has a berry and a novelty called inflated calyx syndrome (ICS, also named the ‘Chinese lantern’). Elucidation of the underlying developmental mechanisms of fruit diversity demands an efficient gene functional inference platform. Here, we tested the application of the tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated gene-silencing system in Physalis floridana. First, we characterized the putative gene of a phytoene desaturase in P. floridana (PfPDS). Infecting the leaves of the Physalis seedlings with the PfPDS-TRV vector resulted in a bleached plant, including the developing leaves, floral organs, ICS, berry, and seed. These results indicated that a local VIGS treatment can efficiently induce a systemic mutated phenotype. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that the bleaching extent correlated to the mRNA reduction of the endogenous PfPDS. Detailed comparisons of multiple infiltration and growth protocols allowed us to determine the optimal methodologies for VIGS manipulation in Physalis. We subsequently utilized this optimized VIGS methodology to downregulate the expression of two MADS-box genes, MPF2 and MPF3, and compared the resulting effects with gene-downregulation mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The VIGS-mediated gene knockdown plants were found to resemble the mutated phenotypes of floral calyx, fruiting calyx and pollen maturation of the RNAi transgenic plants for both MPF2 and MPF3. Moreover, the two MADS-box genes were appeared to have a novel role in the pedicel development in P. floridana. The major advantage of VIGS-based gene knockdown lies in practical aspects of saving time and easy manipulation as compared to the RNAi. Despite the lack of heritability and mosaic mutation phenotypes observed in some organs, the TRV-mediated gene silencing system provides an alternative efficient way to infer gene function in various developmental processes in Physalis, thus facilitating understanding of the genetic basis of the evolution and

  15. Efficient gene silencing mediated by tobacco rattle virus in an emerging model plant physalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Si; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shaohua; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis has a berry and a novelty called inflated calyx syndrome (ICS, also named the 'Chinese lantern'). Elucidation of the underlying developmental mechanisms of fruit diversity demands an efficient gene functional inference platform. Here, we tested the application of the tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated gene-silencing system in Physalis floridana. First, we characterized the putative gene of a phytoene desaturase in P. floridana (PfPDS). Infecting the leaves of the Physalis seedlings with the PfPDS-TRV vector resulted in a bleached plant, including the developing leaves, floral organs, ICS, berry, and seed. These results indicated that a local VIGS treatment can efficiently induce a systemic mutated phenotype. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that the bleaching extent correlated to the mRNA reduction of the endogenous PfPDS. Detailed comparisons of multiple infiltration and growth protocols allowed us to determine the optimal methodologies for VIGS manipulation in Physalis. We subsequently utilized this optimized VIGS methodology to downregulate the expression of two MADS-box genes, MPF2 and MPF3, and compared the resulting effects with gene-downregulation mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The VIGS-mediated gene knockdown plants were found to resemble the mutated phenotypes of floral calyx, fruiting calyx and pollen maturation of the RNAi transgenic plants for both MPF2 and MPF3. Moreover, the two MADS-box genes were appeared to have a novel role in the pedicel development in P. floridana. The major advantage of VIGS-based gene knockdown lies in practical aspects of saving time and easy manipulation as compared to the RNAi. Despite the lack of heritability and mosaic mutation phenotypes observed in some organs, the TRV-mediated gene silencing system provides an alternative efficient way to infer gene function in various developmental processes in Physalis, thus facilitating understanding of the genetic basis of the evolution and development

  16. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing a grass PpEXP1 gene exhibit enhanced tolerance to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Xu, Xiao; Shi, Yang; Xu, Jichen; Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a detrimental abiotic stress limiting the growth of many plant species and is associated with various cellular and physiological damages. Expansins are a family of proteins which are known to play roles in regulating cell wall elongation and expansion, as well as other growth and developmental processes. The in vitro roles of expansins regulating plant heat tolerance are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to isolate and clone an expansin gene in a perennial grass species (Poa pratensis) and to determine whether over-expression of expansin may improve plant heat tolerance. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was used as the model plant for gene transformation and an expansin gene PpEXP1 from Poa pratensis was cloned. Sequence analysis showed PpEXP1 belonged to α-expansins and was closely related to two expansin genes in other perennial grass species (Festuca pratensis and Agrostis stolonifera) as well as Triticum aestivum, Oryza sativa, and Brachypodium distachyon. Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing PpEXP1 were generated through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Under heat stress (42°C) in growth chambers, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the PpEXP1 gene exhibited a less structural damage to cells, lower electrolyte leakage, lower levels of membrane lipid peroxidation, and lower content of hydrogen peroxide, as well as higher chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, relative water content, activity of antioxidant enzyme, and seed germination rates, compared to the wild-type plants. These results demonstrated the positive roles of PpEXP1 in enhancing plant tolerance to heat stress and the possibility of using expansins for genetic modification of cool-season perennial grasses in the development of heat-tolerant germplasm and cultivars.

  17. High-level transgene expression in plant cells: effects of a strong scaffold attachment region from tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, G C; Hall, G; Michalowski, S; Newman, W; Spiker, S; Weissinger, A K; Thompson, W F

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that yeast scaffold attachment regions (SARs) flanking a chimeric beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene increased per-copy expression levels by 24-fold in tobacco suspension cell lines stably transformed by microprojectile bombardment. In this study, we examined the effect of a DNA fragment originally identified in a tobacco genomic clone by its activity in an in vitro binding assay. The tobacco SAR has much greater scaffold binding affinity than does the yeast SAR, and tobacco cell lines stably transformed with constructs containing the tobacco SAR accumulated greater than fivefold more GUS enzyme activity than did lines transformed with the yeast SAR construct. Relative to the control construct, flanking the GUS gene with plant SARs increased overall expression per transgene copy by almost 140-fold. In transient expression assays, the same construct increased expression only approximately threefold relative to a control without SARs, indicating that the full SAR effect requires integration into chromosomal DNA. GUS activity in individual stable transformants was not simply proportional to transgene copy number, and the SAR effect was maximal in cell lines with fewer than approximately 10 transgene copies per tobacco genome. Lines with significantly higher copy numbers showed greatly greatly reduced expression relative to the low-copy-number lines. Our results indicate that strong SARs flanking a transgene greatly increases expression without eliminating variation between transformants. We propose that SARs dramatically reduce the severity or likelihood of homology-dependent gene silencing in cells with small numbers of transgenes but do not prevent silencing of transgenes present in many copies. PMID:8672887

  18. [Effect of glucuronoxylomannan of Tremella mesenterica Ritz. Fr. (Basidiomycota) on the plants resistance to tobacco mosaic virus].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, O H; Polishchuk, O M

    2009-01-01

    It has been established that extracellular polysaccharides of Glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), which are produced by Tremella mesenterica Ritz. Fr. (Basidiomycota), has antivirus properties and can induce the resistance to TMV in hypersensitive variety of tobacco. The resistance was blocked in the presence of actinomycin D. This process confirms that resistance has been activated with GXM de novo. GXM takes influence on the early stages of viruses and host plants interaction too, which are irrespective to cells genome activation.

  19. Cloning, Transformation and Expression of Human Interferon α2b Gene in Tobacco Plant (Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi)

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarzadeh, Shahrzad; Daneshvar, Mohammad Hosein; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Galehdari, Hamid; Alamisaied, Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular farming is the production of important recombinant proteins in transgenic organisms on an agricultural scale. Interferons are proteins with antiviral and antitumor activities and can be used for viral infections and cancers treatments. Objectives This study reports the transformation of INF α2b gene in tobacco plant for the first time in Iran. Materials and Methods Interferon α2b gene was amplified by PCR using specific primers containing appropriate restriction enzymes, plant highly expression sequence and Histidine tag sequence. Target sequence was cloned in plant expression vector pCAMBIA1304 and the construct named pCAMINFα. pCAMINFα was transferred to E. coli strain DH5α and plated on LB agar medium containing kanamycin 50 mgl-1. The colonies were confirmed by colony PCR and sequencing. The construct was transferred into Agrobacterium tumefaciens by freeze-thaw method and transformed colonies were confirmed by colony PCR. Tobacco plants (cultivar xanthi) were inoculated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 by leaf disc method. Inoculated explants were cultured on MSII (MS + BAP 1mgl-1 + NAA 0.1 mgl-1) at 28°C and darkness for 48 hours. Then explants were transferred to selection medium containing cephotaxime (250 mgl-1) and hygromycin (15 mgl-1) in a 16/8 (day/night) h photoperiod in growth room with an irradiance of 5000 lux. Transgenic plants were regenerated and transferred to perlite. Genomic DNA was extracted from regenerated plants by Dellaporta method at 5-leaf step and transgenic lines were confirmed by PCR with specific primers. Expression of Interferon α2b gene was confirmed by dot blotting. Conclusions Since no report of interferon alpha production in plants in Iran has been expressed yet, this research could create a field of producing this drug in tobacco, in Iran. PMID:24624166

  20. Enhanced production of resveratrol derivatives in tobacco plants by improving the metabolic flux of intermediates in the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yu Jeong; An, Chul Han; Woo, Su Gyeong; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Ki-Won; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Rim, Yeonggil; Jeong, Hyung Jae; Ryu, Young Bae; Kim, Cha Young

    2016-09-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids such as anthocyanin and stilbenes has attracted increasing attention because of their potential health benefits. Anthocyanins and stilbenes share common phenylpropanoid precursor pathways. We previously reported that the overexpression of sweetpotato IbMYB1a induced anthocyanin pigmentation in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. In the present study, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum SR1) plants (STS-OX and ROST-OX) expressing the RpSTS gene encoding stilbene synthase from rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L. cv. Jangyeop) and the RpSTS and VrROMT genes encoding resveratrol O-methyltransferase from frost grape (Vitis riparia) were generated under the control of 35S promoter. Phenotypic alterations in floral organs, such as a reduction in floral pigments and male sterility, were observed in STS-OX transgenic tobacco plants. However, we failed to obtain STS-OX and ROST-OX plants with high levels of resveratrol compounds. Therefore, to improve the production of resveratrol derivatives in plants, we cross-pollinated flowers of STS-OX or ROST-OX and IbMYB1a-OX transgenic lines (SM and RSM). Phenotypic changes in vegetative and reproductive development of SM and RSM plants were observed. Furthermore, by HPLC and LC-MS analyses, we found enhanced production of resveratrol derivatives such as piceid, piceid methyl ether, resveratrol methyl ether O-hexoside, and 5-methyl resveratrol-3,4'-O-β-D-diglucopyranoside in SM and RSM cross-pollinated lines. Here, total contents of trans- and cis-piceids ranged from approximately 104-240 µg/g fresh weight in SM (F2). Collectively, we suggest that coexpression of RpSTS and IbMYB1a via cross-pollination can induce enhanced production of resveratrol compounds in plants by increasing metabolic flux into stilbenoid biosynthesis.

  1. Oil from Tobacco Leaves: FOLIUM - Installation of Hydrocarbon Accumulating Pathways in Tobacco Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: LBNL is modifying tobacco to enable it to directly produce fuel molecules in its leaves for use as a biofuel. Tobacco is a good crop for biofuels production because it is an outstanding biomass crop, has a long history of cultivation, does not compete with the national food supply, and is highly responsive to genetic manipulation. LBNL will incorporate traits for hydrocarbon biosynthesis from cyanobacteria and algae, and enhance light utilization and carbon uptake in tobacco, improving the efficiency of photosynthesis so more fuel can be produced in the leaves. The tobacco-generated biofuels can be processed for gasoline, jet fuel or diesel alternatives. LBNL is also working to optimize methods for planting, cultivating and harvesting tobacco to increase biomass production several-fold over the level of traditional growing techniques.

  2. Revisiting Plant Plasma Membrane Lipids in Tobacco: A Focus on Sphingolipids1

    PubMed Central

    Cacas, Jean-Luc; Grosjean, Kevin; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Lherminier, Jeannine; Rombouts, Yoann; Maes, Emmanuel; Gronnier, Julien; Furt, Fabienne; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The lipid composition of plasma membrane (PM) and the corresponding detergent-insoluble membrane (DIM) fraction were analyzed with a specific focus on highly polar sphingolipids, so-called glycosyl inositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs). Using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) ‘Bright Yellow 2’ cell suspension and leaves, evidence is provided that GIPCs represent up to 40 mol % of the PM lipids. Comparative analysis of DIMs with the PM showed an enrichment of 2-hydroxylated very-long-chain fatty acid-containing GIPCs and polyglycosylated GIPCs in the DIMs. Purified antibodies raised against these GIPCs were further used for immunogold-electron microscopy strategy, revealing the distribution of polyglycosylated GIPCs in domains of 35 ± 7 nm in the plane of the PM. Biophysical studies also showed strong interactions between GIPCs and sterols and suggested a role for very-long-chain fatty acids in the interdigitation between the two PM-composing monolayers. The ins and outs of lipid asymmetry, raft formation, and interdigitation in plant membrane biology are finally discussed. PMID:26518342

  3. Immunogenicity of nuclear-encoded LTB:ST fusion protein from Escherichia coli expressed in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Soria-Guerra, Ruth E; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Herrera-Díaz, Areli; Korban, Schuyler S; Alpuche-Solís, Ángel G

    2011-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the main causative agents of diarrhea in infants and for travelers. Inclusion of a heat-stable (ST) toxin into vaccine formulations is mandatory as most ETEC strains can produce both heat-labile (LT) and ST enterotoxins. In this study, a genetic fusion gene encoding for an LTB:ST protein has been constructed and transferred into tobacco via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic tobacco plants carrying the LTB:ST gene are then subjected to GM1-ELISA revealing that the LTB:ST has assembled into pentamers and displays antigenic determinants from both LTB and ST. Protein accumulation of up to 0.05% total soluble protein is detected. Subsequently, mucosal and systemic humoral responses are elicited in mice orally dosed with transgenic tobacco leaves. This has suggested that the plant-derived LTB:ST is immunogenic via the oral route. These findings are critical for the development of a plant-based vaccine capable of eliciting broader protection against ETEC and targeting both LTB and ST. Features of this platform in comparison to transplastomic approaches are discussed.

  4. Safety of foods derived from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John A

    2003-03-01

    Biopharmaceuticals have been available for clinical use for nearly three decades, but foods derived from agribiotechnology have been available for just under a decade. Controversy surrounding foods from genetically modified (GM) plants has focused primarily upon their allergenicity, with lesser concerns about antibiotic resistance genes. Concerns are related to possible environmental impacts on non-human species, including effects on non-target species (e.g., butterflies) and on the development of so-called "super weeds." Food allergies are no more prevalent in foods from GM plants than in conventional foods. Further, the use of antibiotics in the development of GM plants does not pose a significant risk to the human population. Foods from the current GM plant products have been shown not to pose any detrimental effects to humans, and, in fact, nutritionally enhanced products are being developed. GM foods are subjected globally to intense regulatory scrutiny, and extensive data have been provided consistently to regulatory agencies in the United States on a voluntary basis, with mandatory reporting of data soon to be in force. Existing environmental concerns appear to be unjustified on the basis of existing data and experience.

  5. Response of carbon and nitrogen-rich metabolites to nitrogen deficiency in PSARK::IPT tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Wilhelmi, María del Mar; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Eva; Leyva, Rocio; Blasco, Begoña; Romero, Luis; Blumwald, Eduardo; Ruiz, Juan Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Wild type (WT) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing isopentenyltransferase (IPT), a gene coding the rate-limiting step in cytokinin (CKs) synthesis, were grown under limited nitrogen (N) conditions. Here, we analyse the possible effect of N deficiency on C-rich compounds such as phenolic compounds, as well as on N-rich compounds such as polyamines (PAs) and proline (Pro), examining the pathways involved in their synthesis and degradation. N deficiency was found to stimulate phenolic metabolism and increase these compounds both in P(SARK):IPT as well as in WT tobacco plants. This suggests that nitrate (NO(3)(-)) tissue concentration may act as a signal triggering phenolic compound accumulation in N deficiency plants. In addition, we found the maintenance of PAs in the WT plants would be correlated with the higher stress response to N deficiency. On the contrary, the reduction of free PAs and Pro found in the P(SARK)::IPT plants subjected to N deficiency would indicate the operation of an N-recycling mechanism that could stimulate a more efficient N utilization in P(SARK)::IPT plants.

  6. Overexpression of Ran gene from Lepidium latifolium L. (LlaRan) renders transgenic tobacco plants hypersensitive to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Vimlendu Bhushan; Grover, Atul; Singh, Sadhana; Pande, Veena; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2014-09-01

    Ran is a multifunctional small GTPase involved in important cellular activities like nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly, nuclear envelope formation, etc., but is also known to be differentially expressed in response to abiotic stress, particularly low temperature. We have over-expressed Lepidium latifolium (Fam. Brassicaceae) Ran gene in tobacco to study the response of the plants to cold stress (24 h; 4 °C). Transformation of the tobacco plants was verified using PCR targeting Ran gene and co-transformed selectable marker gene nptII. Segregation in Mendelian ratios was validated in five transgenic lines by germination of T1 and T2 seeds on moist filter papers containing 150 mg/l kanamycin. Higher levels of electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation pointed towards hypersensitivity of plants. Similarly, lesser proline accumulation compared to wild types also indicated susceptibility of plants to death under chilling conditions. Specific activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase was also measured under stressed and control conditions. A variation was observed across the different lines, and four out of five lines showed lesser specific activity compared to wild type plants, thus indicating reduced capability of scavenging free radicals. In totality, a strong evidence on induced hypersensitivity to cold stress has been collected which may further be helpful in designing appropriate strategies for engineering crop plants for survival under cold stress conditions.

  7. Effect of calcium carbonate on cadmium and nutrients uptake in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) planted on contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Ai; Li, Fan; Zhou, Hang; Qin, Xiao-Li; Zou, Zi-Jin; Tian, Tao; Zeng, Min; Liao, Bo-Han

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was applied to Cd-contaminated soil at rates of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 g kg(-1). The effect of CaCO3 on soil pH, organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd and level of major nutrients in a tobacco field and on accumulation of various elements in tobacco plants was determined. The results showed that CaCO3 application significantly increased the pH level, available P and exchangeable Ca but decreased organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd, available heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) and available K in soil. Additionally, CaCO3 application substantially reduced Cd accumulation in tobacco roots, stems, upper leaves, middle leaves and lower leaves, with maximum decrease of 22.3%, 32.1%, 24.5%, 22.0% and 18.2%, respectively. There were large increase in total Ca and slight increases in total N and K but decrease to varying degrees in total Fe, Cu and Zn due to CaCO3 application. CaCO3 had little effect on total P and Mn levels in tobacco leaves.

  8. Dissociation of a population of Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 in tobacco plants: formation of bacterial emboli and dormant cells.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Daminova, Amina; Ageeva, Marina; Petrova, Olga; Gogoleva, Natalya; Tarasova, Nadezhda; Gogolev, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    The population dynamics of Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 (Pba) within tobacco plants was monitored from the time of inoculation until after long-term preservation of microorganisms in the remnants of dead plants. We found and characterised peculiar structures that totally occlude xylem vessels, which we have named bacterial emboli. Viable but non-culturable (VBN) Pba cells were identified in the remnants of dead plants, and the conditions for resuscitation of these VBN cells were established. Our investigation shows that dissociation of the integrated bacterial population during plant colonisation forms distinct subpopulations and cell morphotypes, which are likely to perform specific functions that ensure successful completion of the life cycle within the plant.

  9. Temperature-dependent bursting pattern analysis by modified Plant model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Many electrophysiological properties of neuron including firing rates and rhythmical oscillation change in response to a temperature variation, but the mechanism underlying these correlations remains unverified. In this study, we analyzed various action potential (AP) parameters of bursting pacemaker neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia juliana to examine whether or not bursting patterns are altered in response to temperature change. Here we found that the inter-burst interval, burst duration, and number of spike during burst decreased as temperature increased. On the other hand, the numbers of bursts per minute and numbers of spikes per minute increased and then decreased, but interspike interval during burst firstly decreased and then increased. We also tested the reproducibility of temperature-dependent changes in bursting patterns and AP parameters. Finally we performed computational simulations of these phenomena by using a modified Plant model composed of equations with temperature-dependent scaling factors to mathematically clarify the temperature-dependent changes of bursting patterns in burst-firing neurons. Taken together, we found that the modified Plant model could trace the ionic mechanism underlying the temperature-dependent change in bursting pattern from experiments with bursting pacemaker neurons in the abdominal ganglia of Aplysia juliana. PMID:25051923

  10. Zn2+ -induced changes at the root level account for the increased tolerance of acclimated tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Taiti, Cosimo; Marti, Lucia; Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Spinelli, Francesco; Giordano, Cristiana; Caparrotta, Stefania; Gori, Massimo; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    Evidence suggests that heavy-metal tolerance can be induced in plants following pre-treatment with non-toxic metal concentrations, but the results are still controversial. In the present study, tobacco plants were exposed to increasing Zn2+ concentrations (up to 250 and/or 500 μM ZnSO4) with or without a 1-week acclimation period with 30 μM ZnSO4. Elevated Zn2+ was highly toxic for plants, and after 3 weeks of treatments there was a marked (≥50%) decline in plant growth in non-acclimated plants. Plant acclimation, on the other hand, increased plant dry mass and leaf area up to 1.6-fold compared with non-acclimated ones. In non-acclimated plants, the addition of 250 μM ZnSO4 led to transient membrane depolarization and stomatal closure within 24h from the addition of the stress; by contrast, the acclimation process was associated with an improved stomatal regulation and a superior ability to maintain a negative root membrane potential, with values on average 37% more negative compared with non-acclimated plants. The different response at the plasma-membrane level between acclimated and non-acclimated plants was associated with an enhanced vacuolar Zn2+ sequestration and up to 2-fold higher expression of the tobacco orthologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana MTP1 gene. Thus, the acclimation process elicited specific detoxification mechanisms in roots that enhanced Zn2+ compartmentalization in vacuoles, thereby improving root membrane functionality and stomatal regulation in leaves following elevated Zn2+ stress.

  11. Zn2+-induced changes at the root level account for the increased tolerance of acclimated tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Taiti, Cosimo; Marti, Lucia; Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Spinelli, Francesco; Giordano, Cristiana; Caparrotta, Stefania; Gori, Massimo; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that heavy-metal tolerance can be induced in plants following pre-treatment with non-toxic metal concentrations, but the results are still controversial. In the present study, tobacco plants were exposed to increasing Zn2+ concentrations (up to 250 and/or 500 μM ZnSO4) with or without a 1-week acclimation period with 30 μM ZnSO4. Elevated Zn2+ was highly toxic for plants, and after 3 weeks of treatments there was a marked (≥50%) decline in plant growth in non-acclimated plants. Plant acclimation, on the other hand, increased plant dry mass and leaf area up to 1.6-fold compared with non-acclimated ones. In non-acclimated plants, the addition of 250 μM ZnSO4 led to transient membrane depolarization and stomatal closure within 24h from the addition of the stress; by contrast, the acclimation process was associated with an improved stomatal regulation and a superior ability to maintain a negative root membrane potential, with values on average 37% more negative compared with non-acclimated plants. The different response at the plasma-membrane level between acclimated and non-acclimated plants was associated with an enhanced vacuolar Zn2+ sequestration and up to 2-fold higher expression of the tobacco orthologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana MTP1 gene. Thus, the acclimation process elicited specific detoxification mechanisms in roots that enhanced Zn2+ compartmentalization in vacuoles, thereby improving root membrane functionality and stomatal regulation in leaves following elevated Zn2+ stress. PMID:24928985

  12. Infection with a plant virus modifies vector feeding behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Candice A.; Walker, Gregory P.; Ullman, Diane E.

    2011-01-01

    Vector infection by some animal-infecting parasites results in altered feeding that enhances transmission. Modification of vector behavior is of broad adaptive significance, as parasite fitness relies on passage to a new host, and vector feeding is nearly always essential for transmission. Although several plant viruses infect their insect vectors, we have shown that vector infection by a plant virus alters feeding behavior. Here we show that infection with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), type member of the only plant-infecting genus in the Bunyaviridae, alters the feeding behavior of its thrips vector, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande). Male thrips infected with TSWV fed more than uninfected males, with the frequency of all feeding behaviors increasing by up to threefold, thus increasing the probability of virus inoculation. Importantly, infected males made almost three times more noningestion probes (probes in which they salivate, but leave cells largely undamaged) compared with uninfected males. A functional cell is requisite for TSWV infection and cell-to-cell movement; thus, this behavior is most likely to establish virus infection. Some animal-infecting members of the Bunyaviridae (La Crosse virus and Rift Valley fever virus) also cause increased biting rates in infected vectors. Concomitantly, these data support the hypothesis that capacity to modify vector feeding behavior is a conserved trait among plant- and animal-infecting members of the Bunyaviridae that evolved as a mechanism to enhance virus transmission. Our results underscore the evolutionary importance of vector behavioral modification to diverse parasites with host ranges spanning both plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:21606372

  13. Populus euphratica XTH overexpression enhances salinity tolerance by the development of leaf succulence in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Han, Yansha; Wang, Wei; Sun, Jian; Ding, Mingquan; Zhao, Rui; Deng, Shurong; Wang, Feifei; Hu, Yue; Wang, Yang; Lu, Yanjun; Du, Liping; Hu, Zanmin; Diekmann, Heike; Shen, Xin; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2013-11-01

    Populus euphratica is a salt-tolerant tree species that develops leaf succulence after a prolonged period of salinity stress. In the present study, a putative xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase gene (PeXTH) from P. euphratica was isolated and transferred to tobacco plants. PeXTH localized exclusively to the endoplasmic reticulum and cell wall. Plants overexpressing PeXTH were more salt tolerant than wild-type tobacco with respect to root and leaf growth, and survival. The increased capacity for salt tolerance was due mainly to the anatomical and physiological alterations caused by PeXTH overexpression. Compared with the wild type, PeXTH-transgenic plants contained 36% higher water content per unit area and 39% higher ratio of fresh weight to dry weight, a hallmark of leaf succulence. However, the increased water storage in the leaves in PeXTH-transgenic plants was not accompanied by greater leaf thickness but was due to highly packed palisade parenchyma cells and fewer intercellular air spaces between mesophyll cells. In addition to the salt dilution effect in response to NaCl, these anatomical changes increased leaf water-retaining capacity, which lowered the increase of salt concentration in the succulent tissues and mesophyll cells. Moreover, the increased number of mesophyll cells reduced the intercellular air space, which improved carbon economy and resulted in a 47-78% greater net photosynthesis under control and salt treatments (100-150 mM NaCl). Taken together, the results indicate that PeXTH overexpression enhanced salt tolerance by the development of succulent leaves in tobacco plants without swelling.

  14. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a dimeric single-chain variable fragment (scfv) antibody against Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi B.

    PubMed

    Makvandi-Nejad, Shokouh; McLean, Michael D; Hirama, Tomoko; Almquist, Kurt C; Mackenzie, C Roger; Hall, J Christopher

    2005-10-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants were produced that express an anti-Salmonella enterica single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody that binds to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of S. enterica Paratyphi B. The coding sequence of this scFv was optimized for expression in tobacco, synthesized and subsequently placed behind three different promoters: an enhanced tobacco constitutive ubiquitous promoter (EntCUP4), and single- and double-enhancer versions of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter (CaMV 35S). These chimeric genes were introduced into Nicotiana tabacum cv. 81V9 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and 50 primary transgenic (T(0)) plants per construct were produced. Among these plants, 23 were selected for the ability to express active scFv as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using S. enterica LPS as antigen. Expanded bed adsorption-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (EBA-IMAC) was used to purify 41.7 mug of scFv/g from leaf tissue. Gel filtration and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses demonstrated that the purified scFv was active as a dimer or higher-order multimer. In order to identify T(1) plants suitable for development of homozygous lines with heritable scFv expression, kanamycin-resistance segregation analyses were performed to determine the number of T-DNA loci in each T(0) plant, and quantitative ELISA and immunoblot analyses were used to compare expression of active and total anti-Salmonella scFv, respectively, in the T(1) generation. As S. enterica causes millions of enteric fevers and hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide each year, large-scale production and purification of this scFv will have potential for uses in diagnosis and detection, as a therapeutic agent, and in applications such as water system purification.

  15. Antioxidant Enzyme Responses Induced by Whiteflies in Tobacco Plants in Defense against Aphids: Catalase May Play a Dominant Role

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haipeng; Sun, Xia; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Qingliang

    2016-01-01

    Background Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 (Middle East-Asia Minor 1) feeding alters antioxidative enzyme activity in some plant species. Infestation of B. tabaci nymphs decreases Myzus persicae performance on systemic, but not local leaves of tobacco plants. However, it is unclear if B. tabaci nymphs induced antioxidant activities contributing to the aphid resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the relationship between antioxidants induced by nymphs of B. tabaci feeding on tobacco and aphid resistance. The activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were assayed in tobacco leaves at different feeding times following infestation of B. tabaci nymphs. The infestation altered the activities of CAT and POD, but had no significant effect on SOD activity. The highest CAT activity was observed at 15 d after infestation. This was 98.2% greater than control systemic leaves, but 32.6% lower than the control in local leaves. Higher POD activity was recorded in local vs. systemic leaves after 15 d of infestation. POD activity was 71.0% and 112.9% higher in local and systemic leaves, respectively, than in the controls. The changes of CAT, but not POD or SOD activity were correlated to levels of aphid resistance. H2O2 levels were higher in local than in systemic leaves in contrast to CAT activity. Tobacco curly shoot virus mediated virus-induced gene silencing was employed to determine if CAT activation was involved in the aphid resistance induced by B. tabaci nymphs. B. tabaci induced CAT activity decreased when the Cat1 expression was silenced. The performance assay indicated that Cat1 silencing made B. tabaci infested plants a more suitable host for aphids than infested control plants. The aphid survival rate was reduced by 40.4% in infested control plants, but reduced by only 26.1% in Cat1-silenced plants compared to uninfested controls. Also, qPCR results showed that silencing of Cat1

  16. Characterization of salt tolerance in ectoine-transformed tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabaccum): photosynthesis, osmotic adjustment, and nitrogen partitioning.

    PubMed

    Moghaieb, R E A; Tanaka, N; Saneoka, H; Murooka, Y; Ono, H; Morikawa, H; Nakamura, A; Nguyen, N T; Suwa, R; Fujita, K

    2006-02-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) biosynthetic genes (ect. ABC) from Halomonas elongata were introduced to tobacco plants using an Agrobacterium-mediated gene delivery system. The genes for ectoine biosynthesis were integrated in a stable manner into the tobacco genome and the corresponding transcripts were expressed. The concentration of ectoine under salt-stress conditions was higher in the roots than in leaves. A close relationship was found between stomatal conductance and the amount of transported nitrogen, suggesting that water transport through the xylem in the stem and transpiration may be involved in nitrogen transport to leaves. The data indicate that the turgor values of the ectoine transgenic lines increased with increasing salt concentration. The data revealed two ways in which ectoine enhanced salinity tolerance of tobacco plants. First, ectoine improved the maintenance of root function so that water is taken up consistently and supplied to shoots under saline conditions. Second, ectoine enhanced the nitrogen supply to leaves by increasing transpiration and by protecting Rubisco proteins from deleterious effects of salt, thereby improving the rate of photosynthesis.

  17. Human α-mannosidase produced in transgenic tobacco plants is processed in human α-mannosidosis cell lines.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Balducci, Chiara; Pompa, Andrea; Riise Stensland, Hilde M F; Guaragno, Marco; Pagiotti, Rita; Menghini, Anna R; Persichetti, Emanuele; Beccari, Tommaso; Bellucci, Michele

    2011-12-01

    Deficiency in human lysosomal α-mannosidase (MAN2B1) results in α-mannosidosis, a lysosomal storage disorder; patients present a wide range of neurological, immunological, and skeletal symptoms caused by a multisystemic accumulation of mannose-containing oligosaccharides. Here, we describe the expression of recombinant MAN2B1 both transiently in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and in the leaves and seeds of stably transformed N. tabacum plants. After purification from tobacco leaves, the recombinant enzyme was found to be N-glycosylated and localized in vacuolar compartments. In the fresh leaves of tobacco transformants, MAN2B1 was measured at 10,200 units/kg, and the purified enzyme from these leaves had a specific activity of 32-45 U/mg. Furthermore, tobacco-produced MAN2B1 was biochemically similar to the enzyme purified from human tissues, and it was internalized and processed by α-mannosidosis fibroblast cells. These results strongly indicate that plants can be considered a promising expression system for the production of recombinant MAN2B1 for use in enzyme replacement therapy.

  18. The importance of lipid modified proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A

    2015-01-01

    Membranes have long been known to act as more than physical barriers within and between plant cells. Trafficking of membrane proteins, signalling from and across membranes, organisation of membranes and transport through membranes are all essential processes for plant cellular function. These processes rely on a myriad array of proteins regulated in a variety of manners and are frequently required to be directly associated with membranes. For integral membrane proteins, the mode of membrane association is readily apparent, but many peripherally associated membrane proteins are outwardly soluble proteins. In these cases the proteins are frequently modified by the addition of lipids allowing direct interaction with the hydrophobic core of membranes. These modifications include N-myristoylation, S-acylation (palmitoylation), prenylation and GPI anchors but until recently little was truly known about their function in plants. New data suggest that these modifications are able to act as more than just membrane anchors, and dynamic S-acylation in particular is emerging as a means of regulating protein function in a similar manner to phosphorylation. This review discusses how these modifications occur, their impact on protein function, how they are regulated, recent advances in the field and technical approaches for studying these modifications.

  19. Co-expression of NCED and ALO improves vitamin C level and tolerance to drought and chilling in transgenic tobacco and stylo plants.

    PubMed

    Bao, Gegen; Zhuo, Chunliu; Qian, Chunmei; Xiao, Ting; Guo, Zhenfei; Lu, Shaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant adaptive responses to various environmental stresses, while L-ascorbic acid (AsA) that is also named vitamin C is an important antioxidant and involves in plant stress tolerance and the immune system in domestic animals. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and stylo [Stylosanthes guianensis (Aublet) Swartz], a forage legume, plants co-expressing stylo 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (SgNCED1) and yeast D-arabinono-1,4-lactone oxidase (ALO) genes were generated in this study, and tolerance to drought and chilling was analysed in comparison with transgenic tobacco overexpressing SgNCED1 or ALO and the wild-type plants. Compared to the SgNCED1 or ALO transgenic plants, in which only ABA or AsA levels were increased, both ABA and AsA levels were increased in transgenic tobacco and stylo plants co-expressing SgNCED1 and ALO genes. Compared to the wild type, an enhanced drought tolerance was observed in SgNCED1 transgenic tobacco plants with induced expression of drought-responsive genes, but not in ALO plants, while an enhanced chilling tolerance was observed in ALO transgenic tobaccos with induced expression of cold-responsive genes, but not in SgNCED1 plants. Co-expression of SgNCED1 and ALO genes resulted in elevated tolerance to both drought and chilling in transgenic tobacco and stylo plants with induced expression of both drought and cold-responsive genes. Our result suggests that co-expression of SgNCED1 and ALO genes is an effective way for use in forage plant improvement for increased tolerance to drought and chilling and nutrition quality.

  20. Magnetic graphene as modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe adsorbent for the determination of organochlorine pesticide residues in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan-Bo; Li, Xue; Jiang, Xing-Yi; Cai, Bao-Dong; Zhu, Feng-Peng; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Chen, Zai-Gen; Pang, Yong-Qiang; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-08-07

    In this study, magnetic graphene was used as modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) adsorbent for the determination of organochlorine pesticide (OCPs) residues in tobacco. To achieve the optimum conditions of modified QuEChERS procedure toward target analytes, several parameters affecting the clean-up efficiency including the amount of the adsorbent and clean-up time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a method for the determination of 26 OCPs residues in tobacco was established by coupling the modified QuEChERS procedure to on-line gel permeation chromatography-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (on-line GPC-GC-MS(2)). The limits of detection of proposed method for 26 OCPs residues ranged from 0.01275 to 3.150ng/g. And good linearities of the proposed method were obtained with coefficients of determination (R(2)) greater than 0.9985 for all target analytes. Good reproducibility of method was obtained as intra- and inter-day precisions, the relative standard deviations were less than 11.1 and 15.0%, respectively. The apparent recoveries were in the range of 64-126% at different concentrations for real samples. Compared with the reported methods for the determination of OCPs residues in tobacco, the proposed method has the advantages of simple to operate, low cost and high clean-up ability. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the analysis of OCPs residues in real samples.

  1. Multiple Different Defense Mechanisms Are Activated in the Young Transgenic Tobacco Plants Which Express the Full Length Genome of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus, and Are Resistant against this Virus

    PubMed Central

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J.; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489–1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7–8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV

  2. An acidic class III chitinase in sugar beet: induction by Cercospora beticola, characterization, and expression in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K K; Mikkelsen, J D; Kragh, K M; Bojsen, K

    1993-01-01

    An acidic chitinase (SE) was found to accumulate in leaves of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) during infection with Cercospora beticola. Two isoforms, SE1 and SE2, with MW of 29 kDa and pI of approximately 3.0 were purified to homogeneity. SE2 is an endochitinase that also exhibits exochitinase activity, i.e., it is capable of hydrolyzing chito-oligosaccharides, including chitobiose, into N-acetyl-glucosamine. Partial amino acid sequence data for SE2 were used to obtain a cDNA clone by polymerase chain reaction. The clone was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding SE2. The deduced amino acid sequence for SE2 is 58-67% identical to the class III chitinases from cucumber, Arabidopsis, and tobacco. A transient induction of SE2 mRNA during the early stages of infection with C. beticola is much stronger in tolerant plants than in susceptible plants. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants constitutively accumulate SE2 protein in the intercellular space of their leaves. In a preliminary infection experiment, the transgenic plants did not show increase in resistance against C. nicotianae.

  3. [Estradiol inducible and flower-specific expression of ARGOS and ARGOS-LIKE genes in transgenic tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Nikonorov, Iu M; Cheremis, A V

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing Arabidopsis thaliana ARGOS and ARGOS-LIKE genes under the control of the chalcone synthase promoter of Petunia hybrid L., as well as the estradiol inducible XVE system, have been obtained. The part of transgenic plants with flower-specific expression of the target genes was characterized by increased flower size, caused by an increase in cell size and quantity in the case of the ARGOS gene and by a stimulation of cell growth via stretching in the case of the ARGOS-LIKE gene. An enhanced expression level of the NtEXPA1, NtEXPA4 genes encoding expansins, NtEXGT gene encoding endo-xyloglucan transferase, and the AINTEGUMENTA-like gene was detected in the flowers of transgenic tobacco plants. In the case of inducible expression of ARGOS and ARGOS-LIKE genes, an increase in leaf, stem and flower size was revealed in several lines of transgenic plants as compared to control. Expression of the ARGOS gene also affected cell number and size in this case, while the ARGOS-LIKE gene mainly influenced cell size via stretching. Inducible expression of the ARGOS gene in flowers mainly provided an enhanced containment of AINTEGUMENTA-like mRNA, while ARGOS-LIKE gene expression resulted in the activation of NtEXPA1 and NtEXGT genes.

  4. Functional components of the bacterial CzcCBA efflux system reduce cadmium uptake and accumulation in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Nesler, Andrea; DalCorso, Giovanni; Fasani, Elisa; Manara, Anna; Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Argese, Emanuele; Furini, Antonella

    2017-03-25

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic trace element released into the environment by industrial and agricultural practices, threatening the health of plants and contaminating the food/feed chain. Biotechnology can be used to develop plant varieties with a higher capacity for Cd accumulation (for use in phytoremediation programs) or a lower capacity for Cd accumulation (to reduce Cd levels in food and feed). Here we generated transgenic tobacco plants expressing components of the Pseudomonas putida CzcCBA efflux system. Plants were transformed with combinations of the CzcC, CzcB and CzcA genes, and the impact on Cd mobilization was analysed. Plants expressing PpCzcC showed no differences in Cd accumulation, whereas those expressing PpCzcB or PpCzcA accumulated less Cd in the shoots, but more Cd in the roots. Plants expressing both PpCzcB and PpCzcA accumulated less Cd in the shoots and roots compared to controls, whereas plants expressing all three genes showed a significant reduction in Cd levels only in shoots. These results show that components of the CzcCBA system can be expressed in plants and may be useful for developing plants with a reduced capacity to accumulate Cd in the shoots, potentially reducing the toxicity of food/feed crops cultivated in Cd-contaminated soils.

  5. Enhanced cytokinin synthesis in tobacco plants expressing PSARK::IPT prevents the degradation of photosynthetic protein complexes during drought.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Rosa M; Gimeno, Jacinta; Van Deynze, Allen; Walia, Harkamal; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    To identify genes associated with the cytokinin-induced enhanced drought tolerance, we analyzed the transcriptome of wild-type and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'SR1') plants expressing P(SARK)::IPT (for senescence-associated receptor kinase::isopentenyltransferase) grown under well-watered and prolonged water deficit conditions using the tomato GeneChip. During water deficit, the expression of genes encoding components of the carotenoid pathway leading to ABA biosynthesis was enhanced in the wild-type plants, but repressed in the transgenic plants. On the other hand, transgenic plants displayed higher transcript abundance of genes involved in the brassinosteroid biosynthetic pathways. Several genes coding for proteins associated with Chl synthesis, light reactions, the Calvin-Benson cycle and photorespiration were induced in the transgenic plants. Notably, increased transcript abundance of genes associated with PSII, the cytochrome b(6)/f complex, PSI, NADH oxidoreductase and the ATP complex was found in the P(SARK)::IPT plants. The increased transcript abundance was assessed by quantitative PCR and the increased protein levels were confirmed by Western blots. Our results indicated that while the photosynthetic apparatus in the wild-type plants was degraded, photosynthesis in the transgenic plants was not affected and photosynthetic proteins were not degraded. During water deficit, wild-type plants displayed a significant reduction in electron transfer and photochemical quenching, with a marked increase in non-photochemical quenching, suggesting a decrease in energy transfer to the PSII core complexes and an increase in cyclic electron transfer reactions.

  6. Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA Synthase 1 Shows Increased Plant Growth, Pod Size and Seed Yield

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Pan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mingfu; Hsiao, An-Shan; Bach, Thomas J.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS), the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt) and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i) phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1) in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii) higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii) induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant reproduction

  7. Aerosol from a candidate modified risk tobacco product has reduced effects on chemotaxis and transendothelial migration compared to combustion of conventional cigarettes.

    PubMed

    van der Toorn, Marco; Frentzel, Stefan; De Leon, Hector; Goedertier, Didier; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Reduction of harmful constituents by heating rather than combusting tobacco is a promising new approach to reduce harmful effects associated with cigarette smoking. We investigated the effect from a new candidate modified risk tobacco product, the tobacco heating system (THS) 2.2, on the migratory behavior of monocytes in comparison with combustible 3R4F reference cigarettes. The monocytic cell line (THP-1) and human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) were used to analyze chemotaxis and transendothelial migration (TEM). To assess the influence of aerosol extract from THS2.2 and smoke extract from 3R4F on toxicity and inflammation, flow cytometry and ELISA assays were performed. The results show that treatment of THP-1 cells with extract from 3R4F or THS2.2 induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity and inflammation. The inhibitory effects of THS2.2 extract for chemotaxis and TEM were ∼18 times less effective compared to 3R4F extract. Furthermore, extract from 3R4F or THS2.2 induced concentration-dependent decreases in the integrity of HCAEC monolayer. For all examined endpoints, the extract from 3R4F showed more than one order of magnitude stronger effects than that from THS2.2 extract. These data indicate the potential of a heat not burn tobacco product to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease compared to combustible cigarettes.

  8. Plant scents modify innate colour preference in foraging swallowtail butterflies.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mina; Itoh, Yuki; Ômura, Hisashi; Arikawa, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Michiyo

    2015-07-01

    Flower-visiting insects exhibit innate preferences for particular colours. A previous study demonstrated that naive Papilio xuthus females prefer yellow and red, whereas males are more attracted to blue. Here, we demonstrate that the innate colour preference can be modified by olfactory stimuli in a sexually dimorphic manner. Naive P. xuthus were presented with four coloured discs: blue, green, yellow and red. The innate colour preference (i.e. the colour first landed on) of the majority of individuals was blue. When scent from essential oils of either orange flower or lily was introduced to the room, females' tendency to select the red disc increased. Scents of lavender and flowering potted Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, however, were less effective. Interestingly, the odour of the non-flowering larval host plant, Citrus unshiu, shifted the preference to green in females. In males, however, all plant scents were less effective than in females, such that blue was always the most favoured colour. These observations indicate that interactions between visual and olfactory cues play a more prominent role in females.

  9. Plant scents modify innate colour preference in foraging swallowtail butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Mina; Itoh, Yuki; Ômura, Hisashi; Arikawa, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Michiyo

    2015-01-01

    Flower-visiting insects exhibit innate preferences for particular colours. A previous study demonstrated that naive Papilio xuthus females prefer yellow and red, whereas males are more attracted to blue. Here, we demonstrate that the innate colour preference can be modified by olfactory stimuli in a sexually dimorphic manner. Naive P. xuthus were presented with four coloured discs: blue, green, yellow and red. The innate colour preference (i.e. the colour first landed on) of the majority of individuals was blue. When scent from essential oils of either orange flower or lily was introduced to the room, females’ tendency to select the red disc increased. Scents of lavender and flowering potted Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, however, were less effective. Interestingly, the odour of the non-flowering larval host plant, Citrus unshiu, shifted the preference to green in females. In males, however, all plant scents were less effective than in females, such that blue was always the most favoured colour. These observations indicate that interactions between visual and olfactory cues play a more prominent role in females. PMID:26179802

  10. Altered stomatal dynamics in ascorbate oxidase over-expressing tobacco plants suggest a role for dehydroascorbate signalling.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios; De Tullio, Mario C; Barnes, Jeremy; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2008-01-01

    Control of stomatal aperture is of paramount importance for plant adaptation to the surrounding environment. Here, we report on several parameters related to stomatal dynamics and performance in transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Xanthi) over-expressing cucumber ascorbate oxidase (AO), a cell wall-localized enzyme of uncertain biological function that oxidizes ascorbic acid (AA) to monodehydroascorbic acid which dismutates yielding AA and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). In comparison to WT plants, leaves of AO over-expressing plants exhibited reduced stomatal conductance (due to partial stomatal closure), higher water content, and reduced rates of water loss on detachment. Transgenic plants also exhibited elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide and a decline in hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme activity. Leaf ABA content was also higher in AO over-expressing plants. Treatment of epidermal strips with either 1 mM DHA or 100 microM hydrogen peroxide resulted in rapid stomatal closure in WT plants, but not in AO-over-expressing plants. This suggests that signal perception and/or transduction associated with stomatal closure is altered by AO over-expression. These data support a specific role for cell wall-localized AA in the perception of environmental cues, and suggest that DHA acts as a regulator of stomatal dynamics.

  11. A Novel Stress-Induced Sugarcane Gene Confers Tolerance to Drought, Salt and Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Begcy, Kevin; Mariano, Eduardo D.; Gentile, Agustina; Lembke, Carolina G.; Zingaretti, Sonia Marli; Souza, Glaucia M.; Menossi, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background Drought is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity worldwide. Sugarcane can withstand periods of water scarcity during the final stage of culm maturation, during which sucrose accumulation occurs. Meanwhile, prolonged periods of drought can cause severe plant losses. Methodology/Principal Findings In a previous study, we evaluated the transcriptome of drought-stressed plants to better understand sugarcane responses to drought. Among the up-regulated genes was Scdr1 (sugarcane drought-responsive 1). The aim of the research reported here was to characterize this gene. Scdr1 encodes a putative protein containing 248 amino acids with a large number of proline (19%) and cysteine (13%) residues. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ScDR1is in a clade with homologs from other monocotyledonous plants, separate from those of dicotyledonous plants. The expression of Scdr1 in different varieties of sugarcane plants has not shown a clear association with drought tolerance. Conclusions/Significance The overexpression of Scdr1 in transgenic tobacco plants increased their tolerance to drought, salinity and oxidative stress, as demonstrated by increased photosynthesis, water content, biomass, germination rate, chlorophyll content and reduced accumulation of ROS. Physiological parameters, such as transpiration rate (E), net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and internal leaf CO2 concentration, were less affected by abiotic stresses in transgenic Scdr1 plants compared with wild-type plants. Overall, our results indicated that Scdr1 conferred tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, highlighting the potential of this gene for biotechnological applications. PMID:22984543

  12. Overexpression of lipid transfer protein (LTP) genes enhances resistance to plant pathogens and LTP functions in long-distance systemic signaling in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Sarowar, Sujon; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Ki Deok; Hwang, Byung Kook; Ok, Sung Han; Shin, Jeong Sheop

    2009-03-01

    The lipid signal is essential for the activation of plant defense responses, but downstream components of the signaling pathway are still poorly defined. To investigate the biological functions of pepper lipid transfer protein (LTP), we carried out virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper, constitutive expression of CALTPs and grafting experiments in the tobacco plant. Suppression of endogenous CALTPI and CALTPII by VIGS, respectively, resulted in enhanced susceptibility to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vescatoria and pepper mosaic mottle virus in pepper. On the other hand, the constitutive expression of CALTPI and CALTPII genes in tobacco plants showed enhanced resistance to oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora nicotianae and bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. Enhanced resistance is found to be associated with the enhanced CALTP transcript levels in the independent transgenic CALTPI or II tobacco lines. Induced resistance responses in grafted scion leaves revealed that LTP plays a role in long-distance systemic signaling in plants.

  13. The photosynthetic response of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant aquaporin McMIPB to a soil water deficit and high vapor pressure deficit.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Miki; Hanba, Yuko T; Katsuhara, Maki

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the photosynthetic capacity and plant growth of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) aquaporin McMIPB under (1) a well-watered growth condition, (2) a well-watered and temporal higher vapor pressure deficit (VPD) condition, and (3) a soil water deficit growth condition to investigate the effect of McMIPB on photosynthetic responses under moderate soil and atmospheric humidity and water deficit conditions. Transgenic plants showed a significantly higher photosynthesis rate (by 48 %), higher mesophyll conductance (by 52 %), and enhanced growth under the well-watered growth condition than those of control plants. Decreases in the photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance from ambient to higher VPD were slightly higher in transgenic plants than those in control plants. When plants were grown under the soil water deficit condition, decreases in the photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance were less significant in transgenic plants than those in control plants. McMIPB is likely to work as a CO2 transporter, as well as control the regulation of stomata to water deficits.

  14. Activation of Pathogenesis-related Genes by the Rhizobacterium, Bacillus sp. JS, Which Induces Systemic Resistance in Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Seong; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Chan-Hui; Woo, Su Young; Kang, Hoduck; Seo, Sang-Gyu; Kim, Sun-Hyung

    2015-06-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are known to confer disease resistance to plants. Bacillus sp. JS demonstrated antifungal activities against five fungal pathogens in in vitro assays. To verify whether the volatiles of Bacillus sp. JS confer disease resistance, tobacco leaves pre-treated with the volatiles were damaged by the fungal pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani and oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae. Pre-treated tobacco leaves had smaller lesion than the control plant leaves. In pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression analysis, volatiles of Bacillus sp. JS caused the up-regulation of PR-2 encoding β-1,3-glucanase and acidic PR-3 encoding chitinase. Expression of acidic PR-4 encoding chitinase and acidic PR-9 encoding peroxidase increased gradually after exposure of the volatiles to Bacillus sp. JS. Basic PR-14 encoding lipid transfer protein was also increased. However, PR-1 genes, as markers of salicylic acid (SA) induced resistance, were not expressed. These results suggested that the volatiles of Bacillus sp. JS confer disease resistance against fungal and oomycete pathogens through PR genes expression.

  15. Influence of salicylic acid on rubisco and rubisco activase in tobacco plant grown under sodium chloride in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Young; Damodaran, Puthanveettil Narayanankutty; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth of salt stress (sodium chloride) induced in tobacco plants. In addition, quantification of rubisco and rubisco activase contents of the plants was also determined in treatments with the control, 10−4 mM SA, 50 mM NaCl, 100 mM NaCl, 150 mM NaCl, SA + 50 mM NaCl, SA + 100 mM NaCl and SA + 150 mM NaCl, respectively after in vitro culture for 5 weeks. The growth of the tobacco plant decreased in 50 mM and 100 mM NaCl when not treated with SA. However, the growth was accelerated by SA, and the growth retardation caused by NaCl was improved by SA. The content of rubisco was improved by SA only in plants treated with 50 mM NaCl, and the activity of rubisco was increased by SA resulting in the decreased effect of NaCl, but only in 50 mM NaCl treated plants. The content of rubisco activase decreased due to NaCl, and SA did not improve the effect caused by NaCl. The activity of rubisco activase was increased by SA resulting in decreased activity caused by NaCl, but increased effect by SA was not recovered to the level of NaCl untreated plants. The activity of rubisco and rubisco activase, which decreased due to denaturing agents, did not demonstrate significant improvement when compared to the control. PMID:25313276

  16. Overexpression of a novel soybean gene modulating Na+ and K+ transport enhances salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huatao; He, Hui; Yu, Deyue

    2011-01-01

    Salt is an important factor affecting the growth and development of soybean in saline soil. In this study, a novel soybean gene encoding a transporter (GmHKT1) was identified and its function analyzed using transgenic plants. GmHKT1 encoded a protein of 419 amino acids, with a potential molecular mass of 47.06 kDa and a predicted pI value of 8.59. Comparison of the genomic and cDNA sequences of GmHKT1 identified no intron. The deduced amino acid sequence of GmHKT1 showed 38-49% identity with other plant HKT-like sequences. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of GmHKT1 was upregulated by salt stress (150 mM NaCl) in roots and leaves but not in stems. Overexpression of GmHKT1 significantly enhanced the tolerance of transgenic tobacco plants to salt stress, compared with non-transgenic plants. To investigate the role of GmHKT1 in K(+) and Na(+) transport, we compared K(+) and Na(+) accumulation in roots and shoots of wild-type and transgenic tobacco plants. The results suggested that GmHKT1 is a transporter that affected K(+) and Na(+) transport in roots and shoots, and regulated Na(+) /K(+) homeostasis in these organs. Our findings suggest that GmHKT1 plays an important role in response to salt stress and would be useful in engineering crop plants for enhanced tolerance to salt stress.

  17. Plants having modified response to ethylene by transformation with an ETR nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2001-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  18. Molecular phenotyping of lignin-modified tobacco reveals associated changes in cell-wall metabolism, primary metabolism, stress metabolism and photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Dauwe, Rebecca; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Gielen, Birgit; Rohde, Antje; Van Beeumen, Jos; Ralph, John; Boudet, Alain-Michel; Kopka, Joachim; Rochange, Soizic F; Halpin, Claire; Messens, Eric; Boerjan, Wout

    2007-10-01

    Lignin is an important component of secondarily thickened cell walls. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) are two key enzymes that catalyse the penultimate and last steps in the biosynthesis of the monolignols. Downregulation of CCR in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) has been shown to reduce lignin content, whereas lignin in tobacco downregulated for CAD incorporates more aldehydes. We show that altering the expression of either or both genes in tobacco has far-reaching consequences on the transcriptome and metabolome. cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism-based transcript profiling, combined with HPLC and GC-MS-based metabolite profiling, revealed differential transcripts and metabolites within monolignol biosynthesis, as well as a substantial network of interactions between monolignol and other metabolic pathways. In general, in all transgenic lines, the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway was downregulated, whereas starch mobilization was upregulated. CCR-downregulated lines were characterized by changes at the level of detoxification and carbohydrate metabolism, whereas the molecular phenotype of CAD-downregulated tobacco was enriched in transcript of light- and cell-wall-related genes. In addition, the transcript and metabolite data suggested photo-oxidative stress and increased photorespiration, mainly in the CCR-downregulated lines. These predicted effects on the photosynthetic apparatus were subsequently confirmed physiologically by fluorescence and gas-exchange measurements. Our data provide a molecular picture of a plant's response to altered monolignol biosynthesis.

  19. Use of recombinant tobacco mosaic virus to achieve RNA interference in plants against the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif Muhammad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Kiss, Zsofia; Khan, Azhar Abbas; Mansoor, Shahid; Falk, Bryce W

    2013-01-01

    The citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri, is an important plant pest with a very broad plant host range. P. citri is a phloem feeder and loss of plant vigor and stunting are characteristic symptoms induced on a range of host plants, but P. citri also reduces fruit quality and causes fruit drop leading to significant yield reductions. Better strategies for managing this pest are greatly needed. RNA interference (RNAi) is an emerging tool for functional genomics studies and is being investigated as a practical tool for highly targeted insect control. Here we investigated whether RNAi effects can be induced in P. citri and whether candidate mRNAs could be identified as possible targets for RNAi-based P. citri control. RNAi effects were induced in P. citri, as demonstrated by specific target reductions of P. citri actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs after injection of the corresponding specific double-stranded RNA inducers. We also used recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to express these RNAi effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We found that P. citri showed lower fecundity and pronounced death of crawlers after feeding on recombinant TMV-infected plants. Taken together, our data show that actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs are potential targets for RNAi against P. citri, and that recombinant TMV is an effective tool for evaluating candidate RNAi effectors in plants.

  20. 75 FR 62096 - Agricultural Technical Advisory Committees for Trade in Tobacco, Cotton, Peanuts and Planting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... addresses, such as genetically modified organisms, new technologies and international negotiations, are... the United States Trade Representative (USTR), is considering modifying the existing structure of...

  1. The alc-GR system: a modified alc gene switch designed for use in plant tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gethin R; Garoosi, G Ali; Koroleva, Olga; Ito, Masaki; Laufs, Patrick; Leader, David J; Caddick, Mark X; Doonan, John H; Tomsett, A Brian

    2005-07-01

    The ALCR/alcA (alc) two-component, ethanol-inducible gene expression system provides stringent control of transgene expression in genetically modified plants. ALCR is an ethanol-activated transcription factor that can drive expression from the ALCR-responsive promoter (alcA). However, the alc system has been shown to have constitutive expression when used in plant callus or cell suspension cultures, possibly resulting from endogenous inducer produced in response to lowered oxygen availability. To widen the use of the alc system in plant cell culture conditions, the receptor domain of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was translationally fused to the C terminus of ALCR to produce ALCR-GR, which forms the basis of a glucocorticoid-inducible system (alc-GR). The alc-GR switch system was tested in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 suspension cells using a constitutively expressed ALCR-GR with four alternative alcA promoter-driven reporter genes: beta-glucuronidase, endoplasmic reticulum-targeted green fluorescent protein, haemagglutinin, and green fluorescent protein-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Arath;CDKA;1 cyclin-dependent kinase. Gene expression was shown to be stringently dependent on the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone and, in cell suspensions, no longer required ethanol for induction. Thus, the alc-GR system allows tight control of alcA-driven genes in cell culture and complements the conventional ethanol switch used in whole plants.

  2. A CBL-Interacting Protein Kinase TaCIPK2 Confers Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants through Regulating the Stomatal Movement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Meng; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the CBL-CIPK signaling pathways play key roles in the response to abiotic stresses. However, functional studies of CIPKs in the important staple crop wheat are very rare. In this study, we identified a CIPK gene from wheat, designated TaCIPK2. Expression analysis results showed that TaCIPK2 could be up-regulated in wheat leaves by polyethylene glycol, abscisic acid and H2O2 treatments. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that TaCIPK2 was present in whole wheat epidermal cells. A yeast two-hybrid assay indicated that TaCIPK2 interacted with TaCBL1, 2, 3 and 4 in vitro. Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing TaCIPK2 exhibited increased drought tolerance, indicated by a larger proportion of green cotyledons and higher survival rates under the osmotic and drought stress conditions compared with control plants. Additionally, physiological index analyses revealed that the transgenic tobacco plants had lower water loss rates and ion leakage, accumulated less malondialdehyde and H2O2, and had higher catalase and superoxide dismutase activities than the control plants. The transgenic plants also exhibited faster stomatal closure following exposure to osmotic stress conditions. The seed germination rates and stomatal aperture of TaCIPK2-overexpressing tobacco plants decreased after exogenous abscisic acid treatment was applied, implying that the transgenic tobacco plants were more sensitive to exogenous abscisic acid than the control plants. Our results indicate that TaCIPK2 plays a positive regulatory role in drought stress responses in transgenic tobacco plants. PMID:27936160

  3. The Ectopic Expression of CaRop1 Modulates the Response of Tobacco Plants to Ralstonia solanacearum and Aphids

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ailian; Liu, Zhiqin; Li, Jiazhi; Chen, Yanshen; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    In plants, Rho-related GTPases (Rops) are versatile molecular switches that regulate various biological processes, although their exact roles are not fully understood. Herein, we provide evidence that the ectopic expression of a Rop derived from Capsicum annuum, designated CaRop1, in tobacco plants modulates the response of these plants to Ralstonia solanacearum or aphid attack. The deduced amino acid sequence of CaRop1 harbors a conserved Rho domain and is highly homologous to Rops of other plant species. Transient expression of a CaRop1-GFP fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells revealed localization of the GFP signal to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Overexpression (OE) of the wild-type CaRop1 or its dominant-negative mutant (DN-CaRop1) conferred substantial resistance to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack, and this effect was accompanied by enhanced transcriptional expression of the hypersensitive-reaction marker gene HSR201; the jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive PR1b and LOX1; the insect resistance-associated NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI; the ethylene (ET) production-associated NtACS1; and NPK1, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) that interferes with N-, Bs2-, and Rx-mediated disease resistance. In contrast, OE of the constitutively active mutant of CaRop1(CA-CaRop1) enhanced susceptibility of the transgenic tobacco plants to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack and downregulated or sustained the expression of HSR201, PR1b, NPK1, NtACS1, NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI. These results collectively suggest that CaRop1 acts as a signaling switch in the crosstalk between Solanaceaes’s response to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack possibly via JA/ET-mediated signaling machinery. PMID:27551287

  4. Differences in the rhizosphere bacterial community of a transplastomic tobacco plant compared to its non-engineered counterpart.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Nicole; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2007-01-01

    Cultivation-independent analyses were carried out to compare the bacterial community structure found in the rhizospheres of a transplastomic tobacco plant carrying the antibiotic resistance marker-gene aadA and its non-engineered parental line. PCR- and reverse transcriptase PCR-amplifications of 16S rRNA and their corresponding genes were carried out with primers targeting the domain Bacteria. The diversity of PCR-products amplified from total nucleic acids extracted from rhizospheres of 10-week-old plants, which had been grown in potting soil in the greenhouse, was visualized by genetic profiling using the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. The SSCP profiles generated from DNA extracted with two different protocols, one including total RNA and the other only DNA, did not show any differences. The SSCP profiles amplified from RNA and DNA were also highly similar to each other, indicating that the dominant bacteria detected were metabolically active. High similarities were seen between the SSCP profiles from the transplastomic and the non-engineered plants, except for a single band that consistently occurred with samples from the non-engineered plants (six replicates), but not, or only weakly, with their engineered counterparts. DNA sequencing and database analysis revealed that the partial rRNA gene matched to a Flavobacterium sp. Other bands of the SSCP-profiles, related to Burkholderia and Bordetella were variable between individual plants but not affected by the transplastomic modification. Thus, the transplastomic modification caused a relative decline of a specific Flavobacterium population but not of other bacteria. Further studies including additional tobacco cultivars, soils and conditions of cultivation would be desirable, to elucidate the ecological importance of this difference.

  5. Environmental impacts of genetically modified plants: A review.

    PubMed

    Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Nawaz, Muhammad Amjad; Kouretas, Demetrios; Balias, Georgios; Savolainen, Kai; Tutelyan, Victor A; Golokhvast, Kirill S; Lee, Jeong Dong; Yang, Seung Hwan; Chung, Gyuhwa

    2017-03-27

    Powerful scientific techniques have caused dramatic expansion of genetically modified crops leading to altered agricultural practices posing direct and indirect environmental implications. Despite the enhanced yield potential, risks and biosafety concerns associated with such GM crops are the fundamental issues to be addressed. An increasing interest can be noted among the researchers and policy makers in exploring unintended effects of transgenes associated with gene flow, flow of naked DNA, weediness and chemical toxicity. The current state of knowledge reveals that GM crops impart damaging impacts on the environment such as modification in crop pervasiveness or invasiveness, the emergence of herbicide and insecticide tolerance, transgene stacking and disturbed biodiversity, but these impacts require a more in-depth view and critical research so as to unveil further facts. Most of the reviewed scientific resources provide similar conclusions and currently there is an insufficient amount of data available and up until today, the consumption of GM plant products are safe for consumption to a greater extent with few exceptions. This paper updates the undesirable impacts of GM crops and their products on target and non-target species and attempts to shed light on the emerging challenges and threats associated with it. Underpinning research also realizes the influence of GM crops on a disturbance in biodiversity, development of resistance and evolution slightly resembles with the effects of non-GM cultivation. Future prospects are also discussed.

  6. Frequencies, Timing, and Spatial Patterns of Co-Suppression of Nitrate Reductase and Nitrite Reductase in Transgenic Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Palauqui, J. C.; Elmayan, T.; De Borne, F. D.; Crete, P.; Charles, C.; Vaucheret, H.

    1996-01-01

    Frequencies, timing, and spatial patterns of co-suppression of the nitrate (Nia) and nitrite (Nii) genes were analyzed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants carrying either Nia or Nii cDNAs under the control of the 35S promoter, or a Nii gene with its own regulatory signals (promoter, introns, and terminator) cloned downstream of two copies of the enhancer of the 35S promoter. We show that (a) the frequencies of transgenic lines affected by co- suppression are similar for the three constructs, ranging from 19 to 25%; (b) Nia and Nii co-suppression are triggered stochastically during a phenocritical period of 2 weeks between germination and flowering; (c) the timing of co-suppression (i.e. the percentage of isogenic plants affected by co-suppression reported as a function of the number of days of culture) differs from one transgenic line to another; (d) the percentage of isogenic plants affected by co-suppression is increased by growing the plants in vitro prior to their transfer to the greenhouse and to the field; and (e) at the end of the culture period, plants are either unaffected, completely co-suppressed, or variegated. Suppressed and nonsuppressed parts of these variegated plants are separated by a vertical plane through the stem in Nia co-suppression, and separated by a horizontal plane in Nii co-suppression. PMID:12226457

  7. An engineered pathway for glyoxylate metabolism in tobacco plants aimed to avoid the release of ammonia in photorespiration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The photorespiratory nitrogen cycle in C3 plants involves an extensive diversion of carbon and nitrogen away from the direct pathways of assimilation. The liberated ammonia is re-assimilated, but up to 25% of the carbon may be released into the atmosphere as CO2. Because of the loss of CO2 and high energy costs, there has been considerable interest in attempts to decrease the flux through the cycle in C3 plants. Transgenic tobacco plants were generated that contained the genes gcl and hyi from E. coli encoding glyoxylate carboligase (EC 4.1.1.47) and hydroxypyruvate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.22) respectively, targeted to the peroxisomes. It was presumed that the two enzymes could work together and compete with the aminotransferases that convert glyoxylate to glycine, thus avoiding ammonia production in the photorespiratory nitrogen cycle. Results When grown in ambient air, but not in elevated CO2, the transgenic tobacco lines had a distinctive phenotype of necrotic lesions on the leaves. Three of the six lines chosen for a detailed study contained single copies of the gcl gene, two contained single copies of both the gcl and hyi genes and one line contained multiple copies of both gcl and hyi genes. The gcl protein was detected in the five transgenic lines containing single copies of the gcl gene but hyi protein was not detected in any of the transgenic lines. The content of soluble amino acids including glycine and serine, was generally increased in the transgenic lines growing in air, when compared to the wild type. The content of soluble sugars, glucose, fructose and sucrose in the shoot was decreased in transgenic lines growing in air, consistent with decreased carbon assimilation. Conclusions Tobacco plants have been generated that produce bacterial glyoxylate carboligase but not hydroxypyruvate isomerase. The transgenic plants exhibit a stress response when exposed to air, suggesting that some glyoxylate is diverted away from conversion to glycine in a

  8. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-10

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  9. Cadmium in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, L. )

    1992-03-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the cadmium level in tobacco planted in five main tobacco-producing areas, a cadmium polluted area, and in cigarettes produced domestically (54 brands). The results indicate that average cadmium content in tobacco was 1.48 (0.10-4.95 mg/kg), which was similar to that of Indian tobacco (1.24 mg/kg), but the cadmium of tobacco produced in the cadmium polluted area was quite high (8.60 mg/kg). The average cigarette cadmium was 1.05 micrograms/g (with filter tip) and 1.61 micrograms/g (regular cigarette). Therefore special attention should be paid to the soil used in planting tobacco.

  10. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants.

  11. Plants with modified lignin content and methods for production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Qiao; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-05

    The invention provides methods for decreasing lignin content and for increasing the level of fermentable carbohydrates in plants by down-regulation of the NST transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of NST are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise reduced lignin content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops. Methods for processing plant tissue and for producing ethanol by utilizing such plants are also provided.

  12. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank; Boddupalli, Sekhar S.

    2011-08-23

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  13. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank; Boddupalli, Sekhar S.

    2005-08-30

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  14. C-Terminally fused affinity Strep-tag II is removed by proteolysis from recombinant human erythropoietin expressed in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Lalgondar, Mallikarjun; Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Sane, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Asialo-erythropoietin (asialo-EPO), a desialylated form of EPO, is a potent tissue-protective agent. Recently, we and others have exploited a low cost plant-based expression system to produce recombinant human asialo-EPO (asialo-rhuEPOP). To facilitate purification from plant extracts, Strep-tag II was engineered at the C-terminus of EPO. Although asialo-rhuEPOP was efficiently expressed in transgenic tobacco plants, affinity purification based on Strep-tag II did not result in the recovery of the protein. In this study, we investigated the stability of Strep-tag II tagged asialo-rhuEPOP expressed in tobacco plants to understand whether this fused tag is cleaved or inaccessible. Sequencing RT-PCR products confirmed that fused DNA sequences encoding Strep-tag II were properly transcribed, and three-dimensional protein structure model revealed that the tag must be fully accessible. However, Western blot analysis of leaf extracts and purified asialo-rhuEPOP revealed that the Strep-tag II was absent on the protein. Additionally, no peptide fragment containing Strep-tag II was identified in the LC-MS/MS analysis of purified protein further supporting that the affinity tag was absent on asialo-rhuEPOP. However, Strep-tag II was detected on asialo-rhuEPOP that was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that the Strep-tag II is removed during protein secretion or extraction. These findings together with recent reports that C-terminally fused Strep-tag II or IgG Fc domain are also removed from EPO in tobacco plants, suggest that its C-terminus may be highly susceptible to proteolysis in tobacco plants. Therefore, direct fusion of purification tags at the C-terminus of EPO should be avoided while expressing it in tobacco plants. PMID:25504272

  15. MOLECULAR PHENOTYPING OF LIGNIN-MODIFIED TOBACCO REVEALS ASSOCIATED CHANGES IN CELL WALL METABOLISM, PRIMARY METABOLISM, STRESS METABOLISM AND PHOTORESPIRATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is an important component of secondary thickened cell walls. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) are two key enzymes catalyzing the penultimate and last step in the biosynthesis of the monolignols. Down-regulation of CCR in tobacco has been shown to reduce l...

  16. A comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of autophagy-related genes identified in tobacco suggests a central role of autophagy in plant response to various environmental cues

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xue-mei; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Wei; Zou, Jie; Cheng, Tian-he; Peng, Xiong-bo; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in both animals and plants, which has been shown to be involved in various essential developmental processes in plants. Nicotiana tabacum is considered to be an ideal model plant and has been widely used for the study of the roles of autophagy in the processes of plant development and in the response to various stresses. However, only a few autophagy-related genes (ATGs) have been identified in tobacco up to now. Here, we identified 30 ATGs belonging to 16 different groups in tobacco through a genome-wide survey. Comprehensive expression profile analysis reveals an abroad expression pattern of these ATGs, which could be detected in all tissues tested under normal growth conditions. Our series tests further reveal that majority of ATGs are sensitive and responsive to different stresses including nutrient starvation, plant hormones, heavy metal and other abiotic stresses, suggesting a central role of autophagy, likely as an effector, in plant response to various environmental cues. This work offers a detailed survey of all ATGs in tobacco and also suggests manifold functions of autophagy in both normal plant growth and plant response to environmental stresses. PMID:26205094

  17. Synergistic effects of 2A-mediated polyproteins on the production of lignocellulose degradation enzymes in tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Cost-effective bioethanol production requires a supply of various low-cost enzymes that can hydrolyse lignocellulosic materials consisting of multiple polymers. Because plant-based enzyme expression systems offer low-cost and large-scale production, this study simultaneously expressed β-glucosidase (BglB), xylanase (XylII), exoglucanase (E3), and endoglucanase (Cel5A) in tobacco plants, which were individually fused with chloroplast-targeting transit peptides and linked via the 2A self-cleaving oligopeptideex from foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) as follows: [RsBglB-2A-RaCel5A], [RsXylII-2A-RaCel5A], and [RsE3-2A-RaCel5A]. The enzymes were targeted to chloroplasts in tobacco cells and their activities were confirmed. Similarly to the results of a transient assay using Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts, when XylII was placed upstream of the 2A sequence, the [RsXylII-2A-RaCel5A] transgenic tobacco plant had a more positive influence on expression of the protein placed downstream. The [RsBglB-2A-RaCel5A] and [RsE3-2A-RaCel5A] transgenic lines displayed higher activities towards carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) compared to those in the [RsXylII-2A-RaCel5A] transgenic line. This higher activity was attributable to the synergistic effects of the different cellulases used. The [RsBglB-2A-RaCel5A] lines exhibited greater efficiency (35–74% increase) of CMC hydrolysis when the exoglucanase CBHII was added. Among the various exoglucanases, E3 showed higher activity with the crude extract of the [RsBglB-2A-RaCel5A] transgenic line. Transgenic expression of 2A-mediated multiple enzymes induced synergistic effects and led to more efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials for bioethanol production. PMID:22798663

  18. RNA-Guided Cas9-Induced Mutagenesis in Tobacco Followed by Efficient Genetic Fixation in Doubled Haploid Plants

    PubMed Central

    Schedel, Sindy; Pencs, Stefanie; Hensel, Götz; Müller, Andrea; Rutten, Twan; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Customizable endonucleases are providing an effective tool for genome engineering. The resulting primary transgenic individuals (T0) are typically heterozygous and/or chimeric with respect to any mutations induced. To generate genetically fixed mutants, they are conventionally allowed to self-pollinate, a procedure which segregates individuals into mutant heterozygotes/homozygotes and wild types. The chances of recovering homozygous mutants among the progeny depend not only on meiotic segregation but also on the frequency of mutated germline cells in the chimeric mother plant. In Nicotiana species, the heritability of Cas9-induced mutations has not been demonstrated yet. RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease-mediated mutagenesis was targeted to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene harbored by a transgenic tobacco line. Upon retransformation using a GFP-specific guide RNA/Cas9 construct, the T0 plants were allowed to either self-pollinate, or were propagated via regeneration from in vitro cultured embryogenic pollen which give rise to haploid/doubled haploid plants or from leaf explants that form plants vegetatively. Single or multiple mutations were detected in 80% of the T0 plants. About half of these mutations proved heritable via selfing. Regeneration from in vitro cultured embryogenic pollen allowed for homozygous mutants to be produced more efficiently than via sexual reproduction. Consequently, embryogenic pollen culture provides a convenient method to rapidly generate a variety of genetically fixed mutants following site-directed mutagenesis. The recovery of a mutation not found among sexually produced and analyzed progeny was shown to be achievable through vegetative plant propagation in vitro, which eventually resulted in heritability when the somatic clones were selfed. In addition, some in-frame mutations were associated with functional attenuation of the target gene rather than its full knock-out. The generation of mutants with compromised rather than

  19. ELPylated haemagglutinins produced in tobacco plants induce potentially neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hoang T; Pohl, Julia; Floss, Doreen M; Rabenstein, Frank; Veits, Jutta; Le, Binh T; Chu, Ha H; Hause, Gerd; Mettenleiter, Thomas; Conrad, Udo

    2013-06-01

    Reducing the cost of vaccine production is a key priority for veterinary research, and the possibility of heterologously expressing antigen in plants provides a particularly attractive means of achieving this. Here, we report the expression of the avian influenza virus haemagglutinin (AIV HA) in tobacco, both as a monomer and as a trimer in its native and its ELPylated form. We firstly presented evidence to produce stabilized trimers of soluble HA in plants. ELPylation of these trimers does not influence the trimerization. Strong expression enhancement in planta caused by ELPylation was demonstrated for trimerized H5-ELP. ELPylated trimers could be purified by a membrane-based inverse transition cycling procedure with the potential of successful scale-up. The trimeric form of AIV HA was found to enhance the HA-specific immune response compared with the monomeric form. Plant-derived AIV HA trimers elicited potentially neutralizing antibodies interacting with both homologous virus-like particles from plants and heterologous inactivated AIV. ELPylation did not influence the functionality and the antigenicity of the stabilized H5 trimers. These data allow further developments including scale-up of production, purification and virus challenge experiments with the final goal to achieve suitable technologies for efficient avian flu vaccine production.

  20. Tobacco ankyrin protein NEIP2 interacts with ethylene receptor NTHK1 and regulates plant growth and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Li, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Jian-Jun; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-04-01

    Ethylene is a gaseous hormone that regulates many processes involved in plant growth, development and stress responses. Previously, we found that the tobacco ethylene receptor NTHK1 (Nicotiana tabacum histidine kinase 1) promotes seedling growth and affects plant salt stress responses. In this study, NTHK1 ethylene receptor-interacting protein 2 (NEIP2) was identified and further characterized in relation to these processes. NEIP2 contains three ankyrin repeats that mediate an interaction with NTHK1 as demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. NTHK1 phosphorylates NEIP2 in vitro. Salt stress and ethylene treatment induce NEIP2 accumulation in the first few hours and then the NEIP2 can be phosphorylated in planta. The overexpression of NTHK1 enhances NEIP2 accumulation in the presence of ethylene and salt stress. NEIP2 overexpression promotes plant growth but reduces ethylene responses, which is consistent with the functions of NTHK1. Additionally, NEIP2 improves plant performance under salt and oxidative stress. These results suggest that ethylene-induced NEIP2 probably acts as a brake to reduce ethylene response but resumes growth through interaction with NTHK1. Manipulation of NEIP2 may be beneficial for crop improvement.

  1. A novel bZIP gene from Tamarix hispida mediates physiological responses to salt stress in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yucheng; Gao, Caiqiu; Liang, Yenan; Wang, Chao; Yang, Chuanping; Liu, Guifeng

    2010-02-15

    Basic leucine zipper proteins (bZIPs) are transcription factors that bind abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements (ABREs) and enable plants to withstand adverse environmental conditions. In the present study, a novel bZIP gene, ThbZIP1 was cloned from Tamarix hispida. Expression studies in T. hispida showed differential regulation of ThbZIP1 in response to treatment with NaCl, polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000, NaHCO(3), and CdCl(2), suggesting that ThbZIP1 is involved in abiotic stress responses. To identify the physiological responses mediated by ThbZIP1, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing exogenous ThbZIP1 were generated. Various physiological parameters related to salt stress were measured and compared between transgenic and wild type (WT) plants. Our results indicate that overexpression of ThbZIP1 can enhance the activity of both peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increase the content of soluble sugars and soluble proteins under salt stress conditions. These results suggest that ThbZIP1 contributes to salt tolerance by mediating signaling through multiple physiological pathways. Furthermore, ThbZIP1 confers stress tolerance to plants by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, facilitating the accumulation of compatible osmolytes, and inducing and/or enhancing the biosynthesis of soluble proteins.

  2. Rhodococcus fascians infection accelerates progression of tobacco BY-2 cells into mitosis through rapid changes in plant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Olivier; Vereecke, Danny; Mol, Adeline; Lenjou, Marc; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2007-01-01

    * To characterize plant cell cycle activation following Rhodococcus fascians infection, bacterial impact on cell cycle progression of tobacco BY-2 cells was investigated. * S-phase-synchronized BY-2 cells were cocultivated with R. fascians and cell cycle progression was monitored by measuring mitotic index, cell cycle gene expression and flow cytometry parameters. Cell cycle alteration was further investigated by cDNA-AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism). * It was shown that cell cycle progression of BY-2 cells was accelerated only upon infection with bacteria whose virulence gene expression was induced by a leafy gall extract. Thirty-eight BY-2 genes showed a differential expression within 6 h post-infection. Among these, seven were previously associated with specific plant cell cycle phases (in particular S and G2/M phases). Several genes also showed a differential expression during leafy gall formation. * R. fascians-infected BY-2 cells provide a simple model to identify plant genes related to leafy gall development. R. fascians can also be regarded as a useful biotic agent to alter cell cycle progression and, thereby, gain a better understanding of cell cycle regulation in plants.

  3. Transgenic plants protected from insect attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaeck, Mark; Reynaerts, Arlette; Höfte, Herman; Jansens, Stefan; de Beuckeleer, Marc; Dean, Caroline; Zabeau, Marc; Montagu, Marc Van; Leemans, Jan

    1987-07-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produces proteins which are specifically toxic to a variety of insect species. Modified genes have been derived from bt2, a toxin gene cloned from one Bacillus strain. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing these genes synthesize insecticidal proteins which protect them from feeding damage by larvae of the tobacco hornworm.

  4. Optimization of Acidothermus Celluloyticus Endoglucanase (E1) Production in Transgenic Tobacco Plants by Transcriptional, Post-transcription and Post-Translational Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ziyu; Hooker, Brian S.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Thomas, S. R.

    2005-10-01

    Biochemical characteristics of Acidothermus cellulolyticus endoglucanase (E1) and its physiological effects in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) has been studied previously. In an attempt to obtain a high level of production of intact E1 in transgenic plants, the E1 gene was expressed under the control of strong Mac promoter (a hybrid promoter of manopine synthase promoter and cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter enhancer region) or tomato Rubisco small subunit (RbcS-3C) promoter with different 5’ untranslated leader (UTL) sequence and targeted to different subcellular comartmentations with various transit peptides. The expression of E1 protein in transgenic tobacco plants was determined via E1 activity, protein immunobloting, and RNA gel-blotting analyses. Effects of different transit peptides on E1 protein production and its stability were examined in transgenic tobacco plants carrying one of six transgene expression vectors with the same (Mac) promoter and transcription terminator (Tmas). Transgenic tobacco plants with apoplast transit peptide (Mm-apo) had the highest average E1 activity and protein accumulation , while E1 protein was more stable in transgenic plants with no transit peptide (Mm) than others. The E1 expression under tomato RbcS-3C promoter was higher than that under Mac promoter based on the average E1 activity, E1 protein accumulation, and RNA gel-blotting. The E1 expression was increased more than two fold when the 5’-UTL of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4 gene replaced the UTL of RbcS-3C promoter, while the UTL of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4 gene was less effective than the UTL of Mac promoter. The optimal combination of promoter, 5’-UTL, and subcellular compartmentation (transit peptide) for E1 protein production in transgenic tobacco plants are discussed.

  5. High levels of bioplastic are produced in fertile transplastomic tobacco plants engineered with a synthetic operon for the production of polyhydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Bohmert-Tatarev, Karen; McAvoy, Susan; Daughtry, Sean; Peoples, Oliver P; Snell, Kristi D

    2011-04-01

    An optimized genetic construct for plastid transformation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) for the production of the renewable, biodegradable plastic polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was designed using an operon extension strategy. Bacterial genes encoding the PHB pathway enzymes were selected for use in this construct based on their similarity to the codon usage and GC content of the tobacco plastome. Regulatory elements with limited homology to the host plastome yet known to yield high levels of plastidial recombinant protein production were used to enhance the expression of the transgenes. A partial transcriptional unit, containing genes of the PHB pathway and a selectable marker gene encoding spectinomycin resistance, was flanked at the 5' end by the host plant's psbA coding sequence and at the 3' end by the host plant's 3' psbA untranslated region. This design allowed insertion of the transgenes into the plastome as an extension of the psbA operon, rendering the addition of a promoter to drive the expression of the transgenes unnecessary. Transformation of the optimized construct into tobacco and subsequent spectinomycin selection of transgenic plants yielded T0 plants that were capable of producing up to 18.8% dry weight PHB in samples of leaf tissue. These plants were fertile and produced viable seed. T1 plants producing up to 17.3% dry weight PHB in samples of leaf tissue and 8.8% dry weight PHB in the total biomass of the plant were also isolated.

  6. [Effects of local induction of ipt-gene in roots on cytokinins content in leaf cells tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Vysotskaia, L B; Akhiiarova, G P; Sharapova, G V; Dedova, M A; Veselov, S Iu; Zaĭtsev, D Iu; Kudoiarova, G P

    2014-01-01

    Identification of cytokinins in differentiated leaf cells has received little attention. We have carried out immunohistochemical localization of cytokinins in leaves of transgenic tobacco plants in which the level of increased due to induced in their roots the expression of ipt-gene controlling cytokinin synthesis. Immuno-labeling of cytokinins with the help of antibodies raised against zeatin riboside was characteristic of mesophyll cells. The label was localized in cytoplasm adjacent to cell walls and was absent in vacuoles. Immunohistochemical staining also revealed the presence of cytokinins in guard cells. Induction of cytokinin synthesis enhanced the immunohistochemical staining of both mesophyll cells and guard cells, which was accompanied by elevated stomatal conductance. The possibility of a direct effect of cytokinins on stomatal conductance and their indirect influence through photosynthesis in the mesophyll cells is discussed.

  7. Simultaneous Expression of PDH45 with EPSPS Gene Improves Salinity and Herbicide Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bharti; Gill, Sarvajeet S; Biswas, Dipul K; Sahoo, Ranjan K; Kunchge, Nandkumar S; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the problem of salinity- and weed-induced crop losses, a multi-stress tolerant trait is need of the hour but a combinatorial view of such traits is not yet explored. The overexpression of PDH45 (pea DNA helicase 45) and EPSPS (5-enoylpruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase) genes have been reported to impart salinity and herbicide tolerance. Further, the understanding of mechanism and pathways utilized by PDH45 and EPSPS for salinity and herbicide tolerance will help to improve the crops of economical importance. In the present study, we have performed a comparative analysis of salinity and herbicide tolerance to check the biochemical parameters and antioxidant status of tobacco transgenic plants. Collectively, the results showed that PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines display efficient tolerance to salinity stress, while PDH45+EPSPS transgenics showed tolerance to both the salinity and herbicide as compared to the control [wild type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants. The activities of the components of enzymatic antioxidant machinery were observed to be higher in the transgenic plants indicating the presence of an efficient antioxidant defense system which helps to cope with the stress-induced oxidative-damages. Photosynthetic parameters also showed significant increase in PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS overexpressing transgenic plants in comparison to WT, VC and EPSPS transgenic plants under salinity stress. Furthermore, PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS synergistically modulate the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid mediated signaling pathways for combating salinity stress. The findings of our study suggest that pyramiding of the PDH45 gene with EPSPS gene renders host plants tolerant to salinity and herbicide by enhancing the antioxidant machinery thus photosynthesis.

  8. Enhanced drought and heat stress tolerance of tobacco plants with ectopically enhanced cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Macková, Hana; Hronková, Marie; Dobrá, Jana; Turečková, Veronika; Novák, Ondřej; Lubovská, Zuzana; Motyka, Václav; Haisel, Daniel; Hájek, Tomáš; Prášil, Ilja Tom; Gaudinová, Alena; Štorchová, Helena; Ge, Eva; Werner, Tomáš; Schmülling, Thomas; Vanková, Radomíra

    2013-07-01

    Responses to drought, heat, and combined stress were compared in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants ectopically expressing the cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase CKX1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana L. under the control of either the predominantly root-expressed WRKY6 promoter or the constitutive 35S promoter, and in the wild type. WRKY6:CKX1 plants exhibited high CKX activity in the roots under control conditions. Under stress, the activity of the WRKY6 promoter was down-regulated and the concomitantly reduced cytokinin degradation coincided with raised bioactive cytokinin levels during the early phase of the stress response, which might contribute to enhanced stress tolerance of this genotype. Constitutive expression of CKX1 resulted in an enlarged root system, a stunted, dwarf shoot phenotype, and a low basal level of expression of the dehydration marker gene ERD10B. The high drought tolerance of this genotype was associated with a relatively moderate drop in leaf water potential and a significant decrease in leaf osmotic potential. Basal expression of the proline biosynthetic gene P5CSA was raised. Both wild-type and WRKY6:CKX1 plants responded to heat stress by transient elevation of stomatal conductance, which correlated with an enhanced abscisic acid catabolism. 35S:CKX1 transgenic plants exhibited a small and delayed stomatal response. Nevertheless, they maintained a lower leaf temperature than the other genotypes. Heat shock applied to drought-stressed plants exaggerated the negative stress effects, probably due to the additional water loss caused by a transient stimulation of transpiration. The results indicate that modulation of cytokinin levels may positively affect plant responses to abiotic stress through a variety of physiological mechanisms.

  9. Simultaneous Expression of PDH45 with EPSPS Gene Improves Salinity and Herbicide Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Bharti; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Biswas, Dipul K.; Sahoo, Ranjan K.; Kunchge, Nandkumar S.; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the problem of salinity- and weed-induced crop losses, a multi-stress tolerant trait is need of the hour but a combinatorial view of such traits is not yet explored. The overexpression of PDH45 (pea DNA helicase 45) and EPSPS (5-enoylpruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase) genes have been reported to impart salinity and herbicide tolerance. Further, the understanding of mechanism and pathways utilized by PDH45 and EPSPS for salinity and herbicide tolerance will help to improve the crops of economical importance. In the present study, we have performed a comparative analysis of salinity and herbicide tolerance to check the biochemical parameters and antioxidant status of tobacco transgenic plants. Collectively, the results showed that PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines display efficient tolerance to salinity stress, while PDH45+EPSPS transgenics showed tolerance to both the salinity and herbicide as compared to the control [wild type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants. The activities of the components of enzymatic antioxidant machinery were observed to be higher in the transgenic plants indicating the presence of an efficient antioxidant defense system which helps to cope with the stress-induced oxidative-damages. Photosynthetic parameters also showed significant increase in PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS overexpressing transgenic plants in comparison to WT, VC and EPSPS transgenic plants under salinity stress. Furthermore, PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS synergistically modulate the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid mediated signaling pathways for combating salinity stress. The findings of our study suggest that pyramiding of the PDH45 gene with EPSPS gene renders host plants tolerant to salinity and herbicide by enhancing the antioxidant machinery thus photosynthesis. PMID:28392794

  10. Recovery from drought stress in tobacco: an active process associated with the reversal of senescence in some plant parts and the sacrifice of others.

    PubMed

    Vanková, Radomíra; Dobrá, Jana; Storchová, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Plant response to water deficit and subsequent re-watering is fine tuned at the whole plant level. It differs not only between shoot and root, but also among particular leaves along a plant axis. We estimated the expression of proline metabolism-related genes and the activity of senescence-related promoter in roots and individual leaves of tobacco plants in the course of drought stress and recovery. Proline plays the dual role of an osmoprotectant and an antioxidant under water deficit. High proline concentration in the youngest uppermost leaves contributed to their protection from drought, which was associated with low degree of senescence. During recovery, elevated proline concentrations persisted and the senescence-related promoter was switched off in all surviving leaves. Two mutually exclusive scenarios were followed by tobacco leaves on recovery--restoration of photosynthesis and metabolism, or death, depending on the progress of senescence.

  11. Mutational analyses of molecularly cloned satellite tobacco mosaic virus during serial passage in plants: Evidence for hotspots of genetic change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Dodds, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The high level of genetic diversity and rapid evolution of viral RNA genomes are well documented, but few studies have characterized the rate and nature of ongoing genetic change over time under controlled experimental conditions, especially in plant hosts. The RNA genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was used as an effective model for such studies because of advantageous features of its genome structure and because the extant genetic heterogeneity of STMV has been characterized previously. In the present study, the process of genetic change over time was studied by monitoring multiple serial passage lines of STMV populations for changes in their consensus sequences. A total of 42 passage lines were initiated by inoculation of tobacco plants with a helper tobamovirus and one of four STMV RNA inocula that were transcribed from full-length infectious STMV clones or extracted from purified STMV type strain virions. Ten serial passages were carried out for each line and the consensus genotypes of progeny STMV populations were assessed for genetic change by RNase protection analyses of the entire 1,059-nt STMV genome. Three different types of genetic change were observed, including the fixation of novel mutations in 9 of 42 lines, mutation at the major heterogeneity site near nt 751 in 5 of the 19 lines inoculated with a single genotype, and selection of a single major genotype in 6 of the 23 lines inoculated with mixed genotypes. Sequence analyses showed that the majority of mutations were single base substitutions. The distribution of mutation sites included three clusters in which mutations occurred at or very near the same site, suggesting hot spots of genetic change in the STMV genome. The diversity of genetic changes in sibling lines is clear evidence for the important role of chance and random sampling events in the process of genetic diversification of STMV virus populations.

  12. Mutation analyses of molecularly cloned satellite tobacco mosaic virus during serial passage in plants: evidence for hotspots of genetic change.

    PubMed

    Kurath, G; Dodds, J A

    1995-07-01

    The high level of genetic diversity and rapid evolution of viral RNA genomes are well documented, but few studies have characterized the rate and nature of ongoing genetic change over time under controlled experimental conditions, especially in plant hosts. The RNA genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was used as an effective model for such studies because of advantageous features of its genome structure and because the extant genetic heterogeneity of STMV has been characterized previously. In the present study, the process of genetic change over time was studied by monitoring multiple serial passage lines of STMV populations for changes in their consensus sequences. A total of 42 passage lines were initiated by inoculation of tobacco plants with a helper tobamovirus and one of four STMV RNA inocula that were transcribed from full-length infectious STMV clones or extracted from purified STMV type strain virions. Ten serial passages were carried out for each line and the consensus genotypes of progeny STMV populations were assessed for genetic change by RNase protection analyses of the entire 1,059-nt STMV genome. Three different types of genetic change were observed, including the fixation of novel mutations in 9 of 42 lines, mutation at the major heterogeneity site near nt 751 in 5 of the 19 lines inoculated with a single genotype, and selection of a single major genotype in 6 of the 23 lines inoculated with mixed genotypes. Sequence analyses showed that the majority of mutations were single base substitutions. The distribution of mutation sites included three clusters in which mutations occurred at or very near the same site, suggesting hot spots of genetic change in the STMV genome. The diversity of genetic changes in sibling lines is clear evidence for the important role of chance and random sampling events in the process of genetic diversification of STMV virus populations.

  13. Smokeless Tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    ... stillbirth when used during pregnancy Smokeless tobacco can lead to nicotine poisoning and even death in children who mistake it for candy. Smokeless tobacco causes nicotine addiction. This can lead to smoking and using other forms of tobacco. ...

  14. Metabolic engineering of glycine betaine synthesis: plant betaine aldehyde dehydrogenases lacking typical transit peptides are targeted to tobacco chloroplasts where they confer betaine aldehyde resistance.

    PubMed

    Rathinasabapathi, B; McCue, K F; Gage, D A; Hanson, A D

    1994-01-01

    Certain higher plants synthesize and accumulate glycine betaine, a compound with osmoprotectant properties. Biosynthesis of glycine betaine proceeds via the pathway choline-->betaine aldehyde-->glycine betaine. Plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) which do not accumulate glycine betaine lack the enzymes catalyzing both reactions. As a step towards engineering glycine betaine accumulation into a non-accumulator, spinach and sugar beet complementary-DNA sequences encoding the second enzyme of glycine-betaine synthesis (betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, BADH, EC 1.2.1.8) were expressed in tobacco. Despite the absence of a typical transit peptide, BADH was targeted to the chloroplast in leaves of transgenic plants. Levels of extractable BADH were comparable to those in spinach and sugar beet, and the molecular weight, isoenzyme profile and Km for betaine aldehyde of the BADH enzymes from transgenic plants were the same as for native spinach or sugar beet BADH. Transgenic plants converted supplied betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine at high rates, demonstrating that they were able to transport betaine aldehyde across both the plasma membrane and the chloroplast envelope. The glycine betaine produced in this way was not further metabolized and reached concentrations similar to those in plants which accumulate glycine betaine naturally. Betaine aldehyde was toxic to non-transformed tobacco tissues whereas transgenic tissues were resistant due to detoxification of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine. Betaine aldehyded ehydrogenase is therefore of interest as a potential selectable marker, as well as in the metabolic engineering of osmoprotectant biosynthesis.

  15. Stable Accumulation of Modified 2S Albumin Seed Storage Proteins with Higher Methionine Contents in Transgenic Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Ann; Vandewiele, Martine; Van Damme, Jozef; Guerche, Philippe; Van Montagu, Marc; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Krebbers, Enno

    1990-01-01

    We present the results of two sets of experiments designed to express high methionine proteins in transgenic seeds in three different plant species. In the first approach, two chimeric genes were constructed in which parts of the Arabidopsis 2S albumin gene 1 (AT2S1) were fused at different positions to a Brazil nut 2S albumin cDNA clone. Brazil nut 2S albumin was found to accumulate stably in transgenic Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, and tobacco seeds. In the second approach, methionine-enriched AT2S1 genes were constructed by deleting sequences encoding a region of the protein which is not highly conserved among 2S albumins of different species and replacing them with methioninerich sequences. Introduction of the modified AT2S1 genes into three different plant species resulted in the accumulation of the methionine-enriched 2S albumins in all three species at levels reaching 1 to 2% of the total high salt-extractable seed protein. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16667878

  16. Alpha-momorcharin, a RIP produced by bitter melon, enhances defense response in tobacco plants against diverse plant viruses and shows antifungal activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Zhang, Ping; Meng, Yan-Fa; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Da-Wei; Cheng, Jian; Lin, Hong-Hui; Xi, De-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-momorcharin (α-MMC) is type-1 ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with molecular weight of 29 kDa and has lots of biological activity. Our recent study indicated that the α-MMC purified from seeds of Momordica charantia exhibited distinct antiviral and antifungal activity. Tobacco plants pre-treated with 0.5 mg/mL α-MMC 3 days before inoculation with various viruses showed less-severe symptom and less reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation compared to that inoculated with viruses only. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the replication levels of viruses were lower in the plants treated with the α-MMC than control plants at 15 days post inoculation. Moreover, the coat protein expression of viruses was almost completely inhibited in plants which were treated with the α-MMC compared with control plants. Furthermore, the SA-responsive defense-related genes including non-expressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1), PR1, PR2 were up-regulated and activities of some antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) were increased after the α-MMC treatment. In addition, the α-MMC (500 μg/mL) revealed remarkable antifungal effect against phytopathogenic fungi, in the growth inhibition range 50.35-67.21 %, along with their MIC values ranging from 100 to 500 μg/mL. The α-MMC had also a strong detrimental effect on spore germination of all the tested plant pathogens along with concentration as well as time-dependent kinetic inhibition of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The α-MMC showed a remarkable antiviral and antifungal effect and hence could possibly be exploited in crop protection for controlling certain important plant diseases.

  17. Characterization of siRNAs derived from cucumber mosaic virus in infected tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yanhong; Zhang, Yongjiang; Hu, Fan; Zhu, Shuifang

    2017-03-27

    This study characterized the viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) from Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun infected with a cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) 2b-deficient mutant. Most vsiRNAs were 21 -22 nucleotides in length and the 5'-terminal ends were dominated by A and U, respectively. The observed vsiRNAs were heterogeneously distributed throughout the CMV genome; however, most of the vsiRNAs were derived from sense strands, as opposed to antisense strands. These results demonstrate the conserved and specific function of Dicer-like (DCL), Argonaute (AGO) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR) proteins in tobacco. Finally, it was revealed that vsiRNAs target abundant host genes, indicating complex roles for CMV vsiRNAs during the development of symptoms.

  18. Effects of cigarette smoke, cessation and switching to a candidate modified risk tobacco product on the liver in Apoe -/- mice--a systems toxicology analysis.

    PubMed

    Lo Sasso, Giuseppe; Titz, Bjoern; Nury, Catherine; Boué, Stéphanie; Phillips, Blaine; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Schneider, Thomas; Dijon, Sophie; Baumer, Karine; Peric, Daruisz; Dulize, Remi; Elamin, Ashraf; Guedj, Emmanuel; Buettner, Ansgar; Leroy, Patrice; Kleinhans, Samuel; Vuillaume, Gregory; Veljkovic, Emilija; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Martin, Florian; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-04-01

    The liver is one of the most important organs involved in elimination of xenobiotic and potentially toxic substances. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains more than 7000 chemicals, including those that exert biological effects and cause smoking-related diseases. Though CS is not directly hepatotoxic, a growing body of evidence suggests that it may exacerbate pre-existing chronic liver disease. In this study, we integrated toxicological endpoints with molecular measurements and computational analyses to investigate effects of exposures on the livers of Apoe(-/- )mice. Mice were exposed to 3R4F reference CS, to an aerosol from the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, a candidate modified risk tobacco product (MRTP) or to filtered air (Sham) for up to 8 months. THS2.2 takes advantage of a "heat-not-burn" technology that, by heating tobacco, avoids pyrogenesis and pyrosynthesis. After CS exposure for 2 months, some groups were either switched to the MRTP or filtered air. While no group showed clear signs of hepatotoxicity, integrative analysis of proteomics and transcriptomics data showed a CS-dependent impairment of specific biological networks. These networks included lipid and xenobiotic metabolism and iron homeostasis that likely contributed synergistically to exacerbating oxidative stress. In contrast, most proteomic and transcriptomic changes were lower in mice exposed to THS2.2 and in the cessation and switching groups compared to the CS group. Our findings elucidate the complex biological responses of the liver to CS exposure. Furthermore, they provide evidence that THS2.2 aerosol has reduced biological effects, as compared with CS, on the livers of Apoe(-/- )mice.

  19. Systems toxicology-based assessment of the candidate modified risk tobacco product THS2.2 for the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Poussin, Carine; Laurent, Alexandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2016-01-02

    Alterations of endothelial adhesive properties by cigarette smoke (CS) can progressively favor the development of atherosclerosis which may cause cardiovascular disorders. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) are tobacco products developed to reduce smoking-related risks. A systems biology/toxicology approach combined with a functional in vitro adhesion assay was used to assess the impact of a candidate heat-not-burn technology-based MRTP, Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, on the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) compared with a reference cigarette (3R4F). HCAECs were treated for 4h with conditioned media of human monocytic Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells preincubated with low or high concentrations of aqueous extracts from THS2.2 aerosol or 3R4F smoke for 2h (indirect treatment), unconditioned media (direct treatment), or fresh aqueous aerosol/smoke extracts (fresh direct treatment). Functional and molecular investigations revealed that aqueous 3R4F smoke extract promoted the adhesion of MM6 cells to HCAECs via distinct direct and indirect concentration-dependent mechanisms. Using the same approach, we identified significantly reduced effects of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract on MM6 cell-HCAEC adhesion, and reduced molecular changes in endothelial and monocytic cells. Ten- and 20-fold increased concentrations of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract were necessary to elicit similar effects to those measured with 3R4F in both fresh direct and indirect exposure modalities, respectively. Our systems toxicology study demonstrated reduced effects of an aqueous aerosol extract from the candidate MRTP, THS2.2, using the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary endothelial cells as a surrogate pathophysiologically relevant event in atherogenesis.

  20. Vertebrate herbivores influence soil nematodes by modifying plant communities.

    PubMed

    Veen, G F; Olff, Han; Duyts, Henk; van der Putten, Wim H

    2010-03-01

    Abiotic soil properties, plant community composition, and herbivory all have been reported as important factors influencing the composition of soil communities. However, most studies thus far have considered these factors in isolation, whereas they strongly interact in the field. Here, we study how grazing by vertebrate herbivores influences the soil nematode community composition of a floodplain grassland while we account for effects of grazing on plant community composition and abiotic soil properties. Nematodes are the most ubiquitous invertebrates in the soil. They include a variety of feeding types, ranging from microbial feeders to herbivores and carnivores, and they perform key functions in soil food webs. Our hypothesis was that grazing affects nematode community structure and composition through altering plant community structure and composition. Alternatively, we tested whether the effects of grazing may, directly or indirectly, run via changes in soil abiotic properties. We used a long-term field experiment containing plots with and without vertebrate grazers (cattle and rabbits). We compared plant and nematode community structure and composition, as well as a number of key soil abiotic properties, and we applied structural equation modeling to investigate four possible pathways by which grazing may change nematode community composition. Aboveground grazing increased plant species richness and reduced both plant and nematode community heterogeneity. There was a positive relationship between plant and nematode diversity indices. Grazing decreased the number of bacterial-feeding nematodes, indicating that in these grasslands, top-down control of plant production by grazing leads to bottom-up control in the basal part of the bacterial channel of the soil food web. According to the structural equation model, grazing had a strong effect on soil abiotic properties and plant community composition, whereas plant community composition was the main determinant of

  1. Antimicrobial activity of snakin-defensin hybrid protein in tobacco and potato plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To augment plant protection against phytopathogens, we constructed a fusion gene for the simultaneous expression of snakin-1 (SN1) and defensin-1 (PTH1) antimicrobial proteins as a hybrid protein (SAP) in plant cells. Prior to in vivo evaluation of SAP phytoprotective activity, the hybrid protein ex...

  2. The signal peptide-like segment of hpaXm is required for its association to the cell wall in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Miao, Weiguo; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Shujian

    2017-01-01

    Harpins, encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes of Gram-negative plant pathogens, are elicitors of hypersensitive response (HR). HpaXm is a novel harpin-like protein described from cotton leaf blight bacteria, Xanthomonas citri subsp. malvacearum-a synonym of X. campestris pv. malvacearum (Smith 1901-1978). A putative signal peptide (1-MNSLNTQIGANSSFL-15) of hpaXm was predicted in the nitroxyl-terminal (N-terminal)by SignalP (SignalP 3.0 server). Here, we explored the function of the N-terminal leader peptide like segment of hpaXm using transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc.). Transgenic tobacco lines expressing the full-length hpaXm and the signal peptide-like segment-deleted mutant hpaXmΔLP were developed using transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The target genes were confirmed integrated into the tobacco genomes and expressed normally. Using immune colloidal-gold detection technique, hpaXm protein was found to be transferred to the cytoplasm, the cell membrane, and organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nucleus, as well as the cell wall. However, the deletion mutant hpaXmΔLP expressed in transgenic tobacco was found unable to cross the membrane to reach the cell wall. Additionally, soluble proteins extracted from plants transformed with hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were bio-active. Defensive micro-HR induced by the transgene expression of hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were observed on transgenic tobacco leaves. Disease resistance bioassays to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) showed that tobacco plants transformed with hpaXm and with hpaXmΔLP exhibited enhanced resistance to TMV. In summary, the N-terminal signal peptide-like segment (1-45 bp) in hpaXm sequence is not necessary for transgene expression, bioactivity of hpaXm and resistance to TMV in transgenic tobacco, but is required for the protein to be translocated to the cell wall.

  3. The signal peptide-like segment of hpaXm is required for its association to the cell wall in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Le; Miao, Weiguo; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Shujian

    2017-01-01

    Harpins, encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes of Gram-negative plant pathogens, are elicitors of hypersensitive response (HR). HpaXm is a novel harpin-like protein described from cotton leaf blight bacteria, Xanthomonas citri subsp. malvacearum—a synonym of X. campestris pv. malvacearum (Smith 1901–1978). A putative signal peptide (1-MNSLNTQIGANSSFL-15) of hpaXm was predicted in the nitroxyl-terminal (N-terminal)by SignalP (SignalP 3.0 server). Here, we explored the function of the N-terminal leader peptide like segment of hpaXm using transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc.). Transgenic tobacco lines expressing the full-length hpaXm and the signal peptide-like segment-deleted mutant hpaXmΔLP were developed using transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The target genes were confirmed integrated into the tobacco genomes and expressed normally. Using immune colloidal-gold detection technique, hpaXm protein was found to be transferred to the cytoplasm, the cell membrane, and organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nucleus, as well as the cell wall. However, the deletion mutant hpaXmΔLP expressed in transgenic tobacco was found unable to cross the membrane to reach the cell wall. Additionally, soluble proteins extracted from plants transformed with hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were bio-active. Defensive micro-HR induced by the transgene expression of hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were observed on transgenic tobacco leaves. Disease resistance bioassays to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) showed that tobacco plants transformed with hpaXm and with hpaXmΔLP exhibited enhanced resistance to TMV. In summary, the N-terminal signal peptide-like segment (1–45 bp) in hpaXm sequence is not necessary for transgene expression, bioactivity of hpaXm and resistance to TMV in transgenic tobacco, but is required for the protein to be translocated to the cell wall. PMID:28141855

  4. High Levels of Bioplastic Are Produced in Fertile Transplastomic Tobacco Plants Engineered with a Synthetic Operon for the Production of Polyhydroxybutyrate1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bohmert-Tatarev, Karen; McAvoy, Susan; Daughtry, Sean; Peoples, Oliver P.; Snell, Kristi D.

    2011-01-01

    An optimized genetic construct for plastid transformation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) for the production of the renewable, biodegradable plastic polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was designed using an operon extension strategy. Bacterial genes encoding the PHB pathway enzymes were selected for use in this construct based on their similarity to the codon usage and GC content of the tobacco plastome. Regulatory elements with limited homology to the host plastome yet known to yield high levels of plastidial recombinant protein production were used to enhance the expression of the transgenes. A partial transcriptional unit, containing genes of the PHB pathway and a selectable marker gene encoding spectinomycin resistance, was flanked at the 5′ end by the host plant’s psbA coding sequence and at the 3′ end by the host plant’s 3′ psbA untranslated region. This design allowed insertion of the transgenes into the plastome as an extension of the psbA operon, rendering the addition of a promoter to drive the expression of the transgenes unnecessary. Transformation of the optimized construct into tobacco and subsequent spectinomycin selection of transgenic plants yielded T0 plants that were capable of producing up to 18.8% dry weight PHB in samples of leaf tissue. These plants were fertile and produced viable seed. T1 plants producing up to 17.3% dry weight PHB in samples of leaf tissue and 8.8% dry weight PHB in the total biomass of the plant were also isolated. PMID:21325565

  5. Expression of a multi-epitope DPT fusion protein in transplastomic tobacco plants retains both antigenicity and immunogenicity of all three components of the functional oligomer.

    PubMed

    Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Alpuche-Solís, Angel G; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Bendik, Elise M; Martínez-González, Luzmila; Korban, Schuyler S

    2009-05-01

    Expression of genes in plant chloroplasts provides an opportunity for enhanced production of target proteins. We report the introduction and expression of a fusion DPT protein containing immunoprotective exotoxin epitopes of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Bordetella pertussis, and Clostridium tetani in tobacco chloroplasts. Using biolistic-mediated transformation, a plant-optimized synthetic DPT gene was successfully transferred to tobacco plastomes. Putative transplastomic T0 plants were identified by PCR, and Southern blot analysis confirmed homoplasmy in T1 progeny. ELISA assays demonstrated that the DPT protein retained antigenicity of the three components of the fusion protein. The highest level of expression in these transplastomic plants reached 0.8% of total soluble protein. To assess whether the functional recombinant protein expressed in tobacco plants would induce specific antibodies in test animals, a mice feeding experiment was conducted. For mice orally immunized with freeze-dried transplastomic leaves, production of IgG and IgA antibodies specific to each toxin were detected in serum and mucosal tissues.

  6. β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthase I (KASI) Plays Crucial Roles in the Plant Growth and Fatty Acids Synthesis in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianquan; Xu, Ronghua; Chen, Jianghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids serve many functions in plants, but the effects of some key genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis on plants growth and development are not well understood yet. To understand the functions of 3-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase I (KASI) in tobacco, we isolated two KASI homologs, which we have designated NtKASI-1 and NtKASI-2. Expression analysis showed that these two KASI genes were transcribed constitutively in all tissues examined. Over-expression of NtKASI-1 in tobacco changed the fatty acid content in leaves, whereas over-expressed lines of NtKASI-2 exhibited distinct phenotypic features such as slightly variegated leaves and reduction of the fatty acid content in leaves, similar to the silencing plants of NtKASI-1 gene. Interestingly, the silencing of NtKASI-2 gene had no discernibly altered phenotypes compared to wild type. The double silencing plants of these two genes enhanced the phenotypic changes during vegetative and reproductive growth compared to wild type. These results uncovered that these two KASI genes had the partially functional redundancy, and that the KASI genes played a key role in regulating fatty acids synthesis and in mediating plant growth and development in tobacco. PMID:27509494

  7. A prototypic modified risk tobacco product exhibits reduced effects on chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of monocytes compared with a reference cigarette.

    PubMed

    van der Toorn, Marco; Frentzel, Stefan; Goedertier, Didier; Peitsch, Manuel; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2015-06-01

    Monocyte adhesion and migration to the subendothelial space represent critical steps in atherogenesis. Here, we investigated whether extracts from the aerosol of a prototypic modified risk tobacco product (pMRTP), based on heating rather than combusting tobacco, exhibited differential effects on the migratory behavior of monocytes compared with that from the reference cigarette, 3R4F. THP-1 cells, a monocytic cell line, and human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) were used to investigate chemotaxis and transendothelial migration (TEM) of monocytes in conventional and impedance-based systems. THP-1 cells migrated through a monolayer of HCAECs in response to C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12), a chemokine involved in diverse cellular functions including chemotaxis and survival of stem cells. Treatment of THP-1 cells with extracts from 3R4F or pMRTP induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity (7-aminoactinomycin D), and inflammation (IL-8 and TNF-α). CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis and TEM were decreased in extract-treated THP-1 cells. Extracts from 3R4F were ~21 times more potent than those from pMRTP in all examined endpoints. Extracts from 3R4F and pMRTP induced concentration-dependent responses in assays of inflammation, cytotoxicity, chemotaxis, and TEM. Furthermore, our findings indicate that extracts from a pMRTP are significantly less cytotoxic and induce less inflammation than those from the reference cigarette, 3R4F.

  8. Comparative systems toxicology analysis of cigarette smoke and aerosol from a candidate modified risk tobacco product in organotypic human gingival epithelial cultures: A 3-day repeated exposure study.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Filippo; Titz, Bjoern; Sewer, Alain; Lo Sasso, Giuseppe; Scotti, Elena; Schlage, Walter K; Mathis, Carole; Leroy, Patrice; Majeed, Shoaib; Torres, Laura Ortega; Keppler, Brian R; Elamin, Ashraf; Trivedi, Keyur; Guedj, Emmanuel; Martin, Florian; Frentzel, Stefan; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Smoking is one of the major lifestyle-related risk factors for periodontal diseases. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) offer a promising alternative in the harm reduction strategy for adult smokers unable to quit. Using a systems toxicology approach, we investigated and compared the exposure effects of a reference cigarette (3R4F) and a heat-not-burn technology-based candidate MRTP, the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2. Human gingival epithelial organotypic cultures were repeatedly exposed (3 days) for 28 min at two matching concentrations of cigarette smoke (CS) or THS2.2 aerosol. Results showed only minor histopathological alterations and minimal cytotoxicity upon THS2.2 aerosol exposure compared to CS (1% for THS2.2 aerosol vs. 30% for CS, at the high concentration). Among the 14 proinflammatory mediators analyzed, only 5 exhibited significant alterations with THS2.2 exposure compared with 11 upon CS exposure. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis indicated a general reduction of the impact in THS2.2 aerosol-exposed samples with respect to CS (∼79% lower biological impact for the high THS2.2 aerosol concentration compared to CS, and 13 metabolites significantly perturbed for THS2.2 vs. 181 for CS). This study indicates that exposure to THS2.2 aerosol had a lower impact on the pathophysiology of human gingival organotypic cultures than CS.

  9. Fast determination of pyrethroid pesticides in tobacco by GC-MS-SIM coupled with modified QuEChERS sample preparation procedure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Sun, Ying; Jiang, Chunzhu; Yu, Xi; Wang, Yuanpeng; Zhang, Hanqi; Song, Daqian

    2013-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for the extraction and determination of pyrethroid pesticide residues in tobacco. The modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method was applied for preparing samples. In this study, methyl cyanide (MeCN)-saturated salt aqueous was used as the two-phase extraction solvent for the first time, and a vortex shaker was used for the simultaneous shaking and concentration of the analytes. The effects of experimental parameters on extraction and clean-up efficiency were investigated and optimized. The analytes were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM). The obtained recoveries of the analytes at three different fortification levels were 76.85-114.1% and relative standard deviations (RSDs) were lower than 15.7%. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were from 1.28 to 26.6 μg kg(-1). This method was also applied to the analysis of actual commercial tobacco products and the analytical results were satisfactory.

  10. Substantial equivalence of antinutrients and inherent plant toxins in genetically modified novel foods.

    PubMed

    Novak, W K; Haslberger, A G

    2000-06-01

    For a safety evaluation of foodstuff derived from genetically modified crops, the concept of the substantial equivalence of modified organisms with their parental lines is used following an environmental safety evaluation. To assess the potential pleiotropic effect of genetic modifications on constituents of modified crops data from US and EC documents were investigated with regard to inherent plant toxins and antinutrients. Analysed were documents of rape (glucosinolates, phytate), maize (phytate), tomato (tomatine, solanine, chaconine, lectins, oxalate), potato (solanine, chaconine, protease-inhibitors, phenols) and soybean (protease-inhibitors, lectins, isoflavones, phytate). In several documents used for notifications no declarations even on essential inherent plant toxins and antinutrients could be found, for instance data on phytate in modified maize were provided only in one of four documents. Significant variations in the contents of these compounds in parental and modified plants especially due to environmental influences were observed: drought stress, for example, was made responsible for significantly increased glucosinolate levels of up to 72.6micromol/g meal in modified and parental rape plants in field trials compared to recommended standard concentrations of less than 30micromol/g. Taking into account these wide natural variations generally the concentrations of inherent plant toxins and antinutrients in modified products were in the range of the concentrations in parental organisms. The results presented indicate that the concept of the substantial equivalence is useful for the risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) used for novel foods but possible environmental influences on constituents of modified crops need more attention. Consistent guidelines, specifying data of relevant compounds which have to be provided for notification documents of specific organisms have to be established. Because of the importance of inherent plant

  11. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the Nicta; CycD3; 4 gene demonstrate accelerated growth rates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Wang, Myeong Hyeon

    2008-07-31

    D-type cyclins control the onset of cell division and the response to extracellular signals during the G1 phase. In this study, we transformed a D-type cyclin gene, Nicta;CycD3;4, from Nicotiana tabacum using an Agrobacterium-mediated method. A predicted 1.1 kb cyclin gene was present in all of the transgenic plants, but not in wild-type. Northern analyses showed that the expression level of the Nicta;CycD3;4 gene in all of the transgenic plants was strong when compared to the wild-type plants, suggesting that Nicta;CycD3;4 gene driven by the CaMV 35S promoter was being overexpressed. Our results revealed that transgenic plants overexpressing Nicta;CycD3;4 had an accelerated growth rate when compared to wild-type plants, and that the transgenic plants exhibited a smaller cell size and a decreased cell population in young leaves when compared to wild-type plants.

  12. Simultaneous inbreeding modifies inbreeding depression in a plant-herbivore interaction.

    PubMed

    Kalske, Aino; Mutikainen, Pia; Muola, Anne; Scheepens, J F; Laukkanen, Liisa; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Leimu, Roosa

    2014-02-01

    Because inbreeding is common in natural populations of plants and their herbivores, herbivore-induced selection on plants, and vice versa, may be significantly modified by inbreeding and inbreeding depression. In a feeding assay with inbred and outbred lines of both the perennial herb, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria, and its specialist herbivore, Abrostola asclepiadis, we discovered that plant inbreeding increased inbreeding depression in herbivore performance in some populations. The effect of inbreeding on plant resistance varied among plant and herbivore populations. The among-population variation is likely to be driven by variation in plant secondary compounds across populations. In addition, inbreeding depression in plant resistance was substantial when herbivores were outbred, but diminished when herbivores were inbred. These findings demonstrate that in plant-herbivore interactions expression of inbreeding depression can depend on the level of inbreeding of the interacting species. Furthermore, our results suggest that when herbivores are inbred, herbivore-induced selection against self-fertilisation in plants may diminish.

  13. Enhanced synthesis of choline and glycine betaine in transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Scott D.; Nuccio, Michael L.; Ziemak, Michael J.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2001-01-01

    Choline (Cho) is the precursor of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine and is itself an essential nutrient for humans. Metabolic engineering of Cho biosynthesis in plants could therefore enhance both their resistance to osmotic stresses (drought and salinity) and their nutritional value. The key enzyme of the plant Cho-synthesis pathway is phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase, which catalyzes all three of the methylations required to convert phosphoethanolamine to phosphocholine. We show here that overexpressing this enzyme in transgenic tobacco increased the levels of phosphocholine by 5-fold and free Cho by 50-fold without affecting phosphatidylcholine content or growth. Moreover, the expanded Cho pool led to a 30-fold increase in synthesis of glycine betaine via an engineered glycine betaine pathway. Supplying the transgenics with the Cho precursor ethanolamine (EA) further enhanced Cho levels even though the supplied EA was extensively catabolized. These latter results establish that there is further scope for improving Cho synthesis by engineering an increased endogenous supply of EA and suggest that this could be achieved by enhancing EA synthesis and/or by suppressing its degradation. PMID:11481443

  14. Effects of simultaneous expression of heterologous genes involved in phytochelatin biosynthesis on thiol content and cadmium accumulation in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wawrzynski, Adam; Kopera, Edyta; Wawrzynska, Anna; Kaminska, Jolanta; Bal, Wojciech; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. LA Burley 21) lines expressing three genes encoding enzymes thought to be critical for the efficient production of phytochelatins, (i) serine acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.30) involved in the production of O-acetylserine, the cysteine precursor, (ii) gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (EC 6.3.2.2) involved in the production of gamma-glutamylcysteine, the precursor of glutathione, and (iii) phytochelatin synthase (EC 2.3.2.15), were obtained and analysed for non-protein thiol content and cadmium accumulation. After a 3 week exposure to 15 microM CdCl2, plants expressing transgenes (either separately or in combination) had increased cadmium concentration in roots but not in shoots compared with the wild type. Nearly all transgenic lines analysed had more non-protein thiols than the wild type. The greatest effects (about 8-fold elevation of thiols) were found in one of the lines simultaneously expressing the three transgenes. Despite the fact that a multi-transgene strategy described in this work resulted in a strong increase in the levels of several classes of non-protein thiols in transgenic plants, other factors appeared to restrict cadmium accumulation in shoots.

  15. Overexpression of a Modified Plant Thionin Enhances Disease Resistance to Citrus Canker and Huanglongbing (HLB).

    PubMed

    Hao, Guixia; Stover, Ed; Gupta, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a great threat to the US citrus industry. There are no proven strategies to eliminate HLB disease and no cultivar has been identified with strong HLB resistance. Citrus canker is also an economically important disease associated with a bacterial pathogen (Xanthomonas citri). In this study, we characterized endogenous citrus thionins and investigated their expression in different citrus tissues. Since no HLB-resistant citrus cultivars have been identified, we attempted to develop citrus resistant to both HLB and citrus canker through overexpression of a modified plant thionin. To improve effectiveness for disease resistance, we modified and synthesized the sequence encoding a plant thionin and cloned into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS. The construct was then introduced into Agrobacterium strain EHA105 for citrus transformation. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified plant thionin were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful transformation and transgene gene expression was confirmed by molecular analysis. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified thionin gene were challenged with X. citri 3213 at a range of concentrations, and a significant reduction in canker symptoms and a decrease in bacterial growth were demonstrated compared to nontransgenic plants. Furthermore, the transgenic citrus plants were challenged with HLB via graft inoculation. Our results showed significant Las titer reduction in roots of transgenic Carrizo compared with control plants and reduced scion Las titer 12 months after graft inoculation. These data provide promise for engineering citrus disease resistance against HLB and canker.

  16. Plant potassium content modifies the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on root hydraulic properties in maize plants.

    PubMed

    El-Mesbahi, Mohamed Najib; Azcón, Rosario; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Aroca, Ricardo

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis helps the host plant to overcome several abiotic stresses including drought. One of the mechanisms for this drought tolerance enhancement is the higher water uptake capacity of the mycorrhizal plants. However, the effects of the AM symbiosis on processes regulating root hydraulic properties of the host plant, such as root hydraulic conductivity and plasma membrane aquaporin gene expression, and protein abundance, are not well defined. Since it is known that K(+) status is modified by AM and that it regulates root hydraulic properties, it has been tested how plant K(+) status could modify the effects of the symbiosis on root hydraulic conductivity and plasma membrane aquaporin gene expression and protein abundance, using maize (Zea mays L.) plants and Glomus intraradices as a model. It was observed that the supply of extra K(+) increased root hydraulic conductivity only in AM plants. Also, the different pattern of plasma membrane aquaporin gene expression and protein abundance between AM and non-AM plants changed with the application of extra K(+). Thus, plant K(+) status could be one of the causes of the different observed effects of the AM symbiosis on root hydraulic properties. The present study also highlights the critical importance of AM fungal aquaporins in regulating root hydraulic properties of the host plant.

  17. Influence of Elastin-Like Polypeptide and Hydrophobin on Recombinant Hemagglutinin Accumulations in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Hoang Trong; Hause, Bettina; Hause, Gerd; Arcalis, Elsa; Stoger, Eva; Maresch, Daniel; Altmann, Friedrich; Joensuu, Jussi; Conrad, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Fusion protein strategies are useful tools to enhance expression and to support the development of purification technologies. The capacity of fusion protein strategies to enhance expression was explored in tobacco leaves and seeds. C-terminal fusion of elastin-like polypeptides (ELP) to influenza hemagglutinin under the control of either the constitutive CaMV 35S or the seed-specific USP promoter resulted in increased accumulation in both leaves and seeds compared to the unfused hemagglutinin. The addition of a hydrophobin to the C-terminal end of hemagglutinin did not significantly increase the expression level. We show here that, depending on the target protein, both hydrophobin fusion and ELPylation combined with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeting induced protein bodies in leaves as well as in seeds. The N-glycosylation pattern indicated that KDEL sequence-mediated retention of leaf-derived hemagglutinins and hemagglutinin-hydrophobin fusions were not completely retained in the ER. In contrast, hemagglutinin-ELP from leaves contained only the oligomannose form, suggesting complete ER retention. In seeds, ER retention seems to be nearly complete for all three constructs. An easy and scalable purification method for ELPylated proteins using membrane-based inverse transition cycling could be applied to both leaf- and seed-expressed hemagglutinins. PMID:24914995

  18. Transplastomic expression of a modified human papillomavirus L1 protein leading to the assembly of capsomeres in tobacco: a step towards cost-effective second-generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Waheed, M Tahir; Thönes, Nadja; Müller, Martin; Hassan, S Waqas; Razavi, N Mona; Lössl, Elke; Kaul, Hans-Peter; Lössl, Andreas G

    2011-04-01

    Certain types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) are causatively associated with cervical carcinoma, the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Due to limitations in the availability of currently used virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines against HPV to women of developing countries, where most cases of cervical cancer occur, the development of a cost-effective second-generation vaccine is a necessity. Capsomeres have recently been demonstrated to be highly immunogenic and to have a number of advantages as a potential cost-effective alternative to VLP-based HPV vaccines. We have expressed a mutated HPV-16 L1 (L1_2xCysM) gene that retained the ability to assemble L1 protein to capsomeres in tobacco chloroplasts. The recombinant protein yielded up to 1.5% of total soluble protein. The assembly of capsomeres was examined and verified by cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation and sucrose sedimentation analysis. An antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed the formation of capsomeres by using a conformation-specific monoclonal antibody which recognized the conformational epitopes. Transplastomic tobacco plants exhibited normal growth and morphology, but all such lines showed male sterility in the T₀, T₁ and T₂ generations. Taken together, these results indicate the possibility of producing a low-cost capsomere-based vaccine by plastids.

  19. The function of ascorbate oxidase in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Pignocchi, Cristina; Fletcher, John M; Wilkinson, Joy E; Barnes, Jeremy D; Foyer, Christine H

    2003-07-01

    The function of the apoplastic enzyme ascorbate oxidase (AO) was investigated in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The abundance of AO mRNA was up-regulated by light. Cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (APX1) transcripts were also highest in the light. In contrast, L-galactono-gamma-lactone dehydrogenase, stromal APX, and thylakoid APX transcripts remained constant over the day/night cycle. Salicylic acid inhibited growth, increased expression of the pathogenesis-related protein (PR) 1a, and decreased AO transcript abundance. In contrast, the application of auxin enhanced growth and increased AO and PR 1a gene expression. Therefore, AO transcript abundance varied in a manner similar to hormone-mediated changes in plant growth. To study the effects of modified AO expression on growth, transformed tobacco plants expressing AO in the sense and antisense orientations were generated. The resultant large changes in apoplastic AO activity in the transformed tobacco plants had little effect on whole leaf ascorbate (AA) content, but they had dramatic effects on apoplastic AA levels. Enhanced AO activity oxidized the apoplastic AA pool, whereas decreased AO activity increased the amount of AA compared with dehydroascorbate. A relationship was observed between AO activity and plant height and biomass. Native AO transcript levels were no longer subject to light/dark regulation in AO sense and antisense plants. Taken together, these data show that there is an interaction between hormone, redox, and light signals at the level of the apoplast via modulation of ion of AA content.

  20. Site-specific proteolytic degradation of IgG monoclonal antibodies expressed in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Lombardi, Raffaele; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Paul, Mathew J; Di Micco, Patrizio; Morea, Veronica; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello; Ma, Julian K-C

    2015-02-01

    Plants are promising hosts for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, proteolytic degradation of antibodies produced both in stable transgenic plants and using transient expression systems is still a major issue for efficient high-yield recombinant protein accumulation. In this work, we have performed a detailed study of the degradation profiles of two human IgG1 mAbs produced in plants: an anti-HIV mAb 2G12 and a tumour-targeting mAb H10. Even though they use different light chains (κ and λ, respectively), the fragmentation pattern of both antibodies was similar. The majority of Ig fragments result from proteolytic degradation, but there are only a limited number of plant proteolytic cleavage events in the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. All of the cleavage sites identified were in the proximity of interdomain regions and occurred at each interdomain site, with the exception of the VL /CL interface in mAb H10 λ light chain. Cleavage site sequences were analysed, and residue patterns characteristic of proteolytic enzymes substrates were identified. The results of this work help to define common degradation events in plant-produced mAbs and raise the possibility of predicting antibody degradation patterns 'a priori' and designing novel stabilization strategies by site-specific mutagenesis.

  1. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition.

    PubMed

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-08-01

    The development and marketing of 'novel' genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed.

  2. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition

    PubMed Central

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The development and marketing of ‘novel’ genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed. PMID:24735114

  3. Development of fiber optic spectroscopy for detection of genetically modified plants (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chean, X. Y.; Chong, J.-P. C.; Ho, J.-Z. E.; Chen, J. W.; Asundi, A. K.; Aiemwiwattanakul, O.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, fibre optic spectroscopy (FOSpectr) was developed for detection and quantification of recombinant green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in transgenic tobacco plants. In vitro detection was first carried out to optimize the sensitivity of the optical system. The bacterial expression vectors, pEGFP and pDsRED, were transformed into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and successfully purified by size separation under nondenaturing electrophoretic conditions and quantified. The purified proteins were serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fibre optic spectroscopy using different light sources, namely, blue LED (475 nm), tungsten halogen (350-1000 nm) and double frequency Nd:YAG green laser (532 nm). Tungsten halogen was found to be unsuitable for excitation of both EGFP and DsRED. Blue LED and green laser were the most suitable for excitation of EGFP and DsRED, respectively. The minimum concentration of EGFP detectable with blue LED excitation was 7.5 tg/ml whereas that for DsRED under excitation by green laser was 3.75 ig/ml. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in planta, transgenic tobacco plants expressing EGFP were first imaged under a fluorescence microscope. This was to select a panel of transformed plants expressing varying levels of the fluorescent protein. These plants were then screened via FOSpectr. The results showed that the amplitude of the fluorescence emission signal obtained from FOSpectr correlated well with the level of EGFP expressed as indicated by fluorescence microscopy. Thus, proof-of-concept for the use of FOSpectr as a potentially powerful tool for screening transgenic plants was provided in this paper.

  4. The Xerophyta viscosa aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) confers enhanced drought and salinity tolerance to transgenic tobacco plants by scavenging methylglyoxal and reducing the membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Preeti; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Upadhyaya, Chandrama Prakash; Roy, Suchandra Deb; Hohn, Thomas; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2013-06-01

    We report the efficacy of an aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) enzyme from Xerophyta viscosa Baker in enhancing the prospects of plant's survival under abiotic stress. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing ALDRXV4 cDNA showed alleviation of NaCl and mannitol-induced abiotic stress. The transgenic plants survived longer periods of water deficiency and salinity stress and exhibited improved recovery after rehydration as compared to the wild type plants. The increased synthesis of aldose reductase in transgenic plants correlated with reduced methylglyoxal and malondialdehyde accumulation and an elevated level of sorbitol under stress conditions. In addition, the transgenic lines showed better photosynthetic efficiency, less electrolyte damage, greater water retention, higher proline accumulation, and favorable ionic balance under stress conditions. Together, these findings suggest the potential of engineering aldose reductase levels for better performance of crop plants growing under drought and salt stress conditions.

  5. The mungbean yellow mosaic begomovirus transcriptional activator protein transactivates the viral promoter-driven transgene and causes toxicity in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Sunitha, Sukumaran; Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Pooggin, Mikhail M; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2007-12-01

    The Begomovirus transcriptional activator protein (TrAP/AC2/C2) is a multifunctional protein which activates the viral late gene promoters, suppresses gene silencing, and determines pathogenicity. To study TrAP-mediated transactivation of a stably integrated gene, we generated transgenic tobacco plants with a Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) AV1 late gene promoter-driven reporter gene and supertransformed them with the MYMV TrAP gene driven by a strong 35S promoter. We obtained a single supertransformed plant with an intact 35S-TrAP gene that activated the reporter gene 2.5-fold. However, 10 of the 11 supertransformed plants did not have the TrAP region of the T-DNA, suggesting the likely toxicity of TrAP in plants. Upon transformation of wild-type tobacco plants with the TrAP gene, six of the seven transgenic plants obtained had truncated T-DNAs which lacked TrAP. One plant, which had the intact TrAP gene, did not express TrAP. The apparent toxic effect of the TrAP transgene was abolished by mutations in its nuclear-localization signal or zinc-finger domain and by deletion of its activation domain. Therefore, all three domains of TrAP, which are required for transactivation and suppression of gene silencing, also are needed for its toxic effect.

  6. Uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L.): dependence on stomatal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, A.; Kley, D.; Wildt, J.; Segschneider, H. J.; Förstel, H.

    The uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers ( Helianthus annuus L. var. giganteus) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Bel W3), using concentrations representative for moderately polluted air, has been determined by gas exchange experiments. Conductivities for these trace gases were measured at different light fluxes ranging from 820 μEm -2s -1 to darkness. The conductivities to water vapor and the trace gases are highly correlated. It is concluded that the uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers and tobacco plants is linearly dependent on stomatal opening. While the uptake of NO is limited by the mesophyll resistance, the uptake of NO 2 is only by diffusion through the stomata. Loss processes by deposition to the leaf surfaces are more pronounced for O 3 than for NO and NO 2.

  7. Promoting flowering, lateral shoot outgrowth, leaf development, and flower abscission in tobacco plants overexpressing cotton FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like gene GhFT1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yannan; Zhang, Kun; Guo, Danli; Cui, Baiming; Wang, Xiyin; Huang, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) encodes a mobile signal protein, recognized as major component of florigen, which has a central position in regulating flowering, and also plays important roles in various physiological aspects. A mode is recently emerging for the balance of indeterminate and determinate growth, which is controlled by the ratio of FT-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like gene activities, and has a strong influence on the floral transition and plant architecture. Orthologs of GhFT1 was previously isolated and characterized from Gossypium hirsutum. We demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of GhFT1 in tobacco, other than promoting flowering, promoted lateral shoot outgrowth at the base, induced more axillary bud at the axillae of rosette leaves, altered leaf morphology, increased chlorophyll content, had higher rate of photosynthesis and caused flowers abscission. Analysis of gene expression suggested that flower identity genes were significantly upregulated in transgenic plants. Further analysis of tobacco FT paralogs indicated that NtFT4, acting as flower inducer, was upregulated, whereas NtFT2 and NtFT3 as flower inhibitors were upregulated in transgenic plants under long-day conditions, but downregulated under short-day conditions. Our data suggests that sufficient level of transgenic cotton FT might disturb the balance of the endogenous tobacco FT paralogs of inducers and repressors and resulted in altered phenotype in transgenic tobacco, emphasizing the expanding roles of FT in regulating shoot architecture by advancing determine growth. Manipulating the ratio for indeterminate and determinate growth factors throughout FT-like and TFL1-like gene activity holds promise to improve plant architecture and enhance crop yield. PMID:26136765

  8. Promoting flowering, lateral shoot outgrowth, leaf development, and flower abscission in tobacco plants overexpressing cotton FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like gene GhFT1.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yannan; Zhang, Kun; Guo, Danli; Cui, Baiming; Wang, Xiyin; Huang, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) encodes a mobile signal protein, recognized as major component of florigen, which has a central position in regulating flowering, and also plays important roles in various physiological aspects. A mode is recently emerging for the balance of indeterminate and determinate growth, which is controlled by the ratio of FT-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like gene activities, and has a strong influence on the floral transition and plant architecture. Orthologs of GhFT1 was previously isolated and characterized from Gossypium hirsutum. We demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of GhFT1 in tobacco, other than promoting flowering, promoted lateral shoot outgrowth at the base, induced more axillary bud at the axillae of rosette leaves, altered leaf morphology, increased chlorophyll content, had higher rate of photosynthesis and caused flowers abscission. Analysis of gene expression suggested that flower identity genes were significantly upregulated in transgenic plants. Further analysis of tobacco FT paralogs indicated that NtFT4, acting as flower inducer, was upregulated, whereas NtFT2 and NtFT3 as flower inhibitors were upregulated in transgenic plants under long-day conditions, but downregulated under short-day conditions. Our data suggests that sufficient level of transgenic cotton FT might disturb the balance of the endogenous tobacco FT paralogs of inducers and repressors and resulted in altered phenotype in transgenic tobacco, emphasizing the expanding roles of FT in regulating shoot architecture by advancing determine growth. Manipulating the ratio for indeterminate and determinate growth factors throughout FT-like and TFL1-like gene activity holds promise to improve plant architecture and enhance crop yield.

  9. ASR1 Mediates Glucose-Hormone Cross Talk by Affecting Sugar Trafficking in Tobacco Plants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Frankel, Nicolas; Mazuch, Jeannine; Balbo, Ilse; Iusem, Norberto; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Carrari, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Asr (for ABA, stress, ripening) genes are exclusively found in the genomes of higher plants, and the encoded proteins have been found localized both to the nucleus and cytoplasm. However, before the mechanisms underlying the activity of ASR proteins can be determined, the role of these proteins in planta should be deciphered. Results from this study suggest that ASR is positioned within the signaling cascade of interactions among glucose, abscisic acid, and gibberellins. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) transgenic lines with reduced levels of ASR protein showed impaired glucose metabolism and altered abscisic acid and gibberellin levels. These changes were associated with dwarfism, reduced carbon dioxide assimilation, and accelerated leaf senescence as a consequence of a fine regulation exerted by ASR to the glucose metabolism. This regulation resulted in an impact on glucose signaling mediated by Hexokinase1 and Snf1-related kinase, which would subsequently have been responsible for photosynthesis, leaf senescence, and hormone level alterations. It thus can be postulated that ASR is not only involved in the control of hexose uptake in heterotrophic organs, as we have previously reported, but also in the control of carbon fixation by the leaves mediated by a similar mechanism. PMID:23302128

  10. Developmental and environmental regulation of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase-beta-glucuronidase gene fusion in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, X W; Dron, M; Schmid, J; Dixon, R A; Lamb, C J

    1989-01-01

    A 1.1-kilobase promoter fragment of the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) gene PAL2 was translationally fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and transferred to tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated leaf disk transformation. The distribution of beta-glucuronidase activity in these transgenic plants is very similar to that of endogenous PAL2 transcripts in bean, with very high levels in petals; marked accumulation in anthers, stigmas, roots, and shoots; and low levels in sepals, ovaries, and leaves. Histochemical analysis of the spatial pattern of beta-glucuronidase activity showed that the PAL2 promoter is highly active in the shoot apical meristem, the zone of cell proliferation immediately adjacent to the root apical meristem, and in the early stages of vascular development at the inception of xylem differentiation. Wounding and light evoke specific changes in the spatial pattern of beta-glucuronidase activity in stems, including induction in the epidermis. These data indicate that the PAL2 promoter transduces a complex set of developmental and environmental cues into an integrated spatial and temporal program of gene expression to regulate the synthesis of a diverse array of phenylpropanoid natural products. Images PMID:2594769

  11. Transgenic Tobacco Lines Expressing Sense or Antisense FERROCHELATASE 1 RNA Show Modified Ferrochelatase Activity in Roots and Provide Experimental Evidence for Dual Localization of Ferrochelatase 1.

    PubMed

    Hey, Daniel; Ortega-Rodes, Patricia; Fan, Tingting; Schnurrer, Florian; Brings, Lea; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-12-01

    In plants, two genes encode ferrochelatase (FC), which catalyzes iron chelation into protoporphyrin IX at the final step of heme biosynthesis. FERROCHELATASE1 (FC1) is continuously, but weakly expressed in roots and leaves, while FC2 is dominantly active in leaves. As a continuation of previous studies on the physiological consequences of FC2 inactivation in tobacco, we aimed to assign FC1 function in plant organs. While reduced FC2 expression leads to protoporphyrin IX accumulation in leaves, FC1 down-regulation and overproduction caused reduced and elevated FC activity in root tissue, respectively, but were not associated with changes in macroscopic phenotype, plant development or leaf pigmentation. In contrast to the lower heme content resulting from a deficiency of the dominant FC2 expression in leaves, a reduction of FC1 in roots and leaves does not significantly disturb heme accumulation. The FC1 overexpression was used for an additional approach to re-examine FC activity in mitochondria. Transgenic FC1 protein was immunologically shown to be present in mitochondria. Although matching only a small portion of total cellular FC activity, the mitochondrial FC activity in a FC1 overexpressor line increased 5-fold in comparison with wild-type mitochondria. Thus, it is suggested that FC1 contributes to mitochondrial heme synthesis.

  12. Satellite tobacco mosaic virus sequence variants with only five Nucleotide differences can interfere with each other in a cross protection-like phenomenon in plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Dodds, J. Allan

    1994-01-01

    The type strain of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) contains two major variants, designated type 5 (T5) and type 6 (T6), which can be easily distinguished by RNase protection analyses. Clones containing cDNA of representative T5 and T6 STMV genomes have only five single-base differences in the entire 1059-nucleotide genome, and RNA transcribed from each clone is highly infectious when inoculated onto tobacco plants. The different RNase protection assay patterns can be used as genetic markers to identify individual STMV variants and to follow the interactions of variants and their progeny during coinfections in plants. The study described here investigated the effects of coinoculation and various delayed inoculations of T5 and T6 variants on the composition of the progeny STMV populations in systemically infected tobacco tissues. When T5 and T6 STMV RNAs were coinoculated or inoculated with 1-hr delays, the progeny from individual plants most often contained a mixture of T5 and T6 genomes. However, when there was a 24-hr delay between inoculations, the balance of T5 and T6 components in the progeny populations shifted toward predominance of the first variant inoculated. With delays of 3 or 7 days only the first variant was evident in the progeny populations, indicating that established replication of one STMV variant interferes with replication of another in a manner similar to the cross protection phenomenon.

  13. Involvement of protein kinases and calcium in the NO-signalling cascade for defence-gene induction in ozonated tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, S; Reale, L; Calderini, O; Pagiotti, R; Ederli, L

    2012-07-01

    This study analyses the signalling pathways triggered by nitric oxide (NO) in response to ozone (O(3)) fumigation of tobacco plants, with particular attention to protein kinase cascades and free cytosolic Ca(2+) in defence-gene activation. NO was visualized with the NO probe DAF-FM. Using a pharmacological approach, the effects of different inhibitors on the expression profiles of NO-dependent defence genes were monitored using RT-PCR. The assay of the kinase activity of the immunoprecipitates complexes shows that O(3) stimulates a 48 kDa salicylic acid (SA)-induced protein kinase (SIPK) in an NO-dependent manner. The O(3)-induced alternative oxidase 1a (AOX1a) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase a (PALa) genes are modulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, and SIPK might have a role in this up-regulation. By contrast, protein dephosphorylation mediates pathogenesis-related protein 1a (PR1a) expression in O(3)-treated tobacco plants. Ca(2+) is essential, but not sufficient, to promote NO accumulation in ozonated tobacco plants. Intracellular Ca(2+) transients are also essential for PALa up-regulation and cGMP-induced PR1a expression. Partial dependence on intracellular Ca(2+) suggests two different pathways of SA accumulation and PR1a induction. A model summarizing the signalling networks involving NO, SA, and the cellular messengers in this O(3)-induced defence gene activation is proposed.

  14. Resistance of transgenic tobacco plants incorporating the putative 57-kDa polymerase read-through gene of Tobacco rattle virus against rub-inoculated and nematode-transmitted virus.

    PubMed

    Vassilakos, Nikon; Bem, Frederic; Tzima, Aliki; Barker, Hugh; Reavy, Brian; Karanastasi, Eirini; Robinson, David J

    2008-10-01

    Nicotiana tabacum plants were transformed with the 57-kDa read-through domain of the replicase gene of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) isolate SYM. From a total of six lines containing the viral transgene, four displayed various levels of resistance to TRV infection. Transgenic plants from line 81G were highly resistant to foliar rub-inoculation with the homologous isolate, or with isolates TRV-PpK20 and TRV-PLB, which are almost identical to TRV-SYM in RNA1 sequence. Moreover, 81G plants were moderately resistant to the serologically and genetically distinct, highly pathogenic isolate TRV-GR. Resistance characteristics of line 81G remained stable over six generations. No unambiguous correlation was established between number of transgene insertion loci and level of resistance. Transgene-specific mRNA was clearly detected in plants from susceptible lines but only at an early developmental stage in resistant plants, indicating the operation of a RNA silencing resistance mechanism. Following challenge using viruliferous vector nematodes carrying TRV-PpK20 or by rub inoculation of roots, 81G plants did not show any symptoms and virus was not detected in leaves. However, virus was detected in roots but without apparent effects on plant growth and often at low concentration. When challenged with nematodes carrying TRV-GR, symptoms in aerial parts of 81G plants were less severe and much delayed compared to non-transgenic plants, although younger plants showed less resistance than older ones. No difference was detected in transgene transcript accumulation between leaves and roots of 81G plants. This is the first work reporting a broad level of pathogen derived resistance against two geographically and genetically distinct TRV isolates transmitted directly by their nematode vectors and provides further insight into the expression of transgenic resistance against naturally transmitted soil-borne viruses.

  15. Infection Cycle of Artichoke Italian Latent Virus in Tobacco Plants: Meristem Invasion and Recovery from Disease Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Santovito, Elisa; Mascia, Tiziana; Siddiqui, Shahid A.; Minutillo, Serena Anna; Valkonen, Jari P. T.; Gallitelli, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nepoviral infections induce recovery in fully expanded leaves but persist in shoot apical meristem (SAM) by a largely unknown mechanism. The dynamics of infection of a grapevine isolate of Artichoke Italian latent virus (AILV-V, genus Nepovirus) in tobacco plants, including colonization of SAM, symptom induction and subsequent recovery of mature leaves from symptoms, were characterized. AILV-V moved from the inoculated leaves systemically and invaded SAM in 7 days post-inoculation (dpi), remaining detectable in SAM at least up to 40 dpi. The new top leaves recovered from viral symptoms earliest at 21 dpi. Accumulation of viral RNA to a threshold level was required to trigger the overexpression of RDR6 and DCL4. Consequently, accumulation of viral RNA decreased in the systemically infected leaves, reaching the lowest concentration in the 3rd and 4th leaves at 23 dpi, which was concomitant with recovery of the younger, upper leaves from disease symptoms. No evidence of virus replication was found in the recovered leaves, but they contained infectious virus particles and were protected against re-inoculation with AILV-V. In this study we also showed that AILV-V did not suppress initiation or maintenance of RNA silencing in transgenic plants, but was able to interfere with the cell-to-cell movement of the RNA silencing signal. Our results suggest that AILV-V entrance in SAM and activation of RNA silencing may be distinct processes since the latter is triggered in fully expanded leaves by the accumulation of viral RNA above a threshold level rather than by virus entrance in SAM. PMID:24911029

  16. Impact of Raw and Bioaugmented Olive-Mill Wastewater and Olive-Mill Solid Waste on the Content of Photosynthetic Molecules in Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Parrotta, Luigi; Campani, Tommaso; Casini, Silvia; Romi, Marco; Cai, Giampiero

    2016-08-03

    Disposal and reuse of olive-mill wastes are both an economic and environmental problem, especially in countries where the cultivation of olive trees is extensive. Microorganism-based bioaugmentation can be used to reduce the pollutant capacity of wastes. In this work, bioaugmentation was used to reduce the polyphenolic content of both liquid and solid wastes. After processing, bioaugmented wastes were tested on the root development of maize seeds and on photosynthesis-related molecules of tobacco plants. In maize, we found that bioaugmentation made olive-mill wastes harmless for seed germination. In tobacco, we analyzed the content of RuBisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase) and of the photosynthetic pigments lutein, chlorophylls, and β-carotene. Levels of RuBisCO were negatively affected by untreated wastewater but increased if plants were treated with bioaugmented wastewater. On the contrary, levels of RuBisCO increased in the case of plants treated with raw olive-mill solid waste. Pigment levels showed dissimilar behavior because their concentration increased if plants were irrigated with raw wastewater or treated with raw olive-mill solid waste. Treatment with bioaugmented wastes restored pigment content. Findings show that untreated wastes are potentially toxic at the commencement of treatment, but plants can eventually adapt after an initial stress period. Bioaugmented wastes do not induce immediate damages, and plants rapidly recover optimal levels of photosynthetic molecules.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of tobacco BY-2 cells elicited by cryptogein reveals new potential actors of calcium-dependent and calcium-independent plant defense pathways.

    PubMed

    Amelot, Nicolas; Dorlhac de Borne, François; San Clemente, Hélène; Mazars, Christian; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Brière, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Cryptogein is a proteinaceous elicitor secreted by the oomycete Phytophthora cryptogea, which induces a hypersensitive response in tobacco plants. We have previously reported that in tobacco BY-2 cells treated with cryptogein, most of the genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway were upregulated and cell wall-bound phenolics accumulated. Both events were Ca(2+) dependent. In this study, we designed a microarray covering a large proportion of the tobacco genome and monitored gene expression in cryptogein-elicited BY-2 cells to get a more complete view of the transcriptome changes and to assess their Ca(2+) dependence. The predominant functional gene categories affected by cryptogein included stress- and disease-related proteins, phenylpropanoid pathway, signaling components, transcription factors and cell wall reinforcement. Among the 3819 unigenes whose expression changed more than fourfold, 90% were Ca(2+) dependent, as determined by their sensitivity to lanthanum chloride. The most Ca(2+)-dependent transcripts upregulated by cryptogein were involved in defense responses or the oxylipin pathway. This genome-wide study strongly supports the importance of Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional regulation of regulatory and defense-related genes contributing to cryptogein responses in tobacco.

  18. Pretreatment with nitrogen dioxide modifies plant response to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runeckles, V. C.; Palmer, K.

    Plant growth inhibition by ozone is significantly affected by previous exposure to nitrogen dioxide. Experiments on the early growth of four crop species showed that daily pretreatment with NO 2 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 3 h) immediately prior to exposure to O 3 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 6 h) increased the inhibition of radish and wheat growth, decreased the inhibition of bush bean growth, but had no effect on the growth of mint. The magnitudes of the interactive effects indicate that in regions where relatively high concentrations of O 3 are produced by photochemical processes, for example, downwind from urban centres, assessments of the impact of O 3 on vegetation based on knowledge of response to O 3 alone may be seriously flawed.

  19. Impairment of NtAQP1 gene expression in tobacco plants does not affect root colonisation pattern by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but decreases their symbiotic efficiency under drought.

    PubMed

    Porcel, Rosa; Gómez, Manuel; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2005-09-01

    We investigated in two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plant lines (wildtype or antisense mutant) whether impairment in expression of the plasma membrane aquaporin gene (NtAQP1) affects the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonisation pattern or the symbiotic efficiency of AM fungi. These two objectives were investigated under well-watered and drought stress conditions. Both plant lines had a similar pattern of root colonisation under well-watered and drought stress conditions. In contrast, under drought stress, AM wildtype plants grew faster than mycorrhizal antisense plants. Plant gas exchange also appeared to depend on the expression of NtAQP1 and parallelled the determined growth increments. The implications of enhanced symplastic water transport via NtAQP1 for the efficiency of the AM symbiosis under drought stress conditions are further discussed.

  20. Silencing gene expression of the ethylene-forming enzyme results in a reversible inhibition of ovule development in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    De Martinis D; Mariani, C

    1999-01-01

    To study the role of ethylene in plant reproduction, we constructed transgenic tobacco plants in which the expression of a pistil-specific gene coding for the ethylene-forming enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase was inhibited. Flowers from transgenic plants showed female sterility due to an arrest in ovule development. Megasporogenesis did not occur, and ovules did not reach maturity. When pollinated, pollen tubes were able to reach the ovary but did not penetrate into the immature ovule in transgenic plants. Flower treatment with an ethylene source resulted in a functional recovery of ovule development and restored guidance of the pollen tube tip into the ovule micropyle that resulted in seed set. The recovery was abolished if inhibitors of ethylene action were present. These results demonstrate that the plant hormone ethylene is required during the very early stages of female sporogenesis and ultimately to enable fertilization. PMID:10368177

  1. Altered Epiphytic Colonization of Mannityl Opine-Producing Transgenic Tobacco Plants by a Mannityl Opine-Catabolizing Strain of Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M.; Savka, M. A.; Hwang, I.; Farrand, S. K.; Lindow, S. E.

    1995-01-01

    The plasmid pYDH208, which confers the ability to catabolize the mannityl opines mannopine and agropine, was mobilized into the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strain Cit7. The growth of the mannityl opine-catabolizing strain Cit7(pYDH208) was compared with that of the near-isogenic non-opine-catabolizing strain Cit7xylE on leaves of wild-type tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) and transgenic mannityl opine-producing tobacco plants (N. tabacum cv. Xanthi, line 2-26). The population size of Cit7(pYDH208) was significantly greater on the lower leaves of transgenic plants than on middle or upper leaves of those plants. The population size of Cit7(pYDH208) on lower leaves of transgenic plants was also significantly greater than the population size of Cit7xylE on similar leaves of wild-type plants. High-voltage paper electrophoresis demonstrated higher levels of mannityl opines in washings from lower- and mid-level leaves than in washings from upper-level leaves. The ability of Cit7(pYDH208) to catabolize mannityl opines in the carbon-limited phyllosphere increased the carrying capacity of the lower leaves of transgenic plants for Cit7(pYDH208). In coinoculations, the increase in the ratio of population sizes of Cit7(pYDH208) to Cit7xylE on transgenic plants was apparently due to a subtle difference in the growth rates of the two strains and to the difference in final population sizes. An ability to utilize additional carbon sources on the transgenic plants also enabled Cit7(pYDH208) to achieve a higher degree of coexistence with Cit7xylE on transgenic plants than on wild-type plants. This supports the hypothesis that the level of coexistence between epiphytic bacterial populations can be altered through nutritional resource partitioning. PMID:16535040

  2. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV.

  3. Cross-Resistance to Short Residual Sulfonylurea Herbicides in Transgenic Tobacco Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Gabard, Jerome M.; Charest, Pierre J.; Iyer, V. N.; Miki, Brian L.

    1989-01-01

    Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants, produced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation with a mutant gene (csr1-1) coding for acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) from a chlorsulfuron resistant Arabidopsis thaliana line GH50 (GW Haughn et al. [1988] Mol Gen Genet 211: 266-271; GW Haughn, C Somerville [1986] Mol Gen Genet 204: 430-434), were selected directly on 80 micrograms per liter (225 nanomolar) chlorsulfuron. The expression of csr-1 in two separate transgenic lines CHL-1 and CHL-2 was confirmed by biochemical and genetic analyses. The AHAS activity of GH50 and the equivalent component of AHAS activity in CHL-2 was resistant to three short residual sulfonylurea herbicides, DPX-M6316, DPX-A7881, and DPX-L5300, in addition to chlorsulfuron but not to the sulfonylurea CGA 131′036. Cross-resistance to the imidazolinones AC 263, 499, AC 252, 214, and AC 243,997 was not observed. Parallel observations were made on the inhibition of seedling growth in soil or on culture medium. The relevance of these findings for the application of transgenic plants in agriculture is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667071

  4. Expression of Recombinant Cellulase Cel5A from Trichoderma reesei in Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Megan; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose degrading enzymes, cellulases, are targets of both research and industrial interests. The preponderance of these enzymes in difficult-to-culture organisms, such as hyphae-building fungi and anaerobic bacteria, has hastened the use of recombinant technologies in this field. Plant expression methods are a desirable system for large-scale production of enzymes and other industrially useful proteins. Herein, methods for the transient expression of a fungal endoglucanase, Trichoderma reesei Cel5A, in Nicotiana tabacum are demonstrated. Successful protein expression is shown, monitored by fluorescence using an mCherry-enzyme fusion protein. Additionally, a set of basic tests are used to examine the activity of transiently expressed T. reesei Cel5A, including SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, zymography, as well as fluorescence and dye-based substrate degradation assays. The system described here can be used to produce an active cellulase in a short time period, so as to assess the potential for further production in plants through constitutive or inducible expression systems. PMID:24962636

  5. Does Plant Cultivar Difference Modify the Bottom-Up Effects of Resource Limitation on Plant-Insect Herbivore Interactions?

    PubMed

    Han, Peng; Desneux, Nicolas; Michel, Thomas; Le Bot, Jacques; Seassau, Aurelie; Wajnberg, Eric; Amiens-Desneux, Edwige; Lavoir, Anne-Violette

    2016-12-01

    Variation in resource input to plants triggers bottom-up effects on plant-insect herbivore interactions. However, variation in plant intrinsic traits in response to resource availability may modify the bottom-up effects. Furthermore, the consequences also may depend on the feeding strategy of insect herbivores belonging to different feeding guilds. We evaluated the performance of two insect herbivores from distinct feeding guilds, the leaf miner Tuta absoluta and the phloem feeder Bemisia tabaci. We offered the insects two tomato cultivars growing under optimal nitrogen input vs. nitrogen limitation, or under optimal water input vs. water limitation. We found that: (i) the two cultivars differed in their responses to nitrogen and water limitation by regulating primary (leaf-gas exchange related parameters, leaf nitrogen content, and leaf C/N ratio) and secondary metabolism (main defensive compounds: glycoalkaloids); (ii) for both plant cultivars, nitrogen or water limitation significantly affected T. absoluta survival and development, while B. tabaci survival was affected only by nitrogen limitation; and surprisingly (iii) plant cultivar differences did not modify the negative bottom-up effects of resource limitation on the two insect herbivores. In conclusion, the negative effects of resource limitation cascaded up to insect herbivores even though plant cultivars exhibited various adaptive traits to resource limitation.

  6. Smokeless Tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    ... divisions about tobacco (including smokeless tobacco), its health effects, and quitting. Related Oral Health Topics Oral Cancer ​ ​​​ Share This Page Facebook External link – please review our disclaimer Twitter External ...

  7. Overexpression of a Modified Plant Thionin Enhances Disease Resistance to Citrus Canker and Huanglongbing (HLB)

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Guixia; Stover, Ed; Gupta, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a great threat to the US citrus industry. There are no proven strategies to eliminate HLB disease and no cultivar has been identified with strong HLB resistance. Citrus canker is also an economically important disease associated with a bacterial pathogen (Xanthomonas citri). In this study, we characterized endogenous citrus thionins and investigated their expression in different citrus tissues. Since no HLB-resistant citrus cultivars have been identified, we attempted to develop citrus resistant to both HLB and citrus canker through overexpression of a modified plant thionin. To improve effectiveness for disease resistance, we modified and synthesized the sequence encoding a plant thionin and cloned into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS. The construct was then introduced into Agrobacterium strain EHA105 for citrus transformation. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified plant thionin were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful transformation and transgene gene expression was confirmed by molecular analysis. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified thionin gene were challenged with X. citri 3213 at a range of concentrations, and a significant reduction in canker symptoms and a decrease in bacterial growth were demonstrated compared to nontransgenic plants. Furthermore, the transgenic citrus plants were challenged with HLB via graft inoculation. Our results showed significant Las titer reduction in roots of transgenic Carrizo compared with control plants and reduced scion Las titer 12 months after graft inoculation. These data provide promise for engineering citrus disease resistance against HLB and canker. PMID:27499757

  8. [Analysis of tobacco regeneration plants from the protoplasts produced by electrofusion [corrected] in space].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Gen; Chen, Ai-Di; Wang, Liu-Fa; Zheng, Hui-Qiong

    2007-10-01

    Vacuolated mesophyll protoplasts of Nicotiana rustica L. were electrically fused with evacuolated protoplasts of the same genus (N. tabacum cv. 'Gexin No.1') during a 7-day space flight in the Chinese spacecraft "SZ-4". The initial cell division leading to micro-callus formation took place after landing (Fig.1). Higher plating efficiencies were observed in the flight samples than the control culture, but the frequency of plantlets regeneration reduced by about 20% of the control (Table 1). The hybrid characters were tested by chromosome counting, isozyme analysis and comparison of morphological characteristics (Figs.2-4). About 32% of the regenerates showed hybrid character. Leaf morphological modifications were found in 3 hybrids, i.e., H23, H25 and H27. After backcrossing with N. rustica, alterations in flower color and leaf shape occurred in the somatic hybrid H23 (Fig.5). These results demonstrate that the hybrids formed under microgravity condition could regenerate fertile plants.

  9. Enhanced V-ATPase activity contributes to the improved salt tolerance of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing vacuolar Na(+)/H (+) antiporter AtNHX1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shufeng; Zhang, Zhiming; Tang, Qilin; Lan, Hai; Li, Yinxin; Luo, Ping

    2011-02-01

    AtNHX1, a vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, was introduced into tobacco genome via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation to evaluate the role of vacuolar energy providers in plants salt stress response. Compared to the wild-type plants, over-expression of AtNHX1 increased salt tolerance in the transgenic tobacco plants, allowing higher germination rates of seeds and successful seedling establishment in the presence of toxic concentrations of NaCl. More importantly, the induced Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity in the transgenic plants was closely correlated to the enhanced activity of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) when exposed to 200 mM NaCl. In addition, inhibition of V-ATPase activity led to the malfunction of Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity, placing V-ATPase as the dominant energy provider for the vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter AtNHX1. V-ATPase and vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter thus function in an additive or synergistic way. Simultaneous overexpression of V-ATPase and vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter might be appropriate for producing plants with a higher salt tolerance ability.

  10. Overexpression of a tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 causes salt sensitivity and hydrogen peroxide production in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Cao, YangRong; Li, ZhiGang; Chen, Tao; Zhang, ZhiGang; Zhang, JinSong; Chen, ShouYi

    2008-05-01

    The small GTPases of Rop/Rho family is central regulators of important cellular processes in plants. Tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 has been isolated; however, its roles in stress responses were unknown. In the present study, the genomic sequence of NtRop1 was cloned, which has seven exons and six introns, similar to the Rop gene structure from Arabidopsis. The NtRop1 gene was constitutively expressed in the different organs whereas the other six Rop genes from tobacco had differential expression patterns. The expression of the NtRop1 gene was moderately induced by methyl viologen, NaCl, and ACC treatments, but slightly inhibited by ABA treatment, with no significant induction by NAA treatment. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the NtRop1 showed increased salt sensitivity as can be seen from the reduced root growth and elevated relative electrolyte leakage. The hydrogen peroxide production was also promoted in the NtRop1-trangenic plants in comparison with wild type plants. These results imply that the NtRop1 may confer salt sensitivity through activation of H2O2 production during plant response to salt stress.

  11. Metabolic Profiling with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Carbon-Nitrogen Status of Tobacco Leaves Across Different Planting Areas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jieyu; Zhao, Yanni; Hu, Chunxiu; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Lili; Zeng, Jun; Peng, Xiaojun; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2016-02-05

    The interaction between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism can reflect plant growth status and environmental factors. Little is known regarding the connections between C-N metabolism and growing regions under field conditions. To comprehensively investigate the relationship in mature tobacco leaves, we established metabolomics approaches based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS). Approximately 240 polar metabolites were determined. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the growing region greatly influenced the metabolic profiles of tobacco leaves. A metabolic correlation network and related pathway maps were used to reveal the global overview of the alteration of C-N metabolism across three typical regions. In Yunnan, sugars and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates were closely correlated with amino acid pools. Henan tobacco leaves showed positive correlation between the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) intermediates and C-rich secondary metabolism. In Guizhou, the proline and asparagine had significant links with TCA cycle intermediates and urea cycle, and antioxidant accumulation was observed in response to drought. These results demonstrate that combined analytical approaches have great potential to detect polar metabolites and provide information on C-N metabolism related to planting regional characteristics.

  12. Overexpression of a pepper basic pathogenesis-related protein 1 gene in tobacco plants enhances resistance to heavy metal and pathogen stresses.

    PubMed

    Sarowar, Sujon; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Eui Nam; Kim, Ki Deok; Hwang, Byung Kook; Islam, Rafiul; Shin, Jeong Sheop

    2005-06-01

    A pepper gene, CABPR1, which encodes basic pathogenesis-related protein 1, has been reported to be strongly induced after ethephon treatment, wounding, and tobacco mosaic virus infection. The potential role of CABPR1 in tolerance of biotic or abiotic stresses was examined in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi plants. Overexpression of CABPR1 in tobacco plants enhanced tolerance not only to heavy metal stresses, but also to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae, and the bacterial pathogens Ralstonia solanacearum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. RT-PCR revealed that the CABPR1 transgene increased expression of the PR-Q and glutathione S-transferase genes, but decreased expression of the PR-1a and thaumatin genes. Moreover, these transgenic lines exhibited significant decreases in total peroxidase activity and transcription level, suggesting that overexpression of CABPR1 in tobacco cells altered the balance of redox systems. Redox imbalance in transgenic lines may lead to H(2)O(2) accumulation, triggering tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  13. Calcium signatures and signaling in cytosol and organelles of tobacco cells induced by plant defense elicitors.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Hamid; Chiltz, Annick; Madani, Siham; Vatsa, Parul; Schoefs, Benoît; Pugin, Alain; Garcia-Brugger, Angela

    2012-06-01

    Calcium signatures induced by two elicitors of plant defense reactions, namely cryptogein and oligogalacturonides, were monitored at the subcellular level, using apoaequorin-transformed Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi cells, in which the apoaequorin calcium sensor was targeted either to cytosol, mitochondria or chloroplasts. Our study showed that both elicitors induced specific Ca(2+) signatures in each compartment, with the most striking difference relying on duration. Common properties also emerged from the analysis of Ca(2+) signatures: both elicitors induced a biphasic cytosolic [Ca(2+)] elevation together with a single mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] elevation concomitant with the first cytosolic [Ca(2+)] peak. In addition, both elicitors induced a chloroplastic [Ca(2+)] elevation peaking later in comparison to cytosolic [Ca(2+)] elevation. In cryptogein-treated cells, pharmacological studies indicated that IP(3) should play an important role in Ca(2+) signaling contrarily to cADPR or nitric oxide, which have limited or no effect on [Ca(2+)] variations. Our data also showed that, depending on [Ca(2+)] fluxes at the plasma membrane, cryptogein triggered a mitochondrial respiration increase and affected excess energy dissipation mechanisms in chloroplasts. Altogether the results indicate that cryptogein profoundly impacted cell functions at many levels, including organelles.

  14. [Genetically modified plants and the problems of plant protection: progress and estimation of potential risks].

    PubMed

    Kozub, N O; Pylypenko, L A; Sozinov, I O; Blium, Ia B; Sozinov, O O

    2012-01-01

    The review deals with advances and prospects in development of transgenic plants. At present virtually all commercial GM crops are those created for solving plant protection problems--they carry transgenes conferring resistance to herbicides, pests, viruses. Approaches employed for development of commercial GM crops with herbicide, pest and virus resistance, as well as strategies and prospects of development of commercial GM plants with resistance to fungal and bacterial diseases and nematodes, are considered. Ecological (including agronomical) and social risks associated with commercial growing of transgenic plants are briefly discussed.

  15. A Virulence Factor Encoded by a Polydnavirus Confers Tolerance to Transgenic Tobacco Plants against Lepidopteran Larvae, by Impairing Nutrient Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Mariangela; Buonanno, Martina; Di Prisco, Gennaro; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Corrado, Giandomenico; Monti, Simona M.; Rao, Rosa; Casartelli, Morena; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The biological control of insect pests is based on the use of natural enemies. However, the growing information on the molecular mechanisms underpinning the interactions between insects and their natural antagonists can be exploited to develop “bio-inspired” pest control strategies, mimicking suppression mechanisms shaped by long co-evolutionary processes. Here we focus on a virulence factor encoded by the polydnavirus associated with the braconid wasp Toxoneuron nigriceps (TnBV), an endophagous parasitoid of noctuid moth larvae. This virulence factor (TnBVANK1) is a member of the viral ankyrin (ANK) protein family, and appears to be involved both in immunosuppression and endocrine alterations of the host. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing TnBVANK1 showed insecticide activity and caused developmental delay in Spodoptera littoralis larvae feeding on them. This effect was more evident in a transgenic line showing a higher number of transcripts of the viral gene. However, this effect was not associated with evidence of translocation into the haemocoel of the entire protein, where the receptors of TnBVANK1 are putatively located. Indeed, immunolocalization experiments evidenced the accumulation of this viral protein in the midgut, where it formed a thick layer coating the brush border of epithelial cells. In vitro transport experiments demonstrated that the presence of recombinant TnBVANK1 exerted a dose-dependent negative impact on amino acid transport. These results open new perspectives for insect control and stimulate additional research efforts to pursue the development of novel bioinsecticides, encoded by parasitoid-derived genes. However, future work will have to carefully evaluate any effect that these molecules may have on beneficial insects and on non-target organisms. PMID:25438149

  16. Induced expression of AtLEC1 and AtLEC2 differentially promotes somatic embryogenesis in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengdan; Liu, Chuanliang; Xia, Han; Bi, Yuping; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Zhao, Shuzhen; Hou, Lei; Li, Fuguang; Wang, Xingjun

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON (LEC) genes, AtLEC1 and AtLEC2, are important embryonic regulators that play key roles in morphogenesis and maturation phases during embryo development. Ectopic expression of AtLEC1 and AtLEC2 in tobacco caused abnormality in transgenic seedling. When transgenic seeds germinated on medium containing 30 µM DEX, LEC1 transgenic seedlings were ivory and fleshy, with unexpanded cotyledons, stubby hypocotyls, short roots and no obvious callus formation at the shoot meristem position. While LEC2 transgenic seedlings formed embryonic callus on the shoot apical meristem and somatic embryo-like structures emerged from the surface of the callus. When callus were transferred to hormone free MS0 medium more shoots were regenerated from each callus. However, shoot formation was not observed in LEC1 overexpressors. To investigate the mechanisms of LEC2 in somatic embryogenesis, we studied global gene expression by digital gene expression profiling analysis. The results indicated that ectopic expression of LEC2 genes induced accumulation of embryo-specific proteins such as seed storage proteins, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes, products of steroid biosynthesis related genes and key regulatory genes of the embryo development. Genes of plant-specific transcription factors such as NAC domain protein, AP2 and GRAS family, resistance-related as well as salicylic acid signaling related genes were up-regulated in LEC2 transgenic seedlings. Ectopi c expression of LEC2 induced large number of somatic embryo formation and shoot regeneration but 20 d DEX induction of LEC1 is not sufficient to induce somatic embryogenesis and shoot formation. Our data provide new information to understand the mechanisms on LEC2 gene's induction of somatic embryogenesis.

  17. A modified method for diffusive monitoring of 3-ethenylpyridine as a specific marker of environmental tobacco smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusimäki, Leea; Peltonen, Kimmo; Vainiotalo, Sinikka

    A previously introduced method for monitoring environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was further validated. The method is based on diffusive sampling of a vapour-phase marker, 3-ethenylpyridine (3-EP), with 3 M passive monitors (type 3500). Experiments were done in a dynamic chamber to assess diffusive sampling in comparison with active sampling in charcoal tubes or XAD-4 tubes. The sampling rate for 3-EP collected on the diffusive sampler was 23.1±0.6 mL min -1. The relative standard deviation for parallel samples ( n=6) ranged from 4% to 14% among experiments ( n=9). No marked reverse diffusion of 3-EP was detected nor any significant effect of relative humidity at 20%, 50% or 80%. The diffusive sampling of 3-EP was validated in field measurements in 15 restaurants in comparison with 3-EP and nicotine measurements using active sampling. The 3-EP concentration in restaurants ranged from 0.01 to 9.8 μg m -3, and the uptake rate for 3-EP based on 92 parallel samples was 24.0±0.4 mL min -1. A linear correlation ( r=0.98) was observed between 3-EP and nicotine concentrations, the average ratio of 3-EP to nicotine being 1:8. Active sampling of 3-EP and nicotine in charcoal tubes provided more reliable results than sampling in XAD-4 tubes. All samples were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after elution with a 15% solution of pyridine in toluene. For nicotine, the limit of quantification of the charcoal tube method was 4 ng per sample, corresponding to 0.04 μg m -3 for an air sample of 96 L. For 3-EP, the limit of quantification of the diffusive method was 0.5-1.0 ng per sample, corresponding to 0.04-0.09 μg m -3 for 8 h sampling. The diffusive method proved suitable for ETS monitoring, even at low levels of ETS.

  18. Using vegetative index and modified derivative for early detection of soybean plant injury from glyphosate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate is a non-selective, systemic herbicide highly toxic to sensitive plant species, and its use has seen a significant increase due to the increased adoption of genetically modified glyphosate-resistant crops since the mid-1990s. Glyphosate application for weed control in glyphosate-resistant...

  19. Biochemistry of plant class IV chitinases and fungal chitinase-modifying proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant class IV chitinases have 2 domains, a small (3 kDa) amino-terminal domain with homology to carbohydrate binding peptides, and a larger (25 kDa) catalytic domain. The biological function of these chitinases is not known. But it is known that some pathogenic fungi secrete chitinase modifying pro...

  20. From gene to harvest: insights into upstream process development for the GMP production of a monoclonal antibody in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Sack, Markus; Rademacher, Thomas; Spiegel, Holger; Boes, Alexander; Hellwig, Stephan; Drossard, Juergen; Stoger, Eva; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    The EU Sixth Framework Programme Integrated Project 'Pharma-Planta' developed an approved manufacturing process for recombinant plant-made pharmaceutical proteins (PMPs) using the human HIV-neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2G12 as a case study. In contrast to the well-established Chinese hamster ovary platform, which has been used for the production of therapeutic antibodies for nearly 30 years, only draft regulations were initially available covering the production of recombinant proteins in transgenic tobacco plants. Whereas recombinant proteins produced in animal cells are secreted into the culture medium during fermentation in bioreactors, intact plants grown under nonsterile conditions in a glasshouse environment provide various 'plant-specific' regulatory and technical challenges for the development of a process suitable for the acquisition of a manufacturing licence for clinical phase I trials. During upstream process development, several generic steps were addressed (e.g. plant transformation and screening, seed bank generation, genetic stability, host plant uniformity) as well as product-specific aspects (e.g. product quantity). This report summarizes the efforts undertaken to analyse and define the procedures for the GMP/GACP-compliant upstream production of 2G12 in transgenic tobacco plants from gene to harvest, including the design of expression constructs, plant transformation, the generation of production lines, master and working seed banks and the detailed investigation of cultivation and harvesting parameters and their impact on biomass, product yield and intra/interbatch variability. The resulting procedures were successfully translated into a prototypic manufacturing process that has been approved by the German competent authority.

  1. Overexpression of carnation S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase gene generates a broad-spectrum tolerance to abiotic stresses in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wi, Soo Jin; Kim, Woo Taek; Park, Ky Young

    2006-10-01

    Polyamines (PAs), such as putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, are present in all living organism and implicate in a wide range of cellular physiological processes. We have used transgenic technology in an attempt to evaluate their potential for mitigating the adverse effects of several abiotic stresses in plants. Sense construct of full-length cDNA for S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), a key enzyme in PA biosynthesis, from carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower was introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Several transgenic lines overexpressing SAMDC gene under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter accumulated soluble total PAs by 2.2 (S16-S-4) to 3.1 (S16-S-1) times than wild-type plants. The transgenic tobacco did not show any difference in organ phenotype compared to the wild-type. The number and weight of seeds increased, and net photosynthetic rate also increased in transgenic plants. Stress-induced damage was attenuated in these transgenic plants, in the symptom of visible yellowing and chlorophyll degradation after all experienced stresses such as salt stress, cold stress, acidic stress, and abscisic acid treatment. H2O2-induced damage was attenuated by spermidine treatment. Transcripts for antioxidant enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, manganase superoxide dismutase, and glutathione S-transferase) in transgenic plants and GUS activity transformed with SAMDC promoter::GUS fusion were induced more significantly by stress treatment, compared to control. These results that the transgenic plants with sense SAMDC cDNA are more tolerant to abiotic stresses than wild-type plants suggest that PAs may play an important role in contributing stress tolerance in plants.

  2. [Genetically modified plants and food safety. State of the art and discussion in the European Union].

    PubMed

    Schauzu, M

    2004-09-01

    Placing genetically modified (GM) plants and derived products on the European Union's (EU) market has been regulated by a Community Directive since 1990. This directive was complemented by a regulation specific for genetically modified and other novel foods in 1997. Specific labelling requirements have been applicable for GM foods since 1998. The law requires a pre-market safety assessment for which criteria have been elaborated and continuously adapted in accordance with the state of the art by national and international bodies and organisations. Consequently, only genetically modified products that have been demonstrated to be as safe as their conventional counterparts can be commercialized. However, the poor acceptance of genetically modified foods has led to a de facto moratorium since 1998. It is based on the lack of a qualified majority of EU member states necessary for authorization to place genetically modified plants and derived foods on the market. New Community Regulations are intended to end this moratorium by providing a harmonized and transparent safety assessment, a centralised authorization procedure, extended labelling provisions and a traceability system for genetically modified organisms (GMO) and derived food and feed.

  3. Tobacco plants transformed with the bean. alpha. ai gene express an inhibitor of insect. alpha. -amylase in their seeds. [Nicotiana tabacum; Tenebrio molitor

    SciTech Connect

    Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds contain a putative plant defense protein that inhibits insect and mammalian but not plant {alpha}-amylases. We recently presented strong circumstantial evidence that this {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is encoded by an already-identified lectin gene whose product is referred to as lectin-like-protein (LLP). We have now made a chimeric gene consisting of the coding sequence of the lectin gene that encodes LLP and the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences of the lectin gene that encodes phytohemagglutinin-L. When this chimeric gene was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we observed in the seeds a series of polypeptides (M{sub r} 10,000-18,000) that cross-react with antibodies to the bean {alpha}-amylase inhibitor. Most of these polypeptides bind to a pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase affinity column. An extract of the seeds of the transformed tobacco plants inhibits pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase activity as well as the {alpha}-amylase present in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor. We suggest that introduction of this lectin gene (to be called {alpha}ai) into other leguminous plants may be a strategy to protect the seeds from the seed-eating larvae of Coleoptera.

  4. Expression of Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA-I') from elderberry bark in transgenic tobacco plants results in enhanced resistance to different insect species.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; Smagghe, Guy

    2009-04-01

    Tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun NN) have been transformed with the gene encoding the type-2 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) SNA-I' from elderberry (Sambucus nigra) under the control of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter. Previous research confirmed that these plants synthesize, correctly process and assemble a fully active RIP. Variability in protein expression was observed within the transgenic lines. The effects of the type-2 RIP SNA-I' delivered through a leaf feeding assay were evaluated in the laboratory on two economically important pest insects belonging to the orders of Hemiptera, the tobacco aphid (Myzus nicotianae) and Lepidoptera, the beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua). In the experiment with aphids, significant effects were observed on the life parameters, such as survival, intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rate, mean generation time and mean daily offspring, whereas with caterpillars significant reduction in fresh weight as well as retardation in development were observed. In addition, significant increases in mortality were noted for insects fed on the transgenic lines as compared to wild type plants. This information provides further support for RIPs having a role in plant resistance to insect pest species.

  5. Overexpression of the phosphatidylinositol synthase gene from Zea mays in tobacco plants alters the membrane lipids composition and improves drought stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Shu-Mei; Gao, Qiang; Xue, Hong-Wei; Sui, Zhen-Hua; Yue, Gui-Dong; Yang, Ai-Fang; Zhang, Ju-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) is an important lipid because it serves as a key membrane constituent and is the precursor of the inositol-containing lipids that are found in all plants and animals. It is synthesized from cytidine-diphosphodiacylglycerol (CDP-DG) and myo-inositol by PtdIns synthase (PIS). We have previously reported that two putative PIS genes from maize (Zea mays L.), ZmPIS and ZmPIS2, are transcriptionally up-regulated in response to drought (Sui et al., Gene, 426:47-56, 2008). In this work, we report on the characterization of ZmPIS in vitro and in vivo. The ZmPIS gene successfully complemented the yeast pis mutant BY4743, and the determination of PIS activity in the yeast strain further confirmed the enzymatic function of ZmPIS. An ESI-MS/MS-based lipid profiling approach was used to identify and quantify the lipid species in transgenic and wild-type tobacco plants before and after drought treatment. The results show that the overexpression of ZmPIS significantly increases lipid levels in tobacco leaves under drought stress compared to those of wild-type tobacco, which correlated well with the increased drought tolerance of the transgenic plants. Further analysis showed that, under drought stress conditions, ZmPIS overexpressors were found to exhibit increased membrane integrity, thereby enabling the retention of more solutes and water compared with the wild-type and the vector control transgenic lines. Our findings give us new insights into the role of the ZmPIS gene in the response of maize to drought/osmotic stress and the mechanisms by which plants adapt to drought stress.

  6. Transgenic tobacco plants over expressing cold regulated protein CbCOR15b from Capsella bursa-pastoris exhibit enhanced cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lihua; Zhou, Mingqi; Shen, Chen; Liang, Jing; Lin, Juan

    2012-09-15

    Low temperature is among the most significant abiotic stresses, restricting the habitats of sessile plants and reducing crop productivity. Cold regulated (COR) genes are low temperature-responsive genes expressing under regulation of a specific signal transduction pathway, which is designated C-repeat-binding-factor (CBF) signaling pathway. In the present article, cold bioassay showed that the transcript level of cold regulated gene CbCOR15b from shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris) was obviously elevated under cold treatments. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and GUS report system revealed that unlike AtCOR15b, CbCOR15b expressed not only in leaves but also in stems and maturation zone of roots. When transgenic tobacco plants ectopically expressing CbCOR15b were exposed to chilling and freezing temperatures, they displayed more cold tolerance compared to control plants. According to the electrolyte leakage, the relative water content, the glucose content and the phenotype observation, CbCOR15b transformants suffered less damage under cold stress. Further investigation of the subcellular localization of CbCOR15b by transient expression of fusion protein CbCOR15b-GFP revealed that it was localized exclusively in the chloroplasts of tobacco mesophyll cells and in the cytoplasm of onion epidermal cells. It can be concluded that CbCOR15b which located in the chloroplasts and in the cytoplasm of cells without chloroplasts was involved in cold response of C. bursa-pastoris and conferred enhanced cold tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants.

  7. Increased sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase activity in transgenic tobacco plants stimulates photosynthesis and growth from an early stage in development.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Stephane; Lawson, Tracy; Zakhleniuk, Oksana V; Lloyd, Julie C; Raines, Christine A; Fryer, Mike

    2005-05-01

    Activity of the Calvin cycle enzyme sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase) was increased by overexpression of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cDNA in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. In plants with increased SBPase activity, photosynthetic rates were increased, higher levels of Suc and starch accumulated during the photoperiod, and an increase in leaf area and biomass of up to 30% was also evident. Light saturated photosynthesis increased with increasing SBPase activity and analysis of CO2 response curves revealed that this increase in photosynthesis could be attributed to an increase in ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate regenerative capacity. Seedlings with increased SBPase activity had an increased leaf area at the 4 to 5 leaf stage when compared to wild-type plants, and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of these young plants revealed a higher photosynthetic capacity at the whole plant level. Measurements of photosynthesis, made under growth conditions integrated over the day, showed that mature plants with increased SBPase activity fixed 6% to 12% more carbon than equivalent wild-type leaves, with the young leaves having the highest rates. In this paper, we have shown that photosynthetic capacity per unit area and plant yield can be increased by overexpressing a single native plant enzyme, SBPase, and that this gives an advantage to the growth of these plants from an early phase of vegetative growth. This work has also shown that it is not necessary to bypass the normal regulatory control of SBPase, exerted by conditions in the stroma, to achieve improvements in carbon fixation.

  8. Biological impact of cigarette smoke compared to an aerosol produced from a prototypic modified risk tobacco product on normal human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kogel, U; Gonzalez Suarez, I; Xiang, Y; Dossin, E; Guy, P A; Mathis, C; Marescotti, D; Goedertier, D; Martin, F; Peitsch, M C; Hoeng, J

    2015-12-01

    Cigarette smoking causes serious and fatal diseases. The best way for smokers to avoid health risks is to quit smoking. Using modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) may be an alternative to reduce the harm caused for those who are unwilling to quit smoking, but little is known about the toxic effects of MRTPs, nor were the molecular mechanisms of toxicity investigated in detail. The toxicity of an MRTP and the potential molecular mechanisms involved were investigated in high-content screening tests and whole genome transcriptomics analyses using human bronchial epithelial cells. The prototypic (p)MRTP that was tested had less impact than reference cigarette 3R4F on the cellular oxidative stress response and cell death pathways. Higher pMRTP aerosol extract concentrations had impact on pathways associated with the detoxification of xenobiotics and the reduction of oxidative damage. A pMRTP aerosol concentration up to 18 times higher than the 3R4F caused similar perturbation effects in biological networks and led to the perturbation of networks related to cell stress, and proliferation biology. These results may further facilitate the development of a systems toxicology-based impact assessment for use in future risk assessments in line with the 21st century toxicology paradigm, as shown here for an MRTP.

  9. A 28-day rat inhalation study with an integrated molecular toxicology endpoint demonstrates reduced exposure effects for a prototypic modified risk tobacco product compared with conventional cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Kogel, Ulrike; Schlage, Walter K; Martin, Florian; Xiang, Yang; Ansari, Sam; Leroy, Patrice; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Gebel, Stephan; Buettner, Ansgar; Wyss, Christoph; Esposito, Marco; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-06-01

    Towards a systems toxicology-based risk assessment, we investigated molecular perturbations accompanying histopathological changes in a 28-day rat inhalation study combining transcriptomics with classical histopathology. We demonstrated reduced biological activity of a prototypic modified risk tobacco product (pMRTP) compared with the reference research cigarette 3R4F. Rats were exposed to filtered air or to three concentrations of mainstream smoke (MS) from 3R4F, or to a high concentration of MS from a pMRTP. Histopathology revealed concentration-dependent changes in response to 3R4F that were irritative stress-related in nasal and bronchial epithelium, and inflammation-related in the lung parenchyma. For pMRTP, significant changes were seen in the nasal epithelium only. Transcriptomics data were obtained from nasal and bronchial epithelium and lung parenchyma. Concentration-dependent gene expression changes were observed following 3R4F exposure, with much smaller changes for pMRTP. A computational-modeling approach based on causal models of tissue-specific biological networks identified cell stress, inflammation, proliferation, and senescence as the most perturbed molecular mechanisms. These perturbations correlated with histopathological observations. Only weak perturbations were observed for pMRTP. In conclusion, a correlative evaluation of classical histopathology together with gene expression-based computational network models may facilitate a systems toxicology-based risk assessment, as shown for a pMRTP.

  10. Nicotine and tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    Withdrawal from nicotine; Smoking - nicotine addiction and withdrawal; Smokeless tobacco - nicotine addiction; Cigar smoking; Pipe smoking; Smokeless snuff; Tobacco use; Chewing tobacco; Nicotine addiction and tobacco

  11. Transgenic tobacco plants with improved cyanobacterial Rubisco expression but no extra assembly factors grow at near wild-type rates if provided with elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Occhialini, Alessandro; Lin, Myat T; Andralojc, P John; Hanson, Maureen R; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-01-01

    Introducing a carbon-concentrating mechanism and a faster Rubisco enzyme from cyanobacteria into higher plant chloroplasts may improve photosynthetic performance by increasing the rate of CO2 fixation while decreasing losses caused by photorespiration. We previously demonstrated that tobacco plants grow photoautotrophically using Rubisco from Synechococcus elongatus, although the plants exhibited considerably slower growth than wild-type and required supplementary CO2 . Because of concerns that vascular plant assembly factors may not be adequate for assembly of a cyanobacterial Rubisco, prior transgenic plants included the cyanobacterial chaperone RbcX or the carboxysomal protein CcmM35. Here we show that neither RbcX nor CcmM35 is needed for assembly of active cyanobacterial Rubisco. Furthermore, by altering the gene regulatory sequences on the Rubisco transgenes, cyanobacterial Rubisco expression was enhanced and the transgenic plants grew at near wild-type growth rates, although still requiring elevated CO2 . We performed detailed kinetic characterization of the enzymes produced with and without the RbcX and CcmM35 cyanobacterial proteins. These transgenic plants exhibit photosynthetic characteristics that confirm the predicted benefits of introduction of non-native forms of Rubisco with higher carboxylation rate constants in vascular plants and the potential nitrogen-use efficiency that may be achieved provided that adequate CO2 is available near the enzyme.

  12. The HIV-1 Pr55 gag polyprotein binds to plastidial membranes and leads to severe impairment of chloroplast biogenesis and seedling lethality in transplastomic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Scotti, N; Sannino, L; Idoine, A; Hamman, P; De Stradis, A; Giorio, P; Maréchal-Drouard, L; Bock, R; Cardi, T

    2015-04-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering has long been recognised as a powerful technology to produce recombinant proteins. To date, however, little attention has been given to the causes of pleiotropic effects reported, in some cases, as consequence of the expression of foreign proteins in transgenic plastids. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic alterations observed in transplastomic tobacco plants accumulating the Pr55(gag) polyprotein of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The expression of Pr55(gag) at high levels in the tobacco plastome leads to a lethal phenotype of seedlings grown in soil, severe impairment of plastid development and photosynthetic activity, with chloroplasts largely resembling undeveloped proplastids. These alterations are associated to the binding of Pr55(gag) to thylakoids. During particle assembly in HIV-1 infected human cells, the binding of Pr55(gag) to a specific lipid [phosphatidylinositol-(4-5) bisphosphate] in the plasma membrane is mediated by myristoylation at the amino-terminus and the so-called highly basic region (HBR). Surprisingly, the non-myristoylated Pr55(gag) expressed in tobacco plastids was likely able, through the HBR motif, to bind to nonphosphorous glycerogalactolipids or other classes of lipids present in plastidial membranes. Although secondary consequences of disturbed chloroplast biogenesis on expression of nuclear-encoded plastid proteins cannot be ruled out, results of proteomic analyses suggest that their altered accumulation could be due to retrograde control in which chloroplasts relay their status to the nucleus for fine-tuning of gene expression.

  13. Involvement of NtERF3 in the cell death signalling pathway mediated by SIPK/WIPK and WRKY1 in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Ogata, T; Okada, H; Kawaide, H; Takahashi, H; Seo, S; Mitsuhara, I; Matsushita, Y

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that one of the ethylene response factors (ERFs), NtERF3, and other members of the subgroup VIII-a ERFs of the AP2/ERF family exhibit cell death-inducing ability in tobacco leaves. In this study, we focused on the involvement of NtERF3 in a cell death signalling pathway in tobacco plants, particularly downstream of NtSIPK/NtWIPK and NtWRKY1, which are mitogen-activated protein kinases and a phosphorylation substrate of NtSIPK, respectively. An ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif-deficient NtERF3b mutant (NtERF3bΔEAR) that lacked cell death-inducing ability suppressed the induction of cell death caused by NtERF3a. The transient co-expression of NtERF3bΔEAR suppressed the hypersensitive reaction (HR)-like cell death induced by NtSIPK and NtWRKY1. The induction of cell death by NtSIPK and NtWRKY1 was also inhibited in transgenic plants expressing NtERF3bΔEAR. Analysis of gene expression, ethylene production and cell death symptoms in salicylic acid-deficient tobacco plants suggested the existence of some feedback regulation in the HR cell death signalling pathway mediated by SIPK/WIPK and WRKY1. Overall, these results suggest that NtERF3 functions downstream of NtSIPK/NtWIPK and NtWRKY1 in a cell death signalling pathway, with some feedback regulation.

  14. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    PubMed Central

    Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry. PMID:26137472

  15. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  16. Recombinant protein expression plasmids optimized for industrial E. coli fermentation and plant systems produce biologically active human insulin-like growth factor-1 in transgenic rice and tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Mitra; Alli, Zaman; Cheng, Xiongying; Belbaraka, Loubaba; Belgoudi, Jaafar; Sardana, Ravinder; Phipps, Jenny; Altosaar, Illimar

    2004-06-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor-1 (hIGF-1) is a growth factor with clinical significance in medicine. The therapeutic potential of recombinant hIGF-1 (rthIGF-1) stems from the fact that hIGF-1 resembles insulin in many aspects of physiology. The expression of hIGF-1 in transgenic tobacco and rice plants using different expression cassettes is reported here. In the present study, two coding sequences were tested, one with the original human sequence, but partially optimized for expression in E. coli and the other with a plant-codon-optimized sequence that was expected to give a higher level of expression in plant systems. Three different hIGF-1 recombinant expression constructs were generated. All expression constructs utilized the maize ubiquitin 1 promoter with or without a signal sequence. Analyses conducted using a hIGF-1 specific ELISA kit showed all transgenic plants produced hIGF-1 and the accumulated hIGF-1 increased from the E. coli codon bias to higher levels when the hIGF-1 coding sequence was codon-optimized to match that of the maize zeamatin protein--the most transcribed gene in maize endosperm suspension cells. Further analyses that compared the functionality of the bacterial signal peptide Lam B in plants showed that this leader peptide led to lower expression levels when compared to transgenic plants that did not contain this sequence. This indicated that this expression construct was functional without removal of the bacterial signal sequence. The maize ubiquitin 1 promoter was found to be more active in rice plants than tobacco plants indicating that in this case, there was a class preference that was biased towards a monocot host. Biological analyses conducted using protein extracts from transgenic plants showed that the rthIGF-1 was effective in stimulating the in vitro growth and proliferation of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. This indicated that the plant-produced rthIGF-1 was stable and biologically active. As some plants have been

  17. Suggested improvements for the allergenicity assessment of genetically modified plants used in foods.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Richard E; Tetteh, Afua O

    2011-08-01

    Genetically modified (GM) plants are increasingly used for food production and industrial applications. As the global population has surpassed 7 billion and per capita consumption rises, food production is challenged by loss of arable land, changing weather patterns, and evolving plant pests and disease. Previous gains in quantity and quality relied on natural or artificial breeding, random mutagenesis, increased pesticide and fertilizer use, and improved farming techniques, all without a formal safety evaluation. However, the direct introduction of novel genes raised questions regarding safety that are being addressed by an evaluation process that considers potential increases in the allergenicity, toxicity, and nutrient availability of foods derived from the GM plants. Opinions vary regarding the adequacy of the assessment, but there is no documented proof of an adverse effect resulting from foods produced from GM plants. This review and opinion discusses current practices and new regulatory demands related to food safety.

  18. Suppression of Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation in Chloroplasts Prevents Leaf Damage but Not Growth Arrest in Salt-Stressed Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lodeyro, Anabella F.; Giró, Mariana; Poli, Hugo O.; Bettucci, Gabriel; Cortadi, Adriana; Ferri, Alejandro M.; Carrillo, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    Crop yield reduction due to salinity is a growing agronomical concern in many regions. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells accompanies many abiotic stresses including salinity, acting as toxic and signaling molecules during plant stress responses. While ROS are generated in various cellular compartments, chloroplasts represent a main source in the light, and plastid ROS synthesis and/or elimination have been manipulated to improve stress tolerance. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a plastid-targeted cyanobacterial flavodoxin, a flavoprotein that prevents ROS accumulation specifically in chloroplasts, displayed increased tolerance to many environmental stresses, including drought, excess irradiation, extreme temperatures and iron starvation. Surprisingly, flavodoxin expression failed to protect transgenic plants against NaCl toxicity. However, when high salt was directly applied to leaf discs, flavodoxin did increase tolerance, as reflected by preservation of chlorophylls, carotenoids and photosynthetic activities. Flavodoxin decreased salt-dependent ROS accumulation in leaf tissue from discs and whole plants, but this decline did not improve tolerance at the whole plant level. NaCl accumulation in roots, as well as increased osmotic pressure and salt-induced root damage, were not prevented by flavodoxin expression. The results indicate that ROS formed in chloroplasts have a marginal effect on plant responses during salt stress, and that sensitive targets are present in roots which are not protected by flavodoxin. PMID:27441560

  19. Increased production of wax esters in transgenic tobacco plants by expression of a fatty acid reductase:wax synthase gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Selcuk; Hofvander, Per; Dutta, Paresh; Sun, Chuanxin; Sitbon, Folke

    2015-12-01

    Wax esters are hydrophobic lipids consisting of a fatty acid moiety linked to a fatty alcohol with an ester bond. Plant-derived wax esters are today of particular concern for their potential as cost-effective and sustainable sources of lubricants. However, this aspect is hampered by the fact that the level of wax esters in plants generally is too low to allow commercial exploitation. To investigate whether wax ester biosynthesis can be increased in plants using transgenic approaches, we have here exploited a fusion between two bacterial genes together encoding a single wax ester-forming enzyme, and targeted the resulting protein to chloroplasts in stably transformed tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants. Compared to wild-type controls, transgenic plants showed both in leaves and stems a significant increase in the total level of wax esters, being eight-fold at the whole plant level. The profiles of fatty acid methyl ester and fatty alcohol in wax esters were related, and C16 and C18 molecules constituted predominant forms. Strong transformants displayed certain developmental aberrations, such as stunted growth and chlorotic leaves and stems. These negative effects were associated with an accumulation of fatty alcohols, suggesting that an adequate balance between formation and esterification of fatty alcohols is crucial for a high wax ester production. The results show that wax ester engineering in transgenic plants is feasible, and suggest that higher yields may become achieved in the near future.

  20. RNAi-mediated mortality of the whitefly through transgenic expression of double-stranded RNA homologous to acetylcholinesterase and ecdysone receptor in tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Hassan Jamil; Raza, Amir; Amin, Imran; Scheffler, Jodi A.; Scheffler, Brian E.; Brown, Judith K.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) is a pest and vector of plant viruses to crop and ornamental plants worldwide. Using RNA interference (RNAi) to down regulate whitefly genes by expressing their homologous double stranded RNAs in plants has great potential for management of whiteflies to reduce plant virus disease spread. Using a Tobacco rattle virus-derived plasmid for in planta transient expression of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) homologous to the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and ecdysone receptor (EcR) genes of B. tabaci, resulted in significant adult whitefly mortality. Nicotiana tabacum L. plants expressing dsRNA homologous to B. tabaci AChE and EcR were constructed by fusing sequences derived from both genes. Mortality of adult whiteflies exposed to dsRNA by feeding on N. tabacum plants, compared to non-dsRNA expressing plants, recorded at 24-hr intervals post-ingestion for three days, was >90% and 10%, respectively. Analysis of gene expression by real time quantitative PCR indicated that whitefly mortality was attributable to the down-regulation of both target genes by RNAi. Results indicated that knock down of whitefly genes involved in neuronal transmission and transcriptional activation of developmental genes, has potential as a bio-pesticide to reduce whitefly population size and thereby decrease virus spread. PMID:27929123

  1. Plants with stacked genetically modified events: to assess or not to assess?

    PubMed

    Kok, Esther J; Pedersen, Jan; Onori, Roberta; Sowa, Slawomir; Schauzu, Marianna; De Schrijver, Adinda; Teeri, Teemu H

    2014-02-01

    The principles for the safety assessment of genetically modified (GM) organisms (GMOs) are harmonised worldwide to a large extent. There are, however, still differences between the European GMO regulations and the GMO regulations as they have been formulated in other parts of the world. One of these differences relates to the so-called 'stacked GM events', that is, GMOs, plants so far, where new traits are combined by conventional crossing of different GM plants. This paper advocates rethinking the current food/feed safety assessment of stacked GM events in Europe based on an analysis of different aspects that currently form the rationale for the safety assessment of stacked GM events.

  2. Genetically Modified Plants: What’s the Fuss? (402nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Ben

    2006-03-16

    Genetic transformation is a relatively new and powerful tool used by plant breeders and for basic research. Benefits of gene transformation include resistance to pests and herbicides, which has led to a reduction in pesticide application and soil erosion. Genetically modified plants are used on a massive scale in agriculture in the U.S. and other countries, in part because they are less expensive and more convenient to work with. Yet, despite the benefits, genetic transformation remains a controversial subject and groups in the U.S. and abroad contest its practice.

  3. Large grazers modify effects of aboveground-belowground interactions on small-scale plant community composition.

    PubMed

    Veen, G F Ciska; Geuverink, Elzemiek; Olff, Han

    2012-02-01

    Aboveground and belowground organisms influence plant community composition by local interactions, and their scale of impact may vary from millimeters belowground to kilometers aboveground. However, it still poorly understood how large grazers that select their forage on large spatial scales interact with small-scale aboveground-belowground interactions on plant community heterogeneity. Here, we investigate how cattle (Bos taurus) modify the effects of interactions between yellow meadow ants (Lasius flavus) and European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) on the formation of small-scale heterogeneity in vegetation composition. In the absence of cattle, hares selectively foraged on ant mounds, while under combined grazing by hares and cattle, vertebrate grazing pressure was similar on and off mounds. Ant mounds that were grazed by only hares had a different plant community composition compared to their surroundings: the cover of the grazing-intolerant grass Elytrigia atherica was reduced on ant mounds, whereas the relative cover of the more grazing-tolerant and palatable grass Festuca rubra was enhanced. Combined grazing by hares and cattle, resulted in homogenization of plant community composition on and off ant mounds, with high overall cover of F. rubra. We conclude that hares can respond to local ant-soil-vegetation interactions, because they are small, selective herbivores that make their foraging decisions on a local scale. This results in small-scale plant patches on mounds of yellow meadow ants. In the presence of cattle, which are less selective aboveground herbivores, local plant community patterns triggered by small-scale aboveground-belowground interactions can disappear. Therefore, cattle modify the consequences of aboveground-belowground interactions for small-scale plant community composition.

  4. Determinants of Plant Growth-promoting Ochrobactrum lupini KUDC1013 Involved in Induction of Systemic Resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum in Tobacco Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sumayo, Marilyn; Hahm, Mi-Seon; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Ochrobactrum lupini KUDC1013 elicited induced systemic resistance (ISR) in tobacco against soft rot disease caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. We investigated of its factors involved in ISR elicitation. To characterize the ISR determinants, KUDC1013 cell suspension, heat-treated cells, supernatant from a culture medium, crude bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and flagella were tested for their ISR activities. Both LPS and flagella from KUDC1013 were effective in ISR elicitation. Crude cell free supernatant elicited ISR and factors with the highest ISR activity were retained in the n-butanol fraction. Analysis of the ISR-active fraction revealed the metabolites, phenylacetic acid (PAA), 1-hexadecene and linoleic acid (LA), as elicitors of ISR. Treatment of tobacco with these compounds significantly decreased the soft rot disease symptoms. This is the first report on the ISR determinants by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) KUDC1013 and identifying PAA, 1-hexadecene and LA as ISR-related compounds. This study shows that KUDC1013 has a great potential as biological control agent because of its multiple factors involved in induction of systemic resistance against phytopathogens. PMID:25288944

  5. Determinants of Plant Growth-promoting Ochrobactrum lupini KUDC1013 Involved in Induction of Systemic Resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum in Tobacco Leaves.

    PubMed

    Sumayo, Marilyn; Hahm, Mi-Seon; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2013-06-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Ochrobactrum lupini KUDC1013 elicited induced systemic resistance (ISR) in tobacco against soft rot disease caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. We investigated of its factors involved in ISR elicitation. To characterize the ISR determinants, KUDC1013 cell suspension, heat-treated cells, supernatant from a culture medium, crude bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and flagella were tested for their ISR activities. Both LPS and flagella from KUDC1013 were effective in ISR elicitation. Crude cell free supernatant elicited ISR and factors with the highest ISR activity were retained in the n-butanol fraction. Analysis of the ISR-active fraction revealed the metabolites, phenylacetic acid (PAA), 1-hexadecene and linoleic acid (LA), as elicitors of ISR. Treatment of tobacco with these compounds significantly decreased the soft rot disease symptoms. This is the first report on the ISR determinants by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) KUDC1013 and identifying PAA, 1-hexadecene and LA as ISR-related compounds. This study shows that KUDC1013 has a great potential as biological control agent because of its multiple factors involved in induction of systemic resistance against phytopathogens.

  6. Genetic basis and detection of unintended effects in genetically modified crop plants.

    PubMed

    Ladics, Gregory S; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Bregitzer, Phil; Doerrer, Nancy G; Gray, Alan; Holzhauser, Thomas; Jordan, Mark; Keese, Paul; Kok, Esther; Macdonald, Phil; Parrott, Wayne; Privalle, Laura; Raybould, Alan; Rhee, Seung Yon; Rice, Elena; Romeis, Jörg; Vaughn, Justin; Wal, Jean-Michel; Glenn, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    In January 2014, an international meeting sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency titled "Genetic Basis of Unintended Effects in Modified Plants" was held in Ottawa, Canada, bringing together over 75 scientists from academia, government, and the agro-biotech industry. The objectives of the meeting were to explore current knowledge and identify areas requiring further study on unintended effects in plants and to discuss how this information can inform and improve genetically modified (GM) crop risk assessments. The meeting featured presentations on the molecular basis of plant genome variability in general, unintended changes at the molecular and phenotypic levels, and the development and use of hypothesis-driven evaluations of unintended effects in assessing conventional and GM crops. The development and role of emerging "omics" technologies in the assessment of unintended effects was also discussed. Several themes recurred in a number of talks; for example, a common observation was that no system for genetic modification, including conventional methods of plant breeding, is without unintended effects. Another common observation was that "unintended" does not necessarily mean "harmful". This paper summarizes key points from the information presented at the meeting to provide readers with current viewpoints on these topics.

  7. A metabolomics study delineating geographical location-associated primary metabolic changes in the leaves of growing tobacco plants by GC-MS and CE-MS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanni; Zhao, Jieyu; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhou, Huina; Li, Yanli; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Lili; Hu, Chunxiu; Li, Wenzheng; Peng, Xiaojun; Lu, Xin; Lin, Fucheng; Xu, Guowang

    2015-11-09

    Ecological conditions and developmental senescence significantly affect the physiological metabolism of plants, yet relatively little is known about the influence of geographical location on dynamic changes in plant leaves during growth. Pseudotargeted gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry were used to investigate a time course of the metabolic responses of tobacco leaves to geographical location. Principal component analysis revealed obvious metabolic discrimination between growing districts relative to cultivars. A complex carbon and nitrogen metabolic network was modulated by environmental factors during growth. When the Xuchang and Dali Districts in China were compared, the results indicated that higher rates of photosynthesis, photorespiration and respiration were utilized in Xuchang District to generate the energy and carbon skeletons needed for the biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing metabolites. The increased abundance of defense-associated metabolites generated from the shikimate-phenylpropanoid pathway in Xuchang relative to Dali was implicated in protection against stress.

  8. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri uses a plant natriuretic peptide-like protein to modify host homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gottig, Natalia; Garavaglia, Betiana S; Daurelio, Lucas D; Valentine, Alex; Gehring, Chris; Orellano, Elena G; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2008-11-25

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) are a class of extracellular, systemically mobile molecules that elicit a number of plant responses important in homeostasis and growth. The bacterial citrus pathogen, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, also contains a gene encoding a PNP-like protein, XacPNP, that shares significant sequence similarity and identical domain organization with plant PNPs but has no homologues in other bacteria. We have expressed and purified XacPNP and demonstrated that the bacterial protein alters physiological responses including stomatal opening in plants. Although XacPNP is not expressed under standard nutrient rich culture conditions, it is strongly induced under conditions that mimic the nutrient poor intercellular apoplastic environment of leaves, as well as in infected tissue, suggesting that XacPNP transcription can respond to the host environment. To characterize the role of XacPNP during bacterial infection, we constructed a XacPNP deletion mutant. The lesions caused by this mutant were more necrotic than those observed with the wild-type, and bacterial cell death occurred earlier in the mutant. Moreover, when we expressed XacPNP in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, the transgenic bacteria caused less necrotic lesions in the host than the wild-type. In conclusion, we present evidence that a plant-like bacterial PNP can enable a plant pathogen to modify host responses to create conditions favorable to its own survival.

  9. Vitamin C content in plants is modified by insects and influences susceptibility to herbivory.

    PubMed

    Goggin, Fiona L; Avila, Carlos A; Lorence, Argelia

    2010-09-01

    Analysis of a diverse cross-sample of plant-insect interactions suggests that the abundance of vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid, ascorbate or AsA) in plants influences their susceptibility to insect feeding. These effects may be mediated by AsAs roles as an essential dietary nutrient, as an antioxidant in the insect midgut, or as a substrate for plant-derived ascorbate oxidase, which can lead to generation of toxic reactive oxygen species. Ascorbate can also influence the efficacy of plant defenses such as myrosinases and tannins, and alter insects' susceptibility to natural enemies. Conversely, herbivores appear to influence both de novo synthesis and redox cycling of AsA in their host plants, thereby potentially altering the nutritional value of crops and their susceptibility to pests. The recent development of genetically modified crops with enhanced AsA content provides both an impetus and a tool set for further studies on the role of AsA in plant-insect interactions.

  10. Cadmium concentrations in tobacco and tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.; Barkemeyer, H.

    1983-02-01

    The amount of cadmium in tobacco depends on the variety and origin of the plant as well as on the analytical method used to determine cadmium. In the literature, cadmium concentrations in tobacco of between 0.5 and 5 ppm are reported. Modern German cigarette tobacco contains about 0.5-1.5 micrograms cadmium/cigarette. Of importance for the smoker is the amount of the metal in the mainstream smoke. The cadmium level in the mainstream smoke of modern cigarettes is reduced by means of filters and other construction features. The average Cd value of German filter cigarettes is less than 0.1 microgram/cigarette in mainstream smoke. An average daily intake of about 1 microgram cadmium by smoking 20 cigarettes can be calculated on the basis of an experimentally proved pulmonary retention rate of 50%. Pulmonary resorption rates relevant to uptake rates of cadmium by smoking are discussed. It can be assumed that cadmium uptake by smoking modern cigarettes has been reduced because of modifications in tobacco processing and cigarette construction in the last few decades.

  11. Overexpression of a Cytosolic Abiotic Stress Responsive Universal Stress Protein (SbUSP) Mitigates Salt and Osmotic Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Udawat, Pushpika; Jha, Rajesh K.; Sinha, Dinkar; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein (USP) is a ubiquitous protein and plays an indispensable role in plant abiotic stress tolerance. The genome of Salicornia brachiata contains two homologs of intron less SbUSP gene which encodes for salt and osmotic responsive USP. In vivo localization reveals that SbUSP is a membrane bound cytosolic protein. The role of the gene was functionally validated by developing transgenic tobacco and compared with control [wild-type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants under different abiotic stress condition. Transgenic lines (T1) exhibited higher chlorophyll, relative water, proline, total sugar, reducing sugar, free amino acids, polyphenol contents, osmotic potential, membrane stability, and lower electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde content) under stress treatments than control (WT and VC) plants. Lower accumulation of H2O2 and O2− radicals was also detected in transgenic lines compared to control plants under stress conditions. Present study confers that overexpression of the SbUSP gene enhances plant growth, alleviates ROS buildup, maintains ion homeostasis and improves the physiological status of the plant under salt and osmotic stresses. Principal component analysis exhibited a statistical distinction of plant response to salinity stress, and a significant response was observed for transgenic lines under stress, which provides stress endurance to the plant. A possible signaling role is proposed that some downstream genes may get activated by abiotic stress responsive cytosolic SbUSP, which leads to the protection of cell from oxidative damages. The study unveils that ectopic expression of the gene mitigates salt or osmotic stress by scavenging ROS and modulating the physiological process of the plant. PMID:27148338

  12. Ultrasensitive detection of genetically modified plants by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongsheng; Liu, Jinfeng

    2006-09-01

    In this study, a novel method for the direct detection of GMP without amplified by the general method of PCR is firstly presented and proved by experiments. In our method, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, cleaving nucleic acid by restriction endonuclease and two nucleic acid probe hybridization techniques are combined to distinguish the caulifiower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and determine whether samples contain genetically modified components. The detection principle is as follows: firstly two restriction endonucleases FOKI and BsrDlare used to cleave the genomic DNA and the 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter are retrieved; secondly, two nucleic acid probes labeled by Rhodamine Green and y5 dyes respectively hybridize with cleaved 169bp fragments of CaMV 35S promoter; thirdly, the hybridization products simultaneously with two dye-labeled probes are detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and GMP is distinguished. As the detection and analysis by FCS can be performed at the level of single molecule, there is no need for any type of amplification. Genetically modified tobaccos are measured by this method. The results indicate this method can detect CaMV 35S promoter of GMP exactly and the sensitivity can be down to 3.47X10 -10M. Because no any type of amplification is involved, this method can avoid the non-specffic amplification and false-positive problems of PCR, Due to its high-sensitivity, simplicity, reliability and little need for sample amounts, this method promises to be a highly effective detection method for GMP.

  13. Altered apoplastic ascorbate redox state in tobacco plants via ascorbate oxidase overexpression results in delayed dark-induced senescence in detached leaves.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2013-12-01

    Ascorbate oxidase (AO) is an apoplastic enzyme that uses oxygen to catalyse the oxidation of ascorbate (AA) to dehydroascorbate (DHA) via the unstable radical monodehydroascorbate (MDHA). Here, we report that transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) with an in vivo lowered apoplastic AA redox state through increased AO expression demonstrate signs of delayed dark-induced senescence compared with wild-type plants, as shown by chlorophyll loss assay. In situ localization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggests that, although transgenic plants have higher constitutive levels of H2O2 under normal growth conditions, imposed dark-induced senescence results in smaller induction levels of H2O2, an observation which correlates with increased antioxidant enzyme activities and an induction in the expression of AA recycling genes compared with that in wild-type plants. Our current findings, combined with previous studies which showed the contribution of AO in the regulation of AA redox state, suggest that the reduction in AA redox state in the leaf apoplast of these transgenic plants results in an increase in the endogenous levels of H2O2, which provides a form of 'acquired tolerance' to oxidative stress imposed by dark-induced senescence.

  14. Detoxification activity and energy cost is attenuated in whiteflies feeding on tomato yellow leaf curl China virus-infected tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Luan, J-B; Wang, Y-L; Wang, J; Wang, X-W; Liu, S-S

    2013-10-01

    The begomovirus Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) can benefit its vector, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, through suppressing the defences of their shared host plants. However, the mechanisms of this vector-virus mutualism remain largely unknown on the insect side of the interaction. Here, we compared the transcriptional profiles of female adult whiteflies of B. tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 feeding on TYLCCNV-free and TYLCCNV-infected tobacco plants using the next-generation sequencing technique and quantitative real-time PCR. Interestingly, the genes involved in the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathway and detoxification enzyme were down-regulated in whiteflies feeding on virus-infected plants. Decreased detoxification activity costs less energy, which may reduce OXPHOS activity. Moreover, the genes involved in redox activity were also down-regulated, which may indicate that the reduced OXPHOS activity decreased reactive oxygen species production. Reduced detoxification activity is likely to attenuate energy costs, thereby enhancing the performance of whiteflies on virus-infected plants. These results provide further insight into the mechanisms of the plant-mediated whitefly-virus mutualism. Moreover, our study suggests that investigating the transcriptional profiles on the insect side of the interaction can advance our understanding of the tripartite interactions.

  15. UDP-galactose transporter gene hUGT1 expression in tobacco plants leads to hyper-galactosylated cell wall components.

    PubMed

    Abedi, Tayebeh; Khalil, Mohamed Farouk Mohamed; Asai, Toshihiko; Ishihara, Nami; Kitamura, Kenji; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Nobukazu

    2016-05-01

    We reported previously that tobacco plants transformed with the human UDP-galactose transporter 1 gene (hUGT1-transgenic plants) displayed morphological, architectural, and physiological alterations, such as enhanced growth, increased accumulation of chlorophyll and lignin, and a gibberellin-responsive phenotype. In the present study, we demonstrated that hUGT1 expression altered the monosaccharide composition of cell wall matrix polysaccharides, such as pectic and hemicellulosic polysaccharides, which are biosynthesized in the Golgi lumen. An analysis of the monosaccharide composition of the cell wall matrix polysaccharides revealed that the ratio of galactose to total monosaccharides was significantly elevated in the hemicellulose II and pectin fractions of hUGT1-transgenic plants compared with that of control plants. A hyper-galactosylated xyloglucan structure was detected in hemicellulose II using oligosaccharide mass profiling. These results indicated that, because of the enhanced UDP-galactose transport from the cytosol to the Golgi apparatus by hUGT1, galactose incorporation in the cell wall matrix polysaccharides increased. This increased galactose incorporation may have contributed to increased galactose tolerance in hUGT1-transgenic plants.

  16. Expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) ethylene response factor gene MsERF8 in tobacco plants enhances resistance to salinity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Yang, Qingchuan; Gruber, Margaret; Kang, Junmei; Sun, Yan; Ding, Wang; Zhang, Tiejun; Zhang, Xinquan

    2012-05-01

    Ethylene response factors (ERF) play crucial roles in plant development and response to stresses. Here, a novel cDNA fragment (MsERF8) encoding an ERF protein with an AP2 domain was isolated and characterized from alfalfa. The MsERF8 cDNA has an open reading frame of 603 bp and encodes a nuclear protein of 201 amino acids. Q-RT-PCR analysis revealed that MsERF8 was strongly enriched in roots and leaves compared with stems, flower buds and flowers of mature alfalfa plants. Bioinformatic analysis of the MsERF8 promoter indicated a number of elements associated with stress-related responses, and MsERF8 transcripts in alfalfa seedlings were induced by NaCl, PEG6000, Al(2)(SO(4))(3) and five different hormones. Expression of MsERF8 in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in higher tolerance to salinity than with non-transgenic plants. This data shows that MsERF8 is a gene which prevents or alleviates salinity damage and has strong potential to impart salt tolerance to other crop plants.

  17. Specificity of expression of the GUS reporter gene (uidA) driven by the tobacco ASA2 promoter in soybean plants and tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yoshimi; Zhong, Wei Qun; Zhang, Xing-Hai; Widholm, Jack M

    2007-07-01

    Twelve independent lines were transformed by particle bombardment of soybean embryogenic suspension cultures with the tobacco anthranilate synthase (ASA2) promoter driving the uidA (beta-glucuronidase, GUS) reporter gene. ASA2 appears to be expressed in a tissue culture specific manner in tobacco (Song H-S, Brotherton JE, Gonzales RA, Widholm JM. Tissue culture specific expression of a naturally occurring tobacco feedback-insensitive anthranilate synthase. Plant Physiol 1998;117:533-43). The transgenic lines also contained the hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) gene and were selected using hygromycin. All the selected cultures or the embryos that were induced from these cultures expressed GUS measured histochemically. However, no histochemical GUS expression could be found in leaves, stems, roots, pods and root nodules of the plants formed from the embryos and their progeny. Pollen from some of the plants and immature and mature seeds and embryogenic cultures initiated from immature cotyledons did show GUS activity. Quantitative 4-methylumbelliferyl-glucuronide (MUG) assays of the GUS activity in various tissues showed that all with observable histochemical GUS activity contained easily measurable activities and leaves and stems that showed no observable histochemical GUS staining did contain very low but measurable MUG activity above that of the untransformed control but orders of magnitude lower than the constitutive 35S-uidA controls used. Low but clearly above background levels of boiling sensitive GUS activity could be observed in the untransformed control immature seeds and embryogenic cultures using the MUG assay. Thus in soybean the ASA2 promoter drives readily observable GUS expression in tissue cultures, pollen and seeds, with only extremely low levels seen in vegetative tissues of the plants. The ASA2 driven expression seen in mature seed was, however, much lower than that seen with the constitutive 35S promoter; less than 2% in seed coats and less than

  18. Influence of exogenous application of glutathione on rubisco and rubisco activase in heavy metal-stressed tobacco plant grown in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jeong Ah; Narayanankutty, Damodaran Puthanveettil; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2013-01-01

    The effect of glutathione on the influences of heavy metals affecting rubisco and rubisco activase was studied in tobacco plants grown in vitro where the shoot explants of the tobacco plant cultured on MS medium under aseptic conditions and two explants were placed in the control, 0.1 mM GSH, 1 mM GSH, 0.2 mM Cd, 0.2 mM Cu, 0.2 mM Zn, and a mixture of Cd and GSH, Cu and GSH, Zn and GSH, respectively. The effect of GSH on the growth of the tobacco plant was minimal, but the heavy metals clearly retarded its growth. GSH recovered the growth retarded by heavy metals, and the concentration of GSH required to recover the growth differed depending on the heavy metals. The content of chlorophyll in the plant increased through GSH and Zn, and decreased through Cd and Cu. The chlorophyll content which decreased due to Cd and Cu was recovered by GSH, and the content which increased due to Zn was decreased by 1 mM GSH. The content of rubisco decreased due to GSH and heavy metals, and the content which decreased due to heavy metals was recovered by GSH, and when GSH was treated with Zn, the increased rate was maximum compared to other heavy metals. The activity of rubisco was increased due to GSH and heavy metals, and the activity increased by Cd and Zn decreased through GSH. In the case of Cu, the activity of GSH increased even more. There was no effect of GSH on the influences of heavy metals on the content and activity of rubisco activase. The activity of rubisco decreased by thiourea among six denaturing agents, and increased by l-cysteine, and in most cases the activity level was recorded as high. The activity of rubisco activase all decreased as a result of six denaturing agents, and the effect caused by EDTA and guanidine-HCl was the greatest, while the effect caused by l-cysteine and urea was minimal. PMID:24596504

  19. The capacity of modified nickel catalysts derived from discharged catalyst of fertilizer plants for NOx treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, T. M. P.; Luong, N. T.; Le, P. N.

    2016-11-01

    In Vietnam for recent years, a large amount of hazardous waste containing nickel (Ni) derived from discharged catalyst of fertilizer plants has caused environmental problems in landfill overloading and the risk of soil or surface water sources pollution. Taking advantage of discharged catalyst, recycling Ni components and then synthesizing new catalysts apply for mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) treatments is an approach to bring about both economic and environmental benefits. This study was carried out with the main objective: Evaluate the performance of modified catalysts (using recovered Ni from the discharged RKS-2-7H catalyst of Phu My Fertilizer Plant) on NOx treatment. The catalysts was synthesized and modified with active phases consist of recovered Ni and commercial Barium oxide (BaO), Manganese dioxide (MnO2) / Cerium (IV) oxide (CeO2) on the support Aluminium oxide (γ-Al2O3). The results show that the modified catalysts with Ni, Ba, Ce was not more beneficial for NOx removal than which with Ni, Ba, Mn. 98% NOx removal at 350°C with the start temperature at 115°C and the T60 value at 307°C can be obtained with 10Ni10Ba10Mn/Al catalyst.

  20. Regulatory approval and a first-in-human phase I clinical trial of a monoclonal antibody produced in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Julian K-C; Drossard, Jürgen; Lewis, David; Altmann, Friedrich; Boyle, Julia; Christou, Paul; Cole, Tom; Dale, Philip; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Isitt, Valerie; Katinger, Dietmar; Lobedan, Martin; Mertens, Hubert; Paul, Mathew J; Rademacher, Thomas; Sack, Markus; Hundleby, Penelope A C; Stiegler, Gabriela; Stoger, Eva; Twyman, Richard M; Vcelar, Brigitta; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Although plant biotechnology has been widely investigated for the production of clinical-grade monoclonal antibodies, no antibody products derived from transgenic plants have yet been approved by pharmaceutical regulators for clinical testing. In the Pharma-Planta project, the HIV-neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2G12 was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The scientific, technical and regulatory demands of good manufacturing practice (GMP) were addressed by comprehensive molecular characterization of the transgene locus, confirmation of genetic and phenotypic stability over several generations of transgenic plants, and by establishing standard operating procedures for the creation of a master seed bank, plant cultivation, harvest, initial processing, downstream processing and purification. The project developed specifications for the plant-derived antibody (P2G12) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) based on (i) the guidelines for the manufacture of monoclonal antibodies in cell culture systems; (ii) the draft European Medicines Agency Points to Consider document on quality requirements for APIs produced in transgenic plants; and (iii) de novo guidelines developed with European national regulators. From the resulting process, a GMP manufacturing authorization was issued by the competent authority in Germany for transgenic plant-derived monoclonal antibodies for use in a phase I clinical evaluation. Following preclinical evaluation and ethical approval, a clinical trial application was accepted by the UK national pharmaceutical regulator. A first-in-human, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, dose-escalation phase I safety study of a single vaginal administration of P2G12 was carried out in healthy female subjects. The successful completion of the clinical trial marks a significant milestone in the commercial development of plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins.

  1. Optimization of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to modify abiotic stress responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Watanabe, Takahito; Sugano, Shigeo S; Ueta, Risa; Ishihara, Ryosuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Osakabe, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to modify plant genomes, however, improvements in specificity and applicability are still needed in order for the editing technique to be useful in various plant species. Here, using genome editing mediated by a truncated gRNA (tru-gRNA)/Cas9 combination, we generated new alleles for OST2, a proton pump in Arabidopsis, with no off-target effects. By following expression of Cas9 and the tru-gRNAs, newly generated mutations in CRIPSR/Cas9 transgenic plants were detected with high average mutation rates of up to 32.8% and no off-target effects using constitutive promoter. Reducing nuclear localization signals in Cas9 decreased the mutation rate. In contrast, tru-gRNA Cas9 cassettes driven by meristematic- and reproductive-tissue-specific promoters increased the heritable mutation rate in Arabidopsis, showing that high expression in the germ line can produce bi-allelic mutations. Finally, the new mutant alleles obtained for OST2 exhibited altered stomatal closing in response to environmental conditions. These results suggest further applications in molecular breeding to improve plant function using optimized plant CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:27226176

  2. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    DOE PAGES

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; ...

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose,more » a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.« less

  3. Thai ethnomedicinal plants as resistant modifying agents for combating Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts Background Acinetobacter baumannii is well-recognized as an important nosocomial pathogen, however, due to their intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics, treatment options are limited. Synergistic effects between antibiotics and medicinal plants, particularly their active components, have intensively been studied as alternative approaches. Methods Fifty-one ethanol extracts obtained from 44 different selected medicinal plant species were tested for resistance modifying agents (RMAs) of novobiocin against A. baumannii using growth inhibition assay. Results At 250 μg/ml, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Punica granatum, Quisqualis indica, Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia sp. that possessed low intrinsic antibacterial activity significantly enhanced the activity of novobiocin at 1 μg/ml (1/8xminimum inhibitory concentration) against this pathogen. Holarrhena antidysenterica at 7.8 μg/ml demonstrated remarkable resistant modifying ability against A. baumannii in combination with novobiocin. The phytochemical study revealed that constituents of this medicinal plant contain alkaloids, condensed tannins, and triterpenoids. Conclusion The use of Holarrhena antidysenterica in combination with novobiocin provides an effective alternative treatment for multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections. PMID:22536985

  4. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; Payyavula, Raja S.; Samuel, Reichel; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose, a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.

  5. Emerging Importance of Helicases in Plant Stress Tolerance: Characterization of Oryza sativa Repair Helicase XPB2 Promoter and Its Functional Validation in Tobacco under Multiple Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Raikwar, Shailendra; Srivastava, Vineet K.; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Genetic material always remains at the risk of spontaneous or induced damage which challenges the normal functioning of DNA molecule, thus, DNA repair is vital to protect the organisms against genetic damage. Helicases, the unique molecular motors, are emerged as prospective molecules to engineer stress tolerance in plants and are involved in nucleic acid metabolism including DNA repair. The repair helicase, XPB is an evolutionary conserved protein present in different organisms, including plants. Availability of few efficient promoters for gene expression in plants provoked us to study the promoter of XPB for better understanding of gene regulation under stress conditions. Here, we report the in silico analysis of novel stress inducible promoter of Oryza sativa XPB2 (OsXPB2). The in vivo validation of functionality/activity of OsXPB2 promoter under abiotic and hormonal stress conditions was performed by Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay in tobacco leaves using OsXPB2::GUS chimeric construct. The present research revealed that OsXPB2 promoter contains cis-elements accounting for various abiotic stresses (salt, dehydration, or cold) and hormone (Auxin, ABA, or MeJA) induced GUS expression/activity in the promoter-reporter assay. The promoter region of OsXPB2 contains CACG, GTAACG, CACGTG, CGTCA CCGCCGCGCT cis acting-elements which are reported to be salt, dehydration, cold, MeJA, or ABA responsive, respectively. Functional analysis was done by Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay using agroinfiltration in tobacco leaves, followed by GUS staining and fluorescence quantitative analyses. The results revealed high induction of GUS activity under multiple abiotic stresses as compared to mock treated control. The present findings suggest that OsXPB2 promoter is a multi-stress inducible promoter and has potential applications in sustainable crop production under abiotic stresses by regulating desirable pattern of gene expression. PMID:26734018

  6. Crowd-Sourced Verification of Computational Methods and Data in Systems Toxicology: A Case Study with a Heat-Not-Burn Candidate Modified Risk Tobacco Product.

    PubMed

    Poussin, Carine; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Martin, Florian; Boué, Stéphanie; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-02-09

    Systems toxicology intends to quantify the effect of toxic molecules in biological systems and unravel their mechanisms of toxicity. The development of advanced computational methods is required for analyzing and integrating high throughput data generated for this purpose as well as for extrapolating predictive toxicological outcomes and risk estimates. To ensure the performance and reliability of the methods and verify conclusions from systems toxicology data analysis, it is important to conduct unbiased evaluations by independent third parties. As a case study, we report here the results of an independent verification of methods and data in systems toxicology by crowdsourcing. The sbv IMPROVER systems toxicology computational challenge aimed to evaluate computational methods for the development of blood-based gene expression signature classification models with the ability to predict smoking exposure status. Participants created/trained models on blood gene expression data sets including smokers/mice exposed to 3R4F (a reference cigarette) or noncurrent smokers/Sham (mice exposed to air). Participants applied their models on unseen data to predict whether subjects classify closer to smoke-exposed or nonsmoke exposed groups. The data sets also included data from subjects that had been exposed to potential modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) or that had switched to a MRTP after exposure to conventional cigarette smoke. The scoring of anonymized participants' predictions was done using predefined metrics. The top 3 performers' methods predicted class labels with area under the precision recall scores above 0.9. Furthermore, although various computational approaches were used, the crowd's results confirmed our own data analysis outcomes with regards to the classification of MRTP-related samples. Mice exposed directly to a MRTP were classified closer to the Sham group. After switching to a MRTP, the confidence that subjects belonged to the smoke-exposed group

  7. Utilization of a tobacco rattle virus vector to clone an Nicotiana benthamiana cDNA library for VIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an efficient and rapid method to identify plant gene functions. One of the most widely used VIGS vectors is Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) which has been used successfully for RNA interference (RNAi) in N. benthamiana and tomato. We previously modified a TRV VIGS v...

  8. Validation of Aintegumenta as a gene to modify floral size in ornamental plants.

    PubMed

    Manchado-Rojo, María; Weiss, Julia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2014-10-01

    The gene AINTEGUMENTA (AtANT) is an APETALA2 transcription factor in Arabidopsis activating growth downstream of auxin signalling. Lateral organ size is positively correlated with ANT expression in Arabidopsis. We tested the use of AtANT as a tool to modify floral size in two different plants used as model organisms and ornamental crops, Petunia × hybrida and Antirrhinum majus. Petunia plants expressing PhANT RNAi showed a decrease in PhANT expression correlated with smaller petal limbs. In contrast Petunia plants overexpressing AtANT had larger petal limbs. Petal tube length was less affected in down-regulation of PhANT or overexpression of AtANT. Overexpression of AtANT in Antirrhinum caused increased flower size via increased petal limb width and tube length. Down-regulation of PhANT showed an effect on cell size while overexpression of AtANT in Petunia and Antirrhinum caused significant increases in cell expansion that could explain the differences in floral organ size. The endogenous expression levels of PhANT and AmANT tended to be higher in the limb than in the tube in both Antirrhinum and Petunia. AtANT overexpression caused significant AmANT up-regulation in Antirrhinum limbs but not of PhANT in Petunia, indicating differences in the regulatory network. The differential effect of AtANT on limb and tube in Petunia and Antirrhinum correspond to phenotypic differences observed in natural variation in the corresponding genus indicating a relation between the phenotypic space of a genus and the effect of modified ANT levels, validating ANT as a gene to modify floral size.

  9. Smokeless Tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, chewing tobacco has long been associated with baseball. Players chewed it to keep their mouths moist, ... in most of America and not too many baseball players were spitting big brown gobs all over ...

  10. Significant improvement of stress tolerance in tobacco plants by overexpressing a stress-responsive aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Huang, Weizao; Ma, Xinrong; Wang, Qilin; Gao, Yongfeng; Xue, Ying; Niu, Xiangli; Yu, Guirong; Liu, Yongsheng

    2008-11-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) play a central role in detoxification processes of aldehydes generated in plants when exposed to the stressed conditions. In order to identify genes required for the stresses responses in the grass crop Zea mays, an ALDH (ZmALDH22A1) gene was isolated and characterized. ZmALDH22A1 belongs to the family ALDH22 that is currently known only in plants. The ZmALDH22A1 encodes a protein of 593 amino acids that shares high identity with the orthologs from Saccharum officinarum (95%), Oryza sativa (89%), Triticum aestivum (87%) and Arabidopsis thaliana (77%), respectively. Real-time PCR analysis indicates that ZmALDH22A1 is expressed differentially in different tissues. Various elevated levels of ZmALDH22A1 expression have been detected when the seedling roots exposed to abiotic stresses including dehydration, high salinity and abscisic acid (ABA). Tomato stable transformation of construct expressing the ZmALDH22A1 signal peptide fused with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) driven by the CaMV35S-promoter reveals that the fusion protein is targeted to plastid. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing ZmALDH22A1 shows elevated stresses tolerance. Stresses tolerance in transgenic plants is accompanied by a reduction of malondialdehyde (MDA) derived from cellular lipid peroxidation.

  11. Endogenous allergens and compositional analysis in the allergenicity assessment of genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, A; Mills, E N C; Lovik, M; Spoek, A; Germini, A; Mikalsen, A; Wal, J M

    2013-12-01

    Allergenicity assessment of genetically modified (GM) plants is one of the key pillars in the safety assessment process of these products. As part of this evaluation, one of the concerns is to assess that unintended effects (e.g. over-expression of endogenous allergens) relevant for the food safety have not occurred due to the genetic modification. Novel technologies are now available and could be used as complementary and/or alternative methods to those based on human sera for the assessment of endogenous allergenicity. In view of these developments and as a step forward in the allergenicity assessment of GM plants, it is recommended that known endogenous allergens are included in the compositional analysis as additional parameters to be measured.

  12. Summary of investigations of the use of modified turbine inlet conditions in a binary power plant

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Mines

    2000-09-24

    Investigators at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are developing technologies that will enhance the feasibility of generating electrical power from a hydrothermal resource. One of the concepts investigated is the use of modified inlet conditions in geothermal binary power plant turbines to increase the power generation. An inlet condition of interest allows the expanding vapor to enter the two-phase region, a mode of operation typically avoided because of concern that condensate would form and damage the turbine, degrading performance. INEEL investigators postulated that initially a supersaturated vapor would be supported, and that no turbine damage would occur. This paper summarizes the investigation of these expansions that began with testing of their condensation behavior, and culminated with the incorporation of these expansions into the operation of several commercial binary plant turbines.

  13. Summary of Investigations of the Use of Modified Turbine Inlet Conditions in a Binary Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mines, Gregory Lee

    2000-09-01

    Investigators at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are developing technologies that will enhance the feasibility of generating electrical power from a hydrothermal resource. One of the concepts investigated is the use of modified inlet conditions in geothermal binary power plant turbines to increase the power generation. An inlet condition of interest allows the expanding vapor to enter the two-phase region, a mode of operation typically avoided because of concern that condensate would form and damage the turbine, degrading performance. INEEL investigators postulated that initially a supersaturated vapor would be supported, and that no turbine damage would occur. This paper summarizes the investigation of these expansions that began with testing of their condensation behavior, and culminated with the incorporation of these expansions into the operation of several commercial binary plant turbines.

  14. Applying the Good Laboratory Practice regulations to studies involving genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Holden, D E

    1995-12-01

    How can the Environmental Protection Agency's Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, originally written primarily for mammalian toxicology studies, be applied to regulatory studies conducted for genetically modified plants? Do they fit? Can they be applied and still make sense? How is a Quality Assurance Unit (QAU) to interpret the requirements in this new area of biotechnology? The answers to these questions are discussed in this brief presentation of how one team within the Monsanto QAU, along with the researchers, developed am effective and comprehensive compliance program by applying the "traditional approach" to the GLP regulations to a new and important scientific field in regulatory compliance. Topics discussed will address the differences in the approach between traditional toxicity testing and the newer technology and how the differences were resolved, new and innovative definitions of particular phases and other aspects of regulatory studies, and how the draft regulations for pesticidal plants will help this area of technology in the future.

  15. Medicinal plant extracts can variously modify biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Samoilova, Zoya; Muzyka, Nadezda; Lepekhina, Elena; Oktyabrsky, Oleg; Smirnova, Galina

    2014-04-01

    Low concentrations of black tea and water extracts from medicinal plants Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Tilia cordata, Betula pendula and Zea mays stimulated biofilm formation in Escherichia coli BW25113 up to three times. Similar effect was observed for tannic acid and low concentrations of quercetin. In contrast, the extract from Urtica dioica reduced biofilm production. Pretreatment with plant extracts variously modified antibiotic effects on specific biofilm formation (SBF). Extract from V. vitis-idaea increased SBF, while the extracts from Achillea millefolium, Laminaria japonica and U. dioica considerably decreased SBF in the presence of ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and cefotaxime. Stimulatory effect of the extracts and pure polyphenols on biofilm formation was probably related to their prooxidant properties. The rpoS deletion did not affect SBF significantly, but stimulation of biofilm formation by the compounds tested was accompanied by inhibition of rpoS expression, suggesting that a RpoS-independent signal transduction pathway was apparently used.

  16. A literature review on the safety assessment of genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L; Giné Bordonaba, Jordi

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a notable concern on the safety of genetically modified (GM) foods/plants, an important and complex area of research, which demands rigorous standards. Diverse groups including consumers and environmental Non Governmental Organizations (NGO) have suggested that all GM foods/plants should be subjected to long-term animal feeding studies before approval for human consumption. In 2000 and 2006, we reviewed the information published in international scientific journals, noting that the number of references concerning human and animal toxicological/health risks studies on GM foods/plants was very limited. The main goal of the present review was to assess the current state-of-the-art regarding the potential adverse effects/safety assessment of GM plants for human consumption. The number of citations found in databases (PubMed and Scopus) has dramatically increased since 2006. However, new information on products such as potatoes, cucumber, peas or tomatoes, among others was not available. Corn/maize, rice, and soybeans were included in the present review. An equilibrium in the number research groups suggesting, on the basis of their studies, that a number of varieties of GM products (mainly maize and soybeans) are as safe and nutritious as the respective conventional non-GM plant, and those raising still serious concerns, was currently observed. Nevertheless, it should be noted that most of these studies have been conducted by biotechnology companies responsible of commercializing these GM plants. These findings suggest a notable advance in comparison with the lack of studies published in recent years in scientific journals by those companies. All this recent information is herein critically reviewed.

  17. Characterization of a chemically modified plant cell culture expressed human α-Galactosidase-A enzyme for treatment of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Kizhner, Tali; Azulay, Yaniv; Hainrichson, Mariana; Tekoah, Yoram; Arvatz, Gil; Shulman, Avidor; Ruderfer, Ilya; Aviezer, David; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2015-02-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by the loss of function of the lysosomal enzyme α-Galactosidase-A. Although two enzyme replacement therapies (ERTs) are commercially available, they may not effectively reverse some of the Fabry pathology. PRX-102 is a novel enzyme for the therapy of Fabry disease expressed in a BY2 Tobacco cell culture. PRX-102 is chemically modified, resulting in a cross-linked homo-dimer. We have characterized the in-vitro and in-vivo properties of PRX-102 and compared the results with the two commercially produced α-Galactosidase-A enzymes. Results show that PRX-102 has prolonged in-vitro stability in plasma, after 1h incubation it retains 30% activity compared with complete inactivation of the commercial enzymes. Under lysosomal-like conditions PRX-102 maintains over 80% activity following 10 days of incubation, while commercial enzymes become inactive after 2days. Pharmacokinetic profile of PRX-102 measured in male Fabry mice shows a 10 fold increase in t1/2 in mice (581min) compared to approved drugs. The enzyme has significantly different kinetic parameters to the alternative ERTs available (p-value<0.05, one way ANOVA), although these differences do not indicate any significant biochemical variations. PRX-102 is uptaken to primary human Fabry fibroblasts. The repeat administration of the enzyme to Fabry mice caused significant reduction (p-value<0.05) of Gb3 in various tissues (the measured residual content was 64% in kidney, liver was cleaned, 23% in heart, 5.7% in skin and 16.2% in spleen). PRX-102 has a relatively simple glycosylation pattern, characteristic to plants, having mainly tri-mannose structures with the addition of either α(1-3)-linked fucose or β(1-2)-linked xylose, or both, in addition to various high mannose structures, while agalsidase beta has a mixture of sialylated glycans in addition to high mannose structures. This study concludes that PRX-102 is equivalent in functionality to the current

  18. The relationship between the plant-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 and alternative oxidase in tomato basal defense against Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yang-Wen-Ke; Liu, Ya-Ru; Liang, Jia-Yang; Wang, Wen-Ping; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Shi, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical role in plant defense against pathogen attack. The SA-induced viral defense in plants is distinct from the pathways mediating bacterial and fungal defense, which is pathogenesis-related protein-independent but involves an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 (RDR1)-mediated RNA silencing mechanism and/or an alternative oxidase (AOX)-associated defense pathway. However, the relationship between these two viral defense-related pathways remains unclear. In this study, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) inoculation onto Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) leaves induced a rapid induction of the SlAOX1a transcript level as well as the total and CN-resistant respiration at 0.5 dpi, followed by an increase in SlRDR1 gene expression at 1 dpi in the upper uninoculated leaves. Silencing SlRDR1 using virus-induced gene silencing system significantly reduced SlRDR1 expression and tomato defense against TMV but had no evident effect on SlAOX1a transcription. Conversely, silencing SlAOX1a not only effectively reduced the AOX1a transcript level, but also blocked the TMV-induced SlRDR1 expression and decreased the basal defense against TMV. Furthermore, the application of an exogenous AOX activator on empty vector-silenced control plants greatly induced the accumulation of SlRDR1 and SlAOX1a transcript and reduced TMV viral RNA accumulation, but failed to have such effects on SlRDR1-silenced plants. Moreover, RDR1-overexpressed transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants enhanced defense against TMV than the empty vector-transformed plants, but these effects were not affected by the exogenous AOX activator or inhibitor. These results indicate that RDR1 is involved in the AOX-mediated defense pathway against TMV infection and plays a crucial role in enhancing RNA silencing to limit virus systemic spread.

  19. Isolation and Functional Validation of Salinity and Osmotic Stress Inducible Promoter from the Maize Type-II H+-Pyrophosphatase Gene by Deletion Analysis in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; He, Qiuxia; Xu, Changzheng; Ding, Zhaohua; Zhang, Kewei; Li, Kunpeng

    2016-01-01

    Salinity and drought severely affect both plant growth and productivity, making the isolation and characterization of salinity- or drought-inducible promoters suitable for genetic improvement of crop resistance highly desirable. In this study, a 1468-bp sequence upstream of the translation initiation codon ATG of the promoter for ZmGAPP (maize Type-II H+-pyrophosphatase gene) was cloned. Nine 5´ deletion fragments (D1–D9) of different lengths of the ZmGAPP promoter were fused with the GUS reporter and translocated into tobacco. The deletion analysis showed that fragments D1–D8 responded well to NaCl and PEG stresses, whereas fragment D9 and CaMV 35S did not. The D8 segment (219 bp; -219 to -1 bp) exhibited the highest promoter activity of all tissues, with the exception of petals among the D1–D9 transgenic tobacco, which corresponds to about 10% and 25% of CaMV 35S under normal and NaCl or PEG stress conditions, respectively. As such, the D8 segment may confer strong gene expression in a salinity and osmotic stress inducible manner. A 71-bp segment (-219 to -148 bp) was considered as the key region regulating ZmGAPP response to NaCl or PEG stress, as transient transformation assays demonstrated that the 71-bp sequence was sufficient for the salinity or osmotic stress response. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating ZmGAPP expression, and that the D8 promoter would be an ideal candidate for moderating expression of drought and salinity response genes in transgenic plants. PMID:27101137

  20. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the heterologous lea gene Rab16A from rice during high salt and water deficit display enhanced tolerance to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    RoyChoudhury, Aryadeep; Roy, Chaitali; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2007-10-01

    The full length Rab16A, from the indica rice Pokkali, was introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transgene was stably integrated into the genome and they originated from different lines of integration. Expression of Rab16A transcript driven by its own promoter (stress inducible) in T2 progenies, only when triggered by salinity/ABA/PEG (Polyethylene glycol)-mediated dehydration, but not at the constitutive level, led to the stress-induced accumulation of RAB16A protein in the leaves of transgenic plants. The selected independent transgenic lines showed normal growth, morphology and seed production as the WT plants without any yield penalty under stress conditions. They exhibited significantly increased tolerance to salinity, sustained growth rates under stress conditions; with concomitant increased osmolyte production like reducing sugars, proline and higher polyamines. They also showed delayed development of damage symptoms with better antioxidative machinery and more favorable mineral balance, as reflected by reduced H2O2 levels and lipid peroxidation, lesser chlorophyll loss as well as lesser accumulation of Na+ and greater accumulation of K+ in 200 mM NaCl. These findings establish the potential role of Rab16A gene in conferring salt tolerance without affecting growth and yield, as well as pointing to the fact that the upstream region of Rab16A behaves as an efficient stress-inducible promoter. Our result also suggests the considerable potential of Group 2 lea genes as molecular tools for genetic engineering of plants towards stress tolerance.

  1. Identification and Characterization of CYP9A40 from the Tobacco Cutworm Moth (Spodoptera litura), a Cytochrome P450 Gene Induced by Plant Allelochemicals and Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Long; Staehelin, Christian; Xia, Qing-Qing; Su, Yi-Juan; Zeng, Ren-Sen

    2015-09-18

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) of insects play crucial roles in the metabolism of endogenous and dietary compounds. Tobacco cutworm moth (Spodoptera litura), an important agricultural pest, causes severe yield losses in many crops. In this study, we identified CYP9A40, a novel P450 gene of S. litura, and investigated its expression profile and potential role in detoxification of plant allelochemicals and insecticides. The cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding 529 amino acid residues. CYP9A40 transcripts were found to be accumulated during various development stages of S. litura and were highest in fifth and sixth instar larvae. CYP9A40 was mainly expressed in the midgut and fat body. Larval consumption of xenobiotics, namely plant allelochemicals (quercetin and cinnamic acid) and insecticides (deltamethrin and methoxyfenozide) induced accumulation of CYP9A40 transcripts in the midgut and fat body. Injection of dsCYP9A40 (silencing of CYP9A40 by RNA interference) significantly increased the susceptibility of S. litura larvae to the tested plant allelochemicals and insecticides. These results indicate that CYP9A40 expression in S. litura is related to consumption of xenobiotics and suggest that CYP9A40 is involved in detoxification of these compounds.

  2. Genetically modified plants and food hypersensitivity diseases: usage and implications of experimental models for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Vanessa E; Hogan, Simon P

    2006-08-01

    The recent advances in biotechnology in the plant industry have led to increasing crop production and yield that in turn has increased the usage of genetically modified (GM) food in the human food chain. The usage of GM foods for human consumption has raised a number of fundamental questions including the ability of GM foods to elicit potentially harmful immunological responses, including allergic hypersensitivity. To assess the safety of foods derived from GM plants including allergenic potential, the US FDA, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)/World Health Organization (WHO), and the EU have developed approaches for evaluation assessment. One assessment approach that has been a very active area of research and debate is the development and usage of animal models to assess the potential allergenicity of GM foods. A number of specific animal models employing rodents, pigs, and dogs have been developed for allergenicity assessment. However, validation of these models is needed and consideration of the criteria for an appropriate animal model for the assessment of allergenicity in GM plants is required. We have recently employed a BALB/c mouse model to assess the potential allergenicity of GM plants. We have been able to demonstrate that this model is able to detect differences in antigenicity and identify aspects of protein post-translational modifications that can alter antigenicity. Furthermore, this model has also enabled us to examine the usage of GM plants as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic diseases. This review discusses the current approaches to assess the allergenic potential of GM food and particularly focusing on the usage of animal models to determine the potential allergenicity of GM foods and gives an overview of our recent findings and implications of these studies.

  3. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Choi, Hye Kyung; Lee, Chi-Ho; Murphy, John F.; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS) is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90–166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90–166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90–166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL) or -degrading (AiiA) genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90–166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90–166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90–166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90–166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90–166. PMID:25288945

  4. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Choi, Hye Kyung; Lee, Chi-Ho; Murphy, John F; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2013-06-01

    Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS) is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90-166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90-166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90-166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL) or -degrading (AiiA) genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90-166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90-166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90-166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90-166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90-166.

  5. Expression of Cry1Ac in transgenic tobacco plants under the control of a wound-inducible promoter (AoPR1) isolated from Asparagus officinalis to control Heliothis virescens and Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Gulbitti-Onarici, Selma; Zaidi, Mohsin Abbas; Taga, Ibrahim; Ozcan, Sebahattin; Altosaar, Illimar

    2009-07-01

    Expression of cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was evaluated under the control of a wound-inducible AoPR1 promoter from Asparagus officinalis in transgenic tobacco plants. The leaves of transgenic plants were mechanically wounded to evaluate the activity of the AoPR1 promoter in driving the expression of Cry1Ac protein at the wound site. Our results indicate that mechanical wounding of transgenic plants was effective in inducing the expression of Cry1Ac protein. As a result of this induction, the accumulated levels of Cry1Ac protein increased during 6-72 h post-wounding period. The leaves of transgenic tobacco plants were evaluated for resistance against Heliothis virescens and Manduca sexta in insect bioassays in two different ways. The detached tobacco leaves were either fed directly to the insect larvae or they were first mechanically wounded followed by a 72 h post-wounding feeding period. Complete protection of mechanically wounded leaves of transgenic plants was observed within 24 h of the bioassay. The leaves of transgenic plants fed directly (without pre-wounding) to the larvae achieved the same level of protection between 24 and 72 h of the bioassay.

  6. Cell cycle-dependent O-GlcNAc modification of tobacco histones and their interaction with the tobacco lectin.

    PubMed

    Delporte, Annelies; De Zaeytijd, Jeroen; De Storme, Nico; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Geelen, Danny; Smagghe, Guy; Guisez, Yves; Van Damme, Els J M

    2014-10-01

    The Nicotiana tabacum agglutinin or Nictaba is a nucleocytoplasmic lectin that is expressed in tobacco after the plants have been exposed to jasmonate treatment or insect herbivory. Nictaba specifically recognizes GlcNAc residues. Recently, it was shown that Nictaba is interacting in vitro with the core histone proteins from calf thymus. Assuming that plant histones - similar to their animal counterparts - undergo O-GlcNAcylation, this interaction presumably occurs through binding of the lectin to the O-GlcNAc modification present on the histones. Hereupon, the question was raised whether this modification also occurs in plants and if it is cell cycle dependent. To this end, histones were purified from tobacco BY-2 suspension cells and the presence of O-GlcNAc modifications was checked. Concomitantly, O-GlcNAcylation of histone proteins was studied. Our data show that similar to animal histones plant histones are modified by O-GlcNAc in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. In addition, the interaction between Nictaba and tobacco histones was confirmed using lectin chromatography and far Western blot analysis. Collectively these findings suggest that Nictaba can act as a modulator of gene transcription through its interaction with core histones.

  7. Elevated ROS-scavenging enzymes contribute to acclimation to UV-B exposure in transplastomic tobacco plants, reducing the role of plastid peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Czégény, Gyula; Le Martret, Bénédicte; Pávkovics, Dóra; Dix, Philip J; Hideg, Éva

    2016-08-20

    Leaf peroxidases play a key role in the successful acclimation of plants to low UV-B doses. The aim of the present study was to examine whether selective enhancement of alternative chloroplast antioxidant pathways achieved by chloroplast transformation affected the need for peroxidase defense. Transplastomic tobacco lines expressing glutathione reductase in combination with either dehydroascorbate reductase or glutathione-S-transferase in their plastids exhibited better tolerance to supplemental UV-B than wild type plants. After 10days UV treatment, both the maximum and effective quantum yields of PSII decreased in the wild type by 10% but were unaffected in either of the transformed lines. Activities of total peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase, in addition to dehydroascorbate reductase and gluthatione-S-transferase, were increased by UV in all lines. Gluthatione reductase activity was unaffected by UV in the transplastomic line engineered to have a higher constitutive level of this enzyme, but increased in the two other genotypes. However, the observed more successful acclimation required less activation of peroxidases in the doubly transformed plants than in the wild type and less increase in non-enzymatic hydroxyl radical neutralization in the dehydroascorbate reductase plus glutathione reductase fortified plants than in either of the other lines. These results highlight the fundamental role of efficient glutathione, and especially ascorbate, recycling in the chloroplast in response to exposure of plants to UV-B. They also identify chloroplast localized peroxidases among the large variety of leaf peroxidases as essential elements of defense, supporting our earlier hypothesis on hydrogen peroxide UV-B photo-cleavage as the primary mechanism behind damage.

  8. Over-expression of a pepper plastid lipid-associated protein in tobacco leads to changes in plastid ultrastructure and plant development upon stress.

    PubMed

    Rey, P; Gillet, B; Römer, S; Eymery, F; Massimino, J; Peltier, G; Kuntz, M

    2000-03-01

    Proteins homologous to fibrillin, a pepper plastid lipid-associated protein involved in carotenoid storage in fruit chromoplasts, have been recently identified in leaf chloroplasts from several species and shown to be induced upon environmental stress. To further investigate the role of the protein, transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants over-expressing fibrillin using a constitutive promoter were generated. Transgenics grown under standard light intensities (300 micromol photons m-2 sec-1) were found to contain substantial amounts of fibrillin in flowers and leaves. In leaves, the protein was immunolocalized within chloroplasts in both stromal and thylakoid subfractions. No change was noticed in thylakoid structures from transgenics, but chloroplasts contained an increased number of plastoglobules organized in clusters. In petals, leucoplasts were also found to contain more agglutinated plastoglobules. The effects of environmental factors on fibrillin gene expression and protein localization were studied in tobacco leaves. Less fibrillin was present in plants grown under low light intensities, which can be explained by the involvement of a light-dependent splicing step in the control of fibrillin gene expression in leaves. Analysis of protein subfractions from plants subjected to drought or high light showed that both stresses resulted in fibrillin association with thylakoids. Whereas no growth difference between wild-type (WT) and transgenic plants was noticed under low light conditions, transgenics exhibit a longer main stem, enhanced development of lateral stems and accelerated floral development under higher light intensities. These data suggest that fibrillin-related proteins fulfil an important function in plant development in relation to environmental constraints.

  9. Lysophosphatidylcholine enhances susceptibility in signaling pathway against pathogen infection through biphasic production of reactive oxygen species and ethylene in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wi, Soo Jin; Seo, So yeon; Cho, Kyoungwon; Nam, Myung Hee; Park, Ky Young

    2014-08-01

    It was previously reported that the amounts of lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs), which are naturally occurring bioactive lipid molecules, significantly increase following pathogen inoculation, as determined using ultraperformance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight/mass spectrometry analyses. Here, real-time quantitative RT-PCR was performed for the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) genes, Nt1PLA2 and Nt2PLA2, which are responsible for LysoPCs generation. The transcription level of Nt2PLA2 in pathogen-infected tobacco plants transiently peaked at 1h and 36 h, whereas induction of Nt1PLA2 transcription peaked at 36 h. A prominent biphasic ROS accumulation in lysoPC (C18:1(9Z))-treated tobacco leaves was also observed. Transcription of NtRbohD, a gene member of NADPH oxidase, showed biphasic kinetics upon lysoPC 18:1 treatment, as evidenced by an early transient peak in phase I at 1h and a massive peak in phase II at 12h. Each increase in NtACS2 and NtACS4 transcription, gene members of the ACC synthase family, was followed by biphasic peaks of ethylene production after lysoPC 18:1 treatment. This suggested that lysoPC (C18:1)-induced ethylene production was regulated at the transcriptional level of time-dependent gene members. LysoPC 18:1 treatment also rapidly induced cell damage. LysoPC 18:1-induced cell death was almost completely abrogated in ROS generation-impaired transgenic plants (rbohD-as and rbohF-as), ethylene production-impaired transgenic plants (CAS-AS and CAO-AS), and ethylene signaling-impaired transgenic plants (Ein3-AS), respectively. Taken together, pathogen-induced lysoPCs enhance pathogen susceptibility accompanied by ROS and ethylene biosynthesis, resulting in chlorophyll degradation and cell death. Expression of PR genes (PR1-a, PR-3, and PR-4b) and LOX3 was strongly induced in lysoPC 18:1-treated leaves, indicating the involvement of lysoPC 18:1 in the defense response. However, lysoPC 18:1 treatment eventually resulted in cell death, as

  10. Assessment of endogenous allergenicity of genetically modified plants exemplified by soybean - Where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Selb, R; Wal, J M; Moreno, F J; Lovik, M; Mills, C; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; Fernandez, A

    2017-03-01

    According to EU regulation, genetically modified (GM) plants considered to be allergenic have to be assessed concerning their endogenous allergens before placement on the EU market, in line with the international standards described in Codex Alimentarius. Under such premises, a quantitative relevant increase in allergens might occur in GM plants as an unintended effect compared with conventionally produced crops, which could pose a risk to consumers. Currently, data showing a connection between dose and allergic sensitisation are scarce since the pathophysiological mechanisms of sensitisation are insufficiently understood. In contrast, data on population dose-distribution relationships acquired by oral food challenge are available showing a connection between quantity of allergenic protein consumed and the population of allergic individuals experiencing reactions. Soybean is currently the only recognised allergenic GM food by law for which EFSA has received applications and was therefore taken as an example for defining an assessment strategy. Identification of potential allergens, methodology for quantification as well as risk assessment considerations, are discussed. A strategy is proposed for the identification, assessment and evaluation of potential hazards/risks concerning endogenous allergenicity in food derived from plants developed by biotechnology. This approach could be expanded to other allergenic foods in the future, whenever required.

  11. Toxicity studies of genetically modified plants: a review of the published literature.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L

    2007-01-01

    According to the information reported by the WHO, the genetically modified (GM) products that are currently on the international market have all passed risk assessments conducted by national authorities. These assessments have not indicated any risk to human health. In spite of this clear statement, it is quite amazing to note that the review articles published in international scientific journals during the current decade did not find, or the number was particularly small, references concerning human and animal toxicological/health risks studies on GM foods. In this paper, the scientific information concerning the potential toxicity of GM/transgenic plants using the Medline database is reviewed. Studies about the safety of the potential use of potatoes, corn, soybeans, rice, cucumber, tomatoes, sweet pepper, peas, and canola plants for food and feed were included. The number of references was surprisingly limited. Moreover, most published studies were not performed by the biotechnology companies that produce these products. This review can be concluded raising the following question: where is the scientific evidence showing that GM plants/food are toxicologically safe?

  12. Reviewing PSA-based analyses to modify technical specifications at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, P.K.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Vesely, W.E.

    1995-12-01

    Changes to Technical Specifications (TSs) at nuclear power plants (NPPs) require review and approval by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Currently, many requests for changes to TSs use analyses that are based on a plant`s probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). This report presents an approach to reviewing such PSA-based submittals for changes to TSs. We discuss the basic objectives of reviewing a PSA-based submittal to modify NPP TSs; the methodology of reviewing a TS submittal, and the differing roles of a PSA review, a PSA Computer Code review, and a review of a TS submittal. To illustrate this approach, we discuss our review of changes to allowed outage time (AOT) and surveillance test interval (STI) in the TS for the South Texas Project Nuclear Generating Station. Based on this experience gained, a check-list of items is given for future reviewers; it can be used to verify that the submittal contains sufficient information, and also that the review has addressed the relevant issues. Finally, recommended steps in the review process and the expected findings of each step are discussed.

  13. [Tobacco farming in Italy receives more funds in comparison to tobacco control].

    PubMed

    Martino, Gianrocco; Gorini, Giuseppe; Aquilini, Ferruccio; Miligi, Lucia; Chellini, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    In the European Union almost 300,000 tons of raw tobacco are produced every year, contributing for 4% of the world production. In Italy, tobacco crop produces around 90,000 tons/year and is concentrated in Veneto, Tuscany, Umbria and Campania Regions. In 1970, Common Market Organisation provided a virtually unlimited support for European tobacco production. After 2004, funds progressively has been cut by half, even though the other half has been given for restructuring or reconversion of tobacco farms through the Rural Development Plan. The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control recommends conversion of tobacco crops, although there are no effective measures. Tobacco production requires large quantities of chemicals (pesticides, growth regulators, fertilisers), with significant workers' exposure if applied without personal protective equipments. Pesticides may have genotoxic, teratogenic, immunotoxic, hormonal, and carcinogenic effects. Tobacco itself may cause also a disease called "Green tobacco sickness" syndrome, as a consequence of nicotine dermal absorption due to skin exposure to tobacco leaves. In Italy, financial resources for tobacco production and restructuring/conversion to other crops of previously tobacco planted fields are available. On the contrary, anti-smoking media interventions do not receive funds comparatively relevant as those for tobacco production.

  14. A Member of the 14-3-3 Gene Family in Brachypodium distachyon, BdGF14d, Confers Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Lihong; Wu, Chunlai; Luo, Qingchen; Zhang, Fan; Wei, Qiuhui; Li, Kexiu; Chang, Junli; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2017-01-01

    Plant 14-3-3 proteins are involved in diverse biological processes, but for the model monocotyledonous species, Brachypodium distachyon, their roles in abiotic stress tolerance are not well understood. In this study, a total of eight Bd14-3-3 genes were identified from B. distachyon and these were designated respectively as BdGF14a–BdGF14g. The qRT-PCR analyses of 3-month-old plants of B. distachyon showed that these genes were all expressed in the stems, leaves, and spikelets. By contrast, most of the plants had relatively lower transcriptional levels in their roots, except for the BdGF14g gene. The different expression profiles of the Bd14-3-3s under various stress treatments, and the diverse interaction patterns between Bd14-3-3s and BdAREB/ABFs, suggested that these gene products probably had a range of functions in the stress responses. The NaCl-induced Bd14-3-3 gene, BdGF14d, was selected for overexpression in tobacco. BdGF14d was found to be localized throughout the cell and it conferred enhanced tolerance to salt in the transgenic plants. Lowered contents of malondialdehyde, H2O2, and Na+, and lower relative electronic conductance (Rec%), yet greater activities of catalase and peroxidase, were observed in the overexpressing plants. Higher photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, and water use efficiency were measured in the transgenic lines. Following abscisic acid (ABA) or NaCl treatment, stomatal aperture in leaves of the BdGF14d-overexpression plants was significantly lower than in leaves of the wild type (WT) controls. The stress-related marker genes involved in the ABA signaling pathway, the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging system, and the ion transporters were all up-regulated in the BdGF14d-overexpressing plants as compared with WT. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the Bd14-3-3 genes play important roles in abiotic stress tolerance. The ABA signaling pathway, the ROS-scavenging system, and ion

  15. 76 FR 38961 - Tobacco Products, Exemptions From Substantial Equivalence Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ..., tobacco products that are modified by adding or deleting a tobacco additive, or by increasing or decreasing the quantity of an existing tobacco additive, if FDA determines that: (1) The modification would... modifications to additives that meet the statutory criteria. Many of the comments provided us with...

  16. Stress-Inducible Expression of an F-box Gene TaFBA1 from Wheat Enhanced the Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants without Impacting Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangzhu; Zhou, Shumei; Yin, Suhong; Zhao, Zhongxian; Han, Yangyang; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    E3 ligase plays an important role in the response to many environment stresses in plants. In our previous study, constitutive overexpression of an F-box protein gene TaFBA1 driven by 35S promoter improved the drought tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants, but the growth and development in transgenic plants was altered in normal conditions. In this study, we used stress-inducible promoter RD29A instead of 35S promoter, as a results, the stress-inducible transgenic tobacco plants exhibit a similar phenotype with wild type (WT) plants. However, the drought tolerance of the transgenic plants with stress-inducible expressed TaFBA1 was enhanced. The improved drought tolerance of transgenic plants was indicated by their higher seed germination rate and survival rate, greater biomass and photosynthesis than those of WT under water stress, which may be related to their greater water retention capability and osmotic adjustment. Moreover, the transgenic plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species, kept lower MDA content and membrane leakage under water stress, which may be related to their higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activity and upregulated gene expression of some antioxidant enzymes. These results suggest that stress induced expression of TaFBA1 confers drought tolerance via the improved water retention and antioxidative compete ability. Meanwhile, this stress-inducible expression strategy by RD29A promoter can minimize the unexpectable effects by 35S constitutive promoter on phenotypes of the transgenic plants.

  17. Stress-Inducible Expression of an F-box Gene TaFBA1 from Wheat Enhanced the Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants without Impacting Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangzhu; Zhou, Shumei; Yin, Suhong; Zhao, Zhongxian; Han, Yangyang; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    E3 ligase plays an important role in the response to many environment stresses in plants. In our previous study, constitutive overexpression of an F-box protein gene TaFBA1 driven by 35S promoter improved the drought tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants, but the growth and development in transgenic plants was altered in normal conditions. In this study, we used stress-inducible promoter RD29A instead of 35S promoter, as a results, the stress-inducible transgenic tobacco plants exhibit a similar phenotype with wild type (WT) plants. However, the drought tolerance of the transgenic plants with stress-inducible expressed TaFBA1 was enhanced. The improved drought tolerance of transgenic plants was indicated by their higher seed germination rate and survival rate, greater biomass and photosynthesis than those of WT under water stress, which may be related to their greater water retention capability and osmotic adjustment. Moreover, the transgenic plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species, kept lower MDA content and membrane leakage under water stress, which may be related to their higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activity and upregulated gene expression of some antioxidant enzymes. These results suggest that stress induced expression of TaFBA1 confers drought tolerance via the improved water retention and antioxidative compete ability. Meanwhile, this stress-inducible expression strategy by RD29A promoter can minimize the unexpectable effects by 35S constitutive promoter on phenotypes of the transgenic plants. PMID:27656187

  18. Pronounced Phenotypic Changes in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Sucrose Synthase May Reveal a Novel Sugar Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh Anh; Luan, Sheng; Wi, Seung G.; Bae, Hanhong; Lee, Dae-Seok; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Soluble sugars not only serve as nutrients, but also act as signals for plant growth and development, but how sugar signals are perceived and translated into physiological responses in plants remains unclear. We manipulated sugar levels in transgenic plants by overexpressing sucrose synthase (SuSy), which is a key enzyme believed to have reversible sucrose synthesis and sucrose degradation functions. The ectopically expressed SuSy protein exhibited sucrose-degrading activity, which may change the flux of sucrose demand from photosynthetic to non-photosynthetic cells, and trigger an unknown sucrose signaling pathway that lead to increased sucrose content in the transgenic plants. An experiment on the transition from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth demonstrated the existence of a novel sucrose signaling pathway, which stimulated photosynthesis, and enhanced photosynthetic synthesis of sucrose, which was the direct cause or the sucrose increase. In addition, a light/dark time treatment experiment, using different day length ranges for photosynthesis/respiration showed the carbohydrate pattern within a 24-h day and consolidated the role of sucrose signaling pathway as a way to maintain sucrose demand, and indicated the relationships between increased sucrose and upregulation of genes controlling development of the shoot apical meristem (SAM). As a result, transgenic plants featured a higher biomass and a shorter time required to switch to reproduction compared to those of control plants, indicating altered phylotaxis and more rapid advancement of developmental stages in the transgenic plants. PMID:26793204

  19. Crop systems and plant roots can modify the soil water holding capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussan, Claude; Cousin, Isabelle; Berard, Annette; Chabbi, Abad; Legendre, Laurent; Czarnes, Sonia; Toussaint, Bruce; Ruy, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    At the interface between atmosphere and deep sub-soil, the root zone plays a major role in regulating the flow of water between major compartments: groundwater / surface / atmosphere (drainage, runoff, evapotranspiration). This role of soil as regulator/control of water fluxes, but also as a supporting medium to plant growth, is strongly dependent on the hydric properties of the soil. In turn, the plant roots growing in the soil can change its structure; both in the plow layer and in the deeper horizons and, therefore, could change the soil properties, particularly hydric properties. Such root-related alteration of soil properties can be linked to direct effect of roots such as soil perforation during growth, aggregation of soil particles or indirect effects such as the release of exudates by roots that could modify the properties of water or of soil particles. On an another hand, the rhizosphere, the zone around roots influenced by the activity of root and associated microorganisms, could have a high influence on hydric properties, particularly the water retention. To test if crops and plant roots rhizosphere may have a significant effect on water retention, we conducted various experiment from laboratory to field scales. In the lab, we tested different soil and species for rhizospheric effect on soil water retention. Variation in available water content (AWC) between bulk and rhizospheric soil varied from non-significant to a significant increase (to about 16% increase) depending on plant species and soil type. In the field, the alteration of water retention by root systems was tested in different pedological settings for a Maize crop inoculated or not with the bacteria Azospirillum spp., known to alter root structure, growth and morphology. Again, a range of variation in AWC was evidenced, with significant increase (~30%) in some soil types, but more linked to innoculated/non-innoculated plants rather than to a difference between rhizospheric and bulk soil

  20. Smokeless Tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    ... which is a cancerous tumor in the back part of the throat. In 2014, Hall of Famer ... first). Use substitutes such as tobacco-free, mint-leaf snuff; sugarless gum; hard candy; beef jerky; sunflower seeds; shredded coconut; raisins; or dried fruit. Distract yourself ...

  1. My favourite flowering image: Maryland Mammoth tobacco.

    PubMed

    Amasino, Richard M

    2013-12-01

    Almost 100 years ago, the study of Maryland Mammoth tobacco by Garner and Allard was one in a long series of studies that have led to a better understanding of how plants "decide" when to flower. deciphering how plants "decide" when to flower. The extreme phenotype of Maryland Mammoth tobacco, in which a single recessive mutation changes a day-neutral to a strictly photoperiod-requiring plant, impressively illustrates the action of the photoperiodic pathway of flowering.

  2. Monitoring the tobacco use epidemic II. The Agent: Current and Emerging Tobacco Products

    PubMed Central

    Stellman, Steven D.; Djordjevic, Mirjana V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This Agent paper summarizes the findings and recommendations of the Agent (product) Working Group of the November, 2002, National Tobacco Monitoring, Research and Evaluation Workshop. Methods The Agent Working Group evaluated the need to develop new surveillance systems for quantifying ingredients and emissions of tobacco and tobacco smoke and to improve methods to assess uptake and metabolism of these constituents taking into account variability in human smoking behavior. Results The toxic properties of numerous tobacco and tobacco smoke constituents are well known, yet systematic monitoring of tobacco products has historically been limited to tar, nicotine, and CO in mainstream cigarette smoke using a machine-smoking protocol that does not reflect human smoking behavior. Toxicity of smokeless tobacco products has not been regularly monitored. Tobacco products are constantly changing and untested products are introduced into the marketplace with great frequency, including potential reduced-exposure products (PREPs). The public health impact of new or modified tobacco products is unknown. Conclusions Systematic surveillance is recommended for mainstream smoke constituents such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNA), total and free-base nicotine, volatile organic compounds, aromatic amines, and metals; and design attributes including tobacco blend, additives, and filter ventilation. Research on smoking topography is recommended to help define machine-smoking protocols for monitoring emissions reflective of human smoking behavior. Recommendations are made for marketplace product sampling and for population monitoring of smoking topography, emissions of toxic constituents, biomarkers of exposure and, eventually, risk of tobacco-related diseases. PMID:18848577

  3. A proposed impact assessment method for genetically modified plants (AS-GMP Method)

    SciTech Connect

    Jesus-Hitzschky, Katia Regina Evaristo de; Silveira, Jose Maria F.J. da

    2009-11-15

    An essential step in the development of products based on biotechnology is an assessment of their potential economic impacts and safety, including an evaluation of the potential impact of transgenic crops and practices related to their cultivation on the environment and human or animal health. The purpose of this paper is to provide an assessment method to evaluate the impact of biotechnologies that uses quantifiable parameters and allows a comparative analysis between conventional technology and technologies using GMOs. This paper introduces a method to perform an impact analysis associated with the commercial release and use of genetically modified plants, the Assessment System GMP Method. The assessment is performed through indicators that are arranged according to their dimension criterion likewise: environmental, economic, social, capability and institutional approach. To perform an accurate evaluation of the GMP specific indicators related to genetic modification are grouped in common fields: genetic insert features, GM plant features, gene flow, food/feed field, introduction of the GMP, unexpected occurrences and specific indicators. The novelty is the possibility to include specific parameters to the biotechnology under assessment. In this case by case analysis the factors of moderation and the indexes are parameterized to perform an available assessment.

  4. Miraculin, a taste-modifying protein is secreted into intercellular spaces in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminari; Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2010-02-15

    A taste-modifying protein, miraculin, is highly accumulated in ripe fruit of miracle fruit (Richadella dulcifica) and the content can reach up to 10% of the total soluble protein in these fruits. Although speculated for decades that miraculin is secreted into intercellular spaces in miracle fruit, no evidence exists of its cellular localization. To study the cellular localization of miraculin in plant cells, using miracle fruit and transgenic tomato that constitutively express miraculin, immunoelectron microscopy, imaging GFP fusion proteins, and immunological detection of secreted proteins in culture medium of transgenic tomato were carried out. Immunoelectron microscopy showed the specific accumulation of miraculin in the intercellular layers of both miracle fruit and transgenic tomato. Imaging GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the miraculin-GFP fusion protein was accumulated in the intercellular spaces of tomato epidermal cells. Immunological detection of secreted proteins in culture medium of transgenic tomato indicated that miraculin was secreted from the roots of transgenic tomato expressing miraculin. This study firstly showed the evidences of the intercellular localization of miraculin, and provided a new insight of biological roles of miraculin in plants.

  5. From miracle fruit to transgenic tomato: mass production of the taste-modifying protein miraculin in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Kato, Kazuhisa; Duhita, Narendra; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    The utility of plants as biofactories has progressed in recent years. Some recombinant plant-derived pharmaceutical products have already reached the marketplace. However, with the exception of drugs and vaccines, a strong effort has not yet been made to bring recombinant products to market, as cost-effectiveness is critically important for commercialization. Sweet-tasting proteins and taste-modifying proteins have a great deal of potential in industry as substitutes for sugars and as artificial sweeteners. The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, functions to change the perception of a sour taste to a sweet one. This taste-modifying function can potentially be used not only as a low-calorie sweetener but also as a new seasoning that could be the basis of a new dietary lifestyle. However, miraculin is far from inexpensive, and its potential as a marketable product has not yet been fully developed. For the last several years, biotechnological production of this taste-modifying protein has progressed extensively. In this review, the characteristics of miraculin and recent advances in its production using transgenic plants are summarized, focusing on such topics as the suitability of plant species as expression hosts, the cultivation method for transgenic plants, the method of purifying miraculin and future advances required to achieve industrial use.

  6. Investigation on gene transfer from genetically modified corn (Zea mays L.) plants to soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ma, B L; Blackshaw, Robert E; Roy, Julie; He, Tianpei

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about the prevalence and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria communities is required to evaluate the possibility and ecological consequences of the transfer of these genes carried by genetically modified (GM) plants to soil bacteria. The neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) conferring resistance to kanamycin and neomycin is one of the antibiotic resistance genes commonly present in GM plants. In this study, we investigated kanamycin-resistant (Km(R)) and neomycin-resistant (Nm(R)) soil bacterial populations in a 3-year field trial using a commercial GM corn (Zea mays L.) carrying the nptII gene and its near isogenic line. The results showed that a portion (2.3 - 15.6 %) of cultivable soil bacteria was naturally resistant to kanamycin or neomycin. However, no significant difference in the population level of Km(R) or Nm(R) soil bacteria was observed between the GM and non-GM corn fields. The nptII gene was not detected in any of the total 3000 Km(R) or Nm(R) isolates screened by PCR. Further, total soil bacterial cells were collected through Nycodenz gradient centrifugation and bacterial community DNA was subjected to PCR. Detection limit was about 500 cells per gram of fresh soil. Our study suggests that the nptII gene was relatively rare in the soil bacterial populations and there was no evidence of gene transfer from a GM corn plant to soil bacteria based on the data from total soil bacterial communities.

  7. The GMOseek matrix: a decision support tool for optimizing the detection of genetically modified plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since their first commercialization, the diversity of taxa and the genetic composition of transgene sequences in genetically modified plants (GMOs) are constantly increasing. To date, the detection of GMOs and derived products is commonly performed by PCR-based methods targeting specific DNA sequences introduced into the host genome. Information available regarding the GMOs’ molecular characterization is dispersed and not appropriately organized. For this reason, GMO testing is very challenging and requires more complex screening strategies and decision making schemes, demanding in return the use of efficient bioinformatics tools relying on reliable information. Description The GMOseek matrix was built as a comprehensive, online open-access tabulated database which provides a reliable, comprehensive and user-friendly overview of 328 GMO events and 247 different genetic elements (status: 18/07/2013). The GMOseek matrix is aiming to facilitate GMO detection from plant origin at different phases of the analysis. It assists in selecting the targets for a screening analysis, interpreting the screening results, checking the occurrence of a screening element in a group of selected GMOs, identifying gaps in the available pool of GMO detection methods, and designing a decision tree. The GMOseek matrix is an independent database with effective functionalities in a format facilitating transferability to other platforms. Data were collected from all available sources and experimentally tested where detection methods and certified reference materials (CRMs) were available. Conclusions The GMOseek matrix is currently a unique and very valuable tool with reliable information on GMOs from plant origin and their present genetic elements that enables further development of appropriate strategies for GMO detection. It is flexible enough to be further updated with new information and integrated in different applications and platforms. PMID:23965170

  8. Decomposition dynamics and structural plant components of genetically modified Bt maize leaves do not differ from leaves of conventional hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zurbrügg, Corinne; Hönemann, Linda; Meissle, Michael; Romeis, Jörg; Nentwig, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified Bt maize has raised environmental concerns, as large amounts of plant residues remain in the field and may negatively impact the soil ecosystem. In a field experiment, decomposition of leaf residues from three genetically modified (two expressing the Cry1Ab, one the Cry3Bb1 protein) and six non-transgenic hybrids (the three corresponding non-transformed near-isolines and three conventional hybrids) was investigated using litterbags. To elucidate the mechanisms that cause differences in plant decomposition, structural plant components (i.e., C:N ratio, lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose) were examined. Furthermore, Cry1Ab and Cry3Bb1 protein concentrations in maize leaf residues were measured from harvest to the next growing season. While leaf residue decomposition in transgenic and non-transgenic plants was similar, differences among conventional cultivars were evident. Similarly, plant components among conventional hybrids differed more than between transgenic and non-transgenic hybrids. Moreover, differences in senescent plant material collected directly from plants were larger than after exposure to soil for 5 months. While the concentration of Cry3Bb1 was higher in senescent maize leaves than that of Cry1Ab, degradation was faster, indicating that Cry3Bb1 has a shorter persistence in plant residues. As decomposition patterns of Bt-transgenic maize were shown to be well within the range of common conventional hybrids, there is no indication of ecologically relevant, adverse effects on the activity of the decomposer community.

  9. Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase overexpression modifies antioxidant defense against heat, drought and their combination in Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Lubovská, Zuzana; Dobrá, Jana; Storchová, Helena; Wilhelmová, Naďa; Vanková, Radomíra

    2014-11-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) as well as the antioxidant enzyme system (AES) play important roles in plant stress responses. The expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes (AE) were determined in drought, heat and combination of both stresses, comparing the response of tobacco plants overexpressing the main cytokinin degrading enzyme, cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase, under the control of root-specific WRKY6 promoter (W6:CKX1 plants) or constitutive promoter (35S:CKX1 plants) and the corresponding wild-type (WT). Expression levels as well as activities of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase, catalase 3, and cytosolic superoxide dismutase were low under optimal conditions and increased after heat and combined stress in all genotypes. Unlike catalase 3, two other peroxisomal enzymes, catalase 1 and catalase 2, were transcribed extensively under control conditions. Heat stress, in contrast to drought or combined stress, increased catalase 1 and reduced catalase 2 expression in WT and W6:CKX1 plants. In 35S:CKX1, catalase 1 expression was enhanced by heat or drought, but not under combined stress conditions. Mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression was generally higher in 35S:CKX1 plants than in WT. Genes encoding for chloroplastic AEs, stromatal ascorbate peroxidase, thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase and chloroplastic superoxide dismutase, were strongly transcribed under control conditions. All stresses down-regulated their expression in WT and W6:CKX1, whereas more stress-tolerant 35S:CKX1 plants maintained high expression during drought and heat. The achieved data show that the effect of down-regulation of CK levels on AES may be mediated by altered habit, resulting in improved stress tolerance, which is associated with diminished stress impact on photosynthesis, and changes in source/sink relations.

  10. Challenges in electrochemical pre-purification of recombinant proteins from green plant tissues: sgfp produced in tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    Robić, Goran

    2013-01-01

    The use of recombinant proteins has increased greatly in recent years, as have the number of techniques and materials used for their production and purification. The principal advantage of using plants as bioreactors is the cost of the recombinant protein production, which is about 1000-fold lower as in the case of using CHO cells commonly applied in industry today. Among the different types of "green" bioreactors being studied today, there is a general consensus among scientists that production in green plant tissues such as leaves is more feasible. However, the presence of chlorophyll and phenolic compounds in plant extracts, which can precipitate and denature the proteins besides damaging separation membranes and gels, makes this technology impracticable on a commercial scale. Electrochemically produced aluminium hydroxide gel can be used to adsorb these compounds, and pre-purify recombinant synthetic green fluorescent protein (sGFP) produced in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Removal efficiencies of 99.7% of chlorophyll, 88.5% of phenolic compounds, and 38.5% of native proteins from the N. benthamiana extracts were achieved without removing sGFP from the extracts. Since electrochemical preparation of aluminum hydroxide gel is a cost-effective technique, its use can substantially contribute to the development of future production platforms for recombinant proteins produced in green plant tissues of pharmaceutical and industrial interest.

  11. Maize rayado fino virus-like particles expressed in tobacco plants: a new platform for cysteine selective bioconjugation peptide display

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of plant virus coat proteins to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs), coupled with unique properties including three-dimensional structures, orthogonal reactivities, suitability for genetic manipulation and chemical bio-conjugation, provide potential utility in nanotechnology a...

  12. Inheritance and expression of the mouse metallothionein gene in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Wagner, G.J.; Yeargan, R.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Genetically engineered seedlings obtained from self-fertilized transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) contained and expressed the mouse metallothionein and kanamycin resistance marker genes and were more tolerant to cadmium stress than untransformed controls. Cadmium accumulation in leaves of transgenic seedlings exposed to a low, field-like Cd concentration (0.02 micromolar) was about 20% lower than that in untransformed controls. Genetic analysis of R1 and R2 progeny showed inheritance of the marker gene to be as a dominant Mendelian trait. These results suggest the possibility of developing transgenic plants with modified tolerance to heavy metal stress and food crops having lower Cd content.

  13. A survey of insect populations in Capsicum chinense L. plantings in Georgetown, St. Vincent, using modified CC traps.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insect populations in hot pepper, Capsicum chinense L., were surveyed in Georgetown, St. Vincent, during the 2004 wet and 2005 dry seasons. Modified white, blue, and yellow CC traps were used to capture insects in the plantings. Overall, 69 insect families were captured, 41 of which were capture...

  14. Polysaccharide-degrading Enzymes are Unable to Attack Plant Cell Walls without Prior Action by a "Wall-modifying Enzyme".

    PubMed

    Karr, A L; Albersheim, P

    1970-07-01

    A study of the degradation of plant cell walls by the mixture of enzymes present in Pectinol R-10 is described. A "wall-modifying enzyme" has been purified from this mixture by a combination of diethylaminoethyl cellulose, Bio Gel P-100, and carboxymethyl cellulose chromatography. Treatment of cell walls with the "wall-modifying enzyme" is shown to be a necessary prerequisite to wall degradation catalyzed by a mixture of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes prepared from Pectinol R-10 or by an alpha-galactosidase secreted by the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. The action of the "wall-modifying enzyme" on cell walls is shown to result in both a release of water-soluble, 70% ethanol-insoluble polymers and an alteration of the residual cell wall. A purified preparation of the "wall-modifying enzyme" is unable to degrade a wide variety of polysaccharide, glycoside, and peptide substrates. However, the purified preparation of wall-modifying enzyme has a limited ability to degrade polygalacturonic acid. The fact that polygalacturonic acid inhibits the ability of the "wall-modifying enzyme" to affect cell walls suggests that the "wall-modifying enzyme" may be responsible for the limited polygalacturonic acid-degrading activity present in the purified preparation. The importance of a wall-modifying enzyme in developmental processes and in pathogenesis is discussed.

  15. ATP synthase repression in tobacco restricts photosynthetic electron transport, CO2 assimilation, and plant growth by overacidification of the thylakoid lumen.

    PubMed

    Rott, Markus; Martins, Nádia F; Thiele, Wolfram; Lein, Wolfgang; Bock, Ralph; Kramer, David M; Schöttler, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants strictly adjust the contents of both ATP synthase and cytochrome b(6)f complex to the metabolic demand for ATP and NADPH. While the cytochrome b(6)f complex catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic electron flux and thereby controls assimilation, the functional significance of the ATP synthase adjustment is unknown. Here, we reduced ATP synthase accumulation by an antisense approach directed against the essential nuclear-encoded γ-subunit (AtpC) and by the introduction of point mutations into the translation initiation codon of the plastid-encoded atpB gene (encoding the essential β-subunit) via chloroplast transformation. Both strategies yielded transformants with ATP synthase contents ranging from 100 to <10% of wild-type levels. While the accumulation of the components of the linear electron transport chain was largely unaltered, linear electron flux was strongly inhibited due to decreased rates of plastoquinol reoxidation at the cytochrome b(6)f complex (photosynthetic control). Also, nonphotochemical quenching was triggered at very low light intensities, strongly reducing the quantum efficiency of CO(2) fixation. We show evidence that this is due to an increased steady state proton motive force, resulting in strong lumen overacidification, which in turn represses photosynthesis due to photosynthetic control and dissipation of excitation energy in the antenna bed.

  16. Photorespiration plays an important role in the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow under fluctuating light in tobacco plants grown under full sunlight

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Plants usually experience dynamic fluctuations of light intensities under natural conditions. However, the responses of mesophyll conductance, CO2 assimilation, and photorespiration to light fluctuation are not well understood. To address this question, we measured photosynthetic parameters of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence in tobacco leaves at 2-min intervals while irradiance levels alternated between 100 and 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1. Compared with leaves exposed to a constant light of 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1, both stomatal and mesophyll conductances were significantly restricted in leaves treated with fluctuating light condition. Meanwhile, CO2 assimilation rate and electron flow devoted to RuBP carboxylation at 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1 under fluctuating light were limited by the low chloroplast CO2 concentration. Analysis based on the C3 photosynthesis model indicated that, at 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1 under fluctuating light, the CO2 assimilation rate was limited by RuBP carboxylation. Electron flow devoted to RuBP oxygenation at 1200 μmol photons m−2 s−1 under fluctuating light remained at nearly the maximum level throughout the experimental period. We conclude that fluctuating light restricts CO2 assimilation by decreasing both stomatal and mesophyll conductances. Under such conditions, photorespiration plays an important role in the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow. PMID:26322062

  17. Photorespiration plays an important role in the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow under fluctuating light in tobacco plants grown under full sunlight.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Plants usually experience dynamic fluctuations of light intensities under natural conditions. However, the responses of mesophyll conductance, CO2 assimilation, and photorespiration to light fluctuation are not well understood. To address this question, we measured photosynthetic parameters of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence in tobacco leaves at 2-min intervals while irradiance levels alternated between 100 and 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). Compared with leaves exposed to a constant light of 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), both stomatal and mesophyll conductances were significantly restricted in leaves treated with fluctuating light condition. Meanwhile, CO2 assimilation rate and electron flow devoted to RuBP carboxylation at 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) under fluctuating light were limited by the low chloroplast CO2 concentration. Analysis based on the C3 photosynthesis model indicated that, at 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) under fluctuating light, the CO2 assimilation rate was limited by RuBP carboxylation. Electron flow devoted to RuBP oxygenation at 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) under fluctuating light remained at nearly the maximum level throughout the experimental period. We conclude that fluctuating light restricts CO2 assimilation by decreasing both stomatal and mesophyll conductances. Under such conditions, photorespiration plays an important role in the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow.

  18. Functional analysis of the stress-inducible soybean calmodulin isoform-4 (GmCaM-4) promoter in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Man Lyang; Kang, Yun Hwan; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Cheong, Mi Sun; Choi, Wonkyun; Lee, Sang Yeol; Cho, Moo Je; Kim, Min Chul; Chung, Woo Sik; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2009-04-30

    The transcription of soybean (Glycine max) calmodulin isoform-4 (GmCaM-4) is dramatically induced within 0.5 h of exposure to pathogen or NaCl. Core cis-acting elements that regulate the expression of the GmCaM-4 gene in response to pathogen and salt stress were previously identified, between -1,207 and -1,128 bp, and between -858 and -728 bp, in the GmCaM-4 promoter. Here, we characterized the properties of the DNA-binding complexes that form at the two core cis-acting elements of the GmCaM-4 promoter in pathogen-treated nuclear extracts. We generated GUS reporter constructs harboring various deletions of approximately 1.3-kb GmCaM-4 promoter, and analyzed GUS expression in tobacco plants transformed with these constructs. The GUS expression analysis suggested that the two previously identified core regions are involved in inducing GmCaM-4 expression in the heterologous system. Finally, a transient expression assay of Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that the GmCaM-4 promoter produced greater levels of GUS activity than did the CaMV35S promoter after pathogen or NaCl treatments, suggesting that the GmCaM-4 promoter may be useful in the production of conditional gene expression systems.

  19. Validation of PCR methods for quantitation of genetically modified plants in food.

    PubMed

    Hübner, P; Waiblinger, H U; Pietsch, K; Brodmann, P

    2001-01-01

    For enforcement of the recently introduced labeling threshold for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food ingredients, quantitative detection methods such as quantitative competitive (QC-PCR) and real-time PCR are applied by official food control laboratories. The experiences of 3 European food control laboratories in validating such methods were compared to describe realistic performance characteristics of quantitative PCR detection methods. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) of GMO-specific, real-time PCR was experimentally determined to reach 30-50 target molecules, which is close to theoretical prediction. Starting PCR with 200 ng genomic plant DNA, the LOQ depends primarily on the genome size of the target plant and ranges from 0.02% for rice to 0.7% for wheat. The precision of quantitative PCR detection methods, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), varied from 10 to 30%. Using Bt176 corn containing test samples and applying Bt176 specific QC-PCR, mean values deviated from true values by -7to 18%, with an average of 2+/-10%. Ruggedness of real-time PCR detection methods was assessed in an interlaboratory study analyzing commercial, homogeneous food samples. Roundup Ready soybean DNA contents were determined in the range of 0.3 to 36%, relative to soybean DNA, with RSDs of about 25%. Taking the precision of quantitative PCR detection methods into account, suitable sample plans and sample sizes for GMO analysis are suggested. Because quantitative GMO detection methods measure GMO contents of samples in relation to reference material (calibrants), high priority must be given to international agreements and standardization on certified reference materials.

  20. Metabolic shift in the phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians in response to cell-free extract of infected tobacco plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Forizs, Laetitia; Lestrade, Sylvain; Mol, Adeline; Dierick, Jean-François; Gerbaux, Cécile; Diallo, Billo; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie; Vandeputte, Olivier M

    2009-05-01

    The phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians induces the development of leafy gall, which is considered to be its ecological niche. To obtain a view of the metabolic changes occurring in R. fascians during this process, an in vitro system was used where bacteria are grown in the presence of a leafy gall extract, a condition mimicking that found by the bacteria in infected plants. Proteins of R. fascians grown for 24 h under these conditions were displayed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Fifteen polypeptides showing a differential accumulation in response to the inducing conditions were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Two polypeptides potentially linked to the Krebs cycle, a pyruvate dehydrogenase and a fumarate hydratase, were further characterized and shown to be downregulated at the transcriptional level. The identification of these two enzymes suggests that R. fascians may shift its metabolism during the interaction with plants from the Krebs cycle to the glyoxylate shunt.

  1. MBSJ MCC Young Scientist Award 2010. Recent progress in research on small post-translationally modified peptide signals in plants.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2012-01-01

    Peptide signaling plays a major role in various aspects of plant growth and development, as has been shown in recent biochemical, genetic and bioinformatic studies. There are over a dozen secreted peptides recognized in plants known to regulate cellular functions. To become functional, these secreted peptide signals often undergo post-translational modifications, such as tyrosine sulfation, proline hydroxylation, and hydroxyproline arabinosylation, and successive proteolytic processing. These types of ‘small post-translationally modified peptide signals’ are one of the major groups of peptide signals found in plants. In parallel with the discovery of peptide signals, specific receptors for such peptide signals were identified as being membrane-localized leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases. This short review highlights the recent progress in research on small post-translationally modified peptide signals, including our own research.

  2. Tobacco and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Category Cancer A-Z What Causes Cancer? Tobacco and Cancer Get information on cigarette, cigar, and ... affects different groups of people. Read more How Tobacco and Smoking Affects Your Health Carcinogens in Tobacco ...

  3. Modifying rainfall patterns in a Mediterranean shrubland: system design, plant responses, and experimental burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Antonio; Ramírez, David A.; Resco, Víctor; Velasco, Ángel; Moreno, José M.

    2012-11-01

    Global warming is projected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the Mediterranean region, as well as the occurrence of large fires. Understanding the interactions between drought, fire and plant responses is therefore important. In this study, we present an experiment in which rainfall patterns were modified to simulate various levels of drought in a Mediterranean shrubland of central Spain dominated by Cistus ladanifer, Erica arborea and Phillyrea angustifolia. A system composed of automatic rainout shelters with an irrigation facility was used. It was designed to be applied in vegetation 2 m tall, treat relatively large areas (36 m2), and be quickly dismantled to perform experimental burning and reassembled back again. Twenty plots were subjected to four rainfall treatments from early spring: natural rainfall, long-term average rainfall (2 months drought), moderate drought (25% reduction from long-term rainfall, 5 months drought) and severe drought (45% reduction, 7 months drought). The plots were burned in late summer, without interfering with rainfall manipulations. Results indicated that rainfall manipulations caused differences in soil moisture among treatments, leading to reduced water availability and growth of C. ladanifer and E. arborea in the drought treatments. However, P. angustifolia was not affected by the manipulations. Rainout shelters had a negligible impact on plot microenvironment. Experimental burns were of high fire intensity, without differences among treatments. Our system provides a tool to study the combined effects of drought and fire on vegetation, which is important to assess the threats posed by climate change in Mediterranean environments.

  4. Influences of clinoptilolite and surfactant-modified clinoptilolite zeolite on nitrate leaching and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Malekian, Raheleh; Abedi-Koupai, Jahangir; Eslamian, Sayed Saeid

    2011-01-30

    The increasing demands for environmental protection and sustainable food production require an increase in the use of natural and non-toxic materials for agriculture. In this study, the feasibility of using surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) in comparison with zeolite clinoptilolite (Cp) application to reduce nitrate leaching and enhance crop growth was investigated. The effects of size (millimeter and nanometer) and application rate (20 g kg(-1) and 60 g kg(-1)) of Cp and SMZ on nitrate leaching and crop response were also evaluated. Using soil lysimeters, it was determined that the maximum and mean nitrate concentration in the leachate of SMZ-amended soil were significantly (p<0.05) lower than those of Cp-amended soil. The amount of NO(3)-N leached from SMZ- and Cp-amended lysimeters at the higher application rate (60 g kg(-1)) was approximately 26% and 22% lower, respectively, than that from the control system. The mean grain yield, grain nitrogen content, stover dry matter, and N uptake were significantly greater in Cp-amended than SMZ-amended lysimeters. There was no significant effect due to the particle size of the two soil amendments. The results implicitly suggest that plants may have a better response if Cp is used as a fertilizer carrier rather than SMZ when applied at a rate of 60 g kg(-1).

  5. Modifying rainfall patterns in a Mediterranean shrubland: system design, plant responses, and experimental burning.

    PubMed

    Parra, Antonio; Ramírez, David A; Resco, Víctor; Velasco, Ángel; Moreno, José M

    2012-11-01

    Global warming is projected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the Mediterranean region, as well as the occurrence of large fires. Understanding the interactions between drought, fire and plant responses is therefore important. In this study, we present an experiment in which rainfall patterns were modified to simulate various levels of drought in a Mediterranean shrubland of central Spain dominated by Cistus ladanifer, Erica arborea and Phillyrea angustifolia. A system composed of automatic rainout shelters with an irrigation facility was used. It was designed to be applied in vegetation 2 m tall, treat relatively large areas (36 m2), and be quickly dismantled to perform experimental burning and reassembled back again. Twenty plots were subjected to four rainfall treatments from early spring: natural rainfall, long-term average rainfall (2 months drought), moderate drought (25% reduction from long-term rainfall, 5 months drought) and severe drought (45% reduction, 7 months drought). The plots were burned in late summer, without interfering with rainfall manipulations. Results indicated that rainfall manipulations caused differences in soil moisture among treatments, leading to reduced water availability and growth of C. ladanifer and E. arborea in the drought treatments. However, P. angustifolia was not affected by the manipulations. Rainout shelters had a negligible impact on plot microenvironment. Experimental burns were of high fire intensity, without differences among treatments. Our system provides a tool to study the combined effects of drought and fire on vegetation, which is important to assess the threats posed by climate change in Mediterranean environments.

  6. The Moderating Role of Gender in the Relationship Between Tobacco Outlet Exposure and Tobacco Use Among African American Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Brown, Qiana; Milam, Adam J; Bowie, Janice V; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Gaskin, Darrell J; Furr-Holden, Debra

    2016-04-01

    Tobacco outlet exposure is a correlate of tobacco use with potential differences by gender that warrant attention. The aim of this study is to explore the moderating role of gender in the relationship between tobacco outlet exposure and past month tobacco use among African American young adults 21 to 24 years old. This cross-sectional study (n = 283) used geospatial methods to determine the number of tobacco outlets within walking distance (i.e., a quarter mile) of participants' homes and distance to the nearest outlet. Logistic regression models were used to test interactions between gender and tobacco outlet exposure (i.e., density and proximity). Tobacco outlets were classified based on whether or not they were licensed to sell tobacco only (TO outlets) or tobacco and alcohol (TA outlets). Neither density nor proximity was associated with past month tobacco use in the pooled models. However, gender modified the relationship between TO outlet density and tobacco use, and this relationship was significant only among women (OR = 1.02; p < 0.01; adjusted OR = 1.01; p < 0.05). This study underscores the importance of reducing tobacco outlet density in residential neighborhoods, especially TO outlets, as well as highlights potential gender differences in the relationship between tobacco outlet density and tobacco use.

  7. Competence for Regeneration during Tobacco Internodal Development (Involvement of Plant Age, Cell Elongation Stage, and Degree of Polysomaty).

    PubMed Central

    Gilissen, LJW.; Van Staveren, M. J.; Hakkert, J. C.; Smulders, MJM.

    1996-01-01

    This study deals with internodal development in vegetative plants of Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun NN and its reflection in changes of the cellular competence for regeneration. During elongation of the internodes, the cells of the epidermis, subepidermis, and cortex exclusively expanded and increased their DNA content cell type specifically, generally from 2C to 4C. Cells with the 8C DNA content were found mainly among the cortex cells of mature internodes. The frequency of shoot regeneration (directly from subepidermal and epidermal cells together) on thin cell layer explants increased to an optimum along with elongation of the internodes and decreased in mature internodes along with aging. The frequencies of diploid shoots among the regenerants from elongating and mature internodes were high (88 and 75% on the average, respectively), indicating that most cells that had achieved the 4C DNA content generally retained the G2 phase of the diploid cell cycle. Shoots regenerated from explants of young plant material mainly had a vitrified appearance. The occurrence of this type of malformed growth was already determined by the physiological state of the cells in the internode and did not interfere with their acquisition of competence. Vitrification was unrelated to the degree of polysomaty of the internodal tissue. Using the occurrence of tetraploid root regenerants (from intermediate cortex-derived callus), up to a frequency of 50%, we show that the position in the plant where a majority of the 4C cortex cells switched to the G1 phase of the tetraploid cell cycle was at the transition from the elongation phase to the mature phase. PMID:12226359

  8. Can tobacco have a potentially beneficial effect to our health?

    PubMed

    Macek, Tomas; Surá, Martina; Pavliková, Daniela; Francová, Katerina; Scouten, William H; Szekeres, Miklos; Sylvestre, Michel; Macková, Martina

    2005-01-01

    With urgent pressure to clean up the contaminated environment, new approaches are needed. Phyto- and rhizoremediation using plants and related bacteria is a promising approach, but has its inborn limitations. To overcome the slow performance of the process, transgenic plants have been prepared specifically tailored for phytoremediation purposes. Our projects addressed a group of widespread synthetic organic xenobiotics, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and heavy metals as representatives of inorganic contaminants. Beside basic research studies in the field of phyto/rhizoremediation of the mentioned toxicants we focused on genetically modified plants as a highly promising tool for these purposes. We tried to prepare tobacco plants expressing the bacterial enzyme responsible for cleaving PCBs, coded by the gene bphC from the bacterial biphenyl operon. The expression of bphC product in fusion with the green fluorescent protein is described together with evaluation of the twice increased resistance of transgenic seeds towards PCBs. The other model is addressing improvement of cadmium accumulation by preparing plants bearing fused transgenes of metal binding protein (yeast metallothionein) with an introduced additional metal binding domain--polyhistidine anchor with high affinity to metals. The genetically modified plants exhibit 190% Cd accumulation of the control in harvestable parts, higher resistance and lower Cd content in roots. The performance of the plants in real contaminated soil is also evaluated.

  9. A Contribution to Identification of Novel Regulators of Plant Response to Sulfur Deficiency: Characteristics of a Tobacco Gene UP9C, Its Protein Product and the Effects of UP9C Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Wawrzyńska, Anna; Moniuszko, Grzegorz; Łukomska, Jolanta; Zientara, Katarzyna; Piecho, Marta; Hodurek, Paweł; Zhukov, Igor; Liszewska, Frantz; Nikiforova, Victoria; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Extensive changes in plant transcriptome and metabolome have been observed by numerous research groups after transferring plants from optimal conditions to sulfur (S) deficiency. Despite intensive studies and recent important achievements, like identification of SLIM1/EIL3 as a major transcriptional regulator of the response to S-deficiency, many questions concerning other elements of the regulatory network remain unanswered. Investigations of genes with expression regulated by S-deficiency stress encoding proteins of unknown function might help to clarify these problems. This study is focused on the UP9C gene and the UP9-like family in tobacco. Homologs of these genes exist in other plant species, including a family of four genes of unknown function in Arabidopsis thaliana (LSU1-4), of which two were reported as strongly induced by S-deficit and to a lesser extent by salt stress and nitrate limitation. Conservation of the predicted structural features, such as coiled coil region or nuclear localization signal, suggests that these proteins might have important functions possibly mediated by interactions with other proteins. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants with silenced expression of UP9-like genes strongly argues for their significant role in regulation of plant response to S-deficit. Although our study shows that the UP9-like proteins are important components of such response and they might be also required during other stresses, their molecular functions remain a mystery. PMID:20147370

  10. A contribution to identification of novel regulators of plant response to sulfur deficiency: characteristics of a tobacco gene UP9C, its protein product and the effects of UP9C silencing.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Malgorzata; Wawrzynska, Anna; Moniuszko, Grzegorz; Lukomska, Jolanta; Zientara, Katarzyna; Piecho, Marta; Hodurek, Pawel; Zhukov, Igor; Liszewska, Frantz; Nikiforova, Victoria; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2010-03-01

    Extensive changes in plant transcriptome and metabolome have been observed by numerous research groups after transferring plants from optimal conditions to sulfur (S) deficiency. Despite intensive studies and recent important achievements, like identification of SLIM1/EIL3 as a major transcriptional regulator of the response to S-deficiency, many questions concerning other elements of the regulatory network remain unanswered. Investigations of genes with expression regulated by S-deficiency stress encoding proteins of unknown function might help to clarify these problems. This study is focused on the UP9C gene and the UP9-like family in tobacco. Homologs of these genes exist in other plant species, including a family of four genes of unknown function in Arabidopsis thaliana (LSU1-4), of which two were reported as strongly induced by S-deficit and to a lesser extent by salt stress and nitrate limitation. Conservation of the predicted structural features, such as coiled coil region or nuclear localization signal, suggests that these proteins might have important functions possibly mediated by interactions with other proteins. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants with silenced expression of UP9-like genes strongly argues for their significant role in regulation of plant response to S-deficit. Although our study shows that the UP9-like proteins are important components of such response and they might be also required during other stresses, their molecular functions remain a mystery.

  11. Plant-plant signaling: application of trans- or cis-methyl jasmonate equivalent to sagebrush releases does not elicit direct defenses in native tobacco.

    PubMed

    Preston, Catherine A; Laue, Grit; Baldwin, Ian T

    2004-11-01

    Nicotiana attenuata plants growing in close proximity to damaged sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata) suffer less herbivory than plants near undamaged sagebrush. Sagebrush constitutively releases methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a compound that when applied directly to N. attenuata, elicits herbivore resistance and the direct defense traits [protease inhibitors (PIs), nicotine]. Damage increases the release of volatile MeJA, primarily in the cis epimer, suggesting that cis-MeJA may mediate this apparent interplant signaling. We characterized sagebrush's MeJA plume before and after damage in nature and in the laboratory, and compared the activity of trans- and cis-MeJA in inducing PIs, nicotine, and Manduca sexta resistance in N. attenuata. We used both lanolin applications and aqueous sprays that mimic natural exposures, and we determined the amount of volatilized MeJA required to elicit a nicotine response in open-grown plants. Wounding rapidly and transiently increased cis-MeJA emissions from damaged parts (but not systemically), and the released plume did not rapidly dissipate in nature. cis-MeJA was not consistently more active than trans-MeJA, and the order of exposure (trans- then cis-) did not influence activity. We conclude that volatile MeJA, either trans- or cis-, when applied at levels consistent with those released by sagebrush does not elicit direct defenses in N. attenuata.

  12. An 8-Month Systems Toxicology Inhalation/Cessation Study in Apoe−/− Mice to Investigate Cardiovascular and Respiratory Exposure Effects of a Candidate Modified Risk Tobacco Product, THS 2.2, Compared With Conventional Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Blaine; Veljkovic, Emilija; Boué, Stéphanie; Schlage, Walter K.; Vuillaume, Gregory; Martin, Florian; Titz, Bjoern; Leroy, Patrice; Buettner, Ansgar; Elamin, Ashraf; Oviedo, Alberto; Cabanski, Maciej; De León, Héctor; Guedj, Emmanuel; Schneider, Thomas; Talikka, Marja; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cigarettes is a major risk factor in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) are being developed to reduce smoking-related health risks. The goal of this study was to investigate hallmarks of COPD and CVD over an 8-month period in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice exposed to conventional cigarette smoke (CS) or to the aerosol of a candidate MRTP, tobacco heating system (THS) 2.2. In addition to chronic exposure, cessation or switching to THS2.2 after 2 months of CS exposure was assessed. Engaging a systems toxicology approach, exposure effects were investigated using physiology and histology combined with transcriptomics, lipidomics, and proteomics. CS induced nasal epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia, lung inflammation, and emphysematous changes (impaired pulmonary function and alveolar damage). Atherogenic effects of CS exposure included altered lipid profiles and aortic plaque formation. Exposure to THS2.2 aerosol (nicotine concentration matched to CS, 29.9 mg/m3) neither induced lung inflammation or emphysema nor did it consistently change the lipid profile or enhance the plaque area. Cessation or switching to THS2.2 reversed the inflammatory responses and halted progression of initial emphysematous changes and the aortic plaque area. Biological processes, including senescence, inflammation, and proliferation, were significantly impacted by CS but not by THS2.2 aerosol. Both, cessation and switching to THS2.2 reduced these perturbations to almost sham exposure levels. In conclusion, in this mouse model cessation or switching to THS2.2 retarded the progression of CS-induced atherosclerotic and emphysematous changes, while THS2.2 aerosol alone had minimal adverse effects. PMID:26609137

  13. An 8-Month Systems Toxicology Inhalation/Cessation Study in Apoe-/- Mice to Investigate Cardiovascular and Respiratory Exposure Effects of a Candidate Modified Risk Tobacco Product, THS 2.2, Compared With Conventional Cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Blaine; Veljkovic, Emilija; Boué, Stéphanie; Schlage, Walter K; Vuillaume, Gregory; Martin, Florian; Titz, Bjoern; Leroy, Patrice; Buettner, Ansgar; Elamin, Ashraf; Oviedo, Alberto; Cabanski, Maciej; De León, Héctor; Guedj, Emmanuel; Schneider, Thomas; Talikka, Marja; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Smoking cigarettes is a major risk factor in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) are being developed to reduce smoking-related health risks. The goal of this study was to investigate hallmarks of COPD and CVD over an 8-month period in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice exposed to conventional cigarette smoke (CS) or to the aerosol of a candidate MRTP, tobacco heating system (THS) 2.2. In addition to chronic exposure, cessation or switching to THS2.2 after 2 months of CS exposure was assessed. Engaging a systems toxicology approach, exposure effects were investigated using physiology and histology combined with transcriptomics, lipidomics, and proteomics. CS induced nasal epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia, lung inflammation, and emphysematous changes (impaired pulmonary function and alveolar damage). Atherogenic effects of CS exposure included altered lipid profiles and aortic plaque formation. Exposure to THS2.2 aerosol (nicotine concentration matched to CS, 29.9 mg/m(3)) neither induced lung inflammation or emphysema nor did it consistently change the lipid profile or enhance the plaque area. Cessation or switching to THS2.2 reversed the inflammatory responses and halted progression of initial emphysematous changes and the aortic plaque area. Biological processes, including senescence, inflammation, and proliferation, were significantly impacted by CS but not by THS2.2 aerosol. Both, cessation and switching to THS2.2 reduced these perturbations to almost sham exposure levels. In conclusion, in this mouse model cessation or switching to THS2.2 retarded the progression of CS-induced atherosclerotic and emphysematous changes, while THS2.2 aerosol alone had minimal adverse effects.

  14. Ectopic localization of auxin and cytokinin in tobacco seedlings by the plant-oncogenic AK-6b gene of Agrobacterium tumefaciens AKE10.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Sachiko; Sato, Rui; Takahashi, Miho; Hashiba, Noriko; Ogawa, Atsushi; Toyofuku, Kyoko; Sawata, Taiki; Ohsawa, Yuki; Ueda, Kenji; Wabiko, Hiroetsu

    2013-10-01

    The oncogenic 6b gene of Agrobacterium tumefaciens induces a number of morphological and metabolic alterations in plants. Although molecular functions associated with the 6b genes have been proposed, including auxin transport, sugar transport, transcriptional regulation, and miRNA metabolism, so far an unequivocal conclusion has not been obtained. We investigated the association between auxin accumulation and tumor development of the tobacco seedlings expressing the AK-6b gene under the control of the dexamethasone-inducible promoter. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) localization was examined by immunochemical staining with monoclonal antibody against IAA and by histochemical analysis using the IAA-specific induced construct, DR5::GUS (β-glucuronidase). Both procedures indicated that IAA preferentially accumulated in the tumorous protrusions as well as in newly developing vascular bundles in the tumors. Furthermore, true leaves also showed abaxial IAA localization, leading to altered leaves in which the adaxial and abaxial identities were no longer evident. Co-localization of cytokinin and auxin in the abaxial tumors was verified by immunochemical staining with an antibody against cytokinin. Treatment of AK-6b-seedlings with N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of polar auxin transport, promoted the morphological severity of phenotypes, whereas 1-naphthoxyacetic acid, a specific auxin influx carrier inhibitor, induced tumor regression on cotyledons and new tumorous proliferations on hypocotyls. Prominent accumulation of both auxin and cytokinin was observed in both regressed and newly developing tumors. We suggest from these results that modulation of auxin/cytokinin localization as a result of AK-6b gene expression is responsible for the tumorous proliferation.

  15. Tobacco farmers and tobacco manufacturers: implications for tobacco control in tobacco-growing developing countries.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alison Snow; Austin, W David; Beach, Robert H; Altman, David G

    2008-12-01

    Assisting tobacco farmers to transition to non-tobacco alternatives is a key element of comprehensive tobacco control's end-game strategy and specifically required by the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC). We examine the historical relationship between tobacco manufacturers and tobacco farmers in the United States, where the duration of the relationship has been longest and use information obtained to inform possible end-game strategies for tobacco control advocates working with tobacco farmers in developing countries. Tobacco Documents obtained under the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) provide evidence of conflicts between tobacco manufacturers and tobacco farmers. Findings support WHO FCTC articles aimed at helping developing country tobacco farmers adversely affected by tobacco control efforts and highlight difficulties in discouraging tobacco cultivation as long as it remains relatively profitable. We conclude that successful end-game strategies should take a long-term approach aimed at building alliances with tobacco farmers and at creating mechanisms for tobacco farmer investment in local infrastructure.

  16. Maize plants infestation by Fusarium spp. and deoxynivalenol in genetically modified corn hybrid and traditional maize cultivars.

    PubMed

    Selwet, Marek

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the performed investigations was to isolate pathogenic fungi from contaminated maize cobs, to assess the appearance of maize cob fusariosis and to determine grain contamination with deoxynivalenol in the cultivation of genetically modified maize containing a gene resistance against European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis Hbn) as well as selected non-modified cultivars. The plant material comprised the following genetically modified maize cultivar: DKC 3421 YG (MON 810) and non-modified cultivars obtained from Smolice Plant Breeding Ltd., IHAR Group: Junak (FAO 210-220), Prosna (FAO 220), SMH (FAO 230), Baca (FAO 220). Prior to harvesting, the occurrence of maize cob fusariosis was determined in the 89 (BBCH) developmental ripening stage. Microbiological assessment was carried out on grains selected from cobs characterized by various pathological symptoms. In 2008, a total of 133 isolates was obtained from the examined samples of infected maize plants, of which 51 isolates were species-identified, while in 2009, the total of 123 isolates were determined, of which 63 were species-identified. In both experimental years, the majority of isolates contained fungi from the Fusarium genus. The performed analysis of mean levels of cob contamination by fusarioses revealed that DKC 3421 YG (MON 810) and SMH (FAO 230) cultivars showed the smallest levels of contamination as well as the lowest percent of cob contamination per plant, while Junak (FAO 210-220) and Baca (FAO 220) cultivars were characterized by the highest degree of contamination. The lowest deoxynivalenol concentrations were determined in years 2008 and 2009 in the case of the DKC 3421 YG (MON 810) cultivar, whereas Prosna (FAO 220) cultivar was characterized by the highest deoxynivalenol concentration.

  17. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from aqueous solution by raw and modified plant residue materials as biosorbents.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zemin; Chen, Baoliang

    2014-04-01

    Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), e.g., naphthalene, acenaphthene, phenanthrene and pyrene, from aqueous solution by raw and modified plant residues was investigated to develop low cost biosorbents for organic pollutant abatement. Bamboo wood, pine wood, pine needles and pine bark were selected as plant residues, and acid hydrolysis was used as an easily modification method. The raw and modified biosorbents were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The sorption isotherms of PAHs to raw biosorbents were apparently linear, and were dominated by a partitioning process. In comparison, the isotherms of the hydrolyzed biosorbents displayed nonlinearity, which was controlled by partitioning and the specific interaction mechanism. The sorption kinetic curves of PAHs to the raw and modified plant residues fit well with the pseudo second-order kinetics model. The sorption rates were faster for the raw biosorbents than the corresponding hydrolyzed biosorbents, which was attributed to the latter having more condensed domains (i.e., exposed aromatic core). By the consumption of the amorphous cellulose component under acid hydrolysis, the sorption capability of the hydrolyzed biosorbents was notably enhanced, i.e., 6-18 fold for phenanthrene, 6-8 fold for naphthalene and pyrene and 5-8 fold for acenaphthene. The sorption coefficients (Kd) were negatively correlated with the polarity index [(O+N)/C], and positively correlated with the aromaticity of the biosorbents. For a given biosorbent, a positive linear correlation between logKoc and logKow for different PAHs was observed. Interestingly, the linear plots of logKoc-logKow were parallel for different biosorbents. These observations suggest that the raw and modified plant residues have great potential as biosorbents to remove PAHs from wastewater.

  18. Plant species composition alters the sign and strength of an emergent multi-predator effect by modifying predator foraging behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wilby, Andrew; Anglin, Linda Anderson; Nesbit, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of pest-control functioning by multi-predator communities is hindered by the non-additive nature of species functioning. Such non-additivity, commonly termed an emergent multi-predator effect, is known to be affected by elements of the ecological context, such as the structure and composition of vegetation, in addition to the traits of the predators themselves. Here we report mesocosm experiments designed to test the influence of plant density and species composition (wheat monoculture or wheat and faba bean polyculture) on the emergence of multi-predator effects between Adalia bipunctata and Chrysoperla carnea, in their suppression of populations of the aphid Metopolophium dirhodum. The mesocosm experiments were followed by a series of behavioural observations designed to identify how interactions among predators are modified by plant species composition and whether these effects are consistent with the observed influence of plant species composition on aphid population suppression. Although plant density was shown to have no influence on the multi-predator effect on aphid population growth, plant composition had a marked effect. In wheat monoculture, Adalia and Chrysoperla mixed treatments caused greater suppression of M. dirhodum populations than expected. However this positive emergent effect was reversed to a negative multi-predator effect in wheat and faba bean polyculture. The behavioural observations revealed that although dominant individuals did not respond to the presence of faba bean plants, the behaviour of sub-dominants was affected markedly, consistent with their foraging for extra-floral nectar produced by the faba bean. This interaction between plant composition and predator community composition on the foraging behaviour of sub-dominants is thought to underlie the observed effect of plant composition on the multi-predator effect. Thus, the emergence of multi-predator effects is shown to be strongly influenced by plant species

  19. Engineering of gibberellin levels in citrus by sense and antisense overexpression of a GA 20-oxidase gene modifies plant architecture.

    PubMed

    Fagoaga, Carmen; Tadeo, Francisco R; Iglesias, Domingo J; Huerta, Laura; Lliso, Ignacio; Vidal, Ana M; Talon, Manuel; Navarro, Luís; García-Martínez, José L; Peña, Leandro

    2007-01-01

    Carrizo citrange (Citrus sinensisxPoncirus trifoliata) is a citrus hybrid widely used as a rootstock, whose genetic manipulation to improve different growth characteristics is of high agronomic interest. In this work, transgenic Carrizo citrange plants have been produced overexpressing sense and antisense CcGA20ox1 (a key enzyme of GA biosynthesis) under control of the 35S promoter to modify plant architecture. As expected, taller (sense) and shorter (antisense) phenotypes correlated with higher and lower levels, respectively, of active GA1 in growing shoots. In contrast, other phenotypic characteristics seemed to be specific to citrus, or different from those described for similar transgenics in other species. For instance, thorns, typical organs of citrus at juvenile stages, were much longer in sense and shorter in antisense plants, and xylem tissue was reduced in leaf and internode of sense plants. Antisense plants presented a bushy phenotype, suggesting a possible effect of GAs on auxin biosynthesis and/or transport. The main foliole of sense plants was longer, although total leaf area was reduced. Leaf thickness was smaller in sense and larger in antisense plants due to changes in the spongy parenchyma. Internode cell length was not altered in transgenic plants, indicating that, in citrus, GAs regulate cell division rather than cell elongation. Interestingly, the phenotypes described were not apparent when transgenic plants were grafted on non-transgenic rootstock. This suggests that roots contribute to the GA economy of aerial parts in citrus and opens the possibility of using the antisense plants as dwarfing rootstocks.

  20. [Tobacco quality analysis of producing areas of Yunnan tobacco using near-infrared (NIR) spectrum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Xiang; Wen, Ya-Dong; Yu, Chun-Xia; Wang, Luo-Ping; Zhao, Long-Lian; Li, Jun-Hui

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, tobacco quality analysis of different producing areas was carried out applying spectrum projection and correlation methods. The group of industrial classification data was near-infrared (NIR) spectrum in 2010 year of middle parts of tobacco plant from Hongta Tobacco (Group) Co., Ltd. Twelve hundred seventy six superior tobacco leaf samples were collected from four producing areas, in which three areas from Yuxi, Chuxiong and Zhaotong, in Yunnan province all belong to tobacco varieties of K326 and one area from Dali belongs to tobacco varieties of Hongda. The conclusion showed that when the samples were divided into two parts by the ratio of 2 : 1 randomly as analysis and verification sets, the verification set corresponded with the analysis set applying spectrum projection because their correlation coefficients by the first and second dimensional projection were all above 0.99. At the same time, The study discussed a method to get the quantitative similarity values of different producing areas samples. The similarity values were instructive in tobacco plant planning, quality management, acquisition of raw materials of tobacco and tobacco leaf blending.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-TIERED INSECT RESISTANCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FOR GENETICALLY MODIFIED CORN HYBRIDS EXPRESSING THE PLANT INCORPORATED PROTECTANT, BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A significant increase in genetically modified corn planting driven by biofuel demand is expected for the 2007 growing season with future planted acreages approaching 80% of total corn plantings anticipated by 2009. As demand increases, incidence of farmer non-compliance with ma...

  2. Evaluation of buffers toxicity in tobacco cells: Homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid) is a suitable buffer for plant cells studies at low pH.

    PubMed

    Borgo, Lucélia

    2017-03-19

    Low pH is an important environmental stressor of plant root cells. Understanding the mechanisms of stress and tolerance to acidity is critical; however, there is no widely accepted pH buffer for studies of plant cells at low pH. Such a buffer might also benefit studies of Al toxicity, in which buffering at low pH is also important. The challenge is to find a buffer with minimal cellular effects. We examined the cytotoxicity and possible metabolic disturbances of four buffers that have adequate pKa values and potential use for studies in the pH range of 4.0-5.0. These were homopipes (homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid); pKa1 4.4), 3,3-dimethylglutaric acid (pKa1 3.73), β-alanine (pKa1 3.70) and potassium biphthalate (pKa1 2.95; pKa2 5.41). First, tobacco BY-2 cells were grown in a rich medium containing 10 mM of each buffer or MES (2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid) as a control, with the pH initially adjusted to 5.7. β-alanine was clearly toxic and dimethylgluturate and biphthalate were found to be cytostatic, in which no culture growth occurred but cell viability was either unaffected or decreased only after 5 days. Only homopipes allowed normal culture growth and cell viability. Homopipes (10 mM) was then tested in cell cultures with an initial pH of 4.3 ± 0.17 in minimal medium to examine whether its undissociated species (H2A) displayed any cellular effects and no cytotoxic effects were observed. It is possible to conclude that among tested buffers, homopipes is the most suitable for studies at low pH, and may be especially useful for aluminum toxicity experiments.

  3. Grazing-induced effects on soil properties modify plant competitive interactions in semi-natural mountain grasslands.

    PubMed

    Medina-Roldán, Eduardo; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Bardgett, Richard D

    2012-09-01

    Plant-soil feedbacks are widely recognized as playing a significant role in structuring plant communities through their effects on plant-plant interactions. However, the question of whether plant-soil feedbacks can be indirectly driven by other ecological agents, such as large herbivores, which are known to strongly modify plant community structure and soil properties, remains poorly explored. We tested in a glasshouse experiment how changes in soil properties resulting from long-term sheep grazing affect competitive interactions (intra- and inter-specific) of two graminoid species: Nardus stricta, which is typically abundant under high sheep grazing pressure in British mountain grasslands; and Eriophorum vaginatum, whose abundance is typically diminished under grazing. Both species were grown in monocultures and mixtures at different densities in soils taken from adjacent grazed and ungrazed mountain grassland in the Yorkshire Dales, northern England. Nardus stricta performed better (shoot and root biomass) when grown in grazing-conditioned soil, independent of whether or not it grew under inter-specific competition. Eriophorum vaginatum also grew better when planted in soil from the grazed site, but this occurred only when it did not experience inter-specific competition with N. stricta. This indicates that plant-soil feedback for E. vaginatum is dependent on the presence of an inter-specific competitor. A yield density model showed that indirect effects of grazing increased the intensity of intra-specific competition in both species in comparison with ungrazed-conditioned soil. However, indirect effects of grazing on the intensity of inter-specific competition were species-specific favouring N. stricta. We explain these asymmetric grazing-induced effects on competition on the basis of traits of the superior competitor and grazing effects on soil nutrients. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our findings for plant community dynamics in grazed, semi

  4. When do plants modify fluvial processes? Plant-hydraulic interactions under variable flow and sediment supply rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, Rebecca B.; Wilcox, Andrew C.; Kui, Li; Lightbody, Anne F.; Stella, John C.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2015-02-01

    Flow and sediment regimes shape alluvial river channels; yet the influence of these abiotic drivers can be strongly mediated by biotic factors such as the size and density of riparian vegetation. We present results from an experiment designed to identify when plants control fluvial processes and to investigate the sensitivity of fluvial processes to changes in plant characteristics versus changes in flow rate or sediment supply. Live seedlings of two species with distinct morphologies, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) and cottonwood (Populus fremontii), were placed in different configurations in a mobile sand-bed flume. We measured the hydraulic and sediment flux responses of the channel at different flow rates and sediment supply conditions representing equilibrium (sediment supply = transport rate) and deficit (sediment supply < transport rate). We found that the hydraulic and sediment flux responses during sediment equilibrium represented a balance between abiotic and biotic factors and was sensitive to increasing flow rates and plant species and configuration. Species-specific traits controlled the hydraulic response: compared to cottonwood, which has a more tree-like morphology, the shrubby morphology of tamarisk resulted in less pronation and greater reductions in near-bed velocities, Reynolds stress, and sediment flux rates. Under sediment-deficit conditions, on the other hand, abiotic factors dampened the effect of variations in plant characteristics on the hydraulic response. We identified scenarios for which the highest stem-density patch, independent of abiotic factors, dominated the fluvial response. These results provide insight into how and when plants influence fluvial processes in natural systems.

  5. DECOMPOSTION OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED TOBACCO UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS: PERSISTENCE OF THE PROTEINASE INHIBITOR I PRODUCT AND EFFECTS OF SOIL MICROBIAL RESPIRATION AND PROTOZOA, NEMATODE AND MICROARTHR

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. To evaluate the potential effects of genetically engineered (transgenic) plants on soil ecosystems, litterbags containing leaves of non-engineered (parental) and transgenic tobacco plants were buried in field plots. The transgenic tobacco plants were genetically engineered to ...

  6. Imaging Spatial Reorganization of a MAPK Signaling Pathway Using the Tobacco Transient Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Dong, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Visualization of dynamic signaling events in live cells has been a challenge. We expanded an established transient expression system, the biomolecular fluorescent complementation (BiFC) assay in tobacco epidermal cells, from testing protein-protein interaction to monitoring spatial distribution of signal transduction in plant cells. In this protocol, we used the BiFC assay to show that the interaction and the signaling between the Arabidopsis MAPKKK YODA and MAPK6 occur at the plasma membrane. When the scaffold protein BASL was co-expressed, the YODA-MAPK interaction redistributed and spatially co-polarized with CFP-BASL. This modified tobacco expression system allows for quick examination of signaling localization and dynamic changes (less than 4 days) and can accommodate multiple of fluorescent protein colors (at least three). We also presented detailed methods to quantify protein distribution (asymmetric spatial localization, or "polarization") in tobacco cells. This advanced tobacco expression system has a potential to be used widely for quick testing of dynamic signaling events in live plant cells. PMID:27022690

  7. Transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing the two multifunctional sorghum cytochrome P450 enzymes, CYP79A1 and CYP71E1, are cyanogenic and accumulate metabolites derived from intermediates in Dhurrin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bak, S; Olsen, C E; Halkier, B A; Møller, B L

    2000-08-01

    Novel cyanogenic plants have been generated by the simultaneous expression of the two multifunctional sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) and Arabidopsis under the regulation of the constitutive 35S promoter. CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 catalyze the conversion of the parent amino acid tyrosine to p-hydroxymandelonitrile, the aglycone of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin. CYP79A1 catalyzes the conversion of tyrosine to p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime and CYP71E1, the subsequent conversion to p-hydroxymandelonitrile. p-Hydroxymandelonitrile is labile and dissociates into p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide, the same products released from dhurrin upon cell disruption as a result of pest or herbivore attack. In transgenic plants expressing CYP79A1 as well as CYP71E1, the activity of CYP79A1 is higher than that of CYP71E1, resulting in the accumulation of several p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime-derived products in the addition to those derived from p-hydroxymandelonitrile. Transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing only CYP79A1 accumulate the same p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime-derived products as transgenic plants expressing both sorghum cytochrome P450 enzymes. In addition, the transgenic CYP79A1 Arabidopsis plants accumulate large amounts of p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate. In transgenic Arabidopsis expressing CYP71E1, this enzyme and the enzymes of the pre-existing glucosinolate pathway compete for the p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime as substrate, resulting in the formation of small amounts of p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate. Cyanogenic glucosides are phytoanticipins, and the present study demonstrates the feasibility of expressing cyanogenic compounds in new plant species by gene transfer technology to improve pest and disease resistance.

  8. DNA staining with the fluorochromes EtBr, DAPI and YOYO-1 in the comet assay with tobacco plants after treatment with ethyl methanesulphonate, hyperthermia and DNase-I.

    PubMed

    Gichner, Tomás; Mukherjee, Anita; Velemínský, Jirí

    2006-06-16

    We applied the alkaline version of the single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay to roots and leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. xanthi) seedlings or isolated leaf nuclei treated with: (1) the alkylating agent ethyl methanesulphonate, (2) necrotic heat treatments at 50 degrees C, and (3) DNase-I. All three treatments induced a dose-dependent increase in DNA migration, expressed as percentage of tail DNA. A comparison of the fluorochrome DNA dyes ethidium bromide, DAPI and YOYO-1 demonstrated that for the alkaline version of the comet assay in plants, the commonly used fluorescent dye ethidium bromide can be used with the same efficiency as DAPI or YOYO-1.

  9. A 7-month cigarette smoke inhalation study in C57BL/6 mice demonstrates reduced lung inflammation and emphysema following smoking cessation or aerosol exposure from a prototypic modified risk tobacco product.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Blaine; Veljkovic, Emilija; Peck, Michael J; Buettner, Ansgar; Elamin, Ashraf; Guedj, Emmanuel; Vuillaume, Gregory; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Martin, Florian; Boué, Stéphanie; Schlage, Walter K; Schneider, Thomas; Titz, Bjoern; Talikka, Marja; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2015-06-01

    Modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) are designed to reduce smoking-related health risks. A murine model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was applied to investigate classical toxicology end points plus systems toxicology (transcriptomics and proteomics). C57BL/6 mice were exposed to conventional cigarette smoke (3R4F), fresh air (sham), or a prototypic MRTP (pMRTP) aerosol for up to 7 months, including a cessation group and a switching-to-pMRTP group (2 months of 3R4F exposure followed by fresh air or pMRTP for up to 5 months respectively). 3R4F smoke induced the typical adaptive changes in the airways, as well as inflammation in the lung, associated with emphysematous changes (impaired pulmonary function and alveolar damage). At nicotine-matched exposure concentrations of pMRTP aerosol, no signs of lung inflammation and emphysema were observed. Both the cessation and switching groups showed a similar reversal of inflammatory responses and no progression of initial emphysematous changes. A significant impact on biological processes, including COPD-related inflammation, apoptosis, and proliferation, was identified in 3R4F-exposed, but not in pMRTP-exposed lungs. Smoking cessation or switching reduced these perturbations to near sham-exposed levels. In conclusion, the mouse model indicated retarded disease progression upon cessation or switching to pMRTP which alone had no adverse effects.

  10. Assessing environmental impacts of genetically modified plants on non-target organisms: The relevance of in planta studies.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, Salvatore; Birch, A Nicholas E; Kiss, Jozsef; van Loon, Joop J A; Messéan, Antoine; Nuti, Marco; Perry, Joe N; Sweet, Jeremy B; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2017-04-01

    In legal frameworks worldwide, genetically modified plants (GMPs) are subjected to pre-market environmental risk assessment (ERA) with the aim of identifying potential effects on the environment. In the European Union, the EFSA Guidance Document introduces the rationale that GMPs, as well as their newly produced metabolites, represent the potential stressor to be evaluated during ERA. As a consequence, during several phases of ERA for cultivation purposes, it is considered necessary to use whole plants or plant parts in experimental protocols. The importance of in planta studies as a strategy to address impacts of GMPs on non-target organisms is demonstrated, to evaluate both effects due to the intended modification in plant phenotype (e.g. expression of Cry proteins) and effects due to unintended modifications in plant phenotype resulting from the transformation process (e.g. due to somaclonal variations or pleiotropic effects). In planta tests are also necessary for GMPs in which newly expressed metabolites cannot easily be studied in vitro. This paper reviews the scientific literature supporting the choice of in planta studies as a fundamental tool in ERA of GMPs in cultivation dossiers; the evidence indicates they can realistically mimic the ecological relationships occurring in their receiving environments and provide important insights into the biology and sustainable management of GMPs.

  11. Overexpression of ARGOS Genes Modifies Plant Sensitivity to Ethylene, Leading to Improved Drought Tolerance in Both Arabidopsis and Maize.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinrui; Habben, Jeffrey E; Archibald, Rayeann L; Drummond, Bruce J; Chamberlin, Mark A; Williams, Robert W; Lafitte, H Renee; Weers, Ben P

    2015-09-01

    Lack of sufficient water is a major limiting factor to crop production worldwide, and the development of drought-tolerant germplasm is needed to improve crop productivity. The phytohormone ethylene modulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to abiotic stress. Recent research has shown that modifying ethylene biosynthesis and signaling can enhance plant drought tolerance. Here, we report novel negative regulators of ethylene signal transduction in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). These regulators are encoded by the ARGOS gene family. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of maize ARGOS1 (ZmARGOS1), ZmARGOS8, Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1 (AtOSR1), and AtOSR2 reduced plant sensitivity to ethylene, leading to enhanced drought tolerance. RNA profiling and genetic analysis suggested that the ZmARGOS1 transgene acts between an ethylene receptor and CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 in the ethylene signaling pathway, affecting ethylene perception or the early stages of ethylene signaling. Overexpressed ZmARGOS1 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membrane, where the ethylene receptors and the ethylene signaling protein ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE2 and REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 reside. In transgenic maize plants, overexpression of ARGOS genes also reduces ethylene sensitivity. Moreover, field testing showed that UBIQUITIN1:ZmARGOS8 maize events had a greater grain yield than nontransgenic controls under both drought stress and well-watered conditions.

  12. Use of Native American imagery to sell tobacco.

    PubMed

    BlueEye, LaDonna

    2004-05-01

    The tobacco plant has been used in Native American communities in sacred, traditional and cultural ways prior to the arrival of Christopher Columbus. Early immigrants to North America were introduced to tobacco use by Native Americans and the plant was quickly turned into a commercial success in Europe. Native American images have been used for centuries to commercialize a product that once held only spiritual significance to American Indian tribes. This article provides a history of tobacco, from the sacred use by Native Americans, to the commercialism of tobacco in North America. Included is a review of early to current advertisements using Native American images.

  13. Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Administration authority to regulate tobacco products and marketing. The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids was a ... gives the FDA authority to regulate the manufacturing, marketing and sale of tobacco products National Tobacco Control ...

  14. Smokeless Tobacco and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Pregnancy Text Size: A A A Smokeless Tobacco and Your Health Can smokeless tobacco affect my ... tobacco use cause other health problems? Can smokeless tobacco affect my oral health? It may cause tooth ...

  15. Rainfall and soils modify plant community response to grazing in Serengeti National Park.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T Michael; Ritchie, Mark E; McNaughton, Samuel J

    2007-05-01

    Terrestrial plant community responses to herbivory depend on resource availability, but the separate influences of different resources are difficult to study because they often correlate across natural environmental gradients. We studied the effects of excluding ungulate herbivores on plant species richness and composition, as well as available soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), across eight grassland sites in Serengeti National Park (SNP), Tanzania. These sites varied independently in rainfall and available soil N and P. Excluding herbivores decreased plant species richness at all sites and by an average of 5.4 species across all plots. Although plant species richness was a unimodal function of rainfall in both grazed and ungrazed plots, fences caused a greater decrease in plant species richness at sites of intermediate rainfall compared to sites of high or low rainfall. In terms of the relative or proportional decreases in plant species richness, excluding herbivores caused the strongest relative decreases at lower rainfall and where exclusion of herbivores increased available soil P. Herbivore exclusion increased among-plot heterogeneity in species composition but decreased coexistence of congeneric grasses. Compositional similarity between grazed and ungrazed treatments decreased with increasing rainfall due to greater forb richness in exclosures and greater sedge richness outside exclosures and was not related to effects of excluding herbivores on soil nutrients. Our results show that plant resources, especially water and P, appear to modulate the effects of herbivores on tropical grassland plant diversity and composition. We show that herbivore effects on soil P may be an important and previously unappreciated mechanism by which herbivores influence plant diversity, at least in tropical grasslands.

  16. Expression of flowering locus T2 transgene from Pyrus communis L. delays dormancy and leaf senescence in Malus×domestica Borkh, and causes early flowering in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Freiman, Aviad; Golobovitch, Sara; Yablovitz, Zeev; Belausov, Eduard; Dahan, Yardena; Peer, Reut; Avraham, Lior; Freiman, Zohar; Evenor, Dalia; Reuveni, Moshe; Sobolev, Vladimir; Edelman, Marvin; Shahak, Yosepha; Samach, Alon; Flaishman, Moshe A

    2015-12-01

    Annual and perennial plants represent two different evolutionary strategies based on differential synchronization of their reproductive development. The mobile signal protein FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) plays a central role in mediating the onset of reproduction in both plant types. Two novel FT-like genes from pear (Pyrus communis)-PcFT1 and PcFT2-were isolated, and their expression profiles were determined for one annual cycle. The effects of PcFT2 on flowering were investigated in annual (tobacco) and perennial (apple) plants by means of grafting and generating transgenic plants. Long-distance graft transmission of PcFT2 in both annual and perennial plants was confirmed using a 35S::PcFT2-YFP construct. Ectopic overexpression of PcFT2 caused early flowering in tobacco but not in apple. Transgenic apples were less sensitive to short-day-induced dormancy, and this phenotype was also observed in wild-type apples grafted onto the transgenic plants. Comparison of PcFT2 protein structure to the paralogous FT proteins from apple and pear showed alterations that could influence protein structure and thus the florigen-activation complex. PcFT2 protein seems to function by promoting flowering as all other FT proteins in the annual plant tobacco while in the perennial plant apple PcFT2 does not promote flowering but delays senescence. This observation may hint to a modified function of FT2 in perennial plants.

  17. An Intergenic Region Shared by At4g35985 and At4g35987 in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Tissue Specific and Stress Inducible Bidirectional Promoter Analyzed in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Joydeep; Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Dey, Nrisingha; Houtz, Robert L.; Maiti, Indu Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    On chromosome 4 in the Arabidopsis genome, two neighboring genes (calmodulin methyl transferase At4g35987 and senescence associated gene At4g35985) are located in a head-to-head divergent orientation sharing a putative bidirectional promoter. This 1258 bp intergenic region contains a number of environmental stress responsive and tissue specific cis-regulatory elements. Transcript analysis of At4g35985 and At4g35987 genes by quantitative real time PCR showed tissue specific and stress inducible expression profiles. We tested the bidirectional promoter-function of the intergenic region shared by the divergent genes At4g35985 and At4g35987 using two reporter genes (GFP and GUS) in both orientations in transient tobacco protoplast and Agro-infiltration assays, as well as in stably transformed transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. In transient assays with GFP and GUS reporter genes the At4g35985 promoter (P85) showed stronger expression (about 3.5 fold) compared to the At4g35987 promoter (P87). The tissue specific as well as stress responsive functional nature of the bidirectional promoter was evaluated in independent transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco lines. Expression of P85 activity was detected in the midrib of leaves, leaf trichomes, apical meristemic regions, throughout the root, lateral roots and flowers. The expression of P87 was observed in leaf-tip, hydathodes, apical meristem, root tips, emerging lateral root tips, root stele region and in floral tissues. The bidirectional promoter in both orientations shows differential up-regulation (2.5 to 3 fold) under salt stress. Use of such regulatory elements of bidirectional promoters showing spatial and stress inducible promoter-functions in heterologous system might be an important tool for plant biotechnology and gene stacking applications. PMID:24260266

  18. Youth and Tobacco Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2,10 Community programs that reduce tobacco advertising, promotions, and availability of tobacco products 2,10 Some ... National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2016 ...

  19. Non-native earthworms promote plant invasion by ingesting seeds and modifying soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clause, Julia; Forey, Estelle; Lortie, Christopher J.; Lambert, Adam M.; Barot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms can have strong direct effects on plant communities through consumption and digestion of seeds, however it is unclear how earthworms may influence the relative abundance and composition of plant communities invaded by non-native species. In this study, earthworms, seed banks, and the standing vegetation were sampled in a grassland of central California. Our objectives were i) to examine whether the abundances of non-native, invasive earthworm species and non-native grassland plant species are correlated, and ii) to test whether seed ingestion by these worms alters the soil seed bank by evaluating the composition of seeds in casts relative to uningested soil. Sampling locations were selected based on historical land-use practices, including presence or absence of tilling, and revegetation by seed using Phalaris aquatica. Only non-native earthworm species were found, dominated by the invasive European species Aporrectodea trapezoides. Earthworm abundance was significantly higher in the grassland blocks dominated by non-native plant species, and these sites had higher carbon and moisture contents. Earthworm abundance was also positively related to increased emergence of non-native seedlings, but had no effect on that of native seedlings. Plant species richness and total seedling emergence were higher in casts than in uningested soils. This study suggests that there is a potential effect of non-native earthworms in promoting non-native and likely invasive plant species within grasslands, due to seed-plant-earthworm interactions via soil modification or to seed ingestion by earthworms and subsequent cast effects on grassland dynamics. This study supports a growing body of literature for earthworms as ecosystem engineers but highlights the relative importance of considering non-native-native interactions with the associated plant community.

  20. Smokeless Tobacco Consumption by Mexican-American University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Linda C.

    A modified version of the Illinois Department of Public Health Tobacco Use Survey was used to assess smokeless tobacco consumption among students attending a state university in New Mexico. Respondents included 65 male and 83 female Mexican-Americans, as well as 59 male and 118 female Anglo-Americans. Ages ranged from 16 to 67; subgroup median…

  1. Tobacco Induced Mutations: A Fun, Visually Impressive Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milholland, Rebecca B. R.; Hines, Stefani D.

    2004-01-01

    A modified version "Tobacco Induced Mutations" of Ames assay experiment provides a meaningful context for students to learn about the concept of mutations by using a known carcinogen that is tobacco. This experiment shows toxicological concept of the dose/response relationship and visually demonstrates when a mutation have occurred in bacteria…

  2. Opinion Building on a Socio-Scientific Issue: The Case of Genetically Modified Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekborg, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results from a study with the following research questions: (a) are pupils' opinions on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) influenced by biology teaching; and (b) what is important for the opinion pupils hold and how does knowledge work together with other parameters such as values? 64 pupils in an upper secondary school…

  3. Genetic basis and detection of unintended effects in genetically modified crop plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In January 2014, an international meeting sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency titled “Genetic Basis of Unintended Effects in Modified Plants” was held in Ottawa, Canada, bringing together over 75 s...

  4. A statistical simulation model for field testing of non-target organisms in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants

    PubMed Central

    Goedhart, Paul W; van der Voet, Hilko; Baldacchino, Ferdinando; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Genetic modification of plants may result in unintended effects causing potentially adverse effects on the environment. A comparative safety assessment is therefore required by authorities, such as the European Food Safety Authority, in which the genetically modified plant is compared with its conventional counterpart. Part of the environmental risk assessment is a comparative field experiment in which the effect on non-target organisms is compared. Statistical analysis of such trials come in two flavors: difference testing and equivalence testing. It is important to know the statistical properties of these, for example, the power to detect environmental change of a given magnitude, before the start of an experiment. Such prospective power analysis can best be studied by means of a statistical simulation model. This paper describes a general framework for simulating data typically encountered in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants. The simulation model, available as Supplementary Material, can be used to generate count data having different statistical distributions possibly with excess-zeros. In addition the model employs completely randomized or randomized block experiments, can be used to simulate single or multiple trials across environments, enables genotype by environment interaction by adding random variety effects, and finally includes repeated measures in time following a constant, linear or quadratic pattern in time possibly with some form of autocorrelation. The model also allows to add a set of reference varieties to the GM plants and its comparator to assess the natural variation which can then be used to set limits of concern for equivalence testing. The different count distributions are described in some detail and some examples of how to use the simulation model to study various aspects, including a prospective power analysis, are provided. PMID:24834325

  5. A statistical simulation model for field testing of non-target organisms in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Goedhart, Paul W; van der Voet, Hilko; Baldacchino, Ferdinando; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2014-04-01

    Genetic modification of plants may result in unintended effects causing potentially adverse effects on the environment. A comparative safety assessment is therefore required by authorities, such as the European Food Safety Authority, in which the genetically modified plant is compared with its conventional counterpart. Part of the environmental risk assessment is a comparative field experiment in which the effect on non-target organisms is compared. Statistical analysis of such trials come in two flavors: difference testing and equivalence testing. It is important to know the statistical properties of these, for example, the power to detect environmental change of a given magnitude, before the start of an experiment. Such prospective power analysis can best be studied by means of a statistical simulation model. This paper describes a general framework for simulating data typically encountered in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants. The simulation model, available as Supplementary Material, can be used to generate count data having different statistical distributions possibly with excess-zeros. In addition the model employs completely randomized or randomized block experiments, can be used to simulate single or multiple trials across environments, enables genotype by environment interaction by adding random variety effects, and finally includes repeated measures in time following a constant, linear or quadratic pattern in time possibly with some form of autocorrelation. The model also allows to add a set of reference varieties to the GM plants and its comparator to assess the natural variation which can then be used to set limits of concern for equivalence testing. The different count distributions are described in some detail and some examples of how to use the simulation model to study various aspects, including a prospective power analysis, are provided.

  6. The Role of Vacuolar Malate-Transport Capacity in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism and Nitrate Nutrition. Higher Malate-Transport Capacity in Ice Plant after Crassulacean Acid Metabolism-Induction and in Tobacco under Nitrate Nutrition1

    PubMed Central

    Lüttge, Ulrich; Pfeifer, Tanja; Fischer-Schliebs, Elke; Ratajczak, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    Anion uptake by isolated tonoplast vesicles was recorded indirectly via increased H+-transport by H+-pumping of the V-ATPase due to dissipation of the electrical component of the electrochemical proton gradient, ΔμH+, across the membrane. ATP hydrolysis by the V-ATPase was measured simultaneously after the Palmgren test. Normalizing for ATP-hydrolysis and effects of chloride, which was added to the assays as a stimulating effector of the V-ATPase, a parameter, Jmalrel, of apparent ATP-dependent malate-stimulated H+-transport was worked out as an indirect measure of malate transport capacity. This allowed comparison of various species and physiological conditions. Jmalrel was high in the obligate crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier, it increased substantially after CAM induction in ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum), and it was positively correlated with NO3− nutrition in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). For tobacco this was confirmed by measurements of malate transport energized via the V-PPase. In ice plant a new polypeptide of 32-kD apparent molecular mass appeared, and a 33-kD polypeptide showed higher levels after CAM induction under conditions of higher Jmalrel. It is concluded that tonoplast malate transport capacity plays an important role in physiological regulation in CAM and NO3− nutrition and that a putative malate transporter must be within the 32- to 33-kD polypeptide fraction of tonoplast proteins. PMID:11080309

  7. Development of modified flyash as a permeable reactive barrier medium for a former manufactured gas plant site, Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, R.; Phillips, D. H.; McGeough, K. L.; Walsh, K. P.; Kalin, R. M.

    2006-05-01

    A sequential biological permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was determined to be the best option for remediating groundwater that has become contaminated with a wide range of organic contaminants (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and polyaromatic hydrocarbons), heavy metals (i.e., lead and arsenic), and cyanide at a former manufactured gas plant after 150 years of operation in Portadown, Northern Ireland. The objective of this study was to develop a modified flyash that could be used in the initial cell within a sequential biological PRB to filter complex contaminated groundwater containing ammonium. Flyash modified with lime (CaOH) and alum was subjected to a series of batch tests which investigated the modified cation exchange capacity (CEC) and rate of removal of anions and cations from the solution. These tests showed that a high flyash composition medium (80%) could remove 8.65 mol of ammonium contaminant for every kilogram of medium. The modified CEC procedure ruled out the possibility of cation exchange as the major removal mechanism. The medium could also adsorb anions as well as cations (i.e., Pb and Cr), but not with the same capacity. The initial mechanism for Pb and Cr removal is probably precipitation. This is followed by sorption, which is possibly the only mechanism for the removal of dichromate anions. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed very small (<1 μm) cubic highly crystalline precipitates on the flyash, although this new crystalline zeolite growth did not occur rapidly enough to enable productive zeolite formation. Surface area measurements showed that biofilm growth on the medium could be a major factor in the comparative reduction of surface area between real and synthetic contaminant groundwaters. The modified flyash was found to be a highly sorptive granular material that did not inhibit microbiological activity, however, leaching tests revealed that the medium would fail as a long-term barrier material.

  8. Tobacco and Pregnancy

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper will review the epidemiology of the impact of cigarette smoking and other forms of tobacco exposure on human development. Sources of exposure described include cigarettes and other forms of smoked tobacco, secondhand (environmental) tobacco smoke, several forms of smok...

  9. Assessment of the carcinogenic N-nitrosodiethanolamine in tobacco products and tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Brunnemann, K.D.; Hoffmann, D.

    1981-01-01

    A simple, reproducible gas chromatography-thermal energy analyzer (g.c.-TEA) method has been developed for the analysis of N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA) in tobacco and tobacco smoke. The extract of tobacco or the trapped particulates of tobacco smoke are chromatographed on silica gel. The NDELA containing fractions are concentrated, silylated and analyzed with a modified g.c.-TEA system. (/sup 14/C)NDELA serves as internal standard for the quantitative analysis. Experimental cigarettes made from tobaccos which were treated with the sucker growth inhibitor maleic hydrazidediethanolamine (MH-DELA) contained 115--420 p.p.b. of NDELA and their smoke contained 20--290 ng/cigarette, whereas hand-suckered tobacco and its smoke were free of NDELA. The tobacco of US smoking products contained 115--420 p.p.b. of NDELA and the mainstream smoke from such products yielded 10--68 ng/cigar or cigarette. NDELA levels in chewing tobacco ranged from 220--280 p.p.b. and in two commercial snuff products were 3,200 and 6,800 p.p.b. Although the five analyzed MH-DELA preparations contained between 0.6--1.9 p.p.m. NDELA it is evident that the major portion of NDELA in tobacco is formed from the DELA residue during the tobacco processing. Based on bioassay data from various laboratories which have shown that NDELA is a relatively strong carcinogen and based on the results of this study the use of MH-DELA for the cultivation of tobacco is questioned.

  10. Physical stress modifies top-down and bottom-up forcing on plant growth and reproduction in a coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Daleo, Pedro; Alberti, Juan; Bruschetti, Carlos Martin; Pascual, Jesos; Iribarne, Oscar; Silliman, Brian R

    2015-08-01

    Bottom-up and top-down effects act together to exert strong control over plant growth and reproduction, but how physical stress modifies those interactive forces remains unclear. Even though empirical evidence is scarce, theory predicts that the importance of both top-down- and bottom-up forces may decrease as physical stress increases. Here, we experimentally evaluate in the field the separate and interactive effect of salinity, nutrient availability, and crab herbivory on plant above- and belowground biomass, as well as on sexual and clonal reproduction in the salt marsh plant Spartina densiflora. Results show that the outcome of the interaction between nutrient availability and herbivory is highly context dependent, not only varying with the abiotic context (i.e., with or without increased salinity stress), but also with the dependent variable considered. Contrary to theoretical predictions, our results show that, consistently across different measured variables, salinity stress did not cancel bottom-up (i.e., nutrients) or top-down (i.e., consumers) control, but has additive effects. Our results support emerging theory by highlighting that, under many conditions, physical stress can act additively with, or even stimulate, consumer control, especially in cases where the physical stress is only experienced by basal levels of the trophic chain. Abiotic stress, as well as bottom-up and top-down factors, can affect salt marsh structure and function not only by affecting biomass production but also by having other indirect effects, such as changing patterns in plant biomass allocation and reproduction.

  11. North Carolina Tobacco Farmers' Changing Perceptions of Tobacco Control and Tobacco Manufacturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crankshaw, Erik C.; Beach, Robert H.; Austin, W. David; Altman, David G.; Jones, Alison Snow

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine tobacco farmers' attitudes toward tobacco control, public health, and tobacco manufacturers in order to determine the extent to which rapidly changing economic conditions have influenced North Carolina tobacco farmer attitudes in ways that may provide tobacco control advocates with new opportunities to promote tobacco control…

  12. Genetically modified plants in phytoremediation of heavy metal and metalloid soil and sediment pollution.

    PubMed

    Kotrba, Pavel; Najmanova, Jitka; Macek, Tomas; Ruml, Tomas; Mackova, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Phytoremediation to clean up metal- and metalloid-contaminated soil or sediments has gained increasing attention as environmental friendly and cost effective. Achievements of the last decade suggest that genetic engineering of plants can be instrumental in improving phytoremediation. Transgenic approaches successfully employed to promote phytoextraction of metals (mainly Cd, Pb, Cu) and metalloids (As, Se) from soil by their accumulation in the aboveground biomass involved mainly implementation of metal transporters, improved production of enzymes of sulphur metabolism and production of metal-detoxifying chelators - metallothioneins and phytochelatins. Plants producing bacterial mercuric reductase and organomercurial lyase can covert the toxic ion or organomercury to metallic Hg volatized from the leaf surface. Phytovolatization of selenium compounds was promoted in plants overexpressing genes encoding enzymes involved in production of gas methylselenide species. This paper provides a broad overview of the evidence supporting suitability and prospects of transgenic research in phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids.

  13. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  14. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  15. A modified acidic approach for DNA extraction from plant species containing high levels of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, M M; Siqueira, M V B M; Val, T M; Pavanelli, J C; Monteiro, M; Grando, C; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Gimenes, M A

    2014-08-25

    Purified genomic DNA can be difficult to obtain from some plant species because of the presence of impurities such as polysaccharides, which are often co-extracted with DNA. In this study, we developed a fast, simple, and low-cost protocol for extracting DNA from plants containing high levels of secondary metabolites. This protocol does not require the use of volatile toxic reagents such as mercaptoethanol, chloroform, or phenol and allows the extraction of high-quality DNA from wild and cultivated tropical species.

  16. Cold Radiofrequency Plasma Treatment Modifies Wettability and Germination Speed of Plant Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Grynyov, Roman; Bormashenko, Yelena; Drori, Elyashiv

    2012-10-01

    We report the possibility to modify the wetting properties of the surfaces of a diversity of seeds including: lentils (Lens culinaris), beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and wheat (Triticum, species C9) by cold radiofrequency air plasma treatment. Air plasma treatment leads to the dramatic decrease in the apparent contact angle. Moreover, the speed of germination and yield (germination rate) of seeds can be modified by preliminary plasma treatment. The change in the wetting properties of seeds is at least partially due to oxidation of their surface under plasma treatment. Significant growth of the peaks corresponding to the nitrogen containing groups in the mass spectra of air plasma treated seeds was registered by TOF-SIMS spectroscopy.

  17. Cold radiofrequency plasma treatment modifies wettability and germination speed of plant seeds.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Grynyov, Roman; Bormashenko, Yelena; Drori, Elyashiv

    2012-01-01

    We report the possibility to modify the wetting properties of the surfaces of a diversity of seeds including: lentils (Lens culinaris), beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and wheat (Triticum, species C9) by cold radiofrequency air plasma treatment. Air plasma treatment leads to the dramatic decrease in the apparent contact angle. Moreover, the speed of germination and yield (germination rate) of seeds can be modified by preliminary plasma treatment. The change in the wetting properties of seeds is at least partially due to oxidation of their surface under plasma treatment. Significant growth of the peaks corresponding to the nitrogen containing groups in the mass spectra of air plasma treated seeds was registered by TOF-SIMS spectroscopy.

  18. Flood-Induced Changes in Soil Microbial Functions as Modified by Plant Diversity

    PubMed Central

    González Macé, Odette; Steinauer, Katja; Jousset, Alexandre; Eisenhauer, Nico; Scheu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Flooding frequency is predicted to increase during the next decades, calling for a better understanding of impacts on terrestrial ecosystems and for developing strategies to mitigate potential damage. Plant diversity is expected to buffer flooding effects by providing a broad range of species’ responses. Here we report on the response of soil processes to a severe summer flood in 2013, which affected major parts of central Europe. We compared soil microbial respiration, biomass, nutrient limitation and enzyme activity in a grassland biodiversity experiment in Germany before flooding, one week and three months after the flood. Microbial biomass was reduced in the severely flooded plots at high, but not at low plant functional group richness. Flooding alleviated microbial nitrogen limitation, presumably due the input of nutrient-rich sediments. Further, the activity of soil enzymes including 1,4-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase, phenol oxidase and peroxidase increased with flooding severity, suggesting increased chitin and lignin degradation as a consequence of the input of detritus in sediments. Flooding effects were enhanced at higher plant diversity, indicating that plant diversity temporarily reduces stability of soil processes during flooding. The long-term impacts, however, remain unknown and deserve further investigation. PMID:27870864

  19. Silicon modifies root anatomy, and uptake and subcellular distribution of cadmium in young maize plants

    PubMed Central

    Vaculík, Marek; Landberg, Tommy; Greger, Maria; Luxová, Miroslava; Stoláriková, Miroslava; Lux, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Silicon (Si) has been shown to ameliorate the negative influence of cadmium (Cd) on plant growth and development. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Here we describe the effect of Si on growth, and uptake and subcellular distribution of Cd in maize plants in relation to the development of root tissues. Methods Young maize plants (Zea mays) were cultivated for 10 d hydroponically with 5 or 50 µm Cd and/or 5 mm Si. Growth parameters and the concentrations of Cd and Si were determined in root and shoot by atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) and vascular tissues in roots were analysed, and the influence of Si on apoplasmic and symplasmic distribution of 109Cd applied at 34 nm was investigated between root and shoot. Key Results Si stimulated the growth of young maize plants exposed to Cd and influenced the development of Casparian bands and suberin lamellae as well as vascular tissues in root. Si did not affect the distribution of apoplasmic and symplasmic Cd in maize roots, but considerably decreased symplasmic and increased apoplasmic concentration of Cd in maize shoots. Conclusions Differences in Cd uptake of roots and shoots are probably related to the development of apoplasmic barriers and maturation of vascular tissues in roots. Alleviation of Cd toxicity by Si might be attributed to enhanced binding of Cd to the apoplasmic fraction in maize shoots. PMID:22455991

  20. Plant disease resistance is augmented in uzu barley lines modified in the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassinosteroid hormones regulate many aspects of plant growth and development and the membrane receptors BRI1 and BAK1 are central players in the upstream signaling cascade. Semi-dwarf ‘uzu’ barley carries a mutation in a conserved domain of the kinase tail of BRI1 and this mutant allele is recogni...

  1. A gene for plant protection: expression of a bean polygalacturonase inhibitor in tobacco confers a strong resistance against Rhizoctonia solani and two oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Borras-Hidalgo, Orlando; Caprari, Claudio; Hernandez-Estevez, Ingrid; Lorenzo, Giulia De; Cervone, Felice

    2012-01-01

    We have tested whether a gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) protects tobacco against a fungal pathogen (Rhizoctonia solani) and two oomycetes (Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae and Peronospora hyoscyami f. sp. tabacina). The trials were performed in greenhouse conditions for R. solani and P. parasitica and in the field for P. hyoscyami. Our results show that expression of PGIP is a powerful way of engineering a broad-spectrum disease resistance.

  2. Phosphorus deficiency modifies As translocation in the halophyte plant species Atriplex atacamensis.

    PubMed

    Vromman, Delphine; Martínez, Juan-Pablo; Lutts, Stanley

    2017-05-01

    Most arsenic in surface soil and water exists primarily in its oxidized form, as arsenate (As(V); AsO4(3-)), which is an analog of phosphate (PO4(3-)). Arsenate can be taken up by phosphate transporters. Atriplex atacamensis Phil. is native to northern Chile (Atacama Desert), and this species can cope with high As concentrations and low P availability in its natural environment. To determine the impact of P on As accumulation and tolerance in A. atacamensis, the plants were cultivated in a hydroponic system under four treatments: no As(V) addition with 323µM phosphate (control); 1000µM As(V) addition with 323µM phosphate; no As(V) and no phosphate; 1000µM As(V) addition and no phosphate. Phosphate starvation decreased shoot fresh weight, while As(V) addition reduced stem and root fresh weights. Arsenate addition decreased the P concentrations in both roots and leaves, but to a lesser extent than for P starvation. Phosphorus starvation increased the As concentrations in roots, but decreased it in shoots, which suggests that P deficiency reduced As translocation from roots to shoots. Arsenate addition increased total glutathione, but P deficiency decreased oxidized and reduced glutathione in As(V)-treated plants. Arsenate also induced an increase in S accumulation and nonprotein thiol and ethylene synthesis, and a decrease in K concentrations, effects that were similar for the P-supplied and P-starved plants. In contrast, in As(V)-treated plants, P starvation dramatically decreased total soluble protein content and increased lipid peroxidation, compared to plants supplied with P. Phosphorus nutrition thus appears to be an important component of A. atacamensis response to As toxicity.

  3. Differential accumulation of four phaseolin glycoforms in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Bustos, M M; Kalkan, F A; VandenBosch, K A; Hall, T C

    1991-03-01

    An intron-less phaseolin gene was used to express phaseolin polypeptides in transgenic tobacco plants. The corresponding amounts of phaseolin immunoreactive polypeptides and mRNA were similar to those found in plants transformed with a bean genomic DNA sequence that encodes an identical beta-phaseolin subunit. These results justified the use of the intron-less gene for engineering of the phaseolin protein by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Each and both of the two Asn residues that serve as glycan acceptors in wild-type phaseolin were modified to prevent N-linked glycosylation. Wild-type (beta wti-) and mutant phaseolin glycoforms (beta dgly1, beta dgly2 and beta dgly1,2) were localized to the protein body matrix by immunogold microscopy. Although quantitative slot-blot hybridization analysis showed similar levels of phaseolin mRNA in transgenic seed derived from all constructs, seed from the beta dgly1 and beta dgly2 mutations contained only 41% and 73% of that expressed from the wild-type control; even less (23%) was present in seed of plants transformed with the phaseolin beta dgly1,2 gene. Additionally, the profile of 25-29 kDa processed peptides was different for each of the glycoforms, indicating that processing of the full-length phaseolin polypeptides was modified. Thus, although targeting of phaseolin to the protein body was not eliminated by removal of the glycan side-chains, decreased accumulation and stability of the full-length phaseolin protein in transgenic tobacco seed were evident.

  4. Eliminating child labour in Malawi: a British American Tobacco corporate responsibility project to sidestep tobacco labour exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Otañez, M G; Muggli, M E; Hurt, R D; Glantz, S A

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine British American Tobacco and other tobacco industry support of the Eliminating Child Labour in Tobacco Growing Foundation. Design Analyses of internal tobacco industry documents and ethnographic data. Results British American Tobacco co‐founded the Eliminating Child Labour in Tobacco Growing Foundation (ECLT) in October 2000 and launched its pilot project in Malawi. ECLT's initial projects were budgeted at US$2.3 million over four years. Labour unions and leaf dealers, through ECLT funds, have undertook modest efforts such as building schools, planting trees, and constructing shallow wells to address the use of child labour in tobacco farming. In stark contrast, the tobacco companies receive nearly US$40 million over four years in economic benefit through the use of unpaid child labour in Malawi during the same time. BAT's efforts to combat child labour in Malawi through ECLT was developed to support the company's “corporate social responsibility agenda” rather than accepting responsibility for taking meaningful steps to eradicate child labour in the Malawi tobacco sector. Conclusion In Malawi, transnational tobacco companies are using child labour projects to enhance corporate reputations and distract public attention from how they profit from low wages and cheap tobacco. PMID:16728754

  5. [Detection of recombinant-DNA in foods from stacked genetically modified plants].

    PubMed

    Sorokina, E Iu; Chernyshova, O N

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction method was applied to the detection and quantification of MON863 and MON810 in stacked genetically modified maize MON 810xMON 863. The limit of detection was approximately 0,1%. The accuracy of the quantification, measured as bias from the accepted value and the relative repeatability standard deviation, which measures the intra-laboratory variability, were within 25% at each GM-level. A method verification has demonstrated that the MON 863 and the MON810 methods can be equally applied in quantification of the respective events in stacked MON810xMON 863.

  6. Genetic engineering of flavonoid pigments to modify flower color in floricultural plants.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in genetic transformation techniques enable the production of desirable and novel flower colors in some important floricultural plants. Genetic engineering of novel flower colors is now a practical technology as typified by commercialization of a transgenic blue rose and blue carnation. Many researchers exploit knowledge of flavonoid biosynthesis effectively to obtain unique flower colors. So far, the main pigments targeted for flower color modification are anthocyanins that contribute to a variety of colors such as red, pink and blue, but recent studies have also utilized colorless or faint-colored compounds. For example, chalcones and aurones have been successfully engineered to produce yellow flowers, and flavones and flavonols used to change flower color hues. In this review, we summarize examples of successful flower color modification in floricultural plants focusing on recent advances in techniques.

  7. Metal phytoremediation: General strategies, genetically modified plants and applications in metal nanoparticle contamination.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria Angélica da Conceição; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; de Souza, Adriane Nunes; Vitória, Angela Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The accumulation of metals in different environmental compartments poses a risk to both the environment and biota health. In particular, the continuous increase of these elements in soil ecosystems is a major worldwide concern. Phytoremediation has been gaining more attention in this regard. This approach takes advantage of the unique and selective uptake capabilities of plant root systems, and applies these natural processes alongside the translocation, bioaccumulation, and contaminant degradation abilities of the entire plant and, although it is a relatively recent technology, beginning in the 90's, it is already considered a green alternative solution to the problem of metal pollution, with great potential. This review focuses on phytoremediation of metals from soil, sludge, wastewater and water, the different strategies applied, the biological and physico-chemical processes involved and the advantages and limitations of each strategy. Special note is given to the use of transgenic species and phytoremediation of metallic nanoparticles.

  8. Bluegill growth as modified by plant density: an exploration of underlying mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Stein, Roy A.

    1992-01-01

    Bluegill (Lepomis macrochira) growth varies inconsistently with plant density. In laboratory and field experiments, we explored mechanisms underlying bluegill growth as a function of plant and invertebrate density. In the laboratory, bluegills captured more chironomids (Chironomus riparius) than damselflies (Enallagma spp. and Ischnura spp.), but energy intake per time spent searching did not differ between damselfly and chironomid treatments. From laboratory data, we described prey encounter rates as functions of plant and invertebrate density. In Clark Lake, Ohio, we created 0.05-ha mesocosms of inshore vegetation to generate macrophyte densities of 125, 270, and 385 stems/m2 of Potamogeton and Ceratophyllum and added 46-mm bluegill (1/m2). In these mesocosms, invertebrate density increased as a function of macrophyte density. Combining this function with encounter rate functions derived from laboratory data, we predicted that bluegill growth should peak at a high macrophyte density, greater than 1000 stems/m2, even though growth should change only slightly beyond 100 stems/m2. Consistent with our predictions, bluegills did not grow differentially, nor did their use of different prey taxa differ, across macrophyte densities in the field. Bluegills preferred chironomid pupae, which were relatively few in numbers but vulnerable to predation, whereas more cryptic, chironomid larvae, which were associated with vegetation but were relatively abundant, were eaten as encountered. Bluegill avoided physid snails. Contrary to previous work, vegetation did not influence growth or diet of bluegill beyond relatively low densities owing to the interaction between capture probabilities and macroinvertebrate densities.

  9. RNAi-mediated Mortality of the Whitefly through Transgenic Expression of Double-stranded RNA Homologous to Acetylcholinesterase and Ecdysone Receptor in Tobacco Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) is a pest and vector of plant viruses affecting plants worldwide. Using RNA interference (RNAi) to downregulate whitefly genes by expressing their homologous double stranded RNAs in plants has great potential for management of whiteflies to reduce plant virus dise...

  10. Cell cycle stage-specific differential expression of topoisomerase I in tobacco BY-2 cells and its ectopic overexpression and knockdown unravels its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Singh, Badri Nath; Mudgil, Yashwanti; John, Riffat; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Tripathy, Manas Kumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K; Kaul, Tanushri

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases catalyze the inter-conversion of different topological forms of DNA. Cell cycle coupled differential accumulation of topoisomerase I (Topo I) revealed biphasic expression maximum at S-phase and M/G1-phase of cultured synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells. This suggested its active role in resolving topological constrains during DNA replication (S-phase) and chromosome decondensation (M/G1 phase). Immuno-localization revealed high concentrations of Topo I in nucleolus. Propidium iodide staining and Br-UTP incorporation patterns revealed direct correlation between immunofluorescence intensity and rRNA transcription activity within nucleolus. Immuno-stained chromosomes during metaphase and anaphase suggested possible role of Topo I in resolving topological constrains during mitotic chromosome condensation. Inhibitor studies showed that in comparison to Topo I, Topo II was essential in resolving topological constrains during chromosome condensation. Probably, Topo II substituted Topo I functioning to certain extent during chromosome condensation, but not vice-versa. Transgenic Topo I tobacco lines revealed morphological abnormalities and highlighted its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development.

  11. Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic.

    PubMed

    Melamede, Robert

    2005-10-18

    More people are using the cannabis plant as modern basic and clinical science reaffirms and extends its medicinal uses. Concomitantly, concern and opposition to smoked medicine has occurred, in part due to the known carcinogenic consequences of smoking tobacco. Are these reactions justified? While chemically very similar, there are fundamental differences in the pharmacological properties between cannabis and tobacco smoke. Cannabis smoke contains cannabinoids whereas tobacco smoke contains nicotine. Available scientific data, that examines the carcinogenic properties of inhaling smoke and its biological consequences, suggests reasons why tobacco smoke, but not cannabis smoke, may result in lung cancer.

  12. Elk browsing increases aboveground growth of water-stressed willows by modifying plant architecture.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Danielle B; Cooper, David J; Hobbs, N Thompson

    2007-12-01

    In the northern elk wintering range of Yellowstone National Park, USA, wolf (Canis lupus) removal allowed elk (Cervus elaphus) to overbrowse riparian woody plants, leading to the exclusion of beaver (Castor canadensis) and a subsequent water table decline in many small stream valleys. Reduced elk browsing following wolf reintroduction may or may not facilitate willow (Salix sp.) recovery in these areas. To determine if the effect of elk browsing on willow interacts with that of beaver abandonment, we manipulated elk browsing and the water table in a factorial experiment. Under the condition of an ambient (low) water table, elk browsing increased shoot water potential (Psis), photosynthesis per unit leaf area (A), stomatal conductance per unit leaf area (gs), and aboveground current annual growth (CAG) by 50%. Elk browsing occurred entirely during dormancy and did not affect total plant leaf area (L). Improved water balance, photosynthetic rate, and annual aboveground productivity in browsed willows appeared to be due to morphological changes, such as increased shoot diameter and decreased branching, which typically increase plant hydraulic conductivity. An elevated water table increased Psis, A, gs, CAG, and L, and eliminated or lessened the positive effect of browsing on CAG for most species. Because low water tables create conditions whereby high willow productivity depends on the morphological effects of annual elk browsing, removing elk browsing in areas of water table decline is unlikely to result in vigorous willow stands. As large willow standing crops are required by beaver, a positive feedback between water-stressed willow and beaver absence may preclude the reestablishment of historical conditions. In areas with low water table, willow restoration may depend on actions to promote the re-establishment of beaver in addition to reducing elk browsing.

  13. Modified power law equations for vertical wind profiles. [in investigation of windpower plant siting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Richards, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    In an investigation of windpower plant siting, equations are presented and evaluated for a wind profile model which incorporates both roughness and wind speed effects, while retaining the basic simplicity of the Hellman power law. These equations recognize the statistical nature of wind profiles and are compatible with existing analytical models and recent wind profile data. Predictions of energy output based on the proposed profile equations are 10% to 20% higher than those made with the 1/7 power law. In addition, correlation between calculated and observed blade loads is significantly better at higher wind speeds when the proposed wind profile model is used than when a constant power model is used.

  14. Study of Indonesia low rank coal utilization on modified fixed bed gasification for combined cycle power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardianto, T.; Amalia, A. R.; Suwono, A.; Riauwindu, P.

    2015-09-01

    Gasification is a conversion process converting carbon-based solid fuel into gaseous products that have considerable amount of calorific value. One of the carbon-based solid fuel that serves as feed for gasification is coal. Gasification gaseous product is termed as syngas (synthetic gas) that