Science.gov

Sample records for modified tobacco plants

  1. Transgenic tobacco expressing a modified spider peptide inhibits the growth of plant pathogens and insect larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gene encoding lycotoxin I, an amphipathic pore-forming peptide, was modified to increase oral toxicity to insects. One of the most active modified genes was then constitutively expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and transformants were evaluated for insect and disease resistance. Pathogenic...

  2. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE BY TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in the plant tissues. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of tobacco plants in phytoremediation, a technology that employs plants to degrade,...

  3. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE BY TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in the plant tissues. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of tobacco plants in phytoremediation, a technology that employs plants to degrade,...

  4. Hybrid Rubisco of tomato large subunits and tobacco small subunits is functional in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Webb, James; Huang, Yi-Hong; Lin, Li; Tang, Ri-Sheng; Liu, Aimin

    2011-03-01

    Biogenesis of functional ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in plants requires specific assembly in the chloroplast of the imported, cytosol-synthesized small subunits (SS) with the chloroplast-made large subunits (LS). Accumulating evidence indicates that chloroplasts (plastids) generally have a low tolerance for assembling foreign or modified Rubisco. To explore Rubisco engineering, we created two lines of transplastomic tobacco plants whose rbcL gene was replaced by tomato-derived rbcL: plant LLS2 with Rubisco composed of tobacco SS and Q437R LS and plant LLS4 with a hybrid Rubisco of tobacco SS and tomato LS (representing four substitutions of Y226F, A230T, S279T and Q437R from tobacco LS). Plant LLS2 exhibited similar phenotypes as the wild type. Plant LLS4 showed lower chlorophyll and Rubisco levels particularly in young emerging leaves, lower photosynthesis rates and biomass during early stages of development, but was able to reach reproductive maturity and somewhat wild type-like phenotype under ambient CO₂ condition. In vitro assays detected similar carboxylase activity and RuBP affinity in LLS2 and LLS4 plants as in wild type. Our studies demonstrated that tomato LS was sufficiently assembled with tobacco SS into functional Rubisco. The hybrid Rubisco of tomato LS and tobacco SS can drive photosynthesis that supports photoautotrophic growth and reproduction of tobacco plants under ambient CO₂ and light conditions. We discuss the effect of these residue substitutions on Rubisco activity and the possible attribution of chlorophyll deficiency to the in planta photosynthesis performance in the hybrid Rubisco plants.

  5. Modified development in transgenic tobacco plants expressing a rolA::GUS translational fusion and subcellular localization of the fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Vilaine, F; Rembur, J; Chriqui, D; Tepfer, M

    1998-09-01

    The rolA gene is transferred naturally by Agrobacterium rhizogenes to the genome of host plants, where it induces dramatic changes in development of transformed plants, including dwarfism and leaf wrinkling. The predicted translation product of the rolA gene is a small (11.4 kDa), basic (pI = 11.2) protein, which has no clearly significant similarity to sequences in the data bases. We have introduced into the tobacco genome a gene encoding a rolA::GUS fusion protein. Expression of this gene led to synthesis of an RNA and a protein of expected size, and the transformed plants exhibited the dwarfism and leaf wrinkling typical of rolA plants, but to a lesser degree than plants transformed with the wild-type rolA gene. The distribution of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity was compared in subcellular fractions of leaf extracts from plants expressing either the rolA::gus gene or a control gus construct. As expected, in the control plants, GUS activity was essentially cytosolic. In contrast, in plants expressing the rolA::gus gene the highest specific activity was associated with the plasmalemma fraction.

  6. Infection of Plants by Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry; Maratos, Marina; Farabaugh, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Provides three exercises that introduce high school and college students to a common strain of the tobacco mosaic virus and the study of some basic biological processes. Activities involve inoculation of plants and observing and recording symptom development in infected plants. (DDR)

  7. Infection of Plants by Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry; Maratos, Marina; Farabaugh, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Provides three exercises that introduce high school and college students to a common strain of the tobacco mosaic virus and the study of some basic biological processes. Activities involve inoculation of plants and observing and recording symptom development in infected plants. (DDR)

  8. Increased Cysteine Biosynthesis Capacity of Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing an O-Acetylserine(thiol) Lyase Modifies Plant Responses to Oxidative Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Youssefian, Shohab; Nakamura, Michimi; Orudgev, Emin; Kondo, Noriaki

    2001-01-01

    O-Acetylserine(thiol) lyase (OASTL), a key enzyme of plant sulfur metabolism, catalyzes the formation of Cys from sulfide and O-acetylserine. The biosynthesis of Cys is regarded as the exclusive function of sulfur reduction in plants, and a key limiting step in the production of glutathione (GSH), a thiol implicated in various cellular functions, including sulfur transport, gene expression, scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. To examine whether an increased capacity for cysteine (Cys) biosynthesis alters cellular responses to such stresses, we studied the differential changes in thiol levels and ROS scavenging of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing the wheat (Triticum aestivum) OASTL gene, cys1, to SO2 and to the ROS generator, methyl viologen. Intracellular Cys and GSH contents were generally higher in cys1 transgenics than in controls under normal growth conditions, but became especially elevated in transgenic plants after SO2 exposure. An examination of differences in the ROS scavenging system of the transgenic plants also demonstrated the specific accumulation of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase transcripts, known to be induced by Cys or GSH, and elevated cellular superoxide dismutase activities. The transgenic plants accordingly showed dramatic reductions in the extent of both foliar and photooxidative damage in response to acute SO2, as well as reduced levels of chlorosis and membrane damage following methyl viologen treatment. Overall, our results imply that OASTL plays a pivotal role in the synthesis of Cys and GSH that are required for regulation of plant responses to oxidative stress. PMID:11457951

  9. Structural Characterization of Modified Lignin in Transgenic Tobacco Plants in Which the Activity of 4-Coumarate:Coenzyme A Ligase Is Depressed.

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, S.; Hishiyama, S.; Tomimura, Y.; Katayama, Y.; Omori, S.

    1997-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants in which the activity of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase is very low contain a novel lignin in their xylem. Details of changes in hydroxycinnamic acids bound to cell walls and in the structure of the novel lignin were identified by base hydrolysis, alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation, pyrolysis-gas chromatography, and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. In the brownish tissue of the transgenic plants, the levels of three hydroxycinnamic acids, p-coumaric, ferulic, and sinapic, which were bound to cell walls, were apparently increased as a result of down-regulation of the expression of the gene for 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase. Some of these hydroxycinnamic acids were linked to cell walls via ester and ether linkages. The accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acids also induced an increase in the level of condensed units in the novel lignin of the brownish tissue. Our data indicate that the behavior of some of the incorporated hydroxycinnamic acids resembles lignin monomers in the brownish tissue, and their accumulation results in dramatic changes in the biosynthesis of lignin in transgenic plants. PMID:12223748

  10. Enzymatic transamination of pyridoxamine in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Zhang, JianYun; Wu, Mei; Wu, Qiong; Huang, LongQuan

    2013-11-01

    Vitamin B6 (VB6) comprises a group of pyridine compounds that are involved in a surprisingly high diversity of biochemical reactions. Humans and animals depend largely on plants for their VB6 nutrition. Many studies have focused on biosynthesis of VB6 and comparatively little is known about VB6 metabolic conversion in plants. Recently, we have found that an efficient conversion pathway between pyridoxal (PL) and pyridoxamine (PM) is present in tobacco, but the catalytic enzyme remains an unsolved mystery. In this study, enzymes catalyzing the transamination of PM were purified from tobacco leaves and characterized. Our results suggest that a specific PM-pyruvate aminotranferase dominates the reversible transamination of PM in tobacco, and also show that the apo form of glutamic-oxaloacetic aminotranferase from tobacco, but not the holoenzyme, is able to catalyze the analogous transamination reaction between PM and either oxaloacetate or α-ketoglutarate. PM-pyruvate aminotranferase is involved in a degradation pathway for VB6 compounds in bacteria. Therefore, our study raises questions about whether the degradation pathway of VB6 exists in plants.

  11. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS: DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT KINETIC MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in plant tissues. This research determined the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. Three hydroponics growth studies were completed u...

  12. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS: DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT KINETIC MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in plant tissues. This research determined the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. Three hydroponics growth studies were completed u...

  13. Allergenicity assessment of genetically-modified tobacco expressing salt tolerance cbl gene.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Tuteja, Narendra; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2014-09-01

    It is mandatory to assess the allergenic potential of genetically modified (GM) crops before their commercialization. Recently, a transgene [Calcineurin B-like (CBL) protein] has been introduced into tobacco plant to make the crop salt resistance. Therefore, it was felt necessary to assess the allergenic potential of the cbl gene product, which was introduced and expressed in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plant and compared the allergenic effects with the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that there was no significant sequence homology with known allergens. Also, no difference between the protein digestibility profiles of GM and WT tobacco was found. Rapid digestion of CBL protein (Mol Wt 35 kDa) by simulated gastric fluid (SGF) indicated reduced chances of this protein to induce allergenicity. In addition, BALB/c mice sensitized by intraperitoneal administration of WT and GM tobacco protein showed comparable levels of clinical score, specific IgE, IgG1, histamine level, similar effect on different organs as well as IgE binding proteins. These findings indicate that insertion of cbl gene in tobacco did not cause any additional allergic risk to consumer and the GM and native tobacco proteins behave similarly in both in vitro and in vivo situations even after genetic modification.

  14. Postmarketing surveillance for "modified-risk" tobacco products.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acquired authority to regulate tobacco products in 2009. This authority will provide a structured process for manufacturers to introduce products that may have "modified-risk" for morbidity or mortality relative to traditional tobacco products, with postmarketing surveillance and studies a condition of marketing. A narrative review approach was taken. The author searched and integrated publicly accessible literature on tobacco product surveillance as well as drug and medical device postmarket activities currently performed by FDA. FDA relies on active and passive methods for postmarket surveillance and can require specific studies and risk evaluation and mitigation strategies for certain products, including those with abuse liability. Past efforts at examining the individual and population effects of reduced harm tobacco products provide an example of integrating different data streams. Postmarket surveillance can be viewed in terms of the Agent-Host-Vector-Environment model, and concepts from diffusion of innovations are relevant to understanding factors associated with the adoption of new products by the population. Given that active and passive surveillance approaches have different strengths and weaknesses, multiple approaches may be necessary to evaluate population-level effects. Assuring that required studies are properly conducted and reported and that data indicating significant public health harms are quickly recognized will be important going forward. The advent of broad regulatory authority over tobacco provides opportunities for policy evaluation research. The research community can provide FDA with the independent science it needs to evaluate the public health impact of novel tobacco products.

  15. 77 FR 20026 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Modified Risk Tobacco Product Applications; Availability; Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... grants FDA authority to regulate the manufacture, marketing, and distribution of tobacco products to... that, prior to marketing tobacco products for use to reduce harm or the risk of tobacco-related disease... introduction or delivery for introduction into interstate commerce of any modified risk tobacco product...

  16. Postmarketing Surveillance for “Modified-Risk” Tobacco Products

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acquired authority to regulate tobacco products in 2009. This authority will provide a structured process for manufacturers to introduce products that may have “modified-risk” for morbidity or mortality relative to traditional tobacco products, with postmarketing surveillance and studies a condition of marketing. Method: A narrative review approach was taken. The author searched and integrated publicly accessible literature on tobacco product surveillance as well as drug and medical device postmarket activities currently performed by FDA. Results: FDA relies on active and passive methods for postmarket surveillance and can require specific studies and risk evaluation and mitigation strategies for certain products, including those with abuse liability. Past efforts at examining the individual and population effects of reduced harm tobacco products provide an example of integrating different data streams. Discussion: Postmarket surveillance can be viewed in terms of the Agent–Host–Vector–Environment model, and concepts from diffusion of innovations are relevant to understanding factors associated with the adoption of new products by the population. Given that active and passive surveillance approaches have different strengths and weaknesses, multiple approaches may be necessary to evaluate population-level effects. Assuring that required studies are properly conducted and reported and that data indicating significant public health harms are quickly recognized will be important going forward. Conclusions: The advent of broad regulatory authority over tobacco provides opportunities for policy evaluation research. The research community can provide FDA with the independent science it needs to evaluate the public health impact of novel tobacco products. PMID:21330282

  17. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  18. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  19. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  20. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  1. 75 FR 2879 - Use of Tobacco Marketing Descriptors to Convey Modified Risk; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Use of Tobacco Marketing Descriptors to Convey Modified Risk... for interested parties to share information, research, and ideas on tobacco product marketing.... The Tobacco Control Act granted FDA important new authority to regulate the manufacture, marketing...

  2. Loss of alpha-tocopherol in tobacco plants with decreased geranylgeranyl reductase activity does not modify photosynthesis in optimal growth conditions but increases sensitivity to high-light stress.

    PubMed

    Grasses, T; Grimm, B; Koroleva, O; Jahns, P

    2001-08-01

    The enzyme geranylgeranyl reductase (CHL P) catalyses the reduction of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to phytyl diphosphate in higher-plant chloroplasts and provides phytol for both chlorophyll (Chl) and tocopherol synthesis. The reduction in CHL P activity in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants is accompanied by the reduction in total Chl and tocopherol content and the accumulation of geranylgeranylated Chl (ChlGG). The photosynthetic performance and the susceptibility to photo-oxidative stress have been investigated in these transgenic plants. The reduced total Chl content in Chl P antisense plants resulted in the reduction of electron transport chains per leaf area without a concomitant effect on the stoichiometry, composition and activity of both photosystems. However, Chl P antisense plants were much more sensitive to light stress. Analyses of Chl fluorescence quenching indicated an increased photoinhibitory quenching at the expense of the pH-dependent fluorescence quenching after short illumination (15 min) at moderate light intensities. Prolonged illumination (up to 1 h) at saturating light intensities induced an increased photoinactivation from which the Chl P antisense plants could not recover or could only partially recover during a subsequent low light phase. Our data imply that the presence of ChlGG has no influence on harvesting and transfer of light energy in either photosystem. However, the reduced tocopherol content of the thylakoid membrane is a limiting factor for defensive reactions to photo-oxidative stress.

  3. Pathogen resistance of transgenic tobacco plants producing caffeine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Soo; Sano, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a typical purine alkaloid, and produced by a variety of plants such as coffee and tea. Its physiological function, however, is not completely understood, but chemical defense against pathogens and herbivores, and allelopathic effects against competing plant species have been proposed. Previously, we constructed transgenic tobacco plants, which produced caffeine up to 5 microg per gram fresh weight of leaves, and showed them to repel caterpillars of tobacco cutworms (Spodoptera litura). In the present study, we found that these transgenic plants constitutively expressed defense-related genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR)-1a and proteinase inhibitor II under non-stressed conditions. We also found that they were highly resistant against pathogens, tobacco mosaic virus and Pseudomonas syringae. Expression of PR-1a and PR-2 was higher in transgenic plants than in wild-type plants during infection. Exogenously applied caffeine to wild-type tobacco leaves exhibited the similar resistant activity. These results suggested that caffeine stimulated endogenous defense system of host plants through directly or indirectly activating gene expression. This assumption is essentially consistent with the idea of chemical defense, in which caffeine may act as one of signaling molecules to activate defense response. It is thus conceivable that the effect of caffeine is bifunctional; direct interference with pest metabolic pathways, and activation of host defense systems.

  4. Endogenous Methyl Salicylate in Pathogen-Inoculated Tobacco Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Seskar, Mirjana; Shulaev, Vladimir; Raskin, Ilya

    1998-01-01

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivar Xanthi-nc (genotype NN) produces high levels of salicylic acid (SA) after inoculation with the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Gaseous methyl salicylate (MeSA), a major volatile produced in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants, was recently shown to be an airborne defense signal. Using an assay developed to measure the MeSA present in tissue, we have shown that in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants the level of MeSA increases dramatically, paralleling increases in SA. MeSA accumulation was also observed in upper, noninoculated leaves. In TMV-inoculated tobacco shifted from 32 to 24°C, the MeSA concentration increased from nondetectable levels to 2318 ng/g fresh weight 12 h after the temperature shift, but subsequently decreased with the onset of the hypersensitive response. Similar results were observed in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola, in which MeSA levels were highest just before the hypersensitive response-induced tissue desiccation. Transgenic NahG plants unable to accumulate SA also did not accumulate MeSA after TMV inoculation, and did not show increased resistance to TMV following MeSA treatment. Based on the spatial and temporal kinetics of its accumulation, we conclude that tissue MeSA may play a role similar to that of volatile MeSA in the pathogen-induced defense response.

  5. [Tobacco plant parts similarity analysis based on near-infrared spectroscopy and SIMCA algorithm].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Xia; Ma, Xiang; Zhang, Ye-Hui; Li, Jun-Hui; Zhao, Long-Lian; Xu, Li; Wen, Ya-Dong; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Lu-Da

    2011-04-01

    The appearance features of tobacco reflect its inner quality. Many factors, such as different plant parts, variety and maturity, provide standard and foundation for tobacco production processing. According to the different position of tobacco plant parts, tobacco plants leaves can be divided into five parts as tip, upper-middle, middle, lower-middle and priming leaf respectively. Five hundred tobacco leaf samples (100 each for one of five tobacco plant parts) from Yunnan province in 2008 were collected using near infrared spectroscopy, which all belong to tobacco varieties of K326. The similarity analysis of tobacco plant parts was carried out using mathematical model of SIMCA similarity analysis. The conclusion showed that the tobacco plant parts similarity results based on near-infrared spectroscopy corresponded to the relative tobacco plant parts in Yunnan province. The farther two tobacco plant parts were away from each other, the lower the similarity of corresponding parts was. And the similarity results of adjacent tobacco plant parts were different. The study discussed a method of confirming PC numbers and realized the quantitative similarity analysis between classes. It is instructive in replacement or adjustment of tobacco leaf blending and evaluation of tobacco industrial grading.

  6. Ethyl gallate displays elicitor activities in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Goupil, Pascale; Benouaret, Razik; Richard, Claire

    2017-09-29

    Alkyl gallates showed elicitor activities on tobacco in both whole plants and cell suspensions. Methyl gallate (MG), ethyl gallate (EG) and propyl gallate (PG) infiltration into tobacco leaves induced hypersensitive reaction-like lesions and topical production of autofluorescent compounds revealed under UV light. When sprayed on tobacco plants at 5 mM, EG promoted upregulation of defence-related genes such as the antimicrobial PR1, -1,3-glucanase PR2, chitinase PR3 and osmotin PR5 target genes. Tobacco BY-2 cells challenged with EG underwent cell death in 48 h, significantly reduced in the presence of the protease inhibitor aprotinin. The three alkyl gallates all caused alkalinisation of the BY-2 extracellular medium, whereas gallic acid did not trigger any pH variation. Using EGTA or LaCl3, we showed that Ca2+ mobilisation occurred in BY-2 cells elicited with EG. Overall, our findings are the first evidence of alkyl gallate elicitor properties with early perception events on plasma membrane, potential hypersensitive reactions and PR-related downstream defence responses in tobacco.

  7. Expression of the synthetic neutralizing epitope gene of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in tobacco plants without nicotine.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Jin; Kim, Young-Sook; Jang, Yong-Suk; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2005-03-18

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes acute diarrhea and dehydration in pigs, leading to death with a high mortality. In this study, the synthetic neutralizing epitope gene of PEDV, which was optimized based on the coding sequence of tobacco plant genes being modified, was expressed in the no-nicotine tobacco plants. The synthetic gene was cloned into the plant expression vector under the control of CaMV 35S promoter and transformed by an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The amount of synthetic epitope protein of PEDV detected in the transgenic tobacco plants was approximately 2.1% of the total soluble plant protein, which was approximately five-fold higher than that expressed with the native gene.

  8. [Effect of constitutive expression of ARGOS-LIKE gene on dimensions of cells and organs of transgenic tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Khiazev, A V; Safiullina, M G; Cemeris, A V

    2013-05-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress the ARGOS-LIKE (ARL) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana have been developed. The transgenic plants possessed increased dimensions of leaves and stem, whereas the magnitude of flowers was modified to a lesser degree. The increase in the organ dimensions was a result of stimulation of cell expansion; the cell quantity in the organ was even decreased. Ectopic expression of the ARL gene was promoted in order to increase in the level of mRNA of tobacco expansine NtEXPA5. It has been shown that the ARL gene of A. thaliana can be used to obtain transgenic plants with increased sizes of the leaves and stem.

  9. Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor on non-target soil organisms.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Maureen; Brownbridge, Michael; Stilwell, Wendy B; Gerard, Emily M; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Barraclough, Emma I; Christeller, John T

    2007-01-01

    Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express the protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor (BSTI) were examined in laboratory assays against three earthworm and one collembolan species. BSTI is a serine protease inhibitor that can bind to the digestive trypsins of insects feeding on modified plants, resulting in reduced growth and survival. Protease inhibitors are active against a broad range of insects, so may have a large impact on non-target organisms. Survival and fecundity of the collembolan Folsomia candida were unaffected by consumption of artificial diet containing BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf or powdered freeze-dried BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf that was added to soil. Similarly, mortality and growth of earthworms Aporrectodea caliginosa and Lumbricus rubellus did not differ significantly between soil augmented with BSTI-expressing tobacco leaves or unmodified control leaves. The redworm Eisenia fetida gained less weight when provided with BSTI-expressing leaves in one assay, but when the experiment was repeated, there was no significant difference between treatments. BSTI-expressing tobacco and unmodified control leaves decomposed at the same rate, indicating that the inhibitor had no effect on the overall function of the decomposer community of micro-flora and fauna in soil.

  10. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    1997-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  11. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    1998-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  12. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1998-10-20

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 67 figs.

  13. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1997-11-18

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 31 figs.

  14. 76 FR 36544 - Scientific Evaluation of Modified Risk Tobacco Product Applications; Public Workshop; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... produced by the consumption of that tobacco product, that may affect a disease or health-related condition... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Scientific Evaluation of Modified Risk Tobacco Product... of public workshop; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for...

  15. Localization of arginine decarboxylase in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Cristina; Cordeiro, Alexandra; Alcázar, Rubén; Borrell, Antoni; Culiañez-Macià, Francisco A.; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Altabella, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    The lack of knowledge about the tissue and subcellular distribution of polyamines (PAs) and the enzymes involved in their metabolism remains one of the main obstacles in our understanding of the biological role of PAs in plants. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis in plants. We have characterized a cDNA coding for ADC from Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1. The deduced ADC polypeptide had 721 amino acids and a molecular mass of 77 kDa. The ADC cDNA was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the ADC fusion protein obtained was used to produce polyclonal antibodies. Using immunological methods, we demonstrate the presence of the ADC protein in all plant organs analysed: flowers, seeds, stems, leaves and roots. Moreover, depending on the tissue, the protein is localized in two different subcellular compartments, the nucleus and the chloroplast. In photosynthetic tissues, ADC is located mainly in chloroplasts, whereas in non-photosynthetic tissues the protein appears to be located in nuclei. The different compartmentation of ADC may be related to distinct functions of the protein in different cell types.

  16. How Landscape Plants Modify the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Sylvia; Wise, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    Presents three experiments that provide examples of how plants modify their surroundings and create microenvironments. Examples demonstrate (1) how types of ground cover influence water quality; (2) how plants can create a thermal microenvironment; and (3) how plants can serve as barriers to wind. (MDH)

  17. [Nitrogen uptake and allocation characteristics of flue-cured tobacco in Nanxiong tobacco-planting area of Guangdong Province].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Xiao; Liu, Hua-Bing; Ke, You-Song; Wu, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Xiao-Quan; Qiu, Miao-Wen; Zhao, Wei-Cai; Yang, Tie-Zhao

    2011-06-01

    By the method of field in situ culture and 15N isotopic tracer technique, and taking flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum) cultivar K326 as test material, a field experiment was conducted in the Nanxiong tobacco-planting area of Guangdong Province to study the characteristics of soil nitrogen (N) mineralization, the patterns of N accumulation and allocation in tobacco plants, and the allocation of plant-absorbed fertilizer N applied in current growth season. In the study area, the amount of soil mineralized N increased with tobacco growth, peaked at 75 days after transplanting, and decreased thereafter. The soil mineralized N at each tobacco growth stage was significantly higher in the control than in the N fertilization treatment. The N accumulation in tobacco plant organs was in the order of leaf > stalk > root. Tobacco plants mainly absorbed fertilizer N at rosette stage and topping stage, and mainly absorbed soil N at mature stage. The absorbed N in tobacco whole growth period was mainly derived from soil N, and the absorbed soil N and its proportion to the total absorbed N increased evidently with extending growth stage and ascending leaf position. The fertilizer N use efficiency per plant and the residual rate and loss rate of applied fertilizer N were 30. 8%, 32. 3% , and 36. 9% , respectively. In the study area, soil N mineralization rate was relatively high, and soil N had greater effects on the quality of upper tobacco leaves. Under the application rate of 150 kg N x hm(-2), the residual amount and loss amount of applied fertilizer N were relatively high.

  18. Cytokinin Biosynthesis in Cultured Rootless Tobacco Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong-maw; Petschow, Bryon

    1978-01-01

    Biosynthesis of cytokinin in shoots was examined by growing rootless tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants in vitro. The rootless plants were originated by culturing tobacco callus on a high cytokinin-low auxin medium to induce the formation of plantlets which were then grown on medium without exogenous cytokinin and auxin. The rootless plants supplied with [14C]adenine synthesized ethanol-ethyl acetate-water-soluble radioactive components, portions of which had the same chromatographic and electrophoretic mobilities as N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine, N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenosine, 6-(4-hydroxy-3-methyl-2-butenylamino)purine and 6-(4-hydroxy-3-methyl-2-butenylamino)-9-β-d-ribofuranosylpurine. The total amount of these four major cytokinins was estimated to be present at a concentration of 14 to 23 nanomoles per kilogram of rootless plant. These data indicate that adenine serves as a precursor of the purine moiety of cytokinin molecules and that the cytokinin biosynthetic sites are also located in the shoot in addition to the presumed root sites. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:16660626

  19. Composition of hydroponic medium affects thorium uptake by tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Soudek, Petr; Kufner, Daniel; Petrová, Sárka; Mihaljevič, Martin; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2013-08-01

    The ability of thorium uptake as well as responses to heavy metal stress were tested in tobacco cultivar La Burley 21. Thorium was accumulated preferentially in the root system. The presence of citric, tartaric and oxalic acids in hydroponic medium increased thorium accumulation in all plant organs. On the other hand, the addition of diamines and polyamines, the important antioxidants in plants, resulted in decrease of thorium accumulation, especially in the root system. Negative correlation was found between putrescine concentration and thorium accumulation. Nevertheless, the most important factor influencing the accumulation of thorium was the absence of phosphate ions in a hydroponic medium that caused more than 10-fold increase of thorium uptake in all plant parts. Accumulation and distribution of thorium was followed in six cultivars and 14 selected transformants. Cultivar La Barley 21 represented an average between the tested genotypes, having a very good distribution ratio between roots, stems and leaves.

  20. Peroxidase-induced wilting in transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S. ); Rothstein, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases are a family of isoenzymes found in all higher plants. However, little is known concerning their role in growth, development or response to stress. Plant peroxidases are heme-containing monomeric glycoproteins that utilize either H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or O{sub 2} to oxidize a wide variety of molecules. To obtain more information on possible in planta functions of peroxidases, the authors have used a cDNA clone for the primary isoenzyme form of peroxidase to synthesize high levels of this enzyme in transgenic plants. They were able to obtain Nicotiana tabacum and N. sylvestris transformed plants with peroxidase activity that is 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA. The elevated peroxidase activity was a result of increased levels of two anionic peroxidases in N. tabacum, which apparently differ in post-translational modification. Transformed plants of both species have the unique phenotype of chronic severe wilting through loss of turgor in leaves, which was initiated a the time of flowering. The peroxidase-induced wilting was shown not to be an effect of diminished water uptake through the roots, decreased conductance of water through the xylem, or increased water loss through the leaf surface of stomata. Possible explanations for the loss of turgor, and the significance of these types of experiments in studying isoenzyme families, are discussed.

  1. Antibody degradation in tobacco plants: a predominantly apoplastic process

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Interest in using plants for production of recombinant proteins such as monoclonal antibodies is growing, but proteolytic degradation, leading to a loss of functionality and complications in downstream purification, is still a serious problem. Results In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the assembly and breakdown of a human IgG1κ antibody expressed in plants. Initial studies in a human IgG transgenic plant line suggested that IgG fragments were present prior to extraction. Indeed, when the proteolytic activity of non-transgenic Nicotiana tabacum leaf extracts was tested against a human IgG1 substrate, little activity was detectable in extraction buffers with pH > 5. Significant degradation was only observed when the plant extract was buffered below pH 5, but this proteolysis could be abrogated by addition of protease inhibitors. Pulse-chase analysis of IgG MAb transgenic plants also demonstrated that IgG assembly intermediates are present intracellularly and are not secreted, and indicates that the majority of proteolytic degradation occurs following secretion into the apoplastic space. Conclusions The results provide evidence that proteolytic fragments derived from antibodies of the IgG subtype expressed in tobacco plants do not accumulate within the cell, and are instead likely to occur in the apoplastic space. Furthermore, any proteolytic activity due to the release of proteases from subcellular compartments during tissue disruption and extraction is not a major consideration under most commonly used extraction conditions. PMID:22208820

  2. Are genetically modified plants useful and safe?

    PubMed

    Weil, Jacques-Henry

    2005-01-01

    So far, plants have been genetically modified essentially to achieve resistance to herbicides, or to pathogens (mainly insects, or viruses), but resistance to abiotic stresses (such as cold, heat, drought, or salt) is also being studied. Genetically modified (GM) plants with improved nutritional qualities have more recently been developed, such as plants containing higher proportions of unsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) in their oil (to prevent cardio-vascular diseases), or containing beta-carotene as in the golden rice (to prevent vitamin A deficiency). Possible risks for human health (such as the production of allergenic proteins), or for the environment (such as the appearance of superweeds as a result from gene flow), should be carefully studied, and a science-based assessment of benefits vs. risks should be made on a case by case basis, both for GM plants and for plants obtained by conventional breeding methods.

  3. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  4. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  5. Fungal endophytes: modifiers of plant disease.

    PubMed

    Busby, Posy E; Ridout, Mary; Newcombe, George

    2016-04-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated that non-pathogenic fungi within plant microbiomes, i.e., endophytes ("endo" = within, "phyte" = plant), can significantly modify the expression of host plant disease. The rapid pace of advancement in endophyte ecology warrants a pause to synthesize our understanding of endophyte disease modification and to discuss future research directions. We reviewed recent literature on fungal endophyte disease modification, and here report on several emergent themes: (1) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease span the full spectrum from pathogen antagonism to pathogen facilitation, with pathogen antagonism most commonly reported. (2) Agricultural plant pathosystems are the focus of research on endophyte disease modification. (3) A taxonomically diverse group of fungal endophytes can influence plant disease severity. And (4) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease severity are context-dependent. Our review highlights the importance of fungal endophytes for plant disease across a broad range of plant pathosystems, yet simultaneously reveals that complexity within plant microbiomes presents a significant challenge to disentangling the biotic environmental factors affecting plant disease severity. Manipulative studies integrating eco-evolutionary approaches with emerging molecular tools will be poised to elucidate the functional importance of endophytes in natural plant pathosystems that are fundamental to biodiversity and conservation.

  6. Genetically Modified Plants: Public and Scientific Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The potential of genetically modified plants to meet the requirements of growing population is not being recognized at present. This is a consequence of concerns raised by the public and the critics about their applications and release into the environment. These include effect on human health and environment, biosafety, world trade monopolies, trustworthiness of public institutions, integrity of regulatory agencies, loss of individual choice, and ethics as well as skepticism about the real potential of the genetically modified plants, and so on. Such concerns are enormous and prevalent even today. However, it should be acknowledged that most of them are not specific for genetically modified plants, and the public should not forget that the conventionally bred plants consumed by them are also associated with similar risks where no information about the gene(s) transfer is available. Moreover, most of the concerns are hypothetical and lack scientific background. Though a few concerns are still to be disproved, it is viewed that, with proper management, these genetically modified plants have immense potential for the betterment of mankind. In the present paper, an overview of the raised concerns and wherever possible reasons assigned to explain their intensity or unsuitability are reviewed. PMID:25937981

  7. Genetically modified plants: public and scientific perceptions.

    PubMed

    Rastogi Verma, Smita

    2013-01-01

    The potential of genetically modified plants to meet the requirements of growing population is not being recognized at present. This is a consequence of concerns raised by the public and the critics about their applications and release into the environment. These include effect on human health and environment, biosafety, world trade monopolies, trustworthiness of public institutions, integrity of regulatory agencies, loss of individual choice, and ethics as well as skepticism about the real potential of the genetically modified plants, and so on. Such concerns are enormous and prevalent even today. However, it should be acknowledged that most of them are not specific for genetically modified plants, and the public should not forget that the conventionally bred plants consumed by them are also associated with similar risks where no information about the gene(s) transfer is available. Moreover, most of the concerns are hypothetical and lack scientific background. Though a few concerns are still to be disproved, it is viewed that, with proper management, these genetically modified plants have immense potential for the betterment of mankind. In the present paper, an overview of the raised concerns and wherever possible reasons assigned to explain their intensity or unsuitability are reviewed.

  8. Expressions of thermostable bacterial cellulases in tobacco plant.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-ran; Zhou, Xiao-ya; Jiang, Wen-yan; Gao, Xiao-rong; Li, Wen-li

    2011-09-01

    An economical method for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass is to use plants as bioreactors for cellulases production. Two bacterial thermostable cellulases (E2 and E3) and a E3-E2 fusion form were expressed in tobacco, driven by a double 35S promoter and 5' TEV-UTL. The enzymes were targeted to the apoplast and cytosol via 5' signal peptides and 3' retention signal peptides, respectively, and all showed functional activities. All transgenic plants exhibited normal growth compared to wild type. Transgenic plants that expressed apoplast-localized E2 had the highest average activity, about 1.5 and 3 times higher than those expressed ER-localized and cytosolic E2, respectively. Effect of subcellular compartment localization was due primarily to post-transcriptional modification, since mRNA abundances were similar despite the range of cellulase activities obtained. The recombinant cellulases exhibited good thermostability below 65 °C. After storing for 3 days at -20 and 28 °C, the enzymes lost nearly 20 and 80% of activity, respectively. The results suggested a potential application for heterologous expression of cellulases in plant for biomass conversion. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  9. Plant Flavonoid Content Modified by Domestication.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Fuentes, Manuel; Parra, Leonardo; Lizama, Marcelo; Seguel, Ivette; Urzúa, Alejandro; Quiroz, Andrés

    2017-07-21

    Plant domestication can modify and weaken defensive chemical traits, reducing chemical defenses in plants and consequently their resistance against pests. We characterized and quantified the major defensive flavonols and isoflavonoids present in both wild and cultivated murtilla plants (Ugni molinae Turcz), established in a common garden. We examined their effects on the larvae of Chilesia rudis (Butler) (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae). Insect community and diversity indices were also evaluated. We hypothesized that domestication reduces flavonoid contents and modifies C. rudis preference, the insect community, and diversity. Methanolic extracts were obtained from leaves of U. molinae plants and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Results showed higher insect numbers (86.48%) and damage index (1.72 ± 0.16) in cultivated plants. Four new first records of insects were found associated with U. molinae. Diversity indices, such as Simpson, Shannon, and Margalef, were higher in cultivated plants than in wild plants. Furthermore, eight isoflavonoids were identified in U. molinae leaves for the first time. The five flavonols showed higher concentrations in wild U. molinae leaves (89.8 µg/g) than in cultivated plants (75.2 µg/g); however, no differences were found in isoflavonoids between wild and cultivated plants. The larvae of C. rudis consumed more leaf material of cultivated plants than wild plants in choice (3.8 vs. 0.8 mm2) and no-choice (7.5 vs. 3.0 mm2) assays. Our study demonstrates that domestication in U. molinae reduces the amount of flavonoids in leaves, increasing the preference of C. rudis and the insect community. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Genetically modified plants for law enforcement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.

    2002-08-01

    Plants are ubiquitous in the environment and have the unique ability to respond to their environment physiologically and through altered gene expression profiles (they cannot walk away). In addition, plant genetic transformation techniques and genomic information in plants are becoming increasingly advanced. We have been performing research to express the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) in plants. GFP emits green light when excited by blue or UV light. In addition, my group and collaborators have developed methods to detect GFP in plants by contact instruments and at a standoff. There are several law enforcement applications for this technology. One involves using tagging and perhaps modifying drug plants genetically. In one instance, we could tag them for destruction. In another, we could adulterate them directly. Another application is one that falls into the chemical terrorism and bioterrorism countermeasures category. We are developing plants to sense toxins and whole organisms covertly. Plants are well adapted to monitor large geographic areas; biosurveillance. Some examples of research being performed focus on plants with plant pathogen inducible promoters fused to GFP for disease sensing, and algae biosensors for chemicals.

  11. Plant coexistence can enhance phytoextraction of cadmium by tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Li, Yuefang; Tang, Jianjun; Hu, Liangliang; Chen, Xin

    2011-01-01

    A mesocosm experiment was conducted to investigate whether plant coexistence affects cadmium (Cd) uptake by plant in contaminated soil. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. K326) and Japanese clover (Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl.) were used. Cadmium was applied as 3CdSO4 x 8H2O in solution at three levels (0, 1, and 3 mg/kg soil) to simulate an unpolluted soil and soils that were slightly and moderately polluted with Cd. Tobacco (crop), Japanese clover (non-crop), and their combination were grown under each Cd treatment. Compared to monoculture and under all Cd treatments, co-planting with Japanese clover did not affect tobacco biomass but significantly increased Cd concentration in all tobacco tissues and enhanced Cd accumulation in tobacco shoots and roots. Compared to monoculture, co-planting reduced soil pH and increased Cd bioavailability. For tobacco, co-planting with Japanese clover increased the Cd bioconcentration factor (BCF) in Cd contaminated soil. Japanese clover also accumulated substantial quantities of Cd in shoots and roots. Thus, total Cd uptake by the plants was much greater with co-planting than with monoculture. The results suggested that phytoextraction can be effectively increased through tobacco co-planting with Japanese clover in mildly Cd-contaminated soil.

  12. Lung cancer biomarkers for the assessment of modified risk tobacco products: an oxidative stress perspective.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Frazer J; Luettich, Karsta; Gregg, Evan O

    2013-05-01

    Manufacturers have developed prototype cigarettes yielding reduced levels of some tobacco smoke toxicants, when tested using laboratory machine smoking under standardised conditions. For the scientific assessment of modified risk tobacco products, tests that offer objective, reproducible data, which can be obtained in a much shorter time than the requirements of conventional epidemiology are needed. In this review, we consider whether biomarkers of biological effect related to oxidative stress can be used in this role. Based on published data, urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine, thymidine glycol, F2-isoprostanes, serum dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbic acid ratio and carotenoid concentrations show promise, while 4-hydroxynonenal requires further qualification.

  13. Photosynthetic Gas Exchange and Discrimination against 13CO2 and C18O16O in Tobacco Plants Modified by an Antisense Construct to Have Low Chloroplastic Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T. G.; Flanagan, L. B.; Coleman, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    The physiological role of chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase (CA) was examined by antisense suppression of chloroplastic CA (on average 8% of wild type) in Nicotiana tabacum. Photosynthetic gas-exchange characteristics of low-CA and wild-type plants were measured concurrently with short-term, on-line stable isotope discrimination at varying vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and light intensity. Low-CA and wild-type plants were indistinguishable in the responses of assimilation, transpiration, stomatal conductance, and intercellular CO2 concentration to changing VPD or light intensity. At saturating light intensity, low-CA plants had lower discrimination against 13CO2 than wild-type plants by 1.2 to 1.8[per mille (thousand) sign]. Consequently, tissue of the low-CA plants was higher in 13C than the control plants. It was calculated that low-CA plants had chloroplast CO2 concentrations 13 to 22 [mu]mol mol-1 lower than wild-type plants. Discrimination against C18O16O in low-CA plants was 20% of that of the wild type, confirming a role of chloroplastic CA in the mechanism of discrimination against C18O16O ([delta]C18O16O). As VPD increased, stomatal closure caused a reduction in chloroplastic C02 concentration, and since VPD and chloroplastic CO2 concentration act in opposing directions on [delta]C18O16O, no effect of VPD was seen on [delta]C18O16O. PMID:12226395

  14. Photosynthetic Gas Exchange and Discrimination against 13CO2 and C18O16O in Tobacco Plants Modified by an Antisense Construct to Have Low Chloroplastic Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Williams, T. G.; Flanagan, L. B.; Coleman, J. R.

    1996-09-01

    The physiological role of chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase (CA) was examined by antisense suppression of chloroplastic CA (on average 8% of wild type) in Nicotiana tabacum. Photosynthetic gas-exchange characteristics of low-CA and wild-type plants were measured concurrently with short-term, on-line stable isotope discrimination at varying vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and light intensity. Low-CA and wild-type plants were indistinguishable in the responses of assimilation, transpiration, stomatal conductance, and intercellular CO2 concentration to changing VPD or light intensity. At saturating light intensity, low-CA plants had lower discrimination against 13CO2 than wild-type plants by 1.2 to 1.8[per mille (thousand) sign]. Consequently, tissue of the low-CA plants was higher in 13C than the control plants. It was calculated that low-CA plants had chloroplast CO2 concentrations 13 to 22 [mu]mol mol-1 lower than wild-type plants. Discrimination against C18O16O in low-CA plants was 20% of that of the wild type, confirming a role of chloroplastic CA in the mechanism of discrimination against C18O16O ([delta]C18O16O). As VPD increased, stomatal closure caused a reduction in chloroplastic C02 concentration, and since VPD and chloroplastic CO2 concentration act in opposing directions on [delta]C18O16O, no effect of VPD was seen on [delta]C18O16O.

  15. Tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    ... from poor households are frequently employed in tobacco farming to provide family income. These children are especially ... 19% of the world's population, meet the best practice for pictorial warnings, which includes the warnings in ...

  16. Isoprene emission protects photosynthesis but reduces plant productivity during drought in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette C; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Possell, Malcolm; Vickers, Claudia E; Purnell, Anna; Mullineaux, Philip M; Davies, William J; Dodd, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Isoprene protects the photosynthetic apparatus of isoprene-emitting plants from oxidative stress. The role of isoprene in the response of plants to drought is less clear. Water was withheld from transgenic isoprene-emitting and non-emitting tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, to examine: the response of isoprene emission to plant water deficit; a possible relationship between concentrations of the drought-induced phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and isoprene; and whether isoprene affected foliar reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation levels. Isoprene emission did not affect whole-plant water use, foliar ABA concentration or leaf water potential under water deficit. Compared with well-watered controls, droughted non-emitting plants significantly increased ROS content (31-46%) and lipid peroxidation (30-47%), concomitant with decreased operating and maximum efficiencies of photosystem II photochemistry and lower leaf and whole-plant water use efficiency (WUE). Droughted isoprene-emitting plants showed no increase in ROS content or lipid peroxidation relative to well-watered controls, despite isoprene emission decreasing before leaf wilting. Although isoprene emission protected the photosynthetic apparatus and enhanced leaf and whole-plant WUE, non-emitting plants had 8-24% more biomass under drought, implying that isoprene emission incurred a yield penalty. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Production of Haploid Tobacco Plants Using Anther Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert A.; Belzer, Norbert F.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a tobacco haploid experiment in which students learn the cytogenetic technique of metaphase analysis of chromosomes and experience the basic principles of haploidy, diploidy, and polyploidy. (YDS)

  18. Production of Haploid Tobacco Plants Using Anther Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert A.; Belzer, Norbert F.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a tobacco haploid experiment in which students learn the cytogenetic technique of metaphase analysis of chromosomes and experience the basic principles of haploidy, diploidy, and polyploidy. (YDS)

  19. A multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of five tobacco viruses in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Cheng, Julong; Huang, Ting; Zheng, Xuan; Wu, Yunfeng

    2012-07-01

    Tobacco viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco etch virus (TEV), Potato virus Y (PVY) and Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV) are major viruses infecting tobacco and can cause serious crop losses. A multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay was developed to detect simultaneously and differentiate all five viruses. The system used specific primer sets for each virus producing five distinct fragments 237, 273, 347, 456 and 547 bp, representing TMV, CMV subgroup I, TEV, PVY(O) and TVBMV, respectively. These primers were used for detection of the different viruses by single PCR and multiplex PCR and the results were confirmed by DNA sequencing analysis. The protocol was used to detect viruses from different parts of China. The simultaneous and sensitive detection of different viruses using the multiplex PCR is more efficient and economical than other conventional methods for tobacco virus detection. This multiplex PCR provides a rapid and reliable method for the detection and identification of major tobacco viruses, and will be useful for epidemiological studies.

  20. Effect of Yeast CTA1 Gene Expression on Response of Tobacco Plants to Tobacco Mosaic Virus Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Talarczyk, Andrzej; Krzymowska, Magdalena; Borucki, Wojciech; Hennig, Jacek

    2002-01-01

    The response of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Xanthi-nc) plants with elevated catalase activity was studied after infection by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). These plants contain the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) peroxisomal catalase gene CTA1 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The transgenic lines exhibited 2- to 4-fold higher total in vitro catalase activity than untransformed control plants under normal growth conditions. Cellular localization of the CTA1 protein was established using immunocytochemical analysis. Gold particles were detected mainly inside peroxisomes, whereas no significant labeling was detected in other cellular compartments or in the intercellular space. The physiological state of the transgenic plants was evaluated in respect to growth rate, general appearance, carbohydrate content, and dry weight. No significant differences were recorded in comparison with non-transgenic tobacco plants. The 3,3′-diaminobenzidine-stain method was applied to visualize hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the TMV infected tissue. Presence of H2O2 could be detected around necrotic lesions caused by TMV infection in non-transgenic plants but to a much lesser extent in the CTA1 transgenic plants. In addition, the size of necrotic lesions was significantly bigger in the infected leaves of the transgenic plants. Changes in the distribution of H2O2 and in lesion formation were not reflected by changes in salicylic acid production. In contrast to the local response, the systemic response in upper noninoculated leaves of both CTA1 transgenic and control plants was similar. This suggests that increased cellular catalase activity influences local but not systemic response to TMV infection. PMID:12114558

  1. Toxicity and DNA damage in tobacco and potato plants growing on soil polluted with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Gichner, Tomás; Patková, Zdenka; Száková, Jirina; Demnerová, Katerina

    2006-11-01

    Heterezygous tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. xanthi) and potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Korela) plants were cultivated on soil from the site Strimice which is highly polluted with heavy metals and on nonpolluted soil from the recreational site Jezerí, both in North Bohemia, Czech Republic. The total content, the content of bioavailable, easily mobile, and potentially mobile components of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in the tested soils, and the accumulation of these metals in the above-ground biomass and roots of tested plants were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry or flameless atomic absorption spectrometry. The average tobacco leaf area and potato plant height were significantly reduced in plants growing on the polluted soil. We have measured the DNA damage in nuclei of leaves of both plant species using the Comet assay. A small but significant increase in DNA damage was noted in plants growing on the polluted soil versus controls. As the tobacco and potato plants with increased DNA damage were severely injured (inhibited growth, distorted leaves), this increase may be associated with necrotic or apoptotic DNA fragmentation. No increase in the frequency of somatic mutation was detected in tobacco plants growing on the polluted soil. Thus, the polluted soil probably induced toxic but not genotoxic effects on tobacco and potato plants.

  2. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR THE UPTAKE, TRANSLOCATION, AND ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple mathematical model is being developed to describe the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. The model defines a plant as a set of compartments, consisting of mass balance differential equations and plant-specific physiological paramet...

  3. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR THE UPTAKE, TRANSLOCATION, AND ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple mathematical model is being developed to describe the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. The model defines a plant as a set of compartments, consisting of mass balance differential equations and plant-specific physiological paramet...

  4. [Effects of biochar on the micro-ecology of tobacco-planting soil and physiology of flue-cured tobacco].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Chen, Wei; Lin, Ye-chun; Cheng, Jian-zhong; Pan, Wen-jie

    2015-12-01

    Biochar is one of the research hotspots in the field of the agroforestry waste utilization. A field experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of different amounts of tobacco stem biochar (0, 1, 10, 50 t · hm⁻²) on soil micro-ecology and physiological properties of flue-cured tobacco. The results showed that soil water content (SWC) increased at all tobacco growth stages as the amounts of biochar applications increased. There were significant differences of SWC between the treatment of 50 t · hm⁻² and other treatments at the period of tobacco vigorous growth. As the application of biochar increased, the total soil porosity and capillary porosity increased, while soil bacteria, actinomyces, fungi amount increased firstly and then decreased. The amount of soil bacteria, actinomyces, fungi reached the maximum at the treatment of 10 t · hm⁻². Soil respiration rate (SRR) at earlier stage increased with the increase of biochar application. Compared with the control, SSR under biochar treatments increased by 7.9%-36.9%, and there were significant differences of SRR between high biochar application treatments (50 t · hm⁻² and 10 t · hm⁻²) and the control. Biochar improved leaf water potential, carotenoid and chlorophyll contents. Meanwhile, the dry mass of root, shoot and total dry mass under biochar application were higher than that of the control. These results indicated that the biochar played active roles in improving tobacco-planting soil micro-ecology and regulating physiological properties of flue-cured tobacco.

  5. Genetically modified plants and human health

    PubMed Central

    Key, Suzie; Ma, Julian K-C; Drake, Pascal MW

    2008-01-01

    Summary Genetically modified (or GM) plants have attracted a large amount of media attention in recent years and continue to do so. Despite this, the general public remains largely unaware of what a GM plant actually is or what advantages and disadvantages the technology has to offer, particularly with regard to the range of applications for which they can be used. From the first generation of GM crops, two main areas of concern have emerged, namely risk to the environment and risk to human health. As GM plants are gradually being introduced into the European Union there is likely to be increasing public concern regarding potential health issues. Although it is now commonplace for the press to adopt ‘health campaigns’, the information they publish is often unreliable and unrepresentative of the available scientific evidence. We consider it important that the medical profession should be aware of the state of the art, and, as they are often the first port of call for a concerned patient, be in a position to provide an informed opinion. This review will examine how GM plants may impact on human health both directly – through applications targeted at nutrition and enhancement of recombinant medicine production – but also indirectly, through potential effects on the environment. Finally, it will examine the most important opposition currently facing the worldwide adoption of this technology: public opinion. PMID:18515776

  6. [Transgenic tobacco plants with ribosome inactivating protein gene cassin from Cassia occidentalis and their resistance to tobacco mosaic virus].

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Li-Fang; Li, Hua-Ping

    2007-12-01

    Cassin, the new gene of ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) isolated from Cassia occidentalis, was inserted into expression vector pBI121 to produce plant expression vector pBI121-cassin (Figs.1, 2). pBI121-cassin was introduced into tobacco cultivar 'K326' by the Agrobacteriurm tumefaciens transformation method and more than 100 independent transformants were obtained. Southern blot hybridization analysis showed that a single gene locus was inserted into the chromosome of the transgenic tobacco lines (Fig.5) and PCR analysis of segregation population of progeny indicated that the inheritance of transgene was dominant in transgenic lines (Fig.4, Table 1). Results of RT-PCR and Northern blot hybridization analysis showed that transgene could be transcribed correctly (Figs.5, 6) . Three self-pollination lines of transgenic T(1) and T(2) were challenged with TMV at different concentration titers by mechanical inoculation. The transgenic lines exhibited different levels of resistance to TMV with the nontransgenic plants. After both titers of TMV concentration were inoculated, transgenic lines were considered as the highly resistant type with a delay of 4-13 d in development of symptoms and 10%-25% of test plants were infected, while nontransgenic control plants were susceptible typical symptoms on the newly emerged leaves (Table 2). One T(2) line, T(2)-8-2-1, was regarded as an immune type because it did not show any symptoms during 70 d and all plants were shown to be virus free by ELISA tests.

  7. A Genetically Modified Tobacco Mosaic Virus that can Produce Gold Nanoparticles from a Metal Salt Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Love, Andrew J.; Makarov, Valentine V.; Sinitsyna, Olga V.; Shaw, Jane; Yaminsky, Igor V.; Kalinina, Natalia O.; Taliansky, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    We genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to surface display a characterized peptide with potent metal ion binding and reducing capacity (MBP TMV), and demonstrate that unlike wild type TMV, this construct can lead to the formation of discrete 10–40 nm gold nanoparticles when mixed with 3 mM potassium tetrachloroaurate. Using a variety of analytical physicochemical approaches it was found that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and stable. Given that the MBP TMV can produce metal nanomaterials in the absence of chemical reductants, it may have utility in the green production of metal nanomaterials. PMID:26617624

  8. IN UTERO TOBACCO EXPOSURE EPIGENETICALLY MODIFIES PLACENTAL CYP1A1 EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Melissa; Abramovici, Adi; Showalter, Lori; Hu, Min; Shope, Cynthia Do; Varner, Michael; Aagaard-Tillery, Kjersti

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic pathways utilized by higher eukaryotic organisms to deal with potentially carcinogenic xenobiotic compounds from tobacco smoke have been well characterized. Carcinogenic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are metabolized sequentially in two-phases: in phase I CYP1A1 catalyzes conversion into harmful hydrophilic DNA adducts, while in phase II GSTT1 enables excretion via conjugation into polar electrophiles. In an effort to understand susceptibility to in utero tobacco exposure, we previously characterized known metabolic functional polymorphisms and demonstrated that while deletion of fetal GSTT1 significantly modified birth weight in smokers, no polymorphism fully accounted for fetal growth restriction. Since smoking upregulates CYP1A1 expression, we hypothesized that non-allelic (epigenetic) dysregulation of placental CYP1A1 expression via alterations in DNA methylation (meCpG) may further modify fetal growth. In the present manuscript, we compared placental expression of multiple CYP family members among gravidae, and observed significantly increased CYP1A1 expression among smokers relative to controls (4.4-fold, p<0.05). To fully characterize CYP1A1 meCpG status, bisulfite modification and sequencing of the entire proximal 1 kb promoter (containing 59 CpG sites) was performed. CpG sites immediately proximal to the 5′-XRE transcription factor binding element were significantly hypomethylated among smokers (55.6% vs 45.9% meCpG, p=0.027), a finding which uniquely correlated with placental gene expression (r=0.737, p=0.007). Thus in utero tobacco exposure significantly increases placental CYP1A1 expression in association with differential methylation at a critical XRE element. PMID:20462615

  9. In utero tobacco exposure epigenetically modifies placental CYP1A1 expression.

    PubMed

    Suter, Melissa; Abramovici, Adi; Showalter, Lori; Hu, Min; Shope, Cynthia Do; Varner, Michael; Aagaard-Tillery, Kjersti

    2010-10-01

    The metabolic pathways used by higher-eukaryotic organisms to deal with potentially carcinogenic xenobiotic compounds from tobacco smoke have been well characterized. Carcinogenic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are metabolized sequentially in 2 phases: in phase I, CYP1A1 catalyzes conversion into harmful hydrophilic DNA adducts, whereas in phase II, GSTT1 enables excretion via conjugation into polar electrophiles. In an effort to understand susceptibility to in utero tobacco exposure, we previously characterized known metabolic functional polymorphisms and demonstrated that although deletion of fetal GSTT1 significantly modified birth weight in smokers, no polymorphism fully accounted for fetal growth restriction. Because smoking up-regulates CYP1A1 expression, we hypothesized that nonallelic (epigenetic) dysregulation of placental CYP1A1 expression via alterations in DNA methylation (meCpG) may further modify fetal growth. In the present article, we compared placental expression of multiple CYP family members among gravidae and observed significantly increased CYP1A1 expression among smokers relative to controls (4.4-fold, P < .05). To fully characterize CYP1A1 meCpG status, bisulfite modification and sequencing of the entire proximal 1-kilobase promoter (containing 59 CpG sites) were performed. CpG sites immediately proximal to the 5′-xenobiotic response element transcription factor binding element were significantly hypomethylated among smokers (55.6% vs 45.9% meCpG, P = .027), a finding that uniquely correlated with placental gene expression (r = 0.737, P = .007). Thus, in utero tobacco exposure significantly increases placental CYP1A1 expression in association with differential methylation at a critical xenobiotic response element.

  10. Humans Have Antibodies against a Plant Virus: Evidence from Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruolan; Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Roberts, Andrew M.; Friedland, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a widespread plant pathogen, is found in tobacco (including cigarettes and smokeless tobacco) as well as in many other plants. Plant viruses do not replicate or cause infection in humans or other mammals. This study was done to determine whether exposure to tobacco products induces an immune response to TMV in humans. Using a sandwich ELISA assay, we detected serum anti-TMV antibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, IgA, and IgM) in all subjects enrolled in the study (20 healthy smokers, 20 smokeless-tobacco users, and 20 non-smokers). Smokers had a higher level of serum anti-TMV IgG antibodies than non-smokers, while the serum level of anti-TMV IgA from smokeless tobacco users was lower than smokers and non-smokers. Using bioinformatics, we also found that the human protein TOMM40L (an outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog – like translocase) contains a strong homology of six contiguous amino acids to the TMV coat protein, and TOMM40L peptide exhibited cross-reactivity with anti-TMV antibodies. People who smoke cigarettes or other tobacco products experience a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Our results showing molecular mimicry between TMV and human TOMM40L raise the question as to whether TMV has a potential role in smokers against Parkinson’s disease development. The potential mechanisms of molecular mimicry between plant viruses and human disease should be further explored. PMID:23573274

  11. Expression of a functional human adenosine deaminase in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Singhabahu, Sanjeewa; George, John; Bringloe, David

    2013-06-01

    An inherited disorder, adenosine deaminase deficiency is a form of severe combined immunodeficiency, which is ultimately caused by an absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway. The absence of ADA-activity in sufferers eventually results in a dysfunctional immune system due to the build-up of toxic metabolites. To date, this has been treated with mixed success, using PEG-ADA, made from purified bovine ADA coupled to polyethylene glycol. It is likely, however, that an enzyme replacement therapy protocol based on recombinant human ADA would be a more effective treatment for this disease. Therefore, as a preliminary step to produce biologically active human ADA in transgenic tobacco plants a human ADA cDNA has been inserted into a plant expression vector under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter and both human and TMV 5' UTR control regions. Plant vector expression constructs have been used to transform tobacco plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Genomic DNA, RNA and protein blot analyses have demonstrated the integration of the cDNA construct into the plant nuclear genome and the expression of recombinant ADA mRNA and protein in transgenic tobacco leaves. Western blot analysis has also revealed that human and recombinant ADA have a similar size of approximately 41 kDa. ADA-specific activities of between 0.001 and 0.003 units per mg total soluble protein were measured in crude extracts isolated from transformed tobacco plant leaves.

  12. Uncoupling Auxin and Ethylene Effects in Transgenic Tobacco and Arabidopsis Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, CP; Cooper, ML; Klee, HJ

    1993-01-01

    Overproduction of auxin in transgenic plants also results in the overproduction of ethylene. Plants overproducing both auxin and ethylene display inhibition of stem elongation and growth, increased apical dominance, and leaf epinasty. To determine the relative roles of auxin and ethylene in these processes, transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing the auxin-overproducing tryptophan monooxygenase transgene were crossed to plants expressing an ethylene synthesis-inhibiting 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase transgene. Tobacco and Arabidopsis plants with elevated auxin and normal levels of ethylene were obtained by this strategy. Transgenic auxin-overproducing Arabidopsis plants were also crossed with the ethylene-insensitive ein1 and ein2 mutants. Analysis of these plants indicates that apical dominance and leaf epinasty are primarily controlled by auxin rather than ethylene. However, ethylene is partially responsible for the inhibition of stem elongation observed in auxin-overproducing tobacco. Finally, these data show that auxin overproduction can be effectively uncoupled from ethylene overproduction in transgenic plants to enable direct manipulation of plant morphology for agronomic and horticultural purposes. PMID:12271061

  13. Identification of moisture content in tobacco plant leaves using outlier sample eliminating algorithms and hyperspectral data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Qinglin

    2016-02-26

    Fast identification of moisture content in tobacco plant leaves plays a key role in the tobacco cultivation industry and benefits the management of tobacco plant in the farm. In order to identify moisture content of tobacco plant leaves in a fast and nondestructive way, a method involving Mahalanobis distance coupled with Monte Carlo cross validation(MD-MCCV) was proposed to eliminate outlier sample in this study. The hyperspectral data of 200 tobacco plant leaf samples of 20 moisture gradients were obtained using FieldSpc(®) 3 spectrometer. Savitzky-Golay smoothing(SG), roughness penalty smoothing(RPS), kernel smoothing(KS) and median smoothing(MS) were used to preprocess the raw spectra. In addition, Mahalanobis distance(MD), Monte Carlo cross validation(MCCV) and Mahalanobis distance coupled to Monte Carlo cross validation(MD-MCCV) were applied to select the outlier sample of the raw spectrum and four smoothing preprocessing spectra. Successive projections algorithm (SPA) was used to extract the most influential wavelengths. Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) was applied to build the prediction models based on preprocessed spectra feature in characteristic wavelengths. The results showed that the preferably four prediction model were MD-MCCV-SG (Rp(2) = 0.8401 and RMSEP = 0.1355), MD-MCCV-RPS (Rp(2) = 0.8030 and RMSEP = 0.1274), MD-MCCV-KS (Rp(2) = 0.8117 and RMSEP = 0.1433), MD-MCCV-MS (Rp(2) = 0.9132 and RMSEP = 0.1162). MD-MCCV algorithm performed best among MD algorithm, MCCV algorithm and the method without sample pretreatment algorithm in the eliminating outlier sample from 20 different moisture gradients of tobacco plant leaves and MD-MCCV can be used to eliminate outlier sample in the spectral preprocessing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Uptake of Cadmium by Flue-Cured Tobacco Plants: Exploring Bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, I.; Robarge, W. P.; Vann, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific understanding of cadmium (Cd) cycling in North Carolina tobacco plants and soils has lagged, even as production of flue-cured tobacco remains an important part of the NC economy ($903 million in 2014). Cd is considered a tobacco contaminant. When tobacco is burned, Cd can exist as a fine aerosol and subsequent inhalation is linked to cancer. Tobacco root exudates enhance Cd uptake, even though the Cd concentration in NC soils is <0.1 mg/kg. Quantifying Cd concentrations in tobacco plants is crucial to understanding Cd bioavailability and implementing soil remediation efforts. The objective of this study was to develop a Cd mass balance for flue-cured tobacco grown under field conditions in NC. Whole plant samples were collected at transplanting and every 2 weeks thereafter until harvest. Individual plants were segregated into root, stalk and individual leaves (n = 15 whole plants/sampling date; composite samples were taken early in the growing season). After recording dry mass, samples were analyzed using ion-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry or ion-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lower leaves contained the highest Cd concentrations ( 7-10 mg/kg). Leaves occupying the upper 50% of the plant had Cd concentrations of 2 mg/kg. Uptake rate was greatest from day 27 to 66 ( 21.5 μg Cd/day). Selective Cd uptake appears evident between day 27 and 43, but overall the relative rate of Cd uptake was similar to other trace metals and micronutrients. Cd distribution within the plants mirrored the distribution of calcium, a macronutrient. Of the 8 mg of soil extractable Cd (0.075 mg/kg) in the rooting zone, 15.0% (1203 μg) is removed by uptake. Of this 15%, 64.2% (772.2 μg) is exported at harvest, and 35.8% (430.8 μg; lower leaves, roots, stalks) is returned to the soil. This study must be replicated to account for seasonal and soil variations. These results do inform selection of tobacco strains that limit uptake of trace metals, particularly Cd.

  15. Modification of tobacco plant development by sense and antisense expression of the tomato viroid-induced AGC VIIIa protein kinase PKV suggests involvement in gibberellin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Rosemarie W; Zhao, Yan

    2009-08-18

    The serine-threonine protein kinase gene, designated pkv (protein kinase- viroid induced) was previously found to be transcriptionally activated in tomato plants infected with the plant pathogen Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). These plants exhibited symptoms of stunting, and abnormal development of leaf, root, and vascular tissues. The encoded protein, PKV, is a novel member of the AGC VIIIa group of signal-transducing protein kinases; however, the role of PKV in plant development is unknown. In this communication, we report the phenotypic results of over expression and silencing of pkv in transgenic tobacco. Over expression of pkv in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi (tobacco) resulted in stunting, reduced root formation, and delay in flowering, phenotypes similar to symptoms of PSTVd infection of tomato. In addition, homozygous T2 tobacco plants over expressing PKV were male sterile. Antisense expression of pkv, on the other hand, resulted in plants that were taller than non-transformed plants, produced an increased number of flowers, and were fertile. Exogenous application of GA3 stimulated stem elongation in the stunted, sense-expressing plants. PKV sense and antisense expression altered transcript levels of GA biosynthetic genes and genes involved in developmental and signaling pathways, but not genes involved in salicylic acid- or jasmonic acid-dependent pathways. Our data provide evidence suggesting that PKV plays an important role in a GA signaling pathway that controls plant height and fertility. We have found that the over expression of the tomato protein kinase PKV resulted in stunting, modified vascular tissue development, reduced root formation, and male sterility in tobacco, and we propose that PKV regulates plant development by functioning in critical signaling pathways involved in gibberellic acid metabolism.

  16. Ecogenomic survey of plant viruses infecting Tobacco by Next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ibukun A; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Benguo; Qi, Shuishui; Wu, Qingfa

    2016-11-04

    The invasion of plant by viruses cause major damage to plants and reduces crop yield and integrity. Devastating plant virus infection has been experienced at different times all over the world, which are attributed to different events of mutation, re-assortment and recombination occurring in the viruses. Strategies for proper virus management has been mostly limited to eradicating the vectors that spreads the plant viruses. However, development of prompt and effective diagnostic methods are required to monitor emerging and re-emerging diseases that may be symptomatic or asymptomatic in the plant as well as the genetic variation and evolution in the plant viruses. A survey of plant viruses infecting field-grown Tobacco crop was conducted in Anhui Province of China by the deep sequencing of sRNAs. Survey of plant viruses infecting Tobacco was carried based on 104 samples collected across the province. Nine different sRNA libraries was prepared and custom-made bioinformatics pipeline coupled with molecular techniques was developed to sequence, assemble and analyze the siRNAs for plant virus discovery. We also carried out phylogenetic and recombination analysis of the identified viruses. Twenty two isolates from eight different virus species including Cucumber mosaic virus, Potato virus Y, Tobacco mosaic virus, Tobacco vein banding Mosaic virus, Pepper mottle virus, Brassica yellow virus, Chilli venial mottle virus, Broad bean wilt virus 2 were identified in tobacco across the survey area. The near-complete genome sequence of the 22 new isolates were determined and analyzed. The isolates were grouped together with known strains in the phylogenetic tree. Molecular variation in the isolates indicated the conserved coding regions have majorly a nucleotide sequence identity of 80-94 % with previously identified isolates. Various events of recombination were discovered among some of the isolates indicating that two or more viruses or different isolates of one virus infect

  17. Metabolic flux analysis in complex isotopolog space. Recycling of glucose in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Ettenhuber, Christian; Radykewicz, Tanja; Kofer, Waltraud; Koop, Hans-Ulrich; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2005-02-01

    Tobacco plants grown in vitro were supplied with a mixture of [U-13C6]glucose and unlabelled sucrose via the root system. After 20 days, leaves were harvested and extracted with water. Glucose was isolated from the extract and was analysed by 13C NMR spectroscopy. All 13C signals appeared as complex multiplets due to 13C-13C coupling. The abundance of 21 isotopologous glucose species was determined from the 13C NMR signal integrals by numerical deconvolution using a genetic algorithm. The relative fractions of specific isotopologs in the overall excess of 13C-labelled specimens establish flux contributions via glycolysis/glucogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, citric acid cycle and Calvin cycle including 13CO2 refixation. The fluxes were modelled and reconstructed in silico by a novel rule-based approach yielding the contributions of circular pathways and the degree of multiple cycling events. The data indicate that the vast majority of the proffered [U-13C6]glucose molecules had been modified by catabolism and subsequent glucogenesis from catabolic fragments, predominantly via passage through the citric acid cycle and the pentose phosphate pathway.

  18. Spectral reflectance, chlorophyll fluorescence and virological investigations of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Hristova, Dimitrina; Iliev, Ilko; Yanev, Tony

    Application of multispectral remote sensing techniques to plant condition monitoring has been adopted for various purposes. Remote sensing is a reliable tool for detecting signs of vege-tation stress and diseases. Spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence are functions of tissue optical properties and biological status of the plants, and illumination conditions. The mean reflectance spectrum depends on the relative composition of all the pigments in the leaf including chlorophylls, carotenoids etc. Chlorophyll fluorescence results from the primary re-actions of photosynthesis and during the last decade it finds widening application as a means for revelation of stress and diseases. The changes in chlorophyll function take place before the alteration in chlorophyll content to occur so that changes in the fluorescence signal arise before any visible signs are apparent. The aim of our investigations was to study the development and spreading out of a viral infection on the leaves of two cultivars tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We applied two remote sensing tech-niques (spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements) for evaluation of the changes in the optical properties of the plants in accordance to their physiological status. The serological analyses via the Double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) were made with appropriate kits (Leowe, Germany) for quantitative assessment of the concentration of viruses in the plants. The tobacco plants were grown in green house under controlled conditions. The first cultivar Nevrocop 1146 is known as resistive to the TMV, i.e. it shows hypersensitive response. The second cultivar named Krumovgrad is normally sen-sitive to the TMV. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, up to one leaf from 20 plants for each cultivar were inoculated with TMV. The leaves opposite to the infected ones formed the group of control (untreated) leaves. The

  19. The 2b silencing suppressor of a mild strain of Cucumber mosaic virus alone is sufficient for synergistic interaction with Tobacco mosaic virus and induction of severe leaf malformation in 2b-transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shahid A; Valkonen, Jari P T; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Lehto, Kirsi

    2011-06-01

    Tobacco plants infected simultaneously by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) are known to produce a specific synergistic disease in which the emerging leaves are filiformic. Similar developmental malformations are also caused to a lesser extent by the severe strains (e.g., Fny) of CMV alone, but mild strains (e.g., Kin) cause them only in mixed infection with TMV. We show here that transgenic tobacco plants expressing 2b protein of CMV-Kin produce filiformic symptoms when infected with TMV, indicating that only 2b protein is needed from CMV-Kin for this synergistic relationship. On the other hand, transgenic plants that express either the wild-type TMV genome or a modified TMV genome with its coat protein deleted or movement protein (MP) inactivated also develop filiformic or at least distinctly narrow leaves, while plants expressing the MP alone do not develop any malformations when infected with CMV-Kin. These results show that either TMV helicase/replicase protein or active TMV replication are required for this synergistic effect. The effect appears to be related to an efficient depletion of silencing machinery, caused jointly by both viral silencing suppressors, i.e., CMV 2b protein and the TMV 126-kDa replicase subunit.

  20. Tobacco plants over-expressing the sweet orange tau glutathione transferases (CsGSTUs) acquire tolerance to the diphenyl ether herbicide fluorodifen and to salt and drought stresses.

    PubMed

    Lo Cicero, Luca; Madesis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Lo Piero, Angela Roberta

    2015-08-01

    The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are members of a superfamily of enzymes with pivotal role in the detoxification of both xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. In this work, the generation and characterization of transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing tau glutathione transferases from Citrus sinensis (CsGSTU1 and CsGSTU2) and several cross-mutate forms of these genes are reported. Putative transformed plants were verified for the presence of the transgenes and the relative quantification of transgene copy number was evaluated by Taqman real time PCR. The analysis of gene expression revealed that transformed plants exhibit high levels of CsGSTU transcription suggesting that the insertion of the transgenes occurred in transcriptional active regions of the tobacco genome. In planta studies demonstrate that transformed tobacco plants gain tolerance against fluorodifen. Simultaneously, the wild type CsGSTU genes were in vitro expressed and their kinetic properties were determined using fluorodifen as substrate. The results show that CsGSTU2 follows a Michaelis-Menten hyperbolic kinetic, whereas CsGSTU1 generates a sigmoid plot typical of the regulatory enzymes, thus suggesting that when working at sub-lethal fluorodifen concentrations CsGSTU2 can counteract the herbicide injury more efficiently than the CsGSTU1. Moreover, the transgenic tobacco plant over-expressing CsGSTs exhibited both drought and salinity stress tolerance. However, as we show that CsGSTUs do not function as glutathione peroxidase in vitro, the protective effect against salt and drought stress is not due to a direct scavenging activity of the oxidative stress byproducts. The transgenic tobacco plants, which are described in the present study, can be helpful for phytoremediation of residual xenobiotics in the environment and overall the over-expression of CsGSTUs can be helpful to develop genetically modified crops with high resistance to abiotic stresses.

  1. Efficient virus-induced gene silencing in plants using a modified geminivirus DNA1 component.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changjun; Xie, Yan; Zhou, Xueping

    2009-04-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is currently recognized as a powerful reverse genetics tool for application in functional genomics. DNA1, a satellite-like and single-stranded DNA molecule associated with begomoviruses (Family Geminiviridae), has been shown to replicate autonomously but requires the helper virus for its dissemination. We developed a VIGS vector based on the DNA1 component of tobacco curly shoot virus (TbCSV), a monopartite begomovirus, by inserting a multiple cloning site between the replication-associated protein open reading frame and the A-rich region for subsequent insertion of DNA fragments of genes targeted for silencing. When a host gene (sulphur, Su) or transgene (green fluorescent protein, GFP) was inserted into the modified DNA1 vector and co-agroinoculated with TbCSV, efficient silencing of the cognate gene was observed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. More interestingly, we demonstrated that this modified DNA1 could effectively suppress GFP in transgenic N. benthamiana or endogenous Su in tobacco plants when co-agroinoculated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), another monopartite begomovirus that does not induce any viral symptoms. A gene-silencing system in Nicotiana spp., Solanum lycopersicum and Petunia hybrida plants was then established using TYLCCNV and the modified DNA1 vector. The system can be used to silence genes involved in meristem and flower development. The modified DNA1 vector was used to silence the AtTOM homologous genes (NbTOM1 and NbTOM3) in N. benthamiana. Silencing of NbTOM1 or NbTOM3 can reduce tobamovirus multiplication to a lower level, and silencing of both genes simultaneously can completely inhibit tobamovirus multiplication. Previous studies have reported that DNA1 is associated with both monopartite and bipartite begomoviruses, as well as curtoviruses. This vector system can therefore be applied for the study, analysis and discovery of gene function in a variety of important crop plants.

  2. Dynamic metabonomic responses of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingtao; Zhang, Yong; Du, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shiyun; Tang, Huiru

    2011-04-01

    Metabolic responses are important for plant adaptation to osmotic stresses. To understand the dosage and duration dependence of salinity effects on plant metabolisms, we analyzed the metabonome of tobacco plants and its dynamic responses to salt treatments using NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that the tobacco metabonome was dominated by 40 metabolites including organic acids/bases, amino acids, carbohydrates and choline, pyrimidine, and purine metabolites. A dynamic trajectory was clearly observable for the tobacco metabonomic responses to the dosage of salinity. Short-term low-dose salt stress (50 mM NaCl, 1 day) caused metabolic shifts toward gluconeogenesis with depletion of pyrimidine and purine metabolites. Prolonged salinity with high-dose salt (500 mM NaCl) induced progressive accumulation of osmolytes, such as proline and myo-inositol, and changes in GABA shunt. Such treatments also promoted the shikimate-mediated secondary metabolisms with enhanced biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Therefore, salinity caused systems alterations in widespread metabolic networks involving transamination, TCA cycle, gluconeogenesis/glycolysis, glutamate-mediated proline biosynthesis, shikimate-mediated secondary metabolisms, and the metabolisms of choline, pyrimidine, and purine. These findings provided new insights for the tobacco metabolic adaptation to salinity and demonstrated the NMR-based metabonomics as a powerful approach for understanding the osmotic effects on plant biochemistry.

  3. Delay of Disease Development in Transgenic Plants that Express the Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell Abel, Patricia; Nelson, Richard S.; de, Barun; Hoffmann, Nancy; Rogers, Stephen G.; Fraley, Robert T.; Beachy, Roger N.

    1986-05-01

    A chimeric gene containing a cloned cDNA of the coat protein (CP) gene of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was introduced into tobacco cells on a Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens from which tumor inducing genes had been removed. Plants regenerated from transformed cells expressed TMV mRNA and CP as a nuclear trait. Seedlings from self-fertilized transgenic plants were inoculated with TMV and observed for development of disease symptoms. The seedlings that expressed the CP gene were delayed in symptom development and 10 to 60 percent of the transgenic plants failed to develop symptoms for the duration of the experiments. Increasing the concentration of TMV in the inoculum shortened the delay in appearance of symptoms. The results of these experiments indicate that plants can be genetically transformed for resistance to virus disease development.

  4. Characterization of virus-induced gene silencing in tobacco plants infected with apple latent spherical virus.

    PubMed

    Yaegashi, H; Yamatsuta, T; Takahashi, T; Li, C; Isogai, M; Kobori, T; Ohki, S; Yoshikawa, N

    2007-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-ALSV) was used for analysis of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in tobacco plants expressing GFP (GFP-tobacco). In GFP-tobacco inoculated with GFP-ALSV, small dark spots appeared on inoculated leaves at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi), then expanded, and finally covered the whole area of the leaves after 12 dpi. Most of the fluorescence of upper leaves above the 12th true leaf disappeared at 21 dpi. Thus, GFP-ALSV infection efficiently triggered VIGS of a transgene (GFP gene) in tobacco plants. Analysis of GFP-silenced leaves showed that viral RNAs and proteins accumulated in all leaves where most GFP mRNA had been degraded. The siRNAs derived from ALSV-RNAs were not detected in samples from which siRNA of GFP mRNA could be easily detected. Direct tissue blot analysis showed that the spread of GFP-ALSV always preceded the induction of VIGS in infected leaves of GFP-tobacco. GFP leaf patch tests using Nicotiana benthamiana line 16c showed that Vp20, one of the three capsid proteins, is a silencing suppressor which interferes with systemic silencing.

  5. Suppressed expression of the apoplastic ascorbate oxidase gene increases salt tolerance in tobacco and Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuko; Bhuiyan, Md Nazmul H; Waditee, Rungaroon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Esaka, Muneharu; Oba, Kazuko; Jagendorf, André T; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2005-07-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the ascorbate oxidase (AAO) gene in sense and antisense orientations, and an Arabidopsis mutant in which the T-DNA was inserted into a putative AAO gene, were used to examine the potential roles of AAO for salt-stress tolerance in plants. AAO activities in the transgenic tobacco plants expressing the gene in sense and antisense orientations were, respectively, about 16-fold and 0.2-fold of those in the wild type. Under normal growth conditions, no significant differences in phenotypes were observed, except for a delay in flowering time in the antisense plants. However, at high salinity, the percentage germination, photosynthetic activity, and seed yields were higher in antisense plants, with progressively lower levels in the wild type and the sense plants. The redox state of apoplastic ascorbate in sense plants was very low even under normal growth conditions. Upon salt stress, the redox state of symplastic and apoplastic ascorbate decreased among the three types of plants, but was lowest in the sense plants. The hydrogen peroxide contents in the symplastic and apoplastic spaces were higher in sense plants, progressively lower in the wild type, followed by the antisense plants. The Arabidopsis T-DNA inserted mutant exhibited very low ascorbate oxidase activity, and its phenotype was similar to that of antisense tobacco plants. These results suggest that the suppressed expression of apoplastic AAO under salt-stress conditions leads to a relatively low level of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and a high redox state of symplastic and apoplastic ascorbate which, in turn, permits a higher seed yield.

  6. Viral RNA trafficking is inhibited in replicase-mediated resistant transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, L; Lucas, W J; Ding, B; Zaitlin, M

    1996-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Turkish Samsun NN) plants expressing a truncated replicase gene sequence from RNA-2 of strain Fny of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) are resistant to systemic CMV disease. This is due to suppression of virus replication and cell-to-cell movement in the inoculated leaves of these plants. In this study, microinjection protocols were used to directly examine cell-to-cell trafficking of CMV viral RNA in these resistant plants. CMV RNA fluorescently labeled with the nucleotide-specific TOTO-1 iodide dye, when coinjected with unlabeled CMV 3a movement protein (MP), moved rapidly into the surrounding mesophyll cells in mature tobacco leaves of vector control and untransformed plants. Such trafficking required the presence of functional CMV 3a MP. In contrast, coinjection of CMV 3a MP and CMV TOTO-RNA failed to move in transgenic resistant plants expressing the CMV truncated replicase gene. Furthermore, coinjection of 9.4-kDa fluorescein-conjugated dextran (F-dextran) along with unlabeled CMV 3a MP resulted in cell-to-cell movement of the F-dextran in control plants, but not in the transgenic plants. Similar results were obtained with viral RNA when the 30-kDa MP of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was coinjected with TMV TOTO-RNA into replicase-resistant transgenic tobacco expressing the 54-kDa gene sequence of TMV. However, in these transgenic plants, the TMV-MP was still capable of mediating cell-to-cell movement of itself and the 9.4-kDa F-dextran. These results indicate that an inhibition of cell-to-cell viral RNA trafficking is correlated with replicase-mediated resistance. This raises the possibility that the RNA-2 product is potentially involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell movement of viral infectious material during CMV replication. PMID:8901636

  7. Production of an active recombinant thrombomodulin derivative in transgenic tobacco plants and suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, Helga; Schiermeyer, Andreas; Soeur, Raphael; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2005-06-01

    Thrombomodulin is a membrane-bound protein that plays an active role in the blood coagulation system by binding thrombin and initiating the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Solulin is a recombinant soluble derivative of human thrombomodulin. It is used for the treatment of thrombotic disorders. To evaluate the production of this pharmaceutical protein in plants, expression vectors were generated using four different N-terminal signal peptides. Immunoblot analysis of transiently transformed tobacco leaves showed that intact Solulin could be detected using three of these signal peptides. Furthermore transgenic tobacco plants and BY2 cells producing Solulin were generated. Immunoblot experiments showed that Solulin accumulated to maximum levels of 115 and 27 microg g(-1) plant material in tobacco plants and BY2 cells, respectively. Activity tests performed on the culture supernatant of transformed BY2 cells showed that the secreted Solulin was functional. In contrast, thrombomodulin activity was not detected in total soluble protein extracts from BY2 cells, probably due to inhibitory effects of substances in the cell extract. N-terminal sequencing was carried out on partially purified Solulin from the BY2 culture supernatant. The sequence was identical to that of Solulin produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells, confirming correct processing of the N-terminal signal peptide. We have demonstrated that plants and plant cell cultures can be used as alternative systems for the production of an active recombinant thrombomodulin derivative.

  8. Rapid immunohistochemical diagnosis of tobacco mosaic virus disease by microwave-assisted plant sample preparation

    PubMed Central

    Zellnig, Günther; Möstl, Stefan; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Immunoelectron microscopy is a powerful method to diagnose viral diseases and to study the distribution of the viral agent within plant cells and tissues. Nevertheless, current protocols for the immunological detection of viral diseases with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in plants take between 3 and 6 days and are therefore not suited for rapid diagnosis of virus diseases in plants. In this study, we describe a method that allows rapid cytohistochemical detection of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in leaves of tobacco plants. With the help of microwave irradiation, sample preparation of the leaves was reduced to 90 min. After sample sectioning, virus particles were stained on the sections by immunogold labelling of the viral coat protein, which took 100 min. After investigation with the TEM, a clear visualization of TMV in tobacco cells was achieved altogether in about half a day. Comparison of gold particle density by image analysis revealed that samples prepared with the help of microwave irradiation yielded significantly higher gold particle density as samples prepared conventionally at room temperature. This study clearly demonstrates that microwave-assisted plant sample preparation in combination with cytohistochemical localization of viral coat protein is well suited for rapid diagnosis of plant virus diseases in altogether about half a day by TEM. PMID:23580761

  9. Expression of peanut Iron Regulated Transporter 1 in tobacco and rice plants confers improved iron nutrition.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hongchun; Guo, Xiaotong; Kobayashi, Takanori; Kakei, Yusuke; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nozoye, Tomoko; Zhang, Lixia; Shen, Hongyun; Qiu, Wei; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Zuo, Yuanmei

    2014-07-01

    Iron (Fe) limitation is a widespread agricultural problem in calcareous soils and severely limits crop production. Iron Regulated Transporter 1 (IRT1) is a key component for Fe uptake from the soil in dicot plants. In this study, the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) AhIRT1 was introduced into tobacco and rice plants using an Fe-deficiency-inducible artificial promoter. Induced expression of AhIRT1 in tobacco plants resulted in accumulation of Fe in young leaves under Fe deficient conditions. Even under Fe-excess conditions, the Fe concentration was also markedly enhanced, suggesting that the Fe status did not affect the uptake and translocation of Fe by AhIRT1 in the transgenic plants. Most importantly, the transgenic tobacco plants showed improved tolerance to Fe limitation in culture in two types of calcareous soils. Additionally, the induced expression of AhIRT1 in rice plants also resulted in high tolerance to low Fe availability in calcareous soils.

  10. Characterization of Antisense Transformed Plants Deficient in the Tobacco Anionic Peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrimini, L. M.; Gingas, V.; Finger, F.; Rothstein, S.; Liu, TTY.

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of the biological compounds that they metabolize, plant peroxidases have long been implicated in plant growth, cell wall biogenesis, lignification, and host defenses. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that underexpress anionic peroxidase were generated using antisense RNA. The antisense RNA was found to be specific for the anionic isoenzyme and highly effective, reducing endogenous transcript levels and total peroxidase activity by as much as 1600-fold. Antisense-transformed plants appeared normal at initial observation; however, growth studies showed that plants with reduced peroxidase activity grow taller and flower sooner than control plants. In contrast, previously transformed plants overproducing anionic peroxidase were shorter and flowered later than controls. Axillary buds were more developed in antisense-transformed plants and less developed in plants overproducing this enzyme. It was found that the lignin content in leaf, stem, and root was unchanged in antisense-transformed plants, which does not support a role for anionic peroxidase in the lignification of secondary xylem vessels. However, studies of wounded tissue show some reduction in wound-induced deposition of lignin-like polymers. The data support a possible role for tobacco anionic peroxidase in host defenses but not without a reduction in growth potential. PMID:12223765

  11. Suppression of infectious TMV genomes expressed in young transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, S A; Sarmiento, C; Valkonen, S; Truve, E; Lehto, K

    2007-12-01

    Full-length cDNAs of the wild-type (wt) Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and of the coat protein gene-deleted (DeltaCP) derivative of wt-TMV, under control of the 35S promoter and downstream ribozyme sequence to produce accurate viral transcripts, were transformed to tobacco plants to analyze plant-virus interactions through different stages of plant development. Surprisingly, young wt-TMV transgenics accumulated only very low levels of viral RNA, remained free of symptoms, and were moderately resistant against exogenous inoculations. This early resistance caused significant stress to the plants, as indicated by reduced growth. Approximately 7 to 8 weeks after germination, the resistance was broken and plants developed typical wt-TMV symptoms, with high accumulation of the viral RNAs and proteins. The DeltaCP-TMV plants likewise were initially resistant to the endogenous inoculum and were stunted, although to a lesser extent than the wt-TMV plants. The resistance was broken at the same time as in the wt-TMV plants, but the mutant replicated to much lower levels and produced much milder symptoms than the wt virus. TMV-specific small interfering RNAs as well as increased transgene methylation were detected in the plants only after the resistance break, indicating that the resistance in the young plants was not due to RNA silencing.

  12. Assessing modified risk tobacco and nicotine products: Description of the scientific framework and assessment of a closed modular electronic cigarette.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James; Gaca, Marianna; Lowe, Frazer; Minet, Emmanuel; Breheny, Damien; Prasad, Krishna; Camacho, Oscar; Fearon, Ian M; Liu, Chuan; Wright, Christopher; McAdam, Kevin; Proctor, Christopher

    2017-09-22

    Cigarette smoking causes many human diseases including cardiovascular disease, lung disease and cancer. Novel tobacco products with reduced yields of toxicants compared to cigarettes, such as tobacco-heating products, snus and electronic cigarettes, hold great potential for reducing the harms associated with tobacco use. In the UK several public health agencies have advocated a potential role for novel products in tobacco harm reduction. Public Health England has stated that "The current best estimate is that e-cigarettes are around 95% less harmful than smoking" and the Royal College of Physicians has urged public health to "Promote e-cigarettes widely as substitute for smoking". Health related claims on novel products such as 'reduced exposure' and 'reduced risk' should be substantiated using a weight of evidence approach based on a comprehensive scientific assessment. The US FDA, has provided draft guidance outlining a framework to assess novel products as Modified Risk Tobacco Products (MRTP). Based on this, we now propose a framework comprising pre-clinical, clinical, and population studies to assess the risk profile of novel tobacco products. Additionally, the utility of this framework is assessed through the pre-clinical and part of the clinical comparison of a commercial e-cigarette (Vype ePen) with a scientific reference cigarette (3R4F) and the results of these studies suggest that ePen has the potential to be a reduced risk product. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Novel AroA from Pseudomonas putida Confers Tobacco Plant with High Tolerance to Glyphosate

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hai-Qin; Chang, Su-Hua; Tian, Zhe-Xian; Zhang, Le; Sun, Yi-Cheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate is a non-selective broad-spectrum herbicide that inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS, also designated as AroA), a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathway in microorganisms and plants. Previously, we reported that a novel AroA (PpAroA1) from Pseudomonas putida had high tolerance to glyphosate, with little homology to class I or class II glyphosate-tolerant AroA. In this study, the coding sequence of PpAroA1 was optimized for tobacco. For maturation of the enzyme in chloroplast, a chloroplast transit peptide coding sequence was fused in frame with the optimized aroA gene (PparoA1optimized) at the 5′ end. The PparoA1optimized gene was introduced into the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. W38) genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transformed explants were first screened in shoot induction medium containing kanamycin. Then glyphosate tolerance was assayed in putative transgenic plants and its T1 progeny. Our results show that the PpAroA1 from Pseudomonas putida can efficiently confer tobacco plants with high glyphosate tolerance. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing the PparoA1optimized gene exhibit high tolerance to glyphosate, which suggest that the novel PpAroA1 is a new and good candidate applied in transgenic crops with glyphosate tolerance in future. PMID:21611121

  14. [Soil nutrients spatial variability and soil fertility suitability in Qujing tobacco-planting area].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zhou, Ji-heng; Yang, Rong-sheng; Zhang, Zheng-yan; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Yi-yang; Huang, Kua-ke; Li, Wei

    2011-04-01

    By adopting GPS technique, 2088 sampling sites were installed in the tobacco-planting area of Qujing City, Yunnan Province, with 0-20 cm soil samples collected to determine their main nutrients contents. The overall characteristics and spatial variability of the tobacco soil nutrients were analyzed by classic statistics and geo-statistics, and the soil fertility suitability in planting tobacco was evaluated by the methods of fuzzy mathematics. In the study area, soil pH and soil organic matter, available S, and water-soluble Cl contents were appropriate, soil total N and alkalihydrolyzable N contents were too high, soil available K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mo, and Mn contents were abundant, soil available P content was at medium level, while soil total P and K and available B contents were insufficient. All the nutrient indices presented anisotropic distribution, among which, the spatial variability of soil available P and B was mainly caused by random factors, and that of other nutrients was caused by the co-effects of structural and random factors. The spatial distribution map of soil fertility suitability index (SFI) showed that there was no the excellent grade region for tobacco-planting, good grade region accounted for 8.0%, general grade region accounted for 51.6%, moderate grade region accounted for 39.0%, and low grade region accounted for 1.4%.

  15. Review: Genetically modified plants for the promotion of human health.

    PubMed

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Saito, Kazuki

    2006-12-01

    Plants are attractive biological resources because of their ability to produce a huge variety of chemical compounds, and the familiarity of production in even the most rural settings. Genetic engineering gives plants additional characteristics and value for cultivation and post-harvest. Genetically modified (GM) plants of the "first generation" were conferred with traits beneficial to producers, whereas GM plants in subsequent "generations" are intended to provide beneficial traits for consumers. Golden Rice is a promising example of a GM plant in the second generation, and has overcome a number of obstacles for practical use. Furthermore, consumer-acceptable plants with health-promoting properties that are genetically modified using native genes are being developed. The emerging technology of metabolomics will also support the commercial realization of GM plants by providing comprehensive analyzes of plant biochemical components.

  16. Modifying plants for biofuel and biomaterial production.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Agnelo; Lupoi, Jason S; Hoang, Nam V; Healey, Adam; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A; Henry, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    The productivity of plants as biofuel or biomaterial crops is established by both the yield of plant biomass per unit area of land and the efficiency of conversion of the biomass to biofuel. Higher yielding biofuel crops with increased conversion efficiencies allow production on a smaller land footprint minimizing competition with agriculture for food production and biodiversity conservation. Plants have traditionally been domesticated for food, fibre and feed applications. However, utilization for biofuels may require the breeding of novel phenotypes, or new species entirely. Genomics approaches support genetic selection strategies to deliver significant genetic improvement of plants as sources of biomass for biofuel manufacture. Genetic modification of plants provides a further range of options for improving the composition of biomass and for plant modifications to assist the fabrication of biofuels. The relative carbohydrate and lignin content influences the deconstruction of plant cell walls to biofuels. Key options for facilitating the deconstruction leading to higher monomeric sugar release from plants include increasing cellulose content, reducing cellulose crystallinity, and/or altering the amount or composition of noncellulosic polysaccharides or lignin. Modification of chemical linkages within and between these biomass components may improve the ease of deconstruction. Expression of enzymes in the plant may provide a cost-effective option for biochemical conversion to biofuel. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Comparative analysis of the plant mRNA-destabilizing element, DST, in mammalian and tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Feldbrügge, M; Arizti, P; Sullivan, M L; Zamore, P D; Belasco, J G; Green, P J

    2002-05-01

    The labile SAUR transcripts from higher plants contain a conserved DST sequence in their 3'-untranslated regions. Two copies of a DST sequence from soybean are sufficient to destabilize reporter transcripts in cultured tobacco cells whereas variants bearing mutations in the conserved ATAGAT or GTA regions are inactive. To investigate the potential for conserved recognition components in mammalian and plant cells, we examined the function of this instability determinant in mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts and tobacco BY2 cells. In fibroblasts, a tetrameric DST element from soybean accelerated deadenylation and decay of a reporter transcript. However, a version mutated in the ATAGAT region was equally effective in this regard, and a tetrameric DST element from Arabidopsis was inactive. In contrast, the soybean DST element was more active as an mRNA instability element than the mutant version and the Arabidopsis element, when tested as tetramers in tobacco cells. Hence, the plant DST element is not recognized in animal cells with the same sequence requirements as in plant cells. Therefore, its mode of recognition appears to be plant-specific.

  18. Growth and certain chemical constituents of tobacco plants exposed to air ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthakur, N. N.; Arnold, N. P.

    1988-06-01

    Controlled experiments were performed in Faraday cages on the effects of positive and negative air ions on flue-cured tobacco plants. Continuous exposures for 15 days to air ions showed no significant differences in any plant growth characteristic between the treated and control plants. Standard errors in the measurement of the growth parameters for ion exposed plants were, however, consistently higher than those of control plants. Spatial variation in concentration gradients of air ions produced by corona discharge might have contributed to masking of the relatively small effects of air ions on biological organisms observed in previous experiments in this laboratory. No significant difference was observed between the experimental and control plants in nicotine, total alkaloid, and reducing sugar contents. Total nitrogen content was slightly higher for treated than control plants.

  19. 3-D nasal cultures: Systems toxicological assessment of a candidate modified-risk tobacco product.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Anita R; Mathis, Carole; Martin, Florian; Leroy, Patrice; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Trivedi, Keyur; Grandolfo, Davide; Cabanski, Maciej; Guedj, Emmanuel; Merg, Celine; Frentzel, Stefan; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-01-01

    In vitro toxicology approaches have evolved from a focus on molecular changes within a cell to understanding of toxicity-related mechanisms in systems that can mimic the in vivo environment. The recent development of three dimensional (3-D) organotypic nasal epithelial culture models offers a physiologically robust system for studying the effects of exposure through inhalation. Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with nasal inflammation; thus, the nasal epithelium is relevant for evaluating the pathophysiological impact of CS exposure. The present study investigated further the application of in vitro human 3-D nasal epithelial culture models for toxicological assessment of inhalation exposure. Aligned with 3Rs strategy, this study aimed to explore the relevance of a human 3-D nasal culture model to assess the toxicological impact of aerosols generated from a candidate modified risk tobacco product (cMRTP), the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, as compared with smoke generated from reference cigarette 3R4F. A series of experimental repetitions, where multiple concentrations of THS2.2 aerosol and 3R4F smoke were applied, were conducted to obtain reproducible measurements to understand the cellular/molecular changes that occur following exposure. In agreement with "Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century - a Vision and a Strategy", this study implemented a systems toxicology approach and found that for all tested concentrations the impact of 3R4F smoke was substantially greater than that of THS2.2 aerosol in terms of cytotoxicity levels, alterations in tissue morphology, secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators, impaired ciliary function, and increased perturbed transcriptomes and miRNA expression profiles.

  20. Natural products - modifying metabolite pathways in plants.

    PubMed

    Staniek, Agata; Bouwmeester, Harro; Fraser, Paul D; Kayser, Oliver; Martens, Stefan; Tissier, Alain; van der Krol, Sander; Wessjohann, Ludger; Warzecha, Heribert

    2013-10-01

    The diversity of plant natural product (PNP) molecular structures is reflected in the variety of biochemical and genetic pathways that lead to their formation and accumulation. Plant secondary metabolites are important commodities, and include fragrances, colorants, and medicines. Increasing the extractable amount of PNP through plant breeding, or more recently by means of metabolic engineering, is a priority. The prerequisite for any attempt at metabolic engineering is a detailed knowledge of the underlying biosynthetic and regulatory pathways in plants. Over the past few decades, an enormous body of information about the biochemistry and genetics of biosynthetic pathways involved in PNPs production has been generated. In this review, we focus on the three large classes of plant secondary metabolites: terpenoids (or isoprenoids), phenylpropanoids, and alkaloids. All three provide excellent examples of the tremendous efforts undertaken to boost our understanding of biosynthetic pathways, resulting in the first successes in plant metabolic engineering. We further consider what essential information is still missing, and how future research directions could help achieve the rational design of plants as chemical factories for high-value products. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. [The influence of selected plants on the tobacco smoking-induced effects in the oral cavity--review].

    PubMed

    Kedziora, Agata; Raś, Katarzyna; Grzech-Leśniak, Kinga; Wyganowska-Swiatkowska, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a culprit of many pathological lesions on the oral mucosa. In this literature review we focused on various therapeutic options for tobacco induced mucosal pathologies. Many active ingredients of Aloe vera, Chamomile, Curcuma longa and Calendula show potent anti-inflammatory and regenerative activity, making plant derived drugs a reasonable option for traditional pharmaceuticals.

  2. Overexpression of monoubiquitin improves photosynthesis in transgenic tobacco plants following high temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengxia; Gong, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Yanan; Wang, Guokun; Guo, Qifang; Wang, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system (Ub/26S) is implicated in abiotic stress responses in plants. In this paper, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing Ta-Ub2 from wheat were used to study the functions of Ub in the improvement of photosynthesis under high temperature (45°C) stress. We observed higher levels of Ub conjugates in transgenic plants under high temperature stress conditions compared to wild type (WT) as a result of the constitutive overexpression of Ta-Ub2, suggesting increased protein degradation by the 26S proteasome system under high temperature stress. Overexpressing Ub increased the photosynthetic rate (Pn) of transgenic tobacco plants, consistent with the improved ATPase activity in the thylakoid membrane and enhanced efficiency of PSII photochemistry. The higher D1 protein levels following high temperature stress in transgenic plants than WT were also observed. These findings imply that Ub may be involved in tolerance of photosynthesis to high temperature stress in plants. Compared with WT, the transgenic plants showed lower protein carbonylation and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, less reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, but higher antioxidant enzyme activity under high temperature stress. These findings suggest that the improved antioxidant capacity of transgenic plants may be one of the most important mechanisms underlying Ub-regulated high temperature tolerance.

  3. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  4. PDH45 overexpressing transgenic tobacco and rice plants provide salinity stress tolerance via less sodium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Nath, Manoj; Garg, Bharti; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress negatively affects the crop productivity worldwide, including that of rice. Coping with these losses is a major concern for all countries. The pea DNA helicase, PDH45 is a unique member of helicase family involved in the salinity stress tolerance. However, the exact mechanism of the PDH45 in salinity stress tolerance is yet to be established. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of PDH45-mediated salinity stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco and rice lines along with wild type (WT) plants using CoroNa Green dye based sodium localization in root and shoot sections. The results showed that under salinity stress root and shoot of PDH45 overexpressing transgenic tobacco and rice accumulated less sodium (Na(+)) as compared to their respective WT. The present study also reports salinity tolerant (FL478) and salinity susceptible (Pusa-44) varieties of rice accumulated lowest and highest Na(+) level, respectively. All the varieties and transgenic lines of rice accumulate differential Na(+) ions in root and shoot. However, roots accumulate high Na(+) as compared to the shoots in both tobacco and rice transgenic lines suggesting that the Na(+) transport in shoot is somehow inhibited. It is proposed that the PDH45 is probably involved in the deposition of apoplastic hydrophobic barriers and consequently inhibit Na(+) transport to shoot and therefore confers salinity stress tolerance to PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines. This study concludes that tobacco (dicot) and rice (monocot) transgenic plants probably share common salinity tolerance mechanism mediated by PDH45 gene.

  5. The evidence of Tobacco rattle virus impact on host plant organelles ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Otulak, Katarzyna; Chouda, Marcin; Bujarski, Józef; Garbaczewska, Grażyna

    2015-03-01

    Tobraviruses, like other (+) stranded RNA viruses of plants, replicate their genome in cytoplasm and use such usual membranous structures like endoplasmic reticulum. Based on the ultrastructural examination of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-infected potato and tobacco leaf tissues, in this work we provide evidence of the participation of not only the membranous and vesicular ER structures but also other cell organelles during the viral infection cycle. Non-capsidated TRV PSG particles (potato isolate from the Netherlands) (long and short forms) were observed inside the nucleus while the presence of TRV capsid protein (CP) was detected in the nucleus caryolymph and within the nucleolus area. Both capsidated and non-capsidated viral particles were localized inside the strongly disorganized chloroplasts and mitochondria. The electron-dense TRV particles were connected with vesicular structures of mitochondria as well as with chloroplasts in both potato and tobacco tissues. At 15-30 days after infection, vesicles filled with TRV short particles were visible in mitochondria revealing the expanded cristae structures. Immunodetection analysis revealed the TRV PSG CP epitope inside chloroplast with disorganized thylakoids structure as well as in mitochondria of different tobacco and potato tissues. The ultrastructural analysis demonstrated high dynamics of the main cell organelles during the TRV PSG-Solanaceous plants interactions. Moreover, our results suggest a relationship between organelle changes and different stages of virus infection cycle and/or particle formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Plant mediated green synthesis: modified approaches.

    PubMed

    Das, Ratul Kumar; Brar, Satinder Kaur

    2013-11-07

    Plant mediated green synthesis of different metallic nanoparticles has emerged as one of the options for implementation of green chemistry principles, and successfully made an important contribution towards green nanotechnology. However, beyond the synthesis and application aspects, the science of green synthesis has carried some wrong perceptions in an unforeseen fashion. In this review, some of the key issues related to the green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles employing plants as reducing/capping agents have been addressed. Random selection of plants and its overall impact on the different aspects of green synthesis have been discussed. Emphasis is given to the setting of some standard selection criteria to be adopted for selecting a plant for use in green synthesis. How selection of a plant can positively or negatively influence both procedure and products of a green synthesis process is the prime concern of this article. In addition to selection, the key issue of biocompatibility associated with green synthesized metallic nanoparticles has been considered. Both selection of plant and biocompatibility were reconsidered for their minute details in terms of synthesis, analysis and data interpretation in the green synthesis approach. The key factors capable of fine tuning the core meaning of "green" in the synthesis of any metallic nanoparticles were taken into consideration. This article is an effort towards keeping the core meaning of green synthesis.

  7. Tryptamine-induced resistance in tryptophan decarboxylase transgenic poplar and tobacco plants against their specific herbivores.

    PubMed

    Gill, Rishi I S; Ellis, Brian E; Isman, Murray B

    2003-04-01

    The presence of amines and their derivatives in plant tissues is known to influence insect feeding and reproduction. The enzyme tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of tryptophan to tryptamine, which is both a bioactive amine and a precursor of other indole derivatives. Transgenic poplar and tobacco plants ectopically expressing TDC1 accumulated elevated levels of tryptamine without affecting plant growth and development. This accumulation was consistently associated with adverse effects on feeding behavior and physiology of Malacosoma disstria Hub. (forest tent caterpillar, FTC) and Manduca sexta L. (tobacco hornworm, THW). Behavior studies with FTC and THW larvae showed that acceptability of the leaf tissue to larvae was inversely related to foliar tryptamine levels. Physiological studies with FTC and THW larvae showed that consumption of leaf tissue from the transgenic lines is deleterious to larvae growth, apparently due to a postingestive mechanism. Thus, ectopic expression of TDC1 can allow sufficient tryptamine to accumulate in poplar and tobacco leaf tissue to suppress significantly the growth of insect pests that normally feed on these plants.

  8. Delayed Leaf Senescence in Tobacco Plants Transformed with tmr, a Gene for Cytokinin Production in Agrobacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, CM; Scofield, SR; Bevan, MW; Dyer, TA

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether enhanced levels of endogenous cytokinins could influence plant development, particularly leaf senescence. Tobacco plants were transformed with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens gene tmr, under the control of the soybean heat shock promoter HS6871. This gene encodes the enzyme isopentenyl transferase, which catalyzes the initial step in cytokinin biosynthesis. After heat shock, the cytokinin level increased greatly and the level of tmr mRNA, undetectable at 20[deg]C, rose and remained high for up to 8 hours. The levels of cytokinin and tmr mRNA were substantially lower by 24 hours. Transformed plants grown at 20[deg]C were shorter, had larger side shoots, and remained green for longer than untransformed plants. The differences were more pronounced after several heat shocks of whole plants or defined areas of leaves. Our results demonstrated that plant morphology and leaf senescence can be manipulated by changing the endogenous level of cytokinins. PMID:12324608

  9. Effect of drought and combined drought and heat stress on polyamine metabolism in proline-over-producing tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Cvikrová, Milena; Gemperlová, Lenka; Martincová, Olga; Vanková, Radomira

    2013-12-01

    The roles of proline and polyamines (PAs) in the drought stress responses of tobacco plants were investigated by comparing the responses to drought alone and drought in combination with heat in the upper and lower leaves and roots of wild-type tobacco plants and transformants that constitutively over-express a modified gene for the proline biosynthetic enzyme Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CSF129A; EC 2.7.2.11/1.2.1.41). In both genotypes, drought stress coincided with a decrease in relative water content (RWC) that was much less severe in the upper leaves than elsewhere in the plant. The drought also increased proline levels in both genotypes. A brief period of heat stress (2 h at 40 °C) at the end of the drought period did not significantly influence the proline levels in the upper leaves and roots but caused a further increase in the lower leaves of both genotypes. The rate at which these elevated proline levels returned to normal during the post-stress recovery period was slower in the transformants and plants that had been subjected to the combined stress. In both genotypes, drought stress significantly reduced the levels of spermidine (Spd) and putrescine (Put) in the leaves and roots relative to those for controls, and increased the levels of spermine (Spm) and diaminopropane (Dap, formed by the oxidative deamination of Spd and Spm). Spd levels may have declined due to its consumption in Spm biosynthesis and/or oxidation by polyamine oxidase (PAO; EC 1.5.3.11) to form Dap, which became more abundant during drought stress. During the rewatering period, the plants' Put and Spd levels recovered quickly and the activity of the PA biosynthesis enzymes in their leaves and roots increased substantially; this increase was more pronounced in transformants than WT plants. The high levels of Spm observed in drought stressed plants persisted even after the 24 h recovery and rewatering phase. The malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of the lower leaves of WTs

  10. Hyperspectral remote sensing applications for monitoring and stress detection in cultural plants: viral infections in tobacco plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Petrov, Nikolai; Maneva, Svetla

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to reveal the presence of viral infections in two varieties of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) as well as to discriminate the levels of the disease using hyperspectral leaf reflectance. Data sets were collected from two tobacco cultivars, Xanthi and Rustica, known as most widespread in Bulgaria. Experimental plants were grown in a greenhouse under controlled conditions. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf plants of cultivar Xanthi were inoculated with Potato virus Y (PVY) while the Rustica plants were inoculated with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). These two viruses are worldwide distributed and cause significant yield losses in many economically important crops. In the course of time after inoculation the concentration of the viruses in plant leaves was assessed by erological analysis via DAS-ELISA and RT-PCR techniques. Hyperspectral reflectance data were collected by a portable fibreoptics spectrometer in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges (450-850 nm). As control plants healthy untreated tobacco plants were used. The significance of the differences between reflectance spectra of control and infected leaves was analyzed by means of Student's t-criterion at p<0.05. The analyses were performed at ten wavebands selected to cover the green (520-580 nm), red (640-680 nm), red edge (690-720 nm) and near infrared (720-780 nm) spectral ranges. Changes in SRC were found for both viral treatments and comparative analysis showed that the influence of PVY was stronger. The discrimination of disease intensity was achieved by derivative analysis of the red edge position.

  11. The Small Subunit of Snapdragon Geranyl Diphosphate Synthase Modifies the Chain Length Specificity of Tobacco Geranylgeranyl Diphosphate Synthase in Planta[W

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Irina; Nagegowda, Dinesh A.; Kish, Christine M.; Gutensohn, Michael; Maeda, Hiroshi; Varbanova, Marina; Fridman, Eyal; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Hanada, Atsushi; Kamiya, Yuji; Krichevsky, Alexander; Citovsky, Vitaly; Pichersky, Eran; Dudareva, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    Geranyl diphosphate (GPP), the precursor of many monoterpene end products, is synthesized in plastids by a condensation of dimethylallyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) in a reaction catalyzed by homodimeric or heterodimeric GPP synthase (GPPS). In the heterodimeric enzymes, a noncatalytic small subunit (GPPS.SSU) determines the product specificity of the catalytic large subunit, which may be either an active geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) or an inactive GGPPS-like protein. Here, we show that expression of snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) GPPS.SSU in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants increased the total GPPS activity and monoterpene emission from leaves and flowers, indicating that the introduced catalytically inactive GPPS.SSU found endogenous large subunit partner(s) and formed an active snapdragon/tobacco GPPS in planta. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and in vitro enzyme analysis of individual and hybrid proteins revealed that two of four GGPPS-like candidates from tobacco EST databases encode bona fide GGPPS that can interact with snapdragon GPPS.SSU and form a functional GPPS enzyme in plastids. The formation of chimeric GPPS in transgenic plants also resulted in leaf chlorosis, increased light sensitivity, and dwarfism due to decreased levels of chlorophylls, carotenoids, and gibberellins. In addition, these transgenic plants had reduced levels of sesquiterpene emission, suggesting that the export of isoprenoid intermediates from the plastids into the cytosol was decreased. These results provide genetic evidence that GPPS.SSU modifies the chain length specificity of phylogenetically distant GGPPS and can modulate IPP flux distribution between GPP and GGPP synthesis in planta. PMID:20028839

  12. Deregulation of apoplastic polyamine oxidase affects development and salt response of tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Gémes, Katalin; Mellidou, Ιfigeneia; Karamanoli, Katerina; Beris, Despoina; Park, Ky Young; Matsi, Theodora; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Constantinidou, Helen-Isis; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A

    2017-04-01

    Polyamine (PA) homeostasis is associated with plant development, growth and responses to biotic/abiotic stresses. Apoplastic PA oxidase (PAO) catalyzes the oxidation of PAs contributing to cellular homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and PAs. In tobacco, PAs decrease with plant age, while apoplastic PAO activity increases. Our previous results with young transgenic tobacco plants with enhanced/reduced apoplastic PAO activity (S-ZmPAO/AS-ZmPAO, respectively) established the importance of apoplastic PAO in controlling tolerance to short-term salt stress. However, it remains unclear if the apoplastic PAO pathway is important for salt tolerance at later stages of plant development. In this work, we examined whether apoplastic PAO controls also plant development and tolerance of adult plants during long-term salt stress. The AS-ZmPAO plants contained higher Ca(2+) during salt stress, showing also reduced chlorophyll content index (CCI), leaf area and biomass but taller phenotype compared to the wild-type plants during salt. On the contrary, the S-ZmPAO had more leaves with slightly greater size compared to the AS-ZmPAO and higher antioxidant genes/enzyme activities. Accumulation of proline in the roots was evident at prolonged stress and correlated negatively with PAO deregulation as did the transcripts of genes mediating ethylene biosynthesis. In contrast to the strong effect of apoplastic PAO to salt tolerance in young plants described previously, the effect it exerts at later stages of development is rather moderate. However, the different phenotypes observed in plants deregulating PAO reinforce the view that apoplastic PAO exerts multifaceted roles on plant growth and stress responses. Our data suggest that deregulation of the apoplastic PAO can be further examined as a potential approach to breed plants with enhanced/reduced tolerance to abiotic stress with minimal associated trade-offs.

  13. Tobacco overexpressing β-ocimene induces direct and indirect responses against aphids in receiver tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Pasquale; Iodice, Luigi; Maffei, Massimo E; Bossi, Simone; Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Guerrieri, Emilio

    2015-01-15

    In the last decade plant-to-plant communication has received an increasing attention, particularly for the role of Volatile Organic Compounds as possible elicitors of plant defense. The role of β-ocimene as an interspecific elicitor of plant defense has been recently assessed in multitrophic systems including different plant species (Solanaceae, Poaceae, legumes) and different pest species including chewer insects and phytophagous mites. Both chewer insects and phytophagous mites are known to elicit specific plant defensive pathways which are different (at least in part) from those elicited by sap feeders. The aim of this research was to fill this gap of knowledge and to assess the role of β-ocimene as an elicitor of plant defense against aphid pests, which are sap feeders. For this purpose we used as transgenic tobacco plant releasing an odour plume enriched in this compound as emitter and a tomato plant as receiver. We selected the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae and its natural enemy, the parasitoid Aphidius ervi, as the targets of plant induced defense. Tomato plant defense induced by β-ocimene was assessed by characterizing the aphid performance in terms of fixing behaviour, development and reproduction (direct plant defense) and the parasitoid performance in terms of attraction towards tomato plants (indirect plant defense). The characterization of tomato response to β-ocimene was completed by the identification of Volatile Organic Compounds as released by conditioned tomato plants. Tomato plants that were exposed to the volatiles of transgenic tobacco enriched in β-ocimene resulted in less suitable for the aphids in respect to control ones (direct defense). On tomato plants "elicited" by β-ocimene we recorded: a significant lower number of aphids settled; a significant lower number newborn nymphs; a significant lower weight of aphids feeding. In addition, tomato plants "elicited" by β-ocimene resulted became more attractive towards the parasitoid A. ervi

  14. [Transgenic plant regeneration of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) haboring mammalian cyp2e1 gene].

    PubMed

    Li, Peihan; Xiang, Taihe; Xie, Jun; Feng, Ting; Lu, Wenyi

    2012-10-01

    CYP2E1 enzyme encoded by cyp2e1 gene plays an important role in metabolism of heterogeneous organics in mammalian liver cells. The transgenic plant with cyp2e1 can metabolize various low molecular weight organic pollutants. However, it is unclear the mechanism of expression control of cyp2e1 in transgenic plant. In this study, plasmid pSLD50-6 with cyp2e1 and pKH200 with gus as control were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 separately. Then, the cyp2e1 or gus genes were transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and the transgenic plants were regenerated via Agrobacterium tumefaciens method. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze the cyp2e1 gene expression. The expression of cyp2e1 in transgenic tobacco with cyp2e1 decreased obviously treated by ethyl alcohol and reduced slightly by benzene and toluene, while it enhanced by acetone, formaldehyde and oxygen deficit in different levels. In addition, the gene expression of NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in the transgenic tobacco with cyp2e1 were increased significantly treated by benzene, which showed that NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in transgenic tobacco have relation with CYP2E1 detoxication process. It suggested that the NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome b5 enzyme in transgenic plant formed the requirement in mammalian and participated in the electron transport chain of CYP2E1 enzyme catalytic process.

  15. A novel approach to assess the population health impact of introducing a Modified Risk Tobacco Product.

    PubMed

    Weitkunat, Rolf; Lee, Peter N; Baker, Gizelle; Sponsiello-Wang, Zheng; González-Zuloeta Ladd, Angela M; Lüdicke, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Based on the Food and Drug Administration's Modified Risk Tobacco Product (MRTP) Application draft guideline, Philip Morris International (PMI) has developed a Population Health Impact Model to estimate the reduction in the number of deaths over a period following the introduction of an MRTP. Such a model is necessary to assess the effect that its introduction would have on population health, given the lack of epidemiological data available prior to marketing authorization on any risks from MRTPs. The model is based on publicly available data on smoking prevalence and on the relationships between smoking-related disease-specific mortality and various aspects of the smoking of conventional cigarettes (CCs), together with an estimate of exposure from the MRTP relative to that from CCs, and allows the exploration of possible scenarios regarding the effect of MRTP introduction on the prevalence of CC and MRTP use, individually and in combination. By comparing mortality attributable in a scenario where the MRTP is introduced with one where it is not, the model can estimate the mortality attributable to CCs and the MRTP, as well as the reduction in the deaths attributable to the introduction of the MRTP.

  16. Is chloroplast movement in tobacco plants influenced systemically after local illumination or burning stress?

    PubMed

    Naus, Jan; Rolencová, Monika; Hlavácková, Vladimíra

    2008-10-01

    Chloroplast movement has been studied in many plants mainly in relation to the local light, mechanical or stress effects. Here we investigated possible systemic responses of chloroplast movement to local light or burning stress in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun). Chloroplast movement was measured using two independent methods: one with a SPAD 502 Chlorophyll meter and another by collimated transmittance at a selected wavelength (676 nm). A sensitive periodic movement of chloroplasts was used in high or low (2 000 or 50 micromol/m(2) per s photosynthetically active radiation, respectively) cold white light with periods of 50 or 130 min. Measurements were carried out in the irradiated area, in the non-irradiated area of the same leaf or in the leaf located on the stem below the irradiated or burned one. No significant changes in systemic chloroplast movement in non-irradiated parts of the leaf and in the non-treated leaf were detected. Our data indicate that chloroplast movement in tobacco is dependent dominantly on the intensity and spectral composition of the incident light and on the local stimulation and state of the target tissue. No systemic signal was strong enough to evoke a detectable systemic response in chloroplast movement in distant untreated tissues of tobacco plants.

  17. Transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress alfalfa NADH-glutamate synthase have higher carbon and nitrogen content.

    PubMed

    Chichkova, S; Arellano, J; Vance, C P; Hernández, G

    2001-11-01

    This work reports the characterization of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that constitutively overexpress NADH-GOGAT. Three independent transformants, designated GOS10, GOS13 and GOS19 (for GOGAT sense), with stable integration of the chimeric alfalfa NADH-GOGAT gene fused to the CaMV 35S promoter were studied. The transgene was stably integrated and inherited by the progeny. In these GOS lines, the expression of NADH-GOGAT mRNA and protein was detected at low levels in roots and leaves, while the expression of the host tobacco NADH-GOGAT gene was nearly undetectable. The roots of GOS lines showed an elevated (15-40%) enzyme activity as compared to control plants. When GOS plants were grown under greenhouse conditions and fed with either nitrate or ammonium as the sole nitrogen source, they showed higher total carbon and nitrogen content in shoots and increased shoot dry weight when plants were entering into the flowering stage, as compared to control plants. The observed phenotype of GOS plants was interpreted as reflecting a higher capacity to assimilate nitrogen due to a higher NADH-GOGAT activity.

  18. Tobacco mosaic virus infection results in an increase in recombination frequency and resistance to viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens in the progeny of infected tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Kathiria, Palak; Sidler, Corinne; Golubov, Andrey; Kalischuk, Melanie; Kawchuk, Lawrence M; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-08-01

    Our previous experiments showed that infection of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) leads to an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of infected plants also had an increased rate of rearrangements in resistance gene-like loci. Here, we report that tobacco plants infected with TMV exhibited an increase in HRF in two consecutive generations. Analysis of global genome methylation showed the hypermethylated genome in both generations of plants, whereas analysis of methylation via 5-methyl cytosine antibodies demonstrated both hypomethylation and hypermethylation. Analysis of the response of the progeny of infected plants to TMV, Pseudomonas syringae, or Phytophthora nicotianae revealed a significant delay in symptom development. Infection of these plants with TMV or P. syringae showed higher levels of induction of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 gene expression and higher levels of callose deposition. Our experiments suggest that viral infection triggers specific changes in progeny that promote higher levels of HRF at the transgene and higher resistance to stress as compared with the progeny of unstressed plants. However, data reported in these studies do not establish evidence of a link between recombination frequency and stress resistance.

  19. The expression of tomato prosystemin gene in tobacco plants highly affects host proteomic repertoire.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Mariapina; Corrado, Giandomenico; Arena, Simona; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Tortiglione, Claudia; Sellaroli, Stefano; Marra, Mauro; Rao, Rosa; Scaloni, Andrea

    2008-07-21

    Systemin, an octadecapeptide isolated from tomato, is a primary signal molecule involved in the local and systemic responses to pest attack, elicited by activation of a set of defence genes. It derives from processing of prosystemin, a prohormone of almost 200 amino acids. Prosystemin orthologues have been found in other Solanaceae species but not in tobacco, where are present hydroxyproline-rich peptides functionally but not structurally related to tomato systemin. Molecular events leading to the release of signalling peptides from protein precursors are unknown in plants; the occurrence of a family of signal molecules suggests that initiation of wound response may involve different processing mechanisms. It has been previously shown that the protein product from an engineered tomato prosystemin gene is processed in tobacco, thus suggesting that the components responsible for its post-translational modifications are present in this species. By analyzing analysing the proteome repertoire of transformed tobacco plant leaves with 2-DE, here we demonstrate that the constitutive expression of the tomato prosystemin gene highly affected host protein synthesis. In particular, engineered plants showed a number of differentially synthesized proteins that were identified by PMF MALDI-TOF and microLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS experiments as polypeptide species involved in protection from pathogens and oxidative stress, or in carbon/energy metabolism. Significant differences in over-produced proteins were observed with respect to previous data reported on systemin-engineered tomato plants. Our results strongly support the need of using proteomic approaches during systematic analysis of plant tissues to investigate the principle of substantial equivalence in transgenic plants expressing a transgene coding for a signalling molecule.

  20. Modified tobacco mosaic virus particles as scaffolds for display of protein antigens for vaccine applications.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark L; Lindbo, John A; Dillard-Telm, Stephan; Brosio, Paul M; Lasnik, Amanda B; McCormick, Alison A; Nguyen, Long V; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2006-05-10

    Display of peptides or proteins in an ordered, repetitive array, such as on the surface of a virus-like particle, is known to induce an enhanced immune response relative to vaccination with the "free" protein antigen. The coat protein of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) can accommodate short peptide insertions into the primary sequence, but the display of larger protein moieties as genetic fusions to the capsid protein has not been possible. We employed a randomized library approach to introduce a reactive lysine at the externally located amino terminus of the coat protein, which facilitated biotinylation of the capsid. To characterize display of heterologous proteins on the virion surface, we bound a model antigen (green fluorescent protein (GFP)-streptavidin (SA), expressed and purified from plants) to the biotinylated TMV particles, creating a GFP-SA decorated virus particle. A GFP-SA tetramer loading of 26% was obtained, corresponding to approximately 2200 GFP moieties displayed per intact virion. We evaluated the immunogenicity of GFP decorated virions in both mice and guinea pigs and found augmented humoral IgG titers in both species, relative to unbound GFP-SA tetramer. Next, we fused an N-terminal fragment of the Canine oral papillomavirus L2 protein to streptavidin. With TMV display, the L2 protein fragment was significantly more immunogenic than uncoupled antigen when tested in mice. By demonstrating the presentation of whole proteins, this study expands the utility of TMV as a vaccine scaffold beyond that which is possible by genetic manipulation.

  1. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  2. Principal Component Analysis of Chlorophyll Content in Tobacco, Bean and Petunia Plants Exposed to Different Tropospheric Ozone Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiak, Klaudia; Zbierska, Janina; Budka, Anna; Kayzer, Dariusz

    2014-06-01

    Three plant species were assessed in this study - ozone-sensitive and -resistant tobacco, ozone-sensitive petunia and bean. Plants were exposed to ambient air conditions for several weeks in two sites differing in tropospheric ozone concentrations in the growing season of 2009. Every week chlorophyll contents were analysed. Cumulative ozone effects on the chlorophyll content in relation to other meteorological parameters were evaluated using principal component analysis, while the relation between certain days of measurements of the plants were analysed using multivariate analysis of variance. Results revealed variability between plant species response. However, some similarities were noted. Positive relations of all chlorophyll forms to cumulative ozone concentration (AOT 40) were found for all the plant species that were examined. The chlorophyll b/a ratio revealed an opposite position to ozone concentration only in the ozone-resistant tobacco cultivar. In all the plant species the highest average chlorophyll content was noted after the 7th day of the experiment. Afterwards, the plants usually revealed various responses. Ozone-sensitive tobacco revealed decrease of chlorophyll content, and after few weeks of decline again an increase was observed. Probably, due to the accommodation for the stress factor. While during first three weeks relatively high levels of chlorophyll contents were noted in ozone-resistant tobacco. Petunia revealed a slow decrease of chlorophyll content and the lowest values at the end of the experiment. A comparison between the plant species revealed the highest level of chlorophyll contents in ozone-resistant tobacco.

  3. TcCYS4, a cystatin from cocoa, reduces necrosis triggered by MpNEP2 in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Santana, L S; Costa, M G C; Pirovani, N M; Almeida, A F; Alvim, F C; Pirovani, C P

    2014-09-26

    In Brazil, most cocoa bean production occurs in Southern Bahia. Witches' broom disease arrived in this area in 1989 and has since caused heavy losses in production. The disease is caused by the basidiomycete fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, a hemibiotrophic fungus that produces the necrosis and ethylene-inducting protein (MpNEP2) during infection; this protein can activate cysteine proteases and induce programmed cell death. Cysteine proteases can be modulated by cystatin. In this study, we overexpressed TcCYS4, a cocoa cystatin, in tobacco plants and evaluated the effect on MpNEP2 in model plants. Tccys4 cDNA was cloned into the pCAMBIA 1390 vector and inserted into the tobacco plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transgene expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. Transcript and protein levels in Tcccys4:tobacco lines were 8.9- and 1.5-fold higher than in wild-type plants (wt). Tcccys4:tobacco lines showed no change in growth compared to wt plants. CO2 net assimilation (A) increased in Tcccys4:tobacco lines compared to wt plants. Only one line showed statistically significant stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration rate (E) changes. MpNEP2 was infiltered into the foliar mesophyll of Tcccys4:tobacco lines and wt plants, and necrotic lesions were attenuated in lines highly expressing Tccys4. Our results suggest that cocoa cystatin TcCYS4 affects MpNEP2 activity related to the progression of programmed cell death in tobacco plants. This may occur through the action of cystatin to inhibit cysteine proteases activated by MpNEP2 in plant tissues. Further studies are necessary to examine cystatin in the Theobroma cacao-M. perniciosa pathosystem.

  4. Translocation of metal ions from soil to tobacco roots and their concentration in the plant parts.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cleber Pinto; de Almeida, Thiago E; Zittel, Rosimara; de Oliveira Stremel, Tatiana R; Domingues, Cinthia E; Kordiak, Januário; de Campos, Sandro Xavier

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study on the translocation factors (TFs) and bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), and arsenic (As) ions in roots, stems, and leaves of tobacco. The results revealed that during the tobacco growth, the roots are able to increase the sensitiveness of the physiological control, reducing the translocation of the metals Ni (0.38) and Pb (0.48) to the leaves. Cd and Zn presented factors TF and BCF >1 in the three tissues under analysis, which indicates the high potential for transportation and accumulation of these metals in all plant tissues. The TF values for Cr (0.65) and As (0.63) revealed low translocation of these ions to the aerial parts, indicating low mobility of ions from the roots. Therefore, tobacco can be considered an efficient accumulator of Ni, Cr, As and Pb in roots and Cd and Zn in all plant parts.

  5. Role of transpiration and metabolism in translocation and accumulation of cadmium in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiwei; Wang, Haiyun; Ma, Yibing; Wang, Haohao; Shi, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Tobacco plants grown in pots and in hydroponic culture accumulated cadmium (Cd) particularly: the Cd content of tobacco leaves exceeded 100 mg/kg and the enrichment factor (the ratio of Cd in leaves to that in soil) was more than 4. These high levels of accumulation identify tobacco as a hyperaccumulator of Cd. Two transpiration inhibitors (paraffin or CaCl2) and shade decreased the Cd content of tobacco leaves, and the decrease showed a linear relationship with the leaf transpiration rate. A metabolism inhibitor, namely 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), and low temperature (4 °C) also lowered the Cd content of tobacco leaves, but the inhibitory effect of low temperature was greater. In the half number of leaves that were shaded, the Cd content decreased to 26.5% of that in leaves that were not shaded in the same tobacco plants. These results suggests that translocation of Cd from the medium to the leaves is driven by the symplastic and the apoplastic pathways. Probably, of the two crucial steps in the translocation of Cd in tobacco plants, one, namely uptake from the medium to the xylem, is energy-dependent whereas the other, namely the transfer from the xylem to the leaves, is driven mainly by transpiration.

  6. [Safety assessment of foods derived from genetically modified plants].

    PubMed

    Pöting, A; Schauzu, M

    2010-06-01

    The placing of genetically modified plants and derived food on the market falls under Regulation (EC) No. 1829/2003. According to this regulation, applicants need to perform a safety assessment according to the Guidance Document of the Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which is based on internationally agreed recommendations. This article gives an overview of the underlying legislation as well as the strategy and scientific criteria for the safety assessment, which should generally be based on the concept of substantial equivalence and carried out in relation to an unmodified conventional counterpart. Besides the intended genetic modification, potential unintended changes also have to be assessed with regard to potential adverse effects for the consumer. All genetically modified plants and derived food products, which have been evaluated by EFSA so far, were considered to be as safe as products derived from the respective conventional plants.

  7. Expression and Chloroplast Targeting of Cholesterol Oxidase in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, David R.; Grebenok, Robert J.; Ohnmeiss, Thomas E.; Greenplate, John T.; Purcell, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase represents a novel type of insecticidal protein with potent activity against the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman). We transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with the cholesterol oxidase choM gene and expressed cytosolic and chloroplast-targeted versions of the ChoM protein. Transgenic leaf tissues expressing cholesterol oxidase exerted insecticidal activity against boll weevil larvae. Our results indicate that cholesterol oxidase can metabolize phytosterols in vivo when produced cytosolically or when targeted to chloroplasts. The transgenic plants exhibiting cytosolic expression accumulated low levels of saturated sterols known as stanols, and displayed severe developmental aberrations. In contrast, the transgenic plants expressing chloroplast-targeted cholesterol oxidase maintained a greater accumulation of stanols, and appeared phenotypically and developmentally normal. These results are discussed within the context of plant sterol distribution and metabolism. PMID:11457962

  8. Environmental tobacco exposure is associated with vaccine modified measles in junior high school students.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shuichi; Sato, Kazuki; Watanabe, Hiroko; Nezu, Yoko; Nishimuta, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine modified measles (VMM) affects individuals with attenuated vaccine induced immunity. An outbreak of measles occurred in a junior high school, starting from an unvaccinated eighth-grade student who developed natural measles and affected a majority of students who were immunized with a low potent strain of measles vaccine (TD97). To determine whether environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure was associated with the development of VMM in this population, a questionnaire was used asking whether students had VMM symptoms during the outbreak and the smoking status of family members. VMM was defined in the study population as occurrence of fever and/or erythema, along with documented history of measles vaccination. A total of 513 students (85.9%) responded. Overall, the presence of in-house smokers did not differ between VMM students (49.3%) and non-VMM students (50.2%). However, in the ninth grade, presence of an in-house smoker was significantly higher in the family of VMM students (54.0%) than in non-VMM students (36.6%) (P = 0.044). Urinary cotinine levels were also measured in selected students (n = 37). Among families with at least one smoker, urinary cotinine levels were significantly higher in VMM students than in non-VMM students (P = 0.032). Furthermore, a multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that a high urinary cotinine level (>10 ng/mg creatinine; 13.5 percentile) was associated with the development of VMM. Our findings suggest that a high level of ETS exposure may be associated with an increased risk of VMM in a population with attenuated vaccine induced immunity against measles.

  9. Decreased SBPase activity alters growth and development in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Lawson, T; Bryant, B; Lefebvre, S; Lloyd, J C; Raines, C A

    2006-01-01

    The effects of reduced SBPase activity on growth and development were examined in a set of transgenic tobacco plants produced using an antisense construct driven by the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, small subunit promoter. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation rates and carbohydrate levels in source leaves were decreased in the antisense plants. Growth rate and total shoot biomass were reduced in the SBPase antisense plants, even in plants where SBPase activity was reduced by only 25%. Floral biomass also decreased in response to reductions in SBPase activity and the onset of flowering was delayed by 5-10 d. This is the first demonstration of a link between reproductive biomass and reductions in Calvin cycle enzyme activity using antisense plants. Furthermore, unexpected changes in the growth and development of the antisense plants were evident. Small reductions in SBPase activity (above 50% wild type) resulted in shorter plants with only a small decrease in stem biomass and specific leaf area. In contrast, plants with larger reductions in SBPase activity had an increase in specific leaf area and attained heights similar to that of the wild-type plants but with a much reduced stem biomass, largely due to a decrease in xylem tissue. This bi-modal response of growth to reductions in SBPase activity has similarities to changes in leaf and stem anatomy and morphology that accompany light acclimation.

  10. Posttranslationally modified small-peptide signals in plants.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell signaling is essential for many processes in plant growth and development, including coordination of cellular responses to developmental and environmental cues. Cumulative studies have demonstrated that peptide signaling plays a greater-than-anticipated role in such intercellular communication. Some peptides act as signals during plant growth and development, whereas others are involved in defense responses or symbiosis. Peptides secreted as signals often undergo posttranslational modification and proteolytic processing to generate smaller peptides composed of approximately 10 amino acid residues. Such posttranslationally modified small-peptide signals constitute one of the largest groups of secreted peptide signals in plants. The location of the modification group incorporated into the peptides by specific modification enzymes and the peptide chain length defined by the processing enzymes are critical for biological function and receptor interaction. This review covers 20 years of research into posttranslationally modified small-peptide signals in plants.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of {gamma}-thionin-like soybean SE60 in E. coli and tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yeonhee Choi, Yang Do; Lee, Jong Seob

    2008-10-17

    The SE60, a low molecular weight, sulfur-rich protein in soybean, is known to be homologous to wheat {gamma}-purothionin. To elucidate the functional role of SE60, we expressed SE60 cDNA in Escherichia coli and in tobacco plants. A single protein band was detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after anti-FLAG affinity purification of the protein from transformed E. coli. While the control E. coli cells harboring pFLAG-1 showed standard growth with Isopropyl {beta}-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, E. coli cells expressing the SE60 fusion protein did not grow at all, suggesting that SE60 has toxic effects on E. coli growth. Genomic integration and the expression of transgene in the transgenic tobacco plants were confirmed by Southern and Northern blot analysis, respectively. The transgenic plants demonstrated enhanced resistance against the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that SE60 has antimicrobial activity and play a role in the defense mechanism in soybean plants.

  12. Expression of a yeast acetyl CoA hydrolase in the mitochondrion of tobacco plants inhibits growth and restricts photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bender-Machado, Lilia; Bäuerlein, Michael; Carrari, Fernando; Schauer, Nicolas; Lytovchenko, Anna; Gibon, Yves; Kelly, Amelie A; Loureiro, Marcello; Müller-Röber, Bernd; Willmitzer, Lothar; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2004-07-01

    Acetyl Coenzyme A (acetyl CoA) is required in the mitochondria to fuel the operation of the Krebs cycle and within the cytosolic, peroxisomal and plastidial compartments wherein it acts as the immediate precursor for a wide range of anabolic functions. Since this metabolite is impermeable to membranes it follows that discrete pathways both for its synthesis and for its utilization must be present in each of these organelles and that the size of the various compartmented pools are independently regulated. To determine the specific role of acetyl CoA in the mitochondria we exploited a transgenic approach to introduce a yeast acetyl CoA hydrolase (EC 3.1.2.1.) into this compartment in tobacco plants. Despite the facts that the introduced enzyme was correctly targeted and that there were marked reductions in the levels of citrate and malate and an increase in the acetate content of the transformants, the transgenic plants surprisingly exhibited increased acetyl CoA levels. The lines were further characterised by a severe growth retardation, abnormal leaf colouration and a dramatic reduction in photosynthetic activity correlated with a marked reduction in the levels of transcripts of photosynthesis and in the content of photosynthetic pigments. The altered rate of photosynthesis in the transgenics was also reflected by a modified carbon partitioning in leaves of these lines, however, further studies revealed that this was most likely caused by a decreased source to sink transport of carbohydrate. In summary these results suggest that the content of acetyl CoA is under tight control and that alterations in the level of this central metabolite have severe metabolic and developmental consequences in tobacco.

  13. UV-C-irradiated Arabidopsis and tobacco emit volatiles that trigger genomic instability in neighboring plants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Danna, Cristian H; Zemp, Franz J; Titov, Viktor; Ciftci, Ozan Nazim; Przybylski, Roman; Ausubel, Frederick M; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-10-01

    We have previously shown that local exposure of plants to stress results in a systemic increase in genome instability. Here, we show that UV-C-irradiated plants produce a volatile signal that triggers an increase in genome instability in neighboring nonirradiated Arabidopsis thaliana plants. This volatile signal is interspecific, as UV-C-irradiated Arabidopsis plants transmit genome destabilization to naive tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants and vice versa. We report that plants exposed to the volatile hormones methyl salicylate (MeSA) or methyl jasmonate (MeJA) exhibit a similar level of genome destabilization as UV-C-irradiated plants. We also found that irradiated Arabidopsis plants produce MeSA and MeJA. The analysis of mutants impaired in the synthesis and/or response to salicylic acid (SA) and/or jasmonic acid showed that at least one other volatile compound besides MeSA and MeJA can communicate interplant genome instability. The NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (npr1) mutant, defective in SA signaling, is impaired in both the production and the perception of the volatile signals, demonstrating a key role for NPR1 as a central regulator of genome stability. Finally, various forms of stress resulting in the formation of necrotic lesions also generate a volatile signal that leads to genomic instability.

  14. Genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine enhances thermotolerance of photosystem II in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Wen, Xiaogang; Gong, Hongmei; Lu, Qingtao; Yang, Zhipan; Tang, Yunlai; Liang, Zheng; Lu, Congming

    2007-02-01

    Genetically engineered tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) with the ability to accumulate glycinebetaine was established. The wild type and transgenic plants were exposed to heat treatment (25-50 degrees C) for 4 h in the dark and under growth light intensity (300 mumol m(-2) s(-1)). The analyses of oxygen-evolving activity and chlorophyll fluorescence demonstrated that photosystem II (PSII) in transgenic plants showed higher thermotolerance than in wild type plants in particular when heat stress was performed in the light, suggesting that the accumulation of glycinebetaine leads to increased tolerance to heat-enhanced photoinhibition. This increased tolerance was associated with an improvement on thermostability of the oxygen-evolving complex and the reaction center of PSII. The enhanced tolerance was caused by acceleration of the repair of PSII from heat-enhanced photoinhibition. Under heat stress, there was a significant accumulation of H(2)O(2), O (2) (-) and catalytic Fe in wild type plants but this accumulation was much less in transgenic plants. Heat stress significantly decreased the activities of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monodehydroascorbate reductase in wild type plants whereas the activities of these enzymes either decreased much less or maintained or even increased in transgenic plants. In addition, heat stress increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in wild type plants but this increase was much greater in transgenic plants. Furthermore, transgenic plants also showed higher content of ascorbate and reduced glutathione than that of wild type plants under heat stress. The results suggest that the increased thermotolerance induced by accumulation of glycinebetaine in vivo was associated with the enhancement of the repair of PSII from heat-enhanced photo inhibition, which might be due to less accumulation of reactive oxygen species in transgenic plants.

  15. Overexpression of the synthetic chimeric native-T-phylloplanin-GFP genes optimized for monocot and dicot plants renders enhanced resistance to blue mold disease in tobacco (N. tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak K; Raha, Sumita; Hall, James T; Maiti, Indu B

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the natural plant resistance and to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of phylloplanin against blue mold, we have expressed a synthetic chimeric native-phylloplanin-GFP protein fusion in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. KY14, a cultivar that is highly susceptible to infection by Peronospora tabacina. The coding sequence of the tobacco phylloplanin gene along with its native signal peptide was fused with GFP at the carboxy terminus. The synthetic chimeric gene (native-phylloplanin-GFP) was placed between the modified Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter with duplicated enhancer domains and the terminator sequence from the rbcSE9 gene. The chimeric gene, expressed in transgenic tobacco, was stably inherited in successive plant generations as shown by molecular characterization, GFP quantification, and confocal fluorescent microscopy. Transgenic plants were morphologically similar to wild-type plants and showed no deleterious effects due to transgene expression. Blue mold-sensitivity assays of tobacco lines were performed by applying P. tabacina sporangia to the upper leaf surface. Transgenic lines expressing the fused synthetic native-phyllopanin-GFP gene in the leaf apoplast showed resistance to infection. Our results demonstrate that in vivo expression of a synthetic fused native-phylloplanin-GFP gene in plants can potentially achieve natural protection against microbial plant pathogens, including P. tabacina in tobacco.

  16. Overexpression of the Synthetic Chimeric Native-T-phylloplanin-GFP Genes Optimized for Monocot and Dicot Plants Renders Enhanced Resistance to Blue Mold Disease in Tobacco (N. tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Dipak K.; Hall, James T.; Maiti, Indu B.

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the natural plant resistance and to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of phylloplanin against blue mold, we have expressed a synthetic chimeric native-phylloplanin-GFP protein fusion in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. KY14, a cultivar that is highly susceptible to infection by Peronospora tabacina. The coding sequence of the tobacco phylloplanin gene along with its native signal peptide was fused with GFP at the carboxy terminus. The synthetic chimeric gene (native-phylloplanin-GFP) was placed between the modified Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter with duplicated enhancer domains and the terminator sequence from the rbcSE9 gene. The chimeric gene, expressed in transgenic tobacco, was stably inherited in successive plant generations as shown by molecular characterization, GFP quantification, and confocal fluorescent microscopy. Transgenic plants were morphologically similar to wild-type plants and showed no deleterious effects due to transgene expression. Blue mold-sensitivity assays of tobacco lines were performed by applying P. tabacina sporangia to the upper leaf surface. Transgenic lines expressing the fused synthetic native-phyllopanin-GFP gene in the leaf apoplast showed resistance to infection. Our results demonstrate that in vivo expression of a synthetic fused native-phylloplanin-GFP gene in plants can potentially achieve natural protection against microbial plant pathogens, including P. tabacina in tobacco. PMID:24778589

  17. Extremely low frequency weak magnetic fields enhance resistance of NN tobacco plants to tobacco mosaic virus and elicit stress-related biochemical activities.

    PubMed

    Trebbi, Grazia; Borghini, Francesco; Lazzarato, Lisa; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Calzoni, G Lorenzo; Betti, Lucietta

    2007-04-01

    Increasing evidence has accumulated concerning the biological effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) in different plant models. In the present study, effects of ELF-MFs in tobacco plants reacting to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) with a hypersensitive response (HR) were evaluated. Plants were exposed for 8 or 24 h (either before or after TMV inoculation) to a static MF, at either -17 or 13 microT, combined with a 10 Hz sinusoidal MF with different intensities (25.6 or 28.9 microT). The working variables were the area and number of hypersensitive lesions in leaves. Following ELF-MFs exposure, an increased resistance was detected, particularly after an 8-h treatment, as shown by the decrease in lesion area and number. Moreover, two enzyme activities involved in resistance mechanisms were analyzed: ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL). Uninoculated leaves previously exposed to ELF-MFs in general showed a significant increase relative to controls in ODC and PAL activities, in particular for 13 microT static MF plus 28.9 microT, 10 Hz sinusoidal MF (24 h) treatment. In conclusion, ELF-MFs seem to influence the HR of tobacco to TMV, as shown by the increased resistance and changes in ODC and PAL activities, indicating the reliability of the present plant model in the study of bioelectromagnetic interactions.

  18. Research on Time and Spatial Variability of Soil pH in Sanmenxia Planted Tobacco Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Hongbo; Rui, Gao; Hui, Zhang; Chen, Yanchun; Su, Yongshi

    Geostatistics combined with GIS spatial technology was applied to analyze the time and spatial variability of pH in topsoil(0-20cm) for planted tobacco region in Sanmenxia district. The results indicated that the pH value range form 6.5 to 8.8 and meet to the need of produce high quality tobacco, but the pH value of partial region is high. The pH value accord with logarithm normal distribution, variance coefficient is 15.2% and 4.5% of 2002 and 2007 year respectively. The semivariogram of pH was best described by the exponential model and spatial heterogeneity of pH were 55.77km and 92.39km. The Kriging interpolated method was applied to calculated the unobserved points and was used to generate the spatial and discrepancy map, analyzed the reason of the pH value increase and the method to improve soil. The research supply important method of the Sanmenxia high quality tobacco produce.

  19. Purification of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) protein from transplastomic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Abdoli Nasab, Maryam; Jalali Javaran, Mokhtar; Cusido, Rosa M; Palazon, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Plants are low cost platforms for the production of recombinant proteins, but their complexity renders the purification of plant recombinant proteins more difficult than proteins expressed in yeast or bacteria. Plastid transformation enables high-level expression of foreign genes and the accumulation of recombinant proteins in plastid organelles. Histidine (His) tags are widely used for affinity purification of recombinant proteins in a nickel column. The human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is one of the most important pharmaceutical recombinant proteins involved in the breakdown of blood clots in different parts of the body. The truncated form of the tissue plasminogen activator (K2S) has a longer plasma half-life, better diffusion into the clot, and higher fibrinolytic activity. In a construct designed to insert the K2S gene in the tobacco chloroplast, the sequence of six histidines and a factor Xa protease site was fused to the C-terminus of the K2S protein. The presence and amount of tPA recombinant protein in transplastomic tobacco plants was estimated by ELISA analysis using a specific antibody. The protein was purified from total soluble protein, insoluble protein aggregates and the protein was extracted from the isolated chloroplast using nickel resin and a chromatography column. After digestion of the purified protein with factor Xa, the presence of the purified tPA protein was confirmed by western blot analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Involvement of ethylene in alleviation of Cd toxicity by NaCl in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Binglin; Shang, Shenghua; Jabeen, Zahra; Zhang, Guoping

    2014-03-01

    The possible involvement of ethylene in alleviating cadmium (Cd) toxicity by NaCl was investigated because our previous experiments showed that a low concentration of NaCl could alleviate Cd toxicity of tobacco plants. Tobacco plants exposed to the treatment of a combination of Cd-NaCl exhibited more vigorous growth than did those exposed to the treatment of Cd stress alone, as reflected by greater biomass, longer roots, taller shoots, larger SPAD values and higher photosynthetic rates. The results also indicated that it is Na(+), rather than Cl(-), that alleviates Cd toxicity. Cd-NaCl treatments enhanced and inhibited ethylene production in roots and in leaves, respectively, in comparison with the plants exposed to Cd alone. However, the exogenous application of ethylene did not improve root growth under Cd exposure, indicating that ethylene is not directly involved in the rooting process. It may be assumed that the addition of NaCl into the solution containing Cd regulates root growth by mediating ethylene synthesis.

  1. USE OF MODELING APPROACHES TO UNDERSTAND POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED PLANTS ON PLANT COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model development is of interest to ecologists, regulators and developers, since it may assist theoretical understanding, decision making in experimental design, product development and risk assessment. In order to predict the potential impacts of genetically modified (GM) plants...

  2. USE OF MODELING APPROACHES TO UNDERSTAND POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED PLANTS ON PLANT COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model development is of interest to ecologists, regulators and developers, since it may assist theoretical understanding, decision making in experimental design, product development and risk assessment. In order to predict the potential impacts of genetically modified (GM) plants...

  3. Constitutive expression of mammalian nitric oxide synthase in tobacco plants triggers disease resistance to pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hyun Jin; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Koo, Sung Cheol; Lee, Ju Huck; Park, Chan Young; Choi, Man Soo; Kang, Chang Ho; Baek, Dongwon; Cheong, Yong Hwa; Yun, Dae-Jin; Chung, Woo Sik; Cho, Moo Je; Kim, Min Chul

    2012-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known for its role in the activation of plant defense responses. To examine the involvement and mode of action of NO in plant defense responses, we introduced calmodulin-dependent mammalian neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which controls the CaMV35S promoter, into wild-type and NahG tobacco plants. Constitutive expression of nNOS led to NO production and triggered spontaneous induction of leaf lesions. Transgenic plants accumulated high amounts of H(2)O(2), with catalase activity lower than that in the wild type. nNOS transgenic plants contained high levels of salicylic acid (SA), and they induced an array of SA-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and/or ethylene (ET)-related genes. Consequently, NahG co-expression blocked the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-associated genes in transgenic plants, implying SA is involved in NO-mediated induction of SAR genes. The transgenic plants exhibited enhanced resistance to a spectrum of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Our results suggest a highly ranked regulatory role for NO in SA-, JA-, and/or ET-dependent pathways that lead to disease resistance.

  4. Constitutive Expression of Mammalian Nitric Oxide Synthase in Tobacco Plants Triggers Disease Resistance to Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Hyun Jin; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Koo, Sung Cheol; Lee, Ju Huck; Park, Chan Young; Choi, Man Soo; Kang, Chang Ho; Baek, Dongwon; Cheong, Yong Hwa; Yun, Dae-Jin; Chung, Woo Sik; Cho, Moo Je; Kim, Min Chul

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known for its role in the activation of plant defense responses. To examine the involvement and mode of action of NO in plant defense responses, we introduced calmodulin-dependent mammalian neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which controls the CaMV35S promoter, into wild-type and NahG tobacco plants. Constitutive expression of nNOS led to NO production and triggered spontaneous induction of leaf lesions. Transgenic plants accumulated high amounts of H2O2, with catalase activity lower than that in the wild type. nNOS transgenic plants contained high levels of salicylic acid (SA), and they induced an array of SA-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and/or ethylene (ET)-related genes. Consequently, NahG co-expression blocked the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-associated genes in transgenic plants, implying SA is involved in NO-mediated induction of SAR genes. The transgenic plants exhibited enhanced resistance to a spectrum of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Our results suggest a highly ranked regulatory role for NO in SA-, JA-, and/or ET-dependent pathways that lead to disease resistance. PMID:23124383

  5. Molecular control of transgene escape from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, V; Koivu, K; Kanerva, A; Pehu, E

    2001-02-05

    Potential risks of gene escape from transgenic crops through pollen and seed dispersal are being actively discussed and have slowed down full utilization of gene technology in crop improvement. To ban the transgene flow, barren zones and 'terminator' technology were developed as GMO risk management technologies in transgenic crops. Unfortunately, the technologies have not protected reliably the transgene migration to wild relatives. The present study offers a novel molecular technique to eliminate gene flow from transgenic plants to wild relatives by recoverable block of function (RBF). The RBF consists of a blocking sequence linked to the gene of interest and a recovering sequence, all in one transformable construct. The blocking sequence blocks a certain molecular or physiological function of the host plant. Action of the blocking sequence leads to the death of the host plant or to an alteration in its phenotype resulting in inability for sexual reproduction in nature. The recovering construct recovers the blocked function of the host plant. The recovering construct is regulated externally by a specific chemical or physical treatment of the plants and does not act under natural conditions. In nature, hybrids of the transgenic plants with its wild relatives carrying the RBF will die or be unable to reproduce because of the blocking construct action. A working model of RBF is described in this report as one example of the RBF concept. This RBF example is based on barnase (the blocking construct) and barstar (the recovering construct) gene expression in tobacco under sulfhydryl endopeptidase (SH-EP) and a heat shock (HS) promoter, respectively.

  6. Long-term protection against tobacco mosaic virus induced by the marine alga oligo-sulphated-galactan Poly-Ga in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jeannette; Castro, Jorge; González, Alberto; Barrientos, Herna; Matsuhiro, Betty; Arce, Patricio; Zuñiga, Gustavo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the antiviral effect of the oligo-sulphated galactan Poly-Ga, the leaves of tobacco plants Xhanti(NN) were sprayed with water (control), with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, for increasing numbers of treatments or cultivated for increasing times after treatment. Control and treated plants were infected with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the numbers of necrotic lesions were measured in infected leaves. The number of necrotic lesions decreased with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, with increasing numbers of treatments and with increasing time after treatment, indicating a long-term protection against TMV that mimicks vaccination. In addition, control Xhanti(nn) plants and plants treated with Poly-Ga and cultivated for increasing times after treatment were infected with TMV in the middle part of the plant, and the levels of TMV-capsid protein (CP) transcripts were measured in apical leaves. TMV-CP transcripts decreased in distant leaves, indicating that Poly-Ga induces systemic protection against TMV. The activities of the defence enzymes phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) and the amounts of several phenylpropanoid compounds (PPCs) were measured in control and treated plants without infection. A progressive increase in PAL activity was observed with increasing time after treatment, together with the accumulation of free and conjugated PPCs. In contrast, LOX activity remained unchanged. Interestingly, the increase in PAL activity showed a linear correlation with the decrease in necrotic lesions and the decrease in TMV-CP transcript level. Thus, Poly-Ga induced systemic and long-term protection against TMV in tobacco plants that is determined, at least in part, by a sustained activation of PAL and the accumulation of PPCs with potential antiviral activity.

  7. Homogalacturonan-modifying enzymes: structure, expression, and roles in plants

    PubMed Central

    Sénéchal, Fabien; Wattier, Christopher; Rustérucci, Christine; Pelloux, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the changes affecting the plant cell wall is a key element in addressing its functional role in plant growth and in the response to stress. Pectins, which are the main constituents of the primary cell wall in dicot species, play a central role in the control of cellular adhesion and thereby of the rheological properties of the wall. This is likely to be a major determinant of plant growth. How the discrete changes in pectin structure are mediated is thus a key issue in our understanding of plant development and plant responses to changes in the environment. In particular, understanding the remodelling of homogalacturonan (HG), the most abundant pectic polymer, by specific enzymes is a current challenge in addressing its fundamental role. HG, a polymer that can be methylesterified or acetylated, can be modified by HGMEs (HG-modifying enzymes) which all belong to large multigenic families in all species sequenced to date. In particular, both the degrees of substitution (methylesterification and/or acetylation) and polymerization can be controlled by specific enzymes such as pectin methylesterases (PMEs), pectin acetylesterases (PAEs), polygalacturonases (PGs), or pectate lyases-like (PLLs). Major advances in the biochemical and functional characterization of these enzymes have been made over the last 10 years. This review aims to provide a comprehensive, up to date summary of the recent data concerning the structure, regulation, and function of these fascinating enzymes in plant development and in response to biotic stresses. PMID:25056773

  8. Expression of a calmodulin methylation mutant affects the growth and development of transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D M; Besl, L; Oh, S H; Masterson, R V; Schell, J; Stacey, G

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic plants were constructed that express two foreign calmodulins (VU-1 and VU-3 calmodulins) derived from a cloned synthetic calmodulin gene. VU-1 calmodulin, similar to endogenous plant calmodulin, possesses a lysine residue at position 115 and undergoes posttranslational methylation. VU-3 calmodulin is a site-directed mutant of VU-1 calmodulin that is identical in sequence except for the substitution of an arginine at position 115 and thus is incapable of methylation. Both calmodulin genes, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, were expressed in transgenic tobacco. Foreign calmodulin protein accumulated in plant tissues to levels equivalent to that of the endogenous calmodulin. All transformed lines of VU-1 plants were indistinguishable from untransformed controls with respect to growth and development. However, all transformed lines of VU-3 plants were characterized by decreased stem internode growth, reduced seed production, and reduced seed and pollen viability. The data suggest that these phenotypes are the result of the expression of the calmodulin mutant rather than the position of transferred DNA insertion or the overall alteration of calmodulin levels. Analyses of the activity of the purified transgenic calmodulins suggest that calmodulin-dependent NAD kinase is among the potential targets that may have altered regulation in VU-3 transgenic plants. Images PMID:1325656

  9. Chloride regulates leaf cell size and water relations in tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Navarro, Juan D.; Brumós, Javier; Rosales, Miguel A.; Cubero-Font, Paloma; Talón, Manuel; Colmenero-Flores, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Chloride (Cl–) is a micronutrient that accumulates to macronutrient levels since it is normally available in nature and actively taken up by higher plants. Besides a role as an unspecific cell osmoticum, no clear biological roles have been explicitly associated with Cl– when accumulated to macronutrient concentrations. To address this question, the glycophyte tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Habana) has been treated with a basal nutrient solution supplemented with one of three salt combinations containing the same cationic balance: Cl–-based (CL), nitrate-based (N), and sulphate+phosphate-based (SP) treatments. Under non-saline conditions (up to 5mM Cl–) and no water limitation, Cl– specifically stimulated higher leaf cell size and led to a moderate increase of plant fresh and dry biomass mainly due to higher shoot expansion. When applied in the 1–5mM range, Cl– played specific roles in regulating leaf osmotic potential and turgor, allowing plants to improve leaf water balance parameters. In addition, Cl– also altered water relations at the whole-plant level through reduction of plant transpiration. This was a consequence of a lower stomatal conductance, which resulted in lower water loss and greater photosynthetic and integrated water-use efficiency. In contrast to Cl–, these effects were not observed for essential anionic macronutrients such as nitrate, sulphate, and phosphate. We propose that the abundant uptake and accumulation of Cl– responds to adaptive functions improving water homeostasis in higher plants. PMID:26602947

  10. Exploration of horizontal gene transfer between transplastomic tobacco and plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Monier, Jean-Michel; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-10-01

    The likelihood of gene transfer from transgenic plants to bacteria is dependent on the transgene copy number and on the presence of homologous sequences for recombination. The large number of chloroplast genomes in a plant cell as well as the prokaryotic origin of the transgene may thus significantly increase the likelihood of gene transfer from transplastomic plants to bacteria. In order to assess the probability of such a transfer, bacterial isolates, screened for their ability to colonize decaying tobacco plant tissue and possessing DNA sequence similarity to the chloroplastic genes accD and rbcL flanking the transgene (aadA), were tested for their ability to take up extracellular DNA (broad host-range pBBR1MCS-3-derived plasmid, transplastomic plant DNA and PCR products containing the genes accD-aadA-rbcL) by natural or electrotransformation. The results showed that among the 16 bacterial isolates tested, six were able to accept foreign DNA and acquire the spectinomycin resistance conferred by the aadA gene on plasmid, but none of them managed to integrate transgenic DNA in their chromosome. Our results provide no indication that the theoretical gene transfer-enhancing properties of transplastomic plants cause horizontal gene transfer at rates above those found in other studies with nuclear transgenes.

  11. Chloride regulates leaf cell size and water relations in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Franco-Navarro, Juan D; Brumós, Javier; Rosales, Miguel A; Cubero-Font, Paloma; Talón, Manuel; Colmenero-Flores, José M

    2016-02-01

    Chloride (Cl(-)) is a micronutrient that accumulates to macronutrient levels since it is normally available in nature and actively taken up by higher plants. Besides a role as an unspecific cell osmoticum, no clear biological roles have been explicitly associated with Cl(-) when accumulated to macronutrient concentrations. To address this question, the glycophyte tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Habana) has been treated with a basal nutrient solution supplemented with one of three salt combinations containing the same cationic balance: Cl(-)-based (CL), nitrate-based (N), and sulphate+phosphate-based (SP) treatments. Under non-saline conditions (up to 5 mM Cl(-)) and no water limitation, Cl(-) specifically stimulated higher leaf cell size and led to a moderate increase of plant fresh and dry biomass mainly due to higher shoot expansion. When applied in the 1-5 mM range, Cl(-) played specific roles in regulating leaf osmotic potential and turgor, allowing plants to improve leaf water balance parameters. In addition, Cl(-) also altered water relations at the whole-plant level through reduction of plant transpiration. This was a consequence of a lower stomatal conductance, which resulted in lower water loss and greater photosynthetic and integrated water-use efficiency. In contrast to Cl(-), these effects were not observed for essential anionic macronutrients such as nitrate, sulphate, and phosphate. We propose that the abundant uptake and accumulation of Cl(-) responds to adaptive functions improving water homeostasis in higher plants.

  12. Use of buckwheat seed protease inhibitor gene for improvement of tobacco and potato plant resistance to biotic stress.

    PubMed

    Khadeeva, N V; Kochieva, E Z; Tcherednitchenko, M Yu; Yakovleva, E Yu; Sydoruk, K V; Bogush, V G; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A

    2009-03-01

    The possibility to use agrobacterial transformation of leaf discs to produce resistance to bacterial infections in tobacco and potato plants by introduction of a single gene encoding the serine proteinase inhibitor BWI-1a (ISP) from buckwheat seeds is shown. All studied PCR-positive transgenic plants exhibited antibacterial activity in biotests. It was shown that the presence of just a single gene of serine proteinase inhibitor provides sufficient protection at least against two bacterial phytopathogens, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Clavibacter michiganensis sbsp. michiganensis. The biotest including tobacco plant infection by the white wings butterfly in the green house has also demonstrated the existence of protective effect in transgenic tobacco plants. Significant genotypic variations in the protection efficiency were found between members of different genera of the same family (potato and tobacco) as well as between different lines of the same species. Northern blot analysis of four transgenic potato lines and three tobacco lines transformed by a vector plasmid containing the ISP gene of serine proteinases BWI-1a from buckwheat seeds has shown the presence of the expected size mRNA transcript.

  13. Colocalization of barley lectin and sporamin in vacuoles of transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, M.R.; Borkhsenious, O.N.; Raikhel, N.V. ); Matsuoka, K.; Nakamura, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Various targeting motifs have been identified for plant proteins delivered to the vacuole. For barley (Hordeum vulgare) lectin, a typical Gramineae lectin and defense-related protein, the vacuolar information is contained in a carboxyl-terminal propeptide. In contrast, the vacuolar targeting information of sporamin, a storage protein from the tuberous roots of the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), is encoded in an amino-terminal propeptide. Both proteins were expressed simultaneously in transgenic tobacco plants to enable analysis of their posttranslational processing and subcellular localization by pulse-chase labeling and electron-microscopic immunocytochemical methods. The pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that processing and delivery to the vacuole are not impaired by the simultaneous expression of barley lectin and sporamin. Both proteins were targeted quantitatively to the vacuole, indication that the carboxyl-terminal and amino-terminal propeptided are equally recognized by the vacuolar protein-sorting machinery. Double-labeling experiments showed that barley lectin and sporamin accumulate in the same vacuole of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf and root cells. 35 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Contribution of AM inoculation and cattle manure to lead and cadmium phytoremediation by tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fa Yuan; Shi, Zhao Yong; Xu, Xiao Feng; Wang, Xu Gang; Li, You Jun

    2013-04-01

    Lead and cadmium are both highly toxic pollutants and pose potential risks to the environment and human health. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) inoculation and organic amendments may make a potential contribution to phytoremediation of these toxic metals, but their effects remain unclear. We conducted a pot culture experiment to study the contribution of AM inoculation and/or cattle manure to phytoremediation of two soils artificially polluted with 0, 350, 500 and 1000 mg Pb per kg soil or 0, 1, 10, 100 mg Cd per kg soil using tobacco plants. Results showed that AM colonization was greatly reduced when exposed to more heavy metals especially Cd, whereas organic amendment alleviated metal stress and showed protective effects. In general, AM inoculation and cattle manure, singly or in combination, all significantly increased tobacco growth and Pb and Cd accumulation in shoots and roots, while decreased DTPA-extractable Pb and Cd concentrations in soil, and combination treatments (MN) produced the most pronounced positive effects. Improved plant P nutrition, higher soil pH and lower available metal concentrations contributed by AM inoculation and/or organic amendment may be the main strategies to alleviate metal toxicity and enhance phytoremediation efficiency. Our results indicate that AM fungi and organic manure play a synergistic positive role both in phytoextraction and phytostabilization of Cd and Pb.

  15. [Morphological analysis of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra)].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Safiullina, M G; Kniazev, A V; Chemeris, A V

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra), which encodes alpha-expansin, were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increased size of epidermic and mesophyll cells of leaves. However, the size of leaves remained normal. Overexpression of the PnEXPA3 gene provided stimulatory effect only on the stem length. Other morphological traits of the transgenic plants remained unchanged.

  16. Effects of tobacco ethylene receptor mutations on receptor kinase activity, plant growth and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Liu, Jun; Lei, Gang; Liu, Yun-Feng; Li, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Jian-Jun; Hao, Yu-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Lin, Qing; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2009-09-01

    Ethylene receptor is the first component of ethylene signaling that regulates plant growth, development and stress responses. Previously, we have demonstrated that tobacco subfamily 2 ethylene receptor NTHK1 had Ser/Thr kinase activity, and overexpression of NTHK1 caused large rosette, reduced ethylene sensitivity, and increased salt sensitivity in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Here we found that N-box mutation in the NTHK1 kinase domain abolished the kinase activity and led to disruption of NTHK1 roles in conferring reduced ethylene sensitivity and salt sensitive response in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. However, N-box mutation had partial effects on NTHK1 regulation of rosette growth and expression of salt- and ethylene-responsive genes AtNAC2, AtERF1 and AtCor6.6. Mutation of conserved residues in the H box did not affect kinase activity, seedling growth, ethylene sensitivity or salt-induced epinasty in transgenic plants but did influence NTHK1 function in control of specific salt- and ethylene-responsive gene expression. Compared with NTHK1, the tobacco subfamily 1 ethylene receptor NtETR1 had His kinase activity and played a weak role in regulation of rosette growth, triple response and salt response. Mutation of the conserved His residue in the NtETR1 H box eliminated phosphorylation and altered the effect of Ntetr1-1 on reporter gene activity. These results imply that the Ser/Thr kinase activity of NTHK1 is differentially required for various responses, and NTHK1 plays a larger role than NtETR1.

  17. In utero tobacco exposure is associated with modified effects of maternal factors on fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Aagaard-Tillery, Kjersti M; Porter, T Flint; Lane, Robert H; Varner, Michael W; Lacoursiere, D Yvette

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether maternal tobacco use is associated with an attenuation in fetal birthweight among women with nutritional and uteroplacental constraints. A population-based retrospective analysis of term (37 weeks or longer) singleton pregnancies delivered in Utah from 1991 to 2001. Birthweight (BW) and percent small for gestational age (SGA) (less than 10% for gestational age) among self-identified smokers and nonsmokers were compared. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to measure the association of maternal smoking with delivery of an SGA infant controlling for potential confounders across maternal strata. Among the 424,912 gestations, 37,076 occurred in self-identified smokers. Mean BW was significantly less and the prevalence of SGA infants was significantly greater in tobacco-exposed infants across all maternal BMI strata (P < .001) as well as pregnancies complicated by diabetes (P < .001) and hypertensive disorders (P < .001). In a multivariable logistic regression model, tobacco exposure remained the significant associative factor for SGA (OR 3.53, 95% confidence interval 2.61 to 4.79) after selecting for the first birth in the study interval (n = 283,916). Self-identified tobacco use increases the risk of a SGA infant at term across maternal strata.

  18. Immunodiagnostic Properties of Wucheraria bancrofti SXP-1, a Potential Filarial Diagnostic Candidate Expressed in Tobacco Plant, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Mathangi; Chakravarthi, M; Charles, S Jason; Harunipriya, P; Jaiganesh, S; Subramonian, N; Kaliraj, P

    2015-08-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants were developed expressing WbSXP-1, a diagnostic antigen isolated from the cDNA library of L3 stage larvae of Wucheraria bancrofti. This antigen produced by recombinant Escherichia coli has been demonstrated by to be successful as potential diagnostic candidate against lymphatic filariasis. A rapid format simple and qualitative flow through immune-filtration diagnostic kit has been developed for the identification of IgG antibodies to the recombinant WbSXP-1 and is being marketed by M/S Span Diagnostics Ltd in India and Africa. Here, we present the results of experiments on the transformation and expression of the same filarial antigen, WbSXP-1, in tobacco plant, Nicotiana tabacum, to produce plant-based diagnostic antigen. It was possible to successfully transform the tobacco plant with WbSXP-1, the integration of the parasite-specific gene in plants was confirmed by PCR amplification and the expression of the filarial protein by Western blotting. The immunoreactivity of the plant-produced WbSXP-1 was assessed based on its reaction with the monoclonal antibodies developed against the E. coli-produced protein. Immunological screening using clinical sera from patients indicates that the plant-produced protein is comparable to E. coli-produced diagnostic antigen. The result demonstrated that plants can be used as suitable expression systems for the production of diagnostic proteins against lymphatic filariasis, a neglected tropical infectious disease which has a negative impact on socioeconomic development. This is the first report of the integration, expression and efficacy of a diagnostic candidate of lymphatic filariasis in plants.Key MessageTransgenic tobacco plants with WbSXP-1, a filarial diagnostic candidate, were developed. The plant-produced protein showed immunoreactivity on par with the E. coli product.

  19. Effects of root-zone acidity on utilization of nitrate and ammonium in tobacco plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. 'Coker 319') plants were grown for 28 days in flowing nutrient culture containing either 1.0 mM NO3- or 1.0 mM NH4+ as the nitrogen source in a complete nutrient solution. Acidities of the solutions were controlled at pH 6.0 or 4.0 for each nitrogen source. Plants were sampled at intervals of 6 to 8 days for determination of dry matter and nitrogen accumulation. Specific rates of NO3- or NH4+ uptake (rate of uptake per unit root mass) were calculated from these data. Net photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area were measured on attached leaves by infrared gas analysis. When NO3- [correction of NO-] was the sole nitrogen source, root growth and nitrogen uptake rate were unaffected by pH of the solution, and photosynthetic activity of leaves and accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in the whole plant were similar. When NH4+ was the nitrogen source, photosynthetic rate of leaves and accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in the whole plant were not statistically different from NO3(-) -fed plants when acidity of the solution was controlled at pH 6.0. When acidity for NH4(+) -fed plants was increased to pH 4.0, however, specific rate of NH4+ uptake decreased by about 50% within the first 6 days of treatment. The effect of acidity on root function was associated with a decreased rate of accumulation of nitrogen in shoots that was accompanied by a rapid cessation of leaf development between days 6 and 13. The decline in leaf growth rate of NH4(+) -fed plants at pH 4.0 was followed by reductions in photosynthetic rate per unit leaf area. These responses of NH4(+) -fed plants to increased root-zone acidity are characteristic of the sequence of responses that occur during onset of nitrogen stress.

  20. Effects of root-zone acidity on utilization of nitrate and ammonium in tobacco plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. 'Coker 319') plants were grown for 28 days in flowing nutrient culture containing either 1.0 mM NO3- or 1.0 mM NH4+ as the nitrogen source in a complete nutrient solution. Acidities of the solutions were controlled at pH 6.0 or 4.0 for each nitrogen source. Plants were sampled at intervals of 6 to 8 days for determination of dry matter and nitrogen accumulation. Specific rates of NO3- or NH4+ uptake (rate of uptake per unit root mass) were calculated from these data. Net photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area were measured on attached leaves by infrared gas analysis. When NO3- [correction of NO-] was the sole nitrogen source, root growth and nitrogen uptake rate were unaffected by pH of the solution, and photosynthetic activity of leaves and accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in the whole plant were similar. When NH4+ was the nitrogen source, photosynthetic rate of leaves and accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in the whole plant were not statistically different from NO3(-) -fed plants when acidity of the solution was controlled at pH 6.0. When acidity for NH4(+) -fed plants was increased to pH 4.0, however, specific rate of NH4+ uptake decreased by about 50% within the first 6 days of treatment. The effect of acidity on root function was associated with a decreased rate of accumulation of nitrogen in shoots that was accompanied by a rapid cessation of leaf development between days 6 and 13. The decline in leaf growth rate of NH4(+) -fed plants at pH 4.0 was followed by reductions in photosynthetic rate per unit leaf area. These responses of NH4(+) -fed plants to increased root-zone acidity are characteristic of the sequence of responses that occur during onset of nitrogen stress.

  1. [Effects of soil, climate, and their interaction on some neutral volatile aroma components in flue-cured tobacco leaves from high quality tobacco planting regions of Hunan Province].

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiao-Hua; Xie, Peng-Fei; Peng, Xin-Hui; Yi, Jian-Hua; Zhou, Ji-Heng; Zhou, Qing-Ming; Pu, Wen-Xuan; Dai, Yuan-Gang

    2010-08-01

    A pot experiment with the soils from Yongzhou, Liuyang, and Sangzhi, the high-quality tobacco planting regions of Hunan Province, was conducted to study the effects of climate, soil, and their interaction on some neutral volatile aroma components in flue-cured tobacco leaves. The contents of test neutral volatile aroma components in the flue-cured tobacco leaves were of medium variation, and the variation intensity was decreased in the order of dihydroactinolide, damascenone, furfural, total megastigmatrienone, and beta-ionone. Climate, soil, and their interaction affected the neutral volatile aroma components in different degrees. The furfural content was most affected by climate, the damascenone content was most affected by climate and by soil, the total megastigmatrienone and beta-ionone contents were most affected by the interaction of soil and climate, while the dihydroactinolide content was less affected by soil, climate, and their interaction. The contribution of climate, soil, and their interaction to the contents of the five aroma components was 40.82%, 20.67%, and 38.51%, respectively. During different growth periods of tobacco, different climate factors had different effects on the neutral volatile aroma components. The rainfall, cloudiness, and mean air temperature at rooting stage, the diurnal temperature amplitude, sunshine time, and evaporation at vigorous growth stage, and the rainfall, evaporation, and mean air temperature at maturing stage were the top three climate factors affecting the contents of the neutral volatile aroma components in flue-tobacco leaves. For the soil factors, the available potassium, available phosphorus, and pH were the top three factors affecting the contents of the five components.

  2. Characterization of photosystem II photochemistry in transgenic tobacco plants with lowered Rubisco activase content.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Zhang, Aihong; Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2010-11-15

    Rubisco activase plays an important role in the regulation of CO(2) assimilation. However, it is unknown how activase regulates photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry. To investigate the effects of Rubisco activase on PSII photochemistry, we obtained transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with 50% (i7), 25% (i28), and 5% (i46) activase levels as compared to wild type plants by using a gene encoding tobacco activase for the RNAi construct. Both CO(2) assimilation and PSII activity were significantly reduced only in transgenic i28 and i46 plants, suggesting that activase deficiency led to decreased PSII activity. Flash-induced fluorescence kinetics indicated that activase deficiency resulted in a slow electron transfer between Q(A) (primary quinine electron acceptor of PSII) and Q(B) (secondary quinone electron acceptor of PSII). Thermoluminescence measurements revealed that activase deficiency induced a shift of S(2)Q(A)(-) and S(2)Q(B)(-) recombinations to higher temperatures in parallel, and a decrease in the intensities of the thermoluminescence emissions. Activase deficiency also dampened the period-four oscillation of the thermoluminescence B-band. Protein gel blot analysis showed that activase deficiency resulted in a significant decrease in the content of D1, D2, CP43, CP47, and PsbO proteins. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that activase deficiency induced a significant decrease in the number of grana stacks per chloroplast and discs per grana stack. Our results suggest that activase plays an important role in maintaining PSII function and chloroplast development.

  3. Mechanisms of the light-dependent induction of cell death in tobacco plants with delayed senescence.

    PubMed

    Wingler, Astrid; Brownhill, Emily; Pourtau, Nathalie

    2005-11-01

    The relationship between leaf senescence and cell death was investigated using tobacco with delayed senescence due to auto-regulated production of cytokinin (SAG12-IPT). Although leaf senescence ultimately results in cell death, the results show that senescence and cell death can be uncoupled: in nutrient-deficient, but not in fertilized SAG12-IPT plants, necrotic lesions were detected in old, but otherwise green leaves. By contrast, wild-type leaves of the same age were yellow, but not necrotic. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis revealed an over-reduction of the electron transport chain in old SAG12-IPT leaves, in combination with characteristic spatial patterns of minimum fluorescence (F0) quantum efficiency of open photosystem II centres (F(v)/F(m)) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), as determined by fluorescence imaging. The same patterns of F0, F(v)/F(m), and NPQ were induced by incubation of leaf discs from nutrient-deficient SAG12-IPT plants under illumination, but not in the dark, indicating that light-dependent reactions were responsible for the cell death. RT-PCR analysis showed that the pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-1b and PR-Q were strongly induced in old SAG12-IPT tobacco leaves with necrotic lesions. In addition, the ethylene-synthesis gene ACO was induced before lesions became visible in SAG12-IPT. It is proposed that over-reduction of the electron transport chain in combination with decreased electron consumption due to nutrient-deficiency led to oxidative stress, which, mediated by ethylene formation, can induce PR gene expression and hypersensitive cell death. Probably as a consequence of inefficient nutrient mobilization, flower development was prematurely aborted and reproduction thereby impaired in nutrient-deficient SAG12-IPT plants.

  4. Expression of a chitinase gene from Metarhizium anisopliae in tobacco plants confers resistance against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kern, Marcelo Fernando; Maraschin, Simone de Faria; Vom Endt, Débora; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Pasquali, Giancarlo

    2010-04-01

    The chit1 gene from the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, encoding the endochitinase CHIT42, was placed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, and the resulting construct was transferred to tobacco. Seventeen kanamycin-resistant transgenic lines were recovered, and the presence of the transgene was confirmed by polymerase chain reactions and Southern blot hybridization. The number of chit1 copies was determined to be varying from one to four. Copy number had observable effects neither on plant growth nor development. Substantial heterogeneity concerning production of the recombinant chitinase, and both general and specific chitinolytic activities were detected in leaf extracts from primary transformants. The highest chitinase activities were found in plants harboring two copies of chit1 inserts at different loci. Progeny derived from self-pollination of the primary transgenics revealed a stable inheritance pattern, with transgene segregation following a mendelian dihybrid ratio. Two selected plants expressing high levels of CHIT42 were consistently resistant to the soilborne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, suggesting a direct relationship between enzyme activity and reduction of foliar area affected by fungal lesions. To date, this is the first report of resistance to fungal attack in plants mediated by a recombinant chitinase from an entomopathogenic and acaricide fungus.

  5. Light-dependent regulation of chlorophyll b biosynthesis in chlorophyllide a oxygenase overexpressing tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Gopal K; Biswal, Ajaya K; Reddy, Vanga S; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2005-01-14

    Chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO) that converts chlorophyllide a to chlorophyllide b was overexpressed in tobacco to increase chlorophyll (Chl) b biosynthesis and alter the Chl a/b ratio. Transgenic plants along with their wild-type cultivars were grown in low and high light intensities. In low light there was 20% increase in chlorophyll b contents in transgenic plants, which resulted in 16% reduction in the Chl a/b ratio. In high light, total Chl contents were 31% higher in transgenic plants than those of wild type. The increase in Chl a was 19% and that of Chl b was 72% leading to 31% decline of Chl a/b ratio. The increase in Chl b contents was accompanied by enhanced CAO expression that was highly pronounced in low light. As compared to low light, in high light Lhcb1 and Chl a/b transcripts abundance was significantly increased in transgenic plants suggesting a close relationship between Chl b synthesis and cab gene expression. However, there was a small increase in expression of LHCII proteins, which did not correspond to 72% increase in Chl b content in transgenic line, implying that LHCPII has the ability to bind more Chl b molecules.

  6. Expression of root glutamate dehydrogenase genes in tobacco plants subjected to boron deprivation.

    PubMed

    Beato, Víctor M; Teresa Navarro-Gochicoa, M; Rexach, Jesús; Begoña Herrera-Rodríguez, M; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J; Kempa, Stefan; Weckwerth, Wolfram; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2011-11-01

    Recently it has been reported that boron (B) deficiency increases the expression of Nicotiana tabacum asparagine synthetase (AS) gene in roots, and that AS might play a main role as a detoxifying mechanism to convert ammonium into asparagine. Interestingly, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) genes, Ntgdh-NAD;A1 and Ntgdh-NAD;B2, were up-regulated when tobacco roots were subjected to B deprivation for 8 and 24 h. In addition, aminating and deaminating GDH (EC 1.4.1.2) activities were higher in B-deficient than in B-sufficient plants after 24 h of B deficiency. Ammonium concentrations were kept sufficiently low and with similar values in B-deficient roots when compared to control. Glucose and fructose contents decreased after 24 h of B deprivation. This drop in hexoses, which was corroborated by metabolomic analysis, correlated with higher GDH gene expression. Furthermore, metabolomic profiling showed that concentrations of several organic acids, phenolics, and amino acids increased after 24 h of B deficiency. Our results suggest that GDH enzyme plays an important role in metabolic acclimation of tobacco roots to B deprivation. A putative model to explain these results is proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Female sterile tobacco plants are produced by stigma-specific cell ablation.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M H; Goldberg, R B; Mariani, C

    1994-01-01

    We identified a tobacco stigma-specific gene, designated STIG1. The STIG1 gene is developmentally regulated and expressed specifically in the stigmatic secretory zone. We used a chimeric STIG1-GUS gene to show that the stigma-specific STIG1 gene expression pattern is controlled primarily at the transcriptional level. We constructed a stigma-specific cytotoxic gene by fusing the STIG1 gene 5' regulatory region with the coding sequence of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens barnase gene, to assess the role of the stigmatic secretory zone in the pollination process. Pistils of transgenic STIG1-barnase tobacco plants undergo normal development, but lack the stigmatic secretory zone and are female sterile. Pollen grains germinate on the ablated 'stigmatic' surface, but are unable to penetrate the transmitting tissue of the style. Application of stigmatic exudate from wild-type pistils to the ablated surface increases the efficiency of pollen tube germination and growth and restores the capacity of pollen tubes to penetrate the style. Our data demonstrate the importance of the stigmatic secretory zone in the pollination process and provide an approach to identify compounds produced by the stigma that are critical for successful pollination and fertilization to occur. Images PMID:8039494

  8. Enhanced Whitefly Resistance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Expressing Double Stranded RNA of v-ATPase A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Nidhi; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verma, Praveen C.; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa; Tuli, Rakesh; Singh, Pradhyumna K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA) designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi), thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA) coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. Conclusions/Significance Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops. PMID:24595215

  9. Enhanced whitefly resistance in transgenic tobacco plants expressing double stranded RNA of v-ATPase A gene.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Nidhi; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verma, Praveen C; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa; Tuli, Rakesh; Singh, Pradhyumna K

    2014-01-01

    Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA) designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi), thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA) coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops.

  10. Nitrogen enrichment modifies plant community structure via changes to plant-soil feedback.

    PubMed

    Manning, P; Morrison, S A; Bonkowski, M; Bardgett, R D

    2008-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that N enrichment modifies plant-soil feedback relationships, resulting in changes to plant community composition. This was done in a two-phase glasshouse experiment. In the first phase, we grew eight annual plant species in monoculture at two levels of N addition. Plants were harvested at senescence and the effect of each species on a range of soil properties was measured. In the second phase, the eight plant species were grown in multi-species mixtures in the eight soils conditioned by the species in the first phase, at both levels of N addition. At senescence, species performance was measured as aboveground biomass. We found that in the first phase, plant species identity strongly influenced several soil properties, including microbial and protist biomass, soil moisture content and the availability of several soil nutrients. Species effects on the soil were mostly independent of N addition and several were strongly correlated with plant biomass. In the second phase, both the performance of individual species and overall community structure were influenced by the interacting effects of the species identity of the previous soil occupant and the rate of N addition. This indicates that N enrichment modified plant-soil feedback. The performance of two species correlated with differences in soil N availability that were generated by the species formerly occupying the soil. However, negative feedback (poorer performance on the soil of conspecifics relative to that of heterospecifics) was only observed for one species. In conclusion, we provide evidence that N enrichment modifies plant-soil feedback relationships and that these modifications may affect plant community composition. Field testing and further investigations into which mechanisms dominate feedback are required before we fully understand how and when feedback processes determine plant community responses to N enrichment.

  11. Overexpression of the Wheat Expansin Gene TaEXPA2 Improved Seed Production and Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanhui; Han, Yangyang; Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Shan; Kong, Xiangzhu; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Expansins are cell wall proteins that are grouped into two main families, α-expansins and β-expansins, and they are implicated in the control of cell extension via the disruption of hydrogen bonds between cellulose and matrix glucans. TaEXPA2 is an α-expansin gene identified in wheat. Based on putative cis-regulatory elements in the TaEXPA2 promoter sequence and the expression pattern induced when polyethylene glycol (PEG) is used to mimic water stress, we hypothesized that TaEXPA2 is involved in plant drought tolerance and plant development. Through transient expression of 35S::TaEXPA2-GFP in onion epidermal cells, TaEXPA2 was localized to the cell wall. Constitutive expression of TaEXPA2 in tobacco improved seed production by increasing capsule number, not seed size, without having any effect on plant growth patterns. The transgenic tobacco exhibited a significantly greater tolerance to water-deficiency stress than did wild-type (WT) plants. We found that under drought stress, the transgenic plants maintained a better water status. The accumulated content of osmotic adjustment substances, such as proline, in TaEXPA2 transgenic plants was greater than that in WT plants. Transgenic plants also displayed greater antioxidative competence as indicated by their lower malondialdehyde (MDA) content, relative electrical conductivity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation than did WT plants. This result suggests that the transgenic plants suffer less damage from ROS under drought conditions. The activities of some antioxidant enzymes as well as expression levels of several genes encoding key antioxidant enzymes were higher in the transgenic plants than in the WT plants under drought stress. Collectively, our results suggest that ectopic expression of the wheat expansin gene TaEXPA2 improves seed production and drought tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa YC0136, a Plant Growth–Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Tobacco Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Liu, Kai; Li, Yuhuan; Wang, Chengqiang; Hou, Qihui; Xu, Wenfeng; Fan, Lingchao; Zhao, Jian; Gou, Jianyu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paenibacillus polymyxa strain YC0136 is a plant growth–promoting rhizobacterium with antimicrobial activity, which was isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of P. polymyxa YC0136. Several genes with antifungal and antibacterial activity were discovered. PMID:28183774

  13. [Ectopic expression of the PnANTL1 and PnANTL2 black poplar genes in transgenic tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Il'iasova, A A; Chemeris, A V

    2012-10-01

    Four putative orthologs of the AINTEGUMENTA gene were found in the poplar (Populus trichocarpa) genome. Two of them, which we called PnANTL1 and PnANTL2, were isolated from black poplar (Populus nigra L.) and transgenic tobacco plants were generated on their basis. Tobacco plants that were transgenic for the PnANTL1 gene were characterized by increased leaf length, smaller flower size, and different defects in the development of the corolla and stamens. Tobacco plants that were transgenic for the PnANTL2 gene were characterized by an increased length of leaves and larger flowers. The increase in the leaf size in all transgenic plants was determined by stimulation of cell expansion; the number of cells was even reduced in the case of the PnANTL1 gene. Ectopic expression of the PnANTL1 and PnANTL2 genes promoted an increase in the level of mRNA of some tobacco expansins. The data we obtained demonstrate the involvement of transcription factors of the AP2 subfamily in the regulation of cell expansion.

  14. Animal nutrition with feeds from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Flachowsky, Gerhard; Chesson, Andrew; Aulrich, Karen

    2005-02-01

    Plant breeders have made and will continue to make important contributions toward meeting the need for more and better feed and food. The use of new techniques to modify the genetic makeup of plants to improve their properties has led to a new generation of crops, grains and their by-products for feed. The use of ingredients and products from genetically modified plants (GMP) in animal nutrition properly raises many questions and issues, such as the role of a nutritional assessment of the modified feed or feed additive as part of safety assessment, the possible influence of genetically modified (GM) products on animal health and product quality and the persistence of the recombinant DNA and of the 'novel' protein in the digestive tract and tissues of food-producing animals. During the last few years many studies have determined the nutrient value of GM feeds compared to their conventional counterparts and some have additionally followed the fate of DNA and novel protein. The results available to date are reassuring and reveal no significant differences in the safety and nutritional value of feedstuffs containing material derived from the so-called 1st generation of genetically modified plants (those with unchanged gross composition) in comparison with non-GM varieties. In addition, no residues of recombinant DNA or novel proteins have been found in any organ or tissue samples obtained from animals fed with GMP. These results indicate that for compositionally equivalent GMP routine-feeding studies with target species generally add little to nutritional and safety assessment. However, the strategies devised for the nutritional and safety assessment of the 1st generation products will be much more difficult to apply to 2nd generation GMP in which significant changes in constituents have been deliberately introduced (e.g., increased fatty acids or amino acids content or a reduced concentration of undesirable constituents). It is suggested that studies made with animals

  15. The Expression of a Xylanase Targeted to ER-Protein Bodies Provides a Simple Strategy to Produce Active Insoluble Enzyme Polymers in Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Llop-Tous, Immaculada; Ortiz, Miriam; Torrent, Margarita; Ludevid, M. Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Background Xylanases deserve particular attention due to their potential application in the feed, pulp bleaching and paper industries. We have developed here an efficient system for the production of an active xylanase in tobacco plants fused to a proline-rich domain (Zera) of the maize storage protein γ-zein. Zera is a self-assembling domain able to form protein aggregates in vivo packed in newly formed endoplasmic reticulum-derived organelles known as protein bodies (PBs). Methodology/Principal Findings Tobacco leaves were transiently transformed with a binary vector containing the Zera-xylanase coding region, which was optimized for plant expression, under the control of the 35S CaMV promoter. The fusion protein was efficiently expressed and stored in dense PBs, resulting in yields of up to 9% of total protein. Zera-xylanase was post-translationally modified with high-mannose-type glycans. Xylanase fused to Zera was biologically active not only when solubilized from PBs but also in its insoluble form. The resistance of insoluble Zera-xylanase to trypsin digestion demonstrated that the correct folding of xylanase in PBs was not impaired by Zera oligomerization. The activity of insoluble Zera-xylanase was enhanced when substrate accessibility was facilitated by physical treatments such as ultrasound. Moreover, we found that the thermostability of the enzyme was improved when Zera was fused to the C-terminus of xylanase. Conclusion/Significance In the present work we have successfully produced an active insoluble aggregate of xylanase fused to Zera in plants. Zera-xylanase chimeric protein accumulates within ER-derived protein bodies as active aggregates that can easily be recovered by a simple density-based downstream process. The production of insoluble active Zera-xylanase protein in tobacco outlines the potential of Zera as a fusion partner for producing enzymes of biotechnological relevance. Zera-PBs could thus become efficient and low-cost bioreactors for

  16. Over-expression of Arabidopsis CAP causes decreased cell expansion leading to organ size reduction in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Barrero, Roberto A; Umeda, Masaaki; Yamamura, Saburo; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2003-04-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAP) are multifunctional proteins involved in Ras-cAMP signalling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. It has recently been demonstrated that over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic arabidopsis plants causes severe morphological defects owing to loss of actin filaments. To test the generality of the function of AtCAP1 in plants, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing an arabidopsis CAP (AtCAP1) under the regulation of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter were produced. Over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic tobacco plants led to growth abnormalities, in particular a reduction in the size of leaves. Morphological alterations in leaves were the result of reduced elongation of epidermal and mesophyll cells.

  17. [The creation of transgenic tobacco plants expressing fragments of the ARGOS and NtEXPA4 genes in antisense orientation].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Postrigan', B N; Chemeris, A V

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the fragments of the ARGOS and NtEXPA4 genes in antisense orientation have been created. Eleven lines of transgenic plants were investigated and five of them were characterized by a decrease in the sizes of the leaves and flowers as compared to control. Stalk sizes decreased when only the NtEXPA4 gene fragment was used. The organ size of the experimental plants decreased because of a reduction in the level of both cell division and cell expansion. Two lines of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the part of the ARGOS gene in antisense orientation were characterized by a reduction in the level of the NtEXPA1 and NtEXPA4 gene expression.

  18. Effects of Some Rare Elements on Nicotine Content of the Tobacco Plant

    PubMed Central

    Tso, T. C.; Sorokin, T. P.; Engelhaupt, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    Fifty-four rare elements were tested for their effects on the nicotine level of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants grown in solution culture. Be, Cu, Pd, Pt, and Sm definitely increased nicotine yield (over 25%), whereas Bi, Co, Ho, Pb, Ni, Rb, Ag, Tl, Sn, U. V. and Zr definitely decreased nicotine yield. Cs, Er, Li, Rh, Ru, Se, Sr, Ti, and Yb possibly increased (less than 25%) nicotine yield, whereas As, Ce, Cr, Dy, Gd, I, Mo, Nd, Re, Ta, and Th possibly decreased nicotine yield. Other elements including Al, Ge, Au, Hf, In, Ir, La, Lu, Hg, Os, Pr, Sc, Te, Tb, Tm, W, and Zn showed no significant effects. PMID:16658414

  19. An antiviral RISC isolated from Tobacco rattle virus-infected plants

    PubMed Central

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Omarov, Rustem T.; Scholthof, Herman B.

    2011-01-01

    The RNAi model predicts that during antiviral defense a RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is programmed with viral short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to target the cognate viral RNA for degradation. We show that infection of Nicotiana benthamiana with Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) activates an antiviral nuclease that specifically cleaves TRV RNA in vitro. In agreement with known RISC properties, the nuclease activity was inhibited by NaCl and EDTA and stimulated by divalent metal cations; a novel property was its preferential targeting of elongated RNA molecules. Intriguingly, the specificity of the TRV RISC could be re-programmed by exogenous addition of RNA (containing siRNAs) from plants infected with an unrelated virus, resulting in a newly acquired ability of RISC to target this heterologous genome in vitro. Evidently the virus-specific nuclease complex from N. benthamiana represents a genuine RISC that functions as a readily employable and reprogrammable antiviral defense unit. PMID:21272908

  20. A plasma-membrane linker for the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kimiyo; Sano, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We previously screened genes that were transcriptionally activated during the early stage of wound response in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum), and isolated a particular clone, which encoded a membrane-located protein, designated as NtC7. Upon overexpression in tobacco plants, NtC7 conferred a marked tolerance to osmotic stress, suggesting it to be involved in maintenance of osmotic adjustments. In this study, we searched for proteins which interact with NtC7 by the yeast two-hybrid screening, and isolated a clone encoding phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, designated as NtPI-PLC. Physical interaction between NtC7 and C2 domain of NtPI-PLC was confirmed by the pull-down assay. Expression of fused protein to green-fluorescence protein in onion epidermal cell layers indicated both proteins to predominantly localize to the plasma membrane. Their interaction in planta was shown by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation, which exhibited a clear fluorescence of reconstituted yellow fluorescence protein. Transcripts of NtC7 and NtPI-PLC were markedly increased 30 to 60 min after wounding. PI-PLC is one of key enzymes in metabolism of inositol phospholipids, which function in signal transduction and also in response to stresses including osmotic changes. It was shown to localize to plasma-membrane and, to a lesser extent, to cytosol. However, molecular mechanism of membrane localization has remained to be determined, because of the apparent lack of domains for membrane association. The present results suggest that one of such mechanisms is tethering NtPI-PLC to the plasma membrane through interaction with NtC7, which possesses a transmembrane domain at the C-terminus.

  1. Characterization of natural leaf senescence in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uzelac, Branka; Janošević, Dušica; Simonović, Ana; Motyka, Václav; Dobrev, Petre I; Budimir, Snežana

    2016-03-01

    Leaf senescence is a highly regulated final phase of leaf development preceding massive cell death. It results in the coordinated degradation of macromolecules and the subsequent nutrient relocation to other plant parts. Very little is still known about early stages of leaf senescence during normal leaf ontogeny that is not triggered by stress factors. This paper comprises an integrated study of natural leaf senescence in tobacco plants grown in vitro, using molecular, structural, and physiological information. We determined the time sequence of ultrastructural changes in mesophyll cells during leaf senescence, showing that the degradation of chloroplast ultrastructure fully correlated with changes in chlorophyll content. The earliest degenerative changes in chloroplast ultrastructure coinciding with early chromatin condensation were observed already in mature green leaves. A continuum of degradative changes in chloroplast ultrastructure, chromatin condensation and aggregation, along with progressive decrease in cytoplasm organization and electron density were observed in the course of mesophyll cells ageing. Although the total amounts of endogenous cytokinins gradually increased during leaf ontogenesis, the proportion of bioactive cytokinin forms, as well as their phosphate precursors, in total cytokinin content rapidly declined with ageing. Endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were strongly reduced in senescent leaves, and a decreasing tendency was also observed for abscisic acid (ABA) levels. Senescence-associated tobacco cysteine proteases (CP, E.C. 3.4.22) CP1 and CP23 genes were induced in the initial phase of senescence. Genes encoding glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, E.C. 1.4.1.2) and one isoform of cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1, E.C. 6.3.1.2) were induced in the late stage of senescence, while chloroplastic GS (GS2) gene showed a continuous decrease with leaf ageing.

  2. RNA Interference towards the Potato Psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, Is Induced in Plants Infected with Recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)

    PubMed Central

    Wuriyanghan, Hada; Falk, Bryce W.

    2013-01-01

    The potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (B. cockerelli), is an important plant pest and the vector of the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (solanacearum), which is associated with the zebra chip disease of potatoes. Previously, we reported induction of RNA interference effects in B. cockerelli via in vitro-prepared dsRNA/siRNAs after intrathoracic injection, and after feeding of artificial diets containing these effector RNAs. In order to deliver RNAi effectors via plant hosts and to rapidly identify effective target sequences in plant-feeding B. cockerelli, here we developed a plant virus vector-based in planta system for evaluating candidate sequences. We show that recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) containing B. cockerelli sequences can efficiently infect and generate small interfering RNAs in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, and more importantly delivery of interfering sequences via TMV induces RNAi effects, as measured by actin and V-ATPase mRNA reductions, in B. cockerelli feeding on these plants. RNAi effects were primarily detected in the B. cockerelli guts. In contrast to our results with TMV, recombinant Potato virus X (PVX) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) did not give robust infections in all plants and did not induce detectable RNAi effects in B. cockerelli. The greatest RNA interference effects were observed when B. cockerelli nymphs were allowed to feed on leaf discs collected from inoculated or lower expanded leaves from corresponding TMV-infected plants. Tomatillo plants infected with recombinant TMV containing B. cockerelli actin or V-ATPase sequences also showed phenotypic effects resulting in decreased B. cockerelli progeny production as compared to plants infected by recombinant TMV containing GFP. These results showed that RNAi effects can be achieved in plants against the phloem feeder, B. cockerelli, and the TMV-plant system will

  3. RNA Interference towards the Potato Psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, Is Induced in Plants Infected with Recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV).

    PubMed

    Wuriyanghan, Hada; Falk, Bryce W

    2013-01-01

    The potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (B. cockerelli), is an important plant pest and the vector of the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (solanacearum), which is associated with the zebra chip disease of potatoes. Previously, we reported induction of RNA interference effects in B. cockerelli via in vitro-prepared dsRNA/siRNAs after intrathoracic injection, and after feeding of artificial diets containing these effector RNAs. In order to deliver RNAi effectors via plant hosts and to rapidly identify effective target sequences in plant-feeding B. cockerelli, here we developed a plant virus vector-based in planta system for evaluating candidate sequences. We show that recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) containing B. cockerelli sequences can efficiently infect and generate small interfering RNAs in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, and more importantly delivery of interfering sequences via TMV induces RNAi effects, as measured by actin and V-ATPase mRNA reductions, in B. cockerelli feeding on these plants. RNAi effects were primarily detected in the B. cockerelli guts. In contrast to our results with TMV, recombinant Potato virus X (PVX) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) did not give robust infections in all plants and did not induce detectable RNAi effects in B. cockerelli. The greatest RNA interference effects were observed when B. cockerelli nymphs were allowed to feed on leaf discs collected from inoculated or lower expanded leaves from corresponding TMV-infected plants. Tomatillo plants infected with recombinant TMV containing B. cockerelli actin or V-ATPase sequences also showed phenotypic effects resulting in decreased B. cockerelli progeny production as compared to plants infected by recombinant TMV containing GFP. These results showed that RNAi effects can be achieved in plants against the phloem feeder, B. cockerelli, and the TMV-plant system will

  4. Ectopic expression of Lc differentially regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in the floral parts of tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zong-An; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Ning; Zheng, Shu-Song

    2016-12-01

    Anthocyanins are the conspicuous pigments of flowering plants and participate in several aspects of plant development and defense, such as seeds and pollens dispersal. Leaf colour (Lc) is the first basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor controlling anthocyanin biosynthesis isolated from maize (Zea mays L.). Ectopic expression of maize Lc enhanced anthocyanin biosynthesis in many plants including tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.). However, the molecular regulatory mechanism of anthocyanin biosynthesis in the different floral parts of tobacco remains largely unknown. Therefore, the molecular and biochemical characterization of anthocyanin biosynthesis were investigated in the flowers of both wild type and Lc-transgenic tobacco plants. At the reproductive stage, with respect to the different parts of the flowers in wild type SR1, the calyxes and the pistils were green, and the petals and the filaments showed light pink pigmentation; the Lc-transgenic tobacco exhibited light red in calyxes and crimson in petals and in filaments respectively. Correspondingly, the total anthocyanin contents (TAC) in calyxes, petals and filaments of Lc-transgenic plants were much higher than that of the counterparts in SR1. Though the TAC in anthers of Lc-transgenic plants was low, it was still significantly higher than that of SR1. SR1 has almost the same TAC in the pistils as Lc-transgenic plants. Consistent with the intense phenotype and the increased TAC, Lc was weakly expressed in the calyxes and strongly expressed in petals and filaments of Lc-transgenic plants, while Lc was not detected in SR1. The expression level of NtAN2 in petals was similar between SR1 and Lc-transgenic lines. In agreement with the expression profile of Lc, both early (NtCHS) and late anthocyanin-biosynthetic genes (NtDFR, NtF3'H, and NtANS) were coordinately up-regulated in the counterparts of flowers. HPLC analysis demonstrated that the cyanidin (Cya) deposition was mainly responsible for the

  5. Molecular sensing of bacteria in plants. The highly conserved RNA-binding motif RNP-1 of bacterial cold shock proteins is recognized as an elicitor signal in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Felix, Georg; Boller, Thomas

    2003-02-21

    To detect microbial infection multicellular organisms have evolved sensing systems for pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Here, we identify bacterial cold shock protein (CSP) as a new such PAMP that acts as a highly active elicitor of defense responses in tobacco. Tobacco cells perceive a conserved domain of CSP and synthetic peptides representing 15 amino acids of this domain-induced responses at subnanomolar concentrations. Central to the elicitor-active domain is the RNP-1 motif KGFGFITP, a motif conserved also in many RNA- and DNA-binding proteins of eukaryotes. Csp15-Nsyl, a peptide representing the domain with highest homology to csp15 in a protein of Nicotiana sylvestris exhibited only weak activity in tobacco cells. Crystallographic and genetic data from the literature show that the RNP-1 domain of bacterial CSPs resides on a protruding loop and exposes a series of aromatic and basic side chains to the surface that are essential for the nucleotide-binding activity of CSPs. Similarly, these side chains were also essential for elicitor activity and replacement of single residues in csp15 with Ala strongly reduced or abolished activity. Most strikingly, csp15-Ala10, a peptide with the RNP-1 motif modified to KGAGFITP, lacked elicitor activity but acted as a competitive antagonist for CSP-related elicitors. Bacteria commonly have a small family of CSP-like proteins including both cold-inducible and noninducible members, and Csp-related elicitor activity was detected in extracts from all bacteria tested. Thus, the CSP domain containing the RNP-1 motif provides a structure characteristic for bacteria in general, and tobacco plants have evolved a highly sensitive chemoperception system to detect this bacterial PAMP.

  6. Ascorbate oxidase-dependent changes in the redox state of the apoplast modulate gene transcript accumulation leading to modified hormone signaling and orchestration of defense processes in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Pignocchi, Cristina; Kiddle, Guy; Hernández, Iker; Foster, Simon J; Asensi, Amparo; Taybi, Tahar; Barnes, Jeremy; Foyer, Christine H

    2006-06-01

    The role of the redox state of the apoplast in hormone responses, signaling cascades, and gene expression was studied in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with modified cell wall-localized ascorbate oxidase (AO). High AO activity specifically decreased the ascorbic acid (AA) content of the apoplast and altered plant growth responses triggered by hormones. Auxin stimulated shoot growth only when the apoplastic AA pool was reduced in wild-type or AO antisense lines. Oxidation of apoplastic AA in AO sense lines was associated with loss of the auxin response, higher mitogen-activated protein kinase activities, and susceptibility to a virulent strain of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The total leaf glutathione pool, the ratio of reduced glutathione to glutathione disulfide, and glutathione reductase activities were similar in the leaves of all lines. However, AO sense leaves exhibited significantly lower dehydroascorbate reductase and ascorbate peroxidase activities than wild-type and antisense leaves. The abundance of mRNAs encoding antioxidant enzymes was similar in all lines. However, the day/night rhythms in the abundance of transcripts encoding the three catalase isoforms were changed in response to the AA content of the apoplast. Other transcripts influenced by AO included photorespiratory genes and a plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel-associated gene. We conclude that the redox state of the apoplast modulates plant growth and defense responses by regulating signal transduction cascades and gene expression patterns. Hence, AO activity, which modulates the redox state of the apoplastic AA pool, strongly influences the responses of plant cells to external and internal stimuli.

  7. Modified Artificial Diet for Rearing of Tobacco Budworm, Helicoverpa armigera, using the Taguchi Method and Derringer's Desirability Function

    PubMed Central

    Assemi, H.; Rezapanah, M.; Vafaei-Shoushtari, R.

    2012-01-01

    With the aim to improve the mass rearing feasibility of tobacco budworm, Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), design of experimental methodology using Taguchi orthogonal array was applied. To do so, the effect of 16 ingredients of an artificial diet including bean, wheat germ powder, Nipagin, ascorbic acid, formaldehyde, oil, agar, distilled water, ascorbate, yeast, chloramphenicol, benomyl, penicillin, temperature, humidity, and container size on some biological characteristics of H. armigera was evaluated. The selected 16 factors were considered at two levels (32 experiments) in the experimental design. Among the selected factors, penicillin, container size, formaldehyde, chloramphenicol, wheat germ powder, and agar showed significant effect on the mass rearing performance. Derringer's desirability function was used for simultaneous optimization of mass rearing of tobacco budworm, H. armigera, on a modified artificial diet. Derived optimum operating conditions obtained by Derringer's desirability function and Taguchi methodology decreased larval period from 19 to 15.5 days (18.42 % improvement), decreased the pupal period from 12.29 to 11 days (10.49 % improvement), increased the longevity of adults from 14.51 to 21 days (44.72 % improvement), increased the number of eggs/female from 211.21 to 260, and increased egg hatchability from 54.2% to 72% (32.84 % improvement). The proposed method facilitated a systematic mathematical approach with a few well-defined experimental sets. PMID:23425103

  8. [Effects of different planting patterns on the senescence characteristics of flue-cured tobacco roots and leaves].

    PubMed

    Yang, Tie-zhao; Yang, Zhi-xiao; Ke, You-song; Wu, Wen-bin; Zhang, Xio-quan; Qiu, Miao-wen

    2009-12-01

    With flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivar K326 as test material, a field experiment was conducted at Nanxiong area of Guangdong Province in 2008 to study the effects of four planting patterns, i.e., single-row ridge + film mulching at early stage, single-row ridge + film mulching at early and late stages, double-row concave ridge + film mulching at early stage, and double-row concave ridge + film mulching at early and late stages, on the senescence characteristics of its roots and leaves, and the economic traits of its leaves. Comparing with other three planting patterns, double-row concave ridge + film Aulching at early and late stages promoted the root growth of test cultivar during its whole growth period, with the root vigor increased significantly. Meanwhile, the leaf chlorophyll content and protective enzymes (SOD and POD) activities were higher, and the MDA content was lower. The leaf yield, output value, average price, and the proportion of superior leaves were also higher. Double-row concave ridge + film mulching at early and late stages alleviated the senescence characteristics of roots and leaves, and improved the economic traits of flue-cured tobacco leaves, being the efficient planting pattern to product high-quality flue-cured tobacco leaves in Nanxiong tobacco-growing area of Guangdong Province.

  9. The Brachypodium distachyon BdWRKY36 gene confers tolerance to drought stress in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiutong; Hu, Wei; Zhou, Run; Wang, Lianzhe; Wang, Xiatian; Wang, Qiong; Feng, Zhijuan; Li, Yaping; Qiu, Ding; He, Guangyuan; Yang, Guangxiao

    2015-01-01

    The expression of BdWRKY36 was upregulated by drought treatment. BdWRKY36 -overexpressing transgenic tobacco increased drought tolerance by controlling ROS homeostasis and regulating transcription of stress related genes. WRKY transcription factor plays important roles in plant growth, development and stress response. However, the function of group IIe WRKYs is less known. In this study, we cloned and characterized a gene of group IIe WRKY, designated as BdWRKY36, from Brachypodium distachyon. Transient expression of BdWRKY36 in onion epidermal cell suggested its localization in the nucleus. Transactivation assay revealed that the C-terminal region, instead of full length BdWRKY36, had transcriptional activity. BdWRKY36 expression was upregulated by drought. Overexpression of BdWRKY36 in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in enhanced tolerance to drought stress. Physiological-biochemical indices analyses showed that BdWRKY36-overexpressing tobacco lines had lesser ion leakage (IL) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, but higher contents of chlorophyll, relative water content (RWC) and activities of antioxidant enzyme than that in control plants under drought condition. Meanwhile expression levels of some ROS-scavenging and stress-responsive genes were upregulated in BdWRKY36-overexpressing tobacco lines under drought stress. These results demonstrate that BdWRKY36 functions as a positive regulator of drought stress response by controlling ROS homeostasis and regulating transcription of stress related genes.

  10. Safety of foods derived from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John A

    2003-03-01

    Biopharmaceuticals have been available for clinical use for nearly three decades, but foods derived from agribiotechnology have been available for just under a decade. Controversy surrounding foods from genetically modified (GM) plants has focused primarily upon their allergenicity, with lesser concerns about antibiotic resistance genes. Concerns are related to possible environmental impacts on non-human species, including effects on non-target species (e.g., butterflies) and on the development of so-called "super weeds." Food allergies are no more prevalent in foods from GM plants than in conventional foods. Further, the use of antibiotics in the development of GM plants does not pose a significant risk to the human population. Foods from the current GM plant products have been shown not to pose any detrimental effects to humans, and, in fact, nutritionally enhanced products are being developed. GM foods are subjected globally to intense regulatory scrutiny, and extensive data have been provided consistently to regulatory agencies in the United States on a voluntary basis, with mandatory reporting of data soon to be in force. Existing environmental concerns appear to be unjustified on the basis of existing data and experience.

  11. Population Modeling of Modified Risk Tobacco Products Accounting for Smoking Reduction and Gradual Transitions of Relative Risk.

    PubMed

    Poland, Bill; Teischinger, Florian

    2017-03-27

    As suggested by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Modified Risk Tobacco Product (MRTP) Applications Draft Guidance, we developed a statistical model based on public data to explore the effect on population mortality of an MRTP resulting in reduced conventional cigarette smoking. Many cigarette smokers who try an MRTP persist as dual users while smoking fewer conventional cigarettes per day (CPD). Lower-CPD smokers have lower mortality risk based on large cohort studies. However, with little data on the effect of smoking reduction on mortality, predictive modeling is needed. We generalize prior assumptions of gradual, exponential decay of Excess Risk (ER) of death, relative to never-smokers, after quitting or reducing CPD. The same age-dependent slopes are applied to all transitions, including initiation to conventional cigarettes and to a second product (MRTP). A Monte Carlo simulation model generates random individual product use histories, including CPD, to project cumulative deaths through 2060 in a population with versus without the MRTP. Transitions are modeled to and from dual use, which affects CPD and cigarette quit rates, and to MRTP use only. Results in a hypothetical scenario showed high sensitivity of long-run mortality to CPD reduction levels and moderate sensitivity to ER transition rates. Models to project population effects of an MRTP should account for possible mortality effects of reduced smoking among dual users. In addition, studies should follow dual-user CPD histories and quit rates over long time periods to clarify long-term usage patterns and thereby improve health impact projections. We simulated mortality effects of a hypothetical Modified Risk Tobacco Product accounting for cigarette smoking reduction by smokers who add MRTP use. Data on relative mortality risk vs. cigarettes per day suggest that this reduction may have a substantial effect on mortality rates, unaccounted for in other models. This effect is weighed with additional

  12. Alteration of the alkaloid profile in genetically modified tobacco reveals a role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in nicotine N-demethylation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Fan, Longjiang; Kittur, Farooqahmed S; Sun, Kehan; Qiu, Jie; Tang, She; Holliday, Bronwyn M; Xiao, Bingguang; Burkey, Kent O; Bush, Lowell P; Conkling, Mark A; Roje, Sanja; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-02-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of the tetrahydrofolate (THF)-mediated one-carbon (C1) metabolic network. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylene-THF to 5-methyl-THF. The latter donates its methyl group to homocysteine, forming methionine, which is then used for the synthesis of S-adenosyl-methionine, a universal methyl donor for numerous methylation reactions, to produce primary and secondary metabolites. Here, we demonstrate that manipulating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) MTHFR gene (NtMTHFR1) expression dramatically alters the alkaloid profile in transgenic tobacco plants by negatively regulating the expression of a secondary metabolic pathway nicotine N-demethylase gene, CYP82E4. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and alkaloid analyses revealed that reducing NtMTHFR expression by RNA interference dramatically induced CYP82E4 expression, resulting in higher nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. Conversely, overexpressing NtMTHFR1 suppressed CYP82E4 expression, leading to lower nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. However, the reduced expression of NtMTHFR did not affect the methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine levels in the knockdown lines. Our finding reveals a new regulatory role of NtMTHFR1 in nicotine N-demethylation and suggests that the negative regulation of CYP82E4 expression may serve to recruit methyl groups from nicotine into the C1 pool under C1-deficient conditions.

  13. Ectopic Expression of Maize Polyamine Oxidase and Pea Copper Amine Oxidase in the Cell Wall of Tobacco Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Giuseppina; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Tavazza, Raffaela; Biondi, Stefania; Gobbi, Valentina; Ferrante, Paola; De Gara, Laura; Federico, Rodolfo; Angelini, Riccardo; Tavladoraki, Paraskevi

    2004-01-01

    To test the feasibility of altering polyamine levels by influencing their catabolic pathway, we obtained transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants constitutively expressing either maize (Zea mays) polyamine oxidase (MPAO) or pea (Pisum sativum) copper amine oxidase (PCuAO), two extracellular and H2O2-producing enzymes. Despite the high expression levels of the transgenes in the extracellular space, the amount of free polyamines in the homozygous transgenic plants was similar to that in the wild-type ones, suggesting either a tight regulation of polyamine levels or a different compartmentalization of the two recombinant proteins and the bulk amount of endogenous polyamines. Furthermore, no change in lignification levels and plant morphology was observed in the transgenic plants compared to untransformed plants, while a small but significant change in reactive oxygen species-scavenging capacity was verified. Both the MPAO and the PCuAO tobacco transgenic plants produced high amounts of H2O2 only in the presence of exogenously added enzyme substrates. These observations provided evidence for the limiting amount of freely available polyamines in the extracellular space in tobacco plants under physiological conditions, which was further confirmed for untransformed maize and pea plants. The amount of H2O2 produced by exogenously added polyamines in cell suspensions from the MPAO transgenic plants was sufficient to induce programmed cell death, which was sensitive to catalase treatment and required gene expression and caspase-like activity. The MPAO and PCuAO transgenic plants represent excellent tools to study polyamine secretion and conjugation in the extracellular space, as well as to determine when and how polyamine catabolism actually intervenes both in cell wall development and in response to stress. PMID:15064377

  14. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M; Jacobs, Jonathan M; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-21

    Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. Plant pathogens such as the bacterial wilt agent Ralstonia solanacearum threaten food and economic security by causing significant losses for small- and large-scale growers of tomato, tobacco, banana, potato, and ornamentals. Like most plants

  15. Cadmium and zinc induced similar changes in protein and glycoprotein patterns in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum l.) seedlings and plants.

    PubMed

    Peharec Štefanić, Petra; Sikić, Sandra; Cvjetko, Petra; Balen, Biljana

    2012-09-01

    The effects of 10 μmol L-1 and 15 μmol L-1 cadmium (Cd), a nonessential toxic element and 25 μmol L-1 and 50 μmol L-1 zinc (Zn), an essential micronutrient, on proteins and glycoproteins of Nicotiana tabacum L. seedlings and plants were investigated after exposure to each metal alone or to their combinations. Changes in only few polypeptides related to heavy metal treatments were observed in tobacco seedlings and leaves of adult plants, while the greatest change in total soluble protein pattern was observed in plant roots. Differences between control and treated tobacco tissues were more pronounced in the glycoprotein pattern, which was analysed by application of different lectins. The majority of the detected glycoproteins in leaves and roots of adult plants can be considered as a result of enhanced glycosylation due to heavy metal stress. The difference in glycoproteins between Cd and Zn application on tobacco seedlings and adult plants could not be determined since enhanced glycosylation was noticed after treatment with either metal alone or in combination. Therefore, it can be concluded that both metals induced N- and Oglycosylation as a result of changed environmental conditions.

  16. Temperature-dependent bursting pattern analysis by modified Plant model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Many electrophysiological properties of neuron including firing rates and rhythmical oscillation change in response to a temperature variation, but the mechanism underlying these correlations remains unverified. In this study, we analyzed various action potential (AP) parameters of bursting pacemaker neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia juliana to examine whether or not bursting patterns are altered in response to temperature change. Here we found that the inter-burst interval, burst duration, and number of spike during burst decreased as temperature increased. On the other hand, the numbers of bursts per minute and numbers of spikes per minute increased and then decreased, but interspike interval during burst firstly decreased and then increased. We also tested the reproducibility of temperature-dependent changes in bursting patterns and AP parameters. Finally we performed computational simulations of these phenomena by using a modified Plant model composed of equations with temperature-dependent scaling factors to mathematically clarify the temperature-dependent changes of bursting patterns in burst-firing neurons. Taken together, we found that the modified Plant model could trace the ionic mechanism underlying the temperature-dependent change in bursting pattern from experiments with bursting pacemaker neurons in the abdominal ganglia of Aplysia juliana. PMID:25051923

  17. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation.

  18. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation. PMID:25941315

  19. Phenotypic Changes in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Vacuole-Targeted Thermotoga maritima BglB Related to Elevated Levels of Liberated Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh Anh; Lee, Dae-Seok; Jung, Jakyun; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermostable β-glucosidase BglB of Thermotoga maritima was modified by adding a short C-terminal tetrapeptide (AFVY, which transports phaseolin to the vacuole, to its C-terminal sequence). The modified β-glucosidase BglB was transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants. We observed a range of significant phenotypic changes in the transgenic plants compared to the wild-type (WT) plants. The transgenic plants had faster stem growth, earlier flowering, enhanced root systems development, an increased biomass biosynthesis rate, and higher salt stress tolerance in young plants compared to WT. In addition, programed cell death was enhanced in mature plants. Furthermore, the C-terminal AFVY tetrapeptide efficiently sorted T. maritima BglB into the vacuole, which was maintained in an active form and could perform its glycoside hydrolysis function on hormone conjugates, leading to elevated hormone [abscisic acid (ABA), indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), and cytokinin] levels that likely contributed to the phenotypic changes in the transgenic plants. The elevation of cytokinin led to upregulation of the transcription factor WUSCHELL, a homeodomain factor that regulates the development, division, and reproduction of stem cells in the shoot apical meristems. Elevation of IAA led to enhanced root development, and the elevation of ABA contributed to enhanced tolerance to salt stress and programed cell death. These results suggest that overexpressing vacuole-targeted T. maritima BglB may have several advantages for molecular farming technology to improve multiple targets, including enhanced production of the β-glucosidase BglB, increased biomass, and shortened developmental stages, that could play pivotal roles in bioenergy and biofuel production. PMID:26618153

  20. Phenotypic Changes in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Vacuole-Targeted Thermotoga maritima BglB Related to Elevated Levels of Liberated Hormones.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quynh Anh; Lee, Dae-Seok; Jung, Jakyun; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermostable β-glucosidase BglB of Thermotoga maritima was modified by adding a short C-terminal tetrapeptide (AFVY, which transports phaseolin to the vacuole, to its C-terminal sequence). The modified β-glucosidase BglB was transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants. We observed a range of significant phenotypic changes in the transgenic plants compared to the wild-type (WT) plants. The transgenic plants had faster stem growth, earlier flowering, enhanced root systems development, an increased biomass biosynthesis rate, and higher salt stress tolerance in young plants compared to WT. In addition, programed cell death was enhanced in mature plants. Furthermore, the C-terminal AFVY tetrapeptide efficiently sorted T. maritima BglB into the vacuole, which was maintained in an active form and could perform its glycoside hydrolysis function on hormone conjugates, leading to elevated hormone [abscisic acid (ABA), indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), and cytokinin] levels that likely contributed to the phenotypic changes in the transgenic plants. The elevation of cytokinin led to upregulation of the transcription factor WUSCHELL, a homeodomain factor that regulates the development, division, and reproduction of stem cells in the shoot apical meristems. Elevation of IAA led to enhanced root development, and the elevation of ABA contributed to enhanced tolerance to salt stress and programed cell death. These results suggest that overexpressing vacuole-targeted T. maritima BglB may have several advantages for molecular farming technology to improve multiple targets, including enhanced production of the β-glucosidase BglB, increased biomass, and shortened developmental stages, that could play pivotal roles in bioenergy and biofuel production.

  1. Chloroplast Membrane Photostability in chlP Transgenic Tobacco Plants Deficient in Tocopherols

    PubMed Central

    Havaux, Michel; Lütz, Cornelius; Grimm, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    The phototolerance of three chlP transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) lines, affected in geranylgeranyl reductase and, hence, deficient in tocopherols (vitamin E), was estimated by in vivo luminescence and fluorescence measurements and was compared with that of the wild type (WT). Exposure of leaf discs to high light (1 mmol photon m−2 s−1) and low temperature (10°C) led to a rapid inhibition of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry that showed little dependence on the tocopherol level. PSII photo-inhibition was followed by lipid peroxidation with a time delay of about 4 h, and this phenomenon was exacerbated in the tocopherol-deficient leaves. A linear correlation was observed in these short-term experiments between resistance to photooxidation and tocopherol content. When whole plants were exposed to the same treatment, PSII was severely photo-inhibited in mature leaves of all genotypes. Lipid peroxidation was also observed in all plants, but it occurred much more rapidly in tocopherol-deficient transgenic plants relative to WT plants. The time at which extensive lipid peroxidation occurred was correlated with the tocopherol content of the leaves. The present results show that tocopherols protect thylakoid membranes against photodestruction through lipid peroxidation. However, tocopherol deficiency was compensated in young, developing leaves that were able to photo-acclimate in the long term and did not suffer from photooxidative damage. Soluble antioxidants (glutathione and ascorbate) did not accumulate in photo-acclimated chlP transgenic leaves relative to WT leaves. In contrast, a selective accumulation of xanthophyll cycle pigments was observed in young transgenic leaves, and this could represent a compensatory mechanism for tocopherol deficiency. PMID:12746535

  2. Photosynthesis is improved by exogenous calcium in heat-stressed tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Meng, Qing wei; Brestic, Marian; Olsovska, Katarina; Yang, Xinghong

    2011-11-15

    Effects of exogenous calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) (20 mM) on photosynthetic gas exchange, photosystem II photochemistry, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes in tobacco plants under high temperature stress (43°C for 2 h) were investigated. Heat stress resulted in a decrease in net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), stomatal conductance as well as the apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of photosynthesis. Heat stress also caused a decrease of the maximal photochemical efficiency of primary photochemistry (F(v)/F(m)). On the other hand, CaCl(2) application improved P(n), AQY, and CE as well as F(v)/F(m) under high temperature stress. Heat stress reduced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), peroxidase (POD), whereas the activities of these enzymes either decreased less or increased in plants pretreated with CaCl(2); glutathione reductase (GR) activity increased under high temperature, and it increased more in plants pretreated with CaCl(2). There was an obvious accumulation of H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) under high temperature, but CaCl(2) application decreased the contents of H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) under heat stress conditions. Heat stress induced the level of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), while CaCl(2) pretreatment enhanced it. These results suggested that photosynthesis was improved by CaCl(2) application in heat-stressed plants and such an improvement was associated with an improvement in stomatal conductance and the thermostability of oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), which might be due to less accumulation of reactive oxygen species.

  3. Tobacco plants carrying a tms locus of Ti-plasmid origin and the Hl-1 allele are tumor prone.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A D; Aebi, R; Meins, F

    1997-05-01

    The autonomous growth of plant tumor cells is believed to result from their persistent loss of the requirement for growth hormones such as auxin and cytokinin. The partially dominant gene Habituated leaf-1 (Hl-1) regulates the requirement of cultures tissues of Havana 425 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) for cytokinins. The Hl-1 allele can partially restore the tumor phenotype in tobacco cells transformed with a Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid defective in the isopentenyl transferase locus, which encodes a key enzyme in cytokinin biosynthesis and is required for neoplastic growth. To investigate the oncogenic function of Hl-1, we transformed wild-type (hl-1/hl-1) and Hl-1/Hl-1 tobacco plants with the tms locus derived from the limited-host-range Ti plasmid pTiAg162. This locus encodes enzymes for biosynthesis of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid. Grafting tests and measurements of the hormone requirement of cultured explants show that wound-induced overgrowths arising in tms transformed Hl-1 plants are tumorous. While some wound-induced overgrowths also formed in hl-1/hl-1 transformants, these showed slight hormone-autotrophic growth and weak tumorigenicity in grafting tests. In addition, Hl-1/Hl-1 tms/tms plants, but not hl-1/hl-1 tms/tms plants, spontaneously developed rooty teratomatous overgrowths, showed flowering abnormalities, and formed calli at the base of the stem in young seedlings. Thus, Hl-1 tms plants exhibit a tumor-prone phenotype, and in this regard closely resemble tumor-prone hybrids that arise in certain interspecific crosses of Nicotiana species. Our results show that the interaction of just two genetic elements-the mutant Hl-1 allele of the tobacco host with tms genes of Ti plasmid origin-are sufficient for a tumor-prone phenotype.

  4. Rapid and proven production of transplastomic tobacco plants by restoration of pigmentation and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Sebastian M J; Huang, Fong-Chin; Eibl, Christian; Koop, Hans-Ulrich; Golds, Timothy J

    2003-09-01

    Tobacco chloroplast transformation is typically achieved using dominant, selectable antibiotic resistance genes such as aadA, nptII and aphA-6. An improvement would be the combination of such a marker with a visual screening system for the early and conclusive detection of plastid transformants. As such, we investigated the use of three photosynthesis-deficient plastid mutants, DeltapetA, Deltaycf3 and DeltarpoA, for the development of a phenotypic selection system. Mutant plants were used as an alternative to the wild-type as source tissue for transformation, re-introducing deleted plastid sequences and using the aphA-6 gene as a selection marker. The reconstitution of the deleted genes in transformed regenerants resulted in shoots with a visually distinct phenotype comparable to the wild-type. This transformation/selection system overcomes the common problems associated with plastid transformation, e.g. the recovery of spontaneous mutants or nuclear insertions. In addition to the benefits offered by phenotypic selection, phenotype reconstitution leads to restoration of photosynthesis, which we assume drives reconstituted plants rapidly towards homoplasmy. As such, repeated cycles of regeneration in the presence of an antibiotic selection agent are no longer required.

  5. Accumulation of plant antenna complexes is regulated by post-transcriptional mechanisms in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Flachmann, R; Kühlbrandt, W

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing antisense RNA directed against the multigene family of the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII) were raised and analyzed biochemically and physiologically. A partial 5' terminal sequence with 509 nucleotides complementary to cab (chlorophyll a/b binding protein) genes reduced the amount of transcript to almost undectectable levels. We demonstrated for endogenous genes that a 5' terminal sequence with only 52 to 105 nucleotides complementary to the transit sequence of cab can be equally efficient in gene repression. Chlorophyll content and chlorophyll a-to-chlorophyll b ratios of thylakoid membranes isolated from transgenic plants were unchanged in comparison with the wild type. Photosynthetic oxygen evolution and in vivo-measured chlorophyll fluorescence of the transformants showed that LHCII accumulates to normal levels. The reduced level of cab mRNA did not correlate with the amount of LHCII in thylakoids. This indicates that transcriptional regulation is not the rate-limiting step in the biogenesis of the LHCII apoprotein. The antenna size of photosystem II is therefore modulated by yet undiscovered posttranscriptional mechanisms. PMID:7756826

  6. A plant mitochondrial sequence transcribed in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts is not edited

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, C.A.; Hanson, M.R.; Zoubenko, O.V.; Maliga, P.

    1995-03-01

    RNA editing occurs in two higher-plant organelles, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Because chloroplasts and mitochondria exhibit some similarity in editing site selection, we investigated whether mitochondrial RNA sequences could be edited in chloroplasts. We produced transgenic tobacco plants that contained chimeric genes in which the second exon of a Petunia hybrida mitochondrial coxII gene was under the control of chloroplast gene regulatory sequences. coxII transcripts accumulated to low or high levels in transgenic chloroplasts containing chimeric genes with the plastid ribosomal protein gene rps16 or the rRNA operon promoter, respectively. Exon 2 of coxII was chosen because it carries seven editing sites and is edited in petunia mitochondria even when located in an abnormal context in an aberrant recombined gene. When editing of the coxII transcripts in transgenic chloroplasts was examined, no RNA editing at any of the usual sites was detected, nor was there any novel editing at any other sites. These results indicate that the RNA editing mechanisms of chloroplasts and mitochondria are not identical but must have at least some organelle-specific components. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. © The Author(s).

  8. Infection with a plant virus modifies vector feeding behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Candice A.; Walker, Gregory P.; Ullman, Diane E.

    2011-01-01

    Vector infection by some animal-infecting parasites results in altered feeding that enhances transmission. Modification of vector behavior is of broad adaptive significance, as parasite fitness relies on passage to a new host, and vector feeding is nearly always essential for transmission. Although several plant viruses infect their insect vectors, we have shown that vector infection by a plant virus alters feeding behavior. Here we show that infection with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), type member of the only plant-infecting genus in the Bunyaviridae, alters the feeding behavior of its thrips vector, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande). Male thrips infected with TSWV fed more than uninfected males, with the frequency of all feeding behaviors increasing by up to threefold, thus increasing the probability of virus inoculation. Importantly, infected males made almost three times more noningestion probes (probes in which they salivate, but leave cells largely undamaged) compared with uninfected males. A functional cell is requisite for TSWV infection and cell-to-cell movement; thus, this behavior is most likely to establish virus infection. Some animal-infecting members of the Bunyaviridae (La Crosse virus and Rift Valley fever virus) also cause increased biting rates in infected vectors. Concomitantly, these data support the hypothesis that capacity to modify vector feeding behavior is a conserved trait among plant- and animal-infecting members of the Bunyaviridae that evolved as a mechanism to enhance virus transmission. Our results underscore the evolutionary importance of vector behavioral modification to diverse parasites with host ranges spanning both plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:21606372

  9. Engineering of benzylglucosinolate in tobacco provides proof-of-concept for dead-end trap crops genetically modified to attract Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth).

    PubMed

    Møldrup, Morten E; Geu-Flores, Fernando; de Vos, Martin; Olsen, Carl E; Sun, Joel; Jander, Georg; Halkier, Barbara A

    2012-05-01

    Glucosinolates are biologically active natural products characteristic of crucifers, including oilseed rape, cabbage vegetables and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Crucifer-specialist insect herbivores, like the economically important pest Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth), frequently use glucosinolates as oviposition stimuli. This suggests that the transfer of a glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway to a non-crucifer would stimulate oviposition on an otherwise non-attractive plant. Here, we demonstrate that stable genetic transfer of the six-step benzylglucosinolate pathway from A. thaliana to Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) results in the production of benzylglucosinolate without causing morphological alterations. Benzylglucosinolate-producing tobacco plants were more attractive for oviposition by female P. xylostella moths than wild-type tobacco plants. As newly hatched P. xylostella larvae were unable to survive on tobacco, these results represent a proof-of-concept strategy for rendering non-host plants attractive for oviposition by specialist herbivores with the long-term goal of generating efficient dead-end trap crops for agriculturally important pests.

  10. Modification of non-protein thiols contents in transgenic tobacco plants producing bacterial enzymes of cysteine biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Liszewska, F; Blaszczyk, A; Sirko, A

    2001-01-01

    Conditions of achieving the maximal accumulation of sulfhydryl metabolites in the leaves of tobacco were explored. Simultaneous production of bacterial O-acetylserine (thiol)-lyase and serine acetyltransferase resulted in the increased thiols contents as compared to single transformants and controls. However, leaf discs feeding experiments differently affected thiols concentration in different plant groups and suggested that the most promising strategy to obtain plants with a high level of non-protein thiol-containing compounds might be sulfate feeding to plants overproducing serine acetyltransferase.

  11. The importance of lipid modified proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A

    2015-01-01

    Membranes have long been known to act as more than physical barriers within and between plant cells. Trafficking of membrane proteins, signalling from and across membranes, organisation of membranes and transport through membranes are all essential processes for plant cellular function. These processes rely on a myriad array of proteins regulated in a variety of manners and are frequently required to be directly associated with membranes. For integral membrane proteins, the mode of membrane association is readily apparent, but many peripherally associated membrane proteins are outwardly soluble proteins. In these cases the proteins are frequently modified by the addition of lipids allowing direct interaction with the hydrophobic core of membranes. These modifications include N-myristoylation, S-acylation (palmitoylation), prenylation and GPI anchors but until recently little was truly known about their function in plants. New data suggest that these modifications are able to act as more than just membrane anchors, and dynamic S-acylation in particular is emerging as a means of regulating protein function in a similar manner to phosphorylation. This review discusses how these modifications occur, their impact on protein function, how they are regulated, recent advances in the field and technical approaches for studying these modifications.

  12. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M.; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. PMID:27329752

  13. Grape Marc Extract-Induced Defense Reactions and Protection against Phytophthora parasitica Are Impaired in NahG Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Benouaret, Razik; Goupil, Pascale

    2015-08-05

    Grape marc extract (GME) acts as an elicitor of plant defense responses. This study analyzed GME-induced plant defense reactions in NahG transgenic tobacco. Leaf infiltration of NahG leaves revealed HR-like reactions with reduced lesions and weak deployment of autofluorescent compounds in the surrounding infiltrated tissues. The β-1,3-glucanase PR2-, endochitinase PR3-, and osmotin PR5-target transcript levels were strongly lowered in NahG leaves, and the mutant failed to accumulate the antimicrobial PR1 transcripts. GME-induced protection against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae (Ppn) was evaluated on tobacco leaves. The antimicrobial properties of GME against Ppn were evidenced using a range of in vitro tests. GME-sprayed wild-type leaves showed reduced infection areas, whereas GME failed to induce a protective effect against Ppn in NahG leaves. The results suggest that GME-induced plant defense reactions in tobacco plants was mediated by salicylic acid (SA) and that GME-induced protection against Ppn could be the combined result of antimicrobial and defense actions.

  14. Monocot regulatory protein Opaque-2 is localized in the nucleus of maize endosperm and transformed tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Varagona, M J; Schmidt, R J; Raikhel, N V

    1991-02-01

    Protein targeting to the nucleus has been studied extensively in animal and yeast systems; however, nothing is known about nuclear targeting in plants. The Opaque-2 (O2) gene produces a regulatory protein that is responsible for inducing transcription of the alpha-zein class of storage proteins in maize kernels. The cloned O2 gene encodes a protein that contains a leucine zipper DNA binding domain that can interact with zein gene promoters. We have used immunolocalization to show that the O2 protein is present in nuclei in the maize endosperm tissues known to produce alpha-zeins. In addition, neither embryo tissue from wild-type kernels nor endosperm from kernels harboring a null o2 allele contain the O2 protein. Analysis of a transposable, element-induced o2 allele, o2-m20, revealed that sectors of endosperm cells contained the nuclear-localized O2 protein, indicating excision of the transposable element. To study further the nuclear transport of the O2 protein, we have transformed this gene, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into tobacco. Plants were shown to have detectable levels of steady-state O2 mRNA and O2 protein. Immunolocalization of O2 protein in transformed tobacco plants indicated that the O2 protein was transported into tobacco nuclei. Therefore, we have developed a system to study nuclear targeting in plants and have established that the nuclear transport machinery is similar in monocots and dicots.

  15. Ectopic expression of Pokkali phosphoglycerate kinase-2 (OsPGK2-P) improves yield in tobacco plants under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rohit; Karan, Ratna; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Pareek, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Our results indicate that OsPGK2a-P gene is differentially regulated in contrasting rice cultivars under stress and its overexpression confers salt stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco. Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK; EC = 2.7.2.3) plays a major role for ATP production during glycolysis and 1, 3-bisphosphoglycerate production to participate in the Calvin cycle for carbon fixation in plants. Whole genome analysis of rice reveals the presence of four PGK genes (OsPgks) on different chromosomes. Comparative expression analysis of OsPgks in rice revealed highest level of transcripts for OsPgk2 at most of its developmental stages. Detailed characterization of OsPgk2 transcript and protein showed that it is strongly induced by salinity stress in two contrasting genotypes of rice, i.e., cv IR64 (salt sensitive) and landrace Pokkali (salt tolerant). Ectopic expression of OsPgk2a-P (isolated from Pokkali) in transgenic tobacco improved its salinity stress tolerance by higher chlorophyll retention and enhanced proline accumulation, besides maintaining better ion homeostasis. Ectopically expressing OsPgk2a-P transgenic tobacco plants showed tall phenotype with more number of pods than wild-type plants. Therefore, OsPgk2a-P appears to be a potential candidate for increasing salinity stress tolerance and enhanced yield in crop plants.

  16. Monocot regulatory protein Opaque-2 is localized in the nucleus of maize endosperm and transformed tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Varagona, M J; Schmidt, R J; Raikhel, N V

    1991-01-01

    Protein targeting to the nucleus has been studied extensively in animal and yeast systems; however, nothing is known about nuclear targeting in plants. The Opaque-2 (O2) gene produces a regulatory protein that is responsible for inducing transcription of the alpha-zein class of storage proteins in maize kernels. The cloned O2 gene encodes a protein that contains a leucine zipper DNA binding domain that can interact with zein gene promoters. We have used immunolocalization to show that the O2 protein is present in nuclei in the maize endosperm tissues known to produce alpha-zeins. In addition, neither embryo tissue from wild-type kernels nor endosperm from kernels harboring a null o2 allele contain the O2 protein. Analysis of a transposable, element-induced o2 allele, o2-m20, revealed that sectors of endosperm cells contained the nuclear-localized O2 protein, indicating excision of the transposable element. To study further the nuclear transport of the O2 protein, we have transformed this gene, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into tobacco. Plants were shown to have detectable levels of steady-state O2 mRNA and O2 protein. Immunolocalization of O2 protein in transformed tobacco plants indicated that the O2 protein was transported into tobacco nuclei. Therefore, we have developed a system to study nuclear targeting in plants and have established that the nuclear transport machinery is similar in monocots and dicots. PMID:1840902

  17. Spicing Up the N Gene: F. O. Holmes and Tobacco mosaic virus Resistance in Capsicum and Nicotiana Plants.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2017-02-01

    One of the seminal events in plant pathology was the discovery by Francis O. Holmes that necrotic local lesions induced on certain species of Nicotiana following rub-inoculation of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was due to a specific interaction involving a dominant host gene (N). From this, Holmes had an idea that if the N gene from N. glutinosa was introgressed into susceptible tobacco, the greatly reduced titer of TMV would, by extension, prevent subsequent infection of tomato and pepper plants by field workers whose hands were contaminated with TMV from their use of chewing and smoking tobacco. The ultimate outcome has many surprising twists and turns, including Holmes' failure to obtain fertile crosses of N. glutinosa × N. tabacum after 3 years of intensive work. Progress was made with N. digluta, a rare amphidiploid that was readily crossed with N. tabacum. And, importantly, the first demonstration by Holmes of the utility of interspecies hybridization for virus resistance was made with Capsicum (pepper) species with the identification of the L gene in Tabasco pepper, that he introgressed into commercial bell pepper varieties. Holmes' findings are important as they predate Flor's gene-for-gene hypothesis, show the use of interspecies hybridization for control of plant pathogens, and the use of the local lesion as a bioassay to monitor resistance events in crop plants.

  18. Overexpression of a peroxidase gene (AtPrx64) of Arabidopsis thaliana in tobacco improves plant's tolerance to aluminum stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanshuang; Yang, Zhili; How, Jingyi; Xu, Huini; Chen, Limei; Li, Kunzhi

    2017-08-16

    AtPrx64 is one of the peroxidases gene up-regulated in Al stress and has some functions in the formation of plant second cell wall. Its overexpression may improve plant tolerance to Al by some ways. Studies on its function under Al stress may help us to understand the mechanism of plant tolerance to Al stress. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the expressions of some genes (AtPrxs) encoding class III plant peroxidases have been found to be either up-regulated or down-regulated under aluminum (Al) stress. Among 73 genes that encode AtPrxs in Arabidopsis, AtPrx64 is always up-regulated by Al stress, suggesting this gene plays protective roles in response to such stress. In this study, transgenic tobacco plants were generated to examine the effects of overexpressing of AtPrx64 gene on the tolerance to Al stress. The results showed that overexpression of AtPrx64 gene increased the root growth and reduced the accumulation of Al and ROS in the roots. Compared with wild type controls, transgenic tobaccos had much less soluble proteins and malondialdehyde in roots and much more root citrate exudation. The activity of plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase, the phosphorylation of PM H(+)-ATPase and its interaction with 14-3-3 proteins increased in transgenic tobaccos; moreover, the content of lignin in root tips also increased. Taken together, these results showed that overexpression of AtPrx64 gene might enhance the tolerance of tobacco to Al stress.

  19. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing a grass PpEXP1 gene exhibit enhanced tolerance to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Xu, Xiao; Shi, Yang; Xu, Jichen; Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a detrimental abiotic stress limiting the growth of many plant species and is associated with various cellular and physiological damages. Expansins are a family of proteins which are known to play roles in regulating cell wall elongation and expansion, as well as other growth and developmental processes. The in vitro roles of expansins regulating plant heat tolerance are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to isolate and clone an expansin gene in a perennial grass species (Poa pratensis) and to determine whether over-expression of expansin may improve plant heat tolerance. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was used as the model plant for gene transformation and an expansin gene PpEXP1 from Poa pratensis was cloned. Sequence analysis showed PpEXP1 belonged to α-expansins and was closely related to two expansin genes in other perennial grass species (Festuca pratensis and Agrostis stolonifera) as well as Triticum aestivum, Oryza sativa, and Brachypodium distachyon. Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing PpEXP1 were generated through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Under heat stress (42°C) in growth chambers, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the PpEXP1 gene exhibited a less structural damage to cells, lower electrolyte leakage, lower levels of membrane lipid peroxidation, and lower content of hydrogen peroxide, as well as higher chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, relative water content, activity of antioxidant enzyme, and seed germination rates, compared to the wild-type plants. These results demonstrated the positive roles of PpEXP1 in enhancing plant tolerance to heat stress and the possibility of using expansins for genetic modification of cool-season perennial grasses in the development of heat-tolerant germplasm and cultivars.

  20. Over-expression of SlJA2 decreased heat tolerance of transgenic tobacco plants via salicylic acid pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Ming; Yue, Meng-Meng; Yang, Dong-Yue; Zhu, Shao-Bo; Ma, Na-Na; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Over-expression of SlJA2 decreased the accumulation of SA, which resulted in significant physiological and gene expression changes in transgenic tobacco plants, leading to the decreased heat tolerance of transgenic tobacco. NAC family, the largest transcription factors in plants, responses to different environmental stimuli. Here, we isolated a typical NAC transcription factor (SlJA2) from tomato and got transgenic tobacco with SlJA2 over-expression. Expression of SlJA2 was induced by heat stress (42 °C), chilling stress (4 °C), drought stress, osmotic stress, abscisic acid, and salicylic acid. Over-expression of SlJA2 decreased the accumulation of salicylic acid by regulating expression of salicylic acid degradation gene under heat stress. Compared to WT plants, stomatal apertures and water loss increased in transgenic plants, and the damage of photosynthetic apparatus and chlorophyll breakdown were more serious in transgenic plants under heat stress. Meanwhile, more H2O2 and O2(·-) were accumulated transgenic plants and proline synthesis was restricted, which resulted in more serious oxidative damage compared to WT. qRT-PCR analysis showed that over-expression of SlJA2 could down-regulate genes involved in reactive oxygen species scavenging, proline biosynthesis, and response to heat stress. All the above results indicated that SlJA2 may be a negative regulator responded to plant's heat tolerance. Thus, this study provides new insight into roles of NAC family member in plant response to abiotic stress.

  1. Efficient gene silencing mediated by tobacco rattle virus in an emerging model plant physalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Si; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shaohua; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis has a berry and a novelty called inflated calyx syndrome (ICS, also named the 'Chinese lantern'). Elucidation of the underlying developmental mechanisms of fruit diversity demands an efficient gene functional inference platform. Here, we tested the application of the tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated gene-silencing system in Physalis floridana. First, we characterized the putative gene of a phytoene desaturase in P. floridana (PfPDS). Infecting the leaves of the Physalis seedlings with the PfPDS-TRV vector resulted in a bleached plant, including the developing leaves, floral organs, ICS, berry, and seed. These results indicated that a local VIGS treatment can efficiently induce a systemic mutated phenotype. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that the bleaching extent correlated to the mRNA reduction of the endogenous PfPDS. Detailed comparisons of multiple infiltration and growth protocols allowed us to determine the optimal methodologies for VIGS manipulation in Physalis. We subsequently utilized this optimized VIGS methodology to downregulate the expression of two MADS-box genes, MPF2 and MPF3, and compared the resulting effects with gene-downregulation mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The VIGS-mediated gene knockdown plants were found to resemble the mutated phenotypes of floral calyx, fruiting calyx and pollen maturation of the RNAi transgenic plants for both MPF2 and MPF3. Moreover, the two MADS-box genes were appeared to have a novel role in the pedicel development in P. floridana. The major advantage of VIGS-based gene knockdown lies in practical aspects of saving time and easy manipulation as compared to the RNAi. Despite the lack of heritability and mosaic mutation phenotypes observed in some organs, the TRV-mediated gene silencing system provides an alternative efficient way to infer gene function in various developmental processes in Physalis, thus facilitating understanding of the genetic basis of the evolution and development

  2. Efficient Gene Silencing Mediated by Tobacco Rattle Virus in an Emerging Model Plant Physalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaohua; He, Chaoying

    2014-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis has a berry and a novelty called inflated calyx syndrome (ICS, also named the ‘Chinese lantern’). Elucidation of the underlying developmental mechanisms of fruit diversity demands an efficient gene functional inference platform. Here, we tested the application of the tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated gene-silencing system in Physalis floridana. First, we characterized the putative gene of a phytoene desaturase in P. floridana (PfPDS). Infecting the leaves of the Physalis seedlings with the PfPDS-TRV vector resulted in a bleached plant, including the developing leaves, floral organs, ICS, berry, and seed. These results indicated that a local VIGS treatment can efficiently induce a systemic mutated phenotype. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that the bleaching extent correlated to the mRNA reduction of the endogenous PfPDS. Detailed comparisons of multiple infiltration and growth protocols allowed us to determine the optimal methodologies for VIGS manipulation in Physalis. We subsequently utilized this optimized VIGS methodology to downregulate the expression of two MADS-box genes, MPF2 and MPF3, and compared the resulting effects with gene-downregulation mediated by RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The VIGS-mediated gene knockdown plants were found to resemble the mutated phenotypes of floral calyx, fruiting calyx and pollen maturation of the RNAi transgenic plants for both MPF2 and MPF3. Moreover, the two MADS-box genes were appeared to have a novel role in the pedicel development in P. floridana. The major advantage of VIGS-based gene knockdown lies in practical aspects of saving time and easy manipulation as compared to the RNAi. Despite the lack of heritability and mosaic mutation phenotypes observed in some organs, the TRV-mediated gene silencing system provides an alternative efficient way to infer gene function in various developmental processes in Physalis, thus facilitating understanding of the genetic basis of the evolution and

  3. Haploid technology allows for the efficient and rapid generation of homozygous antibody-accumulating transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Floss, Doreen M; Kumlehn, Jochen; Conrad, Udo; Saalbach, Isolde

    2009-09-01

    The large-scale production of plant-derived recombinant proteins requires the breeding of lines homozygous for the transgene(s). These can be selected by progeny testing over multiple sexual generations, but a more efficient means is to fix homozygosity in a single generation using doubled haploid technology. In this study, transgenic tobacco plants, hemizygous for both of the independently inherited genes encoding the light and heavy chains of the anti-human immunodeficiency virus monoclonal antibody 2F5, were used to establish embryogenic pollen cultures. The improved protocol employed in this study guaranteed a very high regeneration efficiency, with more than 50% of the regenerants being spontaneously doubled haploids. Hence, there was no requirement to chemically induce chromosome doubling to recover sufficient entirely homozygous recombinants. As expected, approximately 25% of the regenerants were homozygous for both transgenes. Thus, the employment of haploid technology allowed for the efficient and rapid generation of true-breeding tobacco lines accumulating functional immunoglobulins.

  4. Inhibition of cell proliferation, cell expansion and differentiation by the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Bereterbide, A; Hernould, M; Castera, S; Mouras, A

    2001-11-01

    Plant development depends upon the control of growth, organization and differentiation of cells derived from shoot and root meristems. Among the genes involved in flower organ determination, the cadastral gene SUPERMAN controls the boundary between whorls 3 and 4 and the growth of the adaxial outer ovule integument by down-regulating cell divisions. To determine the precise function of this gene we overexpressed ectopically the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. SUPERMAN gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The transgenic plants exhibited a dwarf phenotype. Histologically and cytologically detailed analyses showed that dwarfism is correlated with a reduction in cell number, which is in agreement with the SUPERMAN function in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, a reduction in cell expansion and an impairment of cell differentiation were observed in tobacco organs. These traits were observed in differentiated vegetative and floral organs but not in meristem structures. A potential effect of the SUPERMAN transcription factor in the control of gibberellin biosynthesis is discussed.

  5. High-level transgene expression in plant cells: effects of a strong scaffold attachment region from tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, G C; Hall, G; Michalowski, S; Newman, W; Spiker, S; Weissinger, A K; Thompson, W F

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that yeast scaffold attachment regions (SARs) flanking a chimeric beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene increased per-copy expression levels by 24-fold in tobacco suspension cell lines stably transformed by microprojectile bombardment. In this study, we examined the effect of a DNA fragment originally identified in a tobacco genomic clone by its activity in an in vitro binding assay. The tobacco SAR has much greater scaffold binding affinity than does the yeast SAR, and tobacco cell lines stably transformed with constructs containing the tobacco SAR accumulated greater than fivefold more GUS enzyme activity than did lines transformed with the yeast SAR construct. Relative to the control construct, flanking the GUS gene with plant SARs increased overall expression per transgene copy by almost 140-fold. In transient expression assays, the same construct increased expression only approximately threefold relative to a control without SARs, indicating that the full SAR effect requires integration into chromosomal DNA. GUS activity in individual stable transformants was not simply proportional to transgene copy number, and the SAR effect was maximal in cell lines with fewer than approximately 10 transgene copies per tobacco genome. Lines with significantly higher copy numbers showed greatly greatly reduced expression relative to the low-copy-number lines. Our results indicate that strong SARs flanking a transgene greatly increases expression without eliminating variation between transformants. We propose that SARs dramatically reduce the severity or likelihood of homology-dependent gene silencing in cells with small numbers of transgenes but do not prevent silencing of transgenes present in many copies. PMID:8672887

  6. Enhanced production of resveratrol derivatives in tobacco plants by improving the metabolic flux of intermediates in the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yu Jeong; An, Chul Han; Woo, Su Gyeong; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Ki-Won; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Rim, Yeonggil; Jeong, Hyung Jae; Ryu, Young Bae; Kim, Cha Young

    2016-09-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids such as anthocyanin and stilbenes has attracted increasing attention because of their potential health benefits. Anthocyanins and stilbenes share common phenylpropanoid precursor pathways. We previously reported that the overexpression of sweetpotato IbMYB1a induced anthocyanin pigmentation in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. In the present study, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum SR1) plants (STS-OX and ROST-OX) expressing the RpSTS gene encoding stilbene synthase from rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L. cv. Jangyeop) and the RpSTS and VrROMT genes encoding resveratrol O-methyltransferase from frost grape (Vitis riparia) were generated under the control of 35S promoter. Phenotypic alterations in floral organs, such as a reduction in floral pigments and male sterility, were observed in STS-OX transgenic tobacco plants. However, we failed to obtain STS-OX and ROST-OX plants with high levels of resveratrol compounds. Therefore, to improve the production of resveratrol derivatives in plants, we cross-pollinated flowers of STS-OX or ROST-OX and IbMYB1a-OX transgenic lines (SM and RSM). Phenotypic changes in vegetative and reproductive development of SM and RSM plants were observed. Furthermore, by HPLC and LC-MS analyses, we found enhanced production of resveratrol derivatives such as piceid, piceid methyl ether, resveratrol methyl ether O-hexoside, and 5-methyl resveratrol-3,4'-O-β-D-diglucopyranoside in SM and RSM cross-pollinated lines. Here, total contents of trans- and cis-piceids ranged from approximately 104-240 µg/g fresh weight in SM (F2). Collectively, we suggest that coexpression of RpSTS and IbMYB1a via cross-pollination can induce enhanced production of resveratrol compounds in plants by increasing metabolic flux into stilbenoid biosynthesis.

  7. Interaction of sulfur and nitrogen nutrition in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants: significance of nitrogen source and root nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kruse, J; Kopriva, S; Hänsch, R; Krauss, G-J; Mendel, R-R; Rennenberg, H

    2007-09-01

    The significance of root nitrate reductase for sulfur assimilation was studied in tobacco (NICOTIANA TABACUM) plants. For this purpose, uptake, assimilation, and long-distance transport of sulfur were compared between wild-type tobacco and transformants lacking root nitrate reductase, cultivated either with nitrate or with ammonium nitrate. A recently developed empirical model of plant internal nitrogen cycling was adapted to sulfur and applied to characterise whole plant sulfur relations in wild-type tobacco and the transformant. Both transformation and nitrogen nutrition strongly affected sulfur pools and sulfur fluxes. Transformation decreased the rate of sulfate uptake in nitrate-grown plants and root sulfate and total sulfur contents in root biomass, irrespective of N nutrition. Nevertheless, glutathione levels were enhanced in the roots of transformed plants. This may be a consequence of enhanced APR activity in the leaves that also resulted in enhanced organic sulfur content in the leaves of the tranformants. The lack of nitrate reductase in the roots in the transformants caused regulatory changes in sulfur metabolism that resembled those observed under nitrogen deficiency. Nitrate nutrition reduced total sulfur content and all the major fractions analysed in the leaves, but not in the roots, compared to ammonium nitrate supply. The enhanced organic sulfur and glutathione levels in ammonium nitrate-fed plants corresponded well to elevated APR activity. But foliar sulfate contents also increased due to decreased re-allocation of sulfate into the phloem of ammonium nitrate-fed plants. Further studies will elucidate whether this decrease is achieved by downregulation of a specific sulfate transporter in vascular tissues.

  8. Cloning, Transformation and Expression of Human Interferon α2b Gene in Tobacco Plant (Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi)

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarzadeh, Shahrzad; Daneshvar, Mohammad Hosein; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Galehdari, Hamid; Alamisaied, Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular farming is the production of important recombinant proteins in transgenic organisms on an agricultural scale. Interferons are proteins with antiviral and antitumor activities and can be used for viral infections and cancers treatments. Objectives This study reports the transformation of INF α2b gene in tobacco plant for the first time in Iran. Materials and Methods Interferon α2b gene was amplified by PCR using specific primers containing appropriate restriction enzymes, plant highly expression sequence and Histidine tag sequence. Target sequence was cloned in plant expression vector pCAMBIA1304 and the construct named pCAMINFα. pCAMINFα was transferred to E. coli strain DH5α and plated on LB agar medium containing kanamycin 50 mgl-1. The colonies were confirmed by colony PCR and sequencing. The construct was transferred into Agrobacterium tumefaciens by freeze-thaw method and transformed colonies were confirmed by colony PCR. Tobacco plants (cultivar xanthi) were inoculated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 by leaf disc method. Inoculated explants were cultured on MSII (MS + BAP 1mgl-1 + NAA 0.1 mgl-1) at 28°C and darkness for 48 hours. Then explants were transferred to selection medium containing cephotaxime (250 mgl-1) and hygromycin (15 mgl-1) in a 16/8 (day/night) h photoperiod in growth room with an irradiance of 5000 lux. Transgenic plants were regenerated and transferred to perlite. Genomic DNA was extracted from regenerated plants by Dellaporta method at 5-leaf step and transgenic lines were confirmed by PCR with specific primers. Expression of Interferon α2b gene was confirmed by dot blotting. Conclusions Since no report of interferon alpha production in plants in Iran has been expressed yet, this research could create a field of producing this drug in tobacco, in Iran. PMID:24624166

  9. [Effect of glucuronoxylomannan of Tremella mesenterica Ritz. Fr. (Basidiomycota) on the plants resistance to tobacco mosaic virus].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, O H; Polishchuk, O M

    2009-01-01

    It has been established that extracellular polysaccharides of Glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), which are produced by Tremella mesenterica Ritz. Fr. (Basidiomycota), has antivirus properties and can induce the resistance to TMV in hypersensitive variety of tobacco. The resistance was blocked in the presence of actinomycin D. This process confirms that resistance has been activated with GXM de novo. GXM takes influence on the early stages of viruses and host plants interaction too, which are irrespective to cells genome activation.

  10. ASR1 mediates glucose-hormone cross talk by affecting sugar trafficking in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Frankel, Nicolas; Mazuch, Jeannine; Balbo, Ilse; Iusem, Norberto; Fernie, Alisdair R; Carrari, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Asr (for ABA, stress, ripening) genes are exclusively found in the genomes of higher plants, and the encoded proteins have been found localized both to the nucleus and cytoplasm. However, before the mechanisms underlying the activity of ASR proteins can be determined, the role of these proteins in planta should be deciphered. Results from this study suggest that ASR is positioned within the signaling cascade of interactions among glucose, abscisic acid, and gibberellins. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) transgenic lines with reduced levels of ASR protein showed impaired glucose metabolism and altered abscisic acid and gibberellin levels. These changes were associated with dwarfism, reduced carbon dioxide assimilation, and accelerated leaf senescence as a consequence of a fine regulation exerted by ASR to the glucose metabolism. This regulation resulted in an impact on glucose signaling mediated by Hexokinase1 and Snf1-related kinase, which would subsequently have been responsible for photosynthesis, leaf senescence, and hormone level alterations. It thus can be postulated that ASR is not only involved in the control of hexose uptake in heterotrophic organs, as we have previously reported, but also in the control of carbon fixation by the leaves mediated by a similar mechanism.

  11. Revisiting Plant Plasma Membrane Lipids in Tobacco: A Focus on Sphingolipids1

    PubMed Central

    Cacas, Jean-Luc; Grosjean, Kevin; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Lherminier, Jeannine; Rombouts, Yoann; Maes, Emmanuel; Gronnier, Julien; Furt, Fabienne; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The lipid composition of plasma membrane (PM) and the corresponding detergent-insoluble membrane (DIM) fraction were analyzed with a specific focus on highly polar sphingolipids, so-called glycosyl inositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs). Using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) ‘Bright Yellow 2’ cell suspension and leaves, evidence is provided that GIPCs represent up to 40 mol % of the PM lipids. Comparative analysis of DIMs with the PM showed an enrichment of 2-hydroxylated very-long-chain fatty acid-containing GIPCs and polyglycosylated GIPCs in the DIMs. Purified antibodies raised against these GIPCs were further used for immunogold-electron microscopy strategy, revealing the distribution of polyglycosylated GIPCs in domains of 35 ± 7 nm in the plane of the PM. Biophysical studies also showed strong interactions between GIPCs and sterols and suggested a role for very-long-chain fatty acids in the interdigitation between the two PM-composing monolayers. The ins and outs of lipid asymmetry, raft formation, and interdigitation in plant membrane biology are finally discussed. PMID:26518342

  12. Plant scents modify innate colour preference in foraging swallowtail butterflies.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mina; Itoh, Yuki; Ômura, Hisashi; Arikawa, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Michiyo

    2015-07-01

    Flower-visiting insects exhibit innate preferences for particular colours. A previous study demonstrated that naive Papilio xuthus females prefer yellow and red, whereas males are more attracted to blue. Here, we demonstrate that the innate colour preference can be modified by olfactory stimuli in a sexually dimorphic manner. Naive P. xuthus were presented with four coloured discs: blue, green, yellow and red. The innate colour preference (i.e. the colour first landed on) of the majority of individuals was blue. When scent from essential oils of either orange flower or lily was introduced to the room, females' tendency to select the red disc increased. Scents of lavender and flowering potted Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, however, were less effective. Interestingly, the odour of the non-flowering larval host plant, Citrus unshiu, shifted the preference to green in females. In males, however, all plant scents were less effective than in females, such that blue was always the most favoured colour. These observations indicate that interactions between visual and olfactory cues play a more prominent role in females. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Plant scents modify innate colour preference in foraging swallowtail butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Mina; Itoh, Yuki; Ômura, Hisashi; Arikawa, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Michiyo

    2015-01-01

    Flower-visiting insects exhibit innate preferences for particular colours. A previous study demonstrated that naive Papilio xuthus females prefer yellow and red, whereas males are more attracted to blue. Here, we demonstrate that the innate colour preference can be modified by olfactory stimuli in a sexually dimorphic manner. Naive P. xuthus were presented with four coloured discs: blue, green, yellow and red. The innate colour preference (i.e. the colour first landed on) of the majority of individuals was blue. When scent from essential oils of either orange flower or lily was introduced to the room, females’ tendency to select the red disc increased. Scents of lavender and flowering potted Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, however, were less effective. Interestingly, the odour of the non-flowering larval host plant, Citrus unshiu, shifted the preference to green in females. In males, however, all plant scents were less effective than in females, such that blue was always the most favoured colour. These observations indicate that interactions between visual and olfactory cues play a more prominent role in females. PMID:26179802

  14. Expression of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene (xPPARalpha) from Xenopus laevis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Nila, Alejandro G; Sandalio, Luisa M; López, Mercedes G; Gómez, Manuel; del Rio, Luis A; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2006-08-01

    In this work, we have genetically transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor cDNA (xPPARalpha) from Xenopus laevis, which is a transcriptional factor involved in the peroxisomal proliferation and induction of fatty acid beta-oxidation in animal cells. Several transgenic lines were generated and one representative line (T) from the R2 generation was selected for further studies. Analysis of free fatty acids revealed that unsaturated fatty acids such as C16:2 and C16:3 were deficient in line T, whereas saturated fatty acids like C16:0, C18:0, and C20:0 were more abundant than in non-transformed plants. Acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX) activity was assayed as a marker enzyme of beta-oxidation in crude leaf extracts and it was found that in line T there was a threefold increase in enzyme activity. We also found that the peroxisome population was increased and that catalase (CAT) activity was induced by clofibrate, a known activator of xPPARalpha protein, in leaves from line T. Taken together, these findings suggest that xPPARalpha is functional in plants and that its expression in tobacco leads to changes in general lipid metabolism and peroxisomal proliferation as reported in animal cells. Furthermore, it indicates that there is an endogenous ligand in tobacco cells able to activate xPPARalpha.

  15. Immunogenicity of nuclear-encoded LTB:ST fusion protein from Escherichia coli expressed in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Soria-Guerra, Ruth E; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Herrera-Díaz, Areli; Korban, Schuyler S; Alpuche-Solís, Ángel G

    2011-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the main causative agents of diarrhea in infants and for travelers. Inclusion of a heat-stable (ST) toxin into vaccine formulations is mandatory as most ETEC strains can produce both heat-labile (LT) and ST enterotoxins. In this study, a genetic fusion gene encoding for an LTB:ST protein has been constructed and transferred into tobacco via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic tobacco plants carrying the LTB:ST gene are then subjected to GM1-ELISA revealing that the LTB:ST has assembled into pentamers and displays antigenic determinants from both LTB and ST. Protein accumulation of up to 0.05% total soluble protein is detected. Subsequently, mucosal and systemic humoral responses are elicited in mice orally dosed with transgenic tobacco leaves. This has suggested that the plant-derived LTB:ST is immunogenic via the oral route. These findings are critical for the development of a plant-based vaccine capable of eliciting broader protection against ETEC and targeting both LTB and ST. Features of this platform in comparison to transplastomic approaches are discussed.

  16. Expression of chimeric P450 genes encoding flavonoid-3', 5'-hydroxylase in transgenic tobacco and petunia plants(1).

    PubMed

    Shimada, Y; Nakano-Shimada, R; Ohbayashi, M; Okinaka, Y; Kiyokawa, S; Kikuchi, Y

    1999-11-19

    Flavonoid-3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H), a member of the cytochrome P450 family, is the key enzyme in the synthesis of 3', 5'-hydroxylated anthocyanins, which are generally required for blue or purple flowers. A full-length cDNA, TG1, was isolated from prairie gentian by heterologous hybridization with a petunia cDNA, AK14, which encodes F3'5'H. To investigate the in vivo function of TG1 and AK14, they were subcloned into a plant expression vector and expressed under the control of the CaMV35S promoter in transgenic tobacco or petunia, both of which originally lack the enzyme. Transgenic petunia plants had a dramatic change in flower color from pink to magenta with a high content of 3',5'-hydroxylated anthocyanins. In contrast, transgenic tobacco plants had minimal color change with at most 35% 3',5'-hydroxylated anthocyanin content. These results indicate that the products of TG1 and AK14 have F3'5'H activity in planta and that interspecific gene transfer alters anthocyanin pigment synthesis. The difference in apparent F3'5'H activity between tobacco and petunia is discussed.

  17. Response of carbon and nitrogen-rich metabolites to nitrogen deficiency in PSARK::IPT tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Wilhelmi, María del Mar; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Eva; Leyva, Rocio; Blasco, Begoña; Romero, Luis; Blumwald, Eduardo; Ruiz, Juan Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Wild type (WT) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing isopentenyltransferase (IPT), a gene coding the rate-limiting step in cytokinin (CKs) synthesis, were grown under limited nitrogen (N) conditions. Here, we analyse the possible effect of N deficiency on C-rich compounds such as phenolic compounds, as well as on N-rich compounds such as polyamines (PAs) and proline (Pro), examining the pathways involved in their synthesis and degradation. N deficiency was found to stimulate phenolic metabolism and increase these compounds both in P(SARK):IPT as well as in WT tobacco plants. This suggests that nitrate (NO(3)(-)) tissue concentration may act as a signal triggering phenolic compound accumulation in N deficiency plants. In addition, we found the maintenance of PAs in the WT plants would be correlated with the higher stress response to N deficiency. On the contrary, the reduction of free PAs and Pro found in the P(SARK)::IPT plants subjected to N deficiency would indicate the operation of an N-recycling mechanism that could stimulate a more efficient N utilization in P(SARK)::IPT plants.

  18. A Novel 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase Shows High Glyphosate Tolerance in Escherichia coli and Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengxue; Yang, Xuewen; Chen, Rongrong; Zhang, Yuwen; Lu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jianhua; Lin, Min; Wang, Guoying

    2012-01-01

    A key enzyme in the shikimate pathway, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is the primary target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Identification of new aroA genes coding for EPSPS with a high level of glyphosate tolerance is essential for the development of glyphosate-tolerant crops. In the present study, the glyphosate tolerance of five bacterial aroA genes was evaluated in the E. coli aroA-defective strain ER2799 and in transgenic tobacco plants. All five aroA genes could complement the aroA-defective strain ER2799, and AM79 aroA showed the highest glyphosate tolerance. Although glyphosate treatment inhibited the growth of both WT and transgenic tobacco plants, transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA tolerated higher concentration of glyphosate and had a higher fresh weight and survival rate than plants expressing other aroA genes. When treated with high concentration of glyphosate, lower shikimate content was detected in the leaves of transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA than transgenic plants expressing other aroA genes. These results suggest that AM79 aroA could be a good candidate for the development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant crops. PMID:22715408

  19. Overexpression of Ran gene from Lepidium latifolium L. (LlaRan) renders transgenic tobacco plants hypersensitive to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Vimlendu Bhushan; Grover, Atul; Singh, Sadhana; Pande, Veena; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2014-09-01

    Ran is a multifunctional small GTPase involved in important cellular activities like nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly, nuclear envelope formation, etc., but is also known to be differentially expressed in response to abiotic stress, particularly low temperature. We have over-expressed Lepidium latifolium (Fam. Brassicaceae) Ran gene in tobacco to study the response of the plants to cold stress (24 h; 4 °C). Transformation of the tobacco plants was verified using PCR targeting Ran gene and co-transformed selectable marker gene nptII. Segregation in Mendelian ratios was validated in five transgenic lines by germination of T1 and T2 seeds on moist filter papers containing 150 mg/l kanamycin. Higher levels of electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation pointed towards hypersensitivity of plants. Similarly, lesser proline accumulation compared to wild types also indicated susceptibility of plants to death under chilling conditions. Specific activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase was also measured under stressed and control conditions. A variation was observed across the different lines, and four out of five lines showed lesser specific activity compared to wild type plants, thus indicating reduced capability of scavenging free radicals. In totality, a strong evidence on induced hypersensitivity to cold stress has been collected which may further be helpful in designing appropriate strategies for engineering crop plants for survival under cold stress conditions.

  20. Dissociation of a population of Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 in tobacco plants: formation of bacterial emboli and dormant cells.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Daminova, Amina; Ageeva, Marina; Petrova, Olga; Gogoleva, Natalya; Tarasova, Nadezhda; Gogolev, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    The population dynamics of Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 (Pba) within tobacco plants was monitored from the time of inoculation until after long-term preservation of microorganisms in the remnants of dead plants. We found and characterised peculiar structures that totally occlude xylem vessels, which we have named bacterial emboli. Viable but non-culturable (VBN) Pba cells were identified in the remnants of dead plants, and the conditions for resuscitation of these VBN cells were established. Our investigation shows that dissociation of the integrated bacterial population during plant colonisation forms distinct subpopulations and cell morphotypes, which are likely to perform specific functions that ensure successful completion of the life cycle within the plant.

  1. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing glyoxalase enzymes resist an increase in methylglyoxal and maintain higher reduced glutathione levels under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sudesh Kumar; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L; Reddy, M K; Sopory, S K

    2005-11-07

    The mechanism behind enhanced salt tolerance conferred by the overexpression of glyoxalase pathway enzymes was studied in transgenic vis-à-vis wild-type (WT) plants. We have recently documented that salinity stress induces higher level accumulation of methylglyoxal (MG), a potent cytotoxin and primary substrate for glyoxalase pathway, in various plant species [Yadav, S.K., Singla-Pareek, S.L., Ray, M., Reddy, M.K. and Sopory, S.K. (2005) MG levels in plants under salinity stress are dependent on glyoxalase I and glutathione. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 337, 61-67]. The transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing glyoxalase pathway enzymes, resist an increase in the level of MG that increased to over 70% in WT plants under salinity stress. These plants showed enhanced basal activity of various glutathione related antioxidative enzymes that increased further upon salinity stress. These plants suffered minimal salinity stress induced oxidative damage measured in terms of the lipid peroxidation. The reduced glutathione (GSH) content was high in these transgenic plants and also maintained a higher reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH:GSSG) ratio under salinity. Manipulation of glutathione ratio by exogenous application of GSSG retarded the growth of non-transgenic plants whereas transgenic plants sustained their growth. These results suggest that resisting an increase in MG together with maintaining higher reduced glutathione levels can be efficiently achieved by the overexpression of glyoxalase pathway enzymes towards developing salinity stress tolerant plants.

  2. Zn2+ -induced changes at the root level account for the increased tolerance of acclimated tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Taiti, Cosimo; Marti, Lucia; Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Spinelli, Francesco; Giordano, Cristiana; Caparrotta, Stefania; Gori, Massimo; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    Evidence suggests that heavy-metal tolerance can be induced in plants following pre-treatment with non-toxic metal concentrations, but the results are still controversial. In the present study, tobacco plants were exposed to increasing Zn2+ concentrations (up to 250 and/or 500 μM ZnSO4) with or without a 1-week acclimation period with 30 μM ZnSO4. Elevated Zn2+ was highly toxic for plants, and after 3 weeks of treatments there was a marked (≥50%) decline in plant growth in non-acclimated plants. Plant acclimation, on the other hand, increased plant dry mass and leaf area up to 1.6-fold compared with non-acclimated ones. In non-acclimated plants, the addition of 250 μM ZnSO4 led to transient membrane depolarization and stomatal closure within 24h from the addition of the stress; by contrast, the acclimation process was associated with an improved stomatal regulation and a superior ability to maintain a negative root membrane potential, with values on average 37% more negative compared with non-acclimated plants. The different response at the plasma-membrane level between acclimated and non-acclimated plants was associated with an enhanced vacuolar Zn2+ sequestration and up to 2-fold higher expression of the tobacco orthologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana MTP1 gene. Thus, the acclimation process elicited specific detoxification mechanisms in roots that enhanced Zn2+ compartmentalization in vacuoles, thereby improving root membrane functionality and stomatal regulation in leaves following elevated Zn2+ stress.

  3. Zn2+-induced changes at the root level account for the increased tolerance of acclimated tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Taiti, Cosimo; Marti, Lucia; Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Spinelli, Francesco; Giordano, Cristiana; Caparrotta, Stefania; Gori, Massimo; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that heavy-metal tolerance can be induced in plants following pre-treatment with non-toxic metal concentrations, but the results are still controversial. In the present study, tobacco plants were exposed to increasing Zn2+ concentrations (up to 250 and/or 500 μM ZnSO4) with or without a 1-week acclimation period with 30 μM ZnSO4. Elevated Zn2+ was highly toxic for plants, and after 3 weeks of treatments there was a marked (≥50%) decline in plant growth in non-acclimated plants. Plant acclimation, on the other hand, increased plant dry mass and leaf area up to 1.6-fold compared with non-acclimated ones. In non-acclimated plants, the addition of 250 μM ZnSO4 led to transient membrane depolarization and stomatal closure within 24h from the addition of the stress; by contrast, the acclimation process was associated with an improved stomatal regulation and a superior ability to maintain a negative root membrane potential, with values on average 37% more negative compared with non-acclimated plants. The different response at the plasma-membrane level between acclimated and non-acclimated plants was associated with an enhanced vacuolar Zn2+ sequestration and up to 2-fold higher expression of the tobacco orthologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana MTP1 gene. Thus, the acclimation process elicited specific detoxification mechanisms in roots that enhanced Zn2+ compartmentalization in vacuoles, thereby improving root membrane functionality and stomatal regulation in leaves following elevated Zn2+ stress. PMID:24928985

  4. Effect of calcium carbonate on cadmium and nutrients uptake in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) planted on contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Ai; Li, Fan; Zhou, Hang; Qin, Xiao-Li; Zou, Zi-Jin; Tian, Tao; Zeng, Min; Liao, Bo-Han

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was applied to Cd-contaminated soil at rates of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 g kg(-1). The effect of CaCO3 on soil pH, organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd and level of major nutrients in a tobacco field and on accumulation of various elements in tobacco plants was determined. The results showed that CaCO3 application significantly increased the pH level, available P and exchangeable Ca but decreased organic matter, available Cd, exchangeable Cd, available heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) and available K in soil. Additionally, CaCO3 application substantially reduced Cd accumulation in tobacco roots, stems, upper leaves, middle leaves and lower leaves, with maximum decrease of 22.3%, 32.1%, 24.5%, 22.0% and 18.2%, respectively. There were large increase in total Ca and slight increases in total N and K but decrease to varying degrees in total Fe, Cu and Zn due to CaCO3 application. CaCO3 had little effect on total P and Mn levels in tobacco leaves.

  5. Plants having modified response to ethylene by transformation with an ETR nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2001-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  6. Host recovery and reduced virus level in the upper leaves after Potato virus Y infection occur in tobacco and tomato but not in potato plants.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xianzhou; Molen, Teresa A

    2015-02-11

    In this study, the recovery phenomenon following infection with Potato virus Y (PVY) was investigated in tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants. In tobacco plants, infection of severe strains of PVY (PVYN or PVYN:O) induced conspicuous vein clearing and leaf deformation in the first three leaves above the inoculated leaves, but much milder symptoms in the upper leaves. The recovery phenotype was not obvious in tobacco plants infected with PVY strain that induce mild symptoms (PVYO). However, regardless of the virus strains, reduction in PVY RNA levels was similarly observed in the upper leaves of these plants. Removal of the first three leaves above the inoculated leaves interfered with the occurrence of recovery, suggesting that the signal(s) mediating the recovery is likely generated in these leaves. In PVYN or PVYN:O but not in PVYO-infected tobacco plants, the expression of PR-1a transcripts were correlated with the accumulation level of PVY RNA. Reduced level of PVY RNA in the upper leaves was also observed in infected tomato plants, whereas such phenomenon was not observed in potato plants. PVY-derived small RNAs were detected in both tobacco and potato plants and their accumulation levels were correlated with PVY RNA levels. Our results demonstrate that the recovery phenotype following PVY infection is host-specific and not necessarily associated with the expression of PR-1a and generation of PVY small RNAs.

  7. Host Recovery and Reduced Virus Level in the Upper Leaves after Potato virus Y Infection Occur in Tobacco and Tomato but not in Potato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xianzhou; Molen, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the recovery phenomenon following infection with Potato virus Y (PVY) was investigated in tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants. In tobacco plants, infection of severe strains of PVY (PVYN or PVYN:O) induced conspicuous vein clearing and leaf deformation in the first three leaves above the inoculated leaves, but much milder symptoms in the upper leaves. The recovery phenotype was not obvious in tobacco plants infected with PVY strain that induce mild symptoms (PVYO). However, regardless of the virus strains, reduction in PVY RNA levels was similarly observed in the upper leaves of these plants. Removal of the first three leaves above the inoculated leaves interfered with the occurrence of recovery, suggesting that the signal(s) mediating the recovery is likely generated in these leaves. In PVYN or PVYN:O but not in PVYO-infected tobacco plants, the expression of PR-1a transcripts were correlated with the accumulation level of PVY RNA. Reduced level of PVY RNA in the upper leaves was also observed in infected tomato plants, whereas such phenomenon was not observed in potato plants. PVY-derived small RNAs were detected in both tobacco and potato plants and their accumulation levels were correlated with PVY RNA levels. Our results demonstrate that the recovery phenotype following PVY infection is host-specific and not necessarily associated with the expression of PR-1a and generation of PVY small RNAs. PMID:25679498

  8. Oil from Tobacco Leaves: FOLIUM - Installation of Hydrocarbon Accumulating Pathways in Tobacco Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: LBNL is modifying tobacco to enable it to directly produce fuel molecules in its leaves for use as a biofuel. Tobacco is a good crop for biofuels production because it is an outstanding biomass crop, has a long history of cultivation, does not compete with the national food supply, and is highly responsive to genetic manipulation. LBNL will incorporate traits for hydrocarbon biosynthesis from cyanobacteria and algae, and enhance light utilization and carbon uptake in tobacco, improving the efficiency of photosynthesis so more fuel can be produced in the leaves. The tobacco-generated biofuels can be processed for gasoline, jet fuel or diesel alternatives. LBNL is also working to optimize methods for planting, cultivating and harvesting tobacco to increase biomass production several-fold over the level of traditional growing techniques.

  9. An antibody produced in tobacco expressing a hybrid β-1,4-galactosyltransferase is essentially devoid of plant carbohydrate epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Hans; Rouwendal, Gerard J. A.; Karnoup, Anton S.; Florack, Dion E. A.; Stoopen, Geert M.; Helsper, Johannes P. F. G.; van Ree, Ronald; van Die, Irma; Bosch, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    N-glycosylation of a mAb may have a major impact on its therapeutic merits. Here, we demonstrate that expression of a hybrid enzyme (called xylGalT), consisting of the N-terminal domain of Arabidopsis thaliana xylosyltransferase and the catalytic domain of human β-1,4-galactosyltransferase I (GalT), in tobacco causes a sharp reduction of N-glycans with potentially immunogenic core-bound xylose (Xyl) and fucose (Fuc) residues as shown by Western blot and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. A radioallergosorbent test inhibition assay with proteins purified from leaves of WT and these transgenic tobacco plants using sera from allergic patients suggests a significant reduction of potential immunogenicity of xylGalT proteins. A mAb purified from leaves of plants expressing xylGalT displayed an N-glycan profile that featured high levels of galactose, undetectable xylose, and a trace of fucose. Hence, a transgenic plant expressing the hybrid GalT might yield more effective and safer monoclonals for therapeutic purposes than WT plants and even transgenic plants expressing the unchanged GalT. PMID:16675551

  10. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a dimeric single-chain variable fragment (scfv) antibody against Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi B.

    PubMed

    Makvandi-Nejad, Shokouh; McLean, Michael D; Hirama, Tomoko; Almquist, Kurt C; Mackenzie, C Roger; Hall, J Christopher

    2005-10-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants were produced that express an anti-Salmonella enterica single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody that binds to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of S. enterica Paratyphi B. The coding sequence of this scFv was optimized for expression in tobacco, synthesized and subsequently placed behind three different promoters: an enhanced tobacco constitutive ubiquitous promoter (EntCUP4), and single- and double-enhancer versions of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter (CaMV 35S). These chimeric genes were introduced into Nicotiana tabacum cv. 81V9 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and 50 primary transgenic (T(0)) plants per construct were produced. Among these plants, 23 were selected for the ability to express active scFv as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using S. enterica LPS as antigen. Expanded bed adsorption-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (EBA-IMAC) was used to purify 41.7 mug of scFv/g from leaf tissue. Gel filtration and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses demonstrated that the purified scFv was active as a dimer or higher-order multimer. In order to identify T(1) plants suitable for development of homozygous lines with heritable scFv expression, kanamycin-resistance segregation analyses were performed to determine the number of T-DNA loci in each T(0) plant, and quantitative ELISA and immunoblot analyses were used to compare expression of active and total anti-Salmonella scFv, respectively, in the T(1) generation. As S. enterica causes millions of enteric fevers and hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide each year, large-scale production and purification of this scFv will have potential for uses in diagnosis and detection, as a therapeutic agent, and in applications such as water system purification.

  11. Populus euphratica XTH overexpression enhances salinity tolerance by the development of leaf succulence in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Han, Yansha; Wang, Wei; Sun, Jian; Ding, Mingquan; Zhao, Rui; Deng, Shurong; Wang, Feifei; Hu, Yue; Wang, Yang; Lu, Yanjun; Du, Liping; Hu, Zanmin; Diekmann, Heike; Shen, Xin; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2013-11-01

    Populus euphratica is a salt-tolerant tree species that develops leaf succulence after a prolonged period of salinity stress. In the present study, a putative xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase gene (PeXTH) from P. euphratica was isolated and transferred to tobacco plants. PeXTH localized exclusively to the endoplasmic reticulum and cell wall. Plants overexpressing PeXTH were more salt tolerant than wild-type tobacco with respect to root and leaf growth, and survival. The increased capacity for salt tolerance was due mainly to the anatomical and physiological alterations caused by PeXTH overexpression. Compared with the wild type, PeXTH-transgenic plants contained 36% higher water content per unit area and 39% higher ratio of fresh weight to dry weight, a hallmark of leaf succulence. However, the increased water storage in the leaves in PeXTH-transgenic plants was not accompanied by greater leaf thickness but was due to highly packed palisade parenchyma cells and fewer intercellular air spaces between mesophyll cells. In addition to the salt dilution effect in response to NaCl, these anatomical changes increased leaf water-retaining capacity, which lowered the increase of salt concentration in the succulent tissues and mesophyll cells. Moreover, the increased number of mesophyll cells reduced the intercellular air space, which improved carbon economy and resulted in a 47-78% greater net photosynthesis under control and salt treatments (100-150 mM NaCl). Taken together, the results indicate that PeXTH overexpression enhanced salt tolerance by the development of succulent leaves in tobacco plants without swelling.

  12. Small changes in the activity of chloroplastic NADP(+)-dependent ferredoxin oxidoreductase lead to impaired plant growth and restrict photosynthetic activity of transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Peisker, Martin; Tschiersch, Henning; Palatnik, Javier F; Valle, Estela M; Carrillo, Néstor; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2002-02-01

    A ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) cDNA from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun) was cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed high identity to FNR proteins from Capsicum annuum, Pisum sativum, Spinacia oleracea and Vicia faba. Transgenic tobacco plants were generated that constitutively express the FNR cDNA in reverse orientation between the CaMV 35S promoter and the polyadenylation signal of the octopine synthase gene. Plants expressing the FNR antisense gene showed lower levels of FNR mRNA and protein accumulation, which was paralleled by a decrease in FNR activity. As a consequence, NADPH levels declined whereas NADP+ levels increased, leading to an unaltered NADP(H) pool. Growth rates, chlorophyll content and net CO2 uptake rates at high and low irradiances were strongly reduced in FNR antisense tobacco plants. These changes were accompanied by an over-reduced state of P700 as estimated by absorption changes at 820 nm. FNR control coefficients determined for the photosynthetic rate at saturating (C(R) = 0.94) and limiting (C(R) = 0.70) light conditions revealed a prominent role of this reductase in the regulation of photosynthesis.

  13. Antioxidant Enzyme Responses Induced by Whiteflies in Tobacco Plants in Defense against Aphids: Catalase May Play a Dominant Role.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haipeng; Sun, Xia; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Qingliang

    2016-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 (Middle East-Asia Minor 1) feeding alters antioxidative enzyme activity in some plant species. Infestation of B. tabaci nymphs decreases Myzus persicae performance on systemic, but not local leaves of tobacco plants. However, it is unclear if B. tabaci nymphs induced antioxidant activities contributing to the aphid resistance. We investigated the relationship between antioxidants induced by nymphs of B. tabaci feeding on tobacco and aphid resistance. The activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were assayed in tobacco leaves at different feeding times following infestation of B. tabaci nymphs. The infestation altered the activities of CAT and POD, but had no significant effect on SOD activity. The highest CAT activity was observed at 15 d after infestation. This was 98.2% greater than control systemic leaves, but 32.6% lower than the control in local leaves. Higher POD activity was recorded in local vs. systemic leaves after 15 d of infestation. POD activity was 71.0% and 112.9% higher in local and systemic leaves, respectively, than in the controls. The changes of CAT, but not POD or SOD activity were correlated to levels of aphid resistance. H2O2 levels were higher in local than in systemic leaves in contrast to CAT activity. Tobacco curly shoot virus mediated virus-induced gene silencing was employed to determine if CAT activation was involved in the aphid resistance induced by B. tabaci nymphs. B. tabaci induced CAT activity decreased when the Cat1 expression was silenced. The performance assay indicated that Cat1 silencing made B. tabaci infested plants a more suitable host for aphids than infested control plants. The aphid survival rate was reduced by 40.4% in infested control plants, but reduced by only 26.1% in Cat1-silenced plants compared to uninfested controls. Also, qPCR results showed that silencing of Cat1 led to the suppression of the B. tabaci

  14. Antioxidant Enzyme Responses Induced by Whiteflies in Tobacco Plants in Defense against Aphids: Catalase May Play a Dominant Role

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haipeng; Sun, Xia; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Qingliang

    2016-01-01

    Background Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 (Middle East-Asia Minor 1) feeding alters antioxidative enzyme activity in some plant species. Infestation of B. tabaci nymphs decreases Myzus persicae performance on systemic, but not local leaves of tobacco plants. However, it is unclear if B. tabaci nymphs induced antioxidant activities contributing to the aphid resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the relationship between antioxidants induced by nymphs of B. tabaci feeding on tobacco and aphid resistance. The activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were assayed in tobacco leaves at different feeding times following infestation of B. tabaci nymphs. The infestation altered the activities of CAT and POD, but had no significant effect on SOD activity. The highest CAT activity was observed at 15 d after infestation. This was 98.2% greater than control systemic leaves, but 32.6% lower than the control in local leaves. Higher POD activity was recorded in local vs. systemic leaves after 15 d of infestation. POD activity was 71.0% and 112.9% higher in local and systemic leaves, respectively, than in the controls. The changes of CAT, but not POD or SOD activity were correlated to levels of aphid resistance. H2O2 levels were higher in local than in systemic leaves in contrast to CAT activity. Tobacco curly shoot virus mediated virus-induced gene silencing was employed to determine if CAT activation was involved in the aphid resistance induced by B. tabaci nymphs. B. tabaci induced CAT activity decreased when the Cat1 expression was silenced. The performance assay indicated that Cat1 silencing made B. tabaci infested plants a more suitable host for aphids than infested control plants. The aphid survival rate was reduced by 40.4% in infested control plants, but reduced by only 26.1% in Cat1-silenced plants compared to uninfested controls. Also, qPCR results showed that silencing of Cat1

  15. Human α-mannosidase produced in transgenic tobacco plants is processed in human α-mannosidosis cell lines.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Balducci, Chiara; Pompa, Andrea; Riise Stensland, Hilde M F; Guaragno, Marco; Pagiotti, Rita; Menghini, Anna R; Persichetti, Emanuele; Beccari, Tommaso; Bellucci, Michele

    2011-12-01

    Deficiency in human lysosomal α-mannosidase (MAN2B1) results in α-mannosidosis, a lysosomal storage disorder; patients present a wide range of neurological, immunological, and skeletal symptoms caused by a multisystemic accumulation of mannose-containing oligosaccharides. Here, we describe the expression of recombinant MAN2B1 both transiently in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and in the leaves and seeds of stably transformed N. tabacum plants. After purification from tobacco leaves, the recombinant enzyme was found to be N-glycosylated and localized in vacuolar compartments. In the fresh leaves of tobacco transformants, MAN2B1 was measured at 10,200 units/kg, and the purified enzyme from these leaves had a specific activity of 32-45 U/mg. Furthermore, tobacco-produced MAN2B1 was biochemically similar to the enzyme purified from human tissues, and it was internalized and processed by α-mannosidosis fibroblast cells. These results strongly indicate that plants can be considered a promising expression system for the production of recombinant MAN2B1 for use in enzyme replacement therapy.

  16. Characterization of salt tolerance in ectoine-transformed tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabaccum): photosynthesis, osmotic adjustment, and nitrogen partitioning.

    PubMed

    Moghaieb, R E A; Tanaka, N; Saneoka, H; Murooka, Y; Ono, H; Morikawa, H; Nakamura, A; Nguyen, N T; Suwa, R; Fujita, K

    2006-02-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) biosynthetic genes (ect. ABC) from Halomonas elongata were introduced to tobacco plants using an Agrobacterium-mediated gene delivery system. The genes for ectoine biosynthesis were integrated in a stable manner into the tobacco genome and the corresponding transcripts were expressed. The concentration of ectoine under salt-stress conditions was higher in the roots than in leaves. A close relationship was found between stomatal conductance and the amount of transported nitrogen, suggesting that water transport through the xylem in the stem and transpiration may be involved in nitrogen transport to leaves. The data indicate that the turgor values of the ectoine transgenic lines increased with increasing salt concentration. The data revealed two ways in which ectoine enhanced salinity tolerance of tobacco plants. First, ectoine improved the maintenance of root function so that water is taken up consistently and supplied to shoots under saline conditions. Second, ectoine enhanced the nitrogen supply to leaves by increasing transpiration and by protecting Rubisco proteins from deleterious effects of salt, thereby improving the rate of photosynthesis.

  17. Sucrose transporter NtSUT4 from tobacco BY-2 involved in plant cell shape during miniprotoplast culture.

    PubMed

    Okubo-Kurihara, Emiko; Higaki, Takumi; Kurihara, Yukio; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Yamaguchi, Junji; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2011-05-01

    Sucrose plays an important role in several cellular processes since it is a general source of metabolic energy, serves as a precursor for starch and cellulose synthesis, and is a metabolic starting point for carboxylate- and amino acid synthesis. While plant vacuole is the main cellular storage pool, where sucrose accumulates to high concentrations, only a small number of vacuolar sugar transporters have been identified and characterized to date. We initially identified a vacuolar sucrose transporter (NtSUT4) from tobacco BY-2 cells and established transgenic tobacco BY-2 cell lines that overexpress NtSUT4-GFP (BY-SUTG cells). Using a model system for synchronous cell elongation in miniprotoplasts (evacuolated cells) prepared from tobacco BY-2 cells, we found that NtSUT4-GFP overexpression inhibited cell growth towards the cell major axis. Moreover, under the same conditions, we found that the cell walls were well stained by calcofluor in BY-SUTG cells than in wild type BY-2 cells. These results suggest that NtSUT4 is involved in cell shape via sucrose homeostasis in plant cells.

  18. Viral infection of tobacco plants improves performance of Bemisia tabaci but more so for an invasive than for an indigenous biotype of the whitefly*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Li, Meng; Li, Jun-min; Huang, Chang-jun; Zhou, Xue-ping; Xu, Fang-cheng; Liu, Shu-sheng

    2010-01-01

    The ecological effects of plant-virus-vector interactions on invasion of alien plant viral vectors have been rarely investigated. We examined the transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) by the invasive Q biotype and the indigenous ZHJ2 biotype of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, a plant viral vector, as well as the influence of TYLCCNV-infection of plants on the performance of the two whitefly biotypes. Both whitefly biotypes were able to acquire viruses from infected plants and retained them in their bodies, but were unable to transmit them to either tobacco or tomato plants. However, when the Q biotype fed on tobacco plants infected with TYLCCNV, its fecundity and longevity were increased by 7- and 1-fold, respectively, compared to those of the Q biotype fed on uninfected tobacco plants. When the ZHJ2 biotype fed on virus-infected plants, its fecundity and longevity were increased by only 2- and 0.5-fold, respectively. These data show that the Q biotype acquired higher beneficial effects from TYLCCNV-infection of tobacco plants than the ZHJ2 biotype. Thus, the Q biotype whitefly may have advantages in its invasion and displacement of the indigenous ZHJ2 biotype. PMID:20043350

  19. Environmental impacts of genetically modified plants: A review.

    PubMed

    Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Nawaz, Muhammad Amjad; Kouretas, Demetrios; Balias, Georgios; Savolainen, Kai; Tutelyan, Victor A; Golokhvast, Kirill S; Lee, Jeong Dong; Yang, Seung Hwan; Chung, Gyuhwa

    2017-03-27

    Powerful scientific techniques have caused dramatic expansion of genetically modified crops leading to altered agricultural practices posing direct and indirect environmental implications. Despite the enhanced yield potential, risks and biosafety concerns associated with such GM crops are the fundamental issues to be addressed. An increasing interest can be noted among the researchers and policy makers in exploring unintended effects of transgenes associated with gene flow, flow of naked DNA, weediness and chemical toxicity. The current state of knowledge reveals that GM crops impart damaging impacts on the environment such as modification in crop pervasiveness or invasiveness, the emergence of herbicide and insecticide tolerance, transgene stacking and disturbed biodiversity, but these impacts require a more in-depth view and critical research so as to unveil further facts. Most of the reviewed scientific resources provide similar conclusions and currently there is an insufficient amount of data available and up until today, the consumption of GM plant products are safe for consumption to a greater extent with few exceptions. This paper updates the undesirable impacts of GM crops and their products on target and non-target species and attempts to shed light on the emerging challenges and threats associated with it. Underpinning research also realizes the influence of GM crops on a disturbance in biodiversity, development of resistance and evolution slightly resembles with the effects of non-GM cultivation. Future prospects are also discussed.

  20. Multiple Different Defense Mechanisms Are Activated in the Young Transgenic Tobacco Plants Which Express the Full Length Genome of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus, and Are Resistant against this Virus

    PubMed Central

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J.; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489–1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7–8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV

  1. Multiple different defense mechanisms are activated in the young transgenic tobacco plants which express the full length genome of the Tobacco mosaic virus, and are resistant against this virus.

    PubMed

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489-1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7-8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV replication

  2. Functional components of the bacterial CzcCBA efflux system reduce cadmium uptake and accumulation in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Nesler, Andrea; DalCorso, Giovanni; Fasani, Elisa; Manara, Anna; Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Argese, Emanuele; Furini, Antonella

    2017-03-25

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic trace element released into the environment by industrial and agricultural practices, threatening the health of plants and contaminating the food/feed chain. Biotechnology can be used to develop plant varieties with a higher capacity for Cd accumulation (for use in phytoremediation programs) or a lower capacity for Cd accumulation (to reduce Cd levels in food and feed). Here we generated transgenic tobacco plants expressing components of the Pseudomonas putida CzcCBA efflux system. Plants were transformed with combinations of the CzcC, CzcB and CzcA genes, and the impact on Cd mobilization was analysed. Plants expressing PpCzcC showed no differences in Cd accumulation, whereas those expressing PpCzcB or PpCzcA accumulated less Cd in the shoots, but more Cd in the roots. Plants expressing both PpCzcB and PpCzcA accumulated less Cd in the shoots and roots compared to controls, whereas plants expressing all three genes showed a significant reduction in Cd levels only in shoots. These results show that components of the CzcCBA system can be expressed in plants and may be useful for developing plants with a reduced capacity to accumulate Cd in the shoots, potentially reducing the toxicity of food/feed crops cultivated in Cd-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced cytokinin synthesis in tobacco plants expressing PSARK::IPT prevents the degradation of photosynthetic protein complexes during drought.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Rosa M; Gimeno, Jacinta; Van Deynze, Allen; Walia, Harkamal; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    To identify genes associated with the cytokinin-induced enhanced drought tolerance, we analyzed the transcriptome of wild-type and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'SR1') plants expressing P(SARK)::IPT (for senescence-associated receptor kinase::isopentenyltransferase) grown under well-watered and prolonged water deficit conditions using the tomato GeneChip. During water deficit, the expression of genes encoding components of the carotenoid pathway leading to ABA biosynthesis was enhanced in the wild-type plants, but repressed in the transgenic plants. On the other hand, transgenic plants displayed higher transcript abundance of genes involved in the brassinosteroid biosynthetic pathways. Several genes coding for proteins associated with Chl synthesis, light reactions, the Calvin-Benson cycle and photorespiration were induced in the transgenic plants. Notably, increased transcript abundance of genes associated with PSII, the cytochrome b(6)/f complex, PSI, NADH oxidoreductase and the ATP complex was found in the P(SARK)::IPT plants. The increased transcript abundance was assessed by quantitative PCR and the increased protein levels were confirmed by Western blots. Our results indicated that while the photosynthetic apparatus in the wild-type plants was degraded, photosynthesis in the transgenic plants was not affected and photosynthetic proteins were not degraded. During water deficit, wild-type plants displayed a significant reduction in electron transfer and photochemical quenching, with a marked increase in non-photochemical quenching, suggesting a decrease in energy transfer to the PSII core complexes and an increase in cyclic electron transfer reactions.

  4. The alc-GR system: a modified alc gene switch designed for use in plant tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gethin R; Garoosi, G Ali; Koroleva, Olga; Ito, Masaki; Laufs, Patrick; Leader, David J; Caddick, Mark X; Doonan, John H; Tomsett, A Brian

    2005-07-01

    The ALCR/alcA (alc) two-component, ethanol-inducible gene expression system provides stringent control of transgene expression in genetically modified plants. ALCR is an ethanol-activated transcription factor that can drive expression from the ALCR-responsive promoter (alcA). However, the alc system has been shown to have constitutive expression when used in plant callus or cell suspension cultures, possibly resulting from endogenous inducer produced in response to lowered oxygen availability. To widen the use of the alc system in plant cell culture conditions, the receptor domain of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was translationally fused to the C terminus of ALCR to produce ALCR-GR, which forms the basis of a glucocorticoid-inducible system (alc-GR). The alc-GR switch system was tested in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 suspension cells using a constitutively expressed ALCR-GR with four alternative alcA promoter-driven reporter genes: beta-glucuronidase, endoplasmic reticulum-targeted green fluorescent protein, haemagglutinin, and green fluorescent protein-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Arath;CDKA;1 cyclin-dependent kinase. Gene expression was shown to be stringently dependent on the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone and, in cell suspensions, no longer required ethanol for induction. Thus, the alc-GR system allows tight control of alcA-driven genes in cell culture and complements the conventional ethanol switch used in whole plants.

  5. Magnetic graphene as modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe adsorbent for the determination of organochlorine pesticide residues in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan-Bo; Li, Xue; Jiang, Xing-Yi; Cai, Bao-Dong; Zhu, Feng-Peng; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Chen, Zai-Gen; Pang, Yong-Qiang; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-08-07

    In this study, magnetic graphene was used as modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) adsorbent for the determination of organochlorine pesticide (OCPs) residues in tobacco. To achieve the optimum conditions of modified QuEChERS procedure toward target analytes, several parameters affecting the clean-up efficiency including the amount of the adsorbent and clean-up time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a method for the determination of 26 OCPs residues in tobacco was established by coupling the modified QuEChERS procedure to on-line gel permeation chromatography-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (on-line GPC-GC-MS(2)). The limits of detection of proposed method for 26 OCPs residues ranged from 0.01275 to 3.150ng/g. And good linearities of the proposed method were obtained with coefficients of determination (R(2)) greater than 0.9985 for all target analytes. Good reproducibility of method was obtained as intra- and inter-day precisions, the relative standard deviations were less than 11.1 and 15.0%, respectively. The apparent recoveries were in the range of 64-126% at different concentrations for real samples. Compared with the reported methods for the determination of OCPs residues in tobacco, the proposed method has the advantages of simple to operate, low cost and high clean-up ability. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the analysis of OCPs residues in real samples.

  6. An acidic class III chitinase in sugar beet: induction by Cercospora beticola, characterization, and expression in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K K; Mikkelsen, J D; Kragh, K M; Bojsen, K

    1993-01-01

    An acidic chitinase (SE) was found to accumulate in leaves of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) during infection with Cercospora beticola. Two isoforms, SE1 and SE2, with MW of 29 kDa and pI of approximately 3.0 were purified to homogeneity. SE2 is an endochitinase that also exhibits exochitinase activity, i.e., it is capable of hydrolyzing chito-oligosaccharides, including chitobiose, into N-acetyl-glucosamine. Partial amino acid sequence data for SE2 were used to obtain a cDNA clone by polymerase chain reaction. The clone was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding SE2. The deduced amino acid sequence for SE2 is 58-67% identical to the class III chitinases from cucumber, Arabidopsis, and tobacco. A transient induction of SE2 mRNA during the early stages of infection with C. beticola is much stronger in tolerant plants than in susceptible plants. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants constitutively accumulate SE2 protein in the intercellular space of their leaves. In a preliminary infection experiment, the transgenic plants did not show increase in resistance against C. nicotianae.

  7. [Estradiol inducible and flower-specific expression of ARGOS and ARGOS-LIKE genes in transgenic tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Nikonorov, Iu M; Cheremis, A V

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing Arabidopsis thaliana ARGOS and ARGOS-LIKE genes under the control of the chalcone synthase promoter of Petunia hybrid L., as well as the estradiol inducible XVE system, have been obtained. The part of transgenic plants with flower-specific expression of the target genes was characterized by increased flower size, caused by an increase in cell size and quantity in the case of the ARGOS gene and by a stimulation of cell growth via stretching in the case of the ARGOS-LIKE gene. An enhanced expression level of the NtEXPA1, NtEXPA4 genes encoding expansins, NtEXGT gene encoding endo-xyloglucan transferase, and the AINTEGUMENTA-like gene was detected in the flowers of transgenic tobacco plants. In the case of inducible expression of ARGOS and ARGOS-LIKE genes, an increase in leaf, stem and flower size was revealed in several lines of transgenic plants as compared to control. Expression of the ARGOS gene also affected cell number and size in this case, while the ARGOS-LIKE gene mainly influenced cell size via stretching. Inducible expression of the ARGOS gene in flowers mainly provided an enhanced containment of AINTEGUMENTA-like mRNA, while ARGOS-LIKE gene expression resulted in the activation of NtEXPA1 and NtEXGT genes.

  8. The photosynthetic response of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant aquaporin McMIPB to a soil water deficit and high vapor pressure deficit.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Miki; Hanba, Yuko T; Katsuhara, Maki

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the photosynthetic capacity and plant growth of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) aquaporin McMIPB under (1) a well-watered growth condition, (2) a well-watered and temporal higher vapor pressure deficit (VPD) condition, and (3) a soil water deficit growth condition to investigate the effect of McMIPB on photosynthetic responses under moderate soil and atmospheric humidity and water deficit conditions. Transgenic plants showed a significantly higher photosynthesis rate (by 48 %), higher mesophyll conductance (by 52 %), and enhanced growth under the well-watered growth condition than those of control plants. Decreases in the photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance from ambient to higher VPD were slightly higher in transgenic plants than those in control plants. When plants were grown under the soil water deficit condition, decreases in the photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance were less significant in transgenic plants than those in control plants. McMIPB is likely to work as a CO2 transporter, as well as control the regulation of stomata to water deficits.

  9. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA synthase 1 shows increased plant growth, pod size and seed yield.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mingfu; Hsiao, An-Shan; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS), the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt) and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i) phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1) in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii) higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii) induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant reproduction

  10. Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA Synthase 1 Shows Increased Plant Growth, Pod Size and Seed Yield

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Pan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mingfu; Hsiao, An-Shan; Bach, Thomas J.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS), the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt) and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i) phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1) in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii) higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii) induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant reproduction

  11. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants.

  12. A Novel Stress-Induced Sugarcane Gene Confers Tolerance to Drought, Salt and Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Begcy, Kevin; Mariano, Eduardo D.; Gentile, Agustina; Lembke, Carolina G.; Zingaretti, Sonia Marli; Souza, Glaucia M.; Menossi, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background Drought is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity worldwide. Sugarcane can withstand periods of water scarcity during the final stage of culm maturation, during which sucrose accumulation occurs. Meanwhile, prolonged periods of drought can cause severe plant losses. Methodology/Principal Findings In a previous study, we evaluated the transcriptome of drought-stressed plants to better understand sugarcane responses to drought. Among the up-regulated genes was Scdr1 (sugarcane drought-responsive 1). The aim of the research reported here was to characterize this gene. Scdr1 encodes a putative protein containing 248 amino acids with a large number of proline (19%) and cysteine (13%) residues. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ScDR1is in a clade with homologs from other monocotyledonous plants, separate from those of dicotyledonous plants. The expression of Scdr1 in different varieties of sugarcane plants has not shown a clear association with drought tolerance. Conclusions/Significance The overexpression of Scdr1 in transgenic tobacco plants increased their tolerance to drought, salinity and oxidative stress, as demonstrated by increased photosynthesis, water content, biomass, germination rate, chlorophyll content and reduced accumulation of ROS. Physiological parameters, such as transpiration rate (E), net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and internal leaf CO2 concentration, were less affected by abiotic stresses in transgenic Scdr1 plants compared with wild-type plants. Overall, our results indicated that Scdr1 conferred tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, highlighting the potential of this gene for biotechnological applications. PMID:22984543

  13. UV-C–Irradiated Arabidopsis and Tobacco Emit Volatiles That Trigger Genomic Instability in Neighboring Plants[W

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Youli; Danna, Cristian H.; Zemp, Franz J.; Titov, Viktor; Ciftci, Ozan Nazim; Przybylski, Roman; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that local exposure of plants to stress results in a systemic increase in genome instability. Here, we show that UV-C–irradiated plants produce a volatile signal that triggers an increase in genome instability in neighboring nonirradiated Arabidopsis thaliana plants. This volatile signal is interspecific, as UV-C–irradiated Arabidopsis plants transmit genome destabilization to naive tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants and vice versa. We report that plants exposed to the volatile hormones methyl salicylate (MeSA) or methyl jasmonate (MeJA) exhibit a similar level of genome destabilization as UV-C–irradiated plants. We also found that irradiated Arabidopsis plants produce MeSA and MeJA. The analysis of mutants impaired in the synthesis and/or response to salicylic acid (SA) and/or jasmonic acid showed that at least one other volatile compound besides MeSA and MeJA can communicate interplant genome instability. The NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (npr1) mutant, defective in SA signaling, is impaired in both the production and the perception of the volatile signals, demonstrating a key role for NPR1 as a central regulator of genome stability. Finally, various forms of stress resulting in the formation of necrotic lesions also generate a volatile signal that leads to genomic instability. PMID:22028460

  14. Altered stomatal dynamics in ascorbate oxidase over-expressing tobacco plants suggest a role for dehydroascorbate signalling.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios; De Tullio, Mario C; Barnes, Jeremy; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2008-01-01

    Control of stomatal aperture is of paramount importance for plant adaptation to the surrounding environment. Here, we report on several parameters related to stomatal dynamics and performance in transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Xanthi) over-expressing cucumber ascorbate oxidase (AO), a cell wall-localized enzyme of uncertain biological function that oxidizes ascorbic acid (AA) to monodehydroascorbic acid which dismutates yielding AA and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). In comparison to WT plants, leaves of AO over-expressing plants exhibited reduced stomatal conductance (due to partial stomatal closure), higher water content, and reduced rates of water loss on detachment. Transgenic plants also exhibited elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide and a decline in hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme activity. Leaf ABA content was also higher in AO over-expressing plants. Treatment of epidermal strips with either 1 mM DHA or 100 microM hydrogen peroxide resulted in rapid stomatal closure in WT plants, but not in AO-over-expressing plants. This suggests that signal perception and/or transduction associated with stomatal closure is altered by AO over-expression. These data support a specific role for cell wall-localized AA in the perception of environmental cues, and suggest that DHA acts as a regulator of stomatal dynamics.

  15. A novel stress-induced sugarcane gene confers tolerance to drought, salt and oxidative stress in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Begcy, Kevin; Mariano, Eduardo D; Gentile, Agustina; Lembke, Carolina G; Zingaretti, Sonia Marli; Souza, Glaucia M; Menossi, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Drought is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity worldwide. Sugarcane can withstand periods of water scarcity during the final stage of culm maturation, during which sucrose accumulation occurs. Meanwhile, prolonged periods of drought can cause severe plant losses. In a previous study, we evaluated the transcriptome of drought-stressed plants to better understand sugarcane responses to drought. Among the up-regulated genes was Scdr1 (sugarcane drought-responsive 1). The aim of the research reported here was to characterize this gene. Scdr1 encodes a putative protein containing 248 amino acids with a large number of proline (19%) and cysteine (13%) residues. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ScDR1is in a clade with homologs from other monocotyledonous plants, separate from those of dicotyledonous plants. The expression of Scdr1 in different varieties of sugarcane plants has not shown a clear association with drought tolerance. The overexpression of Scdr1 in transgenic tobacco plants increased their tolerance to drought, salinity and oxidative stress, as demonstrated by increased photosynthesis, water content, biomass, germination rate, chlorophyll content and reduced accumulation of ROS. Physiological parameters, such as transpiration rate (E), net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and internal leaf CO(2) concentration, were less affected by abiotic stresses in transgenic Scdr1 plants compared with wild-type plants. Overall, our results indicated that Scdr1 conferred tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, highlighting the potential of this gene for biotechnological applications.

  16. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank; Boddupalli, Sekhar S.

    2005-08-30

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  17. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris [Portola Valley, CA; Broun, Pierre [Burlingame, CA; van de Loo, Frank [Weston, AU; Boddupalli, Sekhar S [Manchester, MI

    2011-08-23

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  18. Plants with modified lignin content and methods for production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Qiao; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-05

    The invention provides methods for decreasing lignin content and for increasing the level of fermentable carbohydrates in plants by down-regulation of the NST transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of NST are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise reduced lignin content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops. Methods for processing plant tissue and for producing ethanol by utilizing such plants are also provided.

  19. Smokeless Tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer? Tobacco and Cancer Health Risks of Smokeless Tobacco Spit or smokeless tobacco is a less lethal, ... still unsafe, alternative to smoking. Types of smokeless tobacco Many types of tobacco are put into the ...

  20. Overexpression of lipid transfer protein (LTP) genes enhances resistance to plant pathogens and LTP functions in long-distance systemic signaling in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Sarowar, Sujon; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Ki Deok; Hwang, Byung Kook; Ok, Sung Han; Shin, Jeong Sheop

    2009-03-01

    The lipid signal is essential for the activation of plant defense responses, but downstream components of the signaling pathway are still poorly defined. To investigate the biological functions of pepper lipid transfer protein (LTP), we carried out virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper, constitutive expression of CALTPs and grafting experiments in the tobacco plant. Suppression of endogenous CALTPI and CALTPII by VIGS, respectively, resulted in enhanced susceptibility to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vescatoria and pepper mosaic mottle virus in pepper. On the other hand, the constitutive expression of CALTPI and CALTPII genes in tobacco plants showed enhanced resistance to oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora nicotianae and bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. Enhanced resistance is found to be associated with the enhanced CALTP transcript levels in the independent transgenic CALTPI or II tobacco lines. Induced resistance responses in grafted scion leaves revealed that LTP plays a role in long-distance systemic signaling in plants.

  1. Herbicide-resistant tobacco plants expressing the fused enzyme between rat cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and yeast NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, N; Nagasawa, A; Sakaki, T; Yabusaki, Y; Ohkawa, H

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) plants expressing a genetically engineered fused enzyme between rat cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and yeast NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase were produced. The expression plasmid pGFC2 for the fused enzyme was constructed by insertion of the corresponding cDNA into the expression vector pNG01 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and nopaline synthase gene terminator. The fused enzyme cDNA was integrated into tobacco genomes by Agrobacterium infection techniques. In transgenic tobacco plants, the fused enzyme protein was localized primarily in the microsomal fraction. The microsomal monooxygenase activities were approximately 10 times higher toward both 7-ethoxycoumarin and benzo[a]pyrene than in the control plant. The transgenic plants also showed resistance to the herbicide chlortoluron. PMID:7972515

  2. Aerosol from a candidate modified risk tobacco product has reduced effects on chemotaxis and transendothelial migration compared to combustion of conventional cigarettes.

    PubMed

    van der Toorn, Marco; Frentzel, Stefan; De Leon, Hector; Goedertier, Didier; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Reduction of harmful constituents by heating rather than combusting tobacco is a promising new approach to reduce harmful effects associated with cigarette smoking. We investigated the effect from a new candidate modified risk tobacco product, the tobacco heating system (THS) 2.2, on the migratory behavior of monocytes in comparison with combustible 3R4F reference cigarettes. The monocytic cell line (THP-1) and human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) were used to analyze chemotaxis and transendothelial migration (TEM). To assess the influence of aerosol extract from THS2.2 and smoke extract from 3R4F on toxicity and inflammation, flow cytometry and ELISA assays were performed. The results show that treatment of THP-1 cells with extract from 3R4F or THS2.2 induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity and inflammation. The inhibitory effects of THS2.2 extract for chemotaxis and TEM were ∼18 times less effective compared to 3R4F extract. Furthermore, extract from 3R4F or THS2.2 induced concentration-dependent decreases in the integrity of HCAEC monolayer. For all examined endpoints, the extract from 3R4F showed more than one order of magnitude stronger effects than that from THS2.2 extract. These data indicate the potential of a heat not burn tobacco product to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease compared to combustible cigarettes.

  3. Tobacco Mosaic Virus Infection Results in an Increase in Recombination Frequency and Resistance to Viral, Bacterial, and Fungal Pathogens in the Progeny of Infected Tobacco Plants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kathiria, Palak; Sidler, Corinne; Golubov, Andrey; Kalischuk, Melanie; Kawchuk, Lawrence M.; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Our previous experiments showed that infection of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) leads to an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of infected plants also had an increased rate of rearrangements in resistance gene-like loci. Here, we report that tobacco plants infected with TMV exhibited an increase in HRF in two consecutive generations. Analysis of global genome methylation showed the hypermethylated genome in both generations of plants, whereas analysis of methylation via 5-methyl cytosine antibodies demonstrated both hypomethylation and hypermethylation. Analysis of the response of the progeny of infected plants to TMV, Pseudomonas syringae, or Phytophthora nicotianae revealed a significant delay in symptom development. Infection of these plants with TMV or P. syringae showed higher levels of induction of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 gene expression and higher levels of callose deposition. Our experiments suggest that viral infection triggers specific changes in progeny that promote higher levels of HRF at the transgene and higher resistance to stress as compared with the progeny of unstressed plants. However, data reported in these studies do not establish evidence of a link between recombination frequency and stress resistance. PMID:20498336

  4. Synergistic biosynthesis of biphasic ethylene and reactive oxygen species in response to hemibiotrophic Phytophthora parasitica in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wi, Soo Jin; Ji, Na Ri; Park, Ky Young

    2012-05-01

    We observed the biphasic production of ethylene and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in susceptible tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'Wisconsin 38') plants after shoot inoculation with Phytophthora parasitica var nicotianae. The initial transient increase in ROS and ethylene at 1 and 3 h (phase I), respectively, was followed by a second massive increase at 48 and 72 h (phase II), respectively, after pathogen inoculation. This biphasic pattern of ROS production significantly differed from the hypersensitive response exhibited by cryptogein-treated wild-type tobacco plants. The biphasic increase in ROS production was mediated by both NADPH oxidase isoforms, respiratory burst oxidase homolog (Rboh) D and RbohF. Conversely, different 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase members were involved in specific phases of ethylene production: NtACS4 in the first phase and NtACS1 in the second phase. Biphasic production of ROS was inhibited in transgenic antisense plant lines expressing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase/oxidase or ethylene-insensitive3 as well as in transgenic plants impaired in ROS production. All tested transgenic plants were more tolerant against P. parasitica var nicotianae infection as determined based on trypan blue staining and pathogen proliferation. Further, silencing of NtACS4 blocked the second massive increase in ROS production as well as pathogen progression. Pathogen tolerance was due to the inhibition of ROS and ethylene production, which further resulted in lower activation of ROS-detoxifying enzymes. Accordingly, the synergistic inhibition of the second phase of ROS and ethylene production had protective effects against pathogen-induced cell damage. We conclude that the levels of ethylene and ROS correlate with compatible P. parasitica proliferation in susceptible plants.

  5. Overexpression of a novel soybean gene modulating Na+ and K+ transport enhances salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huatao; He, Hui; Yu, Deyue

    2011-01-01

    Salt is an important factor affecting the growth and development of soybean in saline soil. In this study, a novel soybean gene encoding a transporter (GmHKT1) was identified and its function analyzed using transgenic plants. GmHKT1 encoded a protein of 419 amino acids, with a potential molecular mass of 47.06 kDa and a predicted pI value of 8.59. Comparison of the genomic and cDNA sequences of GmHKT1 identified no intron. The deduced amino acid sequence of GmHKT1 showed 38-49% identity with other plant HKT-like sequences. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of GmHKT1 was upregulated by salt stress (150 mM NaCl) in roots and leaves but not in stems. Overexpression of GmHKT1 significantly enhanced the tolerance of transgenic tobacco plants to salt stress, compared with non-transgenic plants. To investigate the role of GmHKT1 in K(+) and Na(+) transport, we compared K(+) and Na(+) accumulation in roots and shoots of wild-type and transgenic tobacco plants. The results suggested that GmHKT1 is a transporter that affected K(+) and Na(+) transport in roots and shoots, and regulated Na(+) /K(+) homeostasis in these organs. Our findings suggest that GmHKT1 plays an important role in response to salt stress and would be useful in engineering crop plants for enhanced tolerance to salt stress.

  6. Influence of salicylic acid on rubisco and rubisco activase in tobacco plant grown under sodium chloride in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Young; Damodaran, Puthanveettil Narayanankutty; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth of salt stress (sodium chloride) induced in tobacco plants. In addition, quantification of rubisco and rubisco activase contents of the plants was also determined in treatments with the control, 10−4 mM SA, 50 mM NaCl, 100 mM NaCl, 150 mM NaCl, SA + 50 mM NaCl, SA + 100 mM NaCl and SA + 150 mM NaCl, respectively after in vitro culture for 5 weeks. The growth of the tobacco plant decreased in 50 mM and 100 mM NaCl when not treated with SA. However, the growth was accelerated by SA, and the growth retardation caused by NaCl was improved by SA. The content of rubisco was improved by SA only in plants treated with 50 mM NaCl, and the activity of rubisco was increased by SA resulting in the decreased effect of NaCl, but only in 50 mM NaCl treated plants. The content of rubisco activase decreased due to NaCl, and SA did not improve the effect caused by NaCl. The activity of rubisco activase was increased by SA resulting in decreased activity caused by NaCl, but increased effect by SA was not recovered to the level of NaCl untreated plants. The activity of rubisco and rubisco activase, which decreased due to denaturing agents, did not demonstrate significant improvement when compared to the control. PMID:25313276

  7. Activation of Pathogenesis-related Genes by the Rhizobacterium, Bacillus sp. JS, Which Induces Systemic Resistance in Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Seong; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Chan-Hui; Woo, Su Young; Kang, Hoduck; Seo, Sang-Gyu; Kim, Sun-Hyung

    2015-06-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are known to confer disease resistance to plants. Bacillus sp. JS demonstrated antifungal activities against five fungal pathogens in in vitro assays. To verify whether the volatiles of Bacillus sp. JS confer disease resistance, tobacco leaves pre-treated with the volatiles were damaged by the fungal pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani and oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae. Pre-treated tobacco leaves had smaller lesion than the control plant leaves. In pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression analysis, volatiles of Bacillus sp. JS caused the up-regulation of PR-2 encoding β-1,3-glucanase and acidic PR-3 encoding chitinase. Expression of acidic PR-4 encoding chitinase and acidic PR-9 encoding peroxidase increased gradually after exposure of the volatiles to Bacillus sp. JS. Basic PR-14 encoding lipid transfer protein was also increased. However, PR-1 genes, as markers of salicylic acid (SA) induced resistance, were not expressed. These results suggested that the volatiles of Bacillus sp. JS confer disease resistance against fungal and oomycete pathogens through PR genes expression.

  8. Expression of geminiviral AC2 RNA silencing suppressor changes sugar and jasmonate responsive gene expression in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Soitamo, Arto J; Jada, Balaji; Lehto, Kirsi

    2012-11-07

    RNA-silencing is a conserved gene regulation and surveillance machinery, which in plants, is also used as major defence mechanism against viruses. Various virus-specific dsRNA structures are recognized by the silencing machinery leading to degradation of the viral RNAs or, as in case of begomoviruses, to methylation of their DNA genomes. Viruses produce specific RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to prevent these host defence mechanisms, and as these interfere with the silencing machinery they also disturb the endogenous silencing reactions. In this paper, we describe how expression of AC2 RSS, derived from African cassava mosaic geminivirus changes transcription profile in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and in flowers. Expression of AC2 RSS in transgenic tobacco plants induced clear phenotypic changes both in leaves and in flowers. Transcriptomes of these plants were strongly altered, with total of 1118 and 251 differentially expressed genes in leaves and flowers, respectively. The three most up-regulated transcript groups were related to stress, cell wall modifications and signalling, whereas the three most down-regulated groups were related to translation, photosynthesis and transcription. It appears that many of the gene expression alterations appeared to be related to enhanced biosynthesis of jasmonate and ethylene, and consequent enhancement of the genes and pathways that are regulated by these hormones, or to the retrograde signalling caused by the reduced photosynthetic activity and sugar metabolism. Comparison of these results to a previous transcriptional profiling of HC-Pro RSS-expressing plants revealed that some of same genes were induced by both RSSs, but their expression levels were typically higher in AC2 than in HC-Pro RSS expressing plants. All in all, a large number of transcript alterations were found to be specific to each of the RSS expressing transgenic plants. AC2 RSS in transgenic tobacco plants interferes with the silencing

  9. Expression of geminiviral AC2 RNA silencing suppressor changes sugar and jasmonate responsive gene expression in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA-silencing is a conserved gene regulation and surveillance machinery, which in plants, is also used as major defence mechanism against viruses. Various virus-specific dsRNA structures are recognized by the silencing machinery leading to degradation of the viral RNAs or, as in case of begomoviruses, to methylation of their DNA genomes. Viruses produce specific RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to prevent these host defence mechanisms, and as these interfere with the silencing machinery they also disturb the endogenous silencing reactions. In this paper, we describe how expression of AC2 RSS, derived from African cassava mosaic geminivirus changes transcription profile in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and in flowers. Results Expression of AC2 RSS in transgenic tobacco plants induced clear phenotypic changes both in leaves and in flowers. Transcriptomes of these plants were strongly altered, with total of 1118 and 251 differentially expressed genes in leaves and flowers, respectively. The three most up-regulated transcript groups were related to stress, cell wall modifications and signalling, whereas the three most down-regulated groups were related to translation, photosynthesis and transcription. It appears that many of the gene expression alterations appeared to be related to enhanced biosynthesis of jasmonate and ethylene, and consequent enhancement of the genes and pathways that are regulated by these hormones, or to the retrograde signalling caused by the reduced photosynthetic activity and sugar metabolism. Comparison of these results to a previous transcriptional profiling of HC-Pro RSS-expressing plants revealed that some of same genes were induced by both RSSs, but their expression levels were typically higher in AC2 than in HC-Pro RSS expressing plants. All in all, a large number of transcript alterations were found to be specific to each of the RSS expressing transgenic plants. Conclusions AC2 RSS in transgenic tobacco plants

  10. Use of Recombinant Tobacco Mosaic Virus To Achieve RNA Interference in Plants against the Citrus Mealybug, Planococcus citri (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif Muhammad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Kiss, Zsofia; Khan, Azhar Abbas; Mansoor, Shahid; Falk, Bryce W.

    2013-01-01

    The citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri, is an important plant pest with a very broad plant host range. P. citri is a phloem feeder and loss of plant vigor and stunting are characteristic symptoms induced on a range of host plants, but P. citri also reduces fruit quality and causes fruit drop leading to significant yield reductions. Better strategies for managing this pest are greatly needed. RNA interference (RNAi) is an emerging tool for functional genomics studies and is being investigated as a practical tool for highly targeted insect control. Here we investigated whether RNAi effects can be induced in P. citri and whether candidate mRNAs could be identified as possible targets for RNAi-based P. citri control. RNAi effects were induced in P. citri, as demonstrated by specific target reductions of P. citri actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs after injection of the corresponding specific double-stranded RNA inducers. We also used recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to express these RNAi effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We found that P. citri showed lower fecundity and pronounced death of crawlers after feeding on recombinant TMV-infected plants. Taken together, our data show that actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs are potential targets for RNAi against P. citri, and that recombinant TMV is an effective tool for evaluating candidate RNAi effectors in plants. PMID:24040013

  11. Use of recombinant tobacco mosaic virus to achieve RNA interference in plants against the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif Muhammad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Kiss, Zsofia; Khan, Azhar Abbas; Mansoor, Shahid; Falk, Bryce W

    2013-01-01

    The citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri, is an important plant pest with a very broad plant host range. P. citri is a phloem feeder and loss of plant vigor and stunting are characteristic symptoms induced on a range of host plants, but P. citri also reduces fruit quality and causes fruit drop leading to significant yield reductions. Better strategies for managing this pest are greatly needed. RNA interference (RNAi) is an emerging tool for functional genomics studies and is being investigated as a practical tool for highly targeted insect control. Here we investigated whether RNAi effects can be induced in P. citri and whether candidate mRNAs could be identified as possible targets for RNAi-based P. citri control. RNAi effects were induced in P. citri, as demonstrated by specific target reductions of P. citri actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs after injection of the corresponding specific double-stranded RNA inducers. We also used recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to express these RNAi effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We found that P. citri showed lower fecundity and pronounced death of crawlers after feeding on recombinant TMV-infected plants. Taken together, our data show that actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs are potential targets for RNAi against P. citri, and that recombinant TMV is an effective tool for evaluating candidate RNAi effectors in plants.

  12. Investigation of the Possibility of Using Serum Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA) as a Novel and Early Marker of the Extent of Oxidative Stress Induced by Various Tobacco Products.

    PubMed

    Gothe, Pavan R; Jose, Maji; Pai, Vinitha R; Harish, Sindhu; D'Souza, Jyothi; Prabhu, Vishnudas

    2015-11-01

    Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA) is an altered serum albumin that forms under the conditions of oxidative stress and is considered as a biomarker of cardiac ischemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ischemia modified albumin (IMA) in the serum of the individuals with different types of tobacco habits in order to investigate the possibility of using this as a biomarker for the oxidative stress induced by the tobacco products. The study included 90 subjects, who were Grouped as control (30), Group I (betel quid chewers), Group II (gutkha chewers), Group III (smokers) and Group IV (mixed). Serum was collected from subjects of all Groups and IMA estimation was done using Albumin Cobalt binding assay. The results were tabulated and analysed statistically. The mean serum IMA levels in control, Group I, Group II, Group III and Group IV were 0.52547 ABSU, 0.68767 ABSU, 0.47433 ABSU,0.36540 ABSU and 0.54593 ABSU respectively. The results show that serum IMA levels were increased in betel quid chewers and mixed Group compared to the controls. From the results noted in this study we suggest that IMA can be used as an early marker for tobacco related oxidative stress.

  13. Investigation of the Possibility of Using Serum Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA) as a Novel and Early Marker of the Extent of Oxidative Stress Induced by Various Tobacco Products

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Maji; Pai, Vinitha R.; Harish, Sindhu; D’Souza, Jyothi; Prabhu, Vishnudas

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA) is an altered serum albumin that forms under the conditions of oxidative stress and is considered as a biomarker of cardiac ischemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ischemia modified albumin (IMA) in the serum of the individuals with different types of tobacco habits in order to investigate the possibility of using this as a biomarker for the oxidative stress induced by the tobacco products. Materials and Methods The study included 90 subjects, who were Grouped as control (30), Group I (betel quid chewers), Group II (gutkha chewers), Group III (smokers) and Group IV (mixed). Serum was collected from subjects of all Groups and IMA estimation was done using Albumin Cobalt binding assay. The results were tabulated and analysed statistically. Results The mean serum IMA levels in control, Group I, Group II, Group III and Group IV were 0.52547 ABSU, 0.68767 ABSU, 0.47433 ABSU,0.36540 ABSU and 0.54593 ABSU respectively. Conclusion The results show that serum IMA levels were increased in betel quid chewers and mixed Group compared to the controls. From the results noted in this study we suggest that IMA can be used as an early marker for tobacco related oxidative stress. PMID:26674345

  14. Molecular phenotyping of lignin-modified tobacco reveals associated changes in cell-wall metabolism, primary metabolism, stress metabolism and photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Dauwe, Rebecca; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Gielen, Birgit; Rohde, Antje; Van Beeumen, Jos; Ralph, John; Boudet, Alain-Michel; Kopka, Joachim; Rochange, Soizic F; Halpin, Claire; Messens, Eric; Boerjan, Wout

    2007-10-01

    Lignin is an important component of secondarily thickened cell walls. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) are two key enzymes that catalyse the penultimate and last steps in the biosynthesis of the monolignols. Downregulation of CCR in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) has been shown to reduce lignin content, whereas lignin in tobacco downregulated for CAD incorporates more aldehydes. We show that altering the expression of either or both genes in tobacco has far-reaching consequences on the transcriptome and metabolome. cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism-based transcript profiling, combined with HPLC and GC-MS-based metabolite profiling, revealed differential transcripts and metabolites within monolignol biosynthesis, as well as a substantial network of interactions between monolignol and other metabolic pathways. In general, in all transgenic lines, the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway was downregulated, whereas starch mobilization was upregulated. CCR-downregulated lines were characterized by changes at the level of detoxification and carbohydrate metabolism, whereas the molecular phenotype of CAD-downregulated tobacco was enriched in transcript of light- and cell-wall-related genes. In addition, the transcript and metabolite data suggested photo-oxidative stress and increased photorespiration, mainly in the CCR-downregulated lines. These predicted effects on the photosynthetic apparatus were subsequently confirmed physiologically by fluorescence and gas-exchange measurements. Our data provide a molecular picture of a plant's response to altered monolignol biosynthesis.

  15. 75 FR 62096 - Agricultural Technical Advisory Committees for Trade in Tobacco, Cotton, Peanuts and Planting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... addresses, such as genetically modified organisms, new technologies and international negotiations, are... the United States Trade Representative (USTR), is considering modifying the existing structure of both...

  16. A CBL-Interacting Protein Kinase TaCIPK2 Confers Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants through Regulating the Stomatal Movement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Meng; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the CBL-CIPK signaling pathways play key roles in the response to abiotic stresses. However, functional studies of CIPKs in the important staple crop wheat are very rare. In this study, we identified a CIPK gene from wheat, designated TaCIPK2. Expression analysis results showed that TaCIPK2 could be up-regulated in wheat leaves by polyethylene glycol, abscisic acid and H2O2 treatments. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that TaCIPK2 was present in whole wheat epidermal cells. A yeast two-hybrid assay indicated that TaCIPK2 interacted with TaCBL1, 2, 3 and 4 in vitro. Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing TaCIPK2 exhibited increased drought tolerance, indicated by a larger proportion of green cotyledons and higher survival rates under the osmotic and drought stress conditions compared with control plants. Additionally, physiological index analyses revealed that the transgenic tobacco plants had lower water loss rates and ion leakage, accumulated less malondialdehyde and H2O2, and had higher catalase and superoxide dismutase activities than the control plants. The transgenic plants also exhibited faster stomatal closure following exposure to osmotic stress conditions. The seed germination rates and stomatal aperture of TaCIPK2-overexpressing tobacco plants decreased after exogenous abscisic acid treatment was applied, implying that the transgenic tobacco plants were more sensitive to exogenous abscisic acid than the control plants. Our results indicate that TaCIPK2 plays a positive regulatory role in drought stress responses in transgenic tobacco plants. PMID:27936160

  17. A CBL-Interacting Protein Kinase TaCIPK2 Confers Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants through Regulating the Stomatal Movement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Tao; Li, Tingting; Wang, Meng; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the CBL-CIPK signaling pathways play key roles in the response to abiotic stresses. However, functional studies of CIPKs in the important staple crop wheat are very rare. In this study, we identified a CIPK gene from wheat, designated TaCIPK2. Expression analysis results showed that TaCIPK2 could be up-regulated in wheat leaves by polyethylene glycol, abscisic acid and H2O2 treatments. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that TaCIPK2 was present in whole wheat epidermal cells. A yeast two-hybrid assay indicated that TaCIPK2 interacted with TaCBL1, 2, 3 and 4 in vitro. Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing TaCIPK2 exhibited increased drought tolerance, indicated by a larger proportion of green cotyledons and higher survival rates under the osmotic and drought stress conditions compared with control plants. Additionally, physiological index analyses revealed that the transgenic tobacco plants had lower water loss rates and ion leakage, accumulated less malondialdehyde and H2O2, and had higher catalase and superoxide dismutase activities than the control plants. The transgenic plants also exhibited faster stomatal closure following exposure to osmotic stress conditions. The seed germination rates and stomatal aperture of TaCIPK2-overexpressing tobacco plants decreased after exogenous abscisic acid treatment was applied, implying that the transgenic tobacco plants were more sensitive to exogenous abscisic acid than the control plants. Our results indicate that TaCIPK2 plays a positive regulatory role in drought stress responses in transgenic tobacco plants.

  18. Differences in the rhizosphere bacterial community of a transplastomic tobacco plant compared to its non-engineered counterpart.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Nicole; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2007-01-01

    Cultivation-independent analyses were carried out to compare the bacterial community structure found in the rhizospheres of a transplastomic tobacco plant carrying the antibiotic resistance marker-gene aadA and its non-engineered parental line. PCR- and reverse transcriptase PCR-amplifications of 16S rRNA and their corresponding genes were carried out with primers targeting the domain Bacteria. The diversity of PCR-products amplified from total nucleic acids extracted from rhizospheres of 10-week-old plants, which had been grown in potting soil in the greenhouse, was visualized by genetic profiling using the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. The SSCP profiles generated from DNA extracted with two different protocols, one including total RNA and the other only DNA, did not show any differences. The SSCP profiles amplified from RNA and DNA were also highly similar to each other, indicating that the dominant bacteria detected were metabolically active. High similarities were seen between the SSCP profiles from the transplastomic and the non-engineered plants, except for a single band that consistently occurred with samples from the non-engineered plants (six replicates), but not, or only weakly, with their engineered counterparts. DNA sequencing and database analysis revealed that the partial rRNA gene matched to a Flavobacterium sp. Other bands of the SSCP-profiles, related to Burkholderia and Bordetella were variable between individual plants but not affected by the transplastomic modification. Thus, the transplastomic modification caused a relative decline of a specific Flavobacterium population but not of other bacteria. Further studies including additional tobacco cultivars, soils and conditions of cultivation would be desirable, to elucidate the ecological importance of this difference.

  19. The Ectopic Expression of CaRop1 Modulates the Response of Tobacco Plants to Ralstonia solanacearum and Aphids

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ailian; Liu, Zhiqin; Li, Jiazhi; Chen, Yanshen; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    In plants, Rho-related GTPases (Rops) are versatile molecular switches that regulate various biological processes, although their exact roles are not fully understood. Herein, we provide evidence that the ectopic expression of a Rop derived from Capsicum annuum, designated CaRop1, in tobacco plants modulates the response of these plants to Ralstonia solanacearum or aphid attack. The deduced amino acid sequence of CaRop1 harbors a conserved Rho domain and is highly homologous to Rops of other plant species. Transient expression of a CaRop1-GFP fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells revealed localization of the GFP signal to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Overexpression (OE) of the wild-type CaRop1 or its dominant-negative mutant (DN-CaRop1) conferred substantial resistance to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack, and this effect was accompanied by enhanced transcriptional expression of the hypersensitive-reaction marker gene HSR201; the jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive PR1b and LOX1; the insect resistance-associated NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI; the ethylene (ET) production-associated NtACS1; and NPK1, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) that interferes with N-, Bs2-, and Rx-mediated disease resistance. In contrast, OE of the constitutively active mutant of CaRop1(CA-CaRop1) enhanced susceptibility of the transgenic tobacco plants to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack and downregulated or sustained the expression of HSR201, PR1b, NPK1, NtACS1, NtPI-I, NtPI-II, and NtTPI. These results collectively suggest that CaRop1 acts as a signaling switch in the crosstalk between Solanaceaes’s response to R. solanacearum infection and aphid attack possibly via JA/ET-mediated signaling machinery. PMID:27551287

  20. Transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants over-expressing a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene from Xenopus laevis (xPPARα) show increased susceptibility to infection by virulent Pseudomonas syringae pathogens.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Soto, José Humberto; Iruegas-Bocardo, Fernanda; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma Angélica; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Gómez-Lim, Miguel Angel; Délano-Frier, John Paul

    2011-03-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants capable of over-expressing Xenopus PPARα (xPPARα), a transcription factor known to be required for peroxisome proliferation in animals, were recently generated. These plants (herewith referred to as PPAR-OE) were found to have increased peroxisome abundance, higher peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase activity and modified fatty acid metabolism. Further characterization of PPAR-OE plants revealed a higher susceptibility to virulent and a partial loss of resistance to avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pathogens, whereas the basal resistance response remained unaffected. Biochemical- and defense-related gene expression analyses showed that increased susceptibility to bacterial invasion coincided with the generalized reduction in H(2)O(2) and salicylic acid (SA) levels observed within the first 24 h of bacterial contact. Decreased H(2)O(2) levels were correlated with modified activity levels of catalase and other antioxidant enzymes. A correspondence between a rapid (within 1-24 hpi; ACCO and AOC) and sustained increase (up to 6 days pi; ACCO) in the expression levels of ethylene (ACCO) and jasmonic acid (AOC) biosynthetic genes and a higher susceptibility to virulent bacterial invasion was also observed in PPAR-OE plants. Conversely, no apparent differences in the short- and/or long-term expression levels of markers for the hypersensitive-response, oxidative burst and systemic-acquired resistance were observed between wild type and PPAR-OE plants. The results suggest that peroxisome proliferation could lead to increased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens in tobacco by altering the redox balance of the plant and the expression pattern of key defense signaling pathway genes.

  1. Frequencies, Timing, and Spatial Patterns of Co-Suppression of Nitrate Reductase and Nitrite Reductase in Transgenic Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Palauqui, J. C.; Elmayan, T.; De Borne, F. D.; Crete, P.; Charles, C.; Vaucheret, H.

    1996-01-01

    Frequencies, timing, and spatial patterns of co-suppression of the nitrate (Nia) and nitrite (Nii) genes were analyzed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants carrying either Nia or Nii cDNAs under the control of the 35S promoter, or a Nii gene with its own regulatory signals (promoter, introns, and terminator) cloned downstream of two copies of the enhancer of the 35S promoter. We show that (a) the frequencies of transgenic lines affected by co- suppression are similar for the three constructs, ranging from 19 to 25%; (b) Nia and Nii co-suppression are triggered stochastically during a phenocritical period of 2 weeks between germination and flowering; (c) the timing of co-suppression (i.e. the percentage of isogenic plants affected by co-suppression reported as a function of the number of days of culture) differs from one transgenic line to another; (d) the percentage of isogenic plants affected by co-suppression is increased by growing the plants in vitro prior to their transfer to the greenhouse and to the field; and (e) at the end of the culture period, plants are either unaffected, completely co-suppressed, or variegated. Suppressed and nonsuppressed parts of these variegated plants are separated by a vertical plane through the stem in Nia co-suppression, and separated by a horizontal plane in Nii co-suppression. PMID:12226457

  2. Genetic Engineering of the Biosynthesis of Glycinebetaine Enhances Photosynthesis against High Temperature Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinghong; Liang, Zheng; Lu, Congming

    2005-01-01

    Genetically engineered tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with the ability to synthesis glycinebetaine was established by introducing the BADH gene for betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from spinach (Spinacia oleracea). The genetic engineering enabled the plants to accumulate glycinebetaine mainly in chloroplasts and resulted in enhanced tolerance to high temperature stress during growth of young seedlings. Moreover, CO2 assimilation of transgenic plants was significantly more tolerant to high temperatures than that of wild-type plants. The analyses of chlorophyll fluorescence and the activation of Rubisco indicated that the enhancement of photosynthesis to high temperatures was not related to the function of photosystem II but to the Rubisco activase-mediated activation of Rubisco. Western-blotting analyses showed that high temperature stress led to the association of Rubisco activase with the thylakoid membranes from the stroma fractions. However, such an association was much more pronounced in wild-type plants than in transgenic plants. The results in this study suggest that under high temperature stress, glycinebetaine maintains the activation of Rubisco by preventing the sequestration of Rubisco activase to the thylakoid membranes from the soluble stroma fractions and thus enhances the tolerance of CO2 assimilation to high temperature stress. The results seem to suggest that engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine by transformation with the BADH gene might be an effective method for enhancing high temperature tolerance of plants. PMID:16024688

  3. Immunogenicity of recombinant GP5 protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus expressed in tobacco plant.

    PubMed

    Chia, Min-Yuan; Hsiao, Shih-Hsuan; Chan, Hui-Ting; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling; Chang, Hui-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Chieh; Lin, Chun-Ming; Pang, Victor Fei; Jeng, Chian-Ren

    2010-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the immunogenicity of the ORF5-encoded major envelop glycoprotein 5 (GP5) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) expressed in tobacco plant as a potential pig oral vaccine in protection against PRRSV infection. Six-week-old PRRSV-free pigs were fed four times orally with 50g of chopped fresh GP5 transgenic tobacco leaves (GP5-T) (GP5 reaching 0.011% of total soluble protein) or wild-type tobacco leaves (W-T) each on days 0, 14, 28, and 42. Samples of serum, saliva, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected on days -1, 6, 13, 20, 27, 34, 41, and 48 after the initial oral vaccination. A similar vaccination-dependent gradual increase in the responses of serum and saliva anti-PRRSV total IgG and IgA, respectively, and in the levels of PRRSV-specific blastogenic response of PBMCs was seen in GP5-T-treated pigs; all statistically significant elevations occurred after the 2nd vaccination and were revealed after 20 days post-initial oral vaccination (DPIOV). Pigs fed on GP5-T also developed serum neutralizing antibodies to PRRSV at a titer of 1:4-1:8 after the 4th vaccination by 48 DPIOV. No detectable anti-PRRSV antibody responses and PRRSV-specific blastogenic response were seen in W-T-treated pigs. The present study has demonstrated that pigs fed on GP5-T could develop specific mucosal as well as systemic humoral and cellular immune responses against PRRSV. The results also support that transgenic plant as GP5-T can be an effective system for oral delivery of recombinant subunit vaccines in pigs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transglutaminase activity changes during the hypersensitive reaction, a typical defense response of tobacco NN plants to TMV.

    PubMed

    Del Duca, Stefano; Betti, Lucietta; Trebbi, Grazia; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Torrigiani, Patrizia

    2007-10-01

    The occurrence of glutamyl polyamines (PAs) and changes in activity and levels of transglutaminase (TGase, EC 2.3.2.13), the enzyme responsible for their synthesis, are reported during the progression of the hypersensitive reaction (HR) of resistant NN tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Samsun) to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Mature leaves of tobacco were collected over 0-72 h after inoculation with TMV or phosphate buffer (mock). In vivo synthesis of polyamine glutamyl derivatives (glutamyl PAs), catalyzed by TGase activity, was evaluated after supplying labeled putrescine (Pu, a physiological substrate of TGase) to leaves. Results show that, starting from 24 h, mono-(gamma-glutamyl)-Pu and bis-(gamma-glutamyl)-Sd were recovered in TMV-inoculated samples but not in mock-inoculated ones; 2 days later, in the former, the amount of glutamyl derivatives further increased. An in vitro radiometric assay showed that, in TMV-inoculated leaves, TGase activity increased from 24 h onwards relative to mock controls. An immunoblot analysis with AtPng1p polyclonal antibody detected a 72-kDa protein whose amount increased at 72 h in TMV-inoculated leaves and in the lesion-enriched areas. A biotin-labeled cadaverine incorporation assay showed that TGase activity occurred in S1 (containing soluble proteins), S2 (proteins released by both cell walls and membranes) and S3 (membrane intrinsic proteins) fractions. In S3 fraction, where changes were the most relevant, TGase activity was enhanced in both mock-inoculated and TMV-inoculated samples, but the stimulation persisted only in the latter case. These data are discussed in the light of a possible role of TGase activity and glutamyl PAs in the defense against a viral plant pathogen.

  5. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-10

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  6. Application of a modified gaseous exposure system to the in vitro toxicological assessment of tobacco smoke toxicants.

    PubMed

    Breheny, Damien; Cunningham, Fiona; Kilford, Joanne; Payne, Rebecca; Dillon, Deborah; Meredith, Clive

    2014-10-01

    Tobacco smoke is a complex mixture of over 6,000 individual chemical constituents. Approximately 150 of these have been identified as 'tobacco smoke toxicants' due to their known toxicological effects. A number of these toxicants are present in the gaseous phase of tobacco smoke. This presents a technical challenge when assessing the toxicological effects of these chemicals in vitro. We have adapted a commercially available tobacco smoke exposure system to enable the assessment of the contribution of individual smoke toxicants to the overall toxicological effects of whole mainstream cigarette smoke (WS). Here we present a description of the exposure system and the methodology used. We use the example of a gaseous tobacco smoke toxicant, ethylene oxide (EtO), a Group 1 IARC carcinogen and known mutagen, to illustrate how this methodology can be applied to the assessment of genotoxicity of gaseous chemicals in the context of WS. In the present study we found that EtO was positive in Salmonella typhimurium strain YG1042, a strain that is sensitive to tobacco smoke. However, EtO did not increase the mutagenicity of the WS mixture when it was added at greatly higher concentrations than those found typically in WS. The findings presented here demonstrate the suitability of this exposure system for the assessment of the mutagenic potential of gases in vitro. Whilst we have focused on tobacco smoke toxicants, this system has broad application potential in studying the biological effects of exposure to a wide range of gaseous compounds that are present within complex aerosol mixtures. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. An engineered pathway for glyoxylate metabolism in tobacco plants aimed to avoid the release of ammonia in photorespiration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The photorespiratory nitrogen cycle in C3 plants involves an extensive diversion of carbon and nitrogen away from the direct pathways of assimilation. The liberated ammonia is re-assimilated, but up to 25% of the carbon may be released into the atmosphere as CO2. Because of the loss of CO2 and high energy costs, there has been considerable interest in attempts to decrease the flux through the cycle in C3 plants. Transgenic tobacco plants were generated that contained the genes gcl and hyi from E. coli encoding glyoxylate carboligase (EC 4.1.1.47) and hydroxypyruvate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.22) respectively, targeted to the peroxisomes. It was presumed that the two enzymes could work together and compete with the aminotransferases that convert glyoxylate to glycine, thus avoiding ammonia production in the photorespiratory nitrogen cycle. Results When grown in ambient air, but not in elevated CO2, the transgenic tobacco lines had a distinctive phenotype of necrotic lesions on the leaves. Three of the six lines chosen for a detailed study contained single copies of the gcl gene, two contained single copies of both the gcl and hyi genes and one line contained multiple copies of both gcl and hyi genes. The gcl protein was detected in the five transgenic lines containing single copies of the gcl gene but hyi protein was not detected in any of the transgenic lines. The content of soluble amino acids including glycine and serine, was generally increased in the transgenic lines growing in air, when compared to the wild type. The content of soluble sugars, glucose, fructose and sucrose in the shoot was decreased in transgenic lines growing in air, consistent with decreased carbon assimilation. Conclusions Tobacco plants have been generated that produce bacterial glyoxylate carboligase but not hydroxypyruvate isomerase. The transgenic plants exhibit a stress response when exposed to air, suggesting that some glyoxylate is diverted away from conversion to glycine in a

  8. Association of tobacco and alcohol use with earlier development of colorectal cancer: should we modify screening guidelines?

    PubMed

    Acott, Alison A; Theus, Sue A; Marchant-Miros, Kathyrn E; Mancino, Anne T

    2008-12-01

    Current guidelines recommend initial colorectal cancer screening at age 50 years for average-risk patients. Alcohol and tobacco use can be associated with earlier onset of colorectal cancer. We hypothesized an earlier age at diagnosis and/or more advanced stage in patients with these habits. We queried our tumor registry for colorectal cancer diagnosed between January 1997 and December 2006. Data were analyzed to evaluate effects of alcohol and tobacco use. Of 335 colorectal cancer patients, 81% used tobacco, 51% used alcohol, 45% used both, and 14% used neither. Current tobacco and alcohol use were associated with younger ages at onset of colorectal cancer. Thirteen of 332 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer before age 50 years. All had exposure to alcohol and tobacco. Fifty-four percent (7/13) of these patients presented at stage 3/4 compared with 34% of the overall population. Modification of screening guidelines to include these habits as "high-risk" factors may be indicated.

  9. Chemical modification of the inner and outer surfaces of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV).

    PubMed

    Bruckman, Michael A; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2014-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles derived from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) find applications in various fields. We report the purification and chemical modification of TMV which is a hollow rod-shaped plant viral nanoparticle with modifiable interior and exterior surfaces. We describe methods to isolate TMV from its tobacco plant host for spatially controlled interior and exterior chemical modification and to characterize the resulting TMV hybrid materials.

  10. Au nanocrystals grown on a better-defined one-dimensional tobacco mosaic virus coated protein template genetically modified by a hexahistidine tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Wang, Chong; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Zhaopeng; Tian, Dandan; Zhai, Niu; Zhang, Hongfei; Li, Zhonghao; Jiang, Xingyi; Tang, Gangling; Hu, Qingyuan

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coated protein (CP) was genetically modified by introducing a hexahistidine tag into it for a well-defined one-dimensional template, on which Au nanocrystals (NCs) were grown. The results showed that genetic modification could not only ameliorate the one-dimensional structure of the template, but also improve the growth density of Au NCs on the template. This indicated that genetic modification could be an effective method to modulate the structure of the TMVCP template-based nanocomposites allowing for a broader application of them.

  11. Free and Conjugated Benzoic Acid in Tobacco Plants and Cell Cultures. Induced Accumulation upon Elicitation of Defense Responses and Role as Salicylic Acid Precursors1

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Julie; Pierrel, Marie-Agnès; Atanassova, Rossitza; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Fritig, Bernard; Saindrenan, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key endogenous component of local and systemic disease resistance in plants. In this study, we investigated the role of benzoic acid (BA) as precursor of SA biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun NN) plants undergoing a hypersensitive response following infection with tobacco mosaic virus or in tobacco cell suspensions elicited with β-megaspermin, an elicitor from Phytophthora megasperma. We found a small pool of conjugated BA in healthy leaves and untreated cell suspensions of tobacco, whereas free BA levels were barely detectable. Infection of plants with tobacco mosaic virus or elicitation of cells led to a rapid de novo synthesis and accumulation of conjugated BA, whereas free BA was weakly induced. In presence of diphenylene iodonium, an inhibitor of superoxide anion formation, SA accumulation was abolished in elicited cells and much higher BA levels were concomitantly induced, mainly as a conjugated form. Furthermore, piperonylic acid, an inhibitor of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase was used as a powerful tool to redirect the metabolic flow from the main phenylpropanoid pathway into the SA biosynthetic branch. Under these conditions, in vivo labeling and radioisotope dilution experiments with [14C]trans-cinnamic acid as precursor clearly indicated that the free form of BA produced in elicited tobacco cells is not the major precursor of SA biosynthesis. The main conjugated form of BA accumulating after elicitation of tobacco cells was identified for the first time as benzoyl-glucose. Our data point to the likely role of conjugated forms of BA in SA biosynthesis. PMID:11154339

  12. Transgenic plants protected from insect attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaeck, Mark; Reynaerts, Arlette; Höfte, Herman; Jansens, Stefan; de Beuckeleer, Marc; Dean, Caroline; Zabeau, Marc; Montagu, Marc Van; Leemans, Jan

    1987-07-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produces proteins which are specifically toxic to a variety of insect species. Modified genes have been derived from bt2, a toxin gene cloned from one Bacillus strain. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing these genes synthesize insecticidal proteins which protect them from feeding damage by larvae of the tobacco hornworm.

  13. Stable Accumulation of Modified 2S Albumin Seed Storage Proteins with Higher Methionine Contents in Transgenic Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Ann; Vandewiele, Martine; Van Damme, Jozef; Guerche, Philippe; Van Montagu, Marc; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Krebbers, Enno

    1990-01-01

    We present the results of two sets of experiments designed to express high methionine proteins in transgenic seeds in three different plant species. In the first approach, two chimeric genes were constructed in which parts of the Arabidopsis 2S albumin gene 1 (AT2S1) were fused at different positions to a Brazil nut 2S albumin cDNA clone. Brazil nut 2S albumin was found to accumulate stably in transgenic Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, and tobacco seeds. In the second approach, methionine-enriched AT2S1 genes were constructed by deleting sequences encoding a region of the protein which is not highly conserved among 2S albumins of different species and replacing them with methioninerich sequences. Introduction of the modified AT2S1 genes into three different plant species resulted in the accumulation of the methionine-enriched 2S albumins in all three species at levels reaching 1 to 2% of the total high salt-extractable seed protein. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16667878

  14. Overexpression of Elsholtzia haichowensis metallothionein 1 (EhMT1) in tobacco plants enhances copper tolerance and accumulation in root cytoplasm and decreases hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Qi, Ying; Yuan, Yuxiang; Wang, Guiping; Cui, Jin; Chen, Yahua; Zhang, Hongsheng; Shen, Zhenguo

    2012-09-30

    To evaluate the functional roles of metallothionein (MT) in copper tolerance, we generated transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing EhMT1 from the Cu-accumulator Elsholtzia haichowensis Sun. Overexpression of EhMT1 in tobacco plants imparted increased copper (Cu) tolerance based on seedling dry biomass when compared to wild-type plants. Plants expressing EhMT1 accumulated more Cu in roots, which was mainly attributable to an increase of the soluble fraction. Levels of lipid peroxidation and production of hydrogen peroxide were lower in roots of transgenic tobacco than in wild-type plants. EhMT1 was suggested to bind Cu in the cytoplasm, thereby decreasing activity of free Cu(2+) ions and blocking Cu(2+) from interacting with cytoplasmic components, which in turn decreases the production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, our results also indicate that EhMT1-overexpressing tobacco has a more efficient antioxidant system, with improved peroxidase activity to better cope with oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Vertebrate herbivores influence soil nematodes by modifying plant communities.

    PubMed

    Veen, G F; Olff, Han; Duyts, Henk; van der Putten, Wim H

    2010-03-01

    Abiotic soil properties, plant community composition, and herbivory all have been reported as important factors influencing the composition of soil communities. However, most studies thus far have considered these factors in isolation, whereas they strongly interact in the field. Here, we study how grazing by vertebrate herbivores influences the soil nematode community composition of a floodplain grassland while we account for effects of grazing on plant community composition and abiotic soil properties. Nematodes are the most ubiquitous invertebrates in the soil. They include a variety of feeding types, ranging from microbial feeders to herbivores and carnivores, and they perform key functions in soil food webs. Our hypothesis was that grazing affects nematode community structure and composition through altering plant community structure and composition. Alternatively, we tested whether the effects of grazing may, directly or indirectly, run via changes in soil abiotic properties. We used a long-term field experiment containing plots with and without vertebrate grazers (cattle and rabbits). We compared plant and nematode community structure and composition, as well as a number of key soil abiotic properties, and we applied structural equation modeling to investigate four possible pathways by which grazing may change nematode community composition. Aboveground grazing increased plant species richness and reduced both plant and nematode community heterogeneity. There was a positive relationship between plant and nematode diversity indices. Grazing decreased the number of bacterial-feeding nematodes, indicating that in these grasslands, top-down control of plant production by grazing leads to bottom-up control in the basal part of the bacterial channel of the soil food web. According to the structural equation model, grazing had a strong effect on soil abiotic properties and plant community composition, whereas plant community composition was the main determinant of

  16. C-Terminally fused affinity Strep-tag II is removed by proteolysis from recombinant human erythropoietin expressed in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Lalgondar, Mallikarjun; Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Sane, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Asialo-erythropoietin (asialo-EPO), a desialylated form of EPO, is a potent tissue-protective agent. Recently, we and others have exploited a low cost plant-based expression system to produce recombinant human asialo-EPO (asialo-rhuEPOP). To facilitate purification from plant extracts, Strep-tag II was engineered at the C-terminus of EPO. Although asialo-rhuEPOP was efficiently expressed in transgenic tobacco plants, affinity purification based on Strep-tag II did not result in the recovery of the protein. In this study, we investigated the stability of Strep-tag II tagged asialo-rhuEPOP expressed in tobacco plants to understand whether this fused tag is cleaved or inaccessible. Sequencing RT-PCR products confirmed that fused DNA sequences encoding Strep-tag II were properly transcribed, and three-dimensional protein structure model revealed that the tag must be fully accessible. However, Western blot analysis of leaf extracts and purified asialo-rhuEPOP revealed that the Strep-tag II was absent on the protein. Additionally, no peptide fragment containing Strep-tag II was identified in the LC-MS/MS analysis of purified protein further supporting that the affinity tag was absent on asialo-rhuEPOP. However, Strep-tag II was detected on asialo-rhuEPOP that was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that the Strep-tag II is removed during protein secretion or extraction. These findings together with recent reports that C-terminally fused Strep-tag II or IgG Fc domain are also removed from EPO in tobacco plants, suggest that its C-terminus may be highly susceptible to proteolysis in tobacco plants. Therefore, direct fusion of purification tags at the C-terminus of EPO should be avoided while expressing it in tobacco plants. PMID:25504272

  17. A comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of autophagy-related genes identified in tobacco suggests a central role of autophagy in plant response to various environmental cues

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xue-mei; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Wei; Zou, Jie; Cheng, Tian-he; Peng, Xiong-bo; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in both animals and plants, which has been shown to be involved in various essential developmental processes in plants. Nicotiana tabacum is considered to be an ideal model plant and has been widely used for the study of the roles of autophagy in the processes of plant development and in the response to various stresses. However, only a few autophagy-related genes (ATGs) have been identified in tobacco up to now. Here, we identified 30 ATGs belonging to 16 different groups in tobacco through a genome-wide survey. Comprehensive expression profile analysis reveals an abroad expression pattern of these ATGs, which could be detected in all tissues tested under normal growth conditions. Our series tests further reveal that majority of ATGs are sensitive and responsive to different stresses including nutrient starvation, plant hormones, heavy metal and other abiotic stresses, suggesting a central role of autophagy, likely as an effector, in plant response to various environmental cues. This work offers a detailed survey of all ATGs in tobacco and also suggests manifold functions of autophagy in both normal plant growth and plant response to environmental stresses. PMID:26205094

  18. RNA-Guided Cas9-Induced Mutagenesis in Tobacco Followed by Efficient Genetic Fixation in Doubled Haploid Plants

    PubMed Central

    Schedel, Sindy; Pencs, Stefanie; Hensel, Götz; Müller, Andrea; Rutten, Twan; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Customizable endonucleases are providing an effective tool for genome engineering. The resulting primary transgenic individuals (T0) are typically heterozygous and/or chimeric with respect to any mutations induced. To generate genetically fixed mutants, they are conventionally allowed to self-pollinate, a procedure which segregates individuals into mutant heterozygotes/homozygotes and wild types. The chances of recovering homozygous mutants among the progeny depend not only on meiotic segregation but also on the frequency of mutated germline cells in the chimeric mother plant. In Nicotiana species, the heritability of Cas9-induced mutations has not been demonstrated yet. RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease-mediated mutagenesis was targeted to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene harbored by a transgenic tobacco line. Upon retransformation using a GFP-specific guide RNA/Cas9 construct, the T0 plants were allowed to either self-pollinate, or were propagated via regeneration from in vitro cultured embryogenic pollen which give rise to haploid/doubled haploid plants or from leaf explants that form plants vegetatively. Single or multiple mutations were detected in 80% of the T0 plants. About half of these mutations proved heritable via selfing. Regeneration from in vitro cultured embryogenic pollen allowed for homozygous mutants to be produced more efficiently than via sexual reproduction. Consequently, embryogenic pollen culture provides a convenient method to rapidly generate a variety of genetically fixed mutants following site-directed mutagenesis. The recovery of a mutation not found among sexually produced and analyzed progeny was shown to be achievable through vegetative plant propagation in vitro, which eventually resulted in heritability when the somatic clones were selfed. In addition, some in-frame mutations were associated with functional attenuation of the target gene rather than its full knock-out. The generation of mutants with compromised rather than

  19. Cadmium in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, L. )

    1992-03-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the cadmium level in tobacco planted in five main tobacco-producing areas, a cadmium polluted area, and in cigarettes produced domestically (54 brands). The results indicate that average cadmium content in tobacco was 1.48 (0.10-4.95 mg/kg), which was similar to that of Indian tobacco (1.24 mg/kg), but the cadmium of tobacco produced in the cadmium polluted area was quite high (8.60 mg/kg). The average cigarette cadmium was 1.05 micrograms/g (with filter tip) and 1.61 micrograms/g (regular cigarette). Therefore special attention should be paid to the soil used in planting tobacco.

  20. MOLECULAR PHENOTYPING OF LIGNIN-MODIFIED TOBACCO REVEALS ASSOCIATED CHANGES IN CELL WALL METABOLISM, PRIMARY METABOLISM, STRESS METABOLISM AND PHOTORESPIRATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lignin is an important component of secondary thickened cell walls. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) are two key enzymes catalyzing the penultimate and last step in the biosynthesis of the monolignols. Down-regulation of CCR in tobacco has been shown to reduce l...

  1. In utero exposure to tobacco and alcohol modifies neurobehavioral development in mice offspring: consideration a role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Hui

    2004-05-01

    To determine whether in utero tobacco and alcohol exposure induces long-term neurobehavioral alterations and whether oxidative stress/damage is a possible causal factor. Gravid mice were subjected to tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Their offspring were subsequently evaluated in developmental and behavioral tests. Antioxidative enzymes and erythrocyte membrane fluidity of adult offspring were measured. The intrauterine tobacco and alcohol exposure has resulted in significant reduced postnatal body and organ weights accompanied by reduced gestational body weight gain in their mothers. Such exposure also induced remarkable developmental delay in neonatal reflexes and notable behavioral deficit in adulthood, namely reduced motive coordination and locomotor activity as well as impaired learning and memory abilities. Furthermore, the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased significantly whereas the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), catalase (Cat) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) decreased in the cerebral cortex and liver of prenatal intoxicated offspring. The embryonic intoxication also markedly reduced erythrocyte membrane fluidity in offspring. Our study shows the long-term neurotoxicity associated with prenatal tobacco and alcohol exposure, and suggests that the deleterious outcome may be in relation to increased free radicals formation and oxidative stress.

  2. A novel bZIP gene from Tamarix hispida mediates physiological responses to salt stress in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yucheng; Gao, Caiqiu; Liang, Yenan; Wang, Chao; Yang, Chuanping; Liu, Guifeng

    2010-02-15

    Basic leucine zipper proteins (bZIPs) are transcription factors that bind abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements (ABREs) and enable plants to withstand adverse environmental conditions. In the present study, a novel bZIP gene, ThbZIP1 was cloned from Tamarix hispida. Expression studies in T. hispida showed differential regulation of ThbZIP1 in response to treatment with NaCl, polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000, NaHCO(3), and CdCl(2), suggesting that ThbZIP1 is involved in abiotic stress responses. To identify the physiological responses mediated by ThbZIP1, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing exogenous ThbZIP1 were generated. Various physiological parameters related to salt stress were measured and compared between transgenic and wild type (WT) plants. Our results indicate that overexpression of ThbZIP1 can enhance the activity of both peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increase the content of soluble sugars and soluble proteins under salt stress conditions. These results suggest that ThbZIP1 contributes to salt tolerance by mediating signaling through multiple physiological pathways. Furthermore, ThbZIP1 confers stress tolerance to plants by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, facilitating the accumulation of compatible osmolytes, and inducing and/or enhancing the biosynthesis of soluble proteins.

  3. Rhodococcus fascians infection accelerates progression of tobacco BY-2 cells into mitosis through rapid changes in plant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Olivier; Vereecke, Danny; Mol, Adeline; Lenjou, Marc; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2007-01-01

    * To characterize plant cell cycle activation following Rhodococcus fascians infection, bacterial impact on cell cycle progression of tobacco BY-2 cells was investigated. * S-phase-synchronized BY-2 cells were cocultivated with R. fascians and cell cycle progression was monitored by measuring mitotic index, cell cycle gene expression and flow cytometry parameters. Cell cycle alteration was further investigated by cDNA-AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism). * It was shown that cell cycle progression of BY-2 cells was accelerated only upon infection with bacteria whose virulence gene expression was induced by a leafy gall extract. Thirty-eight BY-2 genes showed a differential expression within 6 h post-infection. Among these, seven were previously associated with specific plant cell cycle phases (in particular S and G2/M phases). Several genes also showed a differential expression during leafy gall formation. * R. fascians-infected BY-2 cells provide a simple model to identify plant genes related to leafy gall development. R. fascians can also be regarded as a useful biotic agent to alter cell cycle progression and, thereby, gain a better understanding of cell cycle regulation in plants.

  4. Tobacco ankyrin protein NEIP2 interacts with ethylene receptor NTHK1 and regulates plant growth and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Li, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Jian-Jun; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-04-01

    Ethylene is a gaseous hormone that regulates many processes involved in plant growth, development and stress responses. Previously, we found that the tobacco ethylene receptor NTHK1 (Nicotiana tabacum histidine kinase 1) promotes seedling growth and affects plant salt stress responses. In this study, NTHK1 ethylene receptor-interacting protein 2 (NEIP2) was identified and further characterized in relation to these processes. NEIP2 contains three ankyrin repeats that mediate an interaction with NTHK1 as demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. NTHK1 phosphorylates NEIP2 in vitro. Salt stress and ethylene treatment induce NEIP2 accumulation in the first few hours and then the NEIP2 can be phosphorylated in planta. The overexpression of NTHK1 enhances NEIP2 accumulation in the presence of ethylene and salt stress. NEIP2 overexpression promotes plant growth but reduces ethylene responses, which is consistent with the functions of NTHK1. Additionally, NEIP2 improves plant performance under salt and oxidative stress. These results suggest that ethylene-induced NEIP2 probably acts as a brake to reduce ethylene response but resumes growth through interaction with NTHK1. Manipulation of NEIP2 may be beneficial for crop improvement.

  5. ELPylated haemagglutinins produced in tobacco plants induce potentially neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hoang T; Pohl, Julia; Floss, Doreen M; Rabenstein, Frank; Veits, Jutta; Le, Binh T; Chu, Ha H; Hause, Gerd; Mettenleiter, Thomas; Conrad, Udo

    2013-06-01

    Reducing the cost of vaccine production is a key priority for veterinary research, and the possibility of heterologously expressing antigen in plants provides a particularly attractive means of achieving this. Here, we report the expression of the avian influenza virus haemagglutinin (AIV HA) in tobacco, both as a monomer and as a trimer in its native and its ELPylated form. We firstly presented evidence to produce stabilized trimers of soluble HA in plants. ELPylation of these trimers does not influence the trimerization. Strong expression enhancement in planta caused by ELPylation was demonstrated for trimerized H5-ELP. ELPylated trimers could be purified by a membrane-based inverse transition cycling procedure with the potential of successful scale-up. The trimeric form of AIV HA was found to enhance the HA-specific immune response compared with the monomeric form. Plant-derived AIV HA trimers elicited potentially neutralizing antibodies interacting with both homologous virus-like particles from plants and heterologous inactivated AIV. ELPylation did not influence the functionality and the antigenicity of the stabilized H5 trimers. These data allow further developments including scale-up of production, purification and virus challenge experiments with the final goal to achieve suitable technologies for efficient avian flu vaccine production.

  6. Substantial equivalence of antinutrients and inherent plant toxins in genetically modified novel foods.

    PubMed

    Novak, W K; Haslberger, A G

    2000-06-01

    For a safety evaluation of foodstuff derived from genetically modified crops, the concept of the substantial equivalence of modified organisms with their parental lines is used following an environmental safety evaluation. To assess the potential pleiotropic effect of genetic modifications on constituents of modified crops data from US and EC documents were investigated with regard to inherent plant toxins and antinutrients. Analysed were documents of rape (glucosinolates, phytate), maize (phytate), tomato (tomatine, solanine, chaconine, lectins, oxalate), potato (solanine, chaconine, protease-inhibitors, phenols) and soybean (protease-inhibitors, lectins, isoflavones, phytate). In several documents used for notifications no declarations even on essential inherent plant toxins and antinutrients could be found, for instance data on phytate in modified maize were provided only in one of four documents. Significant variations in the contents of these compounds in parental and modified plants especially due to environmental influences were observed: drought stress, for example, was made responsible for significantly increased glucosinolate levels of up to 72.6micromol/g meal in modified and parental rape plants in field trials compared to recommended standard concentrations of less than 30micromol/g. Taking into account these wide natural variations generally the concentrations of inherent plant toxins and antinutrients in modified products were in the range of the concentrations in parental organisms. The results presented indicate that the concept of the substantial equivalence is useful for the risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) used for novel foods but possible environmental influences on constituents of modified crops need more attention. Consistent guidelines, specifying data of relevant compounds which have to be provided for notification documents of specific organisms have to be established. Because of the importance of inherent plant

  7. Synergistic effects of 2A-mediated polyproteins on the production of lignocellulose degradation enzymes in tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Cost-effective bioethanol production requires a supply of various low-cost enzymes that can hydrolyse lignocellulosic materials consisting of multiple polymers. Because plant-based enzyme expression systems offer low-cost and large-scale production, this study simultaneously expressed β-glucosidase (BglB), xylanase (XylII), exoglucanase (E3), and endoglucanase (Cel5A) in tobacco plants, which were individually fused with chloroplast-targeting transit peptides and linked via the 2A self-cleaving oligopeptideex from foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) as follows: [RsBglB-2A-RaCel5A], [RsXylII-2A-RaCel5A], and [RsE3-2A-RaCel5A]. The enzymes were targeted to chloroplasts in tobacco cells and their activities were confirmed. Similarly to the results of a transient assay using Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts, when XylII was placed upstream of the 2A sequence, the [RsXylII-2A-RaCel5A] transgenic tobacco plant had a more positive influence on expression of the protein placed downstream. The [RsBglB-2A-RaCel5A] and [RsE3-2A-RaCel5A] transgenic lines displayed higher activities towards carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) compared to those in the [RsXylII-2A-RaCel5A] transgenic line. This higher activity was attributable to the synergistic effects of the different cellulases used. The [RsBglB-2A-RaCel5A] lines exhibited greater efficiency (35–74% increase) of CMC hydrolysis when the exoglucanase CBHII was added. Among the various exoglucanases, E3 showed higher activity with the crude extract of the [RsBglB-2A-RaCel5A] transgenic line. Transgenic expression of 2A-mediated multiple enzymes induced synergistic effects and led to more efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials for bioethanol production. PMID:22798663

  8. Overexpression of a Modified Plant Thionin Enhances Disease Resistance to Citrus Canker and Huanglongbing (HLB).

    PubMed

    Hao, Guixia; Stover, Ed; Gupta, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a great threat to the US citrus industry. There are no proven strategies to eliminate HLB disease and no cultivar has been identified with strong HLB resistance. Citrus canker is also an economically important disease associated with a bacterial pathogen (Xanthomonas citri). In this study, we characterized endogenous citrus thionins and investigated their expression in different citrus tissues. Since no HLB-resistant citrus cultivars have been identified, we attempted to develop citrus resistant to both HLB and citrus canker through overexpression of a modified plant thionin. To improve effectiveness for disease resistance, we modified and synthesized the sequence encoding a plant thionin and cloned into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS. The construct was then introduced into Agrobacterium strain EHA105 for citrus transformation. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified plant thionin were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful transformation and transgene gene expression was confirmed by molecular analysis. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified thionin gene were challenged with X. citri 3213 at a range of concentrations, and a significant reduction in canker symptoms and a decrease in bacterial growth were demonstrated compared to nontransgenic plants. Furthermore, the transgenic citrus plants were challenged with HLB via graft inoculation. Our results showed significant Las titer reduction in roots of transgenic Carrizo compared with control plants and reduced scion Las titer 12 months after graft inoculation. These data provide promise for engineering citrus disease resistance against HLB and canker.

  9. Above- and belowground insect herbivory modifies the response of a grassland plant community to nitrogen eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Marini, Lorenzo; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the role that species interactions play in determining the rate and direction of ecosystem change due to nitrogen (N) eutrophication is important for predicting the consequences of global change. Insects might play a major role in this context. They consume substantial amounts of plant biomass and can alter competitive interactions among plants, indirectly shaping plant community composition. Nitrogen eutrophication affects plant communities globally, but there is limited experimental evidence of how insect herbivory modifies plant community response to raised N levels. Even less is known about the roles of above- and belowground herbivory in shaping plant communities, and how the interaction between the two might modify a plant community's response to N eutrophication. We conducted a 3-yr field experiment where grassland plant communities were subjected to above- and belowground insect herbivory with and without N addition, in a full-factorial design. We found that herbivory modified plant community responses to N addition. Aboveground herbivory decreased aboveground plant community biomass by 21%, but only at elevated N. When combined, above- and belowground herbivory had a stronger negative effect on plant community biomass at ambient N (11% decrease) than at elevated N (4% decrease). In addition, herbivory shifted the functional composition of the plant community, and the magnitude of the shifts depended on the N level. The N and herbivory treatments synergistically conferred a competitive advantage to forbs, which benefited when both herbivory types were present at elevated N. Evenness among the plant species groups increased when aboveground herbivory was present, but N addition attenuated this increase. Our results demonstrate that a deeper understanding of how plant-herbivore interactions above and below ground shape the composition of a plant community is crucial for making reliable predictions about the ecological consequences of global

  10. Plant potassium content modifies the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on root hydraulic properties in maize plants.

    PubMed

    El-Mesbahi, Mohamed Najib; Azcón, Rosario; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Aroca, Ricardo

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis helps the host plant to overcome several abiotic stresses including drought. One of the mechanisms for this drought tolerance enhancement is the higher water uptake capacity of the mycorrhizal plants. However, the effects of the AM symbiosis on processes regulating root hydraulic properties of the host plant, such as root hydraulic conductivity and plasma membrane aquaporin gene expression, and protein abundance, are not well defined. Since it is known that K(+) status is modified by AM and that it regulates root hydraulic properties, it has been tested how plant K(+) status could modify the effects of the symbiosis on root hydraulic conductivity and plasma membrane aquaporin gene expression and protein abundance, using maize (Zea mays L.) plants and Glomus intraradices as a model. It was observed that the supply of extra K(+) increased root hydraulic conductivity only in AM plants. Also, the different pattern of plasma membrane aquaporin gene expression and protein abundance between AM and non-AM plants changed with the application of extra K(+). Thus, plant K(+) status could be one of the causes of the different observed effects of the AM symbiosis on root hydraulic properties. The present study also highlights the critical importance of AM fungal aquaporins in regulating root hydraulic properties of the host plant.

  11. Optimization of Acidothermus Celluloyticus Endoglucanase (E1) Production in Transgenic Tobacco Plants by Transcriptional, Post-transcription and Post-Translational Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ziyu; Hooker, Brian S.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Thomas, S. R.

    2005-10-01

    Biochemical characteristics of Acidothermus cellulolyticus endoglucanase (E1) and its physiological effects in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) has been studied previously. In an attempt to obtain a high level of production of intact E1 in transgenic plants, the E1 gene was expressed under the control of strong Mac promoter (a hybrid promoter of manopine synthase promoter and cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter enhancer region) or tomato Rubisco small subunit (RbcS-3C) promoter with different 5’ untranslated leader (UTL) sequence and targeted to different subcellular comartmentations with various transit peptides. The expression of E1 protein in transgenic tobacco plants was determined via E1 activity, protein immunobloting, and RNA gel-blotting analyses. Effects of different transit peptides on E1 protein production and its stability were examined in transgenic tobacco plants carrying one of six transgene expression vectors with the same (Mac) promoter and transcription terminator (Tmas). Transgenic tobacco plants with apoplast transit peptide (Mm-apo) had the highest average E1 activity and protein accumulation , while E1 protein was more stable in transgenic plants with no transit peptide (Mm) than others. The E1 expression under tomato RbcS-3C promoter was higher than that under Mac promoter based on the average E1 activity, E1 protein accumulation, and RNA gel-blotting. The E1 expression was increased more than two fold when the 5’-UTL of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4 gene replaced the UTL of RbcS-3C promoter, while the UTL of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4 gene was less effective than the UTL of Mac promoter. The optimal combination of promoter, 5’-UTL, and subcellular compartmentation (transit peptide) for E1 protein production in transgenic tobacco plants are discussed.

  12. High levels of bioplastic are produced in fertile transplastomic tobacco plants engineered with a synthetic operon for the production of polyhydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Bohmert-Tatarev, Karen; McAvoy, Susan; Daughtry, Sean; Peoples, Oliver P; Snell, Kristi D

    2011-04-01

    An optimized genetic construct for plastid transformation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) for the production of the renewable, biodegradable plastic polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was designed using an operon extension strategy. Bacterial genes encoding the PHB pathway enzymes were selected for use in this construct based on their similarity to the codon usage and GC content of the tobacco plastome. Regulatory elements with limited homology to the host plastome yet known to yield high levels of plastidial recombinant protein production were used to enhance the expression of the transgenes. A partial transcriptional unit, containing genes of the PHB pathway and a selectable marker gene encoding spectinomycin resistance, was flanked at the 5' end by the host plant's psbA coding sequence and at the 3' end by the host plant's 3' psbA untranslated region. This design allowed insertion of the transgenes into the plastome as an extension of the psbA operon, rendering the addition of a promoter to drive the expression of the transgenes unnecessary. Transformation of the optimized construct into tobacco and subsequent spectinomycin selection of transgenic plants yielded T0 plants that were capable of producing up to 18.8% dry weight PHB in samples of leaf tissue. These plants were fertile and produced viable seed. T1 plants producing up to 17.3% dry weight PHB in samples of leaf tissue and 8.8% dry weight PHB in the total biomass of the plant were also isolated.

  13. Bioavailability of transgenic microRNAs in genetically modified plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic expression of small RNAs is a prevalent approach in agrobiotechnology for the global enhancement of plant foods. Meanwhile, emerging studies have, on the one hand, emphasized the potential of transgenic microRNAs (miRNAs) as novel dietary therapeutics and, on the other, suggested potentia...

  14. Simultaneous Expression of PDH45 with EPSPS Gene Improves Salinity and Herbicide Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Bharti; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Biswas, Dipul K.; Sahoo, Ranjan K.; Kunchge, Nandkumar S.; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the problem of salinity- and weed-induced crop losses, a multi-stress tolerant trait is need of the hour but a combinatorial view of such traits is not yet explored. The overexpression of PDH45 (pea DNA helicase 45) and EPSPS (5-enoylpruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase) genes have been reported to impart salinity and herbicide tolerance. Further, the understanding of mechanism and pathways utilized by PDH45 and EPSPS for salinity and herbicide tolerance will help to improve the crops of economical importance. In the present study, we have performed a comparative analysis of salinity and herbicide tolerance to check the biochemical parameters and antioxidant status of tobacco transgenic plants. Collectively, the results showed that PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines display efficient tolerance to salinity stress, while PDH45+EPSPS transgenics showed tolerance to both the salinity and herbicide as compared to the control [wild type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants. The activities of the components of enzymatic antioxidant machinery were observed to be higher in the transgenic plants indicating the presence of an efficient antioxidant defense system which helps to cope with the stress-induced oxidative-damages. Photosynthetic parameters also showed significant increase in PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS overexpressing transgenic plants in comparison to WT, VC and EPSPS transgenic plants under salinity stress. Furthermore, PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS synergistically modulate the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid mediated signaling pathways for combating salinity stress. The findings of our study suggest that pyramiding of the PDH45 gene with EPSPS gene renders host plants tolerant to salinity and herbicide by enhancing the antioxidant machinery thus photosynthesis. PMID:28392794

  15. Visual marker and Agrobacterium-delivered recombinase enable the manipulation of the plastid genome in greenhouse-grown tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Tungsuchat-Huang, Tarinee; Maliga, Pal

    2012-05-01

    Successful manipulation of the plastid genome (ptDNA) has been carried out so far only in tissue-culture cells, a limitation that prevents plastid transformation being applied in major agronomic crops. Our objective is to develop a tissue-culture independent protocol that enables manipulation of plastid genomes directly in plants to yield genetically stable seed progeny. We report that in planta excision of a plastid aurea bar gene (bar(au) ) is detectable in greenhouse-grown plants by restoration of the green pigmentation in tobacco leaves. The P1 phage Cre or PhiC31 phage Int site-specific recombinase was delivered on the Agrobacterium T-DNA injected at the axillary bud site, resulting in the excision of the target-site flanked marker gene. Differentiation of new apical meristems was forced by decapitating the plants above the injection site. The new shoot apex that differentiated at the injection site contained bar(au)-free plastids in 30-40% of the injected plants, of which 7% transmitted the bar(au)-free plastids to the seed progeny. The success of obtaining seed with bar(au)-free plastids depended on repeatedly forcing shoot development from axillary buds, a process that was guided by the size and position of green sectors in the leaves. The success of in planta plastid marker excision proved that manipulation of the plastid genomes is feasible within an intact plant. Extension of the protocol to in planta plastid transformation depends on the development of new protocols for the delivery of transforming DNA encoding visual markers. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. High-level production of the non-cariogenic sucrose isomer palatinose in transgenic tobacco plants strongly impairs development.

    PubMed

    Börnke, Frederik; Hajirezaei, Mohammad; Heineke, Dieter; Melzer, Michael; Herbers, Karin; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2002-01-01

    Palatinose (isomaltulose, 6-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-D-fructose) is a structural isomer of sucrose which is produced from sucrose by some bacterial strains as a reserve material during periods of low carbon availability. The ability to synthesise palatinose is not only advantageous for the bacteria but is also of industrial interest since palatinose is used as a sucrose substitute in food production. To explore the possibility of palatinose production in plants a recently isolated sucrose isomerase gene (palI; EC 5.4.99.11) from Erwinia rhapontici [F. Börnke et al. (2001) J Bacteriol 183: 2425-2430] was cloned into a plant expression vector between the constitutive 35S CaMV promoter and the octopine synthase polyadenylation signal. To allow secretion of the protein into the apoplast the signal peptide of the potato proteinase inhibitor II was N-terminally fused to the pall coding region. Expression of the protein was verified by northern and western blot analyses. Efficient secretion of the protein was demonstrated by palI detection in intercellular fluids. Transgenic plants expressing palI accumulated high levels of palatinose. As a consequence, transgenic plants showed severe phenotypic alterations. Young leaves were curled and developed bleached areas during maturation. Flowers were misshapen and sterile. Based on nonaqueous fractionation experiments palatinose was found in several subcellular compartments, indicating limited membrane transport of the sugar. In contrast to results obtained with short-term feeding experiments, no evidence for palatinose-mediated regulation of photosynthetic or defence genes could be obtained in the transgenic palI-expressing tobacco plants. Based on our results we conclude that plants can efficiently be used as bioreactors for the production of palatinose. Furthermore, tissue-specific expression of palI should allow carbon allocation to specific tissues and/or cell-types to be modulated.

  17. Simultaneous Expression of PDH45 with EPSPS Gene Improves Salinity and Herbicide Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bharti; Gill, Sarvajeet S; Biswas, Dipul K; Sahoo, Ranjan K; Kunchge, Nandkumar S; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the problem of salinity- and weed-induced crop losses, a multi-stress tolerant trait is need of the hour but a combinatorial view of such traits is not yet explored. The overexpression of PDH45 (pea DNA helicase 45) and EPSPS (5-enoylpruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase) genes have been reported to impart salinity and herbicide tolerance. Further, the understanding of mechanism and pathways utilized by PDH45 and EPSPS for salinity and herbicide tolerance will help to improve the crops of economical importance. In the present study, we have performed a comparative analysis of salinity and herbicide tolerance to check the biochemical parameters and antioxidant status of tobacco transgenic plants. Collectively, the results showed that PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines display efficient tolerance to salinity stress, while PDH45+EPSPS transgenics showed tolerance to both the salinity and herbicide as compared to the control [wild type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants. The activities of the components of enzymatic antioxidant machinery were observed to be higher in the transgenic plants indicating the presence of an efficient antioxidant defense system which helps to cope with the stress-induced oxidative-damages. Photosynthetic parameters also showed significant increase in PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS overexpressing transgenic plants in comparison to WT, VC and EPSPS transgenic plants under salinity stress. Furthermore, PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS synergistically modulate the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid mediated signaling pathways for combating salinity stress. The findings of our study suggest that pyramiding of the PDH45 gene with EPSPS gene renders host plants tolerant to salinity and herbicide by enhancing the antioxidant machinery thus photosynthesis.

  18. Overexpression of plastidial thioredoxins f and m differentially alters photosynthetic activity and response to oxidative stress in tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Pascal; Sanz-Barrio, Ruth; Innocenti, Gilles; Ksas, Brigitte; Courteille, Agathe; Rumeau, Dominique; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Farran, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Plants display a remarkable diversity of thioredoxins (Trxs), reductases controlling the thiol redox status of proteins. The physiological function of many of them remains elusive, particularly for plastidial Trxs f and m, which are presumed based on biochemical data to regulate photosynthetic reactions and carbon metabolism. Recent reports revealed that Trxs f and m participate in vivo in the control of starch metabolism and cyclic photosynthetic electron transfer around photosystem I, respectively. To further delineate their in planta function, we compared the photosynthetic characteristics, the level and/or activity of various Trx targets and the responses to oxidative stress in transplastomic tobacco plants overexpressing either Trx f or Trx m. We found that plants overexpressing Trx m specifically exhibit altered growth, reduced chlorophyll content, impaired photosynthetic linear electron transfer and decreased pools of glutathione and ascorbate. In both transplastomic lines, activities of two enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, NADP-malate dehydrogenase and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are markedly and similarly altered. In contrast, plants overexpressing Trx m specifically display increased capacity for methionine sulfoxide reductases, enzymes repairing damaged proteins by regenerating methionine from oxidized methionine. Finally, we also observed that transplastomic plants exhibit distinct responses when exposed to oxidative stress conditions generated by methyl viologen or exposure to high light combined with low temperature, the plants overexpressing Trx m being notably more tolerant than Wt and those overexpressing Trx f. Altogether, these data indicate that Trxs f and m fulfill distinct physiological functions. They prompt us to propose that the m type is involved in key processes linking photosynthetic activity, redox homeostasis and antioxidant mechanisms in the chloroplast. PMID:24137166

  19. Recovery from drought stress in tobacco: an active process associated with the reversal of senescence in some plant parts and the sacrifice of others.

    PubMed

    Vanková, Radomíra; Dobrá, Jana; Storchová, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Plant response to water deficit and subsequent re-watering is fine tuned at the whole plant level. It differs not only between shoot and root, but also among particular leaves along a plant axis. We estimated the expression of proline metabolism-related genes and the activity of senescence-related promoter in roots and individual leaves of tobacco plants in the course of drought stress and recovery. Proline plays the dual role of an osmoprotectant and an antioxidant under water deficit. High proline concentration in the youngest uppermost leaves contributed to their protection from drought, which was associated with low degree of senescence. During recovery, elevated proline concentrations persisted and the senescence-related promoter was switched off in all surviving leaves. Two mutually exclusive scenarios were followed by tobacco leaves on recovery--restoration of photosynthesis and metabolism, or death, depending on the progress of senescence.

  20. [Effects of local induction of ipt-gene in roots on cytokinins content in leaf cells tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Vysotskaia, L B; Akhiiarova, G P; Sharapova, G V; Dedova, M A; Veselov, S Iu; Zaĭtsev, D Iu; Kudoiarova, G P

    2014-01-01

    Identification of cytokinins in differentiated leaf cells has received little attention. We have carried out immunohistochemical localization of cytokinins in leaves of transgenic tobacco plants in which the level of increased due to induced in their roots the expression of ipt-gene controlling cytokinin synthesis. Immuno-labeling of cytokinins with the help of antibodies raised against zeatin riboside was characteristic of mesophyll cells. The label was localized in cytoplasm adjacent to cell walls and was absent in vacuoles. Immunohistochemical staining also revealed the presence of cytokinins in guard cells. Induction of cytokinin synthesis enhanced the immunohistochemical staining of both mesophyll cells and guard cells, which was accompanied by elevated stomatal conductance. The possibility of a direct effect of cytokinins on stomatal conductance and their indirect influence through photosynthesis in the mesophyll cells is discussed.

  1. Mutational analyses of molecularly cloned satellite tobacco mosaic virus during serial passage in plants: Evidence for hotspots of genetic change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Dodds, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The high level of genetic diversity and rapid evolution of viral RNA genomes are well documented, but few studies have characterized the rate and nature of ongoing genetic change over time under controlled experimental conditions, especially in plant hosts. The RNA genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was used as an effective model for such studies because of advantageous features of its genome structure and because the extant genetic heterogeneity of STMV has been characterized previously. In the present study, the process of genetic change over time was studied by monitoring multiple serial passage lines of STMV populations for changes in their consensus sequences. A total of 42 passage lines were initiated by inoculation of tobacco plants with a helper tobamovirus and one of four STMV RNA inocula that were transcribed from full-length infectious STMV clones or extracted from purified STMV type strain virions. Ten serial passages were carried out for each line and the consensus genotypes of progeny STMV populations were assessed for genetic change by RNase protection analyses of the entire 1,059-nt STMV genome. Three different types of genetic change were observed, including the fixation of novel mutations in 9 of 42 lines, mutation at the major heterogeneity site near nt 751 in 5 of the 19 lines inoculated with a single genotype, and selection of a single major genotype in 6 of the 23 lines inoculated with mixed genotypes. Sequence analyses showed that the majority of mutations were single base substitutions. The distribution of mutation sites included three clusters in which mutations occurred at or very near the same site, suggesting hot spots of genetic change in the STMV genome. The diversity of genetic changes in sibling lines is clear evidence for the important role of chance and random sampling events in the process of genetic diversification of STMV virus populations.

  2. Mutation analyses of molecularly cloned satellite tobacco mosaic virus during serial passage in plants: evidence for hotspots of genetic change.

    PubMed

    Kurath, G; Dodds, J A

    1995-07-01

    The high level of genetic diversity and rapid evolution of viral RNA genomes are well documented, but few studies have characterized the rate and nature of ongoing genetic change over time under controlled experimental conditions, especially in plant hosts. The RNA genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was used as an effective model for such studies because of advantageous features of its genome structure and because the extant genetic heterogeneity of STMV has been characterized previously. In the present study, the process of genetic change over time was studied by monitoring multiple serial passage lines of STMV populations for changes in their consensus sequences. A total of 42 passage lines were initiated by inoculation of tobacco plants with a helper tobamovirus and one of four STMV RNA inocula that were transcribed from full-length infectious STMV clones or extracted from purified STMV type strain virions. Ten serial passages were carried out for each line and the consensus genotypes of progeny STMV populations were assessed for genetic change by RNase protection analyses of the entire 1,059-nt STMV genome. Three different types of genetic change were observed, including the fixation of novel mutations in 9 of 42 lines, mutation at the major heterogeneity site near nt 751 in 5 of the 19 lines inoculated with a single genotype, and selection of a single major genotype in 6 of the 23 lines inoculated with mixed genotypes. Sequence analyses showed that the majority of mutations were single base substitutions. The distribution of mutation sites included three clusters in which mutations occurred at or very near the same site, suggesting hot spots of genetic change in the STMV genome. The diversity of genetic changes in sibling lines is clear evidence for the important role of chance and random sampling events in the process of genetic diversification of STMV virus populations.

  3. Alpha-momorcharin, a RIP produced by bitter melon, enhances defense response in tobacco plants against diverse plant viruses and shows antifungal activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Zhang, Ping; Meng, Yan-Fa; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Da-Wei; Cheng, Jian; Lin, Hong-Hui; Xi, De-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-momorcharin (α-MMC) is type-1 ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with molecular weight of 29 kDa and has lots of biological activity. Our recent study indicated that the α-MMC purified from seeds of Momordica charantia exhibited distinct antiviral and antifungal activity. Tobacco plants pre-treated with 0.5 mg/mL α-MMC 3 days before inoculation with various viruses showed less-severe symptom and less reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation compared to that inoculated with viruses only. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the replication levels of viruses were lower in the plants treated with the α-MMC than control plants at 15 days post inoculation. Moreover, the coat protein expression of viruses was almost completely inhibited in plants which were treated with the α-MMC compared with control plants. Furthermore, the SA-responsive defense-related genes including non-expressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1), PR1, PR2 were up-regulated and activities of some antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) were increased after the α-MMC treatment. In addition, the α-MMC (500 μg/mL) revealed remarkable antifungal effect against phytopathogenic fungi, in the growth inhibition range 50.35-67.21 %, along with their MIC values ranging from 100 to 500 μg/mL. The α-MMC had also a strong detrimental effect on spore germination of all the tested plant pathogens along with concentration as well as time-dependent kinetic inhibition of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The α-MMC showed a remarkable antiviral and antifungal effect and hence could possibly be exploited in crop protection for controlling certain important plant diseases.

  4. Over-expression of TaEXPB23, a wheat expansin gene, improves oxidative stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Han, Yangyang; Chen, Yanhui; Yin, Suhong; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-15

    Expansins are cell wall proteins inducing cell wall loosening and participate in all plant growth and development processes which are associated with cell wall modifications. Here, TaEXPB23, a wheat expansin gene, was investigated and the tolerance to oxidative stress was strongly enhanced in over-expression tobacco plants. Our results revealed that over-expressing TaEXPB23 influenced the activity of antioxidant enzymes: in particular, the activity of the cell wall-bound peroxidase. The enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress and increased cell wall-bound peroxidase activity were partly inhibited by an anti-expansin antibody. The Arabidopsis expansin mutant atexpb2 showed reduced cell wall-bound peroxidase activity and decreased oxidative stress tolerance. In addition, atexpb2 exhibited lower chlorophyll contents and the germination rate compared to wild type (WT). Taken together, these results provided a new insight on the role of expansin proteins in plant stress tolerance by cell wall bound peroxidase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Tobacco Host Cell Protein Removal Methods by Blanching Intact Plants or by Heat Treatment of Extracts.

    PubMed

    Buyel, Johannes F; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-08-08

    Plants not only provide food, feed and raw materials for humans, but have also been developed as an economical production system for biopharmaceutical proteins, such as antibodies, vaccine candidates and enzymes. These must be purified from the plant biomass but chromatography steps are hindered by the high concentrations of host cell proteins (HCPs) in plant extracts. However, most HCPs irreversibly aggregate at temperatures above 60 °C facilitating subsequent purification of the target protein. Here, three methods are presented to achieve the heat precipitation of tobacco HCPs in either intact leaves or extracts. The blanching of intact leaves can easily be incorporated into existing processes but may have a negative impact on subsequent filtration steps. The opposite is true for heat precipitation of leaf extracts in a stirred vessel, which can improve the performance of downstream operations albeit with major changes in process equipment design, such as homogenizer geometry. Finally, a heat exchanger setup is well characterized in terms of heat transfer conditions and easy to scale, but cleaning can be difficult and there may be a negative impact on filter capacity. The design-of-experiments approach can be used to identify the most relevant process parameters affecting HCP removal and product recovery. This facilitates the application of each method in other expression platforms and the identification of the most suitable method for a given purification strategy.

  6. The effect of plant cytokinin hormones on the production of ethylene, nitric oxide, and protein nitrotyrosine in ageing tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmová, N; Fuksová, H; Srbová, M; Miková, D; Mýtinová, Z; Procházková, D; Vytásek, R; Wilhelm, J

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic plants with genetically increased or decreased levels of cytokinins were used to investigate the effect of cytokinin level on the production of ethylene, a plant hormone with suggested role in senescence, and the production of nitric oxide, potentially important signalling and regulatory molecule. The production of these gases was followed during the course of leaf development and senescence. The production of ethylene and nitric oxide is under genetic control of genes other than those involved in regulation of senescence. The difference in basic ethylene and NO levels in different tobacco cultivars was higher than their changes in senescence. The results of this study did not indicate a direct link between ethylene production and cytokinin levels. However, there was a decreased production of NO in senescent leaves. Low cytokinins level was associated with increased NO production during leaf development. Protein nitrotyrosine proved to be a better indicator of the reactive nitrogen species than measuring of the NO production. Higher nitrotyrosine concentrations were found in insoluble proteins than in the soluble ones, pointing to membrane proteins as the primary targets of the reactive nitrogen species. In plants with elevated cytokinin levels the content of nitrated proteins decreased both in soluble and insoluble fractions. This finding indicates an antioxidative function of cytokinins against reactive nitrogen species.

  7. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition.

    PubMed

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-08-01

    The development and marketing of 'novel' genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed.

  8. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition

    PubMed Central

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The development and marketing of ‘novel’ genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed. PMID:24735114

  9. Metabolic engineering of glycine betaine synthesis: plant betaine aldehyde dehydrogenases lacking typical transit peptides are targeted to tobacco chloroplasts where they confer betaine aldehyde resistance.

    PubMed

    Rathinasabapathi, B; McCue, K F; Gage, D A; Hanson, A D

    1994-01-01

    Certain higher plants synthesize and accumulate glycine betaine, a compound with osmoprotectant properties. Biosynthesis of glycine betaine proceeds via the pathway choline-->betaine aldehyde-->glycine betaine. Plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) which do not accumulate glycine betaine lack the enzymes catalyzing both reactions. As a step towards engineering glycine betaine accumulation into a non-accumulator, spinach and sugar beet complementary-DNA sequences encoding the second enzyme of glycine-betaine synthesis (betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, BADH, EC 1.2.1.8) were expressed in tobacco. Despite the absence of a typical transit peptide, BADH was targeted to the chloroplast in leaves of transgenic plants. Levels of extractable BADH were comparable to those in spinach and sugar beet, and the molecular weight, isoenzyme profile and Km for betaine aldehyde of the BADH enzymes from transgenic plants were the same as for native spinach or sugar beet BADH. Transgenic plants converted supplied betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine at high rates, demonstrating that they were able to transport betaine aldehyde across both the plasma membrane and the chloroplast envelope. The glycine betaine produced in this way was not further metabolized and reached concentrations similar to those in plants which accumulate glycine betaine naturally. Betaine aldehyde was toxic to non-transformed tobacco tissues whereas transgenic tissues were resistant due to detoxification of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine. Betaine aldehyded ehydrogenase is therefore of interest as a potential selectable marker, as well as in the metabolic engineering of osmoprotectant biosynthesis.

  10. Development of fiber optic spectroscopy for detection of genetically modified plants (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chean, X. Y.; Chong, J.-P. C.; Ho, J.-Z. E.; Chen, J. W.; Asundi, A. K.; Aiemwiwattanakul, O.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, fibre optic spectroscopy (FOSpectr) was developed for detection and quantification of recombinant green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in transgenic tobacco plants. In vitro detection was first carried out to optimize the sensitivity of the optical system. The bacterial expression vectors, pEGFP and pDsRED, were transformed into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and successfully purified by size separation under nondenaturing electrophoretic conditions and quantified. The purified proteins were serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fibre optic spectroscopy using different light sources, namely, blue LED (475 nm), tungsten halogen (350-1000 nm) and double frequency Nd:YAG green laser (532 nm). Tungsten halogen was found to be unsuitable for excitation of both EGFP and DsRED. Blue LED and green laser were the most suitable for excitation of EGFP and DsRED, respectively. The minimum concentration of EGFP detectable with blue LED excitation was 7.5 tg/ml whereas that for DsRED under excitation by green laser was 3.75 ig/ml. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in planta, transgenic tobacco plants expressing EGFP were first imaged under a fluorescence microscope. This was to select a panel of transformed plants expressing varying levels of the fluorescent protein. These plants were then screened via FOSpectr. The results showed that the amplitude of the fluorescence emission signal obtained from FOSpectr correlated well with the level of EGFP expressed as indicated by fluorescence microscopy. Thus, proof-of-concept for the use of FOSpectr as a potentially powerful tool for screening transgenic plants was provided in this paper.

  11. Impact of genetically modified crops on soil- and plant-associated microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Dunfield, Kari E; Germida, James J

    2004-01-01

    Transgenic or genetically modified plants possess novel genes that impart beneficial characteristics such as herbicide resistance. One of the least understood areas in the environmental risk assessment of genetically modified crops is their impact on soil- and plant-associated microbial communities. The potential for interaction between transgenic plants and plant residues and the soil microbial community is not well understood. The recognition that these interactions could change microbial biodiversity and affect ecosystem functioning has initiated a limited number of studies in the area. At this time, studies have shown the possibility that transgenes can be transferred to native soil microorganisms through horizontal gene transfer, although there is not evidence of this occurring in the soil. Furthermore, novel proteins have been shown to be released from transgenic plants into the soil ecosystem, and their presence can influence the biodiversity of the microbial community by selectively stimulating the growth of organisms that can use them. Microbial diversity can be altered when associated with transgenic plants; however, these effects are both variable and transient. Soil- and plant-associated microbial communities are influenced not only by plant species and transgene insertion but also by environmental factors such as field site and sampling date. Minor alterations in the diversity of the microbial community could affect soil health and ecosystem functioning, and therefore, the impact that plant variety may have on the dynamics of the rhizosphere microbial populations and in turn plant growth and health and ecosystem sustainability, requires further study.

  12. Overexpression of a Grapevine Sucrose Transporter (VvSUC27) in Tobacco Improves Plant Growth Rate in the Presence of Sucrose In vitro.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yumeng; Tu, Wenrui; Zu, Yunyun; Jing, Yan; Xu, Zimo; Lu, Jiang; Zhang, Yali

    2017-01-01

    The import of sugar from source leaves and it further accumulation in grape berries are considerably high during ripening, and this process is mediated via sucrose transporters. In this study, a grape sucrose transporter (SUT) gene, VvSUC27, located at the plasma membrane, was transferred to tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The transformants were more sensitive to sucrose and showed more rapid development, especially roots, when cultured on MS agar medium containing sucrose, considering that the shoot/root dry weight ratio was only half that of the control. Moreover, all transformed plants exhibited light-colored leaves throughout their development, which indicated chlorosis and an associated reduction in photosynthesis. The total sugar content in the roots and stems of transformants was higher than that in control plants. No significant difference was observed in the leaves between the transformants and control plants. The levels of growth-promoting hormones were increased, and those of stress-mediating hormones were reduced in transgenic tobacco plants. The qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of VvSUC27 was 1,000 times higher than that of the autologous tobacco sucrose transporter, which suggested that the markedly increased growth rate of transformants was because of the heterogeneously expressed gene. The transgenic tobacco plants showed resistance to abiotic stresses. Strikingly, the overexpression of VvSUC27 leaded to the up regulation of most reactive oxygen species scavengers and abscisic acid-related genes that might enable transgenic plants to overcome abiotic stress. Taken together, these results revealed an important role of VvSUC27 in plant growth and response to abiotic stresses, especially in the presence of sucrose in vitro.

  13. Characterization of siRNAs derived from cucumber mosaic virus in infected tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yanhong; Zhang, Yongjiang; Hu, Fan; Zhu, Shuifang

    2017-03-27

    This study characterized the viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) from Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun infected with a cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) 2b-deficient mutant. Most vsiRNAs were 21 -22 nucleotides in length and the 5'-terminal ends were dominated by A and U, respectively. The observed vsiRNAs were heterogeneously distributed throughout the CMV genome; however, most of the vsiRNAs were derived from sense strands, as opposed to antisense strands. These results demonstrate the conserved and specific function of Dicer-like (DCL), Argonaute (AGO) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR) proteins in tobacco. Finally, it was revealed that vsiRNAs target abundant host genes, indicating complex roles for CMV vsiRNAs during the development of symptoms.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of snakin-defensin hybrid protein in tobacco and potato plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To augment plant protection against phytopathogens, we constructed a fusion gene for the simultaneous expression of snakin-1 (SN1) and defensin-1 (PTH1) antimicrobial proteins as a hybrid protein (SAP) in plant cells. Prior to in vivo evaluation of SAP phytoprotective activity, the hybrid protein ex...

  15. High Levels of Bioplastic Are Produced in Fertile Transplastomic Tobacco Plants Engineered with a Synthetic Operon for the Production of Polyhydroxybutyrate1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bohmert-Tatarev, Karen; McAvoy, Susan; Daughtry, Sean; Peoples, Oliver P.; Snell, Kristi D.

    2011-01-01

    An optimized genetic construct for plastid transformation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) for the production of the renewable, biodegradable plastic polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was designed using an operon extension strategy. Bacterial genes encoding the PHB pathway enzymes were selected for use in this construct based on their similarity to the codon usage and GC content of the tobacco plastome. Regulatory elements with limited homology to the host plastome yet known to yield high levels of plastidial recombinant protein production were used to enhance the expression of the transgenes. A partial transcriptional unit, containing genes of the PHB pathway and a selectable marker gene encoding spectinomycin resistance, was flanked at the 5′ end by the host plant’s psbA coding sequence and at the 3′ end by the host plant’s 3′ psbA untranslated region. This design allowed insertion of the transgenes into the plastome as an extension of the psbA operon, rendering the addition of a promoter to drive the expression of the transgenes unnecessary. Transformation of the optimized construct into tobacco and subsequent spectinomycin selection of transgenic plants yielded T0 plants that were capable of producing up to 18.8% dry weight PHB in samples of leaf tissue. These plants were fertile and produced viable seed. T1 plants producing up to 17.3% dry weight PHB in samples of leaf tissue and 8.8% dry weight PHB in the total biomass of the plant were also isolated. PMID:21325565

  16. β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthase I (KASI) Plays Crucial Roles in the Plant Growth and Fatty Acids Synthesis in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianquan; Xu, Ronghua; Chen, Jianghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids serve many functions in plants, but the effects of some key genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis on plants growth and development are not well understood yet. To understand the functions of 3-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase I (KASI) in tobacco, we isolated two KASI homologs, which we have designated NtKASI-1 and NtKASI-2. Expression analysis showed that these two KASI genes were transcribed constitutively in all tissues examined. Over-expression of NtKASI-1 in tobacco changed the fatty acid content in leaves, whereas over-expressed lines of NtKASI-2 exhibited distinct phenotypic features such as slightly variegated leaves and reduction of the fatty acid content in leaves, similar to the silencing plants of NtKASI-1 gene. Interestingly, the silencing of NtKASI-2 gene had no discernibly altered phenotypes compared to wild type. The double silencing plants of these two genes enhanced the phenotypic changes during vegetative and reproductive growth compared to wild type. These results uncovered that these two KASI genes had the partially functional redundancy, and that the KASI genes played a key role in regulating fatty acids synthesis and in mediating plant growth and development in tobacco. PMID:27509494

  17. Expression of a multi-epitope DPT fusion protein in transplastomic tobacco plants retains both antigenicity and immunogenicity of all three components of the functional oligomer.

    PubMed

    Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Alpuche-Solís, Angel G; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Bendik, Elise M; Martínez-González, Luzmila; Korban, Schuyler S

    2009-05-01

    Expression of genes in plant chloroplasts provides an opportunity for enhanced production of target proteins. We report the introduction and expression of a fusion DPT protein containing immunoprotective exotoxin epitopes of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Bordetella pertussis, and Clostridium tetani in tobacco chloroplasts. Using biolistic-mediated transformation, a plant-optimized synthetic DPT gene was successfully transferred to tobacco plastomes. Putative transplastomic T0 plants were identified by PCR, and Southern blot analysis confirmed homoplasmy in T1 progeny. ELISA assays demonstrated that the DPT protein retained antigenicity of the three components of the fusion protein. The highest level of expression in these transplastomic plants reached 0.8% of total soluble protein. To assess whether the functional recombinant protein expressed in tobacco plants would induce specific antibodies in test animals, a mice feeding experiment was conducted. For mice orally immunized with freeze-dried transplastomic leaves, production of IgG and IgA antibodies specific to each toxin were detected in serum and mucosal tissues.

  18. Pretreatment with nitrogen dioxide modifies plant response to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runeckles, V. C.; Palmer, K.

    Plant growth inhibition by ozone is significantly affected by previous exposure to nitrogen dioxide. Experiments on the early growth of four crop species showed that daily pretreatment with NO 2 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 3 h) immediately prior to exposure to O 3 (0.08-0.10 ppm for 6 h) increased the inhibition of radish and wheat growth, decreased the inhibition of bush bean growth, but had no effect on the growth of mint. The magnitudes of the interactive effects indicate that in regions where relatively high concentrations of O 3 are produced by photochemical processes, for example, downwind from urban centres, assessments of the impact of O 3 on vegetation based on knowledge of response to O 3 alone may be seriously flawed.

  19. Systems toxicology-based assessment of the candidate modified risk tobacco product THS2.2 for the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Poussin, Carine; Laurent, Alexandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2016-01-02

    Alterations of endothelial adhesive properties by cigarette smoke (CS) can progressively favor the development of atherosclerosis which may cause cardiovascular disorders. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) are tobacco products developed to reduce smoking-related risks. A systems biology/toxicology approach combined with a functional in vitro adhesion assay was used to assess the impact of a candidate heat-not-burn technology-based MRTP, Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, on the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) compared with a reference cigarette (3R4F). HCAECs were treated for 4h with conditioned media of human monocytic Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells preincubated with low or high concentrations of aqueous extracts from THS2.2 aerosol or 3R4F smoke for 2h (indirect treatment), unconditioned media (direct treatment), or fresh aqueous aerosol/smoke extracts (fresh direct treatment). Functional and molecular investigations revealed that aqueous 3R4F smoke extract promoted the adhesion of MM6 cells to HCAECs via distinct direct and indirect concentration-dependent mechanisms. Using the same approach, we identified significantly reduced effects of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract on MM6 cell-HCAEC adhesion, and reduced molecular changes in endothelial and monocytic cells. Ten- and 20-fold increased concentrations of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract were necessary to elicit similar effects to those measured with 3R4F in both fresh direct and indirect exposure modalities, respectively. Our systems toxicology study demonstrated reduced effects of an aqueous aerosol extract from the candidate MRTP, THS2.2, using the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary endothelial cells as a surrogate pathophysiologically relevant event in atherogenesis.

  20. Effects of cigarette smoke, cessation and switching to a candidate modified risk tobacco product on the liver in Apoe -/- mice--a systems toxicology analysis.

    PubMed

    Lo Sasso, Giuseppe; Titz, Bjoern; Nury, Catherine; Boué, Stéphanie; Phillips, Blaine; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Schneider, Thomas; Dijon, Sophie; Baumer, Karine; Peric, Daruisz; Dulize, Remi; Elamin, Ashraf; Guedj, Emmanuel; Buettner, Ansgar; Leroy, Patrice; Kleinhans, Samuel; Vuillaume, Gregory; Veljkovic, Emilija; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Martin, Florian; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-04-01

    The liver is one of the most important organs involved in elimination of xenobiotic and potentially toxic substances. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains more than 7000 chemicals, including those that exert biological effects and cause smoking-related diseases. Though CS is not directly hepatotoxic, a growing body of evidence suggests that it may exacerbate pre-existing chronic liver disease. In this study, we integrated toxicological endpoints with molecular measurements and computational analyses to investigate effects of exposures on the livers of Apoe(-/- )mice. Mice were exposed to 3R4F reference CS, to an aerosol from the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, a candidate modified risk tobacco product (MRTP) or to filtered air (Sham) for up to 8 months. THS2.2 takes advantage of a "heat-not-burn" technology that, by heating tobacco, avoids pyrogenesis and pyrosynthesis. After CS exposure for 2 months, some groups were either switched to the MRTP or filtered air. While no group showed clear signs of hepatotoxicity, integrative analysis of proteomics and transcriptomics data showed a CS-dependent impairment of specific biological networks. These networks included lipid and xenobiotic metabolism and iron homeostasis that likely contributed synergistically to exacerbating oxidative stress. In contrast, most proteomic and transcriptomic changes were lower in mice exposed to THS2.2 and in the cessation and switching groups compared to the CS group. Our findings elucidate the complex biological responses of the liver to CS exposure. Furthermore, they provide evidence that THS2.2 aerosol has reduced biological effects, as compared with CS, on the livers of Apoe(-/- )mice.

  1. The signal peptide-like segment of hpaXm is required for its association to the cell wall in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Miao, Weiguo; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Shujian

    2017-01-01

    Harpins, encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes of Gram-negative plant pathogens, are elicitors of hypersensitive response (HR). HpaXm is a novel harpin-like protein described from cotton leaf blight bacteria, Xanthomonas citri subsp. malvacearum-a synonym of X. campestris pv. malvacearum (Smith 1901-1978). A putative signal peptide (1-MNSLNTQIGANSSFL-15) of hpaXm was predicted in the nitroxyl-terminal (N-terminal)by SignalP (SignalP 3.0 server). Here, we explored the function of the N-terminal leader peptide like segment of hpaXm using transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc.). Transgenic tobacco lines expressing the full-length hpaXm and the signal peptide-like segment-deleted mutant hpaXmΔLP were developed using transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The target genes were confirmed integrated into the tobacco genomes and expressed normally. Using immune colloidal-gold detection technique, hpaXm protein was found to be transferred to the cytoplasm, the cell membrane, and organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nucleus, as well as the cell wall. However, the deletion mutant hpaXmΔLP expressed in transgenic tobacco was found unable to cross the membrane to reach the cell wall. Additionally, soluble proteins extracted from plants transformed with hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were bio-active. Defensive micro-HR induced by the transgene expression of hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were observed on transgenic tobacco leaves. Disease resistance bioassays to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) showed that tobacco plants transformed with hpaXm and with hpaXmΔLP exhibited enhanced resistance to TMV. In summary, the N-terminal signal peptide-like segment (1-45 bp) in hpaXm sequence is not necessary for transgene expression, bioactivity of hpaXm and resistance to TMV in transgenic tobacco, but is required for the protein to be translocated to the cell wall.

  2. The signal peptide-like segment of hpaXm is required for its association to the cell wall in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Le; Miao, Weiguo; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Shujian

    2017-01-01

    Harpins, encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes of Gram-negative plant pathogens, are elicitors of hypersensitive response (HR). HpaXm is a novel harpin-like protein described from cotton leaf blight bacteria, Xanthomonas citri subsp. malvacearum—a synonym of X. campestris pv. malvacearum (Smith 1901–1978). A putative signal peptide (1-MNSLNTQIGANSSFL-15) of hpaXm was predicted in the nitroxyl-terminal (N-terminal)by SignalP (SignalP 3.0 server). Here, we explored the function of the N-terminal leader peptide like segment of hpaXm using transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc.). Transgenic tobacco lines expressing the full-length hpaXm and the signal peptide-like segment-deleted mutant hpaXmΔLP were developed using transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The target genes were confirmed integrated into the tobacco genomes and expressed normally. Using immune colloidal-gold detection technique, hpaXm protein was found to be transferred to the cytoplasm, the cell membrane, and organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nucleus, as well as the cell wall. However, the deletion mutant hpaXmΔLP expressed in transgenic tobacco was found unable to cross the membrane to reach the cell wall. Additionally, soluble proteins extracted from plants transformed with hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were bio-active. Defensive micro-HR induced by the transgene expression of hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were observed on transgenic tobacco leaves. Disease resistance bioassays to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) showed that tobacco plants transformed with hpaXm and with hpaXmΔLP exhibited enhanced resistance to TMV. In summary, the N-terminal signal peptide-like segment (1–45 bp) in hpaXm sequence is not necessary for transgene expression, bioactivity of hpaXm and resistance to TMV in transgenic tobacco, but is required for the protein to be translocated to the cell wall. PMID:28141855

  3. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the Nicta; CycD3; 4 gene demonstrate accelerated growth rates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Wang, Myeong Hyeon

    2008-07-31

    D-type cyclins control the onset of cell division and the response to extracellular signals during the G1 phase. In this study, we transformed a D-type cyclin gene, Nicta;CycD3;4, from Nicotiana tabacum using an Agrobacterium-mediated method. A predicted 1.1 kb cyclin gene was present in all of the transgenic plants, but not in wild-type. Northern analyses showed that the expression level of the Nicta;CycD3;4 gene in all of the transgenic plants was strong when compared to the wild-type plants, suggesting that Nicta;CycD3;4 gene driven by the CaMV 35S promoter was being overexpressed. Our results revealed that transgenic plants overexpressing Nicta;CycD3;4 had an accelerated growth rate when compared to wild-type plants, and that the transgenic plants exhibited a smaller cell size and a decreased cell population in young leaves when compared to wild-type plants.

  4. [Adult oviposition and larvae feeding behavior of Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on tobacco plants after infested by B-biotype Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Tao; Xue, Ming; Chen, Hui-Na; Zhou, Fang-Yuan

    2011-05-01

    To understand the effects of the defense responses of tobacco plants induced by the infesting of B-biotype Bemisia tabaci to Spodoptera litura, and to explore the mechanisms of the interspecific interactions between B-biotype B. tabaci and S. litura, a laboratory experiment was conducted to study the effects of tobacco plants after infested by B-biotype B. tabaci on the adult oviposition selection and the larvae feeding, anti-feeding, and other feeding behaviors of S. litura. Comparing with that on control plants, the egg number oviposited by adult S. litura on the infested plants decreased by 40.9%. The plant leaves infested had great repellent effect to the newly-hatched S. litura larvae, while the middle leaves and the leaves with systemic damage symptom (white-vein) had definite attractive effect. Unexpanded terminal leaves had no effects on the host selection of S. litura larvae. The S. litura larvae had significant anti-feeding behavior on the leaves infested, being more notable than that on the leaves with white-vein. On the leaves infested and with white-vein, the feeding times per unit duration or the feeding percentage of S. litura larvae decreased, the time of initiating feeding prolonged, and the total feeding area declined significantly, compared with the control. In conclusion, the tobacco plants after infested by B-biotype B. tabaci had negative effects on the adult oviposition and larvae feeding of S. litura, and the results of the study would be useful in understanding the population dynamics of tobacco pests and their management.

  5. Enhanced synthesis of choline and glycine betaine in transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Scott D.; Nuccio, Michael L.; Ziemak, Michael J.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2001-01-01

    Choline (Cho) is the precursor of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine and is itself an essential nutrient for humans. Metabolic engineering of Cho biosynthesis in plants could therefore enhance both their resistance to osmotic stresses (drought and salinity) and their nutritional value. The key enzyme of the plant Cho-synthesis pathway is phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase, which catalyzes all three of the methylations required to convert phosphoethanolamine to phosphocholine. We show here that overexpressing this enzyme in transgenic tobacco increased the levels of phosphocholine by 5-fold and free Cho by 50-fold without affecting phosphatidylcholine content or growth. Moreover, the expanded Cho pool led to a 30-fold increase in synthesis of glycine betaine via an engineered glycine betaine pathway. Supplying the transgenics with the Cho precursor ethanolamine (EA) further enhanced Cho levels even though the supplied EA was extensively catabolized. These latter results establish that there is further scope for improving Cho synthesis by engineering an increased endogenous supply of EA and suggest that this could be achieved by enhancing EA synthesis and/or by suppressing its degradation. PMID:11481443

  6. Effects of simultaneous expression of heterologous genes involved in phytochelatin biosynthesis on thiol content and cadmium accumulation in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wawrzynski, Adam; Kopera, Edyta; Wawrzynska, Anna; Kaminska, Jolanta; Bal, Wojciech; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. LA Burley 21) lines expressing three genes encoding enzymes thought to be critical for the efficient production of phytochelatins, (i) serine acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.30) involved in the production of O-acetylserine, the cysteine precursor, (ii) gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (EC 6.3.2.2) involved in the production of gamma-glutamylcysteine, the precursor of glutathione, and (iii) phytochelatin synthase (EC 2.3.2.15), were obtained and analysed for non-protein thiol content and cadmium accumulation. After a 3 week exposure to 15 microM CdCl2, plants expressing transgenes (either separately or in combination) had increased cadmium concentration in roots but not in shoots compared with the wild type. Nearly all transgenic lines analysed had more non-protein thiols than the wild type. The greatest effects (about 8-fold elevation of thiols) were found in one of the lines simultaneously expressing the three transgenes. Despite the fact that a multi-transgene strategy described in this work resulted in a strong increase in the levels of several classes of non-protein thiols in transgenic plants, other factors appeared to restrict cadmium accumulation in shoots.

  7. Comparative systems toxicology analysis of cigarette smoke and aerosol from a candidate modified risk tobacco product in organotypic human gingival epithelial cultures: A 3-day repeated exposure study.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Filippo; Titz, Bjoern; Sewer, Alain; Lo Sasso, Giuseppe; Scotti, Elena; Schlage, Walter K; Mathis, Carole; Leroy, Patrice; Majeed, Shoaib; Torres, Laura Ortega; Keppler, Brian R; Elamin, Ashraf; Trivedi, Keyur; Guedj, Emmanuel; Martin, Florian; Frentzel, Stefan; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Smoking is one of the major lifestyle-related risk factors for periodontal diseases. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) offer a promising alternative in the harm reduction strategy for adult smokers unable to quit. Using a systems toxicology approach, we investigated and compared the exposure effects of a reference cigarette (3R4F) and a heat-not-burn technology-based candidate MRTP, the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2. Human gingival epithelial organotypic cultures were repeatedly exposed (3 days) for 28 min at two matching concentrations of cigarette smoke (CS) or THS2.2 aerosol. Results showed only minor histopathological alterations and minimal cytotoxicity upon THS2.2 aerosol exposure compared to CS (1% for THS2.2 aerosol vs. 30% for CS, at the high concentration). Among the 14 proinflammatory mediators analyzed, only 5 exhibited significant alterations with THS2.2 exposure compared with 11 upon CS exposure. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis indicated a general reduction of the impact in THS2.2 aerosol-exposed samples with respect to CS (∼79% lower biological impact for the high THS2.2 aerosol concentration compared to CS, and 13 metabolites significantly perturbed for THS2.2 vs. 181 for CS). This study indicates that exposure to THS2.2 aerosol had a lower impact on the pathophysiology of human gingival organotypic cultures than CS.

  8. Fast determination of pyrethroid pesticides in tobacco by GC-MS-SIM coupled with modified QuEChERS sample preparation procedure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Sun, Ying; Jiang, Chunzhu; Yu, Xi; Wang, Yuanpeng; Zhang, Hanqi; Song, Daqian

    2013-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for the extraction and determination of pyrethroid pesticide residues in tobacco. The modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method was applied for preparing samples. In this study, methyl cyanide (MeCN)-saturated salt aqueous was used as the two-phase extraction solvent for the first time, and a vortex shaker was used for the simultaneous shaking and concentration of the analytes. The effects of experimental parameters on extraction and clean-up efficiency were investigated and optimized. The analytes were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM). The obtained recoveries of the analytes at three different fortification levels were 76.85-114.1% and relative standard deviations (RSDs) were lower than 15.7%. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were from 1.28 to 26.6 μg kg(-1). This method was also applied to the analysis of actual commercial tobacco products and the analytical results were satisfactory.

  9. Does Plant Cultivar Difference Modify the Bottom-Up Effects of Resource Limitation on Plant-Insect Herbivore Interactions?

    PubMed

    Han, Peng; Desneux, Nicolas; Michel, Thomas; Le Bot, Jacques; Seassau, Aurelie; Wajnberg, Eric; Amiens-Desneux, Edwige; Lavoir, Anne-Violette

    2016-12-01

    Variation in resource input to plants triggers bottom-up effects on plant-insect herbivore interactions. However, variation in plant intrinsic traits in response to resource availability may modify the bottom-up effects. Furthermore, the consequences also may depend on the feeding strategy of insect herbivores belonging to different feeding guilds. We evaluated the performance of two insect herbivores from distinct feeding guilds, the leaf miner Tuta absoluta and the phloem feeder Bemisia tabaci. We offered the insects two tomato cultivars growing under optimal nitrogen input vs. nitrogen limitation, or under optimal water input vs. water limitation. We found that: (i) the two cultivars differed in their responses to nitrogen and water limitation by regulating primary (leaf-gas exchange related parameters, leaf nitrogen content, and leaf C/N ratio) and secondary metabolism (main defensive compounds: glycoalkaloids); (ii) for both plant cultivars, nitrogen or water limitation significantly affected T. absoluta survival and development, while B. tabaci survival was affected only by nitrogen limitation; and surprisingly (iii) plant cultivar differences did not modify the negative bottom-up effects of resource limitation on the two insect herbivores. In conclusion, the negative effects of resource limitation cascaded up to insect herbivores even though plant cultivars exhibited various adaptive traits to resource limitation.

  10. Protection against virus infection in tobacco plants expressing the coat protein of grapevine fanleaf nepovirus.

    PubMed

    Bardonnet, N; Hans, F; Serghini, M A; Pinck, L

    1994-03-01

    Grapevine fanleaf nepovirus (GFLV) is responsible for the economically significant "court-noué" disease in vineyards. Its genome is made up of two single-stranded RNA molecules (RNA1 and RNA2) which direct the synthesis of polyproteins P1 and P2 respectively. A chimeric coat protein gene derived from the C-terminal part of P2 was constructed and subsequently introduced into a binary transformation vector. Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing the coat protein under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter were engineered by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Protection against infection with virions or viral RNA was tested in coat protein-expressing plants. A significant delay of systemic invasion was observed in transgenic plants inoculated with virus compared to control plants. This effect was also observed when plants were inoculated with viral RNA. No coat protein-mediated cross-protection was observed when transgenic plants were infected with arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), a closely related nepovirus also responsible for a "court-noué" disease.

  11. Overexpression of a Modified Plant Thionin Enhances Disease Resistance to Citrus Canker and Huanglongbing (HLB)

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Guixia; Stover, Ed; Gupta, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a great threat to the US citrus industry. There are no proven strategies to eliminate HLB disease and no cultivar has been identified with strong HLB resistance. Citrus canker is also an economically important disease associated with a bacterial pathogen (Xanthomonas citri). In this study, we characterized endogenous citrus thionins and investigated their expression in different citrus tissues. Since no HLB-resistant citrus cultivars have been identified, we attempted to develop citrus resistant to both HLB and citrus canker through overexpression of a modified plant thionin. To improve effectiveness for disease resistance, we modified and synthesized the sequence encoding a plant thionin and cloned into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS. The construct was then introduced into Agrobacterium strain EHA105 for citrus transformation. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified plant thionin were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful transformation and transgene gene expression was confirmed by molecular analysis. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified thionin gene were challenged with X. citri 3213 at a range of concentrations, and a significant reduction in canker symptoms and a decrease in bacterial growth were demonstrated compared to nontransgenic plants. Furthermore, the transgenic citrus plants were challenged with HLB via graft inoculation. Our results showed significant Las titer reduction in roots of transgenic Carrizo compared with control plants and reduced scion Las titer 12 months after graft inoculation. These data provide promise for engineering citrus disease resistance against HLB and canker. PMID:27499757

  12. Overview of the current status of genetically modified plants in Europe as compared to the USA.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Peter

    2003-07-01

    Genetically modified crops have been tested in 1,726 experimental releases in the EU member states and in 7,815 experimental releases in the USA. The global commercial cultivation area of genetically modified crops is likely to reach 50 million hectares in 2001, however, the commercial production of genetically modified crops in the EU amounts to only a few thousand hectares and accounts for only some 0.03% of the world production. A significant gap exists between the more than fifty genetically modified crop species already permitted to be cultivated and to be placed on the market in the USA, Canada and other countries and the five genetically modified crop species permitted for the same use in the EU member states, which are still pending inclusion in the Common Catalogue of agricultural plant species. The further development of the "green gene technology" in the EU will be a matter of public acceptance and administrative legislation.

  13. Influence of Elastin-Like Polypeptide and Hydrophobin on Recombinant Hemagglutinin Accumulations in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Hoang Trong; Hause, Bettina; Hause, Gerd; Arcalis, Elsa; Stoger, Eva; Maresch, Daniel; Altmann, Friedrich; Joensuu, Jussi; Conrad, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Fusion protein strategies are useful tools to enhance expression and to support the development of purification technologies. The capacity of fusion protein strategies to enhance expression was explored in tobacco leaves and seeds. C-terminal fusion of elastin-like polypeptides (ELP) to influenza hemagglutinin under the control of either the constitutive CaMV 35S or the seed-specific USP promoter resulted in increased accumulation in both leaves and seeds compared to the unfused hemagglutinin. The addition of a hydrophobin to the C-terminal end of hemagglutinin did not significantly increase the expression level. We show here that, depending on the target protein, both hydrophobin fusion and ELPylation combined with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeting induced protein bodies in leaves as well as in seeds. The N-glycosylation pattern indicated that KDEL sequence-mediated retention of leaf-derived hemagglutinins and hemagglutinin-hydrophobin fusions were not completely retained in the ER. In contrast, hemagglutinin-ELP from leaves contained only the oligomannose form, suggesting complete ER retention. In seeds, ER retention seems to be nearly complete for all three constructs. An easy and scalable purification method for ELPylated proteins using membrane-based inverse transition cycling could be applied to both leaf- and seed-expressed hemagglutinins. PMID:24914995

  14. Functional analysis of PsG6PDH, a cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from Populus suaveolens, and its contribution to cold tolerance improvement in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuanzhen; Lin, Shanzhi; Guo, Hai; Zhang, Zhiyi; Chen, Xiaoyang

    2013-09-01

    A 1,697-bp cDNA sequence, designated as PsG6PDH, was amplified from Populus suaveolens. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that PsG6PDH encodes a cytosolic G6PDH isoform, with Southern blot analysis demonstrating that the gene is single or low copy in Populus. Transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing PsG6PDH exhibited enhanced cold tolerance. In both transgenic and wild-type (WT) tobacco plants, cold stress increased leaf malondialdehyde (MDA) content, electrolyte leakage (EL), and peroxide (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities; relative to WT, however, transgenic lines had lower MDA content and EL and higher SOD and POD activities. In addition, PsG6PDH activated the expression of stress-related genes, including NtERD10b, NtERD10c, and NtSOD, in tobacco plants. Our results provide evidence regarding PsG6PDH regulatory function in plants during low temperature stress.

  15. Chloroplast-targeted bacterial RecA proteins confer tolerance to chloroplast DNA damage by methyl viologen or UV-C radiation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyesung; Jin, Yong-Mei; Choi, Mi Hwa; Lee, Hyeyun; Kim, Minkyun

    2013-02-01

    The nature and importance of the DNA repair system in the chloroplasts of higher plants under oxidative stress or UV radiation-induced genotoxicity was investigated via gain-of-functional approaches exploiting bacterial RecAs. For this purpose, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants and cell suspensions overexpressing Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa RecA fused to a chloroplast-targeting transit peptide were first produced. The transgenic tobacco plants maintained higher amounts of chloroplast DNA compared with wild-type (WT) upon treatments with methyl viologen (MV), a herbicide that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chloroplasts. Consistent with these results, the transgenic tobacco leaves showed less bleaching than WT following MV exposure. Similarly, the MV-treated transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the chloroplast RecA homologue RECA1 showed weak bleaching, while the recA1 mutant showed opposite results upon MV treatment. In addition, when exposed to UV-C radiation, the dark-grown E. coli RecA-overexpressing transgenic tobacco cell suspensions, but not their WT counterparts, resumed growth and greening after the recovery period under light conditions. Measurements of UV radiation-induced chloroplast DNA damage using DraI assays (Harlow et al. 1994) with the chloroplast rbcL DNA probe and quantitative PCR analyses showed that the transgenic cell suspensions better repaired their UV-C radiation-induced chloroplast DNA lesions compared with WT. Taken all together, it was concluded that RecA-overexpressing transgenic plants are endowed with an increased chloroplast DNA maintenance capacity and enhanced repair activities, and consequently have a higher survival tolerance to genotoxic stresses. These observations are made possible by the functional compatibility of the bacterial RecAs in chloroplasts. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  16. Expression of tobacco class II catalase gene activates the endogenous homologous gene and is associated with disease resistance in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, D; Xie, Z; Chen, C; Fan, B; Chen, Z

    1999-02-01

    We have previously shown that healthy potato plants respond poorly to salicylic acid (SA) for activating disease resistance against the late blight fungal pathogen Phytophthora infestans. However, SA is essential for the establishment of potato systemic acquired resistance (SAR) against P. infestans after treatment with the fungal elicitor arachidonic acid (AA). To understand the molecular mechanisms through which AA induces SA-dependent SAR in potato, we have recently studied the expression of potato class II catalase (Cat2St) in comparison with its tobacco homologue, Cat2Nt, which has previously been shown to bind SA. In the present study, we show that tobacco Cat2Nt is expressed at high levels and accounts for almost half of total SA-binding activity detected in tobacco leaves. In contrast, potato Cat2St is not expressed in healthy leaves, which is associated with the low SA responsiveness of potato plants for activation of disease resistance mechanisms. Upon treatment with AA, expression of potato Cat2St is induced not only in AA-treated leaves, but also in the upper untreated parts of the plants, concomitant with the establishment of SA-dependent SAR to P. infestans. Moreover, expression of the tobacco Cat2Nt gene in transgenic potato plants leads to constitutive expression of the endogenous potato Cat2St gene and is associated with enhanced resistance to P. infestans. These results collectively indicate that plant SA-binding class II catalases may play an important role in the development of disease resistance, possibly by serving as biological targets of SA.

  17. Site-specific proteolytic degradation of IgG monoclonal antibodies expressed in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Lombardi, Raffaele; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Paul, Mathew J; Di Micco, Patrizio; Morea, Veronica; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello; Ma, Julian K-C

    2015-02-01

    Plants are promising hosts for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, proteolytic degradation of antibodies produced both in stable transgenic plants and using transient expression systems is still a major issue for efficient high-yield recombinant protein accumulation. In this work, we have performed a detailed study of the degradation profiles of two human IgG1 mAbs produced in plants: an anti-HIV mAb 2G12 and a tumour-targeting mAb H10. Even though they use different light chains (κ and λ, respectively), the fragmentation pattern of both antibodies was similar. The majority of Ig fragments result from proteolytic degradation, but there are only a limited number of plant proteolytic cleavage events in the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. All of the cleavage sites identified were in the proximity of interdomain regions and occurred at each interdomain site, with the exception of the VL /CL interface in mAb H10 λ light chain. Cleavage site sequences were analysed, and residue patterns characteristic of proteolytic enzymes substrates were identified. The results of this work help to define common degradation events in plant-produced mAbs and raise the possibility of predicting antibody degradation patterns 'a priori' and designing novel stabilization strategies by site-specific mutagenesis.

  18. Evaluation of transgenic tobacco plants expressing a bacterial Co-Ni transporter for acquisition of cobalt.

    PubMed

    Nair, Smitha; Joshi-Saha, Archana; Singh, Sudhir; Ramachandran, V; Singh, Surya; Thorat, Vidya; Kaushik, C P; Eapen, Susan; D'Souza, S F

    2012-11-15

    Phytoremediation is a viable strategy for management of toxic wastes in a large area/volume with low concentrations of toxic elemental pollutants. With increased industrial use of cobalt and its alloys, it has become a major metal contaminant in soils and water bodies surrounding these industries and mining sites with adverse effects on the biota. A bacterial Co-Ni permease was cloned from Rhodopseudomonas palustris and introduced into Nicotiana tabacum to explore its potential for phytoremediation and was found to be specific for cobalt and nickel. The transgenic plants accumulated more cobalt and nickel as compared to control, whereas no significant difference in accumulation of other divalent ions was observed. The transgenic plants were evaluated for cobalt content and showed increased acquisition of cobalt (up to 5 times) as compared to control. The plants were also assessed for accumulation of nickel and found to accumulate up to 2 times more nickel than control. At the same initial concentration of cobalt and nickel, transgenic plant preferentially accumulated cobalt as compared to nickel. The present study is perhaps the first attempt to develop transgenic plants expressing heterologous Co transporter with an improved capacity to uptake cobalt. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Transplastomic expression of a modified human papillomavirus L1 protein leading to the assembly of capsomeres in tobacco: a step towards cost-effective second-generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Waheed, M Tahir; Thönes, Nadja; Müller, Martin; Hassan, S Waqas; Razavi, N Mona; Lössl, Elke; Kaul, Hans-Peter; Lössl, Andreas G

    2011-04-01

    Certain types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) are causatively associated with cervical carcinoma, the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Due to limitations in the availability of currently used virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines against HPV to women of developing countries, where most cases of cervical cancer occur, the development of a cost-effective second-generation vaccine is a necessity. Capsomeres have recently been demonstrated to be highly immunogenic and to have a number of advantages as a potential cost-effective alternative to VLP-based HPV vaccines. We have expressed a mutated HPV-16 L1 (L1_2xCysM) gene that retained the ability to assemble L1 protein to capsomeres in tobacco chloroplasts. The recombinant protein yielded up to 1.5% of total soluble protein. The assembly of capsomeres was examined and verified by cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation and sucrose sedimentation analysis. An antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed the formation of capsomeres by using a conformation-specific monoclonal antibody which recognized the conformational epitopes. Transplastomic tobacco plants exhibited normal growth and morphology, but all such lines showed male sterility in the T₀, T₁ and T₂ generations. Taken together, these results indicate the possibility of producing a low-cost capsomere-based vaccine by plastids.

  20. Alteration of the Alkaloid Profile in Genetically Modified Tobacco Reveals a Role of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase in Nicotine N-Demethylation1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Fan, Longjiang; Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Sun, Kehan; Qiu, Jie; Tang, She; Holliday, Bronwyn M.; Xiao, Bingguang; Burkey, Kent O.; Bush, Lowell P.; Conkling, Mark A.; Roje, Sanja; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of the tetrahydrofolate (THF)-mediated one-carbon (C1) metabolic network. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylene-THF to 5-methyl-THF. The latter donates its methyl group to homocysteine, forming methionine, which is then used for the synthesis of S-adenosyl-methionine, a universal methyl donor for numerous methylation reactions, to produce primary and secondary metabolites. Here, we demonstrate that manipulating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) MTHFR gene (NtMTHFR1) expression dramatically alters the alkaloid profile in transgenic tobacco plants by negatively regulating the expression of a secondary metabolic pathway nicotine N-demethylase gene, CYP82E4. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and alkaloid analyses revealed that reducing NtMTHFR expression by RNA interference dramatically induced CYP82E4 expression, resulting in higher nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. Conversely, overexpressing NtMTHFR1 suppressed CYP82E4 expression, leading to lower nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. However, the reduced expression of NtMTHFR did not affect the methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine levels in the knockdown lines. Our finding reveals a new regulatory role of NtMTHFR1 in nicotine N-demethylation and suggests that the negative regulation of CYP82E4 expression may serve to recruit methyl groups from nicotine into the C1 pool under C1-deficient conditions. PMID:23221678

  1. The Xerophyta viscosa aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) confers enhanced drought and salinity tolerance to transgenic tobacco plants by scavenging methylglyoxal and reducing the membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Preeti; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Upadhyaya, Chandrama Prakash; Roy, Suchandra Deb; Hohn, Thomas; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2013-06-01

    We report the efficacy of an aldose reductase (ALDRXV4) enzyme from Xerophyta viscosa Baker in enhancing the prospects of plant's survival under abiotic stress. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing ALDRXV4 cDNA showed alleviation of NaCl and mannitol-induced abiotic stress. The transgenic plants survived longer periods of water deficiency and salinity stress and exhibited improved recovery after rehydration as compared to the wild type plants. The increased synthesis of aldose reductase in transgenic plants correlated with reduced methylglyoxal and malondialdehyde accumulation and an elevated level of sorbitol under stress conditions. In addition, the transgenic lines showed better photosynthetic efficiency, less electrolyte damage, greater water retention, higher proline accumulation, and favorable ionic balance under stress conditions. Together, these findings suggest the potential of engineering aldose reductase levels for better performance of crop plants growing under drought and salt stress conditions.

  2. Increase in the activity of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in cytosol affects sugar partitioning and increases the lateral shoots in tobacco plants at elevated CO2 levels.

    PubMed

    Tamoi, Masahiro; Hiramatsu, Yoshie; Nedachi, Shigeki; Otori, Kumi; Tanabe, Noriaki; Maruta, Takanori; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2011-05-01

    We generated transgenic tobacco plants with high levels of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase expressing cyanobacterialfructose-1,6-/sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase in the cytosol. At ambient CO(2) levels (360 ppm), growth, photosynthetic activity, and fresh weight were unchanged but the sucrose/hexose/starch ratio was slightly altered in the transgenic plants compared with wild-type plants. At elevated CO(2) levels (1200 ppm), lateral shoot, leaf number, and fresh weight were significantly increased in the transgenic plants. Photosynthetic activity was also increased. Hexose accumulated in the upper leaves in the wild-type plants, while sucrose and starch accumulated in the lower leaves and lateral shoots in the transgenic plants. These findings suggest that cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase contributes to the efficient conversion of hexose into sucrose, and that the change in carbon partitioning affects photosynthetic capacity and morphogenesis at elevated CO(2) levels.

  3. [Genetically modified plants and the problems of plant protection: progress and estimation of potential risks].

    PubMed

    Kozub, N O; Pylypenko, L A; Sozinov, I O; Blium, Ia B; Sozinov, O O

    2012-01-01

    The review deals with advances and prospects in development of transgenic plants. At present virtually all commercial GM crops are those created for solving plant protection problems--they carry transgenes conferring resistance to herbicides, pests, viruses. Approaches employed for development of commercial GM crops with herbicide, pest and virus resistance, as well as strategies and prospects of development of commercial GM plants with resistance to fungal and bacterial diseases and nematodes, are considered. Ecological (including agronomical) and social risks associated with commercial growing of transgenic plants are briefly discussed.

  4. The mungbean yellow mosaic begomovirus transcriptional activator protein transactivates the viral promoter-driven transgene and causes toxicity in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Sunitha, Sukumaran; Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Pooggin, Mikhail M; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2007-12-01

    The Begomovirus transcriptional activator protein (TrAP/AC2/C2) is a multifunctional protein which activates the viral late gene promoters, suppresses gene silencing, and determines pathogenicity. To study TrAP-mediated transactivation of a stably integrated gene, we generated transgenic tobacco plants with a Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) AV1 late gene promoter-driven reporter gene and supertransformed them with the MYMV TrAP gene driven by a strong 35S promoter. We obtained a single supertransformed plant with an intact 35S-TrAP gene that activated the reporter gene 2.5-fold. However, 10 of the 11 supertransformed plants did not have the TrAP region of the T-DNA, suggesting the likely toxicity of TrAP in plants. Upon transformation of wild-type tobacco plants with the TrAP gene, six of the seven transgenic plants obtained had truncated T-DNAs which lacked TrAP. One plant, which had the intact TrAP gene, did not express TrAP. The apparent toxic effect of the TrAP transgene was abolished by mutations in its nuclear-localization signal or zinc-finger domain and by deletion of its activation domain. Therefore, all three domains of TrAP, which are required for transactivation and suppression of gene silencing, also are needed for its toxic effect.

  5. The function of ascorbate oxidase in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Pignocchi, Cristina; Fletcher, John M; Wilkinson, Joy E; Barnes, Jeremy D; Foyer, Christine H

    2003-07-01

    The function of the apoplastic enzyme ascorbate oxidase (AO) was investigated in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The abundance of AO mRNA was up-regulated by light. Cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (APX1) transcripts were also highest in the light. In contrast, L-galactono-gamma-lactone dehydrogenase, stromal APX, and thylakoid APX transcripts remained constant over the day/night cycle. Salicylic acid inhibited growth, increased expression of the pathogenesis-related protein (PR) 1a, and decreased AO transcript abundance. In contrast, the application of auxin enhanced growth and increased AO and PR 1a gene expression. Therefore, AO transcript abundance varied in a manner similar to hormone-mediated changes in plant growth. To study the effects of modified AO expression on growth, transformed tobacco plants expressing AO in the sense and antisense orientations were generated. The resultant large changes in apoplastic AO activity in the transformed tobacco plants had little effect on whole leaf ascorbate (AA) content, but they had dramatic effects on apoplastic AA levels. Enhanced AO activity oxidized the apoplastic AA pool, whereas decreased AO activity increased the amount of AA compared with dehydroascorbate. A relationship was observed between AO activity and plant height and biomass. Native AO transcript levels were no longer subject to light/dark regulation in AO sense and antisense plants. Taken together, these data show that there is an interaction between hormone, redox, and light signals at the level of the apoplast via modulation of ion of AA content.

  6. Using vegetative index and modified derivative for early detection of soybean plant injury from glyphosate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is a non-selective, systemic herbicide highly toxic to sensitive plant species, and its use has seen a significant increase due to the increased adoption of genetically modified glyphosate-resistant crops since the mid-1990s. Glyphosate application for weed control in glyphosate-resistant...

  7. Biochemistry of plant class IV chitinases and fungal chitinase-modifying proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant class IV chitinases have 2 domains, a small (3 kDa) amino-terminal domain with homology to carbohydrate binding peptides, and a larger (25 kDa) catalytic domain. The biological function of these chitinases is not known. But it is known that some pathogenic fungi secrete chitinase modifying pro...

  8. Uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L.): dependence on stomatal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, A.; Kley, D.; Wildt, J.; Segschneider, H. J.; Förstel, H.

    The uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers ( Helianthus annuus L. var. giganteus) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Bel W3), using concentrations representative for moderately polluted air, has been determined by gas exchange experiments. Conductivities for these trace gases were measured at different light fluxes ranging from 820 μEm -2s -1 to darkness. The conductivities to water vapor and the trace gases are highly correlated. It is concluded that the uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers and tobacco plants is linearly dependent on stomatal opening. While the uptake of NO is limited by the mesophyll resistance, the uptake of NO 2 is only by diffusion through the stomata. Loss processes by deposition to the leaf surfaces are more pronounced for O 3 than for NO and NO 2.

  9. Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Plant Growth-Promoting Fungus Phoma sp. GS8-3 for Growth Promotion Effects on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Naznin, Hushna Ara; Kimura, Minako; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2013-01-01

    We extracted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by a plant growth-promoting fungus (PGPF) Phoma sp. GS8-3 by gas chromatography and identified them by mass spectrometry. All of the identified compounds belonged to C4-C8 hydrocarbons. Volatiles varied in number and quantity by the culture period of the fungus (in days). 2-Methyl-propanol and 3-methyl-butanol formed the main components of the volatile blends for all the culture periods of fungus. Growth-promoting effects of the identified synthetic compounds were analyzed individually and in blends using tobacco plants. We found that the mixture of volatiles extracted from 3-day-old culture showed significant growth promotion in tobacco in vitro. The volatile blend showed better growth promotion at lower than higher concentrations. Our results confirm the potential role of volatile organic compounds in the mechanism of growth enhancement by GS8-3. PMID:23080408

  10. [Genetically modified plants and food safety. State of the art and discussion in the European Union].

    PubMed

    Schauzu, M

    2004-09-01

    Placing genetically modified (GM) plants and derived products on the European Union's (EU) market has been regulated by a Community Directive since 1990. This directive was complemented by a regulation specific for genetically modified and other novel foods in 1997. Specific labelling requirements have been applicable for GM foods since 1998. The law requires a pre-market safety assessment for which criteria have been elaborated and continuously adapted in accordance with the state of the art by national and international bodies and organisations. Consequently, only genetically modified products that have been demonstrated to be as safe as their conventional counterparts can be commercialized. However, the poor acceptance of genetically modified foods has led to a de facto moratorium since 1998. It is based on the lack of a qualified majority of EU member states necessary for authorization to place genetically modified plants and derived foods on the market. New Community Regulations are intended to end this moratorium by providing a harmonized and transparent safety assessment, a centralised authorization procedure, extended labelling provisions and a traceability system for genetically modified organisms (GMO) and derived food and feed.

  11. Promoting flowering, lateral shoot outgrowth, leaf development, and flower abscission in tobacco plants overexpressing cotton FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like gene GhFT1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yannan; Zhang, Kun; Guo, Danli; Cui, Baiming; Wang, Xiyin; Huang, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) encodes a mobile signal protein, recognized as major component of florigen, which has a central position in regulating flowering, and also plays important roles in various physiological aspects. A mode is recently emerging for the balance of indeterminate and determinate growth, which is controlled by the ratio of FT-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like gene activities, and has a strong influence on the floral transition and plant architecture. Orthologs of GhFT1 was previously isolated and characterized from Gossypium hirsutum. We demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of GhFT1 in tobacco, other than promoting flowering, promoted lateral shoot outgrowth at the base, induced more axillary bud at the axillae of rosette leaves, altered leaf morphology, increased chlorophyll content, had higher rate of photosynthesis and caused flowers abscission. Analysis of gene expression suggested that flower identity genes were significantly upregulated in transgenic plants. Further analysis of tobacco FT paralogs indicated that NtFT4, acting as flower inducer, was upregulated, whereas NtFT2 and NtFT3 as flower inhibitors were upregulated in transgenic plants under long-day conditions, but downregulated under short-day conditions. Our data suggests that sufficient level of transgenic cotton FT might disturb the balance of the endogenous tobacco FT paralogs of inducers and repressors and resulted in altered phenotype in transgenic tobacco, emphasizing the expanding roles of FT in regulating shoot architecture by advancing determine growth. Manipulating the ratio for indeterminate and determinate growth factors throughout FT-like and TFL1-like gene activity holds promise to improve plant architecture and enhance crop yield. PMID:26136765

  12. Promoting flowering, lateral shoot outgrowth, leaf development, and flower abscission in tobacco plants overexpressing cotton FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like gene GhFT1.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yannan; Zhang, Kun; Guo, Danli; Cui, Baiming; Wang, Xiyin; Huang, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) encodes a mobile signal protein, recognized as major component of florigen, which has a central position in regulating flowering, and also plays important roles in various physiological aspects. A mode is recently emerging for the balance of indeterminate and determinate growth, which is controlled by the ratio of FT-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like gene activities, and has a strong influence on the floral transition and plant architecture. Orthologs of GhFT1 was previously isolated and characterized from Gossypium hirsutum. We demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of GhFT1 in tobacco, other than promoting flowering, promoted lateral shoot outgrowth at the base, induced more axillary bud at the axillae of rosette leaves, altered leaf morphology, increased chlorophyll content, had higher rate of photosynthesis and caused flowers abscission. Analysis of gene expression suggested that flower identity genes were significantly upregulated in transgenic plants. Further analysis of tobacco FT paralogs indicated that NtFT4, acting as flower inducer, was upregulated, whereas NtFT2 and NtFT3 as flower inhibitors were upregulated in transgenic plants under long-day conditions, but downregulated under short-day conditions. Our data suggests that sufficient level of transgenic cotton FT might disturb the balance of the endogenous tobacco FT paralogs of inducers and repressors and resulted in altered phenotype in transgenic tobacco, emphasizing the expanding roles of FT in regulating shoot architecture by advancing determine growth. Manipulating the ratio for indeterminate and determinate growth factors throughout FT-like and TFL1-like gene activity holds promise to improve plant architecture and enhance crop yield.

  13. Transgenic Tobacco Lines Expressing Sense or Antisense FERROCHELATASE 1 RNA Show Modified Ferrochelatase Activity in Roots and Provide Experimental Evidence for Dual Localization of Ferrochelatase 1.

    PubMed

    Hey, Daniel; Ortega-Rodes, Patricia; Fan, Tingting; Schnurrer, Florian; Brings, Lea; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-12-01

    In plants, two genes encode ferrochelatase (FC), which catalyzes iron chelation into protoporphyrin IX at the final step of heme biosynthesis. FERROCHELATASE1 (FC1) is continuously, but weakly expressed in roots and leaves, while FC2 is dominantly active in leaves. As a continuation of previous studies on the physiological consequences of FC2 inactivation in tobacco, we aimed to assign FC1 function in plant organs. While reduced FC2 expression leads to protoporphyrin IX accumulation in leaves, FC1 down-regulation and overproduction caused reduced and elevated FC activity in root tissue, respectively, but were not associated with changes in macroscopic phenotype, plant development or leaf pigmentation. In contrast to the lower heme content resulting from a deficiency of the dominant FC2 expression in leaves, a reduction of FC1 in roots and leaves does not significantly disturb heme accumulation. The FC1 overexpression was used for an additional approach to re-examine FC activity in mitochondria. Transgenic FC1 protein was immunologically shown to be present in mitochondria. Although matching only a small portion of total cellular FC activity, the mitochondrial FC activity in a FC1 overexpressor line increased 5-fold in comparison with wild-type mitochondria. Thus, it is suggested that FC1 contributes to mitochondrial heme synthesis.

  14. ASR1 Mediates Glucose-Hormone Cross Talk by Affecting Sugar Trafficking in Tobacco Plants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Frankel, Nicolas; Mazuch, Jeannine; Balbo, Ilse; Iusem, Norberto; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Carrari, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Asr (for ABA, stress, ripening) genes are exclusively found in the genomes of higher plants, and the encoded proteins have been found localized both to the nucleus and cytoplasm. However, before the mechanisms underlying the activity of ASR proteins can be determined, the role of these proteins in planta should be deciphered. Results from this study suggest that ASR is positioned within the signaling cascade of interactions among glucose, abscisic acid, and gibberellins. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) transgenic lines with reduced levels of ASR protein showed impaired glucose metabolism and altered abscisic acid and gibberellin levels. These changes were associated with dwarfism, reduced carbon dioxide assimilation, and accelerated leaf senescence as a consequence of a fine regulation exerted by ASR to the glucose metabolism. This regulation resulted in an impact on glucose signaling mediated by Hexokinase1 and Snf1-related kinase, which would subsequently have been responsible for photosynthesis, leaf senescence, and hormone level alterations. It thus can be postulated that ASR is not only involved in the control of hexose uptake in heterotrophic organs, as we have previously reported, but also in the control of carbon fixation by the leaves mediated by a similar mechanism. PMID:23302128

  15. Tobacco VDL Gene Encodes a Plastid DEAD Box RNA Helicase and Is Involved in Chloroplast Differentiation and Plant Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingchun; Duby, Geoffrey; Purnelle, Bénédicte; Boutry, Marc

    2000-01-01

    The recessive nuclear vdl (for variegated and distorted leaf) mutant of tobacco was obtained by T-DNA insertion and characterized by variegated leaves and abnormal roots and flowers. Affected leaf tissues were white and distorted, lacked palisadic cells, and contained undifferentiated plastids. The variegation was due to phenotypic, rather than genetic, instability. Genomic and cDNA clones were obtained for both the mutant and wild-type VDL alleles. Three transcripts, resulting from alternate intron splicing or polyadenylation, were found for the wild type. The transcripts potentially encode a set of proteins (53, 19, and 15 kD) sharing the same N-terminal region that contains a chloroplast transit peptide capable of importing the green fluorescent protein into chloroplasts. The predicted 53-kD product belongs to the DEAD box RNA helicase family. In the homozygous vdl mutant, T-DNA insertion resulted in accumulation of the shortest transcript and the absence of the RNA helicase–encoding transcript. Genetic transformation of the homozygous mutant by the 53-kD product–encoding cDNA fully restored the wild-type phenotype. These data suggest that a plastid RNA helicase controls early plastid differentiation and plant morphogenesis. PMID:11090214

  16. Evaluation of the photosynthetic activity in transgenic tobacco plants with altered endogenous cytokinin content: lessons from cytokinin.

    PubMed

    Cortleven, Anne; Valcke, Roland

    2012-04-01

    Cytokinin is known to be involved in many processes related to plastid development and function but the exact role of cytokinin in photosynthesis remains elusive. To investigate more profoundly the effects of cytokinin in this process, the photosynthetic activity of transgenic Pssuipt and 35S:CKX1 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with respectively elevated and reduced endogenous cytokinin content was evaluated. Pigment analysis indicated that elevated endogenous cytokinin content resulted in increased pigment content. Functional analysis of the photosynthetic apparatus by chlorophyll a fluorescence and in vitro electron transport measurements clearly showed that changing the endogenous cytokinin content affects the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus. Surprisingly, both an increase as well as a decrease in cytokinin content results in a better photosynthetic performance. Quenching analysis revealed that the initial responses of the photosynthetic apparatus on a dark-light transition are not affected by changed cytokinin content. However, it has an effect on the further kinetic behavior. Taken together, we suggest that cytokinins can induce structural changes in the different parts of the electron transport chain as also demonstrated by the in vitro electron transport measurements. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  17. Developmental and environmental regulation of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase-beta-glucuronidase gene fusion in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, X W; Dron, M; Schmid, J; Dixon, R A; Lamb, C J

    1989-01-01

    A 1.1-kilobase promoter fragment of the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) gene PAL2 was translationally fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and transferred to tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated leaf disk transformation. The distribution of beta-glucuronidase activity in these transgenic plants is very similar to that of endogenous PAL2 transcripts in bean, with very high levels in petals; marked accumulation in anthers, stigmas, roots, and shoots; and low levels in sepals, ovaries, and leaves. Histochemical analysis of the spatial pattern of beta-glucuronidase activity showed that the PAL2 promoter is highly active in the shoot apical meristem, the zone of cell proliferation immediately adjacent to the root apical meristem, and in the early stages of vascular development at the inception of xylem differentiation. Wounding and light evoke specific changes in the spatial pattern of beta-glucuronidase activity in stems, including induction in the epidermis. These data indicate that the PAL2 promoter transduces a complex set of developmental and environmental cues into an integrated spatial and temporal program of gene expression to regulate the synthesis of a diverse array of phenylpropanoid natural products. Images PMID:2594769

  18. Involvement of protein kinases and calcium in the NO-signalling cascade for defence-gene induction in ozonated tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, S; Reale, L; Calderini, O; Pagiotti, R; Ederli, L

    2012-07-01

    This study analyses the signalling pathways triggered by nitric oxide (NO) in response to ozone (O(3)) fumigation of tobacco plants, with particular attention to protein kinase cascades and free cytosolic Ca(2+) in defence-gene activation. NO was visualized with the NO probe DAF-FM. Using a pharmacological approach, the effects of different inhibitors on the expression profiles of NO-dependent defence genes were monitored using RT-PCR. The assay of the kinase activity of the immunoprecipitates complexes shows that O(3) stimulates a 48 kDa salicylic acid (SA)-induced protein kinase (SIPK) in an NO-dependent manner. The O(3)-induced alternative oxidase 1a (AOX1a) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase a (PALa) genes are modulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, and SIPK might have a role in this up-regulation. By contrast, protein dephosphorylation mediates pathogenesis-related protein 1a (PR1a) expression in O(3)-treated tobacco plants. Ca(2+) is essential, but not sufficient, to promote NO accumulation in ozonated tobacco plants. Intracellular Ca(2+) transients are also essential for PALa up-regulation and cGMP-induced PR1a expression. Partial dependence on intracellular Ca(2+) suggests two different pathways of SA accumulation and PR1a induction. A model summarizing the signalling networks involving NO, SA, and the cellular messengers in this O(3)-induced defence gene activation is proposed.

  19. Satellite tobacco mosaic virus sequence variants with only five Nucleotide differences can interfere with each other in a cross protection-like phenomenon in plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Dodds, J. Allan

    1994-01-01

    The type strain of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) contains two major variants, designated type 5 (T5) and type 6 (T6), which can be easily distinguished by RNase protection analyses. Clones containing cDNA of representative T5 and T6 STMV genomes have only five single-base differences in the entire 1059-nucleotide genome, and RNA transcribed from each clone is highly infectious when inoculated onto tobacco plants. The different RNase protection assay patterns can be used as genetic markers to identify individual STMV variants and to follow the interactions of variants and their progeny during coinfections in plants. The study described here investigated the effects of coinoculation and various delayed inoculations of T5 and T6 variants on the composition of the progeny STMV populations in systemically infected tobacco tissues. When T5 and T6 STMV RNAs were coinoculated or inoculated with 1-hr delays, the progeny from individual plants most often contained a mixture of T5 and T6 genomes. However, when there was a 24-hr delay between inoculations, the balance of T5 and T6 components in the progeny populations shifted toward predominance of the first variant inoculated. With delays of 3 or 7 days only the first variant was evident in the progeny populations, indicating that established replication of one STMV variant interferes with replication of another in a manner similar to the cross protection phenomenon.

  20. Resistance of transgenic tobacco plants incorporating the putative 57-kDa polymerase read-through gene of Tobacco rattle virus against rub-inoculated and nematode-transmitted virus.

    PubMed

    Vassilakos, Nikon; Bem, Frederic; Tzima, Aliki; Barker, Hugh; Reavy, Brian; Karanastasi, Eirini; Robinson, David J

    2008-10-01

    Nicotiana tabacum plants were transformed with the 57-kDa read-through domain of the replicase gene of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) isolate SYM. From a total of six lines containing the viral transgene, four displayed various levels of resistance to TRV infection. Transgenic plants from line 81G were highly resistant to foliar rub-inoculation with the homologous isolate, or with isolates TRV-PpK20 and TRV-PLB, which are almost identical to TRV-SYM in RNA1 sequence. Moreover, 81G plants were moderately resistant to the serologically and genetically distinct, highly pathogenic isolate TRV-GR. Resistance characteristics of line 81G remained stable over six generations. No unambiguous correlation was established between number of transgene insertion loci and level of resistance. Transgene-specific mRNA was clearly detected in plants from susceptible lines but only at an early developmental stage in resistant plants, indicating the operation of a RNA silencing resistance mechanism. Following challenge using viruliferous vector nematodes carrying TRV-PpK20 or by rub inoculation of roots, 81G plants did not show any symptoms and virus was not detected in leaves. However, virus was detected in roots but without apparent effects on plant growth and often at low concentration. When challenged with nematodes carrying TRV-GR, symptoms in aerial parts of 81G plants were less severe and much delayed compared to non-transgenic plants, although younger plants showed less resistance than older ones. No difference was detected in transgene transcript accumulation between leaves and roots of 81G plants. This is the first work reporting a broad level of pathogen derived resistance against two geographically and genetically distinct TRV isolates transmitted directly by their nematode vectors and provides further insight into the expression of transgenic resistance against naturally transmitted soil-borne viruses.

  1. Simultaneous inbreeding modifies inbreeding depression in a plant-herbivore interaction.

    PubMed

    Kalske, Aino; Mutikainen, Pia; Muola, Anne; Scheepens, J F; Laukkanen, Liisa; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Leimu, Roosa

    2014-02-01

    Because inbreeding is common in natural populations of plants and their herbivores, herbivore-induced selection on plants, and vice versa, may be significantly modified by inbreeding and inbreeding depression. In a feeding assay with inbred and outbred lines of both the perennial herb, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria, and its specialist herbivore, Abrostola asclepiadis, we discovered that plant inbreeding increased inbreeding depression in herbivore performance in some populations. The effect of inbreeding on plant resistance varied among plant and herbivore populations. The among-population variation is likely to be driven by variation in plant secondary compounds across populations. In addition, inbreeding depression in plant resistance was substantial when herbivores were outbred, but diminished when herbivores were inbred. These findings demonstrate that in plant-herbivore interactions expression of inbreeding depression can depend on the level of inbreeding of the interacting species. Furthermore, our results suggest that when herbivores are inbred, herbivore-induced selection against self-fertilisation in plants may diminish. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  2. Impact of Raw and Bioaugmented Olive-Mill Wastewater and Olive-Mill Solid Waste on the Content of Photosynthetic Molecules in Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Parrotta, Luigi; Campani, Tommaso; Casini, Silvia; Romi, Marco; Cai, Giampiero

    2016-08-03

    Disposal and reuse of olive-mill wastes are both an economic and environmental problem, especially in countries where the cultivation of olive trees is extensive. Microorganism-based bioaugmentation can be used to reduce the pollutant capacity of wastes. In this work, bioaugmentation was used to reduce the polyphenolic content of both liquid and solid wastes. After processing, bioaugmented wastes were tested on the root development of maize seeds and on photosynthesis-related molecules of tobacco plants. In maize, we found that bioaugmentation made olive-mill wastes harmless for seed germination. In tobacco, we analyzed the content of RuBisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase) and of the photosynthetic pigments lutein, chlorophylls, and β-carotene. Levels of RuBisCO were negatively affected by untreated wastewater but increased if plants were treated with bioaugmented wastewater. On the contrary, levels of RuBisCO increased in the case of plants treated with raw olive-mill solid waste. Pigment levels showed dissimilar behavior because their concentration increased if plants were irrigated with raw wastewater or treated with raw olive-mill solid waste. Treatment with bioaugmented wastes restored pigment content. Findings show that untreated wastes are potentially toxic at the commencement of treatment, but plants can eventually adapt after an initial stress period. Bioaugmented wastes do not induce immediate damages, and plants rapidly recover optimal levels of photosynthetic molecules.

  3. Regulatory dephosphorylation of CDK at G₂/M in plants: yeast mitotic phosphatase cdc25 induces cytokinin-like effects in transgenic tobacco morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lipavská, Helena; Masková, Petra; Vojvodová, Petra

    2011-05-01

    During the last three decades, the cell cycle and its control by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been extensively studied in eukaryotes. This endeavour has produced an overall picture that basic mechanisms seem to be largely conserved among all eukaryotes. The intricate regulation of CDK activities includes, among others, CDK activation by CDC25 phosphatase at G₂/M. In plants, however, studies of this regulation have lagged behind as a plant Cdc25 homologue or other unrelated phosphatase active at G₂/M have not yet been identified. Failure to identify a plant mitotic CDK activatory phosphatase led to characterization of the effects of alien cdc25 gene expression in plants. Tobacco, expressing the Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitotic activator gene, Spcdc25, exhibited morphological, developmental and biochemical changes when compared with wild type (WT) and, importantly, increased CDK dephosphorylation at G₂/M. Besides changes in leaf shape, internode length and root development, in day-neutral tobacco there was dramatically earlier onset of flowering with a disturbed acropetal floral capacity gradient typical of WT. In vitro, de novo organ formation revealed substantially earlier and more abundant formation of shoot primordia on Spcdc25 tobacco stem segments grown on shoot-inducing media when compared with WT. Moreover, in contrast to WT, stem segments from transgenic plants formed shoots even without application of exogenous growth regulator. Spcdc25-expressing BY-2 cells exhibited a reduced mitotic cell size due to a shortening of the G₂ phase together with high activity of cyclin-dependent kinase, NtCDKB1, in early S-phase, S/G₂ and early M-phase. Spcdc25-expressing tobacco ('Samsun') cell suspension cultures showed a clustered, more circular, cell phenotype compared with chains of elongated WT cells, and increased content of starch and soluble sugars. Taken together, Spcdc25 expression had cytokinin-like effects on the characteristics studied

  4. Regulatory dephosphorylation of CDK at G2/M in plants: yeast mitotic phosphatase cdc25 induces cytokinin-like effects in transgenic tobacco morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lipavská, Helena; Mašková, Petra; Vojvodová, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Background During the last three decades, the cell cycle and its control by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been extensively studied in eukaryotes. This endeavour has produced an overall picture that basic mechanisms seem to be largely conserved among all eukaryotes. The intricate regulation of CDK activities includes, among others, CDK activation by CDC25 phosphatase at G2/M. In plants, however, studies of this regulation have lagged behind as a plant Cdc25 homologue or other unrelated phosphatase active at G2/M have not yet been identified. Scope Failure to identify a plant mitotic CDK activatory phosphatase led to characterization of the effects of alien cdc25 gene expression in plants. Tobacco, expressing the Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitotic activator gene, Spcdc25, exhibited morphological, developmental and biochemical changes when compared with wild type (WT) and, importantly, increased CDK dephosphorylation at G2/M. Besides changes in leaf shape, internode length and root development, in day-neutral tobacco there was dramatically earlier onset of flowering with a disturbed acropetal floral capacity gradient typical of WT. In vitro, de novo organ formation revealed substantially earlier and more abundant formation of shoot primordia on Spcdc25 tobacco stem segments grown on shoot-inducing media when compared with WT. Moreover, in contrast to WT, stem segments from transgenic plants formed shoots even without application of exogenous growth regulator. Spcdc25-expressing BY-2 cells exhibited a reduced mitotic cell size due to a shortening of the G2 phase together with high activity of cyclin-dependent kinase, NtCDKB1, in early S-phase, S/G2 and early M-phase. Spcdc25-expressing tobacco (‘Samsun’) cell suspension cultures showed a clustered, more circular, cell phenotype compared with chains of elongated WT cells, and increased content of starch and soluble sugars. Taken together, Spcdc25 expression had cytokinin-like effects on the characteristics

  5. Infection Cycle of Artichoke Italian Latent Virus in Tobacco Plants: Meristem Invasion and Recovery from Disease Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Santovito, Elisa; Mascia, Tiziana; Siddiqui, Shahid A.; Minutillo, Serena Anna; Valkonen, Jari P. T.; Gallitelli, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Nepoviral infections induce recovery in fully expanded leaves but persist in shoot apical meristem (SAM) by a largely unknown mechanism. The dynamics of infection of a grapevine isolate of Artichoke Italian latent virus (AILV-V, genus Nepovirus) in tobacco plants, including colonization of SAM, symptom induction and subsequent recovery of mature leaves from symptoms, were characterized. AILV-V moved from the inoculated leaves systemically and invaded SAM in 7 days post-inoculation (dpi), remaining detectable in SAM at least up to 40 dpi. The new top leaves recovered from viral symptoms earliest at 21 dpi. Accumulation of viral RNA to a threshold level was required to trigger the overexpression of RDR6 and DCL4. Consequently, accumulation of viral RNA decreased in the systemically infected leaves, reaching the lowest concentration in the 3rd and 4th leaves at 23 dpi, which was concomitant with recovery of the younger, upper leaves from disease symptoms. No evidence of virus replication was found in the recovered leaves, but they contained infectious virus particles and were protected against re-inoculation with AILV-V. In this study we also showed that AILV-V did not suppress initiation or maintenance of RNA silencing in transgenic plants, but was able to interfere with the cell-to-cell movement of the RNA silencing signal. Our results suggest that AILV-V entrance in SAM and activation of RNA silencing may be distinct processes since the latter is triggered in fully expanded leaves by the accumulation of viral RNA above a threshold level rather than by virus entrance in SAM. PMID:24911029

  6. Using transgenic plants and modified plant viruses for the development of treatments for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Loh, Hwei-San; Green, Brian J; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2017-08-08

    Production of proteins in plants for human health applications has become an attractive strategy attributed by their potentials for low-cost production, increased safety due to the lack of human or animal pathogens, scalability and ability to produce complex proteins. A major milestone for plant-based protein production for use in human health was achieved when Protalix BioTherapeutics produced taliglucerase alfa (Elelyso(®)) in suspension cultures of a transgenic carrot cell line for the treatment of patients with Gaucher's disease, was approved by the USA Food and Drug Administration in 2012. In this review, we are highlighting various approaches for plant-based production of proteins and recent progress in the development of plant-made therapeutics and biologics for the prevention and treatment of human diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Silencing gene expression of the ethylene-forming enzyme results in a reversible inhibition of ovule development in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    De Martinis D; Mariani, C

    1999-01-01

    To study the role of ethylene in plant reproduction, we constructed transgenic tobacco plants in which the expression of a pistil-specific gene coding for the ethylene-forming enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase was inhibited. Flowers from transgenic plants showed female sterility due to an arrest in ovule development. Megasporogenesis did not occur, and ovules did not reach maturity. When pollinated, pollen tubes were able to reach the ovary but did not penetrate into the immature ovule in transgenic plants. Flower treatment with an ethylene source resulted in a functional recovery of ovule development and restored guidance of the pollen tube tip into the ovule micropyle that resulted in seed set. The recovery was abolished if inhibitors of ethylene action were present. These results demonstrate that the plant hormone ethylene is required during the very early stages of female sporogenesis and ultimately to enable fertilization. PMID:10368177

  8. Impairment of NtAQP1 gene expression in tobacco plants does not affect root colonisation pattern by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but decreases their symbiotic efficiency under drought.

    PubMed

    Porcel, Rosa; Gómez, Manuel; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2005-09-01

    We investigated in two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plant lines (wildtype or antisense mutant) whether impairment in expression of the plasma membrane aquaporin gene (NtAQP1) affects the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonisation pattern or the symbiotic efficiency of AM fungi. These two objectives were investigated under well-watered and drought stress conditions. Both plant lines had a similar pattern of root colonisation under well-watered and drought stress conditions. In contrast, under drought stress, AM wildtype plants grew faster than mycorrhizal antisense plants. Plant gas exchange also appeared to depend on the expression of NtAQP1 and parallelled the determined growth increments. The implications of enhanced symplastic water transport via NtAQP1 for the efficiency of the AM symbiosis under drought stress conditions are further discussed.

  9. Specific requirement for translation initiation factor 4E or its isoform drives plant host susceptibility to Tobacco etch virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In plants, eIF4E translation initiation factors and their eIFiso4E isoforms are essential susceptibility factors for many RNA viruses, including potyviruses. Mutations altering these factors are a major source of resistance to the viruses. The eIF4E allelic series is associated with specific resistance spectra in crops such as Capsicum annum. Genetic evidence shows that potyviruses have a specific requirement for a given 4E isoform that depends on the host plant. For example, Tobacco etch virus (TEV) uses eIF4E1 to infect Capsicum annuum but uses eIFiso4E to infect Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we investigated how TEV exploits different translation initiation factor isoforms to infect these two plant species. Results A complementation system was set up in Arabidopsis to test the restoration of systemic infection by TEV. Using this system, Arabidopsis susceptibility to TEV was complemented with a susceptible pepper eIF4E1 allele but not with a resistant allele. Therefore, in Arabidopsis, TEV can use the pepper eIF4E1 instead of the endogenous eIFiso4E isoform so is able to switch between translation initiation factor 4E isoform to infect the same host. Moreover, we show that overexpressing the pepper eIF4E1 alleles is sufficient to make Arabidopsis susceptible to an otherwise incompatible TEV strain. Lastly, we show that the resistant eIF4E1 allele is similarly overcome by a resistance-breaking TEV strain as in pepper, confirming that this Arabidopsis TEV-susceptibility complementation system is allele-specific. Conclusion We report here a complementation system in Arabidopsis that makes it possible to assess the role of pepper pvr2-eIF4E alleles in susceptibility to TEV. Heterologous complementation experiments showed that the idiosyncratic properties of the 4E and iso4E proteins create a major checkpoint for viral infection of different hosts. This system could be used to screen natural or induced eIF4E alleles to find and study alleles of interest for

  10. Enhanced glutathione metabolism is correlated with sulfur-induced resistance in Tobacco mosaic virus-infected genetically susceptible Nicotiana tabacum plants.

    PubMed

    Höller, Kerstin; Király, Lóránt; Künstler, András; Müller, Maria; Gullner, Gábor; Fattinger, Maria; Zechmann, Bernd

    2010-11-01

    Sulfur-induced resistance, also known as sulfur-enhanced defense (SIR/SED) was investigated in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun nn during compatible interaction with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in correlation with glutathione metabolism. To evaluate the influence of sulfur nutritional status on virus infection, tobacco plants were treated with nutrient solutions containing either sufficient sulfate (+S) or no sulfate (-S). Sufficient sulfate supply resulted in a suppressed and delayed symptom development and diminished virus accumulation over a period of 14 days after inoculation as compared with -S conditions. Expression of the defense marker gene PR-1a was markedly upregulated in sulfate-treated plants during the first day after TMV inoculation. The occurrence of SIR/SED correlated with a higher level of activity of sulfate assimilation, cysteine, and glutathione metabolism in plants treated with sulfate. Additionally, two key genes involved in cysteine and glutathione biosynthesis (encoding adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, respectively) were upregulated within the first day after TMV inoculation under +S conditions. Sulfate withdrawal from the soil was accelerated at the beginning of the infection, whereas it declined in the long term, leading to an accumulation of sulfur in the soil of plants grown with sulfate. This observation could be correlated with a decrease in sulfur contents in TMV-infected leaves in the long term. In summary, this is the first study that demonstrates a link between the activation of cysteine and glutathione metabolism and the induction of SIR/SED during a compatible plant-virus interaction in tobacco plants, indicating a general mechanism behind SIR/SED.

  11. Altered Epiphytic Colonization of Mannityl Opine-Producing Transgenic Tobacco Plants by a Mannityl Opine-Catabolizing Strain of Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M.; Savka, M. A.; Hwang, I.; Farrand, S. K.; Lindow, S. E.

    1995-01-01

    The plasmid pYDH208, which confers the ability to catabolize the mannityl opines mannopine and agropine, was mobilized into the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strain Cit7. The growth of the mannityl opine-catabolizing strain Cit7(pYDH208) was compared with that of the near-isogenic non-opine-catabolizing strain Cit7xylE on leaves of wild-type tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) and transgenic mannityl opine-producing tobacco plants (N. tabacum cv. Xanthi, line 2-26). The population size of Cit7(pYDH208) was significantly greater on the lower leaves of transgenic plants than on middle or upper leaves of those plants. The population size of Cit7(pYDH208) on lower leaves of transgenic plants was also significantly greater than the population size of Cit7xylE on similar leaves of wild-type plants. High-voltage paper electrophoresis demonstrated higher levels of mannityl opines in washings from lower- and mid-level leaves than in washings from upper-level leaves. The ability of Cit7(pYDH208) to catabolize mannityl opines in the carbon-limited phyllosphere increased the carrying capacity of the lower leaves of transgenic plants for Cit7(pYDH208). In coinoculations, the increase in the ratio of population sizes of Cit7(pYDH208) to Cit7xylE on transgenic plants was apparently due to a subtle difference in the growth rates of the two strains and to the difference in final population sizes. An ability to utilize additional carbon sources on the transgenic plants also enabled Cit7(pYDH208) to achieve a higher degree of coexistence with Cit7xylE on transgenic plants than on wild-type plants. This supports the hypothesis that the level of coexistence between epiphytic bacterial populations can be altered through nutritional resource partitioning. PMID:16535040

  12. A prototypic modified risk tobacco product exhibits reduced effects on chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of monocytes compared with a reference cigarette.

    PubMed

    van der Toorn, Marco; Frentzel, Stefan; Goedertier, Didier; Peitsch, Manuel; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2015-06-01

    Monocyte adhesion and migration to the subendothelial space represent critical steps in atherogenesis. Here, we investigated whether extracts from the aerosol of a prototypic modified risk tobacco product (pMRTP), based on heating rather than combusting tobacco, exhibited differential effects on the migratory behavior of monocytes compared with that from the reference cigarette, 3R4F. THP-1 cells, a monocytic cell line, and human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) were used to investigate chemotaxis and transendothelial migration (TEM) of monocytes in conventional and impedance-based systems. THP-1 cells migrated through a monolayer of HCAECs in response to C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12), a chemokine involved in diverse cellular functions including chemotaxis and survival of stem cells. Treatment of THP-1 cells with extracts from 3R4F or pMRTP induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity (7-aminoactinomycin D), and inflammation (IL-8 and TNF-α). CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis and TEM were decreased in extract-treated THP-1 cells. Extracts from 3R4F were ~21 times more potent than those from pMRTP in all examined endpoints. Extracts from 3R4F and pMRTP induced concentration-dependent responses in assays of inflammation, cytotoxicity, chemotaxis, and TEM. Furthermore, our findings indicate that extracts from a pMRTP are significantly less cytotoxic and induce less inflammation than those from the reference cigarette, 3R4F. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV.

  14. Cross-Resistance to Short Residual Sulfonylurea Herbicides in Transgenic Tobacco Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Gabard, Jerome M.; Charest, Pierre J.; Iyer, V. N.; Miki, Brian L.

    1989-01-01

    Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants, produced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation with a mutant gene (csr1-1) coding for acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) from a chlorsulfuron resistant Arabidopsis thaliana line GH50 (GW Haughn et al. [1988] Mol Gen Genet 211: 266-271; GW Haughn, C Somerville [1986] Mol Gen Genet 204: 430-434), were selected directly on 80 micrograms per liter (225 nanomolar) chlorsulfuron. The expression of csr-1 in two separate transgenic lines CHL-1 and CHL-2 was confirmed by biochemical and genetic analyses. The AHAS activity of GH50 and the equivalent component of AHAS activity in CHL-2 was resistant to three short residual sulfonylurea herbicides, DPX-M6316, DPX-A7881, and DPX-L5300, in addition to chlorsulfuron but not to the sulfonylurea CGA 131′036. Cross-resistance to the imidazolinones AC 263, 499, AC 252, 214, and AC 243,997 was not observed. Parallel observations were made on the inhibition of seedling growth in soil or on culture medium. The relevance of these findings for the application of transgenic plants in agriculture is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667071

  15. Expression of Recombinant Cellulase Cel5A from Trichoderma reesei in Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Megan; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose degrading enzymes, cellulases, are targets of both research and industrial interests. The preponderance of these enzymes in difficult-to-culture organisms, such as hyphae-building fungi and anaerobic bacteria, has hastened the use of recombinant technologies in this field. Plant expression methods are a desirable system for large-scale production of enzymes and other industrially useful proteins. Herein, methods for the transient expression of a fungal endoglucanase, Trichoderma reesei Cel5A, in Nicotiana tabacum are demonstrated. Successful protein expression is shown, monitored by fluorescence using an mCherry-enzyme fusion protein. Additionally, a set of basic tests are used to examine the activity of transiently expressed T. reesei Cel5A, including SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, zymography, as well as fluorescence and dye-based substrate degradation assays. The system described here can be used to produce an active cellulase in a short time period, so as to assess the potential for further production in plants through constitutive or inducible expression systems. PMID:24962636

  16. Rhizobacteria modify plant-aphid interactions: a case of induced systemic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Pineda, A; Zheng, S-J; van Loon, J J A; Dicke, M

    2012-03-01

    Beneficial microbes, such as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and mycorrhizal fungi, may have a plant-mediated effect on insects aboveground. The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens can induce systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against several microbial pathogens and chewing insects. However, the plant-mediated effect of these beneficial microbes on phloem-feeding insects is not well understood. Using Arabidopsis as a model, we here report that P. fluorescens has a positive effect on the performance (weight gain and intrinsic rate of increase) of the generalist aphid Myzus persicae, while no effect was recorded on the crucifer specialist aphid Brevicoryne brassicae. Additionally, transcriptional analyses of selected marker genes revealed that in the plant-microbe interaction with M. persicae, rhizobacteria (i) prime the plant for enhanced expression of LOX2, a gene involved in the jasmonic acid (JA)-regulated defence pathway, and (ii) suppress the expression of ABA1, a gene involved in the abscisic acid (ABA) signalling pathway, at several time points. In contrast, almost no effect of the plant-microbe interaction with B. brassicae was found at the transcriptional level. This study presents the first data on rhizobacteria-induced systemic susceptibility to an herbivorous insect, supporting the pattern proposed for other belowground beneficial microbes and aboveground phloem feeders. Moreover, we provide further evidence that at the transcript level, soil-borne microbes modify plant-aphid interactions.

  17. Suggested improvements for the allergenicity assessment of genetically modified plants used in foods.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Richard E; Tetteh, Afua O

    2011-08-01

    Genetically modified (GM) plants are increasingly used for food production and industrial applications. As the global population has surpassed 7 billion and per capita consumption rises, food production is challenged by loss of arable land, changing weather patterns, and evolving plant pests and disease. Previous gains in quantity and quality relied on natural or artificial breeding, random mutagenesis, increased pesticide and fertilizer use, and improved farming techniques, all without a formal safety evaluation. However, the direct introduction of novel genes raised questions regarding safety that are being addressed by an evaluation process that considers potential increases in the allergenicity, toxicity, and nutrient availability of foods derived from the GM plants. Opinions vary regarding the adequacy of the assessment, but there is no documented proof of an adverse effect resulting from foods produced from GM plants. This review and opinion discusses current practices and new regulatory demands related to food safety.

  18. Overexpression of a tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 causes salt sensitivity and hydrogen peroxide production in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Cao, YangRong; Li, ZhiGang; Chen, Tao; Zhang, ZhiGang; Zhang, JinSong; Chen, ShouYi

    2008-05-01

    The small GTPases of Rop/Rho family is central regulators of important cellular processes in plants. Tobacco small G protein gene NtRop1 has been isolated; however, its roles in stress responses were unknown. In the present study, the genomic sequence of NtRop1 was cloned, which has seven exons and six introns, similar to the Rop gene structure from Arabidopsis. The NtRop1 gene was constitutively expressed in the different organs whereas the other six Rop genes from tobacco had differential expression patterns. The expression of the NtRop1 gene was moderately induced by methyl viologen, NaCl, and ACC treatments, but slightly inhibited by ABA treatment, with no significant induction by NAA treatment. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the NtRop1 showed increased salt sensitivity as can be seen from the reduced root growth and elevated relative electrolyte leakage. The hydrogen peroxide production was also promoted in the NtRop1-trangenic plants in comparison with wild type plants. These results imply that the NtRop1 may confer salt sensitivity through activation of H2O2 production during plant response to salt stress.

  19. Enhanced V-ATPase activity contributes to the improved salt tolerance of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing vacuolar Na(+)/H (+) antiporter AtNHX1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shufeng; Zhang, Zhiming; Tang, Qilin; Lan, Hai; Li, Yinxin; Luo, Ping

    2011-02-01

    AtNHX1, a vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, was introduced into tobacco genome via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation to evaluate the role of vacuolar energy providers in plants salt stress response. Compared to the wild-type plants, over-expression of AtNHX1 increased salt tolerance in the transgenic tobacco plants, allowing higher germination rates of seeds and successful seedling establishment in the presence of toxic concentrations of NaCl. More importantly, the induced Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity in the transgenic plants was closely correlated to the enhanced activity of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) when exposed to 200 mM NaCl. In addition, inhibition of V-ATPase activity led to the malfunction of Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity, placing V-ATPase as the dominant energy provider for the vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter AtNHX1. V-ATPase and vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter thus function in an additive or synergistic way. Simultaneous overexpression of V-ATPase and vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter might be appropriate for producing plants with a higher salt tolerance ability.

  20. Short-term salinity stress in tobacco plants leads to the onset of animal-like PCD hallmarks in planta in contrast to long-term stress.

    PubMed

    Andronis, Efthimios A; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A

    2010-01-01

    Recent results have identified mitochondria as centers of stress-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in plants. Depolarization of plant mitochondrial membrane during stress results the release of programmed cell death (PCD)-inducing factors in the cytosol in a fashion similar to the onset of animal-like PCD. Herein, we report significant similarities of animal-like PCD and salinity stress-induced plant PCD. Short-term salinity stress (3 h) led to depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, release of cytochrome c (CYT-c), which was visualized using a contemporary molecular technique, activation of caspase-3 type proteases and the onset of PCD in wild type tobacco plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Petit Havana. However, PCD was not manifested during long-term salinity stress (24 h). Interestingly long-term salinity stress led to necrotic-like features, which were accompanied by collapse of respiration, reduction of key components of the respiratory chain, such as CYT-c and alternative oxidase, ATP depletion and high proteolytic activity. The results suggest that salinity stress of tobacco plants in planta leads to the onset of animal-like PCD only during the early stages post-stress, while long-term stress leads to necrotic-like features.

  1. [Analysis of tobacco regeneration plants from the protoplasts produced by electrofusion [corrected] in space].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Gen; Chen, Ai-Di; Wang, Liu-Fa; Zheng, Hui-Qiong

    2007-10-01

    Vacuolated mesophyll protoplasts of Nicotiana rustica L. were electrically fused with evacuolated protoplasts of the same genus (N. tabacum cv. 'Gexin No.1') during a 7-day space flight in the Chinese spacecraft "SZ-4". The initial cell division leading to micro-callus formation took place after landing (Fig.1). Higher plating efficiencies were observed in the flight samples than the control culture, but the frequency of plantlets regeneration reduced by about 20% of the control (Table 1). The hybrid characters were tested by chromosome counting, isozyme analysis and comparison of morphological characteristics (Figs.2-4). About 32% of the regenerates showed hybrid character. Leaf morphological modifications were found in 3 hybrids, i.e., H23, H25 and H27. After backcrossing with N. rustica, alterations in flower color and leaf shape occurred in the somatic hybrid H23 (Fig.5). These results demonstrate that the hybrids formed under microgravity condition could regenerate fertile plants.

  2. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase and Polyphenol Oxidase in the Tobacco Mutant Su/su and Three Green Revertant Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Koivuniemi, Paul J.; Tolbert, N. E.; Carlson, Peter S.

    1980-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) was crystallized from a heterozygous tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) aurea mutant (Su/su), its wild-type sibling (su/su), and green revertant plants regenerated from green spots found on leaves of haploid Su plants. No differences were found in the specific activity or kinetic parameters of this enzyme, when comparing Su/su and su/su plants of the same age, which had been grown under identical conditions. The enzyme crystallized from revertant plants was also identical to the enzyme from wild-type plants with the exception of one clone, designated R2. R2 has a chromosome number approximately double that of the wild-type (87.0 ± 11.1 versus 48). The enzyme from R2 had a lower Vmax for CO2, although the Km values were identical to those for the enzyme from the wild-type plant. The enzyme from all mutant plants had identical isoelectric points, identical molecular weight as demonstrated by migration on native and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels, and the same ratio of large to small subunits as the enzyme from the wild-type. The large subunit of the enzyme from tobacco leaves exhibited a different electrophoretic pattern than did the large subunit from spinach; there were two to three bands on SDS-polyacrylamide gels for the tobacco enzyme whereas the enzyme from spinach had only one species of large subunit. Total polyphenol oxidase activity was the same in leaves from the heterozygous mutant (Su/su) and wild-type (su/su) plants when correlated with developmental age as represented by morphology rather than by the chronological age of the plants. There was a marked increase in the soluble activity of this enzyme with increasing age of both plant types and also as a result of varying environmental conditions. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity correlated inversely with increases in the soluble activity of polyphenol oxidase in crude homogenates from which the

  3. 76 FR 38961 - Tobacco Products, Exemptions From Substantial Equivalence Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... nicotine, or any other additive or ingredient) of a tobacco product where the modified product was..., delivery, or form of nicotine, or any other additive or ingredient) of tobacco product where the modified...

  4. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of candidate universal influenza A nanovaccines produced in plants by Tobacco mosaic virus-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Petukhova, Natalia V; Gasanova, Tatiana V; Stepanova, Liudmila A; Rusova, Oxana A; Potapchuk, Marina V; Korotkov, Alexandr V; Skurat, Eugene V; Tsybalova, Liudmila M; Kiselev, Oleg I; Ivanov, Peter A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2013-01-01

    A new approach for super-expression of the influenza virus epitope M2e in plants has been developed on the basis of a recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, strain U1) genome designed for Agrobacterium-mediated delivery into the plant cell nucleus. The TMV coat protein (CP) served as a carrier and three versions of the M2e sequence were inserted into the surface loop between amino acid residues 155 and 156. Cysteine residues in the heterologous peptide were thought likely to impede efficient assembly of chimeric particles. Therefore, viral vectors TMV-M2e-ala and TMV-M2e-ser were constructed in which cysteine codons 17 and 19 of the M2e epitope were substituted by codons for serine or alanine. Agroinfiltration experiments proved that the chimeric viruses were capable of systemically infecting Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Antisera raised against TMV-M2e-ala virions appear to contain far more antibodies specific to influenza virus M2e than those specific to TMV carrier particle (ratio 5:1). Immunogold electron microscopy showed that the 2-epitopes were uniformly distributed and tightly packed on the surface of the chimeric TMV virions. Apparently, the majority of the TMV CP-specific epitopes in the chimeric TMV-M2e particles are hidden from the immune system by the M2e epitopes exposed on the particle surface. The profile of IgG subclasses after immunization of mice with TMV-M2e-ser and TMV-M2e-ala was evaluated. Immunization with TMV-M2e-ala induced a significant difference between the levels of IgG1 and IgG2a (IgG1/IgG2a=3.2). Mice immunized with the chimeric viruses were resistant to five lethal doses (LD50) of the homologous influenza virus strain, A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) and TMV-M2e-ala also gave partial protection (5LD50, 70% of survival rate) against a heterologous strain influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) (4 amino acid changes in M2e). These results indicate that a new generation candidate universal nanovaccine against influenza based on a recombinant TMV

  5. A statistical assessment of differences and equivalences between genetically modified and reference plant varieties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Safety assessment of genetically modified organisms is currently often performed by comparative evaluation. However, natural variation of plant characteristics between commercial varieties is usually not considered explicitly in the statistical computations underlying the assessment. Results Statistical methods are described for the assessment of the difference between a genetically modified (GM) plant variety and a conventional non-GM counterpart, and for the assessment of the equivalence between the GM variety and a group of reference plant varieties which have a history of safe use. It is proposed to present the results of both difference and equivalence testing for all relevant plant characteristics simultaneously in one or a few graphs, as an aid for further interpretation in safety assessment. A procedure is suggested to derive equivalence limits from the observed results for the reference plant varieties using a specific implementation of the linear mixed model. Three different equivalence tests are defined to classify any result in one of four equivalence classes. The performance of the proposed methods is investigated by a simulation study, and the methods are illustrated on compositional data from a field study on maize grain. Conclusions A clear distinction of practical relevance is shown between difference and equivalence testing. The proposed tests are shown to have appropriate performance characteristics by simulation, and the proposed simultaneous graphical representation of results was found to be helpful for the interpretation of results from a practical field trial data set. PMID:21324199

  6. Genetically Modified Plants: What’s the Fuss? (402nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Ben

    2006-03-16

    Genetic transformation is a relatively new and powerful tool used by plant breeders and for basic research. Benefits of gene transformation include resistance to pests and herbicides, which has led to a reduction in pesticide application and soil erosion. Genetically modified plants are used on a massive scale in agriculture in the U.S. and other countries, in part because they are less expensive and more convenient to work with. Yet, despite the benefits, genetic transformation remains a controversial subject and groups in the U.S. and abroad contest its practice.

  7. Establishing, maintaining and modifying DNA methylation patterns in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Law, Julie A; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2010-03-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic mark that is crucial for diverse biological processes, including gene and transposon silencing, imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. Recent findings in plants and animals have greatly increased our understanding of the pathways used to accurately target, maintain and modify patterns of DNA methylation and have revealed unanticipated mechanistic similarities between these organisms. Key roles have emerged for small RNAs, proteins with domains that bind methylated DNA and DNA glycosylases in these processes. Drawing on insights from both plants and animals should deepen our understanding of the regulation and biological significance of DNA methylation.

  8. Establishing, maintaining and modifying DNA methylation patterns in plants and animals

    PubMed Central

    Law, Julie A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic mark that is critical for diverse biological processes including gene and transposon silencing, imprinting, and X chromosome inactivation. Recent findings in plants and animals have greatly increased our understanding of the pathways utilized to accurately target, maintain, and modify patterns of DNA methylation and have revealed unanticipated mechanistic similarities between these organisms. Key roles for small RNAs, proteins with methylated DNA binding domains and DNA glycosylases in these processes have emerged. Drawing on insights from both plants and animals should deepen our understanding of the regulation and biological significance of DNA methylation. PMID:20142834

  9. Overexpression of a pepper basic pathogenesis-related protein 1 gene in tobacco plants enhances resistance to heavy metal and pathogen stresses.

    PubMed

    Sarowar, Sujon; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Eui Nam; Kim, Ki Deok; Hwang, Byung Kook; Islam, Rafiul; Shin, Jeong Sheop

    2005-06-01

    A pepper gene, CABPR1, which encodes basic pathogenesis-related protein 1, has been reported to be strongly induced after ethephon treatment, wounding, and tobacco mosaic virus infection. The potential role of CABPR1 in tolerance of biotic or abiotic stresses was examined in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi plants. Overexpression of CABPR1 in tobacco plants enhanced tolerance not only to heavy metal stresses, but also to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae, and the bacterial pathogens Ralstonia solanacearum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. RT-PCR revealed that the CABPR1 transgene increased expression of the PR-Q and glutathione S-transferase genes, but decreased expression of the PR-1a and thaumatin genes. Moreover, these transgenic lines exhibited significant decreases in total peroxidase activity and transcription level, suggesting that overexpression of CABPR1 in tobacco cells altered the balance of redox systems. Redox imbalance in transgenic lines may lead to H(2)O(2) accumulation, triggering tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  10. Metabolic Profiling with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Carbon-Nitrogen Status of Tobacco Leaves Across Different Planting Areas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jieyu; Zhao, Yanni; Hu, Chunxiu; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Lili; Zeng, Jun; Peng, Xiaojun; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2016-02-05

    The interaction between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism can reflect plant growth status and environmental factors. Little is known regarding the connections between C-N metabolism and growing regions under field conditions. To comprehensively investigate the relationship in mature tobacco leaves, we established metabolomics approaches based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS). Approximately 240 polar metabolites were determined. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the growing region greatly influenced the metabolic profiles of tobacco leaves. A metabolic correlation network and related pathway maps were used to reveal the global overview of the alteration of C-N metabolism across three typical regions. In Yunnan, sugars and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates were closely correlated with amino acid pools. Henan tobacco leaves showed positive correlation between the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) intermediates and C-rich secondary metabolism. In Guizhou, the proline and asparagine had significant links with TCA cycle intermediates and urea cycle, and antioxidant accumulation was observed in response to drought. These results demonstrate that combined analytical approaches have great potential to detect polar metabolites and provide information on C-N metabolism related to planting regional characteristics.

  11. The essential role of jasmonic acid in plant-herbivore interactions--using the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata as a model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wu, Jianqiang

    2013-12-20

    The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) plays a central role in plant defense against herbivores. Herbivore damage elicits a rapid and transient JA burst in the wounded leaves and JA functions as a signal to mediate the accumulation of various secondary metabolites that confer resistance to herbivores. Nicotiana attenuata is a wild tobacco species that inhabits western North America. More than fifteen years of study and its unique interaction with the specialist herbivore insect Manduca sexta have made this plant one of the best models for studying plant-herbivore interactions. Here we review the recent progress in understanding the elicitation of JA accumulation by herbivore-specific elicitors, the regulation of JA biosynthesis, JA signaling, and the herbivore-defense traits in N. attenuata. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Calcium signatures and signaling in cytosol and organelles of tobacco cells induced by plant defense elicitors.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Hamid; Chiltz, Annick; Madani, Siham; Vatsa, Parul; Schoefs, Benoît; Pugin, Alain; Garcia-Brugger, Angela

    2012-06-01

    Calcium signatures induced by two elicitors of plant defense reactions, namely cryptogein and oligogalacturonides, were monitored at the subcellular level, using apoaequorin-transformed Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi cells, in which the apoaequorin calcium sensor was targeted either to cytosol, mitochondria or chloroplasts. Our study showed that both elicitors induced specific Ca(2+) signatures in each compartment, with the most striking difference relying on duration. Common properties also emerged from the analysis of Ca(2+) signatures: both elicitors induced a biphasic cytosolic [Ca(2+)] elevation together with a single mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] elevation concomitant with the first cytosolic [Ca(2+)] peak. In addition, both elicitors induced a chloroplastic [Ca(2+)] elevation peaking later in comparison to cytosolic [Ca(2+)] elevation. In cryptogein-treated cells, pharmacological studies indicated that IP(3) should play an important role in Ca(2+) signaling contrarily to cADPR or nitric oxide, which have limited or no effect on [Ca(2+)] variations. Our data also showed that, depending on [Ca(2+)] fluxes at the plasma membrane, cryptogein triggered a mitochondrial respiration increase and affected excess energy dissipation mechanisms in chloroplasts. Altogether the results indicate that cryptogein profoundly impacted cell functions at many levels, including organelles.

  13. Flower Formation in Excised Tobacco Stem Segments; I. Methodology and Effects of Plant Hormones 1

    PubMed Central

    Wardell, William L.; Skoog, Folke

    1969-01-01

    The formation of flowers has been studied in stem tissue excised from flowering plants of Nicotiana tabacum variety Wisconsin No. 38, and cultured in vitro on Murashige and Skoog nutrient medium. A procedure for quantitative evaluation of factors influencing floral expression has been developed and effects of the growth substances, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), kinetin and gibberellic acid (GA3), on the process are reported. Although a low (1 μm) level of IAA was required for the development of normal flowers on stem segments, higher concentrations tended to inhibit flowering. The decrease in floral buds was rapid in the 3 to 15 μm range. IAA concentrations up to 75 μm increased vegetative bud formation so as to effect a transition from floral to vegetative buds rather than merely an inhibition of bud formation. Higher IAA concentrations inhibited both vegetative and floral bud formation. Kinetin in high concentrations greatly increased the number of vegetative buds but had no significant effect on the number of floral buds per segment. High kinetin concentrations also permitted branching of floral shoots so that flower clusters were formed. GA3 applied in the medium from the start, strongly inhibited bud formation on the stem segments, but when applied to young floral buds after they had formed, it promoted their further development (“bolting”). Flower formation occurred in complete darkness, but light of moderate intensity was required for the development of normal flowers. Images PMID:16657217

  14. A virulence factor encoded by a polydnavirus confers tolerance to transgenic tobacco plants against lepidopteran larvae, by impairing nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Di Lelio, Ilaria; Caccia, Silvia; Coppola, Mariangela; Buonanno, Martina; Di Prisco, Gennaro; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Corrado, Giandomenico; Monti, Simona M; Rao, Rosa; Casartelli, Morena; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The biological control of insect pests is based on the use of natural enemies. However, the growing information on the molecular mechanisms underpinning the interactions between insects and their natural antagonists can be exploited to develop "bio-inspired" pest control strategies, mimicking suppression mechanisms shaped by long co-evolutionary processes. Here we focus on a virulence factor encoded by the polydnavirus associated with the braconid wasp Toxoneuron nigriceps (TnBV), an endophagous parasitoid of noctuid moth larvae. This virulence factor (TnBVANK1) is a member of the viral ankyrin (ANK) protein family, and appears to be involved both in immunosuppression and endocrine alterations of the host. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing TnBVANK1 showed insecticide activity and caused developmental delay in Spodoptera littoralis larvae feeding on them. This effect was more evident in a transgenic line showing a higher number of transcripts of the viral gene. However, this effect was not associated with evidence of translocation into the haemocoel of the entire protein, where the receptors of TnBVANK1 are putatively located. Indeed, immunolocalization experiments evidenced the accumulation of this viral protein in the midgut, where it formed a thick layer coating the brush border of epithelial cells. In vitro transport experiments demonstrated that the presence of recombinant TnBVANK1 exerted a dose-dependent negative impact on amino acid transport. These results open new perspectives for insect control and stimulate additional research efforts to pursue the development of novel bioinsecticides, encoded by parasitoid-derived genes. However, future work will have to carefully evaluate any effect that these molecules may have on beneficial insects and on non-target organisms.

  15. A Virulence Factor Encoded by a Polydnavirus Confers Tolerance to Transgenic Tobacco Plants against Lepidopteran Larvae, by Impairing Nutrient Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Mariangela; Buonanno, Martina; Di Prisco, Gennaro; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Corrado, Giandomenico; Monti, Simona M.; Rao, Rosa; Casartelli, Morena; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The biological control of insect pests is based on the use of natural enemies. However, the growing information on the molecular mechanisms underpinning the interactions between insects and their natural antagonists can be exploited to develop “bio-inspired” pest control strategies, mimicking suppression mechanisms shaped by long co-evolutionary processes. Here we focus on a virulence factor encoded by the polydnavirus associated with the braconid wasp Toxoneuron nigriceps (TnBV), an endophagous parasitoid of noctuid moth larvae. This virulence factor (TnBVANK1) is a member of the viral ankyrin (ANK) protein family, and appears to be involved both in immunosuppression and endocrine alterations of the host. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing TnBVANK1 showed insecticide activity and caused developmental delay in Spodoptera littoralis larvae feeding on them. This effect was more evident in a transgenic line showing a higher number of transcripts of the viral gene. However, this effect was not associated with evidence of translocation into the haemocoel of the entire protein, where the receptors of TnBVANK1 are putatively located. Indeed, immunolocalization experiments evidenced the accumulation of this viral protein in the midgut, where it formed a thick layer coating the brush border of epithelial cells. In vitro transport experiments demonstrated that the presence of recombinant TnBVANK1 exerted a dose-dependent negative impact on amino acid transport. These results open new perspectives for insect control and stimulate additional research efforts to pursue the development of novel bioinsecticides, encoded by parasitoid-derived genes. However, future work will have to carefully evaluate any effect that these molecules may have on beneficial insects and on non-target organisms. PMID:25438149

  16. Induced expression of AtLEC1 and AtLEC2 differentially promotes somatic embryogenesis in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengdan; Liu, Chuanliang; Xia, Han; Bi, Yuping; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Zhao, Shuzhen; Hou, Lei; Li, Fuguang; Wang, Xingjun

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON (LEC) genes, AtLEC1 and AtLEC2, are important embryonic regulators that play key roles in morphogenesis and maturation phases during embryo development. Ectopic expression of AtLEC1 and AtLEC2 in tobacco caused abnormality in transgenic seedling. When transgenic seeds germinated on medium containing 30 µM DEX, LEC1 transgenic seedlings were ivory and fleshy, with unexpanded cotyledons, stubby hypocotyls, short roots and no obvious callus formation at the shoot meristem position. While LEC2 transgenic seedlings formed embryonic callus on the shoot apical meristem and somatic embryo-like structures emerged from the surface of the callus. When callus were transferred to hormone free MS0 medium more shoots were regenerated from each callus. However, shoot formation was not observed in LEC1 overexpressors. To investigate the mechanisms of LEC2 in somatic embryogenesis, we studied global gene expression by digital gene expression profiling analysis. The results indicated that ectopic expression of LEC2 genes induced accumulation of embryo-specific proteins such as seed storage proteins, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes, products of steroid biosynthesis related genes and key regulatory genes of the embryo development. Genes of plant-specific transcription factors such as NAC domain protein, AP2 and GRAS family, resistance-related as well as salicylic acid signaling related genes were up-regulated in LEC2 transgenic seedlings. Ectopi c expression of LEC2 induced large number of somatic embryo formation and shoot regeneration but 20 d DEX induction of LEC1 is not sufficient to induce somatic embryogenesis and shoot formation. Our data provide new information to understand the mechanisms on LEC2 gene's induction of somatic embryogenesis.

  17. From gene to harvest: insights into upstream process development for the GMP production of a monoclonal antibody in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Sack, Markus; Rademacher, Thomas; Spiegel, Holger; Boes, Alexander; Hellwig, Stephan; Drossard, Juergen; Stoger, Eva; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    The EU Sixth Framework Programme Integrated Project 'Pharma-Planta' developed an approved manufacturing process for recombinant plant-made pharmaceutical proteins (PMPs) using the human HIV-neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2G12 as a case study. In contrast to the well-established Chinese hamster ovary platform, which has been used for the production of therapeutic antibodies for nearly 30 years, only draft regulations were initially available covering the production of recombinant proteins in transgenic tobacco plants. Whereas recombinant proteins produced in animal cells are secreted into the culture medium during fermentation in bioreactors, intact plants grown under nonsterile conditions in a glasshouse environment provide various 'plant-specific' regulatory and technical challenges for the development of a process suitable for the acquisition of a manufacturing licence for clinical phase I trials. During upstream process development, several generic steps were addressed (e.g. plant transformation and screening, seed bank generation, genetic stability, host plant uniformity) as well as product-specific aspects (e.g. product quantity). This report summarizes the efforts undertaken to analyse and define the procedures for the GMP/GACP-compliant upstream production of 2G12 in transgenic tobacco plants from gene to harvest, including the design of expression constructs, plant transformation, the generation of production lines, master and working seed banks and the detailed investigation of cultivation and harvesting parameters and their impact on biomass, product yield and intra/interbatch variability. The resulting procedures were successfully translated into a prototypic manufacturing process that has been approved by the German competent authority. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Overexpression of carnation S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase gene generates a broad-spectrum tolerance to abiotic stresses in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wi, Soo Jin; Kim, Woo Taek; Park, Ky Young

    2006-10-01

    Polyamines (PAs), such as putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, are present in all living organism and implicate in a wide range of cellular physiological processes. We have used transgenic technology in an attempt to evaluate their potential for mitigating the adverse effects of several abiotic stresses in plants. Sense construct of full-length cDNA for S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), a key enzyme in PA biosynthesis, from carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower was introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Several transgenic lines overexpressing SAMDC gene under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter accumulated soluble total PAs by 2.2 (S16-S-4) to 3.1 (S16-S-1) times than wild-type plants. The transgenic tobacco did not show any difference in organ phenotype compared to the wild-type. The number and weight of seeds increased, and net photosynthetic rate also increased in transgenic plants. Stress-induced damage was attenuated in these transgenic plants, in the symptom of visible yellowing and chlorophyll degradation after all experienced stresses such as salt stress, cold stress, acidic stress, and abscisic acid treatment. H2O2-induced damage was attenuated by spermidine treatment. Transcripts for antioxidant enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, manganase superoxide dismutase, and glutathione S-transferase) in transgenic plants and GUS activity transformed with SAMDC promoter::GUS fusion were induced more significantly by stress treatment, compared to control. These results that the transgenic plants with sense SAMDC cDNA are more tolerant to abiotic stresses than wild-type plants suggest that PAs may play an important role in contributing stress tolerance in plants.

  19. A modified method for diffusive monitoring of 3-ethenylpyridine as a specific marker of environmental tobacco smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusimäki, Leea; Peltonen, Kimmo; Vainiotalo, Sinikka

    A previously introduced method for monitoring environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was further validated. The method is based on diffusive sampling of a vapour-phase marker, 3-ethenylpyridine (3-EP), with 3 M passive monitors (type 3500). Experiments were done in a dynamic chamber to assess diffusive sampling in comparison with active sampling in charcoal tubes or XAD-4 tubes. The sampling rate for 3-EP collected on the diffusive sampler was 23.1±0.6 mL min -1. The relative standard deviation for parallel samples ( n=6) ranged from 4% to 14% among experiments ( n=9). No marked reverse diffusion of 3-EP was detected nor any significant effect of relative humidity at 20%, 50% or 80%. The diffusive sampling of 3-EP was validated in field measurements in 15 restaurants in comparison with 3-EP and nicotine measurements using active sampling. The 3-EP concentration in restaurants ranged from 0.01 to 9.8 μg m -3, and the uptake rate for 3-EP based on 92 parallel samples was 24.0±0.4 mL min -1. A linear correlation ( r=0.98) was observed between 3-EP and nicotine concentrations, the average ratio of 3-EP to nicotine being 1:8. Active sampling of 3-EP and nicotine in charcoal tubes provided more reliable results than sampling in XAD-4 tubes. All samples were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after elution with a 15% solution of pyridine in toluene. For nicotine, the limit of quantification of the charcoal tube method was 4 ng per sample, corresponding to 0.04 μg m -3 for an air sample of 96 L. For 3-EP, the limit of quantification of the diffusive method was 0.5-1.0 ng per sample, corresponding to 0.04-0.09 μg m -3 for 8 h sampling. The diffusive method proved suitable for ETS monitoring, even at low levels of ETS.

  20. Patterns of phenylpropanoids in non-inoculated and potato virus Y-inoculated leaves of transgenic tobacco plants expressing yeast-derived invertase.

    PubMed

    Baumert, A; Mock, H P; Schmidt, J; Herbers, K; Sonnewald, U; Strack, D

    2001-03-01

    The patterns of secondary metabolites in leaves of yeast invertase-transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Samsun NN) were analyzed. Plants expressing cytosolic yeast-derived invertase (cytInv) or apoplastic (cell wall associated) yeast invertase (cwInv) showed a characteristic phytochemical phenotype compared to untransformed controls (wild-type plants). The level of phenylpropanoids decreased in the cytInv plants but increased in the cwInv plants, which showed an induced de novo synthesis of a caffeic acid amide, i.e. N-caffeoylputrescine. In addition, the level of the coumarin glucoside scopolin was markedly enhanced. Increased accumulation of scopolin in the cwInv plants is possibly correlated with the induction of defense reactions and the appearance of necrotic lesions similar to the hypersensitive response caused by avirulent pathogens. This is consistent with results from potato virus Y-infected plants. Whereas there was no additional increase in the coumarins in leaves following infection in cwInv plants, wild-type plants showed a slight increase and cytInc a marked increase.

  1. Increased sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase activity in transgenic tobacco plants stimulates photosynthesis and growth from an early stage in development.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Stephane; Lawson, Tracy; Zakhleniuk, Oksana V; Lloyd, Julie C; Raines, Christine A; Fryer, Mike

    2005-05-01

    Activity of the Calvin cycle enzyme sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase) was increased by overexpression of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cDNA in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. In plants with increased SBPase activity, photosynthetic rates were increased, higher levels of Suc and starch accumulated during the photoperiod, and an increase in leaf area and biomass of up to 30% was also evident. Light saturated photosynthesis increased with increasing SBPase activity and analysis of CO2 response curves revealed that this increase in photosynthesis could be attributed to an increase in ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate regenerative capacity. Seedlings with increased SBPase activity had an increased leaf area at the 4 to 5 leaf stage when compared to wild-type plants, and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of these young plants revealed a higher photosynthetic capacity at the whole plant level. Measurements of photosynthesis, made under growth conditions integrated over the day, showed that mature plants with increased SBPase activity fixed 6% to 12% more carbon than equivalent wild-type leaves, with the young leaves having the highest rates. In this paper, we have shown that photosynthetic capacity per unit area and plant yield can be increased by overexpressing a single native plant enzyme, SBPase, and that this gives an advantage to the growth of these plants from an early phase of vegetative growth. This work has also shown that it is not necessary to bypass the normal regulatory control of SBPase, exerted by conditions in the stroma, to achieve improvements in carbon fixation.

  2. Large grazers modify effects of aboveground-belowground interactions on small-scale plant community composition.

    PubMed

    Veen, G F Ciska; Geuverink, Elzemiek; Olff, Han

    2012-02-01

    Aboveground and belowground organisms influence plant community composition by local interactions, and their scale of impact may vary from millimeters belowground to kilometers aboveground. However, it still poorly understood how large grazers that select their forage on large spatial scales interact with small-scale aboveground-belowground interactions