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Sample records for modifies neuroprotecting globins

  1. Running, swimming and diving modifies neuroprotecting globins in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Terrie M; Zavanelli, Mary; Miller, Melissa A; Goldbeck, Robert A; Morledge, Michael; Casper, Dave; Pabst, D. Ann; McLellan, William; Cantin, Lucas P; Kliger, David S

    2007-01-01

    The vulnerability of the human brain to injury following just a few minutes of oxygen deprivation with submergence contrasts markedly with diving mammals, such as Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii), which can remain underwater for more than 90 min while exhibiting no neurological or behavioural impairment. This response occurs despite exposure to blood oxygen levels concomitant with human unconsciousness. To determine whether such aquatic lifestyles result in unique adaptations for avoiding ischaemic–hypoxic neural damage, we measured the presence of circulating (haemoglobin) and resident (neuroglobin and cytoglobin) oxygen-carrying globins in the cerebral cortex of 16 mammalian species considered terrestrial, swimming or diving specialists. Here we report a striking difference in globin levels depending on activity lifestyle. A nearly 9.5-fold range in haemoglobin concentration (0.17–1.62 g Hb 100 g brain wet wt−1) occurred between terrestrial and deep-diving mammals; a threefold range in resident globins was evident between terrestrial and swimming specialists. Together, these two globin groups provide complementary mechanisms for facilitating oxygen transfer into neural tissues and the potential for protection against reactive oxygen and nitrogen groups. This enables marine mammals to maintain sensory and locomotor neural functions during prolonged submergence, and suggests new avenues for averting oxygen-mediated neural injury in the mammalian brain. PMID:18089537

  2. Microbial eukaryote globins.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Serge N; Bailly, Xavier; Smith, David R; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K; Hoogewijs, David

    2013-01-01

    A bioinformatics survey of about 120 protist and 240 fungal genomes and transcriptomes revealed a broad array of globins, representing five of the eight subfamilies identified in bacteria. Most conspicuous is the absence of protoglobins and globin-coupled sensors, except for a two-domain globin in Leishmanias, that comprises a nucleotidyl cyclase domain, and the virtual absence of truncated group 3 globins. In contrast to bacteria, co-occurrence of more than two globin subfamilies appears to be rare in protists. Although globins were lacking in the Apicomplexa and the Microsporidia intracellular pathogens, they occurred in the pathogenic Trypanosomatidae, Stramenopiles and certain fungi. Flavohaemoglobins (FHbs) and related single-domain globins occur across the protist groups. Fungi are unique in having FHbs co-occurring with sensor single-domain globins (SSDgbs). Obligately biotrophic fungi covered in our analysis lack globins. Furthermore, SSDgbs occur only in a heterolobosean amoeba, Naegleria and the stramenopile Hyphochytrium. Of the three subfamilies of truncated Mb-fold globins, TrHb1s appear to be the most widespread, occurring as multiple copies in chlorophyte and ciliophora genomes, many as multidomain proteins. Although the ciliates appear to have only TrHb1s, the chlorophytes have Mb-like globins and TrHb2s, both closely related to the corresponding plant globins. The presently available number of protist genomes is inadequate to provide a definitive census of their globins. Bayesian molecular analyses of single-domain 3/3 Mb-fold globins suggest a close relationship of chlorophyte and haptophyte globins, including choanoflagellate and Capsaspora globins to land plant symbiotic and non-symbiotic haemoglobins and to vertebrate neuroglobins.

  3. Environmental Enrichment Modified Epigenetic Mechanisms in SAMP8 Mouse Hippocampus by Reducing Oxidative Stress and Inflammaging and Achieving Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Puigoriol-Illamola, Dolors; Palomera-Ávalos, Verónica; Pérez-Cáceres, David; Companys-Alemany, Júlia; Camins, Antonio; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Rodrigo, M. Teresa; Pallàs, Mercè

    2016-01-01

    With the increase in life expectancy, aging and age-related cognitive impairments are becoming one of the most important issues for human health. At the same time, it has been shown that epigenetic mechanisms are emerging as universally important factors in life expectancy. The Senescence Accelerated Mouse P8 (SAMP8) strain exhibits age-related deterioration evidenced in learning and memory abilities and is a useful model of neurodegenerative disease. In SAMP8, Environmental Enrichment (EE) increased DNA-methylation levels (5-mC) and reduced hydroxymethylation levels (5-hmC), as well as increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Likewise, we found changes in the hippocampal gene expression of some chromatin-modifying enzyme genes, such as Dnmt3b. Hdac1. Hdac2. Sirt2, and Sirt6. Subsequently, we assessed the effects of EE on neuroprotection-related transcription factors, such as the Nuclear regulatory factor 2 (Nrf2)–Antioxidant Response Element pathway and Nuclear Factor kappa Beta (NF-κB), which play critical roles in inflammation. We found that EE produces an increased expression of antioxidant genes, such as Hmox1. Aox1, and Cox2, and reduced the expression of inflammatory genes such as IL-6 and Cxcl10, all of this within the epigenetic context modified by EE. In conclusion, EE prevents epigenetic changes that promote or drive oxidative stress and inflammaging. PMID:27803663

  4. Coexpression of Human α- and Circularly Permuted β-Globins Yields a Hemoglobin with Normal R State but Modified T State Properties†

    PubMed Central

    Asmundson, Anna L.; Taber, Alexandria M.; van der Walde, Adella; Lin, Danielle H.; Olson, John S.; Anthony-Cahill, Spencer J.

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, a circularly permuted human β-globin (cpβ) has been coexpressed with human α-globin in bacterial cells and shown to associate to form α-cpβ hemoglobin in solution. Flash photolysis studies of α-cpβ show markedly biphasic CO and O2 kinetics with the amplitudes for the fast association phases being dominant due the presence of large amounts of high-affinity liganded hemoglobin dimers. Extensive dimerization of liganded but not deoxygenated α-cpβ was observed by gel chromatography. The rate constants for O2 and CO binding to the R state forms of α-cpβ are almost identical to those of native HbA (k′R(CO) ≈ 5.0 μM−1 s−1; k′R(O2) ≈ 50 μM−1 s−1), and the rate of O2 dissociation from fully oxygenated α-cpβ is also very similar to that observed for HbA (kR(O2) ≈ 21–28 s−1). When the equilibrium deoxyHb form of α-cpβ is reacted with CO in rapid mixing experiments, the observed time courses are monophasic and the observed bimolecular association rate constant is ∼1.0 μM−1 s−1, which is intermediate between the R state rate measured in partial photolysis experiments (∼5 μM−1 s−1) and that observed for T state deoxyHbA (k′T(CO) ≈ 0.1 to 0.2 μM−1 s−1). Thus the deoxygenated permutated β subunits generate an intermediate, higher affinity, deoxyHb quaternary state. This conclusion is supported by equilibrium oxygen binding measurements in which α-cpβ exhibits a P50 of ∼1.5 mmHg and a low n-value (∼1.3) at pH 7, 20 °C, compared to 8.5 mmHg and n ≈ 2.8 for native HbA under identical, dilute conditions. PMID:19397368

  5. Mitochondrial therapy for Parkinson’s disease: Neuroprotective pharmaconutrition may be disease-modifying

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Progressive destruction of neurons that produce dopamine in the basal ganglia of the brain, particularly the substantia nigra, is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease. The syndrome of the Parkinsonian phenotype is caused by many etiologies, involving multiple contributing mechanisms. Characteristic findings are pathologic inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are protein aggregates inside nerve cells. Environmental insults are linked with the disease, and a number of associated genes have also been identified. Neuroinflammation, microglia activation, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction are central processes producing nerve damage. In addition, protein misfolding, driven by accumulation and condensation of α-synuclein, compounded by inadequate elimination of defective protein through the ubiquitin- proteasome system, promote apoptosis. Current pharmacologic therapy is palliative rather than disease- modifying, and typically becomes unsatisfactory over time. Coenzyme Q10 and creatine, two agents involved in energy production, may be disease-modifying, and able to produce sufficient beneficial pathophysiologic changes in preclinical studies to warrant large studies now in progress. Use of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D in PD are also topics of current interest. PMID:22291504

  6. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  7. The Full Globin Repertoire of Turtles Provides Insights into Vertebrate Globin Evolution and Functions.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Kim; Singh, Abhilasha; Burmester, Thorsten

    2015-07-01

    Globins are small heme proteins that play an important role in oxygen supply, but may also have other functions. Globins offer a unique opportunity to study the functional evolution of genes and proteins. We have characterized the globin repertoire of two different turtle species: the Chinese softshell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) and the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii). In the genomes of both species, we have identified eight distinct globin types: hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin, neuroglobin, cytoglobin, globin E, globin X, globin Y, and androglobin. Therefore, along with the coelacanth, turtles are so far the only known vertebrates with a full globin repertoire. This fact allows for the first time a comparative analysis of the expression of all eight globins in a single species. Phylogenetic analysis showed an early divergence of neuroglobin and globin X before the radiation of vertebrates. Among the other globins, cytoglobin diverged first, and there is a close relationship between myoglobin and globin E; the position of globin Y is not resolved. The globin E gene was selectively lost in the green anole, and the genes coding for globin X and globin Y were deleted in chicken. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments revealed that myoglobin, neuroglobin, and globin E are highly expressed with tissue-specific patterns, which are in line with their roles in the oxidative metabolism of the striated muscles, the brain, and the retina, respectively. Histochemical analyses showed high levels of globin E in the pigment epithelium of the eye. Globin E probably has a myoglobin-like role in transporting O2 across the pigment epithelium to supply in the metabolically highly active retina. PMID:26078264

  8. Histone acetylation and globin gene switching.

    PubMed Central

    Hebbes, T R; Thorne, A W; Clayton, A L; Crane-Robinson, C

    1992-01-01

    An affinity-purified antibody that recognises the epitope epsilon-acetyl lysine has been used to fractionate chicken erythrocyte mononucleosomes obtained from 5 and 15 day embryos. The antibody bound chromatin was enriched in multiply acetylated forms of the core histones H3, H4 and H2B, but not in ubiquitinated H2A. The DNA of these modified nucleosomes was probed with genomic sequences from the embryonic beta rho gene (active at 5 days) and from the adult beta A gene (active at 15 days). Both genes were found to be highly enriched in the acetylated nucleosomes fractionated from both 5 day and from 15 day erythrocytes. We conclude that globin switching is not linked to a change in acetylation status of the genes and that a 'poised' gene carries histones acetylated to a similar level as a transcriptionally active gene. Core histone acetylation is not therefore a direct consequence of the transcriptional process and might operate at the level of the globin locus as a general enabling step for transcription. Images PMID:1549462

  9. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  10. Activation of delta-globin gene expression by erythroid Krupple-like factor: a potential approach for gene therapy of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Donze, D; Jeancake, P H; Townes, T M

    1996-11-15

    Hemoglobin A2 (HbA2; alpha 2 delta 2) is a powerful inhibitor of HbS (alpha 2 beta 2(3)) polymerization. However, HbA2 levels are normally low in sickle cell patients. We show that a major reason for low delta-globin gene expression is the defective CACCC box at -90 in the delta-globin promoter. When the CACCC box defect in delta is corrected, expression of an HS2 delta /Luciferase reporter is equivalent to HS2 beta /Luciferase. Erythroid Krupple-like factor (EKLF), which binds to the CACCC box of the beta-globin gene and activates high-level expression, does not bind to the normal delta-globin promoter. Our goal is to design a modified EKLF that binds to the defective delta-globin promoter and enhances delta-globin gene expression. To test the feasibility of this strategy, we inserted the beta-globin CACCC box at -90 of the delta-globin gene promoter to produce an HS2 delta CAC-beta construct and quantitated human delta- and beta-globin mRNA in stably transformed murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. delta- Globin mRNA in these cells was 22.0% +/- 9.0% of total human globin mRNA (delta/delta + beta) as compared with 3.0% +/- 1.3% in the HS2 delta-beta control. In a second set of experiments a GAL4 DNA-binding site was inserted at -90 of the delta-globin gene to produce an HS2 delta GAL4-beta construct. This construct and a GAL4(1-147)/EKLF expression vector were stably transfected into MEL cells. delta-Globin mRNA in these cells was 27.8% +/- 7.1% of total human globin mRNA as compared with 9.9% +/- 2.5% in the HS2 delta GAL4-beta plus GAL4(1-147) control. These results show that delta-globin gene expression can be significantly increased by a modified EKLF. Based on these results, we suggest that modified EKLFs, which contain zinc fingers designed to bind specifically to the defective delta-globin CACCC box, may be useful in gene therapy approaches to increase HbA2 levels and inhibit HbS polymerization.

  11. Perinatal neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Salmeen, Kirsten E; Jelin, Angie C; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2014-01-01

    Fetal or neonatal brain injury can result in lifelong neurologic disability. The most significant risk factor for perinatal brain injury is prematurity; however, in absolute numbers, full-term infants represent the majority of affected children. Research on strategies to prevent or mitigate the impact of perinatal brain injury ("perinatal neuroprotection") has established the mitigating roles of magnesium sulfate administration for preterm infants and therapeutic hypothermia for term infants with suspected perinatal brain injury. Banked umbilical cord blood, erythropoietin, and a number of other agents that may improve neuronal repair show promise for improving outcomes following perinatal brain injury in animal models. Other preventative strategies include delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants and progesterone in women with prior preterm birth or short cervix and avoidance of infections. Despite these advances, we have not successfully decreased the rate of preterm birth, nor are we able to predict term infants at risk of hypoxic brain injury in order to intervene prior to the hypoxic event. Further, we lack the ability to modulate the sequelae of neuronal cell insults or the ability to repair brain injury after it has been sustained. As a consequence, despite exciting advances in the field of perinatal neuroprotection, perinatal brain injury still impacts thousands of newborns each year with significant long-term morbidity and mortality. PMID:24592318

  12. Platypus globin genes and flanking loci suggest a new insertional model for beta-globin evolution in birds and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vidushi S; Cooper, Steven JB; Deakin, Janine E; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Graves, Jennifer AM

    2008-01-01

    Background Vertebrate alpha (α)- and beta (β)-globin gene families exemplify the way in which genomes evolve to produce functional complexity. From tandem duplication of a single globin locus, the α- and β-globin clusters expanded, and then were separated onto different chromosomes. The previous finding of a fossil β-globin gene (ω) in the marsupial α-cluster, however, suggested that duplication of the α-β cluster onto two chromosomes, followed by lineage-specific gene loss and duplication, produced paralogous α- and β-globin clusters in birds and mammals. Here we analyse genomic data from an egg-laying monotreme mammal, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), to explore haemoglobin evolution at the stem of the mammalian radiation. Results The platypus α-globin cluster (chromosome 21) contains embryonic and adult α- globin genes, a β-like ω-globin gene, and the GBY globin gene with homology to cytoglobin, arranged as 5'-ζ-ζ'-αD-α3-α2-α1-ω-GBY-3'. The platypus β-globin cluster (chromosome 2) contains single embryonic and adult globin genes arranged as 5'-ε-β-3'. Surprisingly, all of these globin genes were expressed in some adult tissues. Comparison of flanking sequences revealed that all jawed vertebrate α-globin clusters are flanked by MPG-C16orf35 and LUC7L, whereas all bird and mammal β-globin clusters are embedded in olfactory genes. Thus, the mammalian α- and β-globin clusters are orthologous to the bird α- and β-globin clusters respectively. Conclusion We propose that α- and β-globin clusters evolved from an ancient MPG-C16orf35-α-β-GBY-LUC7L arrangement 410 million years ago. A copy of the original β (represented by ω in marsupials and monotremes) was inserted into an array of olfactory genes before the amniote radiation (>315 million years ago), then duplicated and diverged to form orthologous clusters of β-globin genes with different expression profiles in different lineages. PMID:18657265

  13. A chromosome 11-linked determinant controls fetal globin expression and the fetal-to-adult globin switch.

    PubMed Central

    Melis, M; Demopulos, G; Najfeld, V; Zhang, J W; Brice, M; Papayannopoulou, T; Stamatoyannopoulos, G

    1987-01-01

    Hybrids formed by fusing mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells with human fetal erythroid cells produce human fetal globin, but they switch to adult globin production as culture time advances. To obtain information on the chromosomal assignment of the elements that control gamma-to-beta switching, we analyzed the chromosomal composition of hybrids producing exclusively or predominantly human fetal globin and hybrids producing only adult human globin. No human chromosome was consistently present in hybrids expressing fetal globin and consistently absent in hybrids expressing adult globin. Subcloning experiments demonstrated identical chromosomal compositions in subclones displaying the fetal globin program and those that had switched to expression of the adult globin program. These data indicate that retention of only one human chromosome-i.e., chromosome 11--sufficient for expression of human fetal globin and the subsequent gamma-to-beta switch. The results suggest that the gamma-to-beta switch is controlled either cis to the beta-globin locus or by a trans-acting mechanism, the genes of which reside on human chromosome 11. Images PMID:3479779

  14. Activation of Developmentally Mutated Human Globin Genes by Cell Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Enver, Tariq; Takegawa, Susumu; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    1988-11-01

    Human fetal globin genes are not expressed in hybrid cells produced by the fusion of normal human lymphocytes with mouse erythroleukemia cells. In contrast, when lymphocytes from persons with globin gene developmental mutations (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin) are used for these fusions, fetal globin is expressed in the hybrid cells. Thus, mutations of developmental origin can be reconstituted in vitro by fusing mutant lymphoid cells with differentiated cell lines of the proper lineage. This system can readily be used for analyses, such as globin gene methylation, that normally require large numbers of pure nucleated erythroid cells, which are difficult to obtain.

  15. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sandra E; Pet, Gillian C

    2015-09-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This article explores some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury is discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  16. Modification of Globin Gene Expression by RNA Targeting Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tong-Jian; Rogers, Heather; Yu, Xiaobing; Lin, Felix; Noguchi, Constance T.; Ho, Chien

    2007-01-01

    Objective Sickle cell anemia is a genetic blood disease resulting from production of mutant β-globin (βS) and has severe clinical consequences. It is known that a higher cellular γ-globin level, e.g., higher ratio of cellular γ-globin to βS-globin (γ/βS ratio), inhibits sickle hemoglobin (HbS) polymerization tendency. Hence, therapeutic treatment of sickle cell anemia has been focused on introducing γ-globin gene into red blood cells to increase the cellular γ/βS ratio. Here, we have introduced ribozymes and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against βS-globin mRNA into blood cells as a means to increase the γ/βS ratio. Methods Single and multi-ribozymes against βS-globin mRNA have been tested in vitro and in human erythroleukemia K562βS cells that stably express exogenous βS-globin gene. Primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells were also transfected with multi-ribozyme and the γ/(γ+β) ratio determined and compared with cells transfected with long hairpin β-globin cDNA and synthetic siRNA genes. Results We have found that the multi-ribozyme zb21A containing two ribozyme units effectively reduces βS-globin mRNA both in vitro and in K562βS cells. The γ-globin mRNA to βS-globin mRNA ratio in the multi-ribozyme transfected cells is about a factor of 2 more than that in the control cells. We have also found that the γ/(γ+β) ratio in the transfected hematopoietic progenitor cells is increased by more than 2-fold in cells treated with multi-ribozyme zb21A or siRNA ib5. Conclusion Our results suggest that introducing multi-ribozymes or siRNAs into red blood cells are comparable in their effectiveness to increase the ratio of cellular γ-globin mRNA to β- or βS-globin mRNA, providing possible strategies to increase the effectiveness of γ-globin gene transfer as gene therapy for treatment of patients with sickle cell anemia. PMID:17662889

  17. Conservation of globin genes in the "living fossil" Latimeria chalumnae and reconstruction of the evolution of the vertebrate globin family.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Kim; Burmester, Thorsten

    2013-09-01

    The (hemo-)globins are among the best-investigated proteins in biomedical sciences. These small heme-proteins play an important role in oxygen supply, but may also have other functions. In addition to well known hemoglobin and myoglobin, six other vertebrate globin types have been identified in recent years: neuroglobin, cytoglobin, globin E, globin X, globin Y, and androglobin. Analyses of the genome of the "living fossil" Latimeria chalumnae show that the coelacanth is the only known vertebrate that includes all eight globin types. Thus, Latimeria can also be considered as a "globin fossil". Analyses of gene synteny and phylogenetic reconstructions allow us to trace the evolution and the functional changes of the vertebrate globin family. Neuroglobin and globin X diverged from the other globin types before the separation of Protostomia and Deuterostomia. The cytoglobins, which are unlikely to be involved in O2 supply, form the earliest globin branch within the jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata), but do not group with the agnathan hemoglobins, as it has been proposed before. There is strong evidence from phylogenetic reconstructions and gene synteny that the eye-specific globin E and muscle-specific myoglobin constitute a common clade, suggesting a similar role in intracellular O2 supply. Latimeria possesses two α- and two β-hemoglobin chains, of which one α-chain emerged prior to the divergence of Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii, but has been retained only in the coelacanth. Notably, the embryonic hemoglobin α-chains of Gnathostomata derive from a common ancestor, while the embryonic β-chains - with the exception of a more complex pattern in the coelacanth and amphibians - display a clade-specific evolution. Globin Y is associated with the hemoglobin gene cluster, but its phylogenetic position is not resolved. Our data show an early divergence of distinct globin types in the vertebrate evolution before the emergence of tetrapods. The subsequent loss of

  18. O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Transferase and O-GlcNAcase Interact with Mi2β Protein at the Aγ-Globin Promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Costa, Flávia C; Tan, Ee Phie; Bushue, Nathan; DiTacchio, Luciano; Costello, Catherine E; McComb, Mark E; Whelan, Stephen A; Peterson, Kenneth R; Slawson, Chad

    2016-07-22

    One mode of γ-globin gene silencing involves a GATA-1·FOG-1·Mi2β repressor complex that binds to the -566 GATA site relative to the (A)γ-globin gene cap site. However, the mechanism of how this repressor complex is assembled at the -566 GATA site is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) processing enzymes, O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA), interact with the (A)γ-globin promoter at the -566 GATA repressor site; however, mutation of the GATA site to GAGA significantly reduces OGT and OGA promoter interactions in β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome (β-YAC) bone marrow cells. When WT β-YAC bone marrow cells are treated with the OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G, the occupancy of OGT, OGA, and Mi2β at the (A)γ-globin promoter is increased. In addition, OGT and Mi2β recruitment is increased at the (A)γ-globin promoter when γ-globin becomes repressed in postconception day E18 human β-YAC transgenic mouse fetal liver. Furthermore, we show that Mi2β is modified with O-GlcNAc, and both OGT and OGA interact with Mi2β, GATA-1, and FOG-1. Taken together, our data suggest that O-GlcNAcylation is a novel mechanism of γ-globin gene regulation mediated by modulating the assembly of the GATA-1·FOG-1·Mi2β repressor complex at the -566 GATA motif within the promoter. PMID:27231347

  19. O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Transferase and O-GlcNAcase Interact with Mi2β Protein at the Aγ-Globin Promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Costa, Flávia C; Tan, Ee Phie; Bushue, Nathan; DiTacchio, Luciano; Costello, Catherine E; McComb, Mark E; Whelan, Stephen A; Peterson, Kenneth R; Slawson, Chad

    2016-07-22

    One mode of γ-globin gene silencing involves a GATA-1·FOG-1·Mi2β repressor complex that binds to the -566 GATA site relative to the (A)γ-globin gene cap site. However, the mechanism of how this repressor complex is assembled at the -566 GATA site is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) processing enzymes, O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA), interact with the (A)γ-globin promoter at the -566 GATA repressor site; however, mutation of the GATA site to GAGA significantly reduces OGT and OGA promoter interactions in β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome (β-YAC) bone marrow cells. When WT β-YAC bone marrow cells are treated with the OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G, the occupancy of OGT, OGA, and Mi2β at the (A)γ-globin promoter is increased. In addition, OGT and Mi2β recruitment is increased at the (A)γ-globin promoter when γ-globin becomes repressed in postconception day E18 human β-YAC transgenic mouse fetal liver. Furthermore, we show that Mi2β is modified with O-GlcNAc, and both OGT and OGA interact with Mi2β, GATA-1, and FOG-1. Taken together, our data suggest that O-GlcNAcylation is a novel mechanism of γ-globin gene regulation mediated by modulating the assembly of the GATA-1·FOG-1·Mi2β repressor complex at the -566 GATA motif within the promoter.

  20. Widespread occurrence of N-terminal acylation in animal globins and possible origin of respiratory globins from a membrane-bound ancestor.

    PubMed

    Blank, Miriam; Burmester, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    Proteins of the (hemo-)globin superfamily have been identified in many different animals but also occur in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Globins are renowned for their ability to store and to transport oxygen, but additional globin functions such as sensing, signaling, and detoxification have been proposed. Recently, we found that the zebrafish globin X protein is myristoylated and palmitoylated at its N-terminus. The addition of fatty acids results in an association with the cellular membranes, suggesting a previously unrecognized globin function. In this study, we show that N-terminal acylation likely occurs in globin proteins from a broad range of phyla. An N-terminal myristoylation site was identified in 90 nonredundant globins from Chlorophyta, Heterokontophyta, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Nematoda, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, and Chordata (including Cephalochordata), of which 66 proteins carry an additional palmitoylation site. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified five major globin families, which may mirror the ancient globin diversity of the Metazoa. Globin X-like proteins form two related clades, which diverged before the radiation of the Eumetazoa. Vertebrate hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin, cytoglobin, globin E, and globin Y form a strongly supported common clade, which is the sister group of a clade consisting of invertebrate Hbs and relatives. The N-terminally acylated globins do not form a single monophyletic group but are distributed to four distinct clades. This pattern may be either explained by multiple introduction of an N-terminal acylation site into distinct globin lineages or by the origin of animal respiratory globins from a membrane-bound ancestor. Similarly, respiratory globins were not monophyletic. This suggests that respiratory globins might have emerged independently several times and that the early metazoan globins might have been associated with a membrane and carried out a function that was related to lipid protection or

  1. Widespread occurrence of N-terminal acylation in animal globins and possible origin of respiratory globins from a membrane-bound ancestor.

    PubMed

    Blank, Miriam; Burmester, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    Proteins of the (hemo-)globin superfamily have been identified in many different animals but also occur in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Globins are renowned for their ability to store and to transport oxygen, but additional globin functions such as sensing, signaling, and detoxification have been proposed. Recently, we found that the zebrafish globin X protein is myristoylated and palmitoylated at its N-terminus. The addition of fatty acids results in an association with the cellular membranes, suggesting a previously unrecognized globin function. In this study, we show that N-terminal acylation likely occurs in globin proteins from a broad range of phyla. An N-terminal myristoylation site was identified in 90 nonredundant globins from Chlorophyta, Heterokontophyta, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Nematoda, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, and Chordata (including Cephalochordata), of which 66 proteins carry an additional palmitoylation site. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified five major globin families, which may mirror the ancient globin diversity of the Metazoa. Globin X-like proteins form two related clades, which diverged before the radiation of the Eumetazoa. Vertebrate hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin, cytoglobin, globin E, and globin Y form a strongly supported common clade, which is the sister group of a clade consisting of invertebrate Hbs and relatives. The N-terminally acylated globins do not form a single monophyletic group but are distributed to four distinct clades. This pattern may be either explained by multiple introduction of an N-terminal acylation site into distinct globin lineages or by the origin of animal respiratory globins from a membrane-bound ancestor. Similarly, respiratory globins were not monophyletic. This suggests that respiratory globins might have emerged independently several times and that the early metazoan globins might have been associated with a membrane and carried out a function that was related to lipid protection or

  2. Molecular cloning and expression of α-globin and β-globin genes from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Anwised, Preeyanan; Kabbua, Thai; Temsiripong, Theeranan; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Araki, Tomohiro; Yoneda, Kazunari; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2013-03-01

    The first report of complete nucleotide sequences for α- and β-globin chains from the Siamese hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis) is given in this study. The cDNAs encoding α- and β-globins were cloned by RT-PCR using the degenerate primers and by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method. The full-length α-globin cDNA contains an open reading frame of 423 nucleotides encoding 141 amino acid residues, whereas the β-globin cDNA contains an open reading frame of 438 nucleotides encoding 146 amino acid residues. The authenticity of both α- and β-globin cDNA clones were also confirmed by the heterologous expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli). This is the first time that the recombinant C. siamensis globins were produced in prokaryotic system. Additionally, the heme group was inserted into the recombinant proteins and purified heme-bound proteins were performed by affinity chromatography using Co(2+)-charged Talon resins. The heme-bound proteins appeared to have a maximum absorbance at 415 nm, indicated that the recombinant proteins bound to oxygen and formed active oxyhemoglobin (HbO2). The results indicated that recombinant C. siamensis globins were successfully expressed in prokaryotic system and possessed an activity as ligand binding protein.

  3. Globin X is a six-coordinate globin that reduces nitrite to nitric oxide in fish red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Corti, Paola; Xue, Jianmin; Tejero, Jesús; Wajih, Nadeem; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna B; Tsang, Michael; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Gladwin, Mark T

    2016-07-26

    The discovery of novel globins in diverse organisms has stimulated intense interest in their evolved function, beyond oxygen binding. Globin X (GbX) is a protein found in fish, amphibians, and reptiles that diverged from a common ancestor of mammalian hemoglobins and myoglobins. Like mammalian neuroglobin, GbX was first designated as a neuronal globin in fish and exhibits six-coordinate heme geometry, suggesting a role in intracellular electron transfer reactions rather than oxygen binding. Here, we report that GbX to our knowledge is the first six-coordinate globin and the first globin protein apart from hemoglobin, found in vertebrate RBCs. GbX is present in fish erythrocytes and exhibits a nitrite reduction rate up to 200-fold faster than human hemoglobin and up to 50-fold higher than neuroglobin or cytoglobin. Deoxygenated GbX reduces nitrite to form nitric oxide (NO) and potently inhibits platelet activation in vitro, to a greater extent than hemoglobin. Fish RBCs also reduce nitrite to NO and inhibit platelet activation to a greater extent than human RBCs, whereas GbX knockdown inhibits this nitrite-dependent NO signaling. The description of a novel, six-coordinate globin in RBCs with dominant electron transfer and nitrite reduction functionality provides new insights into the evolved signaling properties of ancestral heme-globins. PMID:27407144

  4. Triplex-forming Peptide Nucleic Acids Induce Heritable Elevations in Gamma-globin Expression in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Joanna Y; Reza, Faisal; Glazer, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Potentiating homologous recombination using triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) can be used to mediate targeted sequence editing by donor DNAs and thereby induce functional gene expression to supplant non-functional counterparts. Mutations that disrupt the normal function of the β-globin subunit cause hemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell disease and β-thalassemias. However, expression of the functional γ-globin subunit in adults, a benign condition called hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH), can ameliorate the severity of these disorders, but this expression is normally silenced. Here, we harness triplex-forming PNA-induced donor DNA recombination to create HPFH mutations that increase the expression of γ-globin in adult mammalian cells, including β-yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) bone marrow and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Transfection of human cells led to site-specific modification frequencies of 1.63% using triplex-forming PNA γ-194-3K in conjunction with donor DNAs, compared with 0.29% using donor DNAs alone. We also concurrently modified the γ-globin promoter to insert both HPFH-associated point mutations and a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE), conferring increased expression that was also regulated by oxygen tension. This work demonstrates application of oligonucleotide-based gene therapy to induce a quiescent gene promoter in mammalian cells and regulate its expression via an introduced HRE transcription factor binding site for potential therapeutic purposes. PMID:23337982

  5. Deletion and replacement of the mouse adult beta-globin genes by a "plug and socket" repeated targeting strategy.

    PubMed

    Detloff, P J; Lewis, J; John, S W; Shehee, W R; Langenbach, R; Maeda, N; Smithies, O

    1994-10-01

    We describe a two-step strategy to alter any mouse locus repeatedly and efficiently by direct positive selection. Using conventional targeting for the first step, a functional neo gene and a nonfunctional HPRT minigene (the "socket") are introduced into the genome of HPRT- embryonic stem (ES) cells close to the chosen locus, in this case the beta-globin locus. For the second step, a targeting construct (the "plug") that recombines homologously with the integrated socket and supplies the remaining portion of the HPRT minigene is used; this homologous recombination generates a functional HPRT gene and makes the ES cells hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine resistant. At the same time, the plug provides DNA sequences that recombine homologously with sequences in the target locus and modifies them in the desired manner; the plug is designed so that correctly targeted cells also lose the neo gene and become G418 sensitive. We have used two different plugs to make alterations in the mouse beta-globin locus starting with the same socket-containing ES cell line. One plug deleted 20 kb of DNA containing the two adult beta-globin genes. The other replaced the same region with the human beta-globin gene containing the mutation responsible for sickle cell anemia.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: methemoglobinemia, beta-globin type

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells. Specifically, it alters a molecule called hemoglobin within these cells. Hemoglobin within red blood cells attaches (binds) to oxygen ... in tissues throughout the body. Instead of normal hemoglobin, people with methemoglobinemia, beta-globin type have an ...

  7. Neuroprotection in Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Doozandeh, Azadeh; Yazdani, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a degenerative optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and visual field defects. It is known that in some glaucoma patients, death of RGCs continues despite intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction. Neuroprotection in the field of glaucoma is defined as any treatment, independent of IOP reduction, which prevents RGC death. Glutamate antagonists, ginkgo biloba extract, neurotrophic factors, antioxidants, calcium channel blockers, brimonidine, glaucoma medications with blood regulatory effect and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors are among compounds with possible neuroprotective activity in preclinical studies. A few agents (such as brimonidine or memantine) with neuroprotective effects in experimental studies have advanced to clinical trials; however the results of clinical trials for these agents have not been conclusive. Nevertheless, lack of compelling clinical evidence has not prevented the off-label use of some of these compounds in glaucoma practice. Stem cell transplantation has been reported to halt experimental neurodegenerative disease processes in the absence of cell replacement. It has been hypothesized that transplantation of some types of stem cells activates multiple neuroprotective pathways via secretion of various factors. The advantage of this approach is a prolonged and targeted effect. Important concerns in this field include the secretion of unwanted harmful mediators, graft survival issues and tumorigenesis. Neuroprotection in glaucoma, pharmacologically or by stem cell transplantation, is an interesting subject waiting for broad and multidisciplinary collaborative studies to better clarify its role in clinical practice. PMID:27413504

  8. Neuroprotection in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Doozandeh, Azadeh; Yazdani, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a degenerative optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and visual field defects. It is known that in some glaucoma patients, death of RGCs continues despite intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction. Neuroprotection in the field of glaucoma is defined as any treatment, independent of IOP reduction, which prevents RGC death. Glutamate antagonists, ginkgo biloba extract, neurotrophic factors, antioxidants, calcium channel blockers, brimonidine, glaucoma medications with blood regulatory effect and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors are among compounds with possible neuroprotective activity in preclinical studies. A few agents (such as brimonidine or memantine) with neuroprotective effects in experimental studies have advanced to clinical trials; however the results of clinical trials for these agents have not been conclusive. Nevertheless, lack of compelling clinical evidence has not prevented the off-label use of some of these compounds in glaucoma practice. Stem cell transplantation has been reported to halt experimental neurodegenerative disease processes in the absence of cell replacement. It has been hypothesized that transplantation of some types of stem cells activates multiple neuroprotective pathways via secretion of various factors. The advantage of this approach is a prolonged and targeted effect. Important concerns in this field include the secretion of unwanted harmful mediators, graft survival issues and tumorigenesis. Neuroprotection in glaucoma, pharmacologically or by stem cell transplantation, is an interesting subject waiting for broad and multidisciplinary collaborative studies to better clarify its role in clinical practice. PMID:27413504

  9. Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Feng-yan; Yang, Le; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-gao; Liu, Shui-bing; An, Jia-ze

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. In vivo studies demonstrated that Asiaticoside could attenuate neurobehavioral, neurochemical and histological changes in transient focal middle cerebral artery occlusion animals. In addition, Asiaticoside showed anxiolytic effects in acute and chronic stress animals. However, its potential neuroprotective properties in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity have not been fully studied. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity invoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Pretreatment with Asiaticoside decreased neuronal cell loss in a concentration-dependent manner and restored changes in expression of apoptotic-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Asiaticoside pretreatment also attenuated the upregulation of NR2B expression, a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but did not affect expression of NR2A subunits. Additionally, in cultured neurons, Asiaticoside significantly inhibited Ca2+ influx induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate. These experimental findings provide preliminary evidence that during excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure in cultured cortical neurons, the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside are mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Aside from its anti-oxidant activity, down-regulation of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be one of the underlying mechanisms in Asiaticoside neuroprotection. PMID:25221579

  10. Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feng-Yan; Yang, Le; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Liu, Shui-Bing; An, Jia-Ze

    2014-07-01

    In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. In vivo studies demonstrated that Asiaticoside could attenuate neurobehavioral, neurochemical and histological changes in transient focal middle cerebral artery occlusion animals. In addition, Asiaticoside showed anxiolytic effects in acute and chronic stress animals. However, its potential neuroprotective properties in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity have not been fully studied. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity invoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Pretreatment with Asiaticoside decreased neuronal cell loss in a concentration-dependent manner and restored changes in expression of apoptotic-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Asiaticoside pretreatment also attenuated the upregulation of NR2B expression, a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but did not affect expression of NR2A subunits. Additionally, in cultured neurons, Asiaticoside significantly inhibited Ca(2+) influx induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate. These experimental findings provide preliminary evidence that during excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure in cultured cortical neurons, the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside are mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Aside from its anti-oxidant activity, down-regulation of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be one of the underlying mechanisms in Asiaticoside neuroprotection.

  11. Differential Loss and Retention of Cytoglobin, Myoglobin, and Globin-E during the Radiation of Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Storz, Jay F.

    2011-01-01

    If rates of postduplication gene retention are positively correlated with levels of functional constraint, then gene duplicates that have been retained in a restricted number of taxonomic lineages would be expected to exhibit relatively low levels of sequence conservation. Paradoxical patterns are presented by gene duplicates that have been retained in a small number of taxa but which are nonetheless subject to strong purifying selection relative to paralogous members of the same multigene family. This pattern suggests that such genes may have been co-opted for novel, lineage-specific functions. One possible example involves the enigmatic globin-E gene (GbE), which appears to be exclusively restricted to birds. Available data indicate that this gene is expressed exclusively in the avian eye, but its physiological function remains a mystery. In contrast to the highly restricted phyletic distribution of GbE, the overwhelming majority of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) possess copies of the related cytoglobin (Cygb) and myoglobin (Mb) genes. The purpose of the present study was 1) to assess the phyletic distribution of the Cygb, Mb, and GbE genes among vertebrates, 2) to elucidate the duplicative origins and evolutionary histories of these three genes, and 3) to evaluate the relative levels of functional constraint of these genes based on comparative sequence analysis. To accomplish these objectives, we conducted a combined phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis involving taxa that represent each of the major lineages of gnathostome vertebrates. Results of synteny comparisons and phylogenetic topology tests revealed that GbE is clearly not the product of a recent, bird-specific duplication event. Instead, GbE originated via duplication of a proto-Mb gene in the stem lineage of gnathostomes. Unlike the Mb gene, which has been retained in all major gnathostome lineages other than amphibians, the GbE gene has been retained only in the lineage leading to modern

  12. [Neuroprotective actions of lithium].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Jeong, Mi Ra; Senatorov, Vladimir V; Christ, Lori; Leeds, Peter; Chuang, De-Maw; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has long been one of the primary drugs used to treat bipolar mood disorder. However, neither the etiology of this disease nor the therapeutic mechanism(s) of this drug is well understood. Several lines of clinical evidence suggest that lithium has neurotrophic actions. For example chronic lithium treatment increases the volume of gray matter and the content of N-acetyl-aspartate, a cell survival marker, in bipolar mood disorder patients (Moore et al., 2000). Moreover, treatment with this mood-stabilizer suppresses the decrease in the volume of the subgenual pre-frontal cortex found in bipolar patients (Drevets, 2001). To elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions of lithium, we employed a preparation of cultured cortical neurons prepared form embryonic rats. We found that treatment with therapeutic doses (0.2-1.2 mM) of lithium robustly protects cortical neurons from multiple insults, notably glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. The neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity is time-dependent, requiring treatment for 5-6 days for maximal effect, and is associated with a reduction in NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx. The latter is correlated with a decrease in Tyrosine 1472 phosphorylation levels in the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors and a loss of Src kinase activity which is involved in NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation. Neither the activity of total tyrosine protein kinase nor that of tyrosine protein phosphatase is affected by this drug, indicating the selectivity of the modulation. Lithium neuroprotection against excitotoxicity is inhibited by a BDNF-neutralizing antibody and K252a, a Trk antagonist. Lithium treatment time-dependently increases the intracellular level of BDNF in cortical neurons and activates its receptor, TrkB. The neuroprotection can be completely blocked by either heterozygous or homozygous knockout of the BDNF gene. These results suggest a central role of BDNF and TrkB in mediating the

  13. NEUROPROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF CURCUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Greg M.; Teter, Bruce; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases result in the loss of functional neurons and synapses. Although future stem cell therapies offer some hope, current treatments for most of these diseases are less than adequate and our best hope is to prevent these devastating diseases. Neuroprotective approaches work best prior to the initiation of damage, suggesting that some safe and effective prophylaxis would be highly desirable. Curcumin has an outstanding safety profile and a number of pleiotropic actions with potential for neuroprotective efficacy, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-protein-aggregate activities. These can be achieved at sub-micromolar levels. Curcumin’s dose–response curves are strongly dose dependent and often biphasic so that in vitro data need to be cautiously interpreted; many effects might not be achievable in target tissues in vivo with oral dosing. However, despite concerns about poor oral bioavailability, curcumin has at least 10 known neuroprotective actions and many of these might be realized in vivo. Indeed, accumulating cell culture and animal model data show that dietary curcumin is a strong candidate for use in the prevention or treatment of major disabling age-related neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and stroke. Promising results have already led to ongoing pilot clinical trials. PMID:17569212

  14. Small Molecule Anticonvulsant Agents with Potent In Vitro Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Garry R.; Zhang, Yan; Du, Yanming; Kondaveeti, Sandeep K.; Zdilla, Michael J.; Reitz, Allen B.

    2012-01-01

    Severe seizure activity is associated with recurring cycles of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress that result in progressive neuronal damage and death. Intervention to halt these pathological processes is a compelling disease-modifying strategy for the treatment of seizure disorders. In the present study, a core small molecule with anticonvulsant activity has been structurally optimized for neuroprotection. Phenotypic screening of rat hippocampal cultures with nutrient medium depleted of antioxidants was utilized as a disease model. Increased cell death and decreased neuronal viability produced by acute treatment with glutamate or hydrogen peroxide were prevented by our novel molecules. The neuroprotection associated with this chemical series has marked structure activity relationships that focus on modification of the benzylic position of a 2-phenyl-2-hydroxyethyl sulfamide core structure. Complete separation between anticonvulsant activity and neuroprotective action was dependent on substitution at the benzylic carbon. Chiral selectivity was evident in that the S-enantiomer of the benzylic hydroxy group had neither neuroprotective nor anticonvulsant activity, while the R-enantiomer of the lead compound had full neuroprotective action at ≤40 nM and antiseizure activity in three animal models. These studies indicate that potent, multifunctional neuroprotective anticonvulsants are feasible within a single molecular entity. PMID:22535312

  15. Transcriptional interference among the murine β-like globin genes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Eszterhas, Susan; Pallazzi, Nicolas; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fields, Jennifer; Tanabe, Osamu; Gerber, Scott A.; Bulger, Michael; Engel, James Douglas; Groudine, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian β-globin loci contain multiple genes that are activated at different developmental stages. Studies have suggested that the transcription of one gene in a locus can influence the expression of the other locus genes. The prevalent model to explain this transcriptional interference is that all potentially active genes compete for locus control region (LCR) activity. To investigate the influence of transcription by the murine embryonic genes on transcription of the other β-like genes, we generated mice with deletions of the promoter regions of Ey and βh1 and measured transcription of the remaining genes. Deletion of the Ey and βh1 promoters increased transcription of βmajor and βminor 2-fold to 3-fold during primitive erythropoiesis. Deletion of Ey did not affect βh1 nor did deletion of βh1 affect Ey, but Ey deletion uniquely activated transcription from βh0, a β-like globin gene immediately downstream of Ey. Protein analysis showed that βh0 encodes a translatable β-like globin protein that can pair with alpha globin. The lack of transcriptional interference between Ey and βh1 and the gene-specific repression of βh0 did not support LCR competition among the embryonic genes and suggested that direct transcriptional interference from Ey suppressed βh0. PMID:17077320

  16. Identification of patients with defects in the globin genes

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Edera, Domenico; Epifania, Annunziata Anna; Milazzo, Giusi Natalia; Leo, Manuela; Santacesaria, Carmela; Allegretti, Arianna; Mazzone, Eleonora; Panetta, Paolo; Iammarino, Giovanna; Lupo, Maria Giovanna; Barbieri, Rocchina; Lioi, Maria Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction hemoglobinopathies constitute a major health problem worldwide. These disorders are characterized by a clinical and hematological phenotypic heterogeneity. The increase of HbA2 is an invaluable hematological marker of the beta-thalassemia heterozygosis and of double heterozygosis for the alleles of delta and alpha globin genes or for the alleles of delta and beta globin genes which can cause the increase of HbA2 up to normal or borderline values. Case Report we report the case of a 30-year-old woman (first pregnant) who was admitted to our Unit at 12 weeks for a screening for thalassemia. The outcomes of the biochemical and haematological exams (MCV, MCH, HbA2, HbF) highlighted that the patient was a carrier of a beta-thalassemic trait. Molecular analysis of the beta globin genes highlighted a β039C>T heterozygous mutation. Biochemical and hematological parameters of the husband (MCV, MCH, HbA2, HbF) were normal except for the level of HbA2 (3,6%). The molecular analysis of the beta globin genes highlighted a IVS2 nt844 C>G heterozygous mutation. Furthermore, the heterozygous mutation δ+cod.27G>T was detected in his δ globin gene. For this reason, he was diagnosed a δ+β Thal. Conclusions the aim of this paper is to highlight that biochemical diagnosis could not exhaustive and a molecular diagnostic widening is required to detect the genetic deficiency causing the thalassemic trait. PMID:24611095

  17. Organization, structure, and expression of the goat globin genes.

    PubMed

    Lingrel, J B; Townes, T M; Shapiro, S G; Spence, S E; Liberator, P A; Wernke, S M

    1983-01-01

    Several hemoglobin switches occur during the development of the goat, making this a useful animal for the study of globin gene expression. In order to help understand the basis for these switches, we have isolated the beta-globin genes of the goat by recombinant DNA technology and characterized these genes with respect to linkage, nucleotide sequence, and expression. The linkage arrangement so far established is epsilon I-epsilon II-psi beta X-beta C-epsilon III-epsilon IV-psi beta Z-beta A-epsilon V. It is proposed that epsilon V is followed by epsilon VI-psi beta-gamma, but so far this linkage has not been established. Several conclusions can be drawn from our findings to date. First, the beta- and gamma-globin genes of the goat have a very different evolutionary history from the beta- and gamma-globin genes of humans. While the beta and gamma genes of the human can be traced to a duplication of the ancestral epsilon/beta-globin gene before the mammalian radiation, the goat beta and gamma genes have arisen much later, and are probably the results of a duplication of a four-gene set, namely the epsilon-epsilon-psi beta-beta primordial linkage group. The beta C gene probably arose from a similar, even later duplication of the non-gamma quadruplet. Because the beta C, beta A, and gamma genes of the goat have diverged much more recently in evolution, they are much more homologous than the equivalent genes in other species. In fact, there are large regions of these genes that share identical sequences. This is meaningful in that regions of sequence identity define areas that cannot be involved in the developmental regulation of these genes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Neuroprotective therapies for glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause for blindness worldwide. It is mainly caused by glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) characterized by retinal ganglion cell loss, which leads to visual field defect and blindness. Up to now, the main purpose of antiglaucomatous therapies has been to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) through surgeries and medications. However, it has been found that progressive GON is still present in some patients with effective IOP decrease. Therefore, risk factors other than IOP elevation, like neurotrophin deprivation and excitotoxicity, contribute to progressive GON. Novel approaches of neuroprotection may be more effective for preserving the function of the optic nerve. PMID:25792807

  19. Acute chest syndrome is associated with single nucleotide polymorphism-defined beta globin cluster haplotype in children with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Bean, Christopher J; Boulet, Sheree L; Yang, Genyan; Payne, Amanda B; Ghaji, Nafisa; Pyle, Meredith E; Hooper, W Craig; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Keefer, Jeffrey; Barron-Casella, Emily A; Casella, James F; Debaun, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    Genetic diversity at the human β-globin locus has been implicated as a modifier of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) severity. However, haplotypes defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism sites across the β-globin locus have not been consistently associated with clinical phenotypes. To define the genetic structure at the β-globin locus more thoroughly, we performed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in 820 children who were homozygous for the sickle cell mutation (HbSS). Genotyping results revealed very high linkage disequilibrium across a large region spanning the locus control region and the HBB (β-globin gene) cluster. We identified three predominant haplotypes accounting for 96% of the β(S) -carrying chromosomes in this population that could be distinguished using a minimal set of common SNPs. Consistent with previous studies, fetal haemoglobin level was significantly associated with β(S) -haplotypes. After controlling for covariates, an association was detected between haplotype and rate of hospitalization for acute chest syndrome (ACS) (incidence rate ratio 0·51, 95% confidence interval 0·29-0·89) but not incidence rate of vaso-occlusive pain or presence of silent cerebral infarct (SCI). Our results suggest that these SNP-defined β(S) -haplotypes may be associated with ACS, but not pain or SCI in a study population of children with SCA.

  20. Neuroprotection in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Berger, R.; Söder, S.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants born before the 30th week of pregnancy are especially at risk of perinatal brain damage which is usually a result of cerebral ischemia or an ascending intrauterine infection. Prevention of preterm birth and early intervention given signs of imminent intrauterine infection can reduce the incidence of perinatal cerebral injury. It has been shown that administering magnesium intravenously to women at imminent risk of a preterm birth leads to a significant reduction in the likelihood of the infant developing cerebral palsy and motor skill dysfunction. It has also been demonstrated that delayed clamping of the umbilical cord after birth reduces the rate of brain hemorrhage among preterm infants by up to 50%. In addition, mesenchymal stem cells seem to have significant neuroprotective potential in animal experiments, as they increase the rate of regeneration of the damaged cerebral area. Clinical tests of these types of therapeutic intervention measures appear to be imminent. In the last trimester of pregnancy, the serum concentrations of estradiol and progesterone increase significantly. Preterm infants are removed abruptly from this estradiol and progesterone rich environment. It has been demonstrated in animal experiments that estradiol and progesterone protect the immature brain from hypoxic-ischemic lesions. However, this neuroprotective strategy has unfortunately not yet been subject to sufficient clinical investigation. PMID:25650134

  1. Zebrafish globin Switching Occurs in Two Developmental Stages and is Controlled by the LCR

    PubMed Central

    Ganis, Jared J.; Hsia, Nelson; Trompouki, Eirini; de Jong, Jill L.O.; DiBiase, Anthony; Lambert, Janelle S.; Jia, Zhiying; Sabo, Peter J.; Weaver, Molly; Sandstrom, Richard; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.

    2012-01-01

    Globin gene switching is a complex, highly regulated process allowing expression of distinct globin genes at specific developmental stages. Here, for the first time, we have characterized all of the zebrafish globins based on the completed genomic sequence. Two distinct chromosomal loci, termed major (chromosome 3) and minor (chromosome 12), harbor the globin genes containing α/β pairs in a 5′-3′ to 3′-5′ orientation. Both these loci share synteny with the mammalian α-globin locus. Zebrafish globin expression was assayed during development and demonstrated two globin switches, similar to human development. A conserved regulatory element, the locus control region (LCR), was revealed by analyzing DNase I hypersensitive sites, H3K4 trimethylation marks and GATA1 binding sites. Surprisingly, the position of these sites with relation to the globin genes is evolutionarily conserved, despite a lack of overall sequence conservation. Motifs within the zebrafish LCR include CACCC, GATA, and NFE2 sites, suggesting functional interactions with known transcription factors but not the same LCR architecture. Functional homology to the mammalian α-LCR MCS-R2 region was confirmed by robust and specific reporter expression in erythrocytes of transgenic zebrafish. Our studies provide a comprehensive characterization of the zebrafish globin loci and clarify the regulation of globin switching. PMID:22537494

  2. An erythroid chaperone that facilitates folding of α-globin subunits for hemoglobin synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang; Kong, Yi; Dore, Louis C.; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Katein, Anne M.; Zhou, Suiping; Choi, John K.; Gell, David; Mackay, Joel P.; Gow, Andrew J.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2007-01-01

    Erythrocyte precursors produce abundant α- and β-globin proteins, which assemble with each other to form hemoglobin A (HbA), the major blood oxygen carrier. αHb-stabilizing protein (AHSP) binds free α subunits reversibly to maintain their structure and limit their ability to generate reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, loss of AHSP aggravates the toxicity of excessive free α-globin caused by β-globin gene disruption in mice. Surprisingly, we found that AHSP also has important functions when free α-globin is limited. Thus, compound mutants lacking both Ahsp and 1 of 4 α-globin genes (genotype Ahsp–/–α-globin*α/αα) exhibited more severe anemia and Hb instability than mice with either mutation alone. In vitro, recombinant AHSP promoted folding of newly translated α-globin, enhanced its refolding after denaturation, and facilitated its incorporation into HbA. Moreover, in erythroid precursors, newly formed free α-globin was destabilized by loss of AHSP. Therefore, in addition to its previously defined role in detoxification of excess α-globin, AHSP also acts as a molecular chaperone to stabilize nascent α-globin for HbA assembly. Our findings illustrate what we believe to be a novel adaptive mechanism by which a specialized cell coordinates high-level production of a multisubunit protein and protects against various synthetic imbalances. PMID:17607360

  3. Genomic evidence for independent origins of beta-like globin genes in monotremes and therian mammals.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Juan C; Hoffmann, Federico G; Storz, Jay F

    2008-02-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions of the beta-globin gene family in vertebrates have revealed that developmentally regulated systems of hemoglobin synthesis have been reinvented multiple times in independent lineages. For example, the functional differentiation of embryonic and adult beta-like globin genes occurred independently in birds and mammals. In both taxa, the embryonic beta-globin gene is exclusively expressed in primitive erythroid cells derived from the yolk sac. However, the "epsilon-globin" gene in birds is not orthologous to the epsilon-globin gene in mammals, because they are independently derived from lineage-specific duplications of a proto beta-globin gene. Here, we report evidence that the early and late expressed beta-like globin genes in monotremes and therian mammals (marsupials and placental mammals) are the products of independent duplications of a proto beta-globin gene in each of these two lineages. Results of our analysis of genomic sequence data from a large number of vertebrate taxa, including sequence from the recently completed platypus genome, reveal that the epsilon- and beta-globin genes of therian mammals arose via duplication of a proto beta-globin gene after the therian/monotreme split. Our analysis of genomic sequence from the platypus also revealed the presence of a duplicate pair of beta-like globin genes that originated via duplication of a proto beta-globin gene in the monotreme lineage. This discovery provides evidence that, in different lineages of mammals, descendent copies of the same proto beta-globin gene may have been independently neofunctionalized to perform physiological tasks associated with oxygen uptake and storage during embryonic development.

  4. Butyrate Infusions in the Ovine Fetus Delay the Biologic Clock for Globin Gene Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Susan P.; Rudolph, Abraham; Faller, Douglas V.; Roman, Christine; Cohen, Ruth A.; Chen, Shao-Jing; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1988-11-01

    The switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin expression is regulated in many mammalian species by a developmental clock-like mechanism and determined by the gestational age of the fetus. Prolonging fetal globin gene expression is of considerable interest for therapeutic potential in diseases caused by abnormal β -globin genes. Butyric acid, which is found in increased plasma concentrations in infants of diabetic mothers who have delayed globin gene switching, was infused into catheterized fetal lambs in utero during the time of the normal globin gene switch period. The globin gene switch was significantly delayed in three of four butyrate-treated fetuses compared with controls and was entirely prevented in one fetus in whom the infusion was begun before the globin switch was under way. These data provide a model for investigating and arresting the biologic clock of hemoglobin switching.

  5. Intervening sequence of DNA identified in the structural portion of a mouse beta-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tilghman, S M; Tiemeier, D C; Seidman, J G; Peterlin, B M; Sullivan, M; Maizel, J V; Leder, P

    1978-01-01

    The unusual electron microscopic appearance of a hybrid formed between 9S mouse beta-globin mRNA and its corresponding cloned gene segment is caused by at least one, and possibly two, intervening sequences of DNA that interrupt the mouse beta-globin gene. Such an interpretation is consistent with a paradoxical restriction site pattern previously noted in this gene and with the nucleotide sequence of that portion of the gene that spans both structural and intervening sequences. The large intervening sequence, approximately 550 base pairs in length, occurs in the structural globin sequence and immediately follows the beta-globin codon corresponding to amino acid 104. A smaller, putative intervening sequence is located close to the 5' end of the beta-globin-coding sequence but may reside beyond its initiation codon. The beta-globin gene thus appears to be encoded in two, and possibly three, discontinuous segments. Images PMID:273235

  6. Neuroprotection and antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Lalkovičová, Maria; Danielisová, Viera

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia as a serious neurodegenerative disorder causes together with reperfusion injury many changes in nervous tissue. Most of the neuronal damage is caused by complex of biochemical reactions and substantial processes, such as protein agregation, reactions of free radicals, insufficient blood supply, glutamate excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. The result of these processes can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death and it can lead to an irreversible damage. Therefore, neuroprotection and prevention of the neurodegeneration are highly important topics to study. There are several approaches to prevent the ischemic damage. Use of many modern therapeutical methods and the incorporation of several substances into the diet of patients is possible to stimulate the endogenous protective mechanisms and improve the life quality. PMID:27482198

  7. Neuroprotection and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Lalkovičová, Maria; Danielisová, Viera

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia as a serious neurodegenerative disorder causes together with reperfusion injury many changes in nervous tissue. Most of the neuronal damage is caused by complex of biochemical reactions and substantial processes, such as protein agregation, reactions of free radicals, insufficient blood supply, glutamate excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. The result of these processes can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death and it can lead to an irreversible damage. Therefore, neuroprotection and prevention of the neurodegeneration are highly important topics to study. There are several approaches to prevent the ischemic damage. Use of many modern therapeutical methods and the incorporation of several substances into the diet of patients is possible to stimulate the endogenous protective mechanisms and improve the life quality. PMID:27482198

  8. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Wartenberg, Katja E.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest recorded application of therapeutic hypothermia in medicine spans about 5000 years; however, its use has become widespread since 2002, following the demonstration of both safety and efficacy of regimens requiring only a mild (32°C-35°C) degree of cooling after cardiac arrest. We review the mechanisms by which hypothermia confers neuroprotection as well as its physiological effects by body system and its associated risks. With regard to clinical applications, we present evidence on the role of hypothermia in traumatic brain injury, intracranial pressure elevation, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, spinal cord injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and neonatal peripartum encephalopathy. Based on the current knowledge and areas undergoing or in need of further exploration, we feel that therapeutic hypothermia holds promise in the treatment of patients with various forms of neurologic injury; however, additional quality studies are needed before its true role is fully known. PMID:24982721

  9. Neuroprotective potential of phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Phani; Khanum, Farhath

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a major health problem in the 21st century, and many neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer's Disease dementia, cerebrovascular impairment, seizure disorders, head injury and Parkinsonism, can be severly functionally debilitating in nature. In course of time, a number of neurotransmitters and signaling molecules have been identified which have been considered as therapeutic targets. Conventional as well newer molecules have been tried against these targets. Phytochemicals from medicinal plants play a vital role in maintaining the brain's chemical balance by influencing the function of receptors for the major inhibitory neurotransmitters. In traditional practice of medicine, several plants have been reported to treat cognitive disorders. In this review paper, we attempt to throw some light on the use of medicinal herbs to treat cognitive disorders. In this review, we briefly deal with some medicinal herbs focusing on their neuroprotective active phytochemical substances like fatty acids, phenols, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, terpenes etc. The resistance of neurons to various stressors by activating specific signal transduction pathways and transcription factors are also discussed. It was observed in the review that a number of herbal medicines used in Ayurvedic practices as well Chinese medicines contain multiple compounds and phytochemicals that may have a neuroprotective effect which may prove beneficial in different neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Though the presence of receptors or transporters for polyphenols or other phytochemicals of the herbal preparations, in brain tissues remains to be ascertained, compounds with multiple targets appear as a potential and promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with a multifactorial etiology. PMID:23055633

  10. Neuroprotective potential of phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. Phani; Khanum, Farhath

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a major health problem in the 21st century, and many neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer's Disease dementia, cerebrovascular impairment, seizure disorders, head injury and Parkinsonism, can be severly functionally debilitating in nature. In course of time, a number of neurotransmitters and signaling molecules have been identified which have been considered as therapeutic targets. Conventional as well newer molecules have been tried against these targets. Phytochemicals from medicinal plants play a vital role in maintaining the brain's chemical balance by influencing the function of receptors for the major inhibitory neurotransmitters. In traditional practice of medicine, several plants have been reported to treat cognitive disorders. In this review paper, we attempt to throw some light on the use of medicinal herbs to treat cognitive disorders. In this review, we briefly deal with some medicinal herbs focusing on their neuroprotective active phytochemical substances like fatty acids, phenols, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, terpenes etc. The resistance of neurons to various stressors by activating specific signal transduction pathways and transcription factors are also discussed. It was observed in the review that a number of herbal medicines used in Ayurvedic practices as well Chinese medicines contain multiple compounds and phytochemicals that may have a neuroprotective effect which may prove beneficial in different neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Though the presence of receptors or transporters for polyphenols or other phytochemicals of the herbal preparations, in brain tissues remains to be ascertained, compounds with multiple targets appear as a potential and promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with a multifactorial etiology. PMID:23055633

  11. Neuroglobin and cytoglobin: two new members of globin family

    PubMed Central

    Tosqui, Priscilla; Colombo, Marcio Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The globin family has long been defined by myoglobin and hemoglobin, proteins with the functions of oxygen storage and transportation, respectively. Recently, two new members of this family were discovered: neuroglobin present in neurons and retinal cells and cytoglobin found in various types of tissue. The increased expression of these proteins in hypoxic conditions first suggested a role in oxygen supply. However structural and functional differences, such as the hexacoordinated heme, a high autoxidation rate and different concentrations between different cellular types, have dismissed this hypothesis. The protective role of these globins has already been established. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated increased survival of neurons under stress in the presence of neuroglobin and increased resistance to neurodegenerative diseases. However the mechanism remains unknown. Functions, including detoxification of nitric oxide, free radical scavenging and as an antioxidant and signaling of apoptosis, have also been suggested for neuroglobin and an antifibrotic function for cytoglobin. PMID:23049323

  12. Immunomodulation as a neuroprotective and therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Olson, Katherine E; Gendelman, Howard E

    2016-02-01

    While immune control is associated with nigrostriatal neuroprotection for Parkinson's disease, direct cause and effect relationships have not yet been realized, and modulating the immune system for therapeutic gain has been openly debated. Here, we review how innate and adaptive immunity affect disease pathobiology, and how each could be harnessed for treatment. The overarching idea is to employ immunopharmacologics as neuroprotective strategies for disease. The aim of the current work is to review disease-modifying treatments that are currently being developed as neuroprotective strategies for PD in experimental animal models and for human disease translation. The long-term goal of this research is to effectively harness the immune system to slow or prevent PD pathobiology.

  13. The Evolution of the Globins: We Thought We Understood It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesk, Arthur M.

    Protein crystallography achieved its first results in the late 1950s with the structure determinations of sperm whale myoglobin and human haemoglobin. These gave us our first glimpse of the structural changes that take place during protein evolution. Many other structures of proteins in the globin family have continued to reveal interesting and important details of the coordinated divergence during evolution of amino acid sequences and protein structures and functions.

  14. Arrangements of alpha-globin gene cluster in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Peng, H W; Choo, K B; Ho, C H; Yen, M S; Liung, W Y; Lin, C K; Yang, Z L; Ng, H T; Ching, K N; Han, S H

    1989-01-01

    In a gene mapping study on 217 newborn babies in Taiwan with alpha- and zeta-globin probes, we have observed 4 cases (1.84%) of alpha-thalassemia-2 heterozygotes (zeta zeta-alpha/zeta zeta alpha alpha) without increased levels of hemoglobin (Hb) Bart's in the cord blood. Eleven subjects (5.07%) were found to have the South East Asian alpha-thalassemia-1 haplotype (zeta zeta--SEA/zeta zeta alpha alpha) with increased Hb Bart's levels ranging from 2.2 to 9%. One case, with Hb Bart's level of 14% in the cord blood, was found to have the genotype of zeta zeta--SEA/zeta zeta alpha alpha T (0.46%). Four heterozygotes (1.84%) were found with the triple alpha gene anti-rightward arrangement (zeta zeta alpha alpha alpha 3.7/zeta zeta alpha alpha). Twenty-one heterozygotes (9.68%) were found to have the triple zeta-globin gene arrangement (zeta zeta zeta alpha alpha/zeta zeta alpha alpha). A new triple zeta-globin gene variant with a BamHI polymorphism was also observed in this study.

  15. Developmental and species-divergent globin switching are driven by BCL11A

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Xu, Jian; Ragoczy, Tobias; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Walkley, Carl R.; Maika, Shanna D.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Ito, Masafumi; Groudine, Mark; Bender, M.A.; Tucker, Philip W.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of changes in cis-regulatory elements or trans-acting factors to interspecies differences in gene expression is not well understood. The mammalian β-globin loci have served as a paradigm for gene regulation during development. Transgenic mice harboring the human β-globin locus, consisting of the linked embryonic (ε), fetal (γ) and adult (β) genes, have been used as a model system to study the temporal switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin, as occurs in humans. We show that the human γ-globin genes in these mice behave as murine embryonic globin genes, revealing a limitation of the model and demonstrating that critical differences in the trans-acting milieu have arisen during mammalian evolution. We show that the expression of BCL11A, a repressor of human γ-globin expression identified through genome-wide association studies, differs between mouse and human. Developmental silencing of the mouse embryonic globin and human γ-globin genes fails to occur in mice in the absence of BCL11A. Thus, BCL11A is a critical mediator of species-divergent globin switching. By comparing the ontogeny of β-globin gene regulation in mice and humans, we have shown that alterations in expression of a trans-acting factor constitute a critical driver of gene expression changes during evolution. PMID:19657335

  16. Neuroprotective Effects of Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Pangestuti, Ratih; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health effects. Among marine organisms, marine algae have been identified as an under-exploited plant resource, although they have long been recognized as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Presently, several lines of studies have provided insight into biological activities and neuroprotective effects of marine algae including antioxidant, anti-neuroinflammatory, cholinesterase inhibitory activity and the inhibition of neuronal death. Hence, marine algae have great potential to be used for neuroprotection as part of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and functional foods. This contribution presents an overview of marine algal neuroprotective effects and their potential application in neuroprotection. PMID:21673890

  17. Structure and function of the globin and globin gene from the Antarctic mollusc Yoldia eightsi.

    PubMed Central

    Dewilde, Sylvia; Angelini, Elisa; Kiger, Laurent; Marden, Michael C; Beltramini, Mariano; Salvato, Benedetto; Moens, Luc

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism of adaptation of haemoglobin from the Antarctic mollusc Yoldia eightsi to its low-temperature environment is a decrease in the oxygen affinity via an increased ligand-dissociation rate. At 2 degrees C this haemoglobin has an oxygen affinity similar to other haemoglobins at 25 degrees C. At 25 degrees C, Yoldia haemoglobin shows a low oxygen affinity, resembling that of human deoxyhaemoglobin. The mechanism involves a lower binding energy to oxygen, suggesting a loss or weakening of the usual hydrogen bond, leading to a higher oxygen-dissociation rate. However, Yoldia haemoglobin has the usual distal and proximal histidines, so the primary structure alone does not provide an obvious explanation for the low affinity. The CO-binding kinetics are biphasic, with the fraction of slow phase increasing at higher protein concentrations, indicating the formation of dimers or a higher level of polymerization. The protein-protein interaction appears to be of hydrophobic nature, since it can be partially reversed by addition of ethylene glycol as co-solvent. While the CO-association rates differ by a factor of 10, the oxygen equilibrium data could be simulated with a single affinity. The Yoldia haemoglobin gene contains three introns, interrupting the coding region at position NA1.2, B12.2 and G7.0. The conservation of the B12.2 and G7.0 introns is in contrast with the unprecedented NA1.2 intron. Phylogenetic analyses reveal a gene tree where the Yoldia haemoglobin gene is separated from other mollusc globin genes, confirming the specific adaptation of the Yoldia haemoglobin. PMID:12423205

  18. Original Research: Generation of non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse models: -175 Black HPFH and -195 Brazilian HPFH

    PubMed Central

    Braghini, Carolina A; Costa, Flavia C; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Neades, Renee Y; Novikova, Lesya V; Parker, Matthew P; Winefield, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin is a major genetic modifier of the phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with sickle cell disease and certain β-thalassemias. Normal levels of fetal hemoglobin postnatally are approximately 1% of total hemoglobin. Patients who have hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin, characterized by elevated synthesis of γ-globin in adulthood, show reduced disease pathophysiology. Hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin is caused by β-globin locus deletions (deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin) or γ-globin gene promoter point mutations (non-deletional hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin). Current research has focused on elucidating the pathways involved in the maintenance/reactivation of γ-globin in adult life. To better understand these pathways, we generated new β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice bearing the Aγ-globin -175 T > C or -195 C > G hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations to model naturally occurring hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. Adult -175 and -195 mutant β-YAC mice displayed a hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin phenotype, as measured at the mRNA and protein levels. The molecular basis for these phenotypes was examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation of transcription factor/co-factor binding, including YY1, PAX1, TAL1, LMO2, and LDB1. In -175 HPFH versus wild-type samples, the occupancy of LMO2, TAL1 and LDB1 proteins was enriched in HPFH mice (5.8-fold, 5.2-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively), a result that concurs with a recent study in cell lines showing that these proteins form a complex with GATA-1 to mediate long-range interactions between the locus control region and the Aγ-globin gene. Both hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations result in a gain of Aγ-globin activation, in contrast to other hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin mutations that result in a loss of repression. The mice provide additional tools to study

  19. Hydroxymethylcytosine and demethylation of the γ-globin gene promoter during erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Maria Armila; Rivers, Angela; Ibanez, Vinzon; Vaitkus, Kestis; Mahmud, Nadim; DeSimone, Joseph; Lavelle, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for developmental stage-specific regulation of γ-globin gene expression involves DNA methylation. Previous results have shown that the γ-globin promoter is nearly fully demethylated during fetal liver erythroid differentiation and partially demethylated during adult bone marrow erythroid differentiation. The hypothesis that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a known intermediate in DNA demethylation pathways, is involved in demethylation of the γ-globin gene promoter during erythroid differentiation was investigated by analyzing levels of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5hmC at a CCGG site within the 5′ γ-globin gene promoter region in FACS-purified cells from baboon bone marrow and fetal liver enriched for different stages of erythroid differentiation. Our results show that 5mC and 5hmC levels at the γ-globin promoter are dynamically modulated during erythroid differentiation with peak levels of 5hmC preceding and/or coinciding with demethylation. The Tet2 and Tet3 dioxygenases that catalyze formation of 5hmC are expressed during early stages of erythroid differentiation and Tet3 expression increases as differentiation proceeds. In baboon CD34+ bone marrow-derived erythroid progenitor cell cultures, γ-globin expression was positively correlated with 5hmC and negatively correlated with 5mC at the γ-globin promoter. Supplementation of culture media with Vitamin C, a cofactor of the Tet dioxygenases, reduced γ-globin promoter DNA methylation and increased γ-globin expression when added alone and in an additive manner in combination with either DNA methyltransferase or LSD1 inhibitors. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the Tet-mediated 5hmC pathway is involved in developmental stage-specific regulation of γ-globin expression by mediating demethylation of the γ-globin promoter. PMID:25932923

  20. Neuroprotection by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Dajas, F; Rivera-Megret, F; Blasina, F; Arredondo, F; Abin-Carriquiry, J A; Costa, G; Echeverry, C; Lafon, L; Heizen, H; Ferreira, M; Morquio, A

    2003-12-01

    The high morbidity, high socioeconomic costs and lack of specific treatments are key factors that define the relevance of brain pathology for human health and the importance of research on neuronal protective agents. Epidemiological studies have shown beneficial effects of flavonoids on arteriosclerosis-related pathology in general and neurodegeneration in particular. Flavonoids can protect the brain by their ability to modulate intracellular signals promoting cellular survival. Quercetin and structurally related flavonoids (myricetin, fisetin, luteolin) showed a marked cytoprotective capacity in in vitro experimental conditions in models of predominantly apoptotic death such as that induced by medium concentrations (200 M) of H2O2 added to PC12 cells in culture. Nevertheless, quercetin did not protect substantia nigra neurons in vivo from an oxidative insult (6-hydroxydopamine), probably due to difficulties in crossing the blood-brain barrier. On the other hand, treatment of permanent focal ischemia with a lecithin/quercetin preparation decreased lesion volume, showing that preparations that help to cross the blood-brain barrier may be critical for the expression of the effects of flavonoids on the brain. The hypothesis is advanced that a group of quercetin-related flavonoids could become lead molecules for the development of neuroprotective compounds with multitarget anti-ischemic effects.

  1. Microglia and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihong; Trapp, Bruce D

    2016-01-01

    Microglia were first identified over a century ago, but our knowledge about their ontogeny and functions has significantly expanded only recently. Microglia colonize the central nervous system (CNS) in utero and play essential roles in brain development. Once neural development is completed, microglia function as the resident innate immune cells of the CNS by surveying their microenvironment and becoming activated when the CNS is challenged by infection, injury, or disease. Despite the traditional view of microglia as being destructive in neurological diseases, recent studies have shown that microglia maintain CNS homeostasis and protect the CNS under various pathological conditions. Microglia can be prophylactically activated by modeling infection with systemic lipopolysaccharide injections and these activated microglia can protect the brain from traumatic injury through modulation of neuronal synapses. Microglia can also protect the CNS by promoting neurogenesis, clearing debris, and suppressing inflammation in diseases such as stroke, autism, and Alzheimer's. Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the CNS. Despite the traditional view of microglia as being destructive in neurological diseases, recent studies have shown that they maintain tissue homeostasis and protect the CNS under various pathological conditions. They achieve so by clearing debris, promoting neurogenesis, suppressing inflammation and stripping inhibitory synapses. This review summarizes recent advances of our understanding on the multi-dimensional neuroprotective roles of microglia.

  2. Genomic remnants of alpha-globin genes in the hemoglobinless antarctic icefishes.

    PubMed Central

    Cocca, E; Ratnayake-Lecamwasam, M; Parker, S K; Camardella, L; Ciaramella, M; di Prisco, G; Detrich, H W

    1995-01-01

    Alone among piscine taxa, the antarctic icefishes (family Channichthyidae, suborder Notothenioidei) have evolved compensatory adaptations that maintain normal metabolic functions in the absence of erythrocytes and the respiratory oxygen transporter hemoglobin. Although the uniquely "colorless" or "white" condition of the blood of icefishes has been recognized since the early 20th century, the status of globin genes in the icefish genomes has, surprisingly, remained unexplored. Using alpha- and beta-globin cDNAs from the antarctic rockcod Notothenia coriiceps (family Nototheniidae, suborder Notothenioidei), we have probed the genomes of three white-blooded icefishes and four red-blooded notothenioid relatives (three antarctic, one temperate) for globin-related DNA sequences. We detect specific, high-stringency hybridization of the alpha-globin probe to genomic DNAs of both white- and red-blooded species, whereas the beta-globin cDNA hybridizes only to the genomes of the red-blooded fishes. Our results suggest that icefishes retain inactive genomic remnants of alpha-globin genes but have lost, either through deletion or through rapid mutation, the gene that encodes beta-globin. We propose that the hemoglobinless phenotype of extant icefishes is the result of deletion of the single adult beta-globin locus prior to the diversification of the clade. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7892183

  3. CACCC and GATA-1 sequences make the constitutively expressed alpha-globin gene erythroid-responsive in mouse erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ren, S; Li, J; Atweh, G F

    1996-01-01

    Although the human alpha-globin and beta-globin genes are co-regulated in adult life, they achieve the same end by very different mechanisms. For example, a transfected beta-globin gene is expressed in an inducible manner in mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells while a transfected alpha-globin gene is constitutively expressed at a high level in induced and uninduced MEL cells. Interestingly, when the alpha-globin gene is transferred into MEL cells as part of human chromosome 16, it is appropriately expressed in an inducible manner. We explored the basis for the lack of erythroid-responsiveness of the proximal regulatory elements of the human alpha-globin gene. Since the alpha-globin gene is the only functional human globin gene that lacks CACCC and GATA-1 motifs, we asked whether their addition to the alpha-globin promoter would make the gene erythroid-responsive in MEL cells. The addition of each of these binding sites to the alpha-globin promoter separately did not result in inducibility in MEL cells. However, when both sites were added together, the alpha-globin gene became inducible in MEL cells. This suggests that erythroid non-responsiveness of the alpha-globin gene results from the lack of erythroid binding sites and is not necessarily a function of the constitutively active, GC rich promoter. PMID:8628660

  4. Clinical trials for neuroprotection in ALS.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, G; Carlesi, C; Pasquali, L; Piazza, S; Pietracupa, S; Fornai, F; Ruggieri, S; Murri, L

    2010-07-01

    Owing to uncertainty on the pathogenic mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) riluzole remains the only available therapy, with only marginal effects on disease survival. Here we review some of the recent advances in the search for disease-modifying drugs for ALS based on their putative neuroprotective effetcs. A number of more or less established agents have recently been investigated also in ALS for their potential role in neuroprotection and relying on antiglutamatergic, antioxidant or antiapoptotic strategies. Among them Talampanel, beta-lactam antibiotics, Coenzyme Q10, and minocycline have been investigated. Progress has also been made in exploiting growth factors for the treatment of ALS, partly due to advances in developing effective delivery systems to the central nervous system. A number of new therapies have also been identified, including a novel class of compounds, such as heat-shock protein co-inducers, which upregulate cell stress responses, and agents promoting autophagy and mitochondriogenesis, such as lithium and rapamycin. More recently, alterations of mRNA processing were described as a pathogenic mechanism in genetically defined forms of ALS, as those related to TDP-43 and FUS-TLS gene mutations. This knowledge is expected to improve our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanism in ALS and developing more effective therapies. PMID:20406180

  5. Beta-globin locus activation regions: conservation of organization, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Li, Q L; Zhou, B; Powers, P; Enver, T; Stamatoyannopoulos, G

    1990-11-01

    The human beta-globin locus activation region (LAR) comprises four erythroid-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (I-IV) thought to be largely responsible for activating the beta-globin domain and facilitating high-level erythroid-specific globin gene expression. We identified the goat beta-globin LAR, determined 10.2 kilobases of its sequence, and demonstrated its function in transgenic mice. The human and goat LARs share 6.5 kilobases of homologous sequences that are as highly conserved as the epsilon-globin gene promoters. Furthermore, the overall spatial organization of the two LARs has been conserved. These results suggest that the functionally relevant regions of the LAR are large and that in addition to their primary structure, the spatial relationship of the conserved elements is important for LAR function.

  6. Evolution of the globin gene family in deuterostomes: lineage-specific patterns of diversification and attrition.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Hoogewijs, David; Hankeln, Thomas; Ebner, Bettina; Vinogradov, Serge N; Bailly, Xavier; Storz, Jay F

    2012-07-01

    In the Metazoa, globin proteins display an underlying unity in tertiary structure that belies an extraordinary diversity in primary structures, biochemical properties, and physiological functions. Phylogenetic reconstructions can reveal which of these functions represent novel, lineage-specific innovations, and which represent ancestral functions that are shared with homologous globin proteins in other eukaryotes and even prokaryotes. To date, our understanding of globin diversity in deuterostomes has been hindered by a dearth of genomic sequence data from the Ambulacraria (echinoderms + hemichordates), the sister group of chordates, and the phylum Xenacoelomorpha, which includes xenoturbellids, acoelomorphs, and nemertodermatids. Here, we report the results of a phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of deuterostomes. We first characterized the globin genes of the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a representative of the phylum Hemichordata. We then integrated genomic sequence data from the acorn worm into a comprehensive analysis of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships among globin genes from representatives of the eight lineages that comprise the superphylum Deuterostomia. The primary aims were 1) to unravel the evolutionary history of the globin gene superfamily in deuterostomes and 2) to use the estimated phylogeny to gain insights into the functional evolution of deuterostome globins. Results of our analyses indicate that the deuterostome common ancestor possessed a repertoire of at least four distinct globin paralogs and that different subsets of these ancestral genes have been retained in each of the descendant organismal lineages. In each major deuterostome group, a different subset of ancestral precursor genes underwent lineage-specific expansions of functional diversity through repeated rounds of gene duplication and divergence. By integrating results of the phylogenetic analysis with available

  7. Evolution of the globin gene family in deuterostomes: lineage-specific patterns of diversification and attrition.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Hoogewijs, David; Hankeln, Thomas; Ebner, Bettina; Vinogradov, Serge N; Bailly, Xavier; Storz, Jay F

    2012-07-01

    In the Metazoa, globin proteins display an underlying unity in tertiary structure that belies an extraordinary diversity in primary structures, biochemical properties, and physiological functions. Phylogenetic reconstructions can reveal which of these functions represent novel, lineage-specific innovations, and which represent ancestral functions that are shared with homologous globin proteins in other eukaryotes and even prokaryotes. To date, our understanding of globin diversity in deuterostomes has been hindered by a dearth of genomic sequence data from the Ambulacraria (echinoderms + hemichordates), the sister group of chordates, and the phylum Xenacoelomorpha, which includes xenoturbellids, acoelomorphs, and nemertodermatids. Here, we report the results of a phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of deuterostomes. We first characterized the globin genes of the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a representative of the phylum Hemichordata. We then integrated genomic sequence data from the acorn worm into a comprehensive analysis of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships among globin genes from representatives of the eight lineages that comprise the superphylum Deuterostomia. The primary aims were 1) to unravel the evolutionary history of the globin gene superfamily in deuterostomes and 2) to use the estimated phylogeny to gain insights into the functional evolution of deuterostome globins. Results of our analyses indicate that the deuterostome common ancestor possessed a repertoire of at least four distinct globin paralogs and that different subsets of these ancestral genes have been retained in each of the descendant organismal lineages. In each major deuterostome group, a different subset of ancestral precursor genes underwent lineage-specific expansions of functional diversity through repeated rounds of gene duplication and divergence. By integrating results of the phylogenetic analysis with available

  8. Evolution of the Globin Gene Family in Deuterostomes: Lineage-Specific Patterns of Diversification and Attrition

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Hoogewijs, David; Hankeln, Thomas; Ebner, Bettina; Vinogradov, Serge N.; Bailly, Xavier; Storz, Jay F.

    2012-01-01

    In the Metazoa, globin proteins display an underlying unity in tertiary structure that belies an extraordinary diversity in primary structures, biochemical properties, and physiological functions. Phylogenetic reconstructions can reveal which of these functions represent novel, lineage-specific innovations, and which represent ancestral functions that are shared with homologous globin proteins in other eukaryotes and even prokaryotes. To date, our understanding of globin diversity in deuterostomes has been hindered by a dearth of genomic sequence data from the Ambulacraria (echinoderms + hemichordates), the sister group of chordates, and the phylum Xenacoelomorpha, which includes xenoturbellids, acoelomorphs, and nemertodermatids. Here, we report the results of a phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of deuterostomes. We first characterized the globin genes of the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a representative of the phylum Hemichordata. We then integrated genomic sequence data from the acorn worm into a comprehensive analysis of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships among globin genes from representatives of the eight lineages that comprise the superphylum Deuterostomia. The primary aims were 1) to unravel the evolutionary history of the globin gene superfamily in deuterostomes and 2) to use the estimated phylogeny to gain insights into the functional evolution of deuterostome globins. Results of our analyses indicate that the deuterostome common ancestor possessed a repertoire of at least four distinct globin paralogs and that different subsets of these ancestral genes have been retained in each of the descendant organismal lineages. In each major deuterostome group, a different subset of ancestral precursor genes underwent lineage-specific expansions of functional diversity through repeated rounds of gene duplication and divergence. By integrating results of the phylogenetic analysis with available

  9. Fate of a redundant gamma-globin gene in the atelid clade of New World monkeys: implications concerning fetal globin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, C M; Schneider, M P; Sampaio, M I; Schneider, H; Slightom, J L; Chiu, C H; Neiswanger, K; Gumucio, D L; Czelusniak, J; Goodman, M

    1995-01-01

    Conclusive evidence was provided that gamma 1, the upstream of the two linked simian gamma-globin loci (5'-gamma 1-gamma 2-3'), is a pseudogene in a major group of New World monkeys. Sequence analysis of PCR-amplified genomic fragments of predicted sizes revealed that all extant genera of the platyrrhine family Atelidae [Lagothrix (woolly monkeys), Brachyteles (woolly spider monkeys), Ateles (spider monkeys), and Alouatta (howler monkeys)] share a large deletion that removed most of exon 2, all of intron 2 and exon 3, and much of the 3' flanking sequence of gamma 1. The fact that two functional gamma-globin genes were not present in early ancestors of the Atelidae (and that gamma 1 was the dispensible gene) suggests that for much or even all of their evolution, platyrrhines have had gamma 2 as the primary fetally expressed gamma-globin gene, in contrast to catarrhines (e.g., humans and chimpanzees) that have gamma 1 as the primary fetally expressed gamma-globin gene. Results from promoter sequences further suggest that all three platyrrhine families (Atelidae, Cebidae, and Pitheciidae) have gamma 2 rather than gamma 1 as their primary fetally expressed gamma-globin gene. The implications of this suggestion were explored in terms of how gene redundancy, regulatory mutations, and distance of each gamma-globin gene from the locus control region were possibly involved in the acquisition and maintenance of fetal, rather than embryonic, expression. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7535927

  10. Transgenic mice containing a 248-kb yeast artificial chromosome carrying the human beta-globin locus display proper developmental control of human globin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, K R; Clegg, C H; Huxley, C; Josephson, B M; Haugen, H S; Furukawa, T; Stamatoyannopoulos, G

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated using a purified 248-kb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) bearing an intact 82-kb human beta-globin locus and 148 kb of flanking sequence. Seventeen of 148 F0 pups were transgenic. RNase protection analysis of RNA isolated from the blood of 13 gamma- and beta-globin-positive founders showed that only the human beta-globin gene was expressed in the adult founders. Studies of F1 and F2 fetuses demonstrated that the genes of the beta-locus YAC displayed the proper developmental switches in beta-like globin gene expression. Expression of epsilon- and gamma-globin, but not beta-globin, was observed in the yolk sac, there was only minor gamma and mostly beta expression in the 14-day liver, and only beta mRNA in the blood of the adult animals. Structural data showed that the locus was intact. These results indicate that it is now possible to dissect regulatory mechanisms within the context of an entire locus in vivo by using the ability to perform mutagenesis efficiently in yeast via homologous recombination, followed by purification of the altered YAC and its introduction into mice. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8356061

  11. Hemoglobin Agenogi--A rare abnormal beta globin chain variant.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Sharma, Geetika; Chandra, Jagdish; Colah, Roshan

    2016-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) Agenogi is clinically asymptomatic, rare β-globin chain variant characterized by a substitution of glutamic acid by lysine at position 90 of β-chain. It elutes in the C-window on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We report a 10-year-old male with easy fatigability, lethargy, pallor, and mild splenomegaly. Hematological parameters revealed microcytic hypochromic anemia and mildly raised red blood cells count, suggestive of thalassemia trait. On HPLC, a predominant peak was observed in the C-window (82.6%) along with raised HbA 2 level (9.3%). Based on these findings, a possibility of HbC disease/β-thalassemia trait doubly heterozygous was considered. Family studies were advised. HPLC findings in father were suggestive of β-thalassemia trait, while both his mother and brother had an abnormal peak in the C-window of 42.7% and 40.8%, respectively, with elevated HbA 2 values of 5% and 4.9%, respectively. Direct DNA sequencing revealed intervening sequences 1-5 (G ; C) in father, confirming β-thalassemia trait. His mother and brother had heterozygous gene mutation at codon 90 of β-globin chain (G ; A) suggestive of Hb Agenogi. The child carried mutations for both β-thalassemia trait as well as Hb Agenogi. PMID:26960650

  12. Neuroprotective therapies in glaucoma: II. Genetic nanotechnology tools

    PubMed Central

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic factor genome engineering could have many potential applications not only in the deeper understanding of neurodegenerative disorders but also in improved therapeutics. The fields of nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, and gene/cell-based therapy have been revolutionized by the development of safer and efficient non-viral technologies for gene delivery and genome editing with modern techniques for insertion of the neurotrophic factors into clinically relevant cells for a more sustained pharmaceutical effect. It has been suggested that the long-term expression of neurotrophic factors is the ultimate approach to prevent and/or treat neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma in patients who do not respond to available treatments or are at the progressive stage of the disease. Recent preclinical research suggests that novel neuroprotective gene and cell therapeutics could be promising approaches for both non-invasive neuroprotection and regenerative functions in the eye. Several progenitor and retinal cell types have been investigated as potential candidates for glaucoma neurotrophin therapy either as targets for gene therapy, options for cell replacement therapy, or as vehicles for gene delivery. Therefore, in parallel with deeper understanding of the specific protective effects of different neurotrophic factors and the potential therapeutic cell candidates for glaucoma neuroprotection, the development of non-invasive and highly specific gene delivery methods with safe and effective technologies to modify cell candidates for life-long neuroprotection in the eye is essential before investing in this field. PMID:26528114

  13. Hb Wilde and Hb Patagonia: two novel elongated beta-globin variants causing dominant beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Scheps, Karen G; Hasenahuer, Marcia A; Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, María S; Pennesi, Sandra P; Erramouspe, Beatriz; Basack, Felisa N; Veber, Ernesto S; Aversa, Luis; Elena, Graciela; Varela, Viviana

    2015-06-01

    We describe here the molecular and hematological characteristics of novel frameshift mutations in exon 2 of the HBB gene (in heterozygous state) found in two Argentinean pediatric patients with dominant β-thalassemia-like features. In Hb Wilde, HBB:c.270_273delTGAG(p.Glu90Cysfs*67), we detected the deletion of the third base of the codon 89 (T) and the codon 90 (GAG), whereas in Hb Patagonia, HBB:c.296_297dupGT(p.Asp99Trpfs*59), the frameshift mutation was due to a duplication of a 'GT' dinucleotide after the second base of codon 98 (GTG). The Hb Patagonia and Hb Wilde mutations would result in elongated β-globin chains with modified C-terminal sequences and a total of 155 and 157 amino acids residues, respectively. Based on bioinformatics and structural analysis, as well as protein modeling, we predict that the elongated β-globins would affect the formation of the αβ dimers and their stability, which would further support the mechanism for the observed clinical features in both patients. PMID:25284604

  14. Hb Wilde and Hb Patagonia: two novel elongated beta-globin variants causing dominant beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Scheps, Karen G; Hasenahuer, Marcia A; Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, María S; Pennesi, Sandra P; Erramouspe, Beatriz; Basack, Felisa N; Veber, Ernesto S; Aversa, Luis; Elena, Graciela; Varela, Viviana

    2015-06-01

    We describe here the molecular and hematological characteristics of novel frameshift mutations in exon 2 of the HBB gene (in heterozygous state) found in two Argentinean pediatric patients with dominant β-thalassemia-like features. In Hb Wilde, HBB:c.270_273delTGAG(p.Glu90Cysfs*67), we detected the deletion of the third base of the codon 89 (T) and the codon 90 (GAG), whereas in Hb Patagonia, HBB:c.296_297dupGT(p.Asp99Trpfs*59), the frameshift mutation was due to a duplication of a 'GT' dinucleotide after the second base of codon 98 (GTG). The Hb Patagonia and Hb Wilde mutations would result in elongated β-globin chains with modified C-terminal sequences and a total of 155 and 157 amino acids residues, respectively. Based on bioinformatics and structural analysis, as well as protein modeling, we predict that the elongated β-globins would affect the formation of the αβ dimers and their stability, which would further support the mechanism for the observed clinical features in both patients.

  15. Opposite responses of rabbit and human globin mRNAs to translational inhibition by cap analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Shakin, S.H.; Liebhaber, S.A.

    1987-11-03

    The translational efficiency of an mRNA may be determined at the step of translational initiation by the efficiency of its interaction with the cap binding protein complex. To further investigate the role of these interactions in translational control, the authors compare in vitro the relative sensitivities of rabbit and human ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNAs to translational inhibition by cap analogues. They find that rabbit ..beta..-globin mRNA is more resistant to translational inhibition by cap analogues than rabbit ..cap alpha..-globin mRNA, while in contrast, human ..beta..-globin mRNA is more sensitive to cap analogue inhibition than human ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNAs is unexpected as direct in vivo and in vitro comparisons of polysome profiles reveal parallel translational handling of the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNAs from these two species. This discordance between the relative translational sensitivities of these mRNAs to cap analogues and their relative ribosome loading activities suggests that cap-dependent events may not be rate limiting in steady-state globin translation.

  16. Characterization, expression, and evolution of the mouse embryonic zeta-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Leder, A; Weir, L; Leder, P

    1985-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the embryonic alpha-like, zeta (zeta)-globin gene of the BALB/c mouse. The structure of this gene establishes the amino acid sequence of the mouse embryonic zeta-globin polypeptide chain and allows us to identify sequences within the gene that may be important for its expression. One of these is a 300-base segment that is tightly conserved between mice and humans and is located at the 5' end of the zeta-globin gene. By introducing the cloned gene into permanently transfected mouse erythroleukemic cell lines and comparing its transcript with that of zeta-globin mRNA derived from embryonic yolk sac erythrocytes, we are able to show that the cloned gene is transcriptionally active and that its transcript is correctly initiated and processed. Interestingly, the zeta-globin gene is also active when permanently transfected into an immunoglobulin-producing B-cell, a cell that presumably has tissue-specific requirements for gene expression. Further, a comparison of the amino acid coding sequence of the mouse zeta-globin gene to that of zeta-like globin genes of other species supports a revised evolutionary lineage in which goats and humans are closely related, whereas mice are further removed. Images PMID:4000117

  17. Recombinant plasmids containing Xenopus laevis globin structural genes derived from complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, P; Old, R; Coggins, L W; McShane, T; Watson, C; Paul, J

    1978-01-01

    Details are presented of the in vitro synthesis of double-stranded DNA complementary to purified Xenopus globin messenger RNA, using a combination of reverse transcriptase, fragment 'A' of E. coli DNA polymerase 1 and S1 endonuclease. After selection of duplex DNA molecules approaching the length of Xenopus globin messenger RNA by sedimentation of the DNA through neutral sucrose gradients, the 3'-OH termini of the synthetic globin gene sequences were extended with short tracts of oligo dGMP using terminal transferase. This material was integrated into oligo dCMP-extended linear pCR1 plasmid DNA and amplified by transfection of E. coli. Plasmids carrying globin sequences were identified by hybridization of 32P-labelled globin mRNA to total cellular DNA in situ, by hybridization of purified plasmids to globin cDNA in solution, by analysis of recombinant DNA on polyacrylamide and agarose gels, and by heteroduplex mapping. The results show that extensive DNA copies of Xenopus globin mRNA have been integrated into recombinant plasmids. Images PMID:347404

  18. Beta Thalassemia: mutations which affect processing of the beta-Globin mRNA precursor.

    PubMed

    Kantor, J A; Turner, P H; Nienhuis, A W

    1980-08-01

    To define the molecular lesion which causes decreased beta-globin synthesis in beta+ thalessemia, four patients of diverse ethnic origin were studied. Each had a 2--3 fold higher concentration of beta-globin mRNA precursor than that found in control bone marrow cells from patients with sickle cell anemia. Globin RNA metabolism was analyzed in two of these patients. Transcription of the beta-globin gene appeared to be normal, since analysis of nuclear RNA indicated that beta-globin mRNA synthesis exceeded that of alpha in a 2 hr pulse but the cytoplasm contained a relative deficiency of labeled beta-globin mRNA. An abnormal RNA species approximately 650 nucleotides in length, which contained sequences transcribed from both the large intron and coding portions of the beta-globin gene, was found in one patient's bone marrow cells. The second patient's cells contained a significant amount of a 1320 nucleotide RNA species, not initially evident in normal cells, from which part but not all of the large intervening sequence had been removed. Our data thus indicate that mutations which affect RNA processing cause beta thalessemia.

  19. Efficient and specific repair of sickle beta-globin RNA by trans-splicing ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jonghoe; Lan, Ning; Long, Meredith; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2003-10-01

    Previously we demonstrated that a group I ribozyme can perform trans-splicing to repair sickle beta-globin transcripts upon transfection of in vitro transcribed ribozyme into mammalian cells. Here, we sought to develop expression cassettes that would yield high levels of active ribozyme after gene transfer. Our initial expression constructs were designed to generate trans-slicing ribozymes identical to those used in our previous RNA transfection studies with ribozymes containing 6-nucleotide long internal guide sequences. The ribozymes expressed from these cassettes, however, were found to be unable to repair sickle beta-globin RNAs. Further experiments revealed that two additional structural elements are important for ribozyme-mediate RNA repair: the P10 interaction formed between the 5' end of the ribozyme and the beginning of the 3' exon and an additional base-pairing interaction formed between an extended guide sequence and the substrate RNA. These optimized expression cassettes yield ribozymes that are able to amend 10%-50% of the sickle beta-globin RNAs in transfected mammalian cells. Finally, a ribozyme with a 5-bp extended guide sequence preferentially reacts with sickle beta-globin RNAs over wild-type beta-globin RNAs, although the wild-type beta-globin transcript forms only a single mismatch with the ribozyme. These results demonstrate that trans-splicing ribozyme expression cassettes can be generated to yield ribozymes that can repair a clinically relevant fraction of sickle beta-globin RNAs in mammalian cells with greatly improved specificity.

  20. Integrated protein quality-control pathways regulate free α-globin in murine β-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Khandros, Eugene; Thom, Christopher S.; D'Souza, Janine

    2012-01-01

    Cells remove unstable polypeptides through protein quality-control (PQC) pathways such as ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and autophagy. In the present study, we investigated how these pathways are used in β-thalassemia, a common hemoglobinopathy in which β-globin gene mutations cause the accumulation and precipitation of cytotoxic α-globin subunits. In β-thalassemic erythrocyte precursors, free α-globin was polyubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome. These cells exhibited enhanced proteasome activity, and transcriptional profiling revealed coordinated induction of most proteasome subunits that was mediated by the stress-response transcription factor Nrf1. In isolated thalassemic cells, short-term proteasome inhibition blocked the degradation of free α-globin. In contrast, prolonged in vivo treatment of β-thalassemic mice with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib did not enhance the accumulation of free α-globin. Rather, systemic proteasome inhibition activated compensatory proteotoxic stress-response mechanisms, including autophagy, which cooperated with ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis to degrade free α-globin in erythroid cells. Our findings show that multiple interregulated PQC responses degrade excess α-globin. Therefore, β-thalassemia fits into the broader framework of protein-aggregation disorders that use PQC pathways as cell-protective mechanisms. PMID:22427201

  1. Neuroprotective Properties of Chitosan and Its Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Pangestuti, Ratih; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal cells are extremely vulnerable and have a limited capacity for self-repair in response to injury. For those reasons, there is obvious interest in limiting neuronal damage. Mechanisms and strategies used in order to protect against neuronal injury, apoptosis, dysfunction, and degeneration in the central nervous system are recognized as neuroprotection. Neuroprotection could be achieved through several classes of natural and synthetic neuroprotective agents. However, considering the side effects of synthetic neuroprotective agents, the search for natural neuroprotective agents has received great attention. Recently, an increasing number of studies have identified neuroprotective properties of chitosan and its derivatives; however, there are some significant challenges that must be overcome for the success of this approach. Hence, the objective of this review is to discuss neuroprotective properties of chitosan and its derivatives. PMID:20714426

  2. Neuroprotective Actions of Brain Aromatase

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Colin J.; Duncan, Kelli A.; Walters, Bradley J.

    2009-01-01

    The steroidal regulation of vertebrate neuroanatomy and neurophysiology includes a seemingly unending list of brain areas, cellular structures and behaviors modulated by these hormones. Estrogens, in particular have emerged as potent neuromodulators, exerting a range of effects including neuroprotection and perhaps neural repair. In songbirds and mammals, the brain itself appears to be the site of injury-induced estrogen synthesis via the rapid transcription and translation of aromatase (estrogen synthase) in astroglia. This induction seems to occur regardless of the nature and location of primary brain damage. The induced expression of aromatase apparently elevates local estrogen levels enough to interfere with apoptotic pathways, thereby decreasing secondary degeneration and ultimately lessening the extent of damage. There is even evidence suggesting that aromatization may affect injury-induced cytogenesis. Thus, aromatization in the brain appears to confer neuroprotection by an array of mechanisms that involve the deceleration and acceleration of degeneration and repair respectively. We are only beginning to understand the factors responsible for the injury-induced transcription of aromatase in astroglia. In contrast, much of the manner in which local and circulating estrogens may achieve their neuroprotective effects has been elucidated. However, gaps in our knowledge include issues about the cell-specific regulation of aromatase expression, steroidal influences of aromatization distinct from estrogen formation, and questions about the role of constitutive aromatase in neuroprotection. Here we describe the considerable consensus and some interesting differences in knowledge gained from studies conducted on diverse animal models, experimental paradigms and preparations towards understanding the neuroprotective actions of brain aromatase. PMID:19450619

  3. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated induction of human gamma-globin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Xu, X; Pace, B; Dean, D A; Glazer, P M; Chan, P; Goodman, S R; Shokolenko, I

    1999-07-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) can bind to homopurine/homopyrimidine sequences of double-stranded DNA targets in a sequence-specific manner and form [PNA]2/DNA triplexes with single-stranded DNA D-loop structures at the PNA binding sites. These D-loop structures have been found to have a capacity to initiate transcription in vitro. If this strategy can be used to induce transcription of endogenous genes, it may provide a novel approach for gene therapy of many human diseases. Human [beta] globin disorders such as sickle cell anemia and beta-thalassemia are very common genetic diseases that are caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene. When gamma-globin genes are highly expressed in sickle cell patients, the presence of high levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF, alpha2gamma2) can compensate for the defective beta-globin gene product and such patients have much improved symptoms or are free of disease. However, the gamma-globin genes are developmentally regulated and normally expressed at very low levels (>1%) in adult blood cells. We have investigated the possibility of inducing gamma-globin gene expression with PNAs. Using PNAs designed to bind to the 5' flanking region of the gamma-globin gene, induction of expression of a reporter gene construct was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, PNA-mediated induction of endogenous gamma-globin gene expression was also demonstrated in K562 human erythroleukemia cells. This result suggests that induction of gamma-globin gene expression with PNAs might provide a new approach for the treatment of sickle cell disease. PNA-induced gene expression strategy also may have implications in gene therapy of other diseases such as genetic diseases, cancer and infectious diseases.

  4. Erythroid-specific expression of beta-globin by the sleeping beauty transposon for Sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhui; Kren, Betsy T; Park, Chang Won; Bilgim, Rasim; Wong, Phillip Y-P; Steer, Clifford J

    2007-06-12

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) results predominately from a single monogenic mutation that affects thousands of individuals worldwide. Gene therapy approaches have focused on using viral vectors to transfer wild-type beta- or gamma-globin transgenes into hematopoietic stem cells for long-term expression of the recombinant globins. In this study, we investigated the use of a novel nonviral vector system, the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon (Tn) to insert a wild-type beta-globin expression cassette into the human genome for sustained expression of beta-globin. We initially constructed a beta-globin expression vector composed of the hybrid cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer chicken beta-actin promoter (CAGGS) and full-length beta-globin cDNA, as well as truncated forms lacking either the 3' or 3' and 5' untranslated regions (UTRs), to optimize expression of beta-globin. Beta-globin with its 5' UTR was efficiently expressed from its cDNA in K-562 cells induced with hemin. However, expression was constitutive and not erythroid-specific. We then constructed cis SB-Tn-beta-globin plasmids using a minimal beta-globin gene driven by hybrid promoter IHK (human ALAS2 intron 8 erythroid-specific enhancer, HS40 core element from human alphaLCR, ankyrin-1 promoter), IHbetap (human ALAS2 intron 8 erythroid-specific enhancer, HS40 core element from human alphaLCR, beta-globin promoter), or HS3betap (HS3 core element from human betaLCR, beta-globin promoter) to establish erythroid-specific expression of beta-globin. Stable genomic insertion of the minimal gene and expression of the beta-globin transgene for >5 months at a level comparable to that of the endogenous gamma-globin gene were achieved using a SB-Tn beta-globin cis construct. Interestingly, erythroid-specific expression of beta-globin driven by IHK was regulated primarily at the translational level, in contrast to post-transcriptional regulation in non-erythroid cells. The SB-Tn system is a promising nonviral vector for efficient

  5. Ancient Duplications and Expression Divergence in the Globin Gene Superfamily of Vertebrates: Insights from the Elephant Shark Genome and Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Juan C; Lee, Alison P; Hoffmann, Federico G; Toloza-Villalobos, Jessica; Burmester, Thorsten; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Storz, Jay F

    2015-07-01

    Comparative analyses of vertebrate genomes continue to uncover a surprising diversity of genes in the globin gene superfamily, some of which have very restricted phyletic distributions despite their antiquity. Genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes) should be especially informative about the duplicative origins and ancestral functions of vertebrate globins, as divergence between Chondrichthyes and bony vertebrates represents the most basal split within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the vertebrate globin gene family that includes the complete globin gene repertoire of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii). Using genomic sequence data from representatives of all major vertebrate classes, integrated analyses of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships revealed that the last common ancestor of vertebrates possessed a repertoire of at least seven globin genes: single copies of androglobin and neuroglobin, four paralogous copies of globin X, and the single-copy progenitor of the entire set of vertebrate-specific globins. Combined with expression data, the genomic inventory of elephant shark globins yielded four especially surprising findings: 1) there is no trace of the neuroglobin gene (a highly conserved gene that is present in all other jawed vertebrates that have been examined to date), 2) myoglobin is highly expressed in heart, but not in skeletal muscle (reflecting a possible ancestral condition in vertebrates with single-circuit circulatory systems), 3) elephant shark possesses two highly divergent globin X paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in gonads, and 4) elephant shark possesses two structurally distinct α-globin paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in the brain. Expression profiles of elephant shark globin genes reveal distinct specializations of function relative to orthologs in bony vertebrates and suggest hypotheses about

  6. Ancient Duplications and Expression Divergence in the Globin Gene Superfamily of Vertebrates: Insights from the Elephant Shark Genome and Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Toloza-Villalobos, Jessica; Burmester, Thorsten; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Storz, Jay F.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analyses of vertebrate genomes continue to uncover a surprising diversity of genes in the globin gene superfamily, some of which have very restricted phyletic distributions despite their antiquity. Genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes) should be especially informative about the duplicative origins and ancestral functions of vertebrate globins, as divergence between Chondrichthyes and bony vertebrates represents the most basal split within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the vertebrate globin gene family that includes the complete globin gene repertoire of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii). Using genomic sequence data from representatives of all major vertebrate classes, integrated analyses of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships revealed that the last common ancestor of vertebrates possessed a repertoire of at least seven globin genes: single copies of androglobin and neuroglobin, four paralogous copies of globin X, and the single-copy progenitor of the entire set of vertebrate-specific globins. Combined with expression data, the genomic inventory of elephant shark globins yielded four especially surprising findings: 1) there is no trace of the neuroglobin gene (a highly conserved gene that is present in all other jawed vertebrates that have been examined to date), 2) myoglobin is highly expressed in heart, but not in skeletal muscle (reflecting a possible ancestral condition in vertebrates with single-circuit circulatory systems), 3) elephant shark possesses two highly divergent globin X paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in gonads, and 4) elephant shark possesses two structurally distinct α-globin paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in the brain. Expression profiles of elephant shark globin genes reveal distinct specializations of function relative to orthologs in bony vertebrates and suggest hypotheses about

  7. Potentially therapeutic levels of anti-sickling globin gene expression following lentivirus-mediated gene transfer in sickle cell disease bone marrow CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Urbinati, Fabrizia; Hargrove, Phillip W; Geiger, Sabine; Romero, Zulema; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L; Hollis, Roger P; Chambers, Christopher B; Persons, Derek A; Kohn, Donald B; Wilber, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. However, this is only possible when a matched donor is available, making the development of gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells a highly desirable alternative. We used a culture model of human erythropoiesis to directly compare two insulated, self-inactivating, and erythroid-specific lentiviral vectors, encoding for γ-globin (V5m3-400) or a modified β-globin (βAS3-FB) for production of antisickling hemoglobin (Hb) and correction of red cell deformability after deoxygenation. Bone marrow CD34+ cells from three SCD patients were transduced using V5m3-400 or βAS3-FB and compared with mock-transduced SCD or healthy donor CD34+ cells. Lentiviral transduction did not impair cell growth or differentiation, as gauged by proliferation and acquisition of erythroid markers. Vector copy number averaged approximately one copy per cell, and corrective globin mRNA levels were increased more than sevenfold over mock-transduced controls. Erythroblasts derived from healthy donor and mock-transduced SCD cells produced a low level of fetal Hb that was increased to 23.6 ± 4.1% per vector copy for cells transduced with V5m3-400. Equivalent levels of modified normal adult Hb of 17.6 ± 3.8% per vector copy were detected for SCD cells transduced with βAS3-FB. These levels of antisickling Hb production were sufficient to reduce sickling of terminal-stage red blood cells upon deoxygenation. We concluded that the achieved levels of fetal Hb and modified normal adult Hb would likely prove therapeutic to SCD patients who lack matched donors.

  8. Identification of a recent recombination event within the human beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, D S; Kidd, K K; Kidd, J R; Egeland, J A; Housman, D E

    1984-01-01

    In a detailed study of inheritance of DNA sequence polymorphism in a large reference pedigree, an individual was identified with an apparent genetic recombination event within the human beta-globin gene cluster. Analysis of the haplotypes of relevant individuals within this pedigree suggested that the meiotic crossing-over event is likely to have occurred within a 19.8-kilobase-pair region of the beta-globin gene cluster. Analysis of other DNA markers closely linked to the beta-globin gene cluster--segment 12 of chromosome 11 (D11S12) and loci for insulin, the cellular oncogene c-Ha-ras, and preproparathyroid hormone--confirmed that a crossover event must have occurred within the region of chromosome 11 between D11S12 and the beta-globin gene cluster. It is suggested that the event observed has occurred within a DNA region compatible with recombinational "hot spots" suggested by population studies. PMID:6096866

  9. Regulated expression of a complete human beta-globin gene encoded by a transmissible retrovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Cone, R D; Weber-Benarous, A; Baorto, D; Mulligan, R C

    1987-01-01

    We introduced a human beta-globin gene into murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells by infection with recombinant retroviruses containing the complete genomic globin sequence. The beta-globin gene was correctly regulated during differentiation, steady-state mRNA levels being induced 5- to 30-fold after treatment of the cells with the chemical inducer dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies using vectors which yield integrated proviruses lacking transcriptional enhancer sequences indicated that neither retroviral transcription nor the retroviral enhancer sequences themselves had any obvious effect on expression of the globin gene. Viral RNA expression also appeared inducible, being considerably depressed in uninduced MEL cells but approaching normal wild-type levels after dimethyl sulfoxide treatment. We provide data which suggest that the control point for both repression and subsequent activation of virus expression in MEL cells lies in the viral enhancer element. Images PMID:3029570

  10. alpha-Thalassemia caused by an unstable alpha-globin mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Liebhaber, S A; Kan, Y W

    1983-01-01

    In a previous study, molecular cloning of the alpha-globin genes from a patient with nondeletion Hb-H disease (genotype--/alpha alpha) showed that a single nucleotide mutation (CTG to CCG) in one of the genes resulted in a leucine to proline substitution. This paper describes the approach we used to detect the abnormal alpha-globin chain. The chain was identified using a cell-free translation system. It turned over rapidly both in vitro and in vivo in the patient's reticulocytes. The unusual feature of this unstable alpha-globin is that the alpha-globin deficiency causes alpha-thalassemia. Simple heterozygotes for this lesion (alpha Pro alpha/alpha alpha) resemble alpha-thalassemia carriers and do not exhibit the hemolytic anemia usually associated with unstable hemoglobins. Images PMID:6826718

  11. Detection of sickle cell beta S-globin allele by hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Conner, B J; Reyes, A A; Morin, C; Itakura, K; Teplitz, R L; Wallace, R B

    1983-01-01

    Two 19-base-long oligonucleotides were synthesized, one complementary to the normal human beta-globin gene (beta A) and one complementary to the sickle cell beta-globin gene (beta S). The nonadecanucleotides were radioactively labeled and used as probes in DNA hybridization. Under appropriate hybridization conditions, these probes can be used to distinguish the beta A gene from the beta S allele. The DNA from individuals homozygous for the normal beta-globin gene (beta A beta A) only hybridized with the beta A specific probe; the DNA from those homozygous for the sickle cell beta-globin gene (beta S beta S) only hybridized with the beta S specific probe. The DNA from heterozygous individuals (beta A beta S) hybridized with both probes. This allele-specific hybridization behavior of oligonucleotides provides a general method for diagnosis of any genetic disease which involves a point mutation in the DNA sequence of a single-copy gene.

  12. Neuroprotective agents for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiaofeng; Chen, Wu; Sinha, Bharati; Tu, Yanyang; Manning, Simon; Thomas, Niranjan; Zhou, Shuanhu; Jiang, Hong; Ma, He; Kroessler, Daphne A; Yao, Jiemin; Li, Zhipu; Inder, Terry E; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) brain injury in newborns is a major cause of morbidity and mortality that claims thousands of lives each year. In this review, we summarize the promising neuroprotective agents tested on animal models and pilot clinical studies of neonatal H-I brain injury according to the different phases of the disease. These agents target various phases of injury including the early phase of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis as well as late-phase inflammatory reaction and neural repair. We analyze the cell survival and cell death pathways modified by these agents in neonatal H-I brain injury. We aim to 'build a bridge' between animal trials of neuroprotective agents and potential candidate treatments for future clinical applications against H-I encephalopathy. PMID:26360053

  13. Multiple physical stresses induce γ-globin gene expression and fetal hemoglobin production in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Emily K; West, Rachel J; Conine, Sarah J; Lowrey, Christopher H

    2014-04-01

    Increased fetal hemoglobin (HbF) expression is beneficial for β-hemoglobinopathy patients; however, current inducing agents do not possess the ideal combination of efficacy, safety and ease of use. Better understanding the mechanisms involved in γ-globin gene induction is critical for designing improved therapies, as no complete mechanism for any inducing agent has been identified. Given the cytotoxic nature of most known inducing drugs, we hypothesized that γ-globin is a cell stress response gene, and that induction occurs via activation of cell stress signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the ability of physical stresses including heat-shock (HS), UV- and X-irradiation and osmotic shock to increase γ-globin gene expression in erythroid cells. Experiments in K562 and KU812 cells showed that each of these stresses increased steady-state γ-globin mRNA levels, but only after 3-5days of treatments. HS and UV also increased γ-globin mRNA and HbF levels in differentiating primary human erythroid cells. Mechanistic studies showed that HS affects γ-globin mRNA at multiple levels, including nascent transcription and transcript stability, and that induction is dependent on neither the master regulator of the canonical HS response, HSF1, nor p38 MAPK. Inhibitor panel testing identified PI3K inhibitor LY294002 as a novel inducing agent and revealed potential roles for NFκB and VEGFR/PDGFR/Raf kinases in HS-mediated γ-globin gene induction. These findings suggest that cell stress signaling pathways play an important role in γ-globin gene induction and may provide novel targets for the pharmacologic induction of fetal hemoglobin.

  14. Understanding α-globin gene regulation and implications for the treatment of β-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Mettananda, Sachith; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2016-03-01

    Over the past three decades, a vast amount of new information has been uncovered describing how the globin genes are regulated. This knowledge has provided significant insights into the general understanding of the regulation of human genes. It is now known that molecular defects within and around the α- and β-globin genes, as well as in the distant regulatory elements, can cause thalassemia. Unbalanced production of globin chains owing to defective synthesis of one, and the continued unopposed synthesis of another, is the central causative factor in the cellular pathology and pathophysiology of thalassemia. A large body of clinical, genetic, and experimental evidence suggests that altering globin chain imbalance by reducing the production of α-globin synthesis ameliorates the disease severity in patients with β-thalassemia. With the development of new genetic-based therapeutic tools that have a potential to decrease the expression of a selected gene in a tissue-specific manner, the possibility of decreasing expression of the α-globin gene to improve the clinical severity of β-thalassemia could become a reality.

  15. Amoebozoa possess lineage-specific globin gene repertoires gained by individual horizontal gene transfers.

    PubMed

    Dröge, Jasmin; Buczek, Dorota; Suzuki, Yutaka; Makałowski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The Amoebozoa represent a clade of unicellular amoeboid organisms that display a wide variety of lifestyles, including free-living and parasitic species. For example, the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has the ability to aggregate into a multicellular fruiting body upon starvation, while the pathogenic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica is a parasite of humans. Globins are small heme proteins that are present in almost all extant organisms. Although several genomes of amoebozoan species have been sequenced, little is known about the phyletic distribution of globin genes within this phylum. Only two flavohemoglobins (FHbs) of D. discoideum have been reported and characterized previously while the genomes of Entamoeba species are apparently devoid of globin genes. We investigated eleven amoebozoan species for the presence of globin genes by genomic and phylogenetic in silico analyses. Additional FHb genes were identified in the genomes of four social amoebas and the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum. Moreover, a single-domain globin (SDFgb) of Hartmannella vermiformis, as well as two truncated hemoglobins (trHbs) of Acanthamoeba castellanii were identified. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that these globin genes were independently acquired via horizontal gene transfer from some ancestral bacteria. Furthermore, the phylogenetic tree of amoebozoan FHbs indicates that they do not share a common ancestry and that a transfer of FHbs from bacteria to amoeba occurred multiple times. PMID:25013378

  16. Nucleotide sequence of 3' untranslated portion of human alpha globin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J T; deRiel, J K; Forget, B G; Marotta, C A; Weissman, S M

    1977-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of 75 nucleotides of the 3'-untranslated portion of normal human alpha globin mRNA which corresponds to the elongated amino acid sequence of the chain termination mutant Hb Constant Spring. This was accomplished by sequence analysis of cDNA fragments obtained by restriction endonuclease or T4 endonuclease IV cleavage of human globin cDNA synthesized from globin mRNA by use of viral reverse transcriptase. Analysis of cRNA synthesized from cDNA by use of RNA polymerase provided additional confirmatory sequence information. Possible polymorphism has been identified at one site of the sequence. Our sequence overlaps with, and extends the sequence of 43 nucleotides determined by Proudfood and coworkers for the very 3'-terminal portion of human alpha globin mRNA. The complete 3'-untranslated sequence of human alpha globin mRNA (112 nucleotides including termination codon) shows little homology to that of the human or rabbit beta globin mRNAs except for the presence of the hexanucleotide sequence AAUAAA which is found in most eukaryotic mRNAs near the 3'-terminal poly (A). Images PMID:909779

  17. [γ-Globin Inductive Therapy of β-thalassemia and Its Relationship with MicroRNA].

    PubMed

    Li, Yao-Yao; Gu, Jian; Yu, Duo-Nan

    2016-04-01

    β-thalassemia is a chronic hemolytic anemia characterized by the reduction or absence of synthesis of β-globin chains because of the β-globin gene mutations. β-thalassemia belongs to the inherited hemoglobin disease, and occurs in some provinces of China, such as in Guangdong, Guangxi, Fujian, its prevalence is about 2%. The treatment of this disease include transfusion, iron chelating agent, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, splenectomy, induced expression of Fetal Hemoglobin (HbF) and gene therapies. However, the mortality rate of this disease is still higher, thus some new treatments are urgently needed. In recent years, the study was mainly concentrated in 2 aspects: the normal β-globin gene transfer and endogenous γ-globin re-activation. Some studies showed that the expression of miRNAs was dysregulated in β-thalassemia. Some miRNAs could regulate γ-globin at posttranscriptional level, thus, the clarification of relationship between miRNAs and β-thalassemia is expected to provide experimental bases to β-thalassemia therapy. In this review, the induced therapy of γ-globin for β-thalassemia and its relationship with the miRNA are summarized. PMID:27151042

  18. Sequence of the 3'-noncoding and adjacent coding regions of human gamma-globin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, R; Kan, Y W; Boyer, H W

    1978-01-01

    In cloning human fetal globin cDNA in bacterial plasmids, we obtained a recombinant which contained a fragment of gammg-globin cDNA corresponding to the region from amino acid 99 to the poly A. We determined a sequence of 169 nucleotides which included the complete 3' non-coding region of the gamma-globin mRNA. The codon for amino acid 136 was GCA, indicating that this cloned fragment was derived from the Agamma-globin gene. In conjunction with the surrounding sequences, the GCA codon provides the Agamma-species with a unique CTGCAG hexanucleotide that is recognized by the restriction enzyme Pst I. The 3'-untranslated region of the gamma-globin mRNA consists of 90 nucleotides, and shares little homology with that of the human beta-globin mRNA. As in other mammalian mRNAs, a symmetrical sequence and the hexanucleotide AAUAAA are present. Images PMID:318163

  19. Neuroprotective strategies in radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Jonathan D; Mulhall, John P

    2005-01-01

    In this section, authors from New York give their views on the various neuroprotective strategies for patients having a radical prostatectomy, such as the use of nerve grafts and other approaches. A joint study from Korea, the USA, Canada and the UK is presented in a paper on the importance of patient perception in the clinical assessment and management of BPH. There is also a review of robotic urological surgery. Finally, authors from New York give a review on the life of Isaac Newton. This is a new historical review in the journal, but one that will be of general interest.

  20. Stimulated stromal cells induce gamma-globin gene expression in erythroid cells via nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Čokić, Vladan P.; Beleslin-Čokić, Bojana B.; Smith, Reginald D.; Economou, Antaeus P.; Wahl, Larry M.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Schechter, Alan N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We have previously shown that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the hydroxyurea-induced increase of gamma-globin gene expression in cultured human erythroid progenitor cells and that hydroxyurea increases NO production in endothelial cells via endothelial NO synthase (NOS). We have now expanded those studies to demonstrate that the stimulation of gamma-globin gene expression is also mediated by NOS induction in stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment. Materials and Methods Using NO analyzer, we measured NO production in endothelial and macrophage cell cultures. In co-culture studies of erythroid and stromal cells we measured globin gene expression during stimulation by NO inducers. Results Hydroxyurea (30–100 μM) induced NOS-dependent production of NO in human macrophages (up to 1.2 μM). Co-culture studies of human macrophages with erythroid progenitor cells also resulted in induction of gamma-globin mRNA expression (up to 3 fold) in the presence of hydroxyurea. NOS-dependent stimulation of NO by lipopolysaccharide (up to 0.6 μM) has been observed in human macrophages. We found that lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma together increased gamma-globin gene expression (up to 2 fold) in human macrophage/erythroid cell co-cultures. Co-culture of human bone marrow endothelial cells with erythroid progenitor cells also induced gamma-globin mRNA expression (2.4 fold) in the presence of hydroxyurea (40 μM). Conclusion These results demonstrate an arrangement by which NO and fetal hemoglobin inducers may stimulate globin genes in erythroid cells via the common paracrine effect of bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:19576950

  1. Retroviral transfer of a human beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene linked to beta locus control region hypersensitive site 2 aimed at the gene therapy of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Takekoshi, K J; Oh, Y H; Westerman, K W; London, I M; Leboulch, P

    1995-03-28

    Human gamma-globin and delta-globin chains have been previously identified as strong inhibitors of the polymerization of hemoglobin S, in contrast to the beta-globin chain, which exerts only a moderate antisickling effect. However, gamma-globin and delta-globin are normally expressed at very low levels in adult erythroid cells, in contrast to beta-globin. We report the design of a beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene, beta/delta-sickle cell inhibitor 1 (beta/delta-SCI1) and its transduction by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. The beta/delta-SCI1-encoding gene retains the overall structure of the human beta-globin gene, while incorporating specific amino acid residues from the delta chain previously found responsible for its enhanced antisickling properties. To achieve high expression levels of beta/delta-SCI1 in adult erythrocytes, the hybrid gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the human beta-globin promoter and the DNase I hypersensitive site 2 of the human beta locus control region. High-titer retroviruses were generated, and stable proviral transmission was achieved in infected cells. The mRNA expression levels of the beta/delta-SCI1 gene in infected, dimethyl sulfoxide-induced murine erythroleukemia cells approached 85% of the endogenous murine beta maj-globin mRNA, on a per gene basis, evidence that high gene expression levels were achieved in adult erythroid cells. Further evaluation of this strategy in transgenic animal models of sickle cell disease should assess its efficacy for the gene therapy of human patients.

  2. Methods for displaying macromolecular structural uncertainty: application to the globins.

    PubMed

    Altman, R B; Hughes, C; Gerstein, M B

    1995-06-01

    Most molecular graphics programs ignore any uncertainty in the atomic coordinates being displayed. Structures are displayed in terms of perfect points, spheres, and lines with no uncertainty. However, all experimental methods for defining structures, and many methods for predicting and comparing structures, associate uncertainties with each atomic coordinate. We have developed graphical representations that highlight these uncertainties. These representations are encapsulated in a new interactive display program, PROTEAND. PROTEAND represents structural uncertainty in three ways: (1) The traditional way: The program shows a collection of structures as superposed and overlapped stick-figure models. (2) Ellipsoids: At each atom position, the program shows an ellipsoid derived from a three-dimensional Gaussian model of uncertainty. This probabilistic model provides additional information about the relationship between atoms that can be displayed as a correlation matrix. (3) Rigid-body volumes: Using clouds of dots, the program can show the range of rigid-body motion of selected substructures, such as individual alpha helices. We illustrate the utility of these display modalities by the applying PROTEAND to the globin family of proteins, and show that certain types of structural variation are best illustrated with different methods of display.

  3. Variation in RNA-Seq Transcriptome Profiles of Peripheral Whole Blood from Healthy Individuals with and without Globin Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Fishbane, Nick; Ruan, Jian; Zhou, Mi; Balshaw, Robert; Wilson-McManus, Janet E.; Ng, Raymond T.; McManus, Bruce M.; Tebbutt, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular profile of circulating blood can reflect physiological and pathological events occurring in other tissues and organs of the body and delivers a comprehensive view of the status of the immune system. Blood has been useful in studying the pathobiology of many diseases. It is accessible and easily collected making it ideally suited to the development of diagnostic biomarker tests. The blood transcriptome has a high complement of globin RNA that could potentially saturate next-generation sequencing platforms, masking lower abundance transcripts. Methods to deplete globin mRNA are available, but their effect has not been comprehensively studied in peripheral whole blood RNA-Seq data. In this study we aimed to assess technical variability associated with globin depletion in addition to assessing general technical variability in RNA-Seq from whole blood derived samples. Results We compared technical and biological replicates having undergone globin depletion or not and found that the experimental globin depletion protocol employed removed approximately 80% of globin transcripts, improved the correlation of technical replicates, allowed for reliable detection of thousands of additional transcripts and generally increased transcript abundance measures. Differential expression analysis revealed thousands of genes significantly up-regulated as a result of globin depletion. In addition, globin depletion resulted in the down-regulation of genes involved in both iron and zinc metal ion bonding. Conclusions Globin depletion appears to meaningfully improve the quality of peripheral whole blood RNA-Seq data, and may improve our ability to detect true biological variation. Some concerns remain, however. Key amongst them the significant reduction in RNA yields following globin depletion. More generally, our investigation of technical and biological variation with and without globin depletion finds that high-throughput sequencing by RNA-Seq is highly

  4. The globin gene repertoire of lampreys: convergent evolution of hemoglobin and myoglobin in jawed and jawless vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Kim; Campbell, Kevin L; Hankeln, Thomas; Storz, Jay F; Hoffmann, Federico G; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-10-01

    Agnathans (jawless vertebrates) occupy a key phylogenetic position for illuminating the evolution of vertebrate anatomy and physiology. Evaluation of the agnathan globin gene repertoire can thus aid efforts to reconstruct the origin and evolution of the globin genes of vertebrates, a superfamily that includes the well-known model proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of the genome of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) which revealed 23 intact globin genes and two hemoglobin pseudogenes. Analyses of the genome of the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum) identified 18 full length and five partial globin gene sequences. The majority of the globin genes in both lamprey species correspond to the known agnathan hemoglobins. Both genomes harbor two copies of globin X, an ancient globin gene that has a broad phylogenetic distribution in the animal kingdom. Surprisingly, we found no evidence for an ortholog of neuroglobin in the lamprey genomes. Expression and phylogenetic analyses identified an ortholog of cytoglobin in the lampreys; in fact, our results indicate that cytoglobin is the only orthologous vertebrate-specific globin that has been retained in both gnathostomes and agnathans. Notably, we also found two globins that are highly expressed in the heart of P. marinus, thus representing functional myoglobins. Both genes have orthologs in L. camtschaticum. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that these heart-expressed globins are not orthologous to the myoglobins of jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata), but originated independently within the agnathans. The agnathan myoglobin and hemoglobin proteins form a monophyletic group to the exclusion of functionally analogous myoglobins and hemoglobins of gnathostomes, indicating that specialized respiratory proteins for O2 transport in the blood and O2 storage in the striated muscles evolved independently in both lineages. This dual convergence of O2-transport and O2-storage proteins in

  5. Neuroprotective compounds of Tilia amurensis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bohyung; Weon, Jin Bae; Eom, Min Rye; Jung, Youn Sik; Ma, Choong Je

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tilia amurensis (Tiliacese) has been used for anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory in Korea, China, and Japan. Objective: In this study, we isolated five compounds from T. amurensis and determined whether protected neuronal cells against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells. Materials and Methods: Compounds were isolated using chromatographic techniques including silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 open column and high performance liquid chromatography analysis, and evaluated neuroprotective effect in HT22 cells by 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Results: β-D-fructofuranosyl α-D-glucopyranoside (1), (-)-epicatechin (2), nudiposide (3), lyoniside (4), and scopoletin (5) were isolated by bioactivity-guided fractionation from the ethyl acetate fraction of T. amurensis. Among them, (-)-epicatechin, nudiposide, lyoniside, and scopoletin had significant neuroprotective activities against glutamate-injured neurotoxicity in HT22 cells. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that compound two, three, four, and five have a pronounced protective effect against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 cells. PMID:26664019

  6. VNTR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin locus are haplotype and population related

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, J.J.; Clegg, J.B.; Boyce, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    The human {alpha}-globin complex contains several polymorphic restriction-enzyme sites (i.e., RFLPs) linked to form haplotypes and is flanked by two hypervariable VNTR loci, the 5{prime} hypervariable region (HVR) and the more highly polymorphic 3{prime}HVR. Using a combination of RFLP analysis and PCR, the authors have characterized the 5{prime}HVR and 3{prime}HVR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin haplotypes of 133 chromosomes, and they here show that specific {alpha}-globin haplotypes are each associated with discrete subsets of the alleles observed at these two VNTR loci. This statistically highly significant association is observed over a region spanning {approximately} 100 kb. With the exception of closely related haplotypes, different haplotypes do not share identically sized 3{prime}HVR alleles. Earlier studies have shown that {alpha}-globin haplotype distributions differ between populations; the current findings also reveal extensive population substructure in the repertoire of {alpha}-globin VNTRs. If similar features are characteristic of other VNTR loci, this will have important implications for forensic and anthropological studies. 42 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Recruitment of Transcription Complexes to the β-Globin Gene Locus in Vivo and in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Karen F.; Levings, Padraic P.; Hill, Meredith A.; Crusselle, Valerie J.; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee; Engel, James Douglas; Bungert, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Erythroid-specific, high level expression of the β-globin genes is regulated by the locus control region (LCR), composed of multiple DNase I-hypersensitive sites and located far upstream of the genes. Recent studies have shown that LCR core elements recruit RNA polymerase II (pol II). In the present study we demonstrate the following: 1) pol II and other basal transcription factors are recruited to LCR core hypersensitive elements; 2) pol II dissociates from and re-associates with the globin gene locus during replication; 3) pol II interacts with the LCR but not with the β-globin gene prior to erythroid differentiation in embryonic stem cells; and 4) the erythroid transcription factor NF-E2 facilitates the transfer of pol II from immobilized LCR constructs to a β-globin gene in vitro. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the LCR serves as the primary attachment site for the recruitment of macromolecular complexes involved in chromatin structure alterations and transcription of the globin genes. PMID:15385559

  8. Membrane-bound globin X protects the cell from reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jonas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Globin X (GbX) is a member of the globin family that emerged early in the evolution of Metazoa. In vertebrates, GbX is restricted to lampreys, fish, amphibians and some reptiles, and is expressed in neurons. Unlike any other metazoan globin, GbX is N-terminally acylated and anchored in the cell membrane via myristoyl and palmitoyl groups, suggesting a unique function. Here, we compared the capacity of GbX to protect a mouse neuronal cell line from hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) with that of myoglobin. To evaluate the contribution of membrane-binding, we generated a mutated version of GbX without acyl groups. All three globins enhanced cell viability under hypoxia, with myoglobin having the most pronounced effect. GbX but not myoglobin protected the cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress. Membrane-bound GbX was significantly more efficient than its mutated, soluble form. Furthermore, myoglobin and mutated GbX increased production of ROS upon H2O2-treatment, while membrane-bound GbX did not. The results indicate that myoglobin enhances O2 supply while GbX protects the cell membrane from ROS-stress. The ancient origin of GbX suggests that ROS-protection reflects the function of the early globins before they acquired a respiratory role.

  9. The role of EKLF in human beta-globin gene competition.

    PubMed

    Wijgerde, M; Gribnau, J; Trimborn, T; Nuez, B; Philipsen, S; Grosveld, F; Fraser, P

    1996-11-15

    We have investigated the role of erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF) in expression of the human beta-globin genes in compound EKLF knockout/human beta-locus transgenic mice. EKLF affects only the adult mouse beta-globin genes in homozygous knockout mice; heterozygous mice are unaffected. Here we show that EKLF knockout mice express the human epsilon and gamma-globin genes normally in embryonic red cells. However, fetal liver erythropoiesis, which is marked by a period of gamma- and beta-gene competition in which the genes are alternately transcribed, exhibits an altered ratio of gamma- to beta-gene transcription. EKLF heterozygous fetal livers display a decrease in the number of transcriptionally active beta genes with a reciprocal increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes. beta-Gene transcription is absent in homozygous knockout fetuses with coincident changes in chromatin structure at the beta promoter. There is a further increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes and accompanying gamma gene promoter chromatin alterations. These results indicate that EKLF plays a major role in gamma- and beta-gene competition and suggest that EKLF is important in stabilizing the interaction between the Locus Control Region and the beta-globin gene. In addition, these findings provide further evidence that developmental modulation of globin gene expression within individual cells is accomplished by altering the frequency and/or duration of transcriptional periods of a gene rather than changing the rate of transcription.

  10. Dual promoter activation by the human beta-globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Bresnick, E H; Felsenfeld, G

    1994-01-01

    The human beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is necessary for high-level and position-independent expression of globin genes in erythroid cells. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed for the cis-activation of individual members of the beta-globin gene family by the LCR located 10-50 kilobases upstream. It is not known, however, whether a given LCR can activate all developmentally appropriate globin family members on its chromosome or whether, within a given chromosome, the LCR must be committed to activating only a single gene. We have devised an experiment to distinguish between these possibilities. This experiment takes advantage of the fact that if two genes in a cluster are transcriptionally active and their promoters, therefore, are in a conformation hypersensitive to nucleases, restriction enzymes that cleave the promoters will excise the intervening chromatin fragment. The Apa I sites on human fetal G gamma- and A gamma-globin gene promoters are accessible to cleavage in nuclei from the human erythroleukemia cell line K562, which expresses these genes, but not in HeLa cells. We find that Apa I digestion leads to excision in high yield of the fragment spanning these promoters, showing that a LCR element is capable of sharing its activating function among members of a gene cluster on a single chromosome. Images PMID:8108408

  11. A globin enhancer acts by increasing the proportion of erythrocytes expressing a linked transgene.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, H G; Martin, D I; Whitelaw, E

    1997-01-01

    Enhancer elements have been shown to affect the probability of a gene establishing an active transcriptional state and suppress the silencing of reporter genes in cell lines, but their effect in transgenic mice has been obscured by the use of assays that do not assess expression on a cell-by-cell basis. We have examined the effect of a globin enhancer on the variegation of lacZ expression in erythrocytes of transgenic mice. Mice carrying lacZ driven by the alpha-globin promoter exhibit beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) expression in only a very small proportion of embryonic erythrocytes. When the transgenic construct also contains the (alphaHS-40 enhancer, which controls expression of the alpha-globin gene, expression is seen in a high proportion of embryonic erythrocytes, although there are variations between transgenic lines which can be attributed to different sites of integration. Analysis of beta-Gal expression levels suggests that expressing cells in lines carrying only the alpha-globin promoter express as much beta-Gal as those in which the transgene also contains alphaHS-40. A marked decline in transgene expression occurs as mice age, which is mainly due to a decrease in the proportion of cells expressing the transgene. Thus, a globin enhancer can act to suppress variegation of a linked transgene; this result is consistent with a model in which enhancers act to establish and maintain an active domain without directly affecting the transcriptional rate. PMID:9032288

  12. Autoinduction, purification, and characterization of soluble α-globin chains of crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) hemoglobin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kabbua, Thai; Anwised, Preeyanan; Boonmee, Atcha; Subedi, Bishnu P; Pierce, Brad S; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2014-11-01

    We have established a method to express soluble heme-bound recombinant crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) α-globin chain holo-protein in bacteria (Escherichia coli) using an autoinduction system without addition of exogenous heme. This is the first time that heme-bound crocodile α-globin chains have been expressed in bacteria without in vitro heme reconstitution. The observed molecular mass of purified recombinant α-globin is consistent with that calculated from the primary amino acid sequence of native crocodile (C. siamensis) α-globin. Both the monomeric and the dimeric protein configuration formed by intermolecular disulfide bond could be purified as soluble protein. Spectroscopic characterization [UV-visible, circular dichroism (CD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)] of purified recombinant α-globin demonstrates nearly identical properties as reported for hemoglobin and myoglobin isolated from other organisms. For comparison, cyanide and nitric oxide binding of purified α-globin was also investigated. These results suggested that C. siamensis α-globin expressed in E. coli was folded correctly with proper incorporation of the heme cofactor. The expression method we now describe can facilitate production and isolation of individual globin chains in order to further study the mechanism and assembly of crocodile hemoglobin.

  13. Evolution and molecular characterization of a beta-globin gene from the Australian Echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus (Monotremata).

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Shroff, R; Cooper, S J; Hope, R

    1999-07-01

    Coinciding with a period in evolution when monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians diverged from a common ancestor, a proto-beta-globin gene duplicated, producing the progenitors of mammalian embryonic and adult beta-like globin genes. To determine whether monotremes contain orthologues of these genes and to further investigate the evolutionary relationships of monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians, we have determined the complete DNA sequence of an echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) beta-like globin gene. Conceptual translation of the gene and sequence comparisons with eutherian and marsupial beta-like globin genes and echidna adult beta-globin indicate that the gene is adult expressed. Phylogenetic analyses do not clearly resolve the branching pattern of mammalian beta-like globin gene lineages and it is therefore uncertain whether monotremes have orthologues of the embryonic beta-like globin genes of marsupials and eutherians. Four models are proposed that provide a framework for interpreting further studies on the evolution of beta-like globin genes in the context of the evolution of monotremes, marsupials, and eutherians.

  14. Erythroid-Specific Expression of β-globin from Sleeping Beauty-Transduced Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sjeklocha, Lucas M.; Park, Chang-Won; Wong, Phillip Y-P; Roney, Mark J.; Belcher, John D.; Kaufman, Dan S.; Vercellotti, Gregory M.; Hebbel, Robert P.; Steer, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy for sickle cell disease will require efficient delivery of a tightly regulated and stably expressed gene product to provide an effective therapy. In this study we utilized the non-viral Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system using the SB100X hyperactive transposase to transduce human cord blood CD34+ cells with DsRed and a hybrid IHK–β-globin transgene. IHK transduced cells were successfully differentiated into multiple lineages which all showed transgene integration. The mature erythroid cells had an increased β-globin to γ-globin ratio from 0.66±0.08 to 1.05±0.12 (p = 0.05), indicating expression of β-globin from the integrated SB transgene. IHK–β-globin mRNA was found in non-erythroid cell types, similar to native β-globin mRNA that was also expressed at low levels. Additional studies in the hematopoietic K562 cell line confirmed the ability of cHS4 insulator elements to protect DsRed and IHK–β-globin transgenes from silencing in long-term culture studies. Insulated transgenes had statistically significant improvement in the maintenance of long term expression, while preserving transgene regulation. These results support the use of Sleeping Beauty vectors in carrying an insulated IHK–β-globin transgene for gene therapy of sickle cell disease. PMID:22216176

  15. Erythroid-specific expression of β-globin from Sleeping Beauty-transduced human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Sjeklocha, Lucas M; Park, Chang-Won; Wong, Phillip Y-P; Roney, Mark J; Belcher, John D; Kaufman, Dan S; Vercellotti, Gregory M; Hebbel, Robert P; Steer, Clifford J

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy for sickle cell disease will require efficient delivery of a tightly regulated and stably expressed gene product to provide an effective therapy. In this study we utilized the non-viral Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system using the SB100X hyperactive transposase to transduce human cord blood CD34(+) cells with DsRed and a hybrid IHK-β-globin transgene. IHK transduced cells were successfully differentiated into multiple lineages which all showed transgene integration. The mature erythroid cells had an increased β-globin to γ-globin ratio from 0.66±0.08 to 1.05±0.12 (p=0.05), indicating expression of β-globin from the integrated SB transgene. IHK-β-globin mRNA was found in non-erythroid cell types, similar to native β-globin mRNA that was also expressed at low levels. Additional studies in the hematopoietic K562 cell line confirmed the ability of cHS4 insulator elements to protect DsRed and IHK-β-globin transgenes from silencing in long-term culture studies. Insulated transgenes had statistically significant improvement in the maintenance of long term expression, while preserving transgene regulation. These results support the use of Sleeping Beauty vectors in carrying an insulated IHK-β-globin transgene for gene therapy of sickle cell disease.

  16. Lineage-Specific Patterns of Functional Diversification in the α- and β-Globin Gene Families of Tetrapod Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Gorr, Thomas A.; Opazo, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    The α- and β-globin gene families of jawed vertebrates have diversified with respect to both gene function and the developmental timing of gene expression. Phylogenetic reconstructions of globin gene family evolution have provided suggestive evidence that the developmental regulation of hemoglobin synthesis has evolved independently in multiple vertebrate lineages. For example, the embryonic β-like globin genes of birds and placental mammals are not 1:1 orthologs. Despite the similarity in developmental expression profiles, the genes are independently derived from lineage-specific duplications of a β-globin pro-ortholog. This suggests the possibility that other vertebrate taxa may also possess distinct repertoires of globin genes that were produced by repeated rounds of lineage-specific gene duplication and divergence. Until recently, investigations into this possibility have been hindered by the dearth of genomic sequence data from nonmammalian vertebrates. Here, we report new insights into globin gene family evolution that were provided by a phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate globins combined with a comparative genomic analysis of three key sauropsid taxa: a squamate reptile (anole lizard, Anolis carolinensis), a passeriform bird (zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata), and a galliform bird (chicken, Gallus gallus). The main objectives of this study were 1) to characterize evolutionary changes in the size and membership composition of the α- and β-globin gene families of tetrapod vertebrates and 2) to test whether functional diversification of the globin gene clusters occurred independently in different tetrapod lineages. Results of our comparative genomic analysis revealed several intriguing patterns of gene turnover in the globin gene clusters of different taxa. Lineage-specific differences in gene content were especially pronounced in the β-globin gene family, as phylogenetic reconstructions revealed that amphibians, lepidosaurs (as represented by anole

  17. A redox signalling globin is essential for reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Henau, Sasha; Tilleman, Lesley; Vangheel, Matthew; Luyckx, Evi; Trashin, Stanislav; Pauwels, Martje; Germani, Francesca; Vlaeminck, Caroline; Vanfleteren, Jacques R.; Bert, Wim; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; de Wael, Karolien; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2015-12-01

    Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognized as redox signalling molecules. However, thus far, only mitochondria and NADPH oxidases have been identified as cellular sources of ROS in signalling. Here we identify a globin (GLB-12) that produces superoxide, a type of ROS, which serves as an essential signal for reproduction in C. elegans. We find that GLB-12 has an important role in the regulation of multiple aspects in germline development, including germ cell apoptosis. We further describe how GLB-12 displays specific molecular, biochemical and structural properties that allow this globin to act as a superoxide generator. In addition, both an intra- and extracellular superoxide dismutase act as key partners of GLB-12 to create a transmembrane redox signal. Our results show that a globin can function as a driving factor in redox signalling, and how this signal is regulated at the subcellular level by multiple control layers.

  18. A redox signalling globin is essential for reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    De Henau, Sasha; Tilleman, Lesley; Vangheel, Matthew; Luyckx, Evi; Trashin, Stanislav; Pauwels, Martje; Germani, Francesca; Vlaeminck, Caroline; Vanfleteren, Jacques R.; Bert, Wim; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; De Wael, Karolien; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2015-01-01

    Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognized as redox signalling molecules. However, thus far, only mitochondria and NADPH oxidases have been identified as cellular sources of ROS in signalling. Here we identify a globin (GLB-12) that produces superoxide, a type of ROS, which serves as an essential signal for reproduction in C. elegans. We find that GLB-12 has an important role in the regulation of multiple aspects in germline development, including germ cell apoptosis. We further describe how GLB-12 displays specific molecular, biochemical and structural properties that allow this globin to act as a superoxide generator. In addition, both an intra- and extracellular superoxide dismutase act as key partners of GLB-12 to create a transmembrane redox signal. Our results show that a globin can function as a driving factor in redox signalling, and how this signal is regulated at the subcellular level by multiple control layers. PMID:26621324

  19. A redox signalling globin is essential for reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    De Henau, Sasha; Tilleman, Lesley; Vangheel, Matthew; Luyckx, Evi; Trashin, Stanislav; Pauwels, Martje; Germani, Francesca; Vlaeminck, Caroline; Vanfleteren, Jacques R; Bert, Wim; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; De Wael, Karolien; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia; Braeckman, Bart P

    2015-12-01

    Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognized as redox signalling molecules. However, thus far, only mitochondria and NADPH oxidases have been identified as cellular sources of ROS in signalling. Here we identify a globin (GLB-12) that produces superoxide, a type of ROS, which serves as an essential signal for reproduction in C. elegans. We find that GLB-12 has an important role in the regulation of multiple aspects in germline development, including germ cell apoptosis. We further describe how GLB-12 displays specific molecular, biochemical and structural properties that allow this globin to act as a superoxide generator. In addition, both an intra- and extracellular superoxide dismutase act as key partners of GLB-12 to create a transmembrane redox signal. Our results show that a globin can function as a driving factor in redox signalling, and how this signal is regulated at the subcellular level by multiple control layers.

  20. Polymorphism of DNA sequence adjacent to human beta-globin structural gene: relationship to sickle mutation.

    PubMed

    Kan, Y W; Dozy, A M

    1978-11-01

    Restriction endonuclease mapping of the human globin genes revealed a genetic variation in a Hpa I recognition site about 5000 nucleotides from the 3' end of the beta-globin structural gene. Instead of a normal 7.6-kilobase (kb) fragment which contains the beta-globin structural gene, 7.0-kb and 13.0-kb variants were detected. Both variants were found in people of African origin and were not detected in Asians or Caucasians. The 13.0-kb variant is frequently associated with the sickle hemoglobin mutation and may be useful for the prediction of the sickle cell gene in prenatal diagnosis. Polymorphism in a restriction enzyme site could be considered as a new class of genetic marker and may offer a new approach to linkage analysis and anthropological studies.

  1. Globin genes transcriptional switching, chromatin structure and linked lessons to epigenetics in cancer: a comparative overview.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Georgina; Delgado-Olguín, Paul; Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martín; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Rebollar, Eria; De La Rosa-Velázquez, Inti A; Soto-Reyes, Ernesto; Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2007-07-01

    At the present time research situates differential regulation of gene expression in an increasingly complex scenario based on interplay between genetic and epigenetic information networks, which need to be highly coordinated. Here we describe in a comparative way relevant concepts and models derived from studies on the chicken alpha- and beta-globin group of genes. We discuss models for globin switching and mechanisms for coordinated transcriptional activation. A comparative overview of globin genes chromatin structure, based on their genomic domain organization and epigenetic components is presented. We argue that the results of those studies and their integrative interpretation may contribute to our understanding of epigenetic abnormalities, from beta-thalassemias to human cancer. Finally we discuss the interdependency of genetic-epigenetic components and the need of their mutual consideration in order to visualize the regulation of gene expression in a more natural context and consequently better understand cell differentiation, development and cancer.

  2. Neuroprotective effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca).

    PubMed

    Pino-Figueroa, Alejandro; Nguyen, Diane; Maher, Timothy J

    2010-06-01

    The neuroprotective activity of the plant Lepidium meyenii (Maca) was studied in two experimental models: in vitro and in vivo. Crayfish neurons were pretreated with vehicle or the pentane extract from Maca, subjected to H(2)O(2), and their viability determined microscopically and chemically. A significant concentration-neuroprotective effect relationship was demonstrated. The pentane extract was then administered intravenously to rats prior to and following middle cerebral artery occlusion. While infarct volumes were decreased for the lower dose, higher doses increased infarct volumes compared to controls. These results suggest a potential application of Maca as a neuroprotectant. PMID:20633111

  3. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Angela C; Liu, Ji

    2016-03-01

    Glaucoma is the principal cause of irreversible blindness in the world. The disease leads to progressive optic nerve degeneration with a gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells. Neurodegeneration in glaucoma extends beyond the eye into the lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex, and the disease even shares some characteristics with other central nervous system degenerative disorders. Glaucoma destroys neurons through oxidative stress, impairment in axonal transport, neuroinflammation, and excitotoxicity. Autophagy may promote or inhibit disease progression. Currently, lowering intraocular pressure is the only way proven to delay glaucoma advancement. However, many new therapies are being developed, including antioxidants, adenosine receptor antagonists, Rho-pathway inhibitors, stem cell therapy, and neurotrophic factors. These therapies focus on neuroprotection, and they may eventually halt glaucoma progression or reverse the process of the disease itself. PMID:27505018

  4. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Angela C.; Liu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is the principal cause of irreversible blindness in the world. The disease leads to progressive optic nerve degeneration with a gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells. Neurodegeneration in glaucoma extends beyond the eye into the lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex, and the disease even shares some characteristics with other central nervous system degenerative disorders. Glaucoma destroys neurons through oxidative stress, impairment in axonal transport, neuroinflammation, and excitotoxicity. Autophagy may promote or inhibit disease progression. Currently, lowering intraocular pressure is the only way proven to delay glaucoma advancement. However, many new therapies are being developed, including antioxidants, adenosine receptor antagonists, Rho-pathway inhibitors, stem cell therapy, and neurotrophic factors. These therapies focus on neuroprotection, and they may eventually halt glaucoma progression or reverse the process of the disease itself. PMID:27505018

  5. A Globin Domain in a Neuronal Transmembrane Receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum

    PubMed Central

    Tilleman, Lesley; Germani, Francesca; De Henau, Sasha; Helbo, Signe; Desmet, Filip; Berghmans, Herald; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Hoogewijs, David; Schoofs, Liliane; Braeckman, Bart P.; Moens, Luc; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of GLB-33, a putative neuropeptide receptor that is exclusively expressed in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This unique chimeric protein is composed of a 7-transmembrane domain (7TM), GLB-33 7TM, typical of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and of a globin domain (GD), GLB-33 GD. Comprehensive sequence similarity searches in the genome of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, revealed a chimeric protein that is similar to a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide neuropeptide receptor. The three-dimensional structures of the separate domains of both species and of the full-length proteins were modeled. The 7TM domains of both proteins appeared very similar, but the globin domain of the A. suum receptor surprisingly seemed to lack several helices, suggesting a novel truncated globin fold. The globin domain of C. elegans GLB-33, however, was very similar to a genuine myoglobin-type molecule. Spectroscopic analysis of the recombinant GLB-33 GD showed that the heme is pentacoordinate when ferrous and in the hydroxide-ligated form when ferric, even at neutral pH. Flash-photolysis experiments showed overall fast biphasic CO rebinding kinetics. In its ferrous deoxy form, GLB-33 GD is capable of reversibly binding O2 with a very high affinity and of reducing nitrite to nitric oxide faster than other globins. Collectively, these properties suggest that the globin domain of GLB-33 may serve as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor and/or as a nitrite reductase. Both properties are potentially able to modulate the neuropeptide sensitivity of the neuronal transmembrane receptor. PMID:25666609

  6. Human globin gene analysis for a patient with beta-o/delta beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ottolenghi, S; Lanyon, W G; Williamson, R; Weatherall, D J; Clegg, J B; Pitcher, C S

    1975-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) was prepared with RNA-dependent DNA polymerase from human globin messenger RNA (mRNA). Annealing and translation experimenta with total mRNA from circulating cells from a patient with heterozygous beta/heterozygous beta-delta-o thalassemia (beta-o/delta beta-o-thalassemia) demonstrated no detectable mRNA for beta-globin. cDNA enriched in sequences homologous to beta-globin mRNA was prepared by hydroxylapatite fractionation of hybrids formed between beta-o/delta beta-o-thalassemic mRNA and cDNA made from mRNA from a patient with alpha-thalassemia (hemoglobin H disease). The rate of annealing of this beta-enriched cDNA to normal human nuclear DNA was that of a sequence present as only a single copy per haploid genome. The beta-enriched cDNA annealed to the beta-o-delta beta-o-thalassemia total DNA with approximately the same kinetics as to normal DNA, indicating that no total gene deletion of beta-globin genes from the diploid genome has occurred, although the accuracy of the technique could not exclude with certainty a partial deletion or a deletion of a beta-globin gene from only one of the haploid genomes. This demonstrates that at least one of the beta-o- or the delta beta-o-thalassemia haploid genomes in this case contains a substantially intact beta-globin gene. PMID:49057

  7. Evidence on primate phylogeny from epsilon-globin gene sequences and flanking regions.

    PubMed

    Porter, C A; Sampaio, I; Schneider, H; Schneider, M P; Czelusniak, J; Goodman, M

    1995-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among various primate groups were examined based on sequences of epsilon-globin genes. epsilon-globin genes were sequenced from five species of strepsirhine primates. These sequences were aligned and compared with other known primate epsilon-globin sequences, including data from two additional strepsirhine species, one species of tarsier, 19 species of New World monkeys (representing all extant genera), and five species of catarrhines. In addition, a 2-kb segment upstream of the epsilon-globin gene was sequenced in two of the five strepsirhines examined. This upstream sequence was aligned with five other species of primates for which data are available in this segment. Domestic rabbit and goat were used as outgroups. This analysis supports the monophyly of order Primates but does not support the traditional prosimian grouping of tarsiers, lorisoids, and lemuroids; rather it supports the sister grouping of tarsiers and anthropoids into Haplorhini and the sister grouping of lorisoids and lemuroids into Strepsirhini. The mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) and dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus medius) appear to be most closely related to each other, forming a clade with the lemuroids, and are probably not closely related to the lorisoids, as suggested by some morphological studies. Analysis of the epsilon-globin data supports the hypothesis that the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) shares a sister-group relationship with other Malagasy strepsirhines (all being classified as lemuroids). Relationships among ceboids agree with findings from a previous epsilon-globin study in which fewer outgroup taxa were employed. Rates of molecular evolution were higher in lorisoids than in lemuroids. PMID:7714911

  8. [Evolution of the neuroprotection concept].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U

    2003-01-01

    Although the modern concept of neuroprotection has been formulated quite recently, the basis of this approach was laid about four decades ago when Zakusov initiated the study of mechanisms involved in the neuroprotector action of GABA shunt metabolites (in particular, alpha-hydroxybutyric acid and succinic semialdehyde) during hypoxia. It was suggested to consider these agents as a system of endogenous neuroprotectors. The interest of Zakusov in endogenous regulators (including oligopeptides) had stimulated research in this direction and gave impact to the investigations of A. P. Skoldinov and T. A. Gudasheva initiated in the early 1980s. Proceeding from the original concept of the possibility of imitation of the action of neurotropic agents by their structural-conformational oligopeptide analogs, a number of biologically active stable dipeptides were obtained, based on pyroglutamate and proline, and high specific bioaccessibility of these dipeptides for the brain was established. Our investigations showed that these compounds not only possess nootropic activity (in a dose 1000 times lower than that of piracetam), but produce a pronounced neuroprotector action as well. Most thoroughly studied in this respect were substituted acyl-prolyl dipeptides, in particular, the drug noopept exhibiting a combined neuroprotector effect both in vitro and in vivo. Noopept decreases the extent of necrotic damage caused by photoinduced thrombosis of cortical blood vessels. It was established that the neuroprotector effect of noopept is related to its action upon the well-known "triad", whereby the drug reduces neurotoxic effects of excess extracellular calcium, glutamate, and free radicals. Two additional components of the neuroprotector action of noopept are related to the antiinflammatory and antithrombotic activity. The prospects of using direct and indirect action upon neurotrophin system for neuroprotection purposes are considered. Taking into account common secondary

  9. Distinctive Patterns of Evolution of the δ-Globin Gene (HBD) in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Moleirinho, Ana; Lopes, Alexandra M.; Seixas, Susana; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Prata, Maria J.; Amorim, António

    2015-01-01

    In most vertebrates, hemoglobin (Hb) is a heterotetramer composed of two dissimilar globin chains, which change during development according to the patterns of expression of α- and β-globin family members. In placental mammals, the β-globin cluster includes three early-expressed genes, ε(HBE)-γ(HBG)-ψβ(HBBP1), and the late expressed genes, δ (HBD) and β (HBB). While HBB encodes the major adult β-globin chain, HBD is weakly expressed or totally silent. Paradoxically, in human populations HBD shows high levels of conservation typical of genes under strong evolutionary constraints, possibly due to a regulatory role in the fetal-to-adult switch unique of Anthropoid primates. In this study, we have performed a comprehensive phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the two adult β-like globin genes in a set of diverse mammalian taxa, focusing on the evolution and functional divergence of HBD in primates. Our analysis revealed that anthropoids are an exception to a general pattern of concerted evolution in placental mammals, showing a high level of sequence conservation at HBD, less frequent and shorter gene conversion events. Moreover, this lineage is unique in the retention of a functional GATA-1 motif, known to be involved in the control of the developmental expression of the β-like globin genes. We further show that not only the mode but also the rate of evolution of the δ-globin gene in higher primates are strictly associated with the fetal/adult β-cluster developmental switch. To gain further insight into the possible functional constraints that have been shaping the evolutionary history of HBD in primates, we calculated dN/dS (ω) ratios under alternative models of gene evolution. Although our results indicate that HBD might have experienced different selective pressures throughout primate evolution, as shown by different ω values between apes and Old World Monkeys + New World Monkeys (0.06 versus 0.43, respectively), these estimates corroborated a

  10. Secondary neuroprotective effects of hypotensive drugs and potential mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Grace C; Calkins, David J

    2012-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma, a long-term degenerative ocular neuropathy, remains a significant cause of vision impairment worldwide. While many risk factors have been correlated with increased risk for primary open-angle glaucoma, intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the only modifiable risk factor and primary therapeutic target. Pharmacologic therapies are administered topically; these include α2-agonists, β-antagonists, prostaglandin analogs and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Some of these topical medications exhibit secondary neuroprotective effects independent of their effect on IOP. This review covers the possible mechanisms of neuroprotection stimulated by drugs currently marketed for the lowering of IOP, based on known literature. While the neuroprotective properties of many glaucoma pharmaceuticals are promising from an experimental standpoint, key challenges for the development of new clinical practices include unknown systemic side effects, limited methods of drug delivery to the retina and optic nerve, and development of extended-release formulations. PMID:22737176

  11. Coinheritance of a Rare Nucleotide Substitution on the β-Globin Gene and Other Known Mutations in the Globin Clusters: Management in Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Margherita; Passarello, Cristina; Leto, Filippo; Crivello, Anna; Fustaneo, Maria; Cassarà, Filippo; Cannata, Monica; Maggio, Aurelio; Giambona, Antonino

    2016-08-01

    A large number of methods for DNA analysis are available to identify defects in globin genes associated with hemoglobin (Hb) disorders. In this study, we report a rare nucleotide (nt) substitution on the β-globin gene, nt 781 in the second intron [IVS-II-781 (C > G); HBB: c.316-70C > G], identified in four patients. This nt substitution was previously described only as a personal communication to the HbVar database and indicated as a β(0) or β(+) mutation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical implication of this nt change, particularly when coinherited with severe β-thalassemia (β-thal), in order to be able to conduct appropriate genetic counseling. Genetic studies were performed on two subjects, one carried Hb S [β6(A3)Glu→Val; HBB: c.20A > T], and the other carried IVS-I-110 (G > A) (HBB: c.93-21G > A). All these subjects showed this new β nt substitution in association with Hb A2' (or Hb B2) [δ16(A13)Gly→Arg; HBD: c.49G > C]. Another 16 samples, carrying the same δ variant as the probands, were processed by β-globin gene sequencing in order to better understand the correlation between this Hb variant and the rare nt substitution reported in this study. The present investigation emphasizes the importance of sharing the observed nt changes in the globin gene cluster, especially in the case of new or rare undefined mutations, in order to facilitate the determination of their phenotypic expression, the possible interactions with known molecular defects and to formulate appropriate genetic counseling for at-risk couples. PMID:27258795

  12. Preliminary identification of hemoglobin q-iran in an Iranian family from central province of Iran by globin chain analysis on HPLC.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Shohreh; Najmabadi, Hossein; Rouhi, Soghra; Mirzazadeh, Roghieh; Bayat, Parastoo; Sadeghi, Sedigheh

    2013-12-01

    Many abnormal α-chain hemoglobins (Hbs) are caused by single nucleotide mutations in α1- or α2-goblin genes. One of these Hbs is Hb Q-Iran which is resulted from a point mutation at codon 75 of the α1-globin gene (Asp→His). The identification of Hb Q-Iran was observed in two members of a family from the Central Province of Iran. In this study, Globin chain analysis on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and DNA sequencing were applied. An unusual Hb variant, like HbS on alkaline pH electrophoresis was identified from samples of a father and his son from Arak city in the Central Province of Iran. The variant was further characterized by globin chain analysis and DNA sequencing methods. Globin chain analysis revealed an unknown globin chain peak after α-globin chain peak with a different retention time from βs-globin chain, as the control in both samples. Genetic analysis led to the identification of an unknown Hb variant, Hb Q-Iran. Globin chain analysis showed the presence of an unknown globin chain, and likewise DNA sequencing revealed HbQ-Iran. In other words, Globin chain analysis procedure could preliminarily detect an unknown globin chain.

  13. An embryonic stage–specific enhancer within the murine β-globin locus mediates domain-wide histone hyperacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, George; Cadiz-Rivera, Brenda; de Vries, Christina; Getman, Michael; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Fields, Jennifer; Fiering, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian nuclei, a select number of tissue-specific gene loci exhibit broadly distributed patterns of histone modifications, such as histone hyperacetylation, that are normally associated with active gene promoters. Previously, we characterized such hyperacetylated domains within mammalian β-globin gene loci, and determined that within the murine locus, neither the β-globin locus control region nor the gene promoters were required for domain formation. Here, we identify a developmentally specific erythroid enhancer, hypersensitive site-embryonic 1 (HS-E1), located within the embryonic β-globin domain in mouse, which is homologous to a region located downstream of the human embryonic ϵ-globin gene. This sequence exhibits nuclease hypersensitivity in primitive erythroid cells and acts as an enhancer in gain-of-function assays. Deletion of HS-E1 from the endogenous murine β-globin locus results in significant decrease in the expression of the embryonic β-globin genes and loss of the domain-wide pattern of histone hyperacetylation. The data suggest that HS-E1 is an enhancer that is uniquely required for β-like globin expression in primitive erythroid cells, and that it defines a novel class of enhancer that works in part by domain-wide modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:21321362

  14. A Novel Mutation in the Promoter Region of the β-Globin Gene: HBB: c.-127G > C.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Turker; Canatan, Duran; Delibas, Serpil; Keser, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    Novel β-globin gene mutations are still occasionally being reported, especially when evaluating milder phenotypes. We report here a novel putative mutation in the promoter region of the β-globin gene and assess its clinical implications. A family, parents and four siblings, with hematological and clinical features suspected of being β-globin gene mutation(s), were involved in this study. In addition to hematological and clinical evaluations of the whole family, molecular analyses of the β-globin gene were performed by direct sequencing. Sequencing of the β-globin gene revealed a novel genomic alteration in the regulatory region of the gene. This novel genomic alteration was defined as HBB: c.-127G > C according to the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature. Two siblings were found to be carriers of the HBB: c.-127G > C mutation, while the other two siblings were carriers of the codon 8 (-AA) (HBB: c.25_26delAA) deletion of the β-globin gene. The mother was a compound heterozygote for the codon 8 and HBB: c.-127G > C mutations. Based on hematological and clinical evaluations, we conclude that this novel β-globin gene promoter region change would be associated with a mild phenotype of β-thalassemia (β-thal). PMID:27349616

  15. Open and Lys–His Hexacoordinated Closed Structures of a Globin with Swapped Proximal and Distal Sites

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Aik-Hong; Saito, Jennifer A.; Najimudin, Nazalan; Alam, Maqsudul

    2015-01-01

    Globins are haem-binding proteins with a conserved fold made up of α-helices and can possess diverse properties. A putative globin-coupled sensor from Methylacidiphilum infernorum, HGbRL, contains an N-terminal globin domain whose open and closed structures reveal an untypical dimeric architecture. Helices E and F fuse into an elongated helix, resulting in a novel site-swapped globin fold made up of helices A–E, hence the distal site, from one subunit and helices F–H, the proximal site, from another. The open structure possesses a large cavity binding an imidazole molecule, while the closed structure forms a unique Lys–His hexacoordinated species, with the first turn of helix E unravelling to allow Lys52(E10) to bind to the haem. Ligand binding induces reorganization of loop CE, which is stabilized in the closed form, and helix E, triggering a large conformational movement in the open form. These provide a mechanical insight into how a signal may be relayed between the globin domain and the C-terminal domain of HGbRL, a Roadblock/LC7 domain. Comparison with HGbI, a closely related globin, further underlines the high degree of structural versatility that the globin fold is capable of, enabling it to perform a diversity of functions. PMID:26094577

  16. β-Globin-Expressing Definitive Erythroid Progenitor Cells Generated from Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Sacs.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Atsushi; Uchida, Naoya; Haro-Mora, Juan J; Winkler, Thomas; Tisdale, John

    2016-06-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells represent a potential alternative source for red blood cell transfusion. However, when using traditional methods with embryoid bodies, ES cell-derived erythroid cells predominantly express embryonic type ɛ-globin, with lesser fetal type γ-globin and very little adult type β-globin. Furthermore, no β-globin expression is detected in iPS cell-derived erythroid cells. ES cell-derived sacs (ES sacs) have been recently used to generate functional platelets. Due to its unique structure, we hypothesized that ES sacs serve as hemangioblast-like progenitors capable to generate definitive erythroid cells that express β-globin. With our ES sac-derived erythroid differentiation protocol, we obtained ∼120 erythroid cells per single ES cell. Both primitive (ɛ-globin expressing) and definitive (γ- and β-globin expressing) erythroid cells were generated from not only ES cells but also iPS cells. Primitive erythropoiesis is gradually switched to definitive erythropoiesis during prolonged ES sac maturation, concurrent with the emergence of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Primitive and definitive erythroid progenitor cells were selected on the basis of glycophorin A or CD34 expression from cells within the ES sacs before erythroid differentiation. This selection and differentiation strategy represents an important step toward the development of in vitro erythroid cell production systems from pluripotent stem cells. Further optimization to improve expansion should be required for clinical application. Stem Cells 2016;34:1541-1552.

  17. Organization, structure, and evolution of the nonadult rat beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Satoh, H; Inokuchi, N; Nagae, Y; Okazaki, T

    1999-07-01

    The beta-globin gene cluster of Wistar rat was extensively cloned and the embryonic genes were mapped and sequenced. Four overlapping lambda Dash recombinant clones cover about 31 kb and contain four nonadult beta-globin genes, 5'-epsilon1-gamma1-gamma2-psigamma3-3'. The epsilon1 and gamma2 are active genes, since their protein products were detected in the fetal stage of the rat (Iwahara et al., J Biochem 119:360-366, 1996). The gamma1 locus might be a pseudogene, since the ATA box in the promoter region is mutated to GTA; however, no other defect is observed. The psigamma3 locus is a truncated pseudogene because a 19-base deletion, which causes a shift of the reading frame, is observed between the second nucleotide of the putative codon 68 and codon 76. A sequence comparison suggests that the psigamma3 might be produced by a gene conversion event of the proto-gamma-globin gene set. Possible histories of the evolution of rat nonadult beta-globin genes are discussed.

  18. Nonsense mutations in the human. beta. -globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baserga, S.J.; Benz, E.J. Jr. )

    1988-04-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human {alpha}- and {beta}-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with {beta}{sup 0}-thalassemia have shown that for both the {beta}-17 and the {beta}-39 mutations less than normal levels of {beta}-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human {beta}-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned {beta}-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human {beta}-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation.

  19. Identification and molecular characterization of four new large deletions in the beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fact that mutations in the human beta-globin gene cluster are essentially point mutations, a significant number of large deletions have also been described. We present here four new large deletions in the beta-globin gene cluster that have been identified on patients displaying an atypical hemoglobin phenotype (high HbF) at routine analysis. The first deletion, which spreads over 2.0 kb, removes the entire beta-globin gene, including its promoter, and is associated with a typical beta-thal minor phenotype. The three other deletions are larger (19.7 to 23.9 kb) and remove both the delta and beta-globin genes. Phenotypically, they look like an HPFH-deletion as they are associated with normal hematological parameters. The precise localization of their 5' and 3' breakpoints gives new insights about the differences between HPFH and (deltabeta)(0)-thalassemia at the molecular level. The importance of detection of these deletions in prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening of hemoglobinopathies is also discussed.

  20. Structural Plasticity in Globins: Role of Protein Dynamics in Defining Ligand Migration Pathways.

    PubMed

    Estarellas, C; Capece, L; Seira, C; Bidon-Chanal, A; Estrin, D A; Luque, F J

    2016-01-01

    Globins are a family of proteins characterized by the presence of the heme prosthetic group and involved in variety of biological functions in the cell. Due to their biological relevance and widespread distribution in all kingdoms of life, intense research efforts have been devoted to disclosing the relationships between structural features, protein dynamics, and function. Particular attention has been paid to the impact of differences in amino acid sequence on the topological features of docking sites and cavities and to the influence of conformational flexibility in facilitating the migration of small ligands through these cavities. Often, tunnels are carved in the interior of globins, and ligand exchange is regulated by gating residues. Understanding the subtle intricacies that relate the differences in sequence with the structural and dynamical features of globins with the ultimate aim of rationalizing the thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding continues to be a major challenge in the field. Due to the evolution of computational techniques, significant advances into our understanding of these questions have been made. In this review we focus our attention on the analysis of the ligand migration pathways as well as the function of the structural cavities and tunnels in a series of representative globins, emphasizing the synergy between experimental and theoretical approaches to gain a comprehensive knowledge into the molecular mechanisms of this diverse family of proteins. PMID:27567484

  1. Whole-Genome Duplications Spurred the Functional Diversification of the Globin Gene Superfamily in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Storz, Jay F.

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that two successive rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the stem lineage of vertebrates provided genetic raw materials for the evolutionary innovation of many vertebrate-specific features. However, it has seldom been possible to trace such innovations to specific functional differences between paralogous gene products that derive from a WGD event. Here, we report genomic evidence for a direct link between WGD and key physiological innovations in the vertebrate oxygen transport system. Specifically, we demonstrate that key globin proteins that evolved specialized functions in different aspects of oxidative metabolism (hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytoglobin) represent paralogous products of two WGD events in the vertebrate common ancestor. Analysis of conserved macrosynteny between the genomes of vertebrates and amphioxus (subphylum Cephalochordata) revealed that homologous chromosomal segments defined by myoglobin + globin-E, cytoglobin, and the α-globin gene cluster each descend from the same linkage group in the reconstructed proto-karyotype of the chordate common ancestor. The physiological division of labor between the oxygen transport function of hemoglobin and the oxygen storage function of myoglobin played a pivotal role in the evolution of aerobic energy metabolism, supporting the hypothesis that WGDs helped fuel key innovations in vertebrate evolution. PMID:21965344

  2. Analysis of the human alpha-globin gene cluster in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, J A; Wells, D J; Whitelaw, E; Vyas, P; Higgs, D R; Wood, W G

    1993-01-01

    A 350-bp segment of DNA associated with an erythroid-specific DNase I-hypersensitive site (HS-40), upstream of the alpha-globin gene cluster, has been identified as the major tissue-specific regulator of the alpha-globin genes. However, this element does not direct copy number-dependent or developmentally stable expression of the human genes in transgenic mice. To determine whether additional upstream hypersensitive sites could provide more complete regulation of alpha gene expression we have studied 17 lines of transgenic mice bearing various DNA fragments containing HSs -33, -10, -8, and -4, in addition to HS -40. Position-independent, high-level expression of the human zeta- and alpha-globin genes was consistently observed in embryonic erythroid cells. However, the additional HSs did not confer copy-number dependence, alter the level of expression, or prevent the variable down-regulation of expression in adults. These results suggest that the region upstream of the human alpha-globin genes is not equivalent to that upstream of the beta locus and that although the two clusters are coordinately expressed, there may be differences in their regulation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8248238

  3. Role of upstream DNase I hypersensitive sites in the regulation of human alpha globin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, J A; Summerhill, R J; Vyas, P; Gourdon, G; Higgs, D R; Wood, W G

    1993-09-01

    Erythroid-specific DNase 1 hypersensitive sites have been identified at the promoters of the human alpha-like genes and within the region from 4 to 40 kb upstream of the gene cluster. One of these sites, HS-40, has been shown previously to be the major regulator of tissue-specific alpha-globin gene expression. We have now examined the function of other hypersensitive sites by studying the expression in mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells of various fragments containing these sites attached to HS-40 and an alpha-globin gene. High level expression of the alpha gene was observed in all cases. When clones of MEL cells bearing a single copy of the alpha-globin gene fragments were examined, expression levels were similar to those of the endogenous mouse alpha genes and similar to MEL cells bearing beta gene constructs under the control of the beta-globin locus control region. However, there was no evidence that the additional hypersensitive sites increased the level of expression or conferred copy number dependence on the expression of a linked alpha gene in MEL cells. PMID:7689876

  4. Generation of a high-titer retroviral vector capable of expressing high levels of the human beta-globin gene.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, M; Wang, C H; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F; Mulligan, R C

    1995-07-18

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic cells may provide a means of treating both inherited and acquired diseases involving hematopoietic cells. Implementation of this approach for disorders resulting from mutations affecting the beta-globin gene (e.g., beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia), however, has been hampered by the inability to generate recombinant viruses able to efficiently and faithfully transmit the necessary sequences for appropriate gene expression. We have addressed this problem by carefully examining the interactions between retroviral and beta-globin gene sequences which affect vector transmission, stability, and expression. First, we examined the transmission properties of a large number of different recombinant proviral genomes which vary both in the precise nature of vector, beta-globin structural gene, and locus control region (LCR) core sequences incorporated and in the placement and orientation of those sequences. Through this analysis, we identified one specific vector, termed M beta 6L, which carries both the human beta-globin gene and core elements HS2, HS3, and HS4 from the LCR and faithfully transmits recombinant proviral sequences to cells with titers greater than 10(6) per ml. Populations of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells transduced by this virus expressed levels of human beta-globin transcript which, on a per gene copy basis, were 78% of the levels detected in an MEL-derived cell line, Hu11, which carries human chromosome 11, the site of the beta-globin locus. Analysis of individual transduced MEL cell clones, however, indicated that, while expression was detected in every clone tested (n = 17), the levels of human beta-globin treatment varied between 4% and 146% of the levels in Hu11. This clonal variation in expression levels suggests that small beta-globin LCR sequences may not provide for as strict chromosomal position-independent expression of beta-globin as previously suspected, at least in the context of

  5. Enzymatic amplification of beta-globin genomic sequences and restriction site analysis for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Saiki, R K; Scharf, S; Faloona, F; Mullis, K B; Horn, G T; Erlich, H A; Arnheim, N

    1985-12-20

    Two new methods were used to establish a rapid and highly sensitive prenatal diagnostic test for sickle cell anemia. The first involves the primer-mediated enzymatic amplification of specific beta-globin target sequences in genomic DNA, resulting in the exponential increase (220,000 times) of target DNA copies. In the second technique, the presence of the beta A and beta S alleles is determined by restriction endonuclease digestion of an end-labeled oligonucleotide probe hybridized in solution to the amplified beta-globin sequences. The beta-globin genotype can be determined in less than 1 day on samples containing significantly less than 1 microgram of genomic DNA.

  6. Gene Turnover in the Avian Globin Gene Families and Evolutionary Changes in Hemoglobin Isoform Expression

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Witt, Christopher C.; Berenbrink, Michael; Storz, Jay F.

    2015-01-01

    The apparent stasis in the evolution of avian chromosomes suggests that birds may have experienced relatively low rates of gene gain and loss in multigene families. To investigate this possibility and to explore the phenotypic consequences of variation in gene copy number, we examined evolutionary changes in the families of genes that encode the α- and β-type subunits of hemoglobin (Hb), the tetrameric α2β2 protein responsible for blood-O2 transport. A comparative genomic analysis of 52 bird species revealed that the size and membership composition of the α- and β-globin gene families have remained remarkably constant during approximately 100 My of avian evolution. Most interspecific variation in gene content is attributable to multiple independent inactivations of the αD-globin gene, which encodes the α-chain subunit of a functionally distinct Hb isoform (HbD) that is expressed in both embryonic and definitive erythrocytes. Due to consistent differences in O2-binding properties between HbD and the major adult-expressed Hb isoform, HbA (which incorporates products of the αA-globin gene), recurrent losses of αD-globin contribute to among-species variation in blood-O2 affinity. Analysis of HbA/HbD expression levels in the red blood cells of 122 bird species revealed high variability among lineages and strong phylogenetic signal. In comparison with the homologous gene clusters in mammals, the low retention rate for lineage-specific gene duplicates in the avian globin gene clusters suggests that the developmental regulation of Hb synthesis in birds may be more highly conserved, with orthologous genes having similar stage-specific expression profiles and similar functional properties in disparate taxa. PMID:25502940

  7. Study of red wine neuroprotection on astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Serranillos, M Pilar; Martín, Sara; Ortega, Teresa; Palomino, Olga M; Prodanov, Marín; Vacas, Visitación; Hernández, Teresa; Estrella, Isabel; Carretero, M Emilia

    2009-12-01

    Phenolic composition of wine depends not only on the grape variety from which it is made, but on some external factors such as winemaking technology. Red wine possesses the most antioxidant effect because of its high polyphenolic content. The aim of this work is to study for the first time, the neuroprotective activity of four monovarietal Spanish red wines (Merlot (ME), Tempranillo (T), Garnacha (G) and Cabernet-Sauvignon (CS)) through its antioxidant ability, and to relate this neuroprotection to its polyphenolic composition, if possible. The wine effect on neuroprotection was studied through its effect as free radical scavenger against FeSO4, H2O2 and FeSO4 + H2O2. Effect on cell survival was determined by 3(4,5-dimethyltiazol-2-il)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium reduction assay (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay on astrocytes cultures. Results showed that most of the studied wine varieties induced neuroprotection through their antioxidant ability in astrocytes, Merlot being the most active; this variety is especially rich in phenolic compounds, mainly catechins and oligomeric proanthocyanidins. Our results show that red wine exerts a protection against oxidative stress generated by different toxic agents and that the observed neuroprotective activity is related to their polyphenolic content.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of psychotropic drugs in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Edward C

    2013-11-15

    Psychotropics (antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, anxiolytics, etc.) are commonly prescribed to treat Huntington's disease (HD). In HD preclinical models, while no psychotropic has convincingly affected huntingtin gene, HD modifying gene, or huntingtin protein expression, psychotropic neuroprotective effects include upregulated huntingtin autophagy (lithium), histone acetylation (lithium, valproate, lamotrigine), miR-222 (lithium-plus-valproate), mitochondrial protection (haloperidol, trifluoperazine, imipramine, desipramine, nortriptyline, maprotiline, trazodone, sertraline, venlafaxine, melatonin), neurogenesis (lithium, valproate, fluoxetine, sertraline), and BDNF (lithium, valproate, sertraline) and downregulated AP-1 DNA binding (lithium), p53 (lithium), huntingtin aggregation (antipsychotics, lithium), and apoptosis (trifluoperazine, loxapine, lithium, desipramine, nortriptyline, maprotiline, cyproheptadine, melatonin). In HD live mouse models, delayed disease onset (nortriptyline, melatonin), striatal preservation (haloperidol, tetrabenazine, lithium, sertraline), memory preservation (imipramine, trazodone, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine), motor improvement (tetrabenazine, lithium, valproate, imipramine, nortriptyline, trazodone, sertraline, venlafaxine), and extended survival (lithium, valproate, sertraline, melatonin) have been documented. Upregulated CREB binding protein (CBP; valproate, dextromethorphan) and downregulated histone deacetylase (HDAC; valproate) await demonstration in HD models. Most preclinical findings await replication and their limitations are reviewed. The most promising findings involve replicated striatal neuroprotection and phenotypic disease modification in transgenic mice for tetrabenazine and for sertraline. Clinical data consist of an uncontrolled lithium case series (n = 3) suggesting non-progression and a primarily negative double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of lamotrigine.

  9. A phase I/II clinical trial of beta-globin gene therapy for beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Bank, Arthur; Dorazio, Ronald; Leboulch, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Recent success in the long-term correction of mouse models of human beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia by lentiviral vectors and evidence of high gene transfer and expression in transduced human hematopoietic cells have led to a first clinical trial of gene therapy for the disease. A LentiGlobin vector containing a beta-globin gene (beta(A-T87Q)) that produces a hemoglobin (Hbbeta(A-T87Q)) that can be distinguished from normal hemoglobin will be used. The LentiGlobin vector is self-inactivating and contains large elements of the beta-globin locus control region as well as chromatin insulators and other features that should prevent untoward events. The study will be done in Paris with Eliane Gluckman as the principal investigator and Philippe Leboulch as scientific director. PMID:16339679

  10. Neuroprotection in stroke: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Majid, Arshad

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating medical condition, killing millions of people each year and causing serious injury to many more. Despite advances in treatment, there is still little that can be done to prevent stroke-related brain damage. The concept of neuroprotection is a source of considerable interest in the search for novel therapies that have the potential to preserve brain tissue and improve overall outcome. Key points of intervention have been identified in many of the processes that are the source of damage to the brain after stroke, and numerous treatment strategies designed to exploit them have been developed. In this review, potential targets of neuroprotection in stroke are discussed, as well as the various treatments that have been targeted against them. In addition, a summary of recent progress in clinical trials of neuroprotective agents in stroke is provided.

  11. Neuroprotection in Stroke: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Arshad

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating medical condition, killing millions of people each year and causing serious injury to many more. Despite advances in treatment, there is still little that can be done to prevent stroke-related brain damage. The concept of neuroprotection is a source of considerable interest in the search for novel therapies that have the potential to preserve brain tissue and improve overall outcome. Key points of intervention have been identified in many of the processes that are the source of damage to the brain after stroke, and numerous treatment strategies designed to exploit them have been developed. In this review, potential targets of neuroprotection in stroke are discussed, as well as the various treatments that have been targeted against them. In addition, a summary of recent progress in clinical trials of neuroprotective agents in stroke is provided. PMID:24579051

  12. Epigenetics and therapeutic targets mediating neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection.

  13. Wine Polyphenols: Potential Agents in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Basli, Abdelkader; Soulet, Stéphanie; Chaher, Nassima; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Chibane, Mohamed; Monti, Jean-Pierre; Richard, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous studies indicating that a moderate consumption of red wine provides certain health benefits, such as the protection against neurodegenerative diseases. This protective effect is most likely due to the presence of phenolic compounds in wine. Wine polyphenolic compounds are well known for the antioxidant properties. Oxidative stress is involved in many forms of cellular and molecular deterioration. This damage can lead to cell death and various neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's diseases. Extensive investigations have been undertaken to determine the neuroprotective effects of wine-related polyphenols. In this review we present the neuroprotective abilities of the major classes of wine-related polyphenols. PMID:22829964

  14. Exosomes: mediators of neurodegeneration, neuroprotection and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Alka; Tyagi, Neetu

    2014-02-01

    Exosomes have emerged as prominent mediators of neurodegenerative diseases where they have been shown to carry disease particles such as beta amyloid and prions from their cells of origin to other cells. Their simple structure and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier allow great opportunity to design a "makeup" with drugs and genetic elements, such as siRNA or miRNA, and use them as delivery vehicles for neurotherapeutics. Their role in neuroprotection is evident by the fact that they are involved in the regeneration of peripheral nerves and repair of neuronal injuries. This review is focused on the role of exosomes in mediating neurodegeneration and neuroprotection.

  15. Nuclear matrix association of the human beta-globin locus utilizing a novel approach to quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ostermeier, G Charles; Liu, Zhandong; Martins, Rui Pires; Bharadwaj, Rikki R; Ellis, James; Draghici, Sorin; Krawetz, Stephen A

    2003-06-15

    The human beta-globin locus is home to five genes that are regulated in a tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific manner. While the exact mode of expression remains somewhat enigmatic, a significant effort has been focused at the locus control region (LCR). The LCR is marked by five DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HS) approximately 15 kb upstream of the epsilon-globin gene. Nuclear matrix-associated regions (MARs) organize chromatin into functional domains and at least one of the HS appears bound to the nuclear matrix. We have employed an in vivo based PCR MAR assay to investigate the role of MAR-mediated regulation of the beta-globin locus. This was facilitated with a novel reaction efficiency based quantitative real-time PCR analysis software tool, Target Analysis Quantification. Using a log-linear regression strategy, discordances were eliminated. This allowed us to reliably estimate the relative amount of initial template associated with the nuclear matrix at 15 unique regions spanning the beta-globin locus in both non-expressing and expressing cell lines. A dynamic association dependent on expression status was revealed both at the LCR/5'HS region and within the second intron of the beta-globin gene. These results provide the first evidence that nuclear matrix association dynamically mediates the looping of the beta-globin locus to achieve transcriptional control.

  16. Analysis of enhancer function of the HS-40 core sequence of the human alpha-globin cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Lowrey, C H; Stamatoyannopoulos, G

    1997-01-01

    HS-40 is the major regulatory element of the human alpha-globin locus, located 40 kb upstream of the zeta-globin gene. To test for potential interactions between HS-40 and the beta- or the gamma-globin gene promoters in stable transfection assays, the HS-40 core sequence was cloned upstream of either the beta promoter or the gamma promoter driving the neomycin phosphotransferase gene and enhancer activity was measured using a colony assay. In K562 or in MEL cells, enhancer activity of HS-40 was higher than that of the individual core sequences of the DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) of the beta-globin locus control region (LCR), and approximately 60% of the enhancer activity of a 2.5 kb microLCR, which contains the core elements of DNase I hypersensitive sites 1-4. In contrast to the synergistic interaction between the DNase I hypersensitive sites of beta locus LCR, combination of HS-40 with these DNase I hypersensitive sites failed to display cooperativity in K562 cells and inhibited enhancer function in MEL cells. Inhibition of enhancer function was also observed when two copies of the HS-40 were arranged tandemly. We conclude that the core element of HS-40 (i) is a powerful enhancer of gamma- and beta-globin gene expression, (ii) in contrast to other classical enhancers, acts best as a single copy, (iii) does not cooperate with the regulatory elements of the beta-globin locus control region. PMID:9207043

  17. Globin mRNA reduction for whole-blood transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Krjutškov, Kaarel; Koel, Mariann; Roost, Anne Mari; Katayama, Shintaro; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Söderhäll, Cilla; Jaakma, Ülle; Plaas, Mario; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Lohi, Hannes; Salumets, Andres; Kere, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptome analysis of whole-blood RNA by sequencing holds promise for the identification and tracking of biomarkers; however, the high globin mRNA (gmRNA) content of erythrocytes hampers whole-blood and buffy coat analyses. We introduce a novel gmRNA locking assay (GlobinLock, GL) as a robust and simple gmRNA reduction tool to preserve RNA quality, save time and cost. GL consists of a pair of gmRNA-specific oligonucleotides in RNA initial denaturation buffer that is effective immediately after RNA denaturation and adds only ten minutes of incubation to the whole cDNA synthesis procedure when compared to non-blood RNA analysis. We show that GL is fully effective not only for human samples but also for mouse and rat, and so far incompletely studied cow, dog and zebrafish. PMID:27515369

  18. Diversity of [beta]-globin mutations in Israeli ethnic groups reflects recent historic events

    SciTech Connect

    Filon, D.; Oron, V.; Krichevski, S.; Shaag, A.; Goldfarb, A.; Aker, M.; Rachmilewitz, E.A.; Rund, D.; Oppenheim, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors characterized nearly 500 [beta]-thalassemia genes from the Israeli population representing a variety of ethnic subgroups. They found 28 different mutations in the [beta]-globin gene, including three mutations ([beta][sup S], [beta][sup C], and [beta][sup O-Arab]) causing hemoglobinopathies. Marked genetic heterogeneity was observed in both the Arab (20 mutations) and Jewish (17 mutations) populations. On the other hand, two ethnic isolates - Druze and Samaritans - had a single mutation each. Fifteen of the [beta]-thalassemia alleles are Mediterranean in type, 5 originated in Kurdistan, 2 are of Indian origin, and 2 sporadic alleles came from Europe. Only one mutant allele-nonsense codon 37-appears to be indigenous to Israel. While human habitation in Israel dates back to early prehistory, the present-day spectrum of [beta]-globin mutations can be largely explained by migration events that occurred in the past millennium. 26 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Spectrum of Common α-Globin Deletion Mutations in the Southern Region of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bui Thi Kim, Ly; Phu Chi, Dung; Hoang Thanh, Chi

    2016-06-01

    The common deletion mutations of α-globin genes in the Vietnamese population is not well known. Here we report the presence of five deletional mutations of Southeast Asia in the southern region of Vietnam. The - -(SEA) (NG_000006.1: g.26264_45564del19301) mutation is the most common type of deletion (87.35%), followed by the -α(3.7) (rightward) (NG_000006.1: g.34164_37967del3804) deletion (9.64%), -α(4.2) (leftward) (AF221717) deletion (2.41%) and - -(THAI) (NG_000006.1: g.10664_44164del33501) (0.6%) mutation in this region. The - -(FIL) (NG_000006.1: g.11684_43534del31581) mutation was not detected in this study. This result provided a view of the distribution of common α-globin gene mutations in Vietnam and could serve as a baseline for further investigations into these genetic defects. PMID:27117571

  20. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus.

    PubMed

    Kotova, E S; Akopov, S B; Didych, D A; Petrova, N V; Iarovaia, O V; Razin, S V; Nikolaev, L G

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently - in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  1. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus

    PubMed Central

    Kotova, E. S.; Akopov, S. B.; Didych, D. A.; Petrova, N. V.; Iarovaia, O. V.; Razin, S. V.; Nikolaev, L. G.

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently – in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  2. Globin mRNA reduction for whole-blood transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Krjutškov, Kaarel; Koel, Mariann; Roost, Anne Mari; Katayama, Shintaro; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Söderhäll, Cilla; Jaakma, Ülle; Plaas, Mario; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Lohi, Hannes; Salumets, Andres; Kere, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptome analysis of whole-blood RNA by sequencing holds promise for the identification and tracking of biomarkers; however, the high globin mRNA (gmRNA) content of erythrocytes hampers whole-blood and buffy coat analyses. We introduce a novel gmRNA locking assay (GlobinLock, GL) as a robust and simple gmRNA reduction tool to preserve RNA quality, save time and cost. GL consists of a pair of gmRNA-specific oligonucleotides in RNA initial denaturation buffer that is effective immediately after RNA denaturation and adds only ten minutes of incubation to the whole cDNA synthesis procedure when compared to non-blood RNA analysis. We show that GL is fully effective not only for human samples but also for mouse and rat, and so far incompletely studied cow, dog and zebrafish. PMID:27515369

  3. Nitrite binding to globins: linkage isomerism, EPR silence and reductive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Cioloboc, Daniela; Bischin, Cristina; Scurtu, Florina; Cooper, Chris E

    2014-11-15

    The nitrite adducts of globins can potentially bind via O- or N- linkage to the heme iron. We have used EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) and DFT (density functional theory) to explore these binding modes to myoglobin and hemoglobin. We demonstrate that the nitrite adducts of both globins have detectable EPR signals; we provide an explanation for the difficulty in detecting these EPR features, based on uniaxial state considerations. The EPR and DFT data show that both nitrite linkage isomers can be present at the same time and that the two isomers are readily interconvertible in solution. The millisecond-scale process of nitrite reduction by Hb is investigated in search of the elusive Fe(II)-nitrite adduct.

  4. Total alpha-globin gene cluster deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.A.; Haruyama, A.Z.; Chu, B.M.

    1994-09-01

    Most {alpha}-thalassemias [Thal] are due to large deletions. In Southeast Asians, the (--{sup SEA}) double {alpha}-globin gene deletion is common, 3 (--{sup Tot}) total {alpha}-globin cluster deletions are known: Filipino (--{sup Fil}), Thai (--{sup Thai}), and Chinese (--{sup Chin}). In a Hawaii Thal project, provisional diagnosis of {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygotes was based on microcytosis, normal isoelectric focusing, and no iron deficiency. One in 10 unselected Filipinos was an {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygote, 2/3 of these had a (--{sup Tot}) deletion: a {var_sigma}-cDNA probe consistently showed fainter intensity of the constant 5.5 kb {var_sigma}{sub 2} BamHI band, with no heterzygosity for {var_sigma}-globin region polymorphisms; {alpha}-cDNA or {var_sigma}-cDNA probes showed no BamHI or BglII bands diagnostic of the (--{sup SEA}) deletion; bands for the (-{alpha}) {alpha}-Thal-2 single {alpha}-globin deletions were only seen in Hb H cases. A reliable monoclonal anti-{var_sigma}-peptide antibody test for the (--{sup SEA}) deletion was always negative in (--{sup Tot}) samples. Southern digests with the Lo probe, a gift from D. Higgs of Oxford Univ., confirmed that 49 of 50 (--{sup Tot}) chromosomes in Filipinos were (--{sup Fil}). Of 20 {alpha}-Thal-1 hydrops born to Filipinos, 11 were (--{sup Fil}/--{sup SEA}) compound heterozygotes; 9 were (--{sup SEA}/--{sup SEA}) homozygotes, but none was a (--{sup Fil}/--{sup Fil}).

  5. Analysis of α1 and α2 globin genes among patients with hemoglobin Adana in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lee, T Y; Lai, M I; Ismail, P; Ramachandran, V; Tan, J A M A; Teh, L K; Othman, R; Hussein, N H; George, E

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Adana [HBA2: c179G>A (or HBA1); p.Gly60Asp] is a non-deletional α-thalassemia variant found in Malaysia. An improvement in the molecular techniques in recent years has made identification of Hb Adana much easier. For this study, a total of 26 Hb Adana α-thalassemia intermedia and 10 Hb Adana trait blood samples were collected from patients. Common deletional and non-deletional α-thalassemia genotypes were determined using multiplex gap polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex ARMS PCR techniques. Identification of the Hb Adana location on the α-globin gene was carried out using genomic sequencing and the location of the mutation was confirmed via restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR. Among the 36 samples, 24 (66.7%) had the -α(3.7)/α(Cd59)α mutation, while the -α(3.7)/α(Cd59)α mutation accounted for 2 samples (5.6%) and the remaining 10 (27.8%) samples were α/α(Cd59)α. All 36 samples were found to have the Hb Adana mutation on the α2-globin gene. The position of the α-globin gene mutation found in our cases was similar to that reported in Indonesia (16%) but not to that in Turkey (0.6%). Our results showed that the Hb Adana mutation was preferentially present in the α2-globin genes in Malays compared to the other ethnicities in Malaysia. Thus, the Malays might have similar ancestry based on the similarities in the Hb Adana position. PMID:27173219

  6. Globin genes in Micronesia: origins and affinities of Pacific Island peoples.

    PubMed Central

    O'Shaughnessy, D F; Hill, A V; Bowden, D K; Weatherall, D J; Clegg, J B

    1990-01-01

    DNA polymorphisms and copy-number variants of alpha-, zeta-, and gamma-globin genes have been studied in seven Micronesian island populations and have been compared with those in populations from Southeast Asia, Melanesia, and Polynesia. Micronesians are not significantly different from Polynesians at these loci and appear to be intermediate between Southeast Asians and Melanesians. There is evidence of significant Melanesian input into the Micronesian gene pool and of substantial proto-Polynesian contact with Melanesia. PMID:1967206

  7. Analysis of α1 and α2 globin genes among patients with hemoglobin Adana in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lee, T Y; Lai, M I; Ismail, P; Ramachandran, V; Tan, J A M A; Teh, L K; Othman, R; Hussein, N H; George, E

    2016-04-07

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Adana [HBA2: c179G>A (or HBA1); p.Gly60Asp] is a non-deletional α-thalassemia variant found in Malaysia. An improvement in the molecular techniques in recent years has made identification of Hb Adana much easier. For this study, a total of 26 Hb Adana α-thalassemia intermedia and 10 Hb Adana trait blood samples were collected from patients. Common deletional and non-deletional α-thalassemia genotypes were determined using multiplex gap polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex ARMS PCR techniques. Identification of the Hb Adana location on the α-globin gene was carried out using genomic sequencing and the location of the mutation was confirmed via restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR. Among the 36 samples, 24 (66.7%) had the -α(3.7)/α(Cd59)α mutation, while the -α(3.7)/α(Cd59)α mutation accounted for 2 samples (5.6%) and the remaining 10 (27.8%) samples were α/α(Cd59)α. All 36 samples were found to have the Hb Adana mutation on the α2-globin gene. The position of the α-globin gene mutation found in our cases was similar to that reported in Indonesia (16%) but not to that in Turkey (0.6%). Our results showed that the Hb Adana mutation was preferentially present in the α2-globin genes in Malays compared to the other ethnicities in Malaysia. Thus, the Malays might have similar ancestry based on the similarities in the Hb Adana position.

  8. Correction of human. beta. sup S -globin gene by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Shesely, E.G.; Hyungsuk Kim; Shehee, W.R.; Smithies, O. ); Papayannopoulou, T. ); Popovich, B.W. )

    1991-05-15

    As a step toward using gene targeting for gene therapy, the authors have corrected a human {beta}{sup S}-globin gene to the normal {beta}{sup A} allele by homologous recombination in the mouse-human hybrid cell line BSM. BSM is derived from a mouse erythroleukemia cell line and carries a single human chromosome 11 with the {beta}{sup S}-globin allele. A {beta}{sup A}-globin targeting construct containing a unique oligomer and a neomycin-resistance gene was electroporated into the BSM cells, which were then placed under G418 selection. Then 126 resulting pools containing a total {approx}29,000 G418-resistant clones were screened by PCR for the presence of a targeted recombinant: 3 positive pools were identified. A targeted clone was isolated by replating one of the positive pools into smaller pools and rescreening by PCR, followed by dilution cloning. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the isolated clone had been targeted as planned. The correction of the {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A} was confirmed both by allele-specific PCR and by allele-specific antibodies. Expression studies comparing the uninduced and induced RNA levels in unmodified BSM cells and in the targeted clone showed no significant alteration in the ability of the targeted clone to undergo induction, despite the potentially disrupting presence of a transcriptionally active neomycin gene 5{prime} to the human {beta}{sup A}-globin gene. Thus gene targeting can correct a {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A}, and the use of a selectable helper gene need not significantly interfere with the induction of the corrected gene.

  9. Erythropoietin: still on the neuroprotection road

    PubMed Central

    del Barco, Diana García; Coro-Antich, Rosa M.

    2012-01-01

    Acute stroke is one of the major causes of death and disabilities. Since the 1980s many clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate neuroprotective approaches to treat this important brain vascular event. However, to date the only drug approved (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rtPA]) represents a thrombolytic, nonneuroprotective approach. An important neuroprotective strategy is based on erythropoietin (EPO). Exogenously administered EPO exhibits neuroprotective effects in numerous animal models, through the activation of anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory pathways as well as through the stimulation of angiogenic and neurogenic events. The capability of EPO to cross the blood–brain barrier after systemic administration and its effective therapeutic window are advantages for human acute stroke therapy. However, a multicenter stroke trial where recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) was combined with rtPA had negative outcomes. The present paper reviews the EPO neuroprotective strategy and its mechanisms in ischemic stroke and in other human nervous system diseases. PMID:22590480

  10. Axonal loss and neuroprotection in optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Levin, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Most optic neuropathies do not have effective treatments. Examples are ischemic optic neuropathy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, optic neuritis, and traumatic optic neuropathy. In some cases, the pathophysiology of the optic nerve injury is not fully understood. For example, while the demyelinative aspects of optic neuritis have been studied, the mechanism by which the axonal loss occurs is less apparent. In other cases, although the pathophysiology of the optic neuropathy may be understood, there is difficulty treating the disease, for example, with traumatic optic neuropathy. In response to this therapeutic dearth, the concept of neuroprotection has arisen. Neuroprotection is a therapeutic paradigm for preventing death of neurons from injury and maintaining function. In optic neuropathies, the corresponding neuron is the retinal ganglion cell. These cells are unable to divide, and optic neuropathies irrevocably result in their death; therefore, the primary target of neuroprotection are retinal ganglion cells and their axons. This review emphasizes that most optic neuropathies are axonal and thus good targets for neuroprotection. PMID:17508035

  11. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z.

  12. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed Central

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-01-01

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z. Images PMID:493112

  13. Induction of fetal hemoglobin through enhanced translation efficiency of γ-globin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Cynthia K; Lowrey, Christopher H

    2014-10-23

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) induction can ameliorate the clinical severity of sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia. We previously reported that activation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) stress pathway increased HbF through a posttranscriptional mechanism. In this study, we explored the underlying means by which salubrinal, an activator of eIF2α signaling, enhances HbF production in primary human erythroid cells. Initial experiments eliminated changes in globin messenger RNA (mRNA) stability or cellular location and reduction of adult hemoglobin as possible salubrinal mechanisms. We then determined that salubrinal selectively increased the number of actively translating ribosomes on γ-globin mRNA. This enhanced translation efficiency occurred in the recovery phase of the stress response as phosphorylation of eIF2α and global protein synthesis returned toward baseline. These findings highlight γ-globin mRNA translation as a novel mechanism for regulating HbF production and as a pharmacologic target for induction of HbF. PMID:25170120

  14. Stress Granules contribute to α-globin homeostasis in differentiating erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghisolfi, Laura; Dutt, Shilpee; McConkey, Marie E.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Anderson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin is the major biosynthetic product of developing erythroid cells. Assembly of hemoglobin requires the balanced production of globin protein and the oxygen-carrying heme moiety. The heme-regulated inhibitor kinase (HRI) participates in this process by phosphorylating eIF2α and inhibiting the translation of globin protein when levels of free heme are limiting. HRI is also activated in erythroid cells subjected to oxidative stress. Phospho-eIF2α-mediated translational repression induces the assembly of stress granules (SG), cytoplasmic foci that harbor untranslated mRNAs and promote the survival of cells subjected to adverse environmental conditions. We have found that differentiating erythroid, but not myelomonocytic or megakaryocytic, murine and human progenitor cells assemble SGs, in vitro and in vivo. Targeted knockdown of HRI or G3BP, a protein required for SG assembly, inhibits spontaneous and arsenite-induced assembly of SGs in erythroid progenitor cells. This is accompanied by reduced globin production and increased apoptosis suggesting that G3BP+ SGs facilitate the survival of developing erythroid cells. PMID:22452989

  15. Pomalidomide reverses γ-globin silencing through the transcriptional reprogramming of adult hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Dulmovits, Brian M; Appiah-Kubi, Abena O; Papoin, Julien; Hale, John; He, Mingzhu; Al-Abed, Yousef; Didier, Sebastien; Gould, Michael; Husain-Krautter, Sehba; Singh, Sharon A; Chan, Kyle W H; Vlachos, Adrianna; Allen, Steven L; Taylor, Naomi; Marambaud, Philippe; An, Xiuli; Gallagher, Patrick G; Mohandas, Narla; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Liu, Johnson M; Blanc, Lionel

    2016-03-17

    Current therapeutic strategies for sickle cell anemia are aimed at reactivating fetal hemoglobin. Pomalidomide, a third-generation immunomodulatory drug, was proposed to induce fetal hemoglobin production by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that pomalidomide induced a fetal-like erythroid differentiation program, leading to a reversion of γ-globin silencing in adult human erythroblasts. Pomalidomide acted early by transiently delaying erythropoiesis at the burst-forming unit-erythroid/colony-forming unit-erythroid transition, but without affecting terminal differentiation. Further, the transcription networks involved in γ-globin repression were selectively and differentially affected by pomalidomide including BCL11A, SOX6, IKZF1, KLF1, and LSD1. IKAROS (IKZF1), a known target of pomalidomide, was degraded by the proteasome, but was not the key effector of this program, because genetic ablation of IKZF1 did not phenocopy pomalidomide treatment. Notably, the pomalidomide-induced reprogramming was conserved in hematopoietic progenitors from individuals with sickle cell anemia. Moreover, multiple myeloma patients treated with pomalidomide demonstrated increased in vivo γ-globin levels in their erythrocytes. Together, these data reveal the molecular mechanisms by which pomalidomide reactivates fetal hemoglobin, reinforcing its potential as a treatment for patients with β-hemoglobinopathies.

  16. Neuroglobins, pivotal proteins associated with emerging neural systems and precursors of metazoan globin diversity.

    PubMed

    Lechauve, Christophe; Jager, Muriel; Laguerre, Laurent; Kiger, Laurent; Correc, Gaëlle; Leroux, Cédric; Vinogradov, Serge; Czjzek, Mirjam; Marden, Michael C; Bailly, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    Neuroglobins, previously thought to be restricted to vertebrate neurons, were detected in the brain of a photosymbiotic acoel, Symsagittifera roscoffensis, and in neurosensory cells of the jellyfish Clytia hemisphaerica. For the neuroglobin of S. roscoffensis, a member of a lineage that originated either at the base of the bilateria or of the deuterostome clade, we report the ligand binding properties, crystal structure at 2.3 Å, and brain immunocytochemical pattern. We also describe in situ hybridizations of two neuroglobins specifically expressed in differentiating nematocytes (neurosensory cells) and in statocytes (ciliated mechanosensory cells) of C. hemisphaerica, a member of the early branching animal phylum cnidaria. In silico searches using these neuroglobins as queries revealed the presence of previously unidentified neuroglobin-like sequences in most metazoan lineages. Because neural systems are almost ubiquitous in metazoa, the constitutive expression of neuroglobin-like proteins strongly supports the notion of an intimate association of neuroglobins with the evolution of animal neural systems and hints at the preservation of a vitally important function. Neuroglobins were probably recruited in the first protoneurons in early metazoans from globin precursors. Neuroglobins were identified in choanoflagellates, sponges, and placozoans and were conserved during nervous system evolution. Because the origin of neuroglobins predates the other metazoan globins, it is likely that neuroglobin gene duplication followed by co-option and subfunctionalization led to the emergence of globin families in protostomes and deuterostomes (i.e. convergent evolution).

  17. Cell-Free Transcription of Mammalian Chromatin: Transcription of Globin Messenger RNA Sequences from Bone-Marrow Chromatin with Mammalian RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Steggles, A. W.; Wilson, G. N.; Kantor, J. A.; Picciano, D. J.; Falvey, A. K.; Anderson, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    A mammalian cell-free transcriptional system was developed in which mammalian RNA polymerase synthesizes globin messenger RNA sequences from bone-marrow chromatin. The messenger RNA sequences are detected by measurement of the ability of the transcribed RNA to hybridize with globin complementary DNA. The globin complementary DNA is synthesized by the enzyme from avian myeloblastosis virus, RNA-directed DNA polymerase, with purified globin messenger RNA as template. The specificity of the globin complementary DNA in annealing reactions was verified by preparing DNA complementary to liver messenger RNA and showing that the globin and liver complementary DNAs are specific for their own messenger RNAs. Both DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II from sheep liver and RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli can transcribe globin messenger RNA sequences from rabbit bone-marrow chromatin; however, the mammalian enzyme appears to be more specific in that globin gene sequences represent a higher proportion of the RNA synthesized. Neither polymerase can transcribe globin messenger RNA sequences from rabbit-liver chromatin. This cell-free assay system should be useful in searching for mammalian transcriptional regulatory factors. PMID:4364529

  18. Progress in Neuroprotective Strategies for Preventing Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroprotection is increasingly considered as a promising therapy for preventing and treating temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The development of chronic TLE, also termed as epileptogenesis, is a dynamic process. An initial precipitating injury (IPI) such as the status epilepticus (SE) leads to neurodegeneration, abnormal reorganization of the brain circuitry and a significant loss of functional inhibition. All of these changes likely contribute to the development of chronic epilepsy, characterized by spontaneous recurrent motor seizures (SRMS) and learning and memory deficits. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge pertaining to neuroprotection in epileptic conditions, and to highlight the efficacy of distinct neuroprotective strategies for preventing or treating chronic TLE. Although the administration of certain conventional and new generation antiepileptic drugs is effective for primary neuroprotection such as reduced neurodegeneration after acute seizures or the SE, their competence for preventing the development of chronic epilepsy after an IPI is either unknown or not promising. On the other hand, alternative strategies such as the ketogenic diet therapy, administration of distinct neurotrophic factors, hormones or antioxidants seem useful for preventing and treating chronic TLE. However, long term studies on the efficacy of these approaches introduced at different time-points after the SE or an IPI are lacking. Additionally, grafting of fetal hippocampal cells at early time-points after an IPI holds considerable promise for preventing TLE, though issues regarding availability of donor cells, ethical concerns, timing of grafting after SE, and durability of graft-mediated seizure suppression need to be resolved for further advances with this approach. Overall, from the studies performed so far, there is consensus that neuroprotective strategies need to be employed as quickly as possible after the onset of the SE or an IPI for

  19. Beta-globin gene evolution in the ruminants: evidence for an ancient origin of sheep haplotype B.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Wang, X; Kijas, J W; Dalrymple, B P

    2015-10-01

    Domestic sheep (Ovis aries) can be divided into two groups with significantly different responses to hypoxic environments, determined by two allelic beta-globin haplotypes. Haplotype A is very similar to the goat beta-globin locus, whereas haplotype B has a deletion spanning four globin genes, including beta-C globin, which encodes a globin with high oxygen affinity. We surveyed the beta-globin locus using resequencing data from 70 domestic sheep from 42 worldwide breeds and three Ovis canadensis and two Ovis dalli individuals. Haplotype B has an allele frequency of 71.4% in O. aries and was homozygous (BB) in all five wild sheep. This shared ancestry indicates haplotype B is at least 2-3 million years old. Approximately 40 kb of the sequence flanking the ~37-kb haplotype B deletion had unexpectedly low identity between haplotypes A and B. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the divergent region of sheep haplotype B is remarkably distinct from the beta-globin loci in goat and cattle but still groups with the Ruminantia. We hypothesize that this divergent ~40-kb region in haplotype B may be from an unknown ancestral ruminant and was maintained in the lineage to O. aries, but not other Bovidae, evolving independently of haplotype A. Alternatively, the ~40-kb sequence in haplotype B was more recently acquired by an ancestor of sheep from an unknown non-Bovidae ruminant, replacing part of haplotype A. Haplotype B has a lower nucleotide diversity than does haplotype A, suggesting a recent bottleneck, whereas the higher frequency of haplotype B suggests a subsequent spread through the global population of O. aries.

  20. Restoration of the CCAAT box or insertion of the CACCC motif activates [corrected] delta-globin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, D C; Ebb, D; Hardison, R C; Rodgers, G P

    1997-07-01

    Hemoglobin A2 (HbA2), which contains delta-globin as its non-alpha-globin, represents a minor fraction of the Hb found in normal adults. It has been shown recently that HbA2 is as potent as HbF in inhibiting intracellular deoxy-HbS polymerization, and its expression is therefore relevant to sickle cell disease treatment strategies. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the low-level expression of the delta-globin gene in adult erythroid cells, we first compared promoter sequences and found that the delta-globin gene differs from the beta-globin gene in the absence of an erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) binding site, the alteration of the CCAAT box to CCAAC, and the presence of a GATA-1 binding site. Second, serial deletions of the human delta-globin promoter sequence fused to a luciferase (LUC) reporter gene were transfected into K562 cells. We identified both positive and negative regulatory regions in the 5' flanking sequence. Furthermore, a plasmid containing a single base pair (bp) mutation in the CCAAC box of the delta promoter, restoring the CCAAT box, caused a 5.6-fold and 2.4-fold (P < .05) increase of LUC activity in transfected K562 cells and MEL cells, respectively, in comparison to the wild-type delta promoter. A set of substitutions that create an EKLF binding site centered at -85 bp increased the expression by 26.8-fold and 6.5-fold (P < .05) in K562 and MEL cells, respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that the restoration of either an EKLF binding site or the CCAAT box can increase delta-globin gene expression, with potential future clinical benefit.

  1. Beta-globin gene evolution in the ruminants: evidence for an ancient origin of sheep haplotype B.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Wang, X; Kijas, J W; Dalrymple, B P

    2015-10-01

    Domestic sheep (Ovis aries) can be divided into two groups with significantly different responses to hypoxic environments, determined by two allelic beta-globin haplotypes. Haplotype A is very similar to the goat beta-globin locus, whereas haplotype B has a deletion spanning four globin genes, including beta-C globin, which encodes a globin with high oxygen affinity. We surveyed the beta-globin locus using resequencing data from 70 domestic sheep from 42 worldwide breeds and three Ovis canadensis and two Ovis dalli individuals. Haplotype B has an allele frequency of 71.4% in O. aries and was homozygous (BB) in all five wild sheep. This shared ancestry indicates haplotype B is at least 2-3 million years old. Approximately 40 kb of the sequence flanking the ~37-kb haplotype B deletion had unexpectedly low identity between haplotypes A and B. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the divergent region of sheep haplotype B is remarkably distinct from the beta-globin loci in goat and cattle but still groups with the Ruminantia. We hypothesize that this divergent ~40-kb region in haplotype B may be from an unknown ancestral ruminant and was maintained in the lineage to O. aries, but not other Bovidae, evolving independently of haplotype A. Alternatively, the ~40-kb sequence in haplotype B was more recently acquired by an ancestor of sheep from an unknown non-Bovidae ruminant, replacing part of haplotype A. Haplotype B has a lower nucleotide diversity than does haplotype A, suggesting a recent bottleneck, whereas the higher frequency of haplotype B suggests a subsequent spread through the global population of O. aries. PMID:26096044

  2. Essential role of NF-E2 in remodeling of chromatin structure and transcriptional activation of the epsilon-globin gene in vivo by 5' hypersensitive site 2 of the beta-globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Q H; McDowell, J C; Dean, A

    1996-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the process by which enhancers activate transcription has been gained from transient-transfection studies in which the DNA is not assembled with histones and other chromatin proteins as it is in the cell nucleus. To study the activation of a mammalian gene in a natural chromatin context in vivo, we constructed a minichromosome containing the human epsilon-globin gene and portions of the beta-globin locus control region (LCR). The minichromosomes replicate and are maintained at stable copy number in human erythroid cells. Expression of the minichromosomal epsilon-globin gene requires the presence of beta-globin LCR elements in cis, as is the case for the chromosomal gene. We determined the chromatin structure of the epsilon-globin gene in both the active and inactive states. The transcriptionally inactive locus is covered by an array of positioned nucleosomes extending over 1,400 bp. In minichromosomes with a (mu)LCR or DNase I-hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) which actively transcribe the epsilon-globin gene, the nucleosome at the promoter is altered or disrupted while positioning of nucleosomes in the rest of the locus is retained. All or virtually all minichromosomes are simultaneously hypersensitive to DNase I both at the promoter and at HS2. Transcriptional activation and promoter remodeling, as well as formation of the HS2 structure itself, depended on the presence of the NF-E2 binding motif in HS2. The nucleosome at the promoter which is altered upon activation is positioned over the transcriptional elements of the epsilon-globin gene, i.e., the TATA, CCAAT, and CACCC elements, and the GATA-1 site at -165. The simple availability of erythroid transcription factors that recognize these motifs is insufficient to allow expression. As in the chromosomal globin locus, regulation also occurs at the level of chromatin structure. These observations are consistent with the idea that one role of the beta-globin LCR is to maintain promoters free

  3. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures. PMID:26874070

  4. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures.

  5. Generation of a high-titer retroviral vector capable of expressing high levels of the human beta-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sadelain, M; Wang, C H; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F; Mulligan, R C

    1995-01-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic cells may provide a means of treating both inherited and acquired diseases involving hematopoietic cells. Implementation of this approach for disorders resulting from mutations affecting the beta-globin gene (e.g., beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia), however, has been hampered by the inability to generate recombinant viruses able to efficiently and faithfully transmit the necessary sequences for appropriate gene expression. We have addressed this problem by carefully examining the interactions between retroviral and beta-globin gene sequences which affect vector transmission, stability, and expression. First, we examined the transmission properties of a large number of different recombinant proviral genomes which vary both in the precise nature of vector, beta-globin structural gene, and locus control region (LCR) core sequences incorporated and in the placement and orientation of those sequences. Through this analysis, we identified one specific vector, termed M beta 6L, which carries both the human beta-globin gene and core elements HS2, HS3, and HS4 from the LCR and faithfully transmits recombinant proviral sequences to cells with titers greater than 10(6) per ml. Populations of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells transduced by this virus expressed levels of human beta-globin transcript which, on a per gene copy basis, were 78% of the levels detected in an MEL-derived cell line, Hu11, which carries human chromosome 11, the site of the beta-globin locus. Analysis of individual transduced MEL cell clones, however, indicated that, while expression was detected in every clone tested (n = 17), the levels of human beta-globin treatment varied between 4% and 146% of the levels in Hu11. This clonal variation in expression levels suggests that small beta-globin LCR sequences may not provide for as strict chromosomal position-independent expression of beta-globin as previously suspected, at least in the context of

  6. A New Intergenic α-Globin Deletion (α-αΔ125) Found in a Kabyle Population.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Lacan, Philippe; Cadet, Estelle; Bignet, Patricia; Dumesnil, Cécile; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Joly, Philippe; Rochette, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We have identified a deletion of 125 bp (α-α(Δ125)) (NG_000006.1: g.37040_37164del) in the α-globin gene cluster in a Kabyle population. A combination of singlex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays have been used to identify the molecular defect. Sequencing of the abnormal PCR amplification product revealed a novel α1-globin promoter deletion. The endpoints of the deletion were characterized by sequencing the deletion junctions of the mutated allele. The observed deletion was located 378 bp upstream of the α1-globin gene transcription initiation site and leaves the α2 gene intact. In some patients, the α-α(Δ125) deletion was shown to segregate with Hb S (HBB: c.20A>T) and/or Hb C (HBB: c.19G>A) or a β-thalassemic allele. The α-α(Δ125) deletion has no discernible effect on red cell indices when inherited with no other abnormal globin genes. The family study demonstrated that the deletion is heritable. This is the only example of an intergenic α2-α1 non coding DNA deletion, leaving the α2-globin gene and the α1 coding part intact.

  7. Current perspective of neuroprotection and glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Kailin; Shibata-Germanos, Shannon; Pahlitzsch, Milena; Cordeiro, M Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide and is most notably characterized by progressive optic nerve atrophy and advancing loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The main concomitant factor is the elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Existing treatments are focused generally on lowering IOP. However, both RGC loss and optic nerve atrophy can independently occur with IOP at normal levels. In recent years, there has been substantial progress in the development of neuroprotective therapies for glaucoma in order to restore vital visual function. The present review intends to offer a brief insight into conventional glaucoma treatments and discuss exciting current developments of mostly preclinical data in novel neuroprotective strategies for glaucoma that include recent advances in noninvasive diagnostics going beyond IOP maintenance for an enhanced global view. Such strategies now target RGC loss and optic nerve damage, opening a critical therapeutic window for preventative monitoring and treatment. PMID:26635467

  8. [The option of neuroprotective therapeutics for glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shuyu; Xu, Xun

    2014-08-01

    Glaucoma is the second common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide associated with a progressive neurodegenerative disease of retinal ganglion cells (RGC). The major hypothetical mechanisms of the apoptosis of RGCs includes deprivation of neurotrophic factors, excitotoxicity mediated by the interaction of glutamate with NMDAR. This article reviewed current development of three kinds of neuroprotective drugs for glaucoma management such as small-molecule therapeutics, recombinant therapeutic proteins and small-molecule bioactive peptides. Particularly, small peptides, which show high target specificity, high potency and low toxicity compared with small molecules, possession of the advantages of low immunogenicity and high cost-effectiveness over recombinant therapeutics, may become most important choice for neuroprotection against glaucoma of next generation.

  9. Neuroprotection by natural polyphenols: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Campos-Esparza, Maria del Rosario; Torres-Ramos, Mónica Adriana

    2010-12-01

    Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in diet. These can be found in fruits, vegetables, beverages (tea, wine, juices, etc.), plants and some herbs. These compounds are capable of protecting neuronal cells in different in vivo and in vitro models through diverse intracellular targets. The focus of this review is aimed at presenting the role of some polyphenols on the molecular mechanism involve in neuroprotection through different biological processes like oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptotic neuronal death, regulation of the kinase signal cascade and modulation of Ubiquitin-Proteasome pathway. The study of the molecular mechanisms involved in neuroprotection and the molecular targets of natural polyphenols are important in the discovery of a valuable tool for new and more advanced therapy in neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  11. Putative neuroprotective agents in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Seetal; Maes, Michael; Anderson, George; Dean, Olivia M; Moylan, Steven; Berk, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In many individuals with major neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, their disease characteristics are consistent with a neuroprogressive illness. This includes progressive structural brain changes, cognitive and functional decline, poorer treatment response and an increasing vulnerability to relapse with chronicity. The underlying molecular mechanisms of neuroprogression are thought to include neurotrophins and regulation of neurogenesis and apoptosis, neurotransmitters, inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, cortisol and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and epigenetic influences. Knowledge of the involvement of each of these pathways implies that specific agents that act on some or multiple of these pathways may thus block this cascade and have neuroprotective properties. This paper reviews the potential of the most promising of these agents, including lithium and other known psychotropics, aspirin, minocycline, statins, N-acetylcysteine, leptin and melatonin. These agents are putative neuroprotective agents for schizophrenia and mood disorders.

  12. Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of fruit residues.

    PubMed

    Tadtong, Sarin; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree; Lourith, Nattaya

    2013-11-01

    Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn., Sapindaceae) and salacca (Salacca edulis Reinw., Arecaceae) pericarp, and sapodilla (Achras sapota L., Sapotaceae) and tamarind Srichompu cultivar (Tamarindus indica L., Caesalpiniaceae) seed coat extracts were evaluated on cultured cholinergic P19-derived neurons. All the extracts, at a very low concentration (1 ng/mL of litchi and salacca pericarp extracts, 10 ng/mL of sapodilla and 100 ng/mL of tamarind seed coat extracts), enhanced the survival of cultured neurons (% viability more than 100%) by XTT reduction assay. The extracts were further evaluated for their neuritogenicity by observing cell morphology by phase-contrast microscopy and neuroprotective activity in serum deprivation and pre- and co-administration of hydrogen peroxide models. The phase-contrast micrographs displayed that all of the extracts possessed neurogenic activity by promoting the neurite outgrowth of the cultured neurons. Moreover, these extracts can protect neurons from oxidative stress-caused cell death in a serum deprivation model, and prevent and protect neuron cells from the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide. In this study we assured that the neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of these extracts derived from the phenolic components and flavonoids contained in the extracts by acting as signaling molecules to enhance neuron survival and promote neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that all of the extracts are potentially sources of neuritogenic and neuroprotective components which might be used either as pharmaceutical products or dietary supplements for neurodegenerative disorder patients, for example, those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24427947

  13. Oxytocin mediates social neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Karelina, Kate; Stuller, Kathleen A.; Jarrett, Brant; Zhang, Ning; Wells, Jackie; Norman, Greg J.; DeVries, A. Courtney

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose The reduced incidence, morbidity and mortality of stroke among humans with strong social support have been well-documented; however, the mechanisms underlying this socially mediated phenomenon remain unknown, but may involve oxytocin (OT), a hormone that modulates some aspects of social behavior in humans and other animals. Methods In the present study, adult male mice were socially isolated (housed individually) or socially paired (housed with an ovariectomized female); social pairing increased hypothalamic OT gene expression. To determine whether a causal relationship exists between increased OT and improved stroke outcome, mice were treated with exogenous OT or OT receptor antagonist (OTA) beginning one week prior to induction of experimental stroke via middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Results Relative to social isolation, social housing attenuated infarct size, neuroinflammation, and oxidative stress following experimental stroke; the neuroprotective effect of social housing was eliminated by OTA treatment. In contrast, administration of OT to socially isolated mice reproduced the neuroprotection conferred by social housing. We further report evidence for a direct suppressive action of OT on cultured microglia, which is a key instigator in the development of neuroinflammation after cerebral ischemia. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that OT mediates the neuroprotective effect of social interaction on stroke outcome. PMID:21960564

  14. Ginseng: a promising neuroprotective strategy in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Santiago-Moreno, Juan; Doré, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng is one of the most widely used herbal medicines in the world. It has been used in the treatment of various ailments and to boost immunity for centuries; especially in Asian countries. The most common ginseng variant in traditional herbal medicine is ginseng, which is made from the peeled and dried root of Panax Ginseng. Ginseng has been suggested as an effective treatment for a vast array of neurological disorders, including stroke and other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Ginseng’s neuroprotective effects are focused on the maintenance of homeostasis. This review involves a comprehensive literature search that highlights aspects of ginseng’s putative neuroprotective effectiveness, focusing on stroke. Attenuation of inflammation through inhibition of various proinflammatory mediators, along with suppression of oxidative stress by various mechanisms, including activation of the cytoprotective transcriptional factor Nrf2, which results in decrease in reactive oxygen species, could account for its neuroprotective efficacy. It can also prevent neuronal death as a result of stroke, thus decreasing anatomical and functional stroke damage. Although there are diverse studies that have investigated the mechanisms involved in the efficacy of ginseng in treating disorders, there is still much that needs to be clarified. Both in vitro and in vivo studies including randomized controlled clinical trials are necessary to develop in-depth knowledge of ginseng and its practical applications. PMID:25653588

  15. Brain neuroprotection by scavenging blood glutamate.

    PubMed

    Zlotnik, Alexander; Gurevich, Boris; Tkachov, Sergei; Maoz, Ilana; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I

    2007-01-01

    Excess glutamate in brain fluids characterizes acute brain insults such as traumatic brain injury and stroke. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As blood glutamate scavenging has been demonstrated to increase the efflux of excess glutamate from brain into blood, we tested the prediction that oxaloacetate-mediated blood glutamate scavenging causes neuroprotection in a pathological situation such as closed head injury (CHI), in which there is a well established deleterious increase of glutamate in brain fluids. We observed highly significant improvements of the neurological status of rats submitted to CHI following an intravenous treatment with 1 mmol oxaloacetate/100 g rat weight which decreases blood glutamate levels by 40%. No detectable therapeutic effect was obtained when rats were treated IV with 1 mmol oxaloacetate together with 1 mmol glutamate/100 g rat. The treatment with 0.005 mmol/100 g rat oxaloacetate was no more effective than saline but when it was combined with the intravenous administration of 0.14 nmol/100 g of recombinant glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, recovery was almost complete. Oxaloacetate provided neuroprotection when administered before CHI or at 60 min post CHI but not at 120 min post CHI. Since neurological recovery from CHI was highly correlated with the decrease of blood glutamate levels (r=0.89, P=0.001), we conclude that blood glutamate scavenging affords brain neuroprotection Blood glutamate scavenging may open now new therapeutic options.

  16. Cis-vaccenic acid induces differentiation and up-regulates gamma globin synthesis in K562, JK1 and transgenic mice erythroid progenitor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Aimola, Idowu A; Inuwa, Hajiya M; Nok, Andrew J; Mamman, Aisha I; Bieker, James J

    2016-04-01

    Gamma globin induction remains a promising pharmacological therapeutic treatment mode for sickle cell anemia and beta thalassemia, however Hydroxyurea remains the only FDA approved drug which works via this mechanism. In this regard, we assayed the γ-globin inducing capacity of Cis-vaccenic acid (CVA). CVA induced differentiation of K562, JK1 and transgenic mice primary bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor stem cells. CVA also significantly up-regulated γ-globin gene expression in JK-1 and transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells (TMbmEPSCs) but not K562 cells without altering cell viability. Increased γ-globin expression was accompanied by KLF1 suppression in CVA induced JK-1 cells. Erythropoietin induced differentiation of JK-1 cells 24h before CVA induction did not significantly alter CVA induced differentiation and γ-globin expression in JK-1 cells. Inhibition of JK-1 and Transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells Fatty acid elongase 5 (Elovl5) and Δ(9) desaturase suppressed the γ-globin inductive effects of CVA. CVA treatment failed to rescue γ-globin expression in Elovl5 and Δ(9)-desaturase inhibited cells 48 h post inhibition in JK-1 cells. The data suggests that CVA directly modulates differentiation of JK-1 and TMbmEPSCs, and indirectly modulates γ-globin gene expression in these cells. Our findings provide important clues for further evaluations of CVA as a potential fetal hemoglobin therapeutic inducer. PMID:26879870

  17. Polymerized and polyethylene glycol-conjugated hemoglobins: a globin-based calibration curve for dynamic light scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, Serena; Ronda, Luca; Bruno, Stefano; Jankevics, Hanna; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2010-06-15

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is a technique capable of determining the hydrodynamic radius of proteins. From this parameter, a molecular weight can be assessed provided that an appropriate calibration curve is available. To this goal, a globin-based calibration curve was used to determine the polymerization state of a recombinant hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier and to assess the equivalent molecular weight of hemoglobins conjugated with polyethylene glycol molecules. The good agreement between DLS values and those obtained from gel filtration chromatography is a consequence of the high similarity in structure, shape, and density within the globin superfamily. Moreover, globins and heme proteins in general share similar spectroscopic properties, thereby reducing possible systematic errors associated with the absorption of the probe radiation by the chromophore.

  18. Inactivation of HDAC1 or HDAC2 induces gamma globin expression without altering cell cycle or proliferation.

    PubMed

    Esrick, Erica B; McConkey, Marie; Lin, Katherine; Frisbee, Alyse; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2015-07-01

    Other than hydroxyurea, no pharmacologic agents are clinically available for fetal hemoglobin (HbF) induction in sickle cell disease (SCD). An optimal candidate would induce HbF without causing cell cycle inhibition and would act independently of hydroxyurea in order to yield additional HbF induction when combined. We explored whether inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 or HDAC2 could achieve these goals. In human erythroid progenitor cells, shRNA knockdown of the HDAC1 or HDAC2 genes induced gamma globin, without altering cellular proliferation in vitro, and without altering cell cycle phase. Treatment with hydroxyurea in combination with HDAC2 knockdown yielded a further increase in gamma globin expression. Additionally, when CD34+ cells were treated with both hydroxyurea and MS-275 (an inhibitor of HDAC 1, 2, and 3), an additive induction of relative gamma globin expression was achieved. Our findings support further clinical investigation of HDAC inhibitors in combination with hydroxyurea in SCD patients.

  19. Genetics of Hemoglobin in the Deer Mouse, PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS . I. Multiple α- and β-Globin Structural Loci

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Lee R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Genetic data, together with molecular structure studies, have demonstrated that the complex hemoglobin phenotypes in four subspecies of P. maniculatus are generated by at least four, and probably five, globin structural loci. The Hba and Hbc loci apparently arose by duplication of an ancestral α-type locus, while Hbb, Hbd, and Hbe apparently were derived from a β-type locus. The Hba and Hbb structural loci are electrophoretically monomorphic, while Hbc, Hbd, and Hbe are each polymorphic for at least two electrophoretic alleles. Alleles at Hbc and Hbd segregate independently. The globin products of Hbc and Hbd are electrophoretically indistinguishable; therefore, it is impossible to enumerate true gene frequencies in population surveys. Combined evidence from Peromyscus, Mus and Rattus indicates a remarkable similarity in the numbers of duplicated globin structural loci and in their linkage relationships to coat color loci. PMID:669255

  20. Human beta-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old.

    PubMed Central

    Béraud-Colomb, E; Roubin, R; Martin, J; Maroc, N; Gardeisen, A; Trabuchet, G; Goosséns, M

    1995-01-01

    Analyzing the nuclear DNA from ancient human bones is an essential step to the understanding of genetic diversity in current populations, provided that such systematic studies are experimentally feasible. This article reports the successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the beta-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old. These have been typed for beta-globin frameworks by sequencing through two variable positions and for a polymorphic (AT) chi (T) gamma microsatellite 500 bp upstream of the beta-globin gene. These specimens of human remains are somewhat older than those analyzed in previous nuclear gene sequencing reports and considerably older than those used to study high-copy-number human mtDNA. These results show that the systematic study of nuclear DNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8533755

  1. Chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precede the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yea Woon; Lee, Sungkung; Yun, Jangmi; Kim, AeRi

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers are closely positioned with actively transcribed target genes by chromatin looping. Non-coding RNAs are often transcribed on active enhancers, referred to as eRNAs (enhancer RNAs). To explore the kinetics of enhancer–promoter looping and eRNA transcription during transcriptional activation, we induced the β-globin locus by chemical treatment and analysed cross-linking frequency between the β-globin gene and locus control region (LCR) and the amount of eRNAs transcribed on the LCR in a time course manner. The cross-linking frequency was increased after chemical induction but before the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus. Transcription of eRNAs was increased in concomitant with the increase in cross-linking frequency. These results show that chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precedes the transcriptional activation of gene. Concomitant occurrence of the two events suggests functional relationship between them. PMID:25588787

  2. Chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precede the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yea Woon; Lee, Sungkung; Yun, Jangmi; Kim, AeRi

    2015-03-18

    Enhancers are closely positioned with actively transcribed target genes by chromatin looping. Non-coding RNAs are often transcribed on active enhancers, referred to as eRNAs (enhancer RNAs). To explore the kinetics of enhancer-promoter looping and eRNA transcription during transcriptional activation, we induced the β-globin locus by chemical treatment and analysed cross-linking frequency between the β-globin gene and locus control region (LCR) and the amount of eRNAs transcribed on the LCR in a time course manner. The cross-linking frequency was increased after chemical induction but before the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus. Transcription of eRNAs was increased in concomitant with the increase in cross-linking frequency. These results show that chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precedes the transcriptional activation of gene. Concomitant occurrence of the two events suggests functional relationship between them.

  3. Gene Therapy of the β-Hemoglobinopathies by Lentiviral Transfer of the βA(T87Q)-Globin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Negre, Olivier; Eggimann, Anne-Virginie; Beuzard, Yves; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Bourget, Philippe; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Hongeng, Suradej; Hacein-Bey, Salima; Cavazzana, Marina; Leboulch, Philippe; Payen, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    β-globin gene disorders are the most prevalent inherited diseases worldwide and result from abnormal β-globin synthesis or structure. Novel therapeutic approaches are being developed in an effort to move beyond palliative management. Gene therapy, by ex vivo lentiviral transfer of a therapeutic β-globin gene derivative (βAT87Q-globin) to hematopoietic stem cells, driven by cis-regulatory elements that confer high, erythroid-specific expression, has been evaluated in human clinical trials over the past 8 years. βAT87Q-globin is used both as a strong inhibitor of HbS polymerization and as a biomarker. While long-term studies are underway in multiple centers in Europe and in the United States, proof-of-principle of efficacy and safety has already been obtained in multiple patients with β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:26886832

  4. Repeated Evolution of Chimeric Fusion Genes in the β-Globin Gene Family of Laurasiatherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Gaudry, Michael J.; Storz, Jay F.; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB “Lepore” deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived “anti-Lepore” duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20–100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion. PMID:24814285

  5. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  6. Repeated evolution of chimeric fusion genes in the β-globin gene family of laurasiatherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Michael J; Storz, Jay F; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2014-05-09

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB "Lepore" deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived "anti-Lepore" duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20-100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion.

  7. Carbamylated Erythropoietin: A Prospective Drug Candidate for Neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Carbamylated erythropoietin (cEpo), which is neuroprotective but lacks hematopoietic activity, has been attracting rising concerns. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the process of neuroprotection of cEpo are not well known. Based on several recent reports, the neuroprotective effects of cEpo are illustrated, and signaling pathways involved in the different effects of erythropoietin and cEpo are discussed. These newly reported researches may shed new light on the development and application of cEpo, a prospective drug candidate for neuroprotection. PMID:26862298

  8. Carbamylated Erythropoietin: A Prospective Drug Candidate for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Carbamylated erythropoietin (cEpo), which is neuroprotective but lacks hematopoietic activity, has been attracting rising concerns. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the process of neuroprotection of cEpo are not well known. Based on several recent reports, the neuroprotective effects of cEpo are illustrated, and signaling pathways involved in the different effects of erythropoietin and cEpo are discussed. These newly reported researches may shed new light on the development and application of cEpo, a prospective drug candidate for neuroprotection. PMID:26862298

  9. Antagonistic roles of the ERK and p38 MAPK signalling pathways in globin expression, haem biosynthesis and iron uptake.

    PubMed

    Mardini, Louay; Gasiorek, Jadwiga; Derjuga, Anna; Carrière, Lucie; Schranzhofer, Matthias; Paw, Barry H; Ponka, Prem; Blank, Volker

    2010-11-15

    Late-stage erythroid cells synthesize large quantities of haemoglobin, a process requiring the co-ordinated regulation of globin and haem synthesis as well as iron uptake. In the present study, we investigated the role of the ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signalling pathways in MEL (mouse erythroleukaemia) cell differentiation. We found that treatment of HMBA (hexamethylene bisacetamide)-induced MEL cells with the ERK pathway inhibitor UO126 results in an increase in intracellular haem and haemoglobin levels. The transcript levels of the genes coding for β(major)-globin, the haem biosynthesis enzyme 5-aminolevulinate synthase 2 and the mitochondrial iron transporter mitoferrin 1 are up-regulated. We also showed enhanced expression of globin and transferrin receptor 1 proteins upon UO126 treatment. With respect to iron uptake, we found that ERK inhibitor treatment led to an increase in both haem-bound and total iron. In contrast, treatment of MEL cells with the p38 MAPK pathway inhibitor SB202190 had the opposite effect, resulting in decreased globin expression, haem synthesis and iron uptake. Reporter assays showed that globin promoter and HS2 enhancer-mediated transcription was under the control of MAPKs, as inhibition of the ERK and p38 MAPK pathways led to increased and decreased gene activity respectively. Our present results suggest that the ERK1/2 and p38α/β MAPKs play antagonistic roles in HMBA-induced globin gene expression and erythroid differentiation. These results provide a novel link between MAPK signalling and the regulation of haem biosynthesis and iron uptake in erythroid cells.

  10. FKLF, a Novel Krüppel-Like Factor That Activates Human Embryonic and Fetal β-Like Globin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Haruhiko; Li, Xi Susan; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a novel Krüppel-type zinc finger protein, FKLF, was cloned from fetal globin-expressing human fetal erythroid cells. The deduced polypeptide sequence composed of 512 amino acids revealed that, like Sp1 and EKLF, FKLF has three contiguous zinc fingers at the near carboxyl-terminal end. A long amino-terminal domain is characterized by the presence of two acidic and two proline-rich regions. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays using various cell lines demonstrated that the FKLF mRNA is expressed predominantly in erythroid cells. FKLF message is detectable by RT-PCR in fetal liver but not in adult bone marrow cells. As predicted from its structural features, FKLF is a transcriptional activator. In luciferase assays FKLF activated the γ- and ɛ-globin gene promoters, and, to a much lower degree, the β-globin promoter. Studies of HS2-γ gene reporter constructs carrying CACCC box deletions revealed that the CACCC box sequence of the γ gene promoter mediates the activation of the γ gene by FKLF. Other erythroid promoters (GATA-1, glycophorin B, ferrochelatase, porphobilinogen deaminase, and 5-aminolevulinate synthase) containing CACCC elements or GC-rich potential Sp1-binding sites were activated minimally, if at all, by FKLF, indicating that FKLF is not a general activator of genes carrying the CACCC motifs. Transfection of K562 cells with FKLF cDNA enhanced the expression of the endogenous ɛ- and γ-globin genes, suggesting an in vivo role of FKLF in fetal and embryonic globin gene expression. Our results indicate that the protein potentially encoded by the FKLF cDNA acts as a transcriptional activator of embryonic and fetal β-like globin genes. PMID:10207080

  11. Determinants of specific RNA interference-mediated silencing of human beta-globin alleles differing by a single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Dykxhoorn, Derek M; Schlehuber, Lisa D; London, Irving M; Lieberman, Judy

    2006-04-11

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the sickle beta-globin gene (beta(S)) leads to sickle cell anemia. Sickling increases sharply with deoxy sickle Hb concentration and decreases with increasing fetal gamma-globin concentration. Measures that decrease sickle Hb concentration should have an antisickling effect. RNA interference (RNAi) uses small interfering (si)RNAs for sequence-specific gene silencing. A beta(S) siRNA with position 10 of the guide strand designed to align with the targeted beta(S) SNP specifically silences beta(S) gene expression without affecting the expression of the gamma-globin or normal beta-globin (beta(A)) genes. Silencing is increased by altering the 5' end of the siRNA antisense (guide) strand to enhance its binding to the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Specific beta(S) silencing was demonstrated by using a luciferase reporter and full-length beta(S) cDNA transfected into HeLa cells and mouse erythroleukemia cells, where it was expressed in the context of the endogenous beta-globin gene promoter and the locus control region enhancers. When this strategy was used to target beta(E), silencing was not limited to the mutant gene but also targeted the normal beta(A) gene. siRNAs, mismatched with their target at position 10, guided mRNA cleavage in all cases except when two bulky purines were aligned. The specific silencing of the beta(S)-globin gene, as compared with beta(E), as well as studies of silencing SNP mutants in other diseases, indicates that siRNAs developed to target a disease-causing SNP will be specific if the mutant residue is a pyrimidine and the normal residue is a purine.

  12. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, "band 3," which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane "band 3" attachment site. "Band 3" contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and channels of the

  13. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Gene A.; Kostellow, Adele B.

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, “band 3,” which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane “band 3” attachment site. “Band 3” contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and

  14. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Gene A.; Kostellow, Adele B.

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, “band 3,” which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane “band 3” attachment site. “Band 3” contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and

  15. Biophysical Characterisation of Globins and Multi-Heme Cytochromes Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Filip

    Heme proteins of different families were investigated in this work, using a combination of pulsed and continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy and laser flash photolysis. The first class of proteins that were investigated, were the globins. The globin-domain of the globin-coupled sensor of the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was studied in detail using different pulsed EPR techniques (HYSCORE and Mims ENDOR). The results of this pulsed EPR study are compared with the results of the optical investigation and the crystal structure of the protein. The second globin, which was studied, is the Protoglobin of Methanosarcina acetivorans, various mutants of this protein were studied using laser flash photolysis and Raman spectroscopy to unravel the link between this protein's unusual structure and its ligand-binding kinetics. In addition to this, the CN -bound form of this protein was investigated using EPR and the influence of the strong deformation of the heme on the unusual low gz values is discussed. Finally, the neuroglobins of three species of fishes, Danio rerio, Dissostichus mawsoni and Chaenocephalus aceratus are studied. The influence of the presence or absence of two cysteine residues in the C-D and D-region of the protein on the EPR spectrum, and the possible formation of a disulfide bond is studied. The second group of proteins that were studied in this thesis belong to the family of the cytochromes. First the Mouse tumor suppressor cytochrome b561 was studied, the results of a Raman and EPR investigation are compared to the Human orthologue of the protein. Secondly, the tonoplast cytochrome b561 of Arabidopsis was investigated in its natural form and in two double-mutant forms, in which the heme at the extravesicular side was removed. The results of this investigation are then compared with two models in literature that predict the localisation of the hemes in this

  16. Same. beta. -globin gene mutation is present on nine different. beta. -thalassemia chromosomes in a Sardinian population

    SciTech Connect

    Pirastu, M.; Galanello, R.; Doherty, M.A.; Tuveri, T.; Cao, A.; Kan, Y.W.

    1987-05-01

    The predominant ..beta..-thalassemia in Sardinia is the ..beta../sup 0/ type in which no ..beta..-globin chains are synthesized in the homozygous state. The authors determined the ..beta..-thalassemia mutations in this population by the oligonucleotide-probe method and defined the chromosome haplotypes on which the mutation resides. The same ..beta../sup 39(CAG..-->..TAG)/ nonsense mutation was found on nine different chromosome haplotypes. Although this mutation may have arisen more than once, the multiple haplotypes could also be generated by crossing over and gene conversion events. These findings underscore the frequency of mutational events in the ..beta..-globin gene region.

  17. Complexity of the alpha-globin genotypes identified with thalassemia screening in Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Origa, Raffaella; Paglietti, Maria E; Sollaino, Maria C; Desogus, Maria F; Barella, Susanna; Loi, Daniela; Galanello, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    α-Thalassemia commonly results from deletions or point mutations in one or both α-globin genes located on chromosome 16p13.3 giving rise to complex and variable genotypes and phenotypes. Rarely, unusual non-deletion defects or atypical deletions down-regulate the expression of the α-globin gene. In the last decade of the program for β-thalassemia carrier screening and genetic counseling in Sardinia, the association of new techniques of molecular biology such as gene sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) to conventional methods has allowed to better define several thalassemic genotypes and the complex variability of the α-cluster with its flanking regions, with a high frequency of different genotypes and compound heterozygosity for two α mutations even in the same family. The exact molecular definition of the genotypes resulting from the interactions among the large number of α-thalassemia determinants and with β-thalassemia, is important for a correct correlation of genotype-phenotype and to prevent underdiagnosis of carrier status which could hamper the effectiveness of a screening program particularly in those regions where a high frequency of hemoglobinopathies is present. PMID:23896219

  18. A Luciferase Reporter Gene System for High-Throughput Screening of γ-Globin Gene Activators.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wensheng; Silvers, Robert; Ouellette, Michael; Wu, Zining; Lu, Quinn; Li, Hu; Gallagher, Kathleen; Johnson, Kathy; Montoute, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Luciferase reporter gene assays have long been used for drug discovery due to their high sensitivity and robust signal. A dual reporter gene system contains a gene of interest and a control gene to monitor non-specific effects on gene expression. In our dual luciferase reporter gene system, a synthetic promoter of γ-globin gene was constructed immediately upstream of the firefly luciferase gene, followed downstream by a synthetic β-globin gene promoter in front of the Renilla luciferase gene. A stable cell line with the dual reporter gene was cloned and used for all assay development and HTS work. Due to the low activity of the control Renilla luciferase, only the firefly luciferase activity was further optimized for HTS. Several critical factors, such as cell density, serum concentration, and miniaturization, were optimized using tool compounds to achieve maximum robustness and sensitivity. Using the optimized reporter assay, the HTS campaign was successfully completed and approximately 1000 hits were identified. In this chapter, we also describe strategies to triage hits that non-specifically interfere with firefly luciferase. PMID:27316998

  19. Heterogeneity of DNA fragments associated with the sickle-globin gene.

    PubMed

    Feldenzer, J; Mears, J G; Burns, A L; Natta, C; Bank, A

    1979-09-01

    We have examined the genetic polymorphism previously reported to be associated with the sickle-cell (beta s) gene. The polymorphism involves an alteration of the DNA sequence 3' to the beta-globin gene as detected with the restriction endonuclease, Hpa I. In normal individuals, the beta-globin gene is contained within a DNA fragment of 7.6 kilobases (kb), whereas 87% of individuals with sickle-cell anemia have been reported to have the beta s-gene associated with a 13.0-kb Hpa I fragment. We have studied this polymorphism in 31 New York Black individuals homozygous for sickle-cell anemia to ascertain its genetic and biochemical significance and to evaluate its potential use in the prenatal diagnosis of sickle-cell disease. Our results show only a 58% association of the beta s-gene and the 13.0-kb Hpa I fragment, as well as the presence of additional variants involving the Hpa I site. In addition, the 13.0-kb fragment is also found associated with the beta c- and beta A-genes. Thus, the Hpa I polymorphism probably represents a change in DNA not specifically associated with the beta s-gene, and appears to antedate the beta s-and beta c-mutations.

  20. Insulation of the Chicken β-Globin Chromosomal Domain from a Chromatin-Condensing Protein, MENT

    PubMed Central

    Istomina, Natalia E.; Shushanov, Sain S.; Springhetti, Evelyn M.; Karpov, Vadim L.; A. Krasheninnikov, Igor; Stevens, Kimberly; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Singh, Prim B.; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

    2003-01-01

    Active genes are insulated from developmentally regulated chromatin condensation in terminally differentiated cells. We mapped the topography of a terminal stage-specific chromatin-condensing protein, MENT, across the active chicken β-globin domain. We observed two sharp transitions of MENT concentration coinciding with the β-globin boundary elements. The MENT distribution profile was opposite to that of acetylated core histones but correlated with that of histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 9 (H3me2K9). Ectopic MENT expression in NIH 3T3 cells caused a large-scale and specific remodeling of chromatin marked by H3me2K9. MENT colocalized with H3me2K9 both in chicken erythrocytes and NIH 3T3 cells. Mutational analysis of MENT and experiments with deacetylase inhibitors revealed the essential role of the reaction center loop domain and an inhibitory affect of histone hyperacetylation on the MENT-induced chromatin remodeling in vivo. In vitro, the elimination of the histone H3 N-terminal peptide containing lysine 9 by trypsin blocked chromatin self-association by MENT, while reconstitution with dimethylated but not acetylated N-terminal domain of histone H3 specifically restored chromatin self-association by MENT. We suggest that histone H3 modification at lysine 9 directly regulates chromatin condensation by recruiting MENT to chromatin in a fashion that is spatially constrained from active genes by gene boundary elements and histone hyperacetylation. PMID:12944473

  1. Determination of ligand pathways in globins: apolar tunnels versus polar gates.

    PubMed

    Salter, Mallory D; Blouin, George C; Soman, Jayashree; Singleton, Eileen W; Dewilde, Sylvia; Moens, Luc; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; Olson, John S

    2012-09-28

    Although molecular dynamics simulations suggest multiple interior pathways for O(2) entry into and exit from globins, most experiments indicate well defined single pathways. In 2001, we highlighted the effects of large-to-small amino acid replacements on rates for ligand entry and exit onto the three-dimensional structure of sperm whale myoglobin. The resultant map argued strongly for ligand movement through a short channel from the heme iron to solvent that is gated by the distal histidine (His-64(E7)) near the solvent edge of the porphyrin ring. In this work, we have applied the same mutagenesis mapping strategy to the neuronal mini-hemoglobin from Cerebratulus lacteus (CerHb), which has a large internal tunnel from the heme iron to the C-terminal ends of the E and H helices, a direction that is 180° opposite to the E7 channel. Detailed comparisons of the new CerHb map with expanded results for Mb show unambiguously that the dominant (>90%) ligand pathway in CerHb is through the internal tunnel, and the major (>75%) ligand pathway in Mb is through the E7 gate. These results demonstrate that: 1) mutagenesis mapping can identify internal pathways when they exist; 2) molecular dynamics simulations need to be refined to address discrepancies with experimental observations; and 3) alternative pathways have evolved in globins to meet specific physiological demands. PMID:22859299

  2. A four base pair deletion 5' to the A gamma T gene is associated not only with decreased expression of the A gamma T-globin gene, but also of the G gamma-globin gene in cis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M B; Adams, J G; Steinberg, M H; Winter, W P

    1994-12-01

    A four base pair deletion 5' to A gamma T-globin gene at positions -222 to -225 has been reported to reduce the expression of this gene. To evaluate the prevalence and effect of this deletion, PCR-based methods were employed. The deletion had a gene frequency of 0.06 in a sample of African-American individuals with sickle cell trait, 0.18 in adult African-Americans with normal Hb AA, and 0.36 in caucasians. Seventy cord blood samples from African-American newborns with Hb AA were evaluated by both HPLC and PCR. The frequency of the A gamma T allele was 0.13. The A gamma T-globin chain was always present in a lower proportion than the A gamma I allele (70% of A gamma I), but the percentage of A gamma-globin was the same whether or not A gamma T was present. The total percentage of Hb F, however, was significantly lower in the group with the A gamma T allele (77.1% vs. 87.4%, P < 0.01). These results indicate that the four base pair deletion is not only associated with reduced expression of the A gamma T allele, but also of the G gamma allele in cis, further suggesting a possible role of this region in the modulation of the expression of the linked gamma-globin genes.

  3. Small-Molecule Anticonvulsant Agents with Potent in vitro Neuroprotection and Favorable Drug-like Properties

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Garry R.; Brenneman, Douglas E.; Zhang, Yan; Du, Yanming; Reitz, Allen B.

    2014-01-01

    Severe seizure activity is associated with reoccurring cycles of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress that result in progressive neuronal damage and death. Intervention with these pathological processes is a compelling disease-modifying strategy for the treatment of seizure disorders. We have optimized a series of small molecules for neuroprotective and anticonvulsant activity as well as altered their physical properties to address potential metabolic liabilities, to improve CNS penetration and to prolong the duration of action in vivo. Utilizing phenotypic screening of hippocampal cultures with nutrient medium depleted of antioxidants as a disease model, cell death and decreased neuronal viability produced by acute treatment with glutamate or hydrogen peroxide were prevented. Modifications to our previously reported proof of concept compounds have resulted in a lead which has full neuroprotective action at < 1 nM and antiseizure activity across six animal models, including the kindled rat, and displays excellent pharmacokinetics including high exposure to the brain. These modifications have also eliminated the requirement for a chiral molecule, removing the possibility of racemization and making large scale synthesis more easily accessible. These studies strengthen our earlier findings which indicate that potent, multifunctional neuroprotective anticonvulsants are feasible within a single molecular entity which also possesses favorable CNS-active drug properties in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24277343

  4. TRPV1 may increase the effectiveness of estrogen therapy on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Barrantes, Ricardo; Marchant, Ivanny; Olivero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Aging induces physical deterioration, loss of the blood brain barrier, neuronal loss-induced mental and neurodegenerative diseases. Hypotalamus-hypophysis-gonad axis aging precedes symptoms of menopause or andropause and is a major determinant of sensory and cognitive integrated function. Sexual steroids support important functions, exert pleiotropic effects in different sensory cells, promote regeneration, plasticity and health of the nervous system. Their diminution is associated with impaired cognitive and mental health and increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases. Then, restoring neuroendocrine axes during aging can be key to enhance brain health through neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, depending on the modulation of plasticity mechanisms. Estrogen-dependent transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) expression induces neuroprotection, neurogenesis and regeneration on damaged tissues. Agonists of TRPV1 can modulate neuroprotection and repair of sensitive neurons, while modulators as other cognitive enhancers may improve the survival rate, differentiation and integration of neural stem cell progenitors in functional neural network. Menopause constitutes a relevant clinical model of steroidal production decline associated with progressive cognitive and mental impairment, which allows exploring the effects of hormone therapy in health outcomes such as dysfunction of CNS. Simulating the administration of hormone therapy to virtual menopausal individuals allows assessing its hypothetical impact and sensitivity to conditions that modify the effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:27651755

  5. TRPV1 may increase the effectiveness of estrogen therapy on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Barrantes, Ricardo; Marchant, Ivanny; Olivero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Aging induces physical deterioration, loss of the blood brain barrier, neuronal loss-induced mental and neurodegenerative diseases. Hypotalamus-hypophysis-gonad axis aging precedes symptoms of menopause or andropause and is a major determinant of sensory and cognitive integrated function. Sexual steroids support important functions, exert pleiotropic effects in different sensory cells, promote regeneration, plasticity and health of the nervous system. Their diminution is associated with impaired cognitive and mental health and increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases. Then, restoring neuroendocrine axes during aging can be key to enhance brain health through neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, depending on the modulation of plasticity mechanisms. Estrogen-dependent transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) expression induces neuroprotection, neurogenesis and regeneration on damaged tissues. Agonists of TRPV1 can modulate neuroprotection and repair of sensitive neurons, while modulators as other cognitive enhancers may improve the survival rate, differentiation and integration of neural stem cell progenitors in functional neural network. Menopause constitutes a relevant clinical model of steroidal production decline associated with progressive cognitive and mental impairment, which allows exploring the effects of hormone therapy in health outcomes such as dysfunction of CNS. Simulating the administration of hormone therapy to virtual menopausal individuals allows assessing its hypothetical impact and sensitivity to conditions that modify the effectiveness and efficiency.

  6. Oral ‘hydrogen water' induces neuroprotective ghrelin secretion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Akio; Yamafuji, Megumi; Tachibana, Tomoko; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Noda, Mami; Nakaya, Haruaki

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of molecular hydrogen (H2) is emerging in a number of human diseases and in their animal models, including in particular Parkinson's disease (PD). H2 supplementation of drinking water has been shown to exert disease-modifying effects in PD patients and neuroprotective effects in experimental PD model mice. However, H2 supplementation does not result in detectable changes in striatal H2 levels, indicating an indirect effect. Here we show that H2 supplementation increases gastric expression of mRNA encoding ghrelin, a growth hormone secretagogue, and ghrelin secretion, which are antagonized by the β1-adrenoceptor blocker, atenolol. Strikingly, the neuroprotective effect of H2 water was abolished by either administration of the ghrelin receptor-antagonist, D-Lys3 GHRP-6, or atenolol. Thus, the neuroprotective effect of H2 in PD is mediated by enhanced production of ghrelin. Our findings point to potential, novel strategies for ameliorating pathophysiology in which a protective effect of H2 supplementation has been demonstrated. PMID:24253616

  7. TRPV1 may increase the effectiveness of estrogen therapy on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Barrantes, Ricardo; Marchant, Ivanny; Olivero, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    Aging induces physical deterioration, loss of the blood brain barrier, neuronal loss-induced mental and neurodegenerative diseases. Hypotalamus-hypophysis-gonad axis aging precedes symptoms of menopause or andropause and is a major determinant of sensory and cognitive integrated function. Sexual steroids support important functions, exert pleiotropic effects in different sensory cells, promote regeneration, plasticity and health of the nervous system. Their diminution is associated with impaired cognitive and mental health and increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases. Then, restoring neuroendocrine axes during aging can be key to enhance brain health through neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, depending on the modulation of plasticity mechanisms. Estrogen-dependent transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) expression induces neuroprotection, neurogenesis and regeneration on damaged tissues. Agonists of TRPV1 can modulate neuroprotection and repair of sensitive neurons, while modulators as other cognitive enhancers may improve the survival rate, differentiation and integration of neural stem cell progenitors in functional neural network. Menopause constitutes a relevant clinical model of steroidal production decline associated with progressive cognitive and mental impairment, which allows exploring the effects of hormone therapy in health outcomes such as dysfunction of CNS. Simulating the administration of hormone therapy to virtual menopausal individuals allows assessing its hypothetical impact and sensitivity to conditions that modify the effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:27651755

  8. Novel Inducers of Fetal Globin Identified through High Throughput Screening (HTS) Are Active In Vivo in Anemic Baboons and Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boosalis, Michael S.; Sangerman, Jose I.; White, Gary L.; Wolf, Roman F.; Shen, Ling; Dai, Yan; White, Emily; Makala, Levi H.; Li, Biaoru; Pace, Betty S.; Nouraie, Mehdi; Faller, Douglas V.; Perrine, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    High-level fetal (γ) globin expression ameliorates clinical severity of the beta (β) hemoglobinopathies, and safe, orally-bioavailable γ-globin inducing agents would benefit many patients. We adapted a LCR-γ-globin promoter-GFP reporter assay to a high-throughput robotic system to evaluate five diverse chemical libraries for this activity. Multiple structurally- and functionally-diverse compounds were identified which activate the γ-globin gene promoter at nanomolar concentrations, including some therapeutics approved for other conditions. Three candidates with established safety profiles were further evaluated in erythroid progenitors, anemic baboons and transgenic mice, with significant induction of γ-globin expression observed in vivo. A lead candidate, Benserazide, emerged which demonstrated > 20-fold induction of γ-globin mRNA expression in anemic baboons and increased F-cell proportions by 3.5-fold in transgenic mice. Benserazide has been used chronically to inhibit amino acid decarboxylase to enhance plasma levels of L-dopa. These studies confirm the utility of high-throughput screening and identify previously unrecognized fetal globin inducing candidates which can be developed expediently for treatment of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26713848

  9. Binding of HMG 17 to mononucleosomes of the avian beta-globin gene cluster in erythroid and non-erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, T W; Reneker, J; Ginder, G D

    1990-01-01

    The binding of HMG 17 to stripped core mononucleosomes containing DNA from the avian beta-globin gene cluster was examined to determine whether binding in vitro in this developmentally-regulated gene domain was associated with transcriptional activity or DNaseI-sensitivity in intact nuclei. Mononucleosomes were prepared from primitive and definitive stage embryonic red blood cells of chick embryos, adult reticulocytes, adult reticulocytes in which embryonic rho-globin transcription was induced, and adult thymus cells. Preferential binding by HMG 17 to mononucleosomes containing the beta-globin gene cluster was confined to erythroid-derived mononucleosomes that contain the embryonic rho-globin gene, the adult beta-globin gene, and DNA sequences located between these two genes, but not to those that contain the embryonic epsilon-globin gene. Comparison of these results to the known patterns of transcription and DNaseI-sensitivity within the beta-globin gene cluster shows that HMG 17 binding, although tissue-specific, does not correlate directly with either DNaseI-sensitivity or active gene transcription, but is dependent on other factors present in core mononucleosomes from this active gene domain. Images PMID:1692412

  10. Novel Inducers of Fetal Globin Identified through High Throughput Screening (HTS) Are Active In Vivo in Anemic Baboons and Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Boosalis, Michael S; Sangerman, Jose I; White, Gary L; Wolf, Roman F; Shen, Ling; Dai, Yan; White, Emily; Makala, Levi H; Li, Biaoru; Pace, Betty S; Nouraie, Mehdi; Faller, Douglas V; Perrine, Susan P

    2015-01-01

    High-level fetal (γ) globin expression ameliorates clinical severity of the beta (β) hemoglobinopathies, and safe, orally-bioavailable γ-globin inducing agents would benefit many patients. We adapted a LCR-γ-globin promoter-GFP reporter assay to a high-throughput robotic system to evaluate five diverse chemical libraries for this activity. Multiple structurally- and functionally-diverse compounds were identified which activate the γ-globin gene promoter at nanomolar concentrations, including some therapeutics approved for other conditions. Three candidates with established safety profiles were further evaluated in erythroid progenitors, anemic baboons and transgenic mice, with significant induction of γ-globin expression observed in vivo. A lead candidate, Benserazide, emerged which demonstrated > 20-fold induction of γ-globin mRNA expression in anemic baboons and increased F-cell proportions by 3.5-fold in transgenic mice. Benserazide has been used chronically to inhibit amino acid decarboxylase to enhance plasma levels of L-dopa. These studies confirm the utility of high-throughput screening and identify previously unrecognized fetal globin inducing candidates which can be developed expediently for treatment of hemoglobinopathies.

  11. The replication timing program of the Chinese hamster β-globin locus is established coincident with its repositioning near peripheral heterochromatin in early G1 phase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Chen, Jianhua; Izumi, Masako; Butler, Mark C.; Keezer, Susan M.; Gilbert, David M.

    2001-01-01

    We have examined the dynamics of nuclear repositioning and the establishment of a replication timing program for the actively transcribed dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus and the silent β-globin gene locus in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The DHFR locus was internally localized and replicated early, whereas the β-globin locus was localized adjacent to the nuclear periphery and replicated during the middle of S phase, coincident with replication of peripheral heterochromatin. Nuclei were prepared from cells synchronized at various times during early G1 phase and stimulated to enter S phase by introduction into Xenopus egg extracts, and the timing of DHFR and β-globin replication was evaluated in vitro. With nuclei isolated 1 h after mitosis, neither locus was preferentially replicated before the other. However, with nuclei isolated 2 or 3 h after mitosis, there was a strong preference for replication of DHFR before β-globin. Measurements of the distance of DHFR and β-globin to the nuclear periphery revealed that the repositioning of the β-globin locus adjacent to peripheral heterochromatin also took place between 1 and 2 h after mitosis. These results suggest that the CHO β-globin locus acquires the replication timing program of peripheral heterochromatin upon association with the peripheral subnuclear compartment during early G1 phase. PMID:11470818

  12. Versatile Cosmid Vectors for the Isolation, Expression, and Rescue of Gene Sequences: Studies with the Human α -globin Gene Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Yun-Fai; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1983-09-01

    We have developed a series of cosmids that can be used as vectors for genomic recombinant DNA library preparations, as expression vectors in mammalian cells for both transient and stable transformations, and as shuttle vectors between bacteria and mammalian cells. These cosmids were constructed by inserting one of the SV2-derived selectable gene markers-SV2-gpt, SV2-DHFR, and SV2-neo-in cosmid pJB8. High efficiency of genomic cloning was obtained with these cosmids and the size of the inserts was 30-42 kilobases. We isolated recombinant cosmids containing the human α -globin gene cluster from these genomic libraries. The simian virus 40 DNA in these selectable gene markers provides the origin of replication and enhancer sequences necessary for replication in permissive cells such as COS 7 cells and thereby allows transient expression of α -globin genes in these cells. These cosmids and their recombinants could also be stably transformed into mammalian cells by using the respective selection systems. Both of the adult α -globin genes were more actively expressed than the embryonic zeta -globin genes in these transformed cell lines. Because of the presence of the cohesive ends of the Charon 4A phage in the cosmids, the transforming DNA sequences could readily be rescued from these stably transformed cells into bacteria by in vitro packaging of total cellular DNA. Thus, these cosmid vectors are potentially useful for direct isolation of structural genes.

  13. A mutation of the beta-globin gene initiation codon, ATG-->AAG, found in a French Caucasian man.

    PubMed

    Lacan, Philippe; Aubry, Martine; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2005-01-01

    A new mutation of the beta-globin gene initiation codon, ATG-->AAG (Met-->Tyr), is reported in a man originating from the southeast of France. Typical hematological findings of beta-thalassemia (thal) trait were found. We emphasize the importance of characterizing uncommon beta-thal mutations for genetic counseling.

  14. Contrasting effects of alpha and beta globin regulatory elements on chromatin structure may be related to their different chromosomal environments.

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, C F; Vyas, P; Sharpe, J A; Ayyub, H; Wood, W G; Higgs, D R

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the human alpha and beta globin gene clusters is regulated by remote sequences, referred to as HS -40 and the beta-locus control region (beta-LCR) that lie 5-40 kb upstream of the genes they activate. Because of their common ancestry, similar organization and coordinate expression it has often been assumed that regulation of the globin gene clusters by HS -40 and the beta-LCR occurs via similar mechanisms. Using interspecific hybrids containing chromosomes with naturally occurring deletions of HS -40 we have shown that, in contrast to the beta-LCR, this element exerts no discernible effect on long-range chromatin structure and in addition does not influence formation of DNase I hypersensitive sites at the alpha globin promoters. These differences in the behaviour of HS -40 and the beta-LCR may reflect their contrasting influence on gene expression in transgenic mice and may result from the differing requirements of these elements in their radically different, natural chromosomal environments; the alpha cluster lying within a region of constitutively 'open' chromatin and the beta cluster in a segment of chromatin which opens in a tissue-specific manner. Differences in the hierarchical control of the alpha and beta globin clusters may exemplify more general differences in the regulation of eukaryotic genes which lie in similar open or closed chromosomal regions. Images PMID:7737123

  15. Recombinant erythroid Kruppel-like factor fused to GATA1 up-regulates delta- and gamma-globin expression in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianqiong; Chin, Kyung; Aerbajinai, Wulin; Trainor, Cecelia; Gao, Peter; Rodgers, Griffin P

    2011-03-17

    The β-hemoglobinopathies sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia are among the most common human genetic disorders worldwide. Hemoglobin A2 (HbA2, α₂δ₂) and fetal hemoglobin (HbF, α₂γ₂) both inhibit the polymerization of hemoglobin S, which results in erythrocyte sickling. Expression of erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF) and GATA1 is critical for transitioning hemoglobin from HbF to hemoglobin A (HbA, α₂β₂) and HbA2. The lower levels of δ-globin expression compared with β-globin expression seen in adulthood are likely due to the absence of an EKLF-binding motif in the δ-globin proximal promoter. In an effort to up-regulate δ-globin to increase HbA2 expression, we created a series of EKLF-GATA1 fusion constructs composed of the transactivation domain of EKLF and the DNA-binding domain of GATA1, and then tested their effects on hemoglobin expression. EKLF-GATA1 fusion proteins activated δ-, γ-, and β-globin promoters in K562 cells, and significantly up-regulated δ- and γ-globin RNA transcript and protein expression in K562 and/or CD34(+) cells. The binding of EKLF-GATA1 fusion proteins at the GATA1 consensus site in the δ-globin promoter was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Our studies demonstrate that EKLF-GATA1 fusion proteins can enhance δ-globin expression through interaction with the δ-globin promoter, and may represent a new genetic therapeutic approach to β-hemoglobinopathies.

  16. Characterization of a large deletion in the {beta}-globin gene cluster in a newborn with hemoglobin FE

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, E.; Dietz, L.; Shafer, F.

    1994-09-01

    A sample on a newborn with hemoglobin FE screen results was obtained to investigate whether E/E or B/{beta}{degrees} thalassemia was present using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodology. The newborn appeared homozygous for the hemoglobin E mutation in our initial study, but the parents` genotypes did not support this diagnosis. The father is homozygous for the absence of the hemoglobin E mutation (non E/non E) and the mother is heterozygous (E/non E) for this mutation. The limitation of PCR analysis is an assumption that the amplification of the two {beta}-globin alleles is equivalent. A large deletion on one {beta}-globin gene, which would produce E/{beta}{degrees} thalassemia, would be missed if it included part or the entire region subjected to amplification. The family results were consistent with either non-paternity, sample mix-up or such a deletion of the {beta}-globin gene in the father and child. To rule out the possibility of non-paternity, two polymorphic loci (HLA on chromosome 6 and a VNTR system of chromosome 17) that are outside of the {beta}-globin gene were analyzed and show that inheritance is consistent and the likelihood of a sample mix-up is then reduced. We therefore believe there is a gene deletion in this family. At the present time, analyses of the RFLPs that are 5{prime} of the {beta}-globin gene cluster show that the polymorphisms most distal from the 5{prime} {beta}-globin gene are not being inherited as expected. These results support our interpretation that a deletion exists in the father and was inherited by the child. The father`s clinical picture of possible HPFH (the father has 12% hemoglobin F) also supports the interpretation of a deletion in this family. Deletions of the {beta}-globin gene within this ethnic group are rare. Currently, Southern blots on the family are being probed to determine the extent of the putative deletion.

  17. Nutraceutical Antioxidants as Novel Neuroprotective Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, Natalie A.; Wilkins, Heather M.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of antioxidant compounds derived from natural products (nutraceuticals) have demonstrated neuroprotective activity in either in vitro or in vivo models of neuronal cell death or neurodegeneration, respectively. These natural antioxidants fall into several distinct groups based on their chemical structures: (1) flavonoid polyphenols like epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea and quercetin from apples; (2) non-flavonoid polyphenols such as curcumin from tumeric and resveratrol from grapes; (3) phenolic acids or phenolic diterpenes such as rosmarinic acid or carnosic acid, respectively, both from rosemary; and (4) organosulfur compounds including the isothiocyanate, L-sulforaphane, from broccoli and the thiosulfonate allicin, from garlic. All of these compounds are generally considered to be antioxidants. They may be classified this way either because they directly scavenge free radicals or they indirectly increase endogenous cellular antioxidant defenses, for example, via activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor pathway. Alternative mechanisms of action have also been suggested for the neuroprotective effects of these compounds such as modulation of signal transduction cascades or effects on gene expression. Here, we review the literature pertaining to these various classes of nutraceutical antioxidants and discuss their potential therapeutic value in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21060289

  18. Nutraceutical antioxidants as novel neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Natalie A; Wilkins, Heather M; Linseman, Daniel A

    2010-11-01

    A variety of antioxidant compounds derived from natural products (nutraceuticals) have demonstrated neuroprotective activity in either in vitro or in vivo models of neuronal cell death or neurodegeneration, respectively. These natural antioxidants fall into several distinct groups based on their chemical structures: (1) flavonoid polyphenols like epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea and quercetin from apples; (2) non-flavonoid polyphenols such as curcumin from tumeric and resveratrol from grapes; (3) phenolic acids or phenolic diterpenes such as rosmarinic acid or carnosic acid, respectively, both from rosemary; and (4) organosulfur compounds including the isothiocyanate, L-sulforaphane, from broccoli and the thiosulfonate allicin, from garlic. All of these compounds are generally considered to be antioxidants. They may be classified this way either because they directly scavenge free radicals or they indirectly increase endogenous cellular antioxidant defenses, for example, via activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor pathway. Alternative mechanisms of action have also been suggested for the neuroprotective effects of these compounds such as modulation of signal transduction cascades or effects on gene expression. Here, we review the literature pertaining to these various classes of nutraceutical antioxidants and discuss their potential therapeutic value in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21060289

  19. Neuroprotective strategies against calpain-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Yildiz-Unal, Aysegul; Korulu, Sirin; Karabay, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Calpains are calcium-dependent proteolytic enzymes that have deleterious effects on neurons upon their pathological over-activation. According to the results of numerous studies to date, there is no doubt that abnormal calpain activation triggers activation and progression of apoptotic processes in neurodegeneration, leading to neuronal death. Thus, it is very crucial to unravel all the aspects of calpain-mediated neurodegeneration in order to protect neurons through eliminating or at least minimizing its lethal effects. Protecting neurons against calpain-activated apoptosis basically requires developing effective, reliable, and most importantly, therapeutically applicable approaches to succeed. From this aspect, the most significant studies focusing on preventing calpain-mediated neurodegeneration include blocking the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor activities, which are closely related to calpain activation; directly inhibiting calpain itself via intrinsic or synthetic calpain inhibitors, or inhibiting its downstream processes; and utilizing the neuroprotectant steroid hormone estrogen and its receptors. In this review, the most remarkable neuroprotective strategies for calpain-mediated neurodegeneration are categorized and summarized with respect to their advantages and disadvantages over one another, in terms of their efficiency and applicability as a therapeutic regimen in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25709452

  20. 2,5-diketopiperazines as neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Cornacchia, C; Cacciatore, I; Baldassarre, L; Mollica, A; Feliciani, F; Pinnen, F

    2012-01-01

    2,5-diketopiperazines are the simplest cyclic peptides found in nature, commonly biosynthesized from amino acids by different organisms, and represent a promising class of biologically active natural products. Their peculiar heterocyclic structure confers high stability against the proteolysis and constitutes a structural requirement for the active intestinal absorption. Furthermore, the diketopiperazine-based motif is considered as a novel brain shuttle for the delivery of drugs with limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and can be proposed as an ideal candidate for the rational development of new therapeutic agents. Although these cyclic peptides have been known since the beginning of the 20th century, only recently have they attracted substantial interest with respect to the wide spectrum of their biological properties, including antitumor, antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antihyperglycemic activities. In addition to these, the most challenging function of the diketopiperazine derivatives is related with their remarkable neuroprotective and nootropic activity. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of the two major classes of diketopiperazines, the TRH-related and the unsaturated derivatives both characterized by a significant ability to protect against neurotoxicity in several experimental models. The neuroprotective profile of these compounds suggests that they may have a future utility in the therapy of neuronal degeneration in vivo, potentially through several different mechanisms.

  1. Effects of increased anionic charge in the beta-globin chain on assembly of hemoglobin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adachi, K; Yamaguchi, T; Pang, J; Surrey, S

    1998-02-15

    Studies on assembly in vitro of alpha-globin chains with recombinant beta16 Gly-->Asp, beta95 Lys-->Glu, beta120 Lys-->Glu and beta16 Gly-->Asp, 120 Lys-->Glu human beta-globin chain variants in addition to human betaA- and betaS-globin chains were performed to evaluate effects of increased anionic charge in the beta chain on hemoglobin assembly using soluble recombinant beta-globin chains expressed in bacteria. A beta112 Cys-->Asp change was also engineered to monitor effects on assembly of increased negative charge at alpha1beta1 interaction sites. Order of tetramer formation in vitro under limiting alpha-globin chain conditions showed Hb betaG16D, K120E = Hb betaK120E = Hb betaK95E > Hb betaG16D > Hb A > Hb S > Hb betaC112D. In addition, beta112 Cys-->Asp chains exist as monomers rather than beta4 tetramers in the absence of alpha chains, and the beta chain in Hb betaC112D tetramers was readily exchanged by addition of betas. These results suggest that affinity between alpha and beta chains is promoted by negatively-charged beta chains up to a maximum of two additional net negative charges and is independent of location on the surface except at the alpha1beta1 interaction site. In addition, our findings show that beta112 Cys on the G helix is critical for facilitating formation of stable alphabeta dimers, which then form functional hemoglobin tetramers, and that beta112 Cys-->Asp inhibits formation of stable alpha1beta1 and beta1beta2 interactions in alpha2beta2 and beta4 tetramers, respectively. PMID:9454775

  2. Altitudinal Variation at Duplicated β-Globin Genes in Deer Mice: Effects of Selection, Recombination, and Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Cheviron, Zachary A.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Kelly, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially varying selection on a given polymorphism is expected to produce a localized peak in the between-population component of nucleotide diversity, and theory suggests that the chromosomal extent of elevated differentiation may be enhanced in cases where tandemly linked genes contribute to fitness variation. An intriguing example is provided by the tandemly duplicated β-globin genes of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), which contribute to adaptive differentiation in blood–oxygen affinity between high- and low-altitude populations. Remarkably, the two β-globin genes segregate the same pair of functionally distinct alleles due to a history of interparalog gene conversion and alleles of the same functional type are in perfect coupling-phase linkage disequilibrium (LD). Here we report a multilocus analysis of nucleotide polymorphism and LD in highland and lowland mice with different genetic backgrounds at the β-globin genes. The analysis of haplotype structure revealed a paradoxical pattern whereby perfect LD between the two β-globin paralogs (which are separated by 16.2 kb) is maintained in spite of the fact that LD within both paralogs decays to background levels over physical distances of less than 1 kb. The survey of nucleotide polymorphism revealed that elevated levels of altitudinal differentiation at each of the β-globin genes drop away quite rapidly in the external flanking regions (upstream of the 5′ paralog and downstream of the 3′ paralog), but the level of differentiation remains unexpectedly high across the intergenic region. Observed patterns of diversity and haplotype structure are difficult to reconcile with expectations of a two-locus selection model with multiplicative fitness. PMID:22042573

  3. Molecular spectrum of α-globin gene mutations in the Aegean region of Turkey: first observation of three α-globin gene mutations in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Onay, Hüseyin; Aykut, Ayça; Karaca, Emin; Durmaz, Asude; Solmaz, Aslı Ece; Çoğulu, Özgür; Aydınok, Yeşim; Vergin, Canan; Özkınay, Ferda

    2015-07-01

    Molecular test results of 231 individuals referred to our molecular genetics laboratory for analysis of α-globin gene mutations between the years 2007 and 2013 were evaluated. Analysis of α-thalassemia gene mutations was performed using reverse dot-blot hybridisation, which includes 21 common mutations. Twelve distinct α-thalassemia mutations and 23 different genotypes have been detected in the Aegean region of Turkey. The most frequent mutations were -α3.7 (52.28 %), -(α)20.5 (14.74 %), --MED (10.53 %), and αPA-1α (8.77 %). Three α-thalassemia mutations (αcd142α, --SEA, and αICα), which are more prevalent in Southeast Asia, are identified for the first time in Turkey in this study. We find that a broad spectrum of α-thalassemia mutations is present in the Aegean region of Turkey. The results obtained in this study may help inform decisions in the design and implementation of prevention strategies and diagnostic approaches.

  4. Total beta-globin gene deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, N.; Miyakawa, F.; Hunt, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    The distribution of {beta}-thalassemia [{beta}{sup Th}] mutations is unique to each ethnic group. Most mutations affect one or a few bases; large deletions have been rare. Among families screened in Hawaii, [{beta}{sup Th}] heterozygotes were diagnosed by microcytosis, absence of abnormal hemoglobins on isoelectric focusing, and raised Hb A{sub 2} by chromatography. Gene frequency for {beta}{sup Th} was 0.02 in Filipinos. In Filipinos, polymerase chain reaction [PCR] with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for {beta}{sup Th} mutations detected a mutation in only 6 of 42 {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes; an IVS2-666 C/T polymorphism showed non-heterozygosity in 37 and heterozygosity in only 5 of these {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes. One {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} major patient and his mother had no mutation detected by allele-specific oligomer hybridization; PCR failed to amplify any DNA from his {beta}-globin gene. After a total {beta}-globin gene deletion [{beta}{sup Del}] was found in a Filipino family in Ontario, specific PCR amplification for {beta}{sup Del} detected this in 43 of 53 {beta}{sup Th} Filipino samples tested; the above {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} patient was a ({beta}{sup Del}/{beta}{sup Del}) homozygote. The {beta}{sup Del} may account for over 60% of all {beta}{sup Th} alleles in Filipinos; this is the highest proportion of a deletion {beta}{sup Th} mutation reported from any population. Most but not all {beta}{sup Del} heterozygotes had high Hb F [5.13 {plus_minus} 3.94 mean {plus_minus} 1 s.d.] compared to the codon 41/42 four base deletion common in Chinese [2.30 {plus_minus} 0.86], or to {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes with normal {alpha}-globin genes [2.23 {plus_minus} 0.80].

  5. Genetic dissection of the α-globin super-enhancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hay, Deborah; Hughes, Jim R; Babbs, Christian; Davies, James O J; Graham, Bryony J; Hanssen, Lars L P; Kassouf, Mira T; Oudelaar, A Marieke; Sharpe, Jacqueline A; Suciu, Maria C; Telenius, Jelena; Williams, Ruth; Rode, Christina; Li, Pik-Shan; Pennacchio, Len A; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; Ayyub, Helena; Butler, Sue; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Gibbons, Richard J; Smith, Andrew J H; Wood, William G; Higgs, Douglas R

    2016-08-01

    Many genes determining cell identity are regulated by clusters of Mediator-bound enhancer elements collectively referred to as super-enhancers. These super-enhancers have been proposed to manifest higher-order properties important in development and disease. Here we report a comprehensive functional dissection of one of the strongest putative super-enhancers in erythroid cells. By generating a series of mouse models, deleting each of the five regulatory elements of the α-globin super-enhancer individually and in informative combinations, we demonstrate that each constituent enhancer seems to act independently and in an additive fashion with respect to hematological phenotype, gene expression, chromatin structure and chromosome conformation, without clear evidence of synergistic or higher-order effects. Our study highlights the importance of functional genetic analyses for the identification of new concepts in transcriptional regulation.

  6. 1990 Mack Forster Prize lecture. The molecular genetics of the alpha globin gene family.

    PubMed

    Higgs, D R

    1990-08-01

    The naturally occurring mutants described here provide an excellent opportunity for elucidating the relationship between structure and function of the alpha globin complex and the larger chromosomal region 16p13.3. From a practical point of view it is important to remember that millions of individuals throughout the world are carriers for alpha thalassaemia and every year many thousands of pregnancies are at risk of producing children with the severe alpha thalassaemia syndromes. The data summarized here provide the basis for accurately predicting the genotype in such cases and thus enabling appropriate prenatal testing. The less common larger rearrangements involving chromosomal band 16p13.3 may provide information on the nature of other genes that surround the alpha complex. Furthermore, the mechanism by which they have occurred provide some new and more general insights into the possible causes of other forms of unexplained mental handicap.

  7. Quality of ham pâté containing bovine globin and plasma as fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Viana, F R; Silva, V D M; Delvivo, F M; Bizzotto, C S; Silvestre, M P C

    2005-05-01

    The effect of the incorporation of globin (10%), plasma (10%) and both combined (5% each) as fat replacers on the quality of ham paté was investigated. The chemical composition, the sensorial analysis (color, flavor and consistency) and the instrumental analysis of the texture (hardness, adhesiveness, elasticity, cohesiveness and tackiness) were evaluated. The results showed an increase of moisture and protein contents after the fat replacement, while the fat reduction of 25-35% led to the preparation of light products. No change was observed for the aroma, taste and the consistency of fat replacing products, but an intensification of the cohesivity and a reduction of color, hardness and tackiness were detected in some samples. PMID:22063291

  8. Quality of ham pâté containing bovine globin and plasma as fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Viana, F R; Silva, V D M; Delvivo, F M; Bizzotto, C S; Silvestre, M P C

    2005-05-01

    The effect of the incorporation of globin (10%), plasma (10%) and both combined (5% each) as fat replacers on the quality of ham paté was investigated. The chemical composition, the sensorial analysis (color, flavor and consistency) and the instrumental analysis of the texture (hardness, adhesiveness, elasticity, cohesiveness and tackiness) were evaluated. The results showed an increase of moisture and protein contents after the fat replacement, while the fat reduction of 25-35% led to the preparation of light products. No change was observed for the aroma, taste and the consistency of fat replacing products, but an intensification of the cohesivity and a reduction of color, hardness and tackiness were detected in some samples.

  9. Gamma thalassemia resulting from the deletion of a gamma-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, P K; Nakatsuji, T; Gardiner, M B; Reese, A L; Gilman, J G; Huisman, T H

    1983-01-01

    The first example of a deletion of one of the two gamma globin genes has been characterized through an analysis of the DNA of the heterozygous parent of a homozygous newborn, using restriction endonuclease mapping techniques. A deletion of approximately 5 kb was observed which was probably caused by an unequal crossing-over between the -G gamma- and -A gamma- genes resulting in the formation of a -G gamma A gamma- hybrid gene. Data on proportions of G gamma and A gamma chains in newborn babies assumed to be heterozygous for the hybrid and normal genes suggest that this hybrid gene may be producing its A gamma chain at levels normally seen only for the G gamma chain. Images PMID:6306596

  10. Mass mapping of large globin complexes by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wall, Joseph S; Simon, Martha N; Lin, Beth Y; Vinogradov, Serge N

    2008-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of unstained, freeze-dried biological macromolecules in the dark-field mode provides an image based on the number of electrons elastically scattered by the constituent atoms of the macromolecule. The image of each isolated particle provides information about the projected structure of the latter, and its integrated intensity is directly related to the mass of the selected particle. Particle images can be sorted by shape, providing independent histograms of mass to study assembly/disassembly intermediates. STEM is optimized for low-dose imaging and is suitable for accurate measurement of particle masses over the range from about 30 kDa to 1,000 MDa. This article describes the details of the method developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory STEM facility and illustrates its application to the mass mapping of large globin complexes.

  11. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Evaluation of α-Globin Gene Mutations Among Different Ethnic Groups in Khuzestan Province, Southwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Abbas; Jalali-Far, Mohammadali; Saki, Najmaldin; Hosseini, Hossein; Galehdari, Hamid; Kiani-Ghalesardi, Omid; Paridar, Mostafa; Azarkeivan, Azita; Magaji-Hamid, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    α-Thalassemia (α-thal) is one of the most common inherited hemoglobin (Hb) disorders in the world. In addition to large deletions, over 50 different α-thal point mutations were detected around the world, thus, patients showed different phenotypes with regard to genotype. This study evaluated the genetic frequency of α-thal in Khuzestan Province, Southwest Iran, to help implement premarital and prenatal screening programs. The study was conducted on couples proposing to get married and parents who were referred to the genetic center of Shafa Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran, for prenatal diagnosis (PND) in 2012. Genomic DNA was purified by the salting-out method and tested using multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR), amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (ARMS-PCR), reverse hybridization test strips and DNA sequencing. Overall, 11 mutations were found on the α-globin genes. Based on gene frequency, the most common mutant allele was -α(3.7) (rightward) (71.3%) followed by the two gene deletion - -(MED) (9.7%). Other common mutations were α(codon 19)α (GCG>GC-, α2) (8.4%), the polyadenylation (polyA1) site α(polyA1)α (AATAAA>AATAAG) (2.8%), and α(-5 nt)α (-TGAGG) (2.0%). In addition, an extremely rare mutation at α(codon 21)α [Hb Fontainebleau, HBA2: c.64G > C (or HBA1)] was also found. The results of this study are critical for correct diagnosis of α-thal carriers, premarriage counseling and PND. This study suggests that the distribution of mutations on the α-globin genes differs among the ethnic groups in Khuzestan Province as well as in other provinces. PMID:26878087

  13. Accuracy of Reverse Dot-Blot PCR in Detection of Different β-Globin Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    El-Fadaly, N; Abd-Elhameed, A; Abd-Elbar, E; El-Shanshory, M

    2016-06-01

    Prevention programs for β-thalassemia based on molecular diagnosis of heterozygous carriers and/or patients require the use of reliable mutation screening methods. The aim of this study was to compare between direct DNA sequencing, and reverse dot-blot PCR in detection of different β-globin gene mutations in Egyptian children with β-thalassemia. Forty children with β-thalassemia were subjected to mutation analysis, performed by both direct DNA sequencing and β-globin Strip Assay MED™ (based on reverse dot-blot PCR). The most frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were; IVSI-110 G>A (31.25 %), IVS I-6 T > C (21.25 %), and IVS I-1 G>A (20 %). Relatively less frequent mutant alleles detected by reverse dot-blot PCR were "IVSII-1 G>A (5 %), IVSII-745 C>G (5 %), IVSII-848 C>A (2.5 %), IVSI-5 G>C (2.5 %), -87 C>G(2.5 %), and cd39 C>T (2.5 %)", While the genotypes of three patients (6 alleles 7.5 %) were not detected by reverse dot-blot PCR. Mutant alleles detected by direct DNA sequencing were the same as reverse dot-blot PCR method except it revealed the genotypes of 3 undetected patients (one patient was homozygous IVSI-110 G>A, and two patients were homozygous IVS I-1 G>A. Sensitivity of the reverse dot-blot PCR was 92.5 % when compared to direct DNA sequencing for detecting β-thalassemia mutations. Our results therefore suggest that, direct DNA sequencing may be preferred over reverse dot-blot PCR in critical diagnostic situations like genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27065589

  14. β-globin matrix attachment region improves stable genomic expression of the Sleeping Beauty transposon.

    PubMed

    Sjeklocha, Lucas; Chen, Yixin; Daly, Meghan C; Steer, Clifford J; Kren, Betsy T

    2011-09-01

    The liver is an attractive target for gene therapy due to its extensive capability for protein production and the numerous diseases resulting from a loss of gene function it normally provides. The Sleeping Beauty Transposon (SB-Tn)(1) system is a non-viral vector capable of delivering and mediating therapeutic transgene(s) insertion into the host genome for long-term expression. A current challenge for this system is the low efficiency of integration of the transgene. In this study we use a human hepatoma cell line (HuH-7) and primary human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) to test vectors containing DNA elements to enhance transposition without integrating themselves. We employed the human β-globin matrix attachment region (MAR) and the Simian virus 40 (SV40) nuclear translocation signal to increase the percent of HuH-7 cells persistently expressing a GFP::Zeo reporter construct by ∼50% for each element; while combining both did not show an additive effect. Interestingly, both elements together displayed an additive effect on the number of insertion sites, and in BOECs the SV40 alone appeared to have an inhibitory effect on transposition. In long-term cultures the loss of plasmid DNA, transposase expression and mapping of insertion sites demonstrated bona fide transposition without episomal expression. These results show that addition of the β-globin MAR and potentially other elements to the backbone of SB-Tn system can enhance transposition and expression of therapeutic transgenes. These findings may have a significant influence on the use of SB transgene delivery to liver for the treatment of a wide variety of disorders. PMID:21520245

  15. Revisiting the Term Neuroprotection in Chronic and Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Matta, Andre P C; Reis, Carlos Henrique Melo; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Moreira, Rayele; Ribeiro, Pedro; Fiorelli, Stenio; Novellino, Pietro; Pessoa, Bruno; Cunha, Mariana; Pupe, Camila; Morales, Pedro S; Filho, Pedro F Moreira; Trajano, Eduardo Lima; Oliveira, Acary Bulle

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to the development of several new researches, the lifetime presented a significant increase, even so, we still have many obstacles to overcome - among them, manage and get responses regarding neurodegenerative diseases. Where we are in the understanding of neuroprotection? Do we really have protective therapies for diseases considered degeneratives such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its variants, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and many others? Neuroprotection is defined by many researches as interactions and interventions that can slow down or even inhibit the progression of neuronal degeneration process. We make some considerations on this neuroprotective effect.

  16. Revisiting the Term Neuroprotection in Chronic and Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Matta, Andre P.C.; Reis, Carlos Henrique Melo; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Moreira, Rayele; Ribeiro, Pedro; Fiorelli, Stenio; Novellino, Pietro; Pessoa, Bruno; Cunha, Mariana; Pupe, Camila; Morales, Pedro S.; Filho, Pedro F. Moreira; Trajano, Eduardo Lima; Oliveira, Acary Bulle

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to the development of several new researches, the lifetime presented a significant increase, even so, we still have many obstacles to overcome – among them, manage and get responses regarding neurodegenerative diseases. Where we are in the understanding of neuroprotection? Do we really have protective therapies for diseases considered degeneratives such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its variants, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and many others? Neuroprotection is defined by many researches as interactions and interventions that can slow down or even inhibit the progression of neuronal degeneration process. We make some considerations on this neuroprotective effect. PMID:27127599

  17. Recent Trends in Erythropoietin-mediated Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Ronald J.; Juul, Sandra E.

    2008-01-01

    Fifteen years of evidence have established that the cytokine erythropoietin offers promise as a treatment for brain injury. In particular, neonatal brain injury may be reduced or prevented by early treatment with recombinant erythropoietin. Extreme prematurity and perinatal asphyxia are common conditions associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, hearing or visual impairment, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. When high doses of erythropoietin are administered systemically, a small proportion crosses the blood-brain barrier and can protect against hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. In addition to other protective effects, erythropoietin can specifically protect dopaminergic neurons. Since reduced dopamine neurotransmission contributes to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, this condition may be amenable to erythropoietin treatment. This review focuses on the potential application of erythropoietin as a neuroprotectant with regard to neurologic complications of extreme prematurity, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Recent concerns that early erythropoietin might exacerbate the pathologic neovascularization associated with retinopathy of prematurity are addressed. PMID:17936539

  18. Modeling Emergence in Neuroprotective Regulatory Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Haack, Jereme N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Stevens, S.L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary

    2013-01-05

    The use of predictive modeling in the analysis of gene expression data can greatly accelerate the pace of scientific discovery in biomedical research by enabling in silico experimentation to test disease triggers and potential drug therapies. Techniques that focus on modeling emergence, such as agent-based modeling and multi-agent simulations, are of particular interest as they support the discovery of pathways that may have never been observed in the past. Thus far, these techniques have been primarily applied at the multi-cellular level, or have focused on signaling and metabolic networks. We present an approach where emergence modeling is extended to regulatory networks and demonstrate its application to the discovery of neuroprotective pathways. An initial evaluation of the approach indicates that emergence modeling provides novel insights for the analysis of regulatory networks that can advance the discovery of acute treatments for stroke and other diseases.

  19. Is genistein neuroprotective in traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Soltani, Zahra; Khaksari, Mohammad; Jafari, Elham; Iranpour, Maryam; Shahrokhi, Nader

    2015-12-01

    The concerns about negative consequences of estrogen therapy have led to introduce other strategies to obtain estrogen's benefits in the brain. The present study tests the hypothesis that a major isoflavone of soy; genistein with estrogen-like activity can be neuroprotective in traumatic brain injury (TBI). The male Wistar rats were randomly divided to four groups: sham, TBI, vehicle and genistein. The TBI was induced by Marmarou method. The brain edema and the disruption of blood-brain-barrier (BBB) were evaluated 48 h post-TBI. Genistein (15 mg/kg) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was injected i.p., twice after TBI. The intracranial pressure (ICP), the motor performance, and the beam-walk task (WB) were determined before trauma, on trauma day (D0), and first (D1) and second (D2) days post-TBI. Genistein inhibited a development of brain edema and a BBB permeability in TBI animals. An increase of ICP and a defect in motor and WB performance were showed following TBI, in all times evaluated. An increase of ICP induced by TBI was suppressed by genistein on D1 and D2 times. Genistein improved a motor disorder induced by TBI, on D1 and D2 times. Also an increase of traversal time in WB task was suppressed by genistein in TBI animals, on D1 and D2 times. The results of this study demonstrated that genistein can be neuroprotective in TBI. Genistein inhibited the disruption of BBB, the brain edema and the increase of ICP, and the disturbance of neurobehavioral performance in TBI. PMID:26367454

  20. Screening for trans-acting factors and other factors involved in the activating or silencing of the gamma-globin gene during human ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Ni; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jun-Wu; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Rong-Xin

    2007-06-01

    Researchers hope to increase gamma-globin expression by controlling potential trans-acting factors that specifically activate the gamma-globin gene in fetuses or silence this gene in adults to potentially treat sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemias. To characterize genes encoding such factors, we analyzed the differential expression of mRNAs in erythroid induction cultures of CD34+ cells derived from normal adult bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and bone marrow from a patient with heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. Using differential-display - reverse-transcription PCR analysis, we identified a number of genes with differential expression in the above-mentioned cells. The differential expression of some genes was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Our data provide important clues for identifying and validating trans-activators that activate the gamma-globin gene in fetuses, and trans-acting factors involved in silencing the gamma-globin gene in adults.

  1. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against α-globin chain-containing human hemoglobins for detecting α-thalassemia disease.

    PubMed

    Pakdeepak, Kanet; Pata, Supansa; Chiampanichayakul, Sawitree; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Tatu, Thanusak

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against α-globin containing human Hbs, named AMS-Alpha1 and AMS-Alpha 2, were produced by the hybridoma technique using spleen cells enriched by the newly developed B lymphocyte enrichment protocol. These two monoclonal antibodies were of IgM class, reacting to only intact form of human Hbs A, A2, E, and F, which contain α-globin chain. By the indirect ELISA, the AMS-Alpha1 and AMS-Alpha 2 quantified less amount of α-globin chain containing hemoglobins in HbH disease than the SEA-α thalassemia 1 carriers and normal individuals. It was thus anticipated that these monoclonal antibodies can be used for detecting Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis in which no α-globin chain is produced. PMID:27050832

  2. A review on the origin and spread of deleterious mutants of the beta-globin gene in Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Das, S K; Talukder, G

    2001-01-01

    Deleterious mutations of the human beta-globin gene are responsible for beta-thalassaemia and other haemoglobinopathies, which are the most common genetic diseases in Indian populations. A highly heterogeneous distribution of those mutations is observed in India and certain mutations are restricted to some extent to particular groups only. The reasons behind the geographical clustering and origin of the mutations in India is a highly debated issue and the evidence is conflicting. Our present article aims at tracing the origin of the deleterious beta-globin mutation and evaluates the role of different evolutionary forces responsible for the spread and present distribution of those mutations in Indian populations, using data from molecular biology and statistical methods. Mutations are generated essentially randomly, but "hot-spot" sites for mutation are reported for the beta-globin gene cluster, indicating sequence dependency of mutation. A single origin of a deleterious beta-globin mutation, followed by recombination (in a hot spot region) and/or interallelic gene conversion (within beta-globin gene) through time is the most plausible hypothesis to explain the association of those mutations with multiple haplotype backgrounds and frameworks. It is suggested that India is the place of origin of HbE and HbD mutations and that they dispersed to other parts of the would by migration. HbS mutants present in Indian populations are not of Middle East origin but rather a fresh mutation is the probable explanation for the prevalence among tribal groups. beta-thalassaemia represents a heterogeneous group of mutant alleles in India. Five common and twelve rare mutations have been reported in variable frequencies among different Indian populations. Gene flow of those mutant alleles from different populations of the world by political, military and commercial interactions possibly accounts for the heterogenous nature of beta-thalassaemia among Indians. A multiple allelic

  3. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated expression of a human gamma-globin gene in human progenitor-derived erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, J L; Donahue, R E; Sellers, S E; Samulski, R J; Young, N S; Nienhuis, A W

    1994-10-11

    Effective gene therapy for the severe hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia, will require an efficient method to transfer, integrate, and express a globin gene in primary erythroid cells. To evaluate recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for this purpose, we constructed a rAAV vector encoding a human gamma-globin gene (pJM24/vHS432A gamma). Its 4725-nucleotide genome consists of two 180-bp AAV inverted terminal repeats flanking the core elements of hypersensitive sites 2, 3, and 4 from the locus control region of the beta-globin gene cluster, linked to a mutationally marked A gamma-globin gene (A gamma) containing native promoter and RNA processing signals. CD34+ human hematopoietic cells were exposed to rAAV particles at a multiplicity of infection of 500-1000 and cultured in semisolid medium containing several cytokines. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay distinguished mRNA signals derived from transduced and endogenous human gamma-globin genes. Twenty to 40% of human erythroid burst-forming unit-derived colonies expressed the rAAV-transduced A gamma-globin gene at levels 4-71% that of the endogenous gamma-globin genes. The HbF content of pooled control colonies was 26%, whereas HbF was 40% of the total in pooled colonies derived from rAAV transduced progenitors. These data establish that rAAV containing elements from the locus control region linked to a gamma-globin gene are capable of transferring and expressing that gene in primary human hematopoietic cells resulting in a substantial increase in HbF content.

  4. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated expression of a human gamma-globin gene in human progenitor-derived erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J L; Donahue, R E; Sellers, S E; Samulski, R J; Young, N S; Nienhuis, A W

    1994-01-01

    Effective gene therapy for the severe hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia, will require an efficient method to transfer, integrate, and express a globin gene in primary erythroid cells. To evaluate recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for this purpose, we constructed a rAAV vector encoding a human gamma-globin gene (pJM24/vHS432A gamma). Its 4725-nucleotide genome consists of two 180-bp AAV inverted terminal repeats flanking the core elements of hypersensitive sites 2, 3, and 4 from the locus control region of the beta-globin gene cluster, linked to a mutationally marked A gamma-globin gene (A gamma) containing native promoter and RNA processing signals. CD34+ human hematopoietic cells were exposed to rAAV particles at a multiplicity of infection of 500-1000 and cultured in semisolid medium containing several cytokines. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay distinguished mRNA signals derived from transduced and endogenous human gamma-globin genes. Twenty to 40% of human erythroid burst-forming unit-derived colonies expressed the rAAV-transduced A gamma-globin gene at levels 4-71% that of the endogenous gamma-globin genes. The HbF content of pooled control colonies was 26%, whereas HbF was 40% of the total in pooled colonies derived from rAAV transduced progenitors. These data establish that rAAV containing elements from the locus control region linked to a gamma-globin gene are capable of transferring and expressing that gene in primary human hematopoietic cells resulting in a substantial increase in HbF content. Images PMID:7524085

  5. Beta-globin active chromatin Hub formation in differentiating erythroid cells and in p45 NF-E2 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Kooren, Jurgen; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Klous, Petra; Splinter, Erik; von Lindern, Marieke; Grosveld, Frank; de Laat, Wouter

    2007-06-01

    Expression of the beta-globin genes proceeds from basal to exceptionally high levels during erythroid differentiation in vivo. High expression is dependent on the locus control region (LCR) and coincides with more frequent LCR-gene contacts. These contacts are established in the context of an active chromatin hub (ACH), a spatial chromatin configuration in which the LCR, together with other regulatory sequences, loops toward the active beta-globin-like genes. Here, we used recently established I/11 cells as a model system that faithfully recapitulates the in vivo erythroid differentiation program to study the molecular events that accompany and underlie ACH formation. Upon I/11 cell induction, histone modifications changed, the ACH was formed, and the beta-globin-like genes were transcribed at rates similar to those observed in vivo. The establishment of frequent LCR-gene contacts coincided with a more efficient loading of polymerase onto the beta-globin promoter. Binding of the transcription factors GATA-1 and EKLF to the locus, although previously shown to be required, was not sufficient for ACH formation. Moreover, we used knock-out mice to show that the erythroid transcription factor p45 NF-E2, which has been implicated in beta-globin gene regulation, is dispensable for beta-globin ACH formation.

  6. Multiple elements in human beta-globin locus control region 5' HS 2 are involved in enhancer activity and position-independent, transgene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Caterina, J J; Ciavatta, D J; Donze, D; Behringer, R R; Townes, T M

    1994-01-01

    The human beta-globin Locus Control Region (LCR) has two important activities. First, the LCR opens a 200 kb chromosomal domain containing the human epsilon-, gamma- and beta-globin genes and, secondly, these sequences function as a powerful enhancer of epsilon-, gamma- and beta-globin gene expression. Erythroid-specific, DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) mark sequences that are critical for LCR activity. Previous experiments demonstrated that a 1.9 kb fragment containing the 5' HS 2 site confers position-independent expression in transgenic mice and enhances human beta-globin gene expression 100-fold. Further analysis of this region demonstrates that multiple sequences are required for maximal enhancer activity; deletion of SP1, NF-E2, GATA-1 or USF binding sites significantly decrease beta-globin gene expression. In contrast, no single site is required for position-independent transgene expression; all mice with site-specific mutations in 5' HS 2 express human beta-globin mRNA regardless of the site of transgene integration. Apparently, multiple combinations of protein binding sites in 5' HS 2 are sufficient to prevent chromosomal position effects that inhibit transgene expression. PMID:8152905

  7. Targeting of c-myc and beta-globin coding sequences to cytoskeletal-bound polysomes by c-myc 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, J; Campbell, G; Piechaczyk, M; Blanchard, J M

    1994-01-01

    The influence of the 3' untranslated region on mRNA localization was investigated by measuring the distribution of myc, beta-globin and hybrid myc-globin mRNAs between free, cytoskeletal-bound and membrane-bound polysomes in cells transfected with either control or chimeric gene constructs. c-myc sequences and beta-globin-coding sequences linked to the myc 3' untranslated region were present at greatest enrichment in cytoskeletal-bound polysomes. beta-Globin mRNA and myc-coding sequences linked to the beta-globin 3' untranslated region were recovered largely in the free polysomes. In situ hybridization confirmed that replacement of the c-myc 3' untranslated region by that of globin caused a relocalization of the mRNA. The results suggest that mRNA localization in differentiated eukaryotic cells depends on a mechanism that involves directional information in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8129712

  8. Proximal promoter elements of the human zeta-globin gene confer embryonic-specific expression on a linked reporter gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pondel, M D; Sharpe, J A; Clark, S; Pearson, L; Wood, W G; Proudfoot, N J

    1996-11-01

    We have investigated the transcriptional regulation of the human embryonic zeta-globin gene promoter. First, we examined the effect that deletion of sequences 5' to zeta-globin's CCAAT box have on zeta-promoter activity in erythroid cell lines. Deletions of sequences between -116 and -556 (cap = 0) had little effect while further deletion to -84 reduced zeta-promoter activity by only 2-3-fold in both transiently and stably transfected erythroid cells. Constructs containing 67, 84 and 556 bp of zeta-globin 5' flanking region linked to a beta-galactosidase reporter gene (lacZ) and hypersensitive site -40 (HS-40) of the human alpha-globin gene cluster were then employed for the generation of transgenic mice. LacZ expression from all constructs, including a 67 bp zeta-globin promoter, was erythroid-specific and most active between 8.5 and 10.5 days post-fertilisation. By 16.5 days gestation, lacZ expression dropped 40-100-fold. These results suggest that embryonic-specific activation of the human zeta-globin promoter is conferred by a 67 bp zeta-promoter fragment containing only a CCAAT and TATA box. PMID:8932366

  9. Bivalent Compound 17MN Exerts Neuroprotection through Interaction at Multiple Sites in a Cellular Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Chojnacki, Jeremy E; Wade, Emily E; Saathoff, John M; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Shijun

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pathogenic factors have been suggested to play a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The multifactorial nature of AD also suggests the potential use of compounds with polypharmacology as effective disease-modifying agents. Recently, we have developed a bivalent strategy to include cell membrane anchorage into the molecular design. Our results demonstrated that the bivalent compounds exhibited multifunctional properties and potent neuroprotection in a cellular AD model. Herein, we report the mechanistic exploration of one of the representative bivalent compounds, 17MN, in MC65 cells. Our results established that MC65 cells die through a necroptotic mechanism upon the removal of tetracycline (TC). Furthermore, we have shown that mitochondrial membrane potential and cytosolic Ca2+ levels are increased upon removal of TC. Our bivalent compound 17MN can reverse such changes and protect MC65 cells from TC removal induced cytotoxicity. The results also suggest that 17MN may function between the Aβ species and RIPK1 in producing its neuroprotection. Colocalization studies employing a fluorescent analog of 17MN and confocal microscopy demonstrated the interactions of 17MN with both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, thus suggesting that 17MN exerts its neuroprotection via a multiple-site mechanism in MC65 cells. Collectively, these results strongly support our original design rationale of bivalent compounds and encourage further optimization of this bivalent strategy to develop more potent analogs as novel disease-modifying agents for AD. PMID:26401780

  10. Bivalent compound 17MN exerts neuroprotection through interaction at multiple sites in a cellular model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Chojnacki, Jeremy E.; Wade, Emily E.; Saathoff, John M.; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Multiple pathogenic factors have been suggested in playing a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The multifactorial nature of AD also suggests the potential use of compounds with polypharmacology as effective disease-modifying agents. Recently, we have developed a bivalent strategy to include cell membrane anchorage into the molecular design. Our results demonstrated that the bivalent compounds exhibited multifunctional properties and potent neuroprotection in a cellular AD model. Herein, we report the mechanistic exploration of one of the representative bivalent compounds, 17MN, in MC65 cells. Our results established that MC65 cells die through a necroptotic mechanism upon the removal of tetracycline (TC). Furthermore, we have shown that mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and cytosolic Ca2+ levels are increased upon removal of TC. Our bivalent compound 17MN can reverse such changes and protect MC65 cells from TC removal induced cytotoxicity. The results also suggest that 17MN may function between the Aβ species and RIPK1 in producing its neuroprotection. Colocalization studies employing a fluorescent analog of 17MN and confocal microscopy demonstrated the interactions of 17MN with both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus suggesting that 17MN exerts its neuroprotection via a multiple-site mechanism in MC65 cells. Collectively, these results strongly support our original design rationale of bivalent compounds and encourage further optimization of this bivalent strategy to develop more potent analogs as novel disease-modifying agents for AD. PMID:26401780

  11. Self-catalytic DNA depurination underlies human β-globin gene mutations at codon 6 that cause anemias and thalassemias.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Amosova, Olga; Fresco, Jacques R

    2013-04-19

    The human β-globin gene contains an 18-nucleotide coding strand sequence centered at codon 6 and capable of forming a stem-loop structure that can self-catalyze depurination of the 5'G residue of that codon. The resultant apurinic lesion is subject to error-prone repair, consistent with the occurrence about this codon of mutations responsible for 6 anemias and β-thalassemias and additional substitutions without clinical consequences. The 4-residue loop of this stem-loop-forming sequence shows the highest incidence of mutation across the gene. The loop and first stem base pair-forming residues appeared early in the mammalian clade. The other stem-forming segments evolved more recently among primates, thereby conferring self-depurination capacity at codon 6. These observations indicate a conserved molecular mechanism leading to β-globin variants underlying phenotypic diversity and disease.

  12. The Role of Crowding Forces in Juxtaposing β-Globin Gene Domain Remote Regulatory Elements in Mouse Erythroid Cells.

    PubMed

    Golov, Arkadiy K; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2015-01-01

    The extremely high concentration of macromolecules in a eukaryotic cell nucleus indicates that the nucleoplasm is a crowded macromolecular solution in which large objects tend to gather together due to crowding forces. It has been shown experimentally that crowding forces support the integrity of various nuclear compartments. However, little is known about their role in control of chromatin dynamics in vivo. Here, we experimentally addressed the possible role of crowding forces in spatial organization of the eukaryotic genome. Using the mouse β-globin domain as a model, we demonstrated that spatial juxtaposition of the remote regulatory elements of this domain in globin-expressing cells may be lost and restored by manipulation of the level of macromolecular crowding. In addition to proving the role of crowding forces in shaping interphase chromatin, our results suggest that the folding of the chromatin fiber is a major determinant in juxtaposing remote genomic elements. PMID:26436546

  13. Identification of a Novel β-Globin Mutation (HBB: C.189_195delTCATGGC) in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    He, Sheng; Lin, Li; Wei, Yuan; Chen, Biyan; Yi, Shang; Chen, Qiuli; Qiu, XiaoXia; Wei, Hongwei; Li, Guojian; Zheng, Chenguang

    2016-08-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is one of the most common genetic disorders worldwide. Molecular characterization of β-thal is essential for prevention and understanding the biology of the disease. More and more rare and novel mutations are being reported. Here, we report a novel 7 bp deletion at codons 63-65 (HBB: c.189_195delTCATGGC) in exon 2 of the β-globin gene in a family from Guangxi Province, China. This novel mutation causes a shift in the normal reading frame of the β-globin coding sequence and created a stop codon at codon 87 in exon 2, which leads to a β(0)-thal phenotype. PMID:27492766

  14. Multi target neuroprotective and neurorestorative anti-Parkinson and anti-Alzheimer drugs ladostigil and m30 derived from rasagiline.

    PubMed

    Youdim, Moussa B H

    2013-03-01

    Present anti-PD and -AD drugs have limited symptomatic activity and devoid of neuroprotective and neurorestorative property that is needed for disease modifying action. The complex pathology of PD and AD led us to develop several multi-target neuroprotective and neurorestorative drugs with several CNS targets with the ability for possible disease modifying activity. Employing the pharmacophore of our anti-parkinson drug rasagiline (Azilect, N-propagrgyl-1-R-aminoindan), we have developed a series of novel multi-functional neuroprotective drugs (A) [TV-3326 (N-propargyl-3R-aminoindan-5yl)-ethyl methylcarbamate)], with both cholinesterase-butyrylesterase and brain selective monoamine-oxidase (MAO) A/B inhibitory activities and (B) the iron chelator-radical scavenging-brain selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) A/B inhibitor and M30 possessing the neuroprotective and neurorescuing propargyl moiety of rasagiline, as potential treatment of AD, DLB and PD with dementia. Another series of multi-target drugs (M30, HLA-20 series) which are brain permeable iron chelators and potent selective brain MAO inhibitors were also developed. These series of drugs have the ability of regulating and processing amyloid precursor protein (APP) since APP and alpha-synuclein are metaloproteins (iron-regulated proteins), with an iron responsive element 5"UTR mRNA similar to transferring and ferritin. Ladostigil inhibits brain acetyl and butyrylcholinesterase in rats after oral doses. After chronic but not acute treatment, it inhibits MAO-A and -B in the brain. Ladostigil acts like an anti-depressant in the forced swim test in rats, indicating a potential for anti-depressant activity. Ladostigil prevents the destruction of nigrostriatal neurons induced by infusion of neurotoxin MPTP in mice. The propargylamine moiety of ladostigil confers neuroprotective activity against cytotoxicity induced by ischemia and peroxynitrite in cultured neuronal cells. The multi-target iron chelator M30 has all the

  15. Novel arylalkenylpropargylamines as neuroprotective, potent, and selective monoamine oxidase B inhibitors for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Huleatt, Paul B; Khoo, Mui Ling; Chua, Yi Yuan; Tan, Tiong Wei; Liew, Rou Shen; Balogh, Balázs; Deme, Ruth; Gölöncsér, Flóra; Magyar, Kalman; Sheela, David P; Ho, Han Kiat; Sperlágh, Beáta; Mátyus, Péter; Chai, Christina L L

    2015-02-12

    To develop novel neuroprotective agents, a library of novel arylalkenylpropargylamines was synthesized and tested for inhibitory activities against monoamine oxidases. From this, a number of highly potent and selective monoamine oxidase B inhibitors were identified. Selected compounds were also tested for neuroprotection in in vitro studies with PC-12 cells treated with 6-OHDA and rotenone, respectively. It was observed that some of the compounds tested yielded a marked increase in survival in PC-12 cells treated with the neurotoxins. This indicates that these propargylamines are able to confer protection against the effects of the toxins and may also be considered as novel disease-modifying anti-Parkinsonian agents, which are much needed for the therapy of Parkinson's disease.

  16. A bioinformatics insight to rhizobial globins: gene identification and mapping, polypeptide sequence and phenetic analysis, and protein modeling.

    PubMed

    Gesto-Borroto, Reinier; Sánchez-Sánchez, Miriam; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Globins (Glbs) are proteins widely distributed in organisms. Three evolutionary families have been identified in Glbs: the M, S and T Glb families. The M Glbs include flavohemoglobins (fHbs) and single-domain Glbs (SDgbs); the S Glbs include globin-coupled sensors (GCSs), protoglobins and sensor single domain globins, and the T Glbs include truncated Glbs (tHbs). Structurally, the M and S Glbs exhibit 3/3-folding whereas the T Glbs exhibit 2/2-folding. Glbs are widespread in bacteria, including several rhizobial genomes. However, only few rhizobial Glbs have been characterized. Hence, we characterized Glbs from 62 rhizobial genomes using bioinformatics methods such as data mining in databases, sequence alignment, phenogram construction and protein modeling. Also, we analyzed soluble extracts from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA38 and USDA58 by (reduced + carbon monoxide (CO) minus reduced) differential spectroscopy. Database searching showed that only fhb, sdgb, gcs and thb genes exist in the rhizobia analyzed in this work. Promoter analysis revealed that apparently several rhizobial glb genes are not regulated by a -10 promoter but might be regulated by -35 and Fnr (fumarate-nitrate reduction regulator)-like promoters. Mapping analysis revealed that rhizobial fhbs and thbs are flanked by a variety of genes whereas several rhizobial sdgbs and gcss are flanked by genes coding for proteins involved in the metabolism of nitrates and nitrites and chemotaxis, respectively. Phenetic analysis showed that rhizobial Glbs segregate into the M, S and T Glb families, while structural analysis showed that predicted rhizobial SDgbs and fHbs and GCSs globin domain and tHbs fold into the 3/3- and 2/2-folding, respectively. Spectra from B. japonicum USDA38 and USDA58 soluble extracts exhibited peaks and troughs characteristic of bacterial and vertebrate Glbs thus indicating that putative Glbs are synthesized in B. japonicum USDA38 and USDA58. PMID:26594329

  17. Genomic organization and differential signature of positive selection in the alpha and beta globin gene clusters in two cetacean species.

    PubMed

    Nery, Mariana F; Arroyo, José Ignacio; Opazo, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The hemoglobin of jawed vertebrates is a heterotetramer protein that contains two α- and two β-chains, which are encoded by members of α- and β-globin gene families. Given the hemoglobin role in mediating an adaptive response to chronic hypoxia, it is likely that this molecule may have experienced a selective pressure during the evolution of cetaceans, which have to deal with hypoxia tolerance during prolonged diving. This selective pressure could have generated a complex history of gene turnover in these clusters and/or changes in protein structure themselves. Accordingly, we aimed to characterize the genomic organization of α- and β-globin gene clusters in two cetacean species and to detect a possible role of positive selection on them using a phylogenetic framework. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogeny reconstructions revealed that both cetacean species had retained a similar complement of putatively functional genes. For the α-globin gene cluster, the killer whale presents a complement of genes composed of HBZ, HBK, and two functional copies of HBA and HBQ genes, whereas the dolphin possesses HBZ, HBK, HBA and HBQ genes, and one HBA pseudogene. For the β-globin gene cluster, both species retained a complement of four genes, two early expressed genes-HBE and HBH-and two adult expressed genes-HBD and HBB. Our natural selection analysis detected two positively selected sites in the HBB gene (56 and 62) and four in HBA (15, 21, 49, 120). Interestingly, only the genes that are expressed during the adulthood showed the signature of positive selection. PMID:24259315

  18. Genetic Heterogeneity of the β-Globin Gene in Various Geographic Populations of Yunnan in Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; He, Jing; Zeng, Xiao-Hong; Ge, Shi-Jun; Huang, Yu; Su, Jie; Ding, Xue-Mei; Yang, Ji-Qing; Cao, Yong-Jiu; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Ying-Hong; Zhu, Bao-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the geographic distribution of β-globin gene mutations in different ethnic groups in Yunnan province. Methods From 2004 to 2014, 1,441 subjects with hemoglobin disorders, identified by PCR-reverse dot blot and DNA sequencing, were studied according to ethnicity and geographic origin. Haplotypes were examined among 41 unrelated thalassemia chromosomes. Results Eighteen β-thalassemia mutations and seven hemoglobin variants were identified for 1,616 alleles in 22 different ethnic groups from all 16 prefecture-level divisions of Yunnan. The prevalence of β-thalassemia was heterogeneous and regionally specific. CD 41-42 (-TCTT) was the most prevalent mutation in the populations of northeastern Yunnan. CD 17 (A>T) was the most common mutation in the populations of southeastern Yunnan, especially for the Zhuang minority, whereas Hb E (CD 26, G>A) was the most prevalent mutation in populations of southwestern Yunnan, especially for the Dai minority. Among the seven types of haplotypes identified, CD 17 (A>T) was mainly linked to haplotype VII (+ - - - - - +) and IVS-II-654 (C>T) was only linked to haplotype I (+ - - - - + +). Conclusion Our data underline the heterogeneity of β-globin gene mutations in Yunnan. This distribution of β-globin mutations in the geographic regions and ethnic populations provided a detailed ethnic basis and evolutionary view of humans in southern China, which will be beneficial for genetic counseling and prevention strategies. PMID:25849334

  19. Sequential changes in chromatin structure during transcriptional activation in the beta globin LCR and its target gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kihoon; Kim, AeRi

    2010-09-01

    Chromatin structure is modulated during transcriptional activation. The changes include the association of transcriptional activators, formation of hypersensitive sites and covalent modifications of histones. To understand the order of the various changes accompanying transcriptional activation, we analyzed the mouse beta globin gene, which is transcriptionally inducible in erythroid MEL cells over a time course of HMBA treatment. Transcription of the globin genes requires the locus control region (LCR) consisting of several hypersensitive sites (HSs). Erythroid specific transcriptional activators such as NF-E2, GATA-1, TAL1 and EKLF were associated with the LCR in the uninduced state before transcriptional activation. The HSs of the LCR were formed in this state as revealed by high sensitivity to DNase I and MNase attack. However the binding of transcriptional activators and the depletion of histones were observed in the promoter of the beta globin gene only after transcriptional activation. In addition, various covalent histone modifications were sequentially detected in lysine residues of histone H3 during the activation. Acetylation of K9, K36 and K27 was notable in both LCR HSs and gene after induction but before transcriptional initiation. Inactive histone marks such as K9me2, K36me2 and K27me2 were removed coincident with transcriptional initiation in the gene region. Taken together, these results indicate that LCR has a substantially active structure in the uninduced state while transcriptional activation serially adds active marks, including histone modifications, and removes inactive marks in the target gene of the LCR.

  20. Strategy for a multicenter phase I clinical trial to evaluate globin gene transfer in beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, Michel; Rivière, Isabelle; Wang, Xiuyan; Boulad, Farid; Prockop, Susan; Giardina, Patricia; Maggio, Aurelio; Galanello, Renzo; Locatelli, Franco; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2010-08-01

    Globin gene transfer in autologous hematopoietic stem cells offers a potentially curative treatment option for patients suffering from beta-thalassemia major who lack an HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cell donor. Based on extensive preclinical investigation, we are initiating a phase I clinical trial using G-CSF mobilized, autologous CD34(+) cells transduced with a vector similar to the original TNS9 vector. Our first mobilizations in adult beta-thalassemic subjects have been well tolerated and yielded the required CD34(+) cell dose. To minimize toxicity to enrolled subjects, and in the absence of a demonstrated requirement for myeloablative conditioning, our trial will use a reduced intensity conditioning regimen. Because low vector titers may adversely affect efficacy and safety, we have focused on vector manufacturing processes. We are now in a position to transfer our globin lentiviral vectors in a clinically relevant dosage (averaging 0.8 vector copy per cell in bulk CD34(+) cells) and to supply clinical grade vector to collaborating centers in the U.S.A. and in Europe. We anticipate that the first U.S. trial of globin gene transfer will start in 2010.

  1. Pridopidine, a dopamine stabilizer, improves motor performance and shows neuroprotective effects in Huntington disease R6/2 mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Squitieri, Ferdinando; Di Pardo, Alba; Favellato, Mariagrazia; Amico, Enrico; Maglione, Vittorio; Frati, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder for which new treatments are urgently needed. Pridopidine is a new dopaminergic stabilizer, recently developed for the treatment of motor symptoms associated with HD. The therapeutic effect of pridopidine in patients with HD has been determined in two double-blind randomized clinical trials, however, whether pridopidine exerts neuroprotection remains to be addressed. The main goal of this study was to define the potential neuroprotective effect of pridopidine, in HD in vivo and in vitro models, thus providing evidence that might support a potential disease-modifying action of the drug and possibly clarifying other aspects of pridopidine mode-of-action. Our data corroborated the hypothesis of neuroprotective action of pridopidine in HD experimental models. Administration of pridopidine protected cells from apoptosis, and resulted in highly improved motor performance in R6/2 mice. The anti-apoptotic effect observed in the in vitro system highlighted neuroprotective properties of the drug, and advanced the idea of sigma-1-receptor as an additional molecular target implicated in the mechanism of action of pridopidine. Coherent with protective effects, pridopidine-mediated beneficial effects in R6/2 mice were associated with an increased expression of pro-survival and neurostimulatory molecules, such as brain derived neurotrophic factor and DARPP32, and with a reduction in the size of mHtt aggregates in striatal tissues. Taken together, these findings support the theory of pridopidine as molecule with disease-modifying properties in HD and advance the idea of a valuable therapeutic strategy for effectively treating the disease. PMID:26094900

  2. The proton permeability of self-assembled polymersomes and their neuroprotection by enhancing a neuroprotective peptide across the blood-brain barrier after modification with lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuan; Jiang, Xinguo; Gong, Shuyu; Feng, Liang; Zhong, Yanqiang; Pang, Zhiqing

    2014-03-21

    Biotherapeutics such as peptides possess strong potential for the treatment of intractable neurological disorders. However, because of their low stability and the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), biotherapeutics are difficult to transport into brain parenchyma via intravenous injection. Herein, we present a novel poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymersome-based nanomedicine with self-assembled bilayers, which was functionalized with lactoferrin (Lf-POS) to facilitate the transport of a neuroprotective peptide into the brain. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D*) of H(+) through the polymersome membrane was 5.659 × 10(-26) cm(2) s(-1), while that of liposomes was 1.017 × 10(-24) cm(2) s(-1). The stability of the polymersome membrane was much higher than that of liposomes. The uptake of polymersomes by mouse brain capillary endothelial cells proved that the optimal density of lactoferrin was 101 molecules per polymersome. Fluorescence imaging indicated that Lf101-POS was effectively transferred into the brain. In pharmacokinetics, compared with transferrin-modified polymersomes and cationic bovine serum albumin-modified polymersomes, Lf-POS obtained the greatest BBB permeability surface area and percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID per g). Furthermore, Lf-POS holding S14G-humanin protected against learning and memory impairment induced by amyloid-β25-35 in rats. Western blotting revealed that the nanomedicine provided neuroprotection against over-expression of apoptotic proteins exhibiting neurofibrillary tangle pathology in neurons. The results indicated that polymersomes can be exploited as a promising non-invasive nanomedicine capable of mediating peptide therapeutic delivery and controlling the release of drugs to the central nervous system.

  3. The proton permeability of self-assembled polymersomes and their neuroprotection by enhancing a neuroprotective peptide across the blood-brain barrier after modification with lactoferrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuan; Jiang, Xinguo; Gong, Shuyu; Feng, Liang; Zhong, Yanqiang; Pang, Zhiqing

    2014-02-01

    Biotherapeutics such as peptides possess strong potential for the treatment of intractable neurological disorders. However, because of their low stability and the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), biotherapeutics are difficult to transport into brain parenchyma via intravenous injection. Herein, we present a novel poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymersome-based nanomedicine with self-assembled bilayers, which was functionalized with lactoferrin (Lf-POS) to facilitate the transport of a neuroprotective peptide into the brain. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D*) of H+ through the polymersome membrane was 5.659 × 10-26 cm2 s-1, while that of liposomes was 1.017 × 10-24 cm2 s-1. The stability of the polymersome membrane was much higher than that of liposomes. The uptake of polymersomes by mouse brain capillary endothelial cells proved that the optimal density of lactoferrin was 101 molecules per polymersome. Fluorescence imaging indicated that Lf101-POS was effectively transferred into the brain. In pharmacokinetics, compared with transferrin-modified polymersomes and cationic bovine serum albumin-modified polymersomes, Lf-POS obtained the greatest BBB permeability surface area and percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID per g). Furthermore, Lf-POS holding S14G-humanin protected against learning and memory impairment induced by amyloid-β25-35 in rats. Western blotting revealed that the nanomedicine provided neuroprotection against over-expression of apoptotic proteins exhibiting neurofibrillary tangle pathology in neurons. The results indicated that polymersomes can be exploited as a promising non-invasive nanomedicine capable of mediating peptide therapeutic delivery and controlling the release of drugs to the central nervous system.

  4. Chaperone-mediated autophagy: roles in neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhibiao; Zeng, Weijun; Tao, Kai; E, Zhen; Wang, Bao; Yang, Qian

    2015-08-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), one of the main pathways of lysosomal proteolysis, is characterized by the selective targeting and direct translocation into the lysosomal lumen of substrate proteins containing a targeting motif biochemically related to the pentapeptide KFERQ. Along with the other two lysosomal pathways, macro- and micro-autophagy, CMA is essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival by selectively degrading misfolded, oxidized, or damaged cytosolic proteins. CMA plays an important role in pathologies such as cancer, kidney disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons are post-mitotic and highly susceptible to dysfunction of cellular quality-control systems. Maintaining a balance between protein synthesis and degradation is critical for neuronal functions and homeostasis. Recent studies have revealed several new mechanisms by which CMA protects neurons through regulating factors critical for their viability and homeostasis. In the current review, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the regulation and physiology of CMA with a specific focus on its possible roles in neuroprotection. PMID:26206599

  5. Neuroprotective effects of tetrandrine against vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yan-ling; Wu, Ze-zhi; Chen, Li-xue; Wu, Bai-xue; Chen, Lian-lian; Qin, Guang-cheng; Gui, Bei; Zhou, Ji-ying

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine is one of the major active ingredients in Menispermaceae Stephania tetrandra S. Moore, and has specific therapeutic effects in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Its use in vascular dementia has not been studied fully. Here, we investigated whether tetrandrine would improve behavioral and cellular impairments in a two-vessel occlusion rat model of chronic vascular dementia. Eight weeks after model establishment, rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 or 30 mg/kg tetrandrine every other day for 4 weeks. Behavioral assessment in the Morris water maze showed that model rats had longer escape latencies in training trials, and spent less time swimming in the target quadrant in probe trials, than sham-operated rats. However, rats that had received tetrandrine showed shorter escape latencies and longer target quadrant swimming time than untreated model rats. Hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining revealed less neuronal necrosis and pathological damage, and more living cells, in the hippocampus of rats treated with tetrandrine than in untreated model rats. Western blot assay showed that interleukin-1β expression, and phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate 2B receptor at tyrosine 1472, were lower in model rats that received tetrandrine than in those that did not. The present findings suggest that tetrandrine may be neuroprotective in chronic vascular dementia by reducing interleukin-1β expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B phosphorylation at tyrosine 1472, and neuronal necrosis. PMID:27127485

  6. ENDOCANNABINOID SIGNALING IN NEUROTOXICITY AND NEUROPROTECTION

    PubMed Central

    Pope, C.; Mechoulam, R.; Parsons, L.

    2010-01-01

    The cannabis plant and products produced from it, such as marijuana and hashish, have been used for centuries for their psychoactive properties. The mechanism for how Δ9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active constituent of cannabis, elicits these neurological effects remained elusive until relatively recently, when specific G-protein coupled receptors were discovered that appeared to mediate cellular actions of THC. Shortly after discovery of these specific receptors, endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) were identified. Since that time, an extensive number of papers have been published on the endocannabinoid signaling system, a widespread neuromodulatory mechanism that influences neurotransmission throughout the nervous system. This paper summarizes presentations given at the 12th International Neurotoxicology Association meeting that described the potential role of endocannabinoids in the expression of neurotoxicity. Dr. Raphael Mechoulam first gave an overview of the discovery of exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids and their potential for neuroprotection in a variety of conditions. Dr. Larry Parsons then described studies suggesting that endocannabinoid signaling may play a selective role in drug reinforcement. Dr. Carey Pope presented information on the role that endocannabinoid signaling may have in the expression of cholinergic toxicity following anticholinesterase exposures. Together, these presentations highlighted the diverse types of neurological insults that may be modulated by endocannabinoids and drugs/toxicants which might influence endocannabinoid signaling pathways. PMID:19969019

  7. Neuroprotective Activities of Saffron and Crocin.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Shinji; Aritake, Kosuke; Urade, Yoshihiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    We first considered that saffron is really safety food because it has a long-use history. The neuroprotective activities of saffron and its major constituent, crocin, are separately discussed in vitro and in vivo. We reviewed the inhibitory activities of crocin against PC-12 cell apoptosis. The oxidative stress decreased the cellular levels of glutathione (GSH) which is an inhibitor of neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase). Therefore, the level of GSH was assayed by the addition of crocin resulted in the activation of glutathione reductase (GR). It became evident that crocin treatment prevents the N-SMase activation resulting in the decrease of ceramide release. From these evidences we summarized the role of crocin for neuronal cell death. We used the ethanol-blocking assay system for learning and memory activities. The effect of saffron and crocin on improving ethanol-induced impairment of learning behaviors of mice in passive avoidance tasks has been clear. Further, we did make clear that saffron and crocin prevent the inhibitory effect of ethanol on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus. Finally we found that 100 mg/kg of crocin gave non-rapid eye movement sleep (non-REM sleep) although mice were started to be active during night time. PMID:27651258

  8. Neuroprotective effects of tetrandrine against vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yan-Ling; Wu, Ze-Zhi; Chen, Li-Xue; Wu, Bai-Xue; Chen, Lian-Lian; Qin, Guang-Cheng; Gui, Bei; Zhou, Ji-Ying

    2016-03-01

    Tetrandrine is one of the major active ingredients in Menispermaceae Stephania tetrandra S. Moore, and has specific therapeutic effects in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Its use in vascular dementia has not been studied fully. Here, we investigated whether tetrandrine would improve behavioral and cellular impairments in a two-vessel occlusion rat model of chronic vascular dementia. Eight weeks after model establishment, rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 or 30 mg/kg tetrandrine every other day for 4 weeks. Behavioral assessment in the Morris water maze showed that model rats had longer escape latencies in training trials, and spent less time swimming in the target quadrant in probe trials, than sham-operated rats. However, rats that had received tetrandrine showed shorter escape latencies and longer target quadrant swimming time than untreated model rats. Hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining revealed less neuronal necrosis and pathological damage, and more living cells, in the hippocampus of rats treated with tetrandrine than in untreated model rats. Western blot assay showed that interleukin-1β expression, and phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate 2B receptor at tyrosine 1472, were lower in model rats that received tetrandrine than in those that did not. The present findings suggest that tetrandrine may be neuroprotective in chronic vascular dementia by reducing interleukin-1β expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B phosphorylation at tyrosine 1472, and neuronal necrosis. PMID:27127485

  9. Neuroprotective properties of tianeptine: interactions with cytokines.

    PubMed

    Plaisant, F; Dommergues, M-A; Spedding, M; Cecchelli, R; Brillault, J; Kato, G; Muñoz, C; Gressens, P

    2003-05-01

    Tianeptine is an antidepressant with proven clinical efficacy and effects on hippocampal plasticity. Hypoxia increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from cortical neuronal cultures, and tianeptine (1, 10 and 100 microM) inhibited LDH release as efficiently as the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, MK-801. However, tianeptine did not block apoptosis in cultured cortical neurones caused by NMDA, but reduced apoptosis when interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) was included with NMDA. In 5-day old mice, intracerebral injection of ibotenate induced reproducible lesions in cortex and white matter. Lesion size was markedly reduced by co-administration of MK-801 (1 mg/kg i.p.) but neither by tianeptine or its enantiomers administered acutely (1, 3 or 10 mg/kg i.p.) nor by tianeptine administered chronically (10 mg/kg i.p. for 5 days). Chronic administration of IL-1beta (10 ng/kg i.p. for 5 days) prior to ibotenate injection exacerbated lesion size in cortex and white matter, and this exacerbation was prevented by chronic pre-treatment with tianeptine (10 mg/kg i.p.) or by acute administration of tianeptine (10 mg/kg i.p.) concomitantly with ibotenate. Thus tianeptine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia in tissue culture and against the deleterious effects of cytokines in cortex and white matter, but not against NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity.

  10. Neuroprotective strategies involving ROS in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Magali; Beal, M Flint

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which oxidative stress is a key hallmark. It occurs early in disease pathogenesis and can exacerbate its progression. Several causes of oxidative stress have been determined over the years. First, mitochondria play an important role in the generation and accumulation of free radicals. In addition to mitochondria, inflammation can also induce oxidative damage, especially via microglia, and microglia are also important for Aβ clearance. In AD, both mitochondrial function and inflammatory response are affected, leading to increased ROS formation and oxidative damage to lipid, proteins, and nucleic acids. Some other sources have also been identified. From these findings, various neuroprotective strategies against ROS-mediated damages have been elaborated in AD research. This review recapitulates some of the major strategies used to prevent oxidative stress and disease progression. Outcomes from in vitro and in vivo studies using models of AD are encouraging. However, only a few clinical trials have provided positive results in terms of slowing down cognitive decline. Nonetheless, there is still hope for improved compounds that would better target pathways implicated in ROS production. In fact, facilitating the endogenous antioxidant system by modulating transcription has great promise for AD therapy.

  11. Promises of novel multi-target neuroprotective and neurorestorative drugs for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Youdim, Moussa B H; Kupershmidt, Lana; Amit, Tamar; Weinreb, Orly

    2014-01-01

    The cascade of neurotoxic events involved in neuronal degeneration suggests that it is naive to think mono-target drugs can induce disease modification by slowing the process of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Employing the pharmacophore of rasagiline (N-propargyl-1-R-aminoindan), we have developed a series of novel multi-target neuroprotective drugs, including: (A) drugs [ladostigil, TV-3326 (N-propargyl-3R-aminoindan-5yl)-ethyl methylcarbamate)] with both cholinesterase-butyrylesterase (Ch-BuE) and brain-selective monamine oxidase-AB (MAO-AB) inhibitory activities and (B) iron chelator-radical scavenging drugs (M30) possessing brain-selective MAO-AB inhibitor activity and the neuroprotective-neurorescue propargylamine moiety of rasagiline. This was considered to be valid since brain MAO and iron increase in PD and aging, which could lead to oxidative stress-dependent neurodegeneration. The multi-target iron chelator, M30, has all the properties of ladostigil, but is not an acetylcholinesterase (CHE) inhibitor. However, M30 has both neuroprotective and neurorestorative activities for nigrostriatal dopamine neurons in post-lesion MPTP, lactacystin and 6-hydroxydopamine animal models of PD. The neurorestorative activity has been identified as being related to the ability of the drug to activate hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) by inhibiting prolyl-4-hydroxylase. M30 regulates cell cycle arrest and induces the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), erythropoietin (EPO), as well as glia-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). These unique multiple actions of M30 make it potentially useful as a disease modifying drug for the treatment of PD. PMID:24262165

  12. Globin's structure and function in vesicomyid bivalves from the Gulf of Guinea cold seeps as an adaptation to life in reduced sediments.

    PubMed

    Decker, C; Zorn, N; Potier, N; Leize-Wagner, E; Lallier, F H; Olu, K; Andersen, A C

    2014-01-01

    Vesicomyid bivalves form dense clam beds in both deep-sea cold seeps and hydrothermal vents. The species diversity within this family raises questions about niche separation and specific adaptations. To compare their abilities to withstand hypoxia, we have studied the structure and function of erythrocyte hemoglobin (Hb) and foot myoglobin (Mb) from two vesicomyid species, Christineconcha regab and Laubiericoncha chuni, collected from the Regab pockmark in the Gulf of Guinea at a depth of 3,000 m. Laubiericoncha chuni possesses three monomeric globins, G1 (15,361 Da), G2 (15,668 Da), and G3 (15,682 Da) in circulating erythrocytes (Hb), and also three globins, G1, G3, and G4 (14,786 Da) in foot muscle (Mb). Therefore, globins G2 and G4 appear to be specific for erythrocytes and muscle, respectively, but globins G1 and G3 are common. In contrast, C. regab lacks erythrocyte Hb completely and possesses only globin monomers G1' (14,941 Da), G2' (15,169 Da), and G3' (15,683 Da) in foot muscle. Thus, these two vesicomyid species, C. regab and L. chuni, show a remarkable diversity in globin expression when examined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Oxygen-binding affinities reveal extremely high oxygen affinities (P50 < 1 Torr, from 5° to 15°C at pH 7.5), in particular L. chuni globins, which might be an advantage allowing L. chuni to dig deeply for sulfides and remain buried for long periods in reduced sediments.

  13. Recent advances in globin research using genome-wide association studies and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-03-01

    A long-sought goal in the hemoglobin field has been an improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the switch from fetal (HbF) to adult (HbA) hemoglobin during development. With such knowledge, the hope is that strategies for directed reactivation of HbF in adults could be devised as an approach to therapy for the β-hemoglobinopathies thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to identification of three loci (BCL11A, HBS1L-MYB, and the β-globin cluster itself) in which natural genetic variation is correlated with different HbF levels in populations. Here, the central role of BCL11A in control of HbF is reviewed from the perspective of how findings may be translated to gene therapy in the not-too-distant future. This summary traces the evolution of recent studies from the initial recognition of BCL11A through GWAS to identification of critical sequences in an enhancer required for its erythroid-specific expression, thereby highlighting an Achilles heel for genome editing.

  14. Protection against telomeric position effects by the chicken cHS4 beta-globin insulator.

    PubMed

    Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2007-08-28

    Epigenetic silencing of genes relocated near telomeres, termed telomeric position effect, has been extensively studied in yeast and more recently in vertebrates. However, protection of a transgene against telomeric position effects by chromatin insulators has not yet been addressed. In this work we investigated the capacity of the chicken beta-globin insulator cHS4 to shield a transgene against silencing by telomeric heterochromatin. Using telomeric repeats, we targeted transgene integration into telomeres of the chicken cell line HD3. When the chicken cHS4 insulator is incorporated to the transgene, we observe a sustained gene expression of single-copy integrants that can be maintained for >100 days of continuous culture. However, uninsulated single-copy clones showed an accelerated gene expression extinction profile. Unexpectedly, telomeric silencing was not reversed with trichostatin A or nicotidamine. In contrast, significant reactivation was obtained with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, consistent with the subtelomeric DNA methylation status. Strikingly, insulated transgenes integrated into telomeric regions were enriched in histone methylation, such as H3K4me2 and H3K79me2, but not in histone acetylation. Furthermore, the cHS4 insulator counteracts telomeric position effects in an upstream stimulatory factor-independent manner. Our results suggest that this insulator has the capacity to adapt to different chromatin propagation signals in distinct insertional epigenome environments.

  15. Incidence of Alpha-Globin Gene Defect in the Lebanese Population: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Rose; Badra, Rebecca; el Rafei, Rym; Charafeddine, Lama

    2015-01-01

    Background. It is well established that the Mediterranean and Arab populations are at high risk for thalassemias in general and for alpha-thalassemia in particular. Yet, reports on alpha-thalassemia in Lebanon are still lacking. In this study, we aim at assessing the incidence of alpha-thalassemia in the Lebanese population. Methods. 230 newborns' dried blood cards remaining from routine neonatal screening at the American University of Beirut Medical Center were collected for DNA extraction. Samples were screened for the 21 most common α-globin deletions and point mutations reported worldwide, through multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Reverse-Hybridization technique. Results. Upon analyses, the carrier rate of α-thalassemia was found to be 8%. Two mutations detected the −α3,7 single gene deletion found in 75% of cases and the nongene deletion α2 IVS1 [−5nt] in the remaining samples. Conclusion. This study is the first dedicated to investigate α-thalassemia trait incidence in Lebanon. Data obtained demonstrates a high carrier rate in a relatively, highly consanguineous population; it also highlighted the presence of two common mutations. These results may be of an important impact on premarital and newborn screening policies in our country. PMID:25834820

  16. Spectrum of alpha-globin gene mutations among premarital Baluch couples in southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Miri-Moghaddam, Ebrahim; Nikravesh, Abass; Gasemzadeh, Negin; Badaksh, Mahin; Rakhshi, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alpha thalassemia (α-thal) is one of the most common hemoglobinopathies worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectrum of α-thal mutations among premarital Baluch couples in southeastern Iran. Subjects and Methods: We assessed 1215 individuals by multiplex gap polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR) and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS-PCR). Results: Of the 1215 participants with mean age of 23±5.7 years, 62.3% lived in urban areas, and the rate of consanguineous marriage was 68.1%. Five mutations were identified, the most frequent one was –α3.7 (rightward) with a frequency of 76.5%, followed by α−5 nt (16.8%), α2/ Codon 19(-G) (4%), –α4.2 (leftward)(2.4%), – –MED (0.3%) among mutated alleles of the α -globin gene. Conclusion : Knowing the alpha-genotype is helpful for genetic counseling, microcytic anemia discrimination and hemoglobinopathy prevention. PMID:26261699

  17. Limited proteolysis of myoglobin opens channel in ferrochelatase-globin complex for iron to zinc transmetallation.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Marcella O; Grossi, Alberto B; Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Borges, Julio C; Cardoso, Daniel R; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-11-01

    Recombinant ferrochelatase (BsFECH) from Bacillus subtilis expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) was found by UV-visible spectroscopy to bind the model substrate tetraphenylporphyrin-sulfonate, TPPS, with Ka=3.8 10(5)mol/L in aqueous phosphate buffer pH 5.7 at 30°C, and to interact with metmyoglobin with Ka=1.07±0.13 10(5)mol/L at 30°C. The iron/zinc exchange in myoglobin occurring during maturation of Parma hams seems to depend on such substrate binding to BsFECH and was facilitated by limited pepsin proteolysis of myoglobin to open a reaction channel for metal exchange still with BsFECH associated to globin. BsFECH increased rate of zinc insertion in TPPS significantly and showed saturation kinetics with an apparent binding constant of Zn(II) to the [enzyme-TPPS] complex of 1.3 10(4)mol/L and a first-order rate constant of 6.6 10(-1)s(-1) for dissociation of the tertiary complex, a similar pattern was found for zinc/iron transmetallation in myoglobin. PMID:27211675

  18. Involvement of ferryl in the reaction between nitrite and the oxy forms of globins.

    PubMed

    Hathazi, Denisa; Mahuţ, Sonia Diana; Scurtu, Florina-Violeta; Bischin, Cristina; Stanciu, Corina; Attia, Amr Ali; Damian, Grigore; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2014-10-01

    The reaction between nitrite and the oxy forms of globins has complex autocatalytic kinetics with several branching steps and evolves through chain reactions mediated by reactive species (including radicals) such as hydrogen peroxide, ferryl and nitrogen dioxide, starting with a lag phase, after which it proceeds onto an autocatalytic phase. Reported here are UV-Vis spectra collected upon stopped-flow mixing of myoglobin with a supraphysiological excess of nitrite. The best fit to the experimental data follows an A → B → C reaction scheme involving the formation of a short-lived intermediate identified as ferryl. This is consistent with a mechanism where nitrite binds to oxy myoglobin to generate an undetectable ferrous-peroxynitrate intermediate, whose decay leads to nitrate and ferryl. The ferryl is then reduced to met by the excess nitrite. DFT calculations reveal an essentially barrierless reaction between nitrite and the oxy heme, with a notable outer-sphere component; the resulting metastable ferrous-peroxynitrate adduct is found to feature a very low barrier towards nitrate liberation, with ferryl as a final product-in good agreement with experiment. PMID:25064750

  19. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. )

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  20. Novel technique for rapid detection of alpha-globin gene mutations and deletions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingzhong; Jia, Xingyuan; Tang, Ning; Zhang, Xu; Wu, Xiaoyi; Cai, Ren; Wang, Lirong; Liu, Quanzhang; Xiao, Bai; Zhu, Jim; Wang, Qingtao

    2010-03-01

    Populations in Southeast Asia and South China have high frequencies of alpha-thalassemia caused by alpha-globin gene mutations and/or deletions. This study was designed to find an efficient and simple diagnostic test for the mutations and deletions. A duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC) was used to detect the mutations and deletions. A blinded study of 110 samples, which included 92 alpha-thalassemia samples with various genotypes and 18 normal DNA samples, was carried out by the methods. The duplex PCR products of the sample with known Constand spring mutation (CS)/alphaalpha, Quonsze mutation (QS)/alphaalpha, and Weastmead mutation (WS)/alphaalpha DNA showed significantly different profiles, which suggests that DHPLC analysis at 63.8 degrees C can detect potential mutations directly. The DHPLC at 50 degrees C analysis can distinguish the --SEA and nondeletional alleles. The new assay is 100% concordant with the original genotype. In conclusion, the technique including the duplex PCR assay followed by DHPLC analysis can be used to diagnose alpha-thalassemia; this methodology is simple, rapid, accurate, semiautomatic, and high output, and thus, it is suitable for large-scale screening.

  1. High diversity of {alpha}-globin haplotypes in a senegalese population, including many previously unreported variants

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, J.J.; Swinburn, C.; Clegg, J.B.

    1995-11-01

    RFLP haplotypes at the {alpha}-globin gene complex have been examined in 190 individuals from the Niokolo Mandenka population of Senegal: haplotypes were assigned unambiguously for 210 chromosomes. The Mandenka share with other African populations a sample size-independent haplotype diversity that is much greater than that in any non-African population: the number of haplotypes observed in the Mandenka is typically twice that seen in the non-African populations sampled to date. Of these haplotypes, 17.3% had not been observed in any previous surveys, and a further 19.1% have previously been reported only in African populations. The haplotype distribution shows clear differences between African and non-African peoples, but this is on the basis of population-specific haplotypes combined with haplotypes common to all. The relationship of the newly reported haplotypes to those previously recorded suggests that several mutation processes, particularly recombination as homologous exchange or gene conversion, have been involved in their production. A computer program based on the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain maximum-likelihood estimates of haplotype frequencies for the entire data set: good concordance between the unambiguous and EM-derived sets was seen for the overall haplotype frequencies. Some of the low-frequency haplotypes reported by the estimation algorithm differ greatly, in structure, from those haplotypes known to be present in human populations, and they may not represent haplotypes actually present in the sample. 43 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. The Neuroprotective Functions of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Vincze, Csilla; Pál, Gabriella; Lovas, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) proteins are multifunctional cytokines whose neural functions are increasingly recognized. The machinery of TGF-β signaling, including the serine kinase type transmembrane receptors, is present in the central nervous system. However, the 3 mammalian TGF-β subtypes have distinct distributions in the brain suggesting different neural functions. Evidence of their involvement in the development and plasticity of the nervous system as well as their functions in peripheral organs suggested that they also exhibit neuroprotective functions. Indeed, TGF-β expression is induced following a variety of types of brain tissue injury. The neuroprotective function of TGF-βs is most established following brain ischemia. Damage in experimental animal models of global and focal ischemia was shown to be attenuated by TGF-βs. In addition, support for their neuroprotective actions following trauma, sclerosis multiplex, neurodegenerative diseases, infections, and brain tumors is also accumulating. The review will also describe the potential mechanisms of neuroprotection exerted by TGF-βs including anti-inflammatory, -apoptotic, -excitotoxic actions as well as the promotion of scar formation, angiogenesis, and neuroregeneration. The participation of these mechanisms in the neuroprotective effects of TGF-βs during different brain lesions will also be discussed. PMID:22942700

  3. Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Khan, Haseeb A.; Alhomida, Abdullah S.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is widely considered to be a neurovascular disease. This is in contrast to its previous identity as solely a vascular disease. Early in the disease progression of diabetes, the major cells in the neuronal component of the retina consist of retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, both of which have been found to be compromised. A number of retinal function tests also indicated a functional deficit in diabetic retina, which further supports dysfunction of neuronal cells. As an endocrinological disorder, diabetes alters metabolism both systemically and locally in several body organs, including the retina. A growing body of evidences indicates increased levels of excitotoxic metabolites, including glutamate, branched chain amino acids and homocysteine in cases of diabetic retinopathy. Also present, early in the disease, are decreased levels of folic acid and vitamin-B12, which are potential metabolites capable of damaging neurons. These altered levels of metabolites are found to activate several metabolic pathways, leading to increases in oxidative stress and decreases in the level of neurotrophic factors. As a consequence, they may damage retinal neurons in diabetic patients. In this review, we have discussed those potential excitotoxic metabolites and their implications in neuronal damage. Possible therapeutic targets to protect neurons are also discussed. However, further research is needed to understand the exact molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration so that effective neuroprotection strategies can be developed. By protecting retinal neurons early in diabetic retinopathy cases, damage of retinal vessels can be protected, thereby helping to ameliorate the progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. PMID:23358247

  4. Endocannabinoids in Synaptic Plasticity and Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-Yi; Chen, Chu

    2014-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in a variety of physiological, pharmacological, and pathological processes. While activation of the eCB system primarily induces inhibitory effects on both GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity through acting on presynaptically-expressed CB1 receptors in the brain, accumulated information suggests that eCB signaling is also capable of facilitating or potentiating excitatory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Recent studies show that a long-lasting potentiation of excitatory synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapses is induced by spatiotemporally primed inputs, accompanying with a long-term depression of inhibitory synaptic transmission (I-LTD) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. This input-timing-dependent long-lasting synaptic potentiation at SC-CA1 synapses is mediated by 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) signaling triggered by activation of postsynaptic NMDA receptors, group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and a concurrent rise in intracellular Ca2+. Emerging evidence now also indicates that 2-AG is an important signaling mediator keeping brain homeostasis by exerting its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in response to harmful insults through CB1/2 receptor-dependent and/or independent mechanisms. Activation of the nuclear receptor protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) apparently is one of the important mechanisms in resolving neuroinflammation and protecting neurons produced by 2-AG signaling. Thus, the information summarized in this review suggests that the role of eCB signaling in maintaining integrity of brain function is greater than what we thought previously. PMID:24571856

  5. Evolution of the sulfide-binding function within the globin multigenic family of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Xavier; Jollivet, Didier; Vanin, Stephano; Deutsch, Jean; Zal, Franck; Lallier, François; Toulmond, André

    2002-09-01

    The giant extracellular hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb) of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent tube worm Riftia pachyptila is able to transport simultaneously O(2) and H(2)S in the blood from the gills to a specific organ: the trophosome that harbors sulfide-oxidizing endosymbionts. This vascular HBL-Hb is made of 144 globins from which four globin types (A1, A2, B1, and B2) coevolve. The H(2)S is bound at a specific location (not on the heme site) onto two of these globin types. In order to understand how such a function emerged and evolved in vestimentiferans and other related annelids, six partial cDNAs corresponding to the six globins known to compose the multigenic family of R. pachyptila have been identified and sequenced. These partial sequences (ca. 120 amino acids, i.e., 80% of the entire protein) were used to reconstruct molecular phylogenies in order to trace duplication events that have led to the family organization of these globins and to locate the position of the free cysteine residues known to bind H(2)S. From these sequences, only two free cysteine residues have been found to occur, at positions Cys + 1 (i.e., 1 a.a. from the well-conserved distal histidine) and Cys + 11 (i.e., 11 a.a. from the same histidine) in globins B2 and A2, respectively. These two positions are well conserved in annelids, vestimentiferans, and pogonophorans, which live in sulfidic environments. The structural comparison of the hydrophobic environment that surrounds these cysteine residues (the sulfide-binding domain) using hydrophobic cluster analysis plots, together with the cysteine positions in paralogous strains, suggests that the sulfide-binding function might have emerged before the annelid radiation in order to detoxify this toxic compound. Moreover, globin evolutionary rates are highly different between paralogous strains. This suggests that either the two globin subfamilies involved in the sulfide-binding function (A2 and B2) have evolved under strong directional

  6. Meridianin derivatives as potent Dyrk1A inhibitors and neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rammohan R; Sharma, Sadhana; Joshi, Prashant; Wani, Abubakar; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Kumar, Ajay; Bharate, Sandip B

    2015-08-01

    Meridianins are a group of marine-derived indole alkaloids which are reported to possess kinase inhibitory activities. In the present Letter, we report synthesis of N1-substituted and C-ring modified meridianin derivatives and their evaluation as Dyrk1A inhibitors and neuroprotective agents. Among the library of 52 compounds screened, morpholinoyl linked derivative 26b and 2-nitro-4-trifluoromethyl phenyl sulfonyl derivative 29v displayed potent inhibition of Dyrk1A with IC50 values of 0.5 and 0.53 μM, respectively. The derivative 26b also inhibited Dyrk2 and Dyrk3 with IC50 values of 1.4 and 2.2 μM, respectively showing 2.2 and 4.4 fold selectivity for Dyrk1A with respect to Dyrk2 and Dyrk3. The compound 26b was not cytotoxic to human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells (IC50>100 μM) and it displayed significant neuroprotection against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in these cells at 10 μM. Molecular modelling studies of compound 26b led to identification of key interactions in the binding site of Dyrk1A and the possible reasons for observed Dyrk1A selectivity over Dyrk2. PMID:26048785

  7. [Joint locus of a/b-globin genes in Danio rerio is segregated into structural subdomains active at different stages of development].

    PubMed

    Dolgushin, K V; Petrova, N V; Iudinkova, E S; Razin, S V; Iarovaia, O V

    2015-01-01

    In the domain model of eukaryotic genome organization, the functional unit of the genome, along with the relevant regulatory elements, is considered to be a gene or a gene family. In hot-blooded vertebrate animals, the domains of a- and b-globin genes are positioned at different chromosomes and are organized and regulated in different fashion. In cold-blooded animals, in particular in tropical fish Danio rerio, a- and b globin genes are located in a common gene cluster. However, the joint a/b-globin gene cluster is subdivided into two development stage-specific subdomains, the adult one and the embryonic-larval one. In an attempt to find out whether this functional segregation correlates with structural segregation of the domain we compared the DNase I sensitivity and profiles of histone modifications of adult and embryonic-larval segments of the domain in cultured D. rerio fibroblasts. We have demonstrated that, in these nonerythroid cells, adult and embryonic- larval subdomains possess different DNase I sensitivities and different profiles of H3K27me3, a histone modification introduced by PRC2 complex. These observations suggest that joint a/b globin gene domain of Danio rerio is segregated into two structural subdomain harboring adult and embryonic-larval globin genes. PMID:26107904

  8. Identification of an immunogenic CD8+ T-cell epitope derived from γ-globin, a putative tumor-associated antigen for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Naoto; Butler, Marcus O.; Xia, Zhinan; Berezovskaya, Alla; Murray, Andrew P.; Ansén, Sascha; Kojima, Seiji; Nadler, Lee M.

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare clonal myeloproliferative disorder. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation can induce long-term remissions, relapse rates remain high and innovative approaches are needed. Since donor lymphocyte infusions have clinical activity in JMML, T-cell-mediated immunotherapy could provide a nonredundant treatment approach to compliment current therapies. γ-Globin, an oncofetal protein overexpressed by clonogenic JMML cells, may serve as a target of an antitumor immune response. We predicted 5 γ-globin-derived peptides as potential human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes and showed that 4 (g031, g071, g105, and g106) bind A2 molecules in vitro. Using an artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) that can process both the N- and C-termini of endogenously expressed proteins, we biochemically confirmed that g105 is naturally processed and presented by cell surface A2. Furthermore, g105-specific CD8+ CTLs generated from A2-positive healthy donors were able to specifically cytolyze γ-globin+, but not γ-globin- JMML cells in an A2-restricted manner. These results suggest that this aAPC-based approach enables the biochemical identification of CD8+ T-cell epitopes that are processed and presented by intact cells, and that CTL immunotherapy of JMML could be directed against the γ-globin-derived epitope g105. PMID:16778141

  9. Transcriptional activation of human adult alpha-globin genes by hypersensitive site-40 enhancer: function of nuclear factor-binding motifs occupied in erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rombel, I; Hu, K Y; Zhang, Q; Papayannopoulou, T; Stamatoyannopoulos, G; Shen, C K

    1995-01-01

    The developmental stage- and erythroid lineage-specific activation of the human embryonic zeta- and fetal/adult alpha-globin genes is controlled by an upstream regulatory element [hypersensitive site (HS)-40] with locus control region properties, a process mediated by multiple nuclear factor-DNA complexes. In vitro DNase I protection experiments of the two G+C-rich, adult alpha-globin promoters have revealed a number of binding sites for nuclear factors that are common to HeLa and K-562 extracts. However, genomic footprinting analysis has demonstrated that only a subset of these sites, clustered between -130 and +1, is occupied in an erythroid tissue-specific manner. The function of these in vivo-occupied motifs of the alpha-globin promoters, as well as those previously mapped in the HS-40 region, is assayed by site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression in embryonic/fetal erythroid K-562 cells. These studies, together with our expression data on the human embryonic zeta-globin promoter, provide a comprehensive view of the functional roles of individual nuclear factor-DNA complexes in the final stages of transcriptional activation of the human alpha-like globin promoters by the HS-40 element. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7604012

  10. Potential application of benzo(a)pyrene-associated adducts (globin or lipid) as blood biomarkers for target organ exposure and human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Kwack, Seung Jun; Kim, Dae Young; Kim, Yeon Joo; Roh, Tae Hyun; Choi, Seul Min; Lim, Duck Soo; Shin, Han-Seung; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the potential application of blood biomarkers as surrogate indicators of carcinogen-adduct formation in target-specific tissues, temporal formation of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)-associated DNA adducts, protein adducts, or lipid damage in target tissues such as lung, liver, and kidney was compared with globin adduct formation or plasma lipid damage in blood after continuous intraperitoneal (ip) injection of [(3)H]BaP into female ICR mice for 7 d. Following treatment with [(3)H]BaP, formation of [(3)H]BaP-DNA or -protein adducts in lung, liver, and kidney increased linearly, and persisted thereafter. This finding was similar to the observed effects on globin adduct formation and plasma lipid damage in blood. The lungs contained a higher level of DNA adducts than liver or kidneys during the treatment period. Further, the rate of cumulative adduct formation in lung was markedly greater than that in liver. Treatment with a single dose of [(3)H]BaP indicated that BaP-globin adduct formation and BaP-lipid damage in blood reached a peak 48 h after treatment. Overall, globin adduct formation and lipid damage in blood were significantly correlated with DNA adduct formation in the target tissues. These data suggest that peripheral blood biomarkers, such as BaP-globin adduct formation or BaP-lipid damage, may be useful for prediction of target tissue-specific DNA adduct formation, and for risk assessment after exposure. PMID:25343297

  11. A modified approach to identification of the sickle cell anemia mutation by means of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Birikh, K R; Plutalov, O V; Schwartz, E I; Devi, P S; Berlin, Y A

    1992-01-01

    The allele-specific PCR approach has been modified by introducing a second mismatch at the 3'-penultimate link of the primer and used to identify the sickle cell anemia mutation (A-->T transversion in the sixth codon of the human beta-globin gene causing Glu-->Val substitution in the protein), thus obviating the problem of an interpretationally ambiguous 3'-terminal mismatch including T residue. PMID:1301951

  12. A modified approach to identification of the sickle cell anemia mutation by means of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Birikh, K R; Plutalov, O V; Schwartz, E I; Devi, P S; Berlin, Y A

    1992-01-01

    The allele-specific PCR approach has been modified by introducing a second mismatch at the 3'-penultimate link of the primer and used to identify the sickle cell anemia mutation (A-->T transversion in the sixth codon of the human beta-globin gene causing Glu-->Val substitution in the protein), thus obviating the problem of an interpretationally ambiguous 3'-terminal mismatch including T residue.

  13. Using lithium as a neuroprotective agent in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Khasraw, Mustafa; Ashley, David; Wheeler, Greg; Berk, Michael

    2012-11-02

    Neurocognitive impairment is being increasingly recognized as an important issue in patients with cancer who develop cognitive difficulties either as part of direct or indirect involvement of the nervous system or as a consequence of either chemotherapy-related or radiotherapy-related complications. Brain radiotherapy in particular can lead to significant cognitive defects. Neurocognitive decline adversely affects quality of life, meaningful employment, and even simple daily activities. Neuroprotection may be a viable and realistic goal in preventing neurocognitive sequelae in these patients, especially in the setting of cranial irradiation. Lithium is an agent that has been in use for psychiatric disorders for decades, but recently there has been emerging evidence that it can have a neuroprotective effect.This review discusses neurocognitive impairment in patients with cancer and the potential for investigating the use of lithium as a neuroprotectant in such patients.

  14. Stepchild or Prodigy? Neuroprotection in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Research

    PubMed Central

    Rottlaender, Andrea; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) and characterized by the infiltration of immune cells, demyelination and axonal loss. Loss of axons and nerve fiber pathology are widely accepted as correlates of neurological disability. Hence, it is surprising that the development of neuroprotective therapies has been neglected for a long time. A reason for this could be the diversity of the underlying mechanisms, complex changes in nerve fiber pathology and the absence of biomarkers and tools to quantify neuroregenerative processes. Present therapeutic strategies are aimed at modulating or suppressing the immune response, but do not primarily attenuate axonal pathology. Yet, target-oriented neuroprotective strategies are essential for the treatment of MS, especially as severe damage of nerve fibers mostly occurs in the course of disease progression and cannot be impeded by immune modulatory drugs. This review shall depict the need for neuroprotective strategies and elucidate difficulties and opportunities. PMID:26140377

  15. A Potent Multi-functional Neuroprotective Derivative of Tetramethylpyrazine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Yun; Xu, Da-Ping; Tan, Guo-Lian; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Gao-Xiao; Cui, Wei; Wang, Jin-Zhao; Long, Cheng; Sun, Ye-Wei; Yu, Pei; Tsim, Karl Wahkeung; Zhang, Zai-Jun; Han, Yi-Fan; Wang, Yu-Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death among the elderly. Therapeutic approaches with a single target have proven unsuccessful in treating these diseases. Structural combination of multi-functional compounds may lead to a molecule with multiple properties. In this study, we designed and synthesized T-006, a novel analog derived from two multi-functional neuroprotective chemicals, tetramethylpyrazine and J147. The methoxyphenyl group of J147 was replaced by tetramethylpyrazine. Bioactivity evaluation showed that T-006 at very low concentrations had multi-functional neuroprotective effects including rescuing iodoacetic acid-induced neuronal loss, preventing oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity and reducing glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in vitro. Most importantly, T-006 significantly ameliorated memory impairments in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. These multiple functions of a single molecule suggest that T-006 is a promising novel neuroprotective agent for treating various neurodegenerative disorders, including and in particular Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25982925

  16. Oxaloacetate: a novel neuroprotective for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Sobrino, Tomás; Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Castillo, José

    2012-02-01

    It is well established that glutamate acts as an important mediator of neuronal degeneration during cerebral ischemia. Different kind of glutamate antagonists have been used to reduce the deleterious effects of glutamate. However, their preclinical success failed to translate into practical treatments. Far from the classical use of glutamate antagonists employed so far, the systemic administration of oxaloacetate represents a novel neuroprotective strategy to minimize the deleterious effect of glutamate in the brain tissue after ischemic stroke. The neuroprotective effect of oxaloacetate is based on the capacity of this molecule to reduce the brain and blood glutamate levels as a result of the activation of the blood-resident enzyme glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase. Here we review the recent experimental and clinical results where it is demonstrated the potential applicability of oxaloacetate as a novel and powerful neuroprotective treatment against ischemic stroke.

  17. Neuroprotective Effects of Intravenous Anesthetics: A New Critical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bilotta, Federico; Stazi, Elisabetta; Zlotnik, Alexander; Gruenbaum, Shaun E.; Rosa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative cerebral damage can result in various clinical sequela ranging from minor neurocognitive deficits to catastrophic neurological morbidity with permanent impairment and death. The goal of neuroprotective treatments is to reduce the clinical effects of cerebral damage through two major mechanisms: increased tolerance of neurological tissue to ischemia and changes in intra-cellular responses to energy supply deprivation. In this review, we present the clinical evidence of intravenous anesthetics on perioperative neuroprotection, and we also provide a critical perspective for future studies. The neuroprotective efficacy of the intravenous anesthetics thiopental, propofol and etomidate is unproven. Lidocaine may be neuroprotective in non-diabetic patients who have undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP) or with a 48-hour infusion, but conclusive data are lacking. There are several limitations of clinical studies that evaluate postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), including difficulties in identifying patients at high-risk and a lack of consensus for defining the “gold-standard” neuropsychological testing. Although a battery of neurocognitive tests remains the primary method for diagnosing POCD, recent evidence suggests a role for novel biomarkers and neuroimaging to preemptively identify patients more susceptible to cognitive decline in the perioperative period. Current evidence, while inconclusive, suggest that intravenous anesthetics may be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic in the perioperative period. A critical analysis on data recorded from randomized control trials (RCTs) is essential in identifying patients who may benefit or be harmed by a particular anesthetic. RCTs will also contribute to defining methodologies for future studies on the neuroprotective effects of intravenous anesthetics. PMID:24669972

  18. Neuroprotective gases--fantasy or reality for clinical use?

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiao; Lei, Chong; Chen, Yu; Fang, Zongping; Yang, Qianzi; Zhang, Haopeng; Cai, Min; Shi, Likai; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2014-04-01

    The neuroprotective properties for certain medical gases have been observed for decades, leading to extensive research that has been widely reported and continues to garner interest. Common gases including oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitric oxide, volatile anesthetics such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane, enflurane and desflurane, non-volatile anesthetics such as xenon and nitrous oxide, inert gases such as helium and argon, and even gases classically considered to be toxic (e.g., hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide) have all been supported by the evidence alluding to their use as potential neuroprotective agents. A wide range of neural injury types such as ischemic/hemorrhagic, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries, neurodegenerative disease as well as spinal cord ischemia have been used as platforms for studying the neuroprotective effects of these gases, yet until now, none of the gases has been widely introduced into clinical use specifically for protection against neural injury. Insufficient clinical data together with contradictory paradigms and results further hinders the clinical trials. However, pre-clinical models suggest that despite the various classes of gases and the broad range of injuries to which medical gases confer, protection, several underlying mechanisms for their neuroprotective properties are similar. In this review, we summarize the literature concerning the neuroprotective effect of each gas and its underlying mechanisms, extract common targets reported for the neuroprotective effects of different gases, highlight the conflicting observations from clinical trials and further discuss the possible hindrances impeding clinical applications in order to propose future research perspectives and therapeutic exploitations. PMID:24440817

  19. Isolation and neuroprotective activities of acylated iridoids from Valeriana jatamansi.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Guo, Yuanqiang; Xie, Chunfeng; Jin, Da-Qing; Gao, Jie; Gui, Liping

    2012-07-01

    Three new iridoids, jatairidoids A-C (1-3, resp.), have been isolated from the roots of Valeriana jatamansi (V. wallichii). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (IR, ESI-MS, HR-ESI-MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR). Compounds 1 and 2 are C(3)-epimers. The three compounds were evaluated for their neuroprotective effects against MPP(+)-induced neuronal cell death in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. All the isolates exhibited moderate neuroprotective effects.

  20. [Neuroprotection by noble gases: New developments and insights].

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, A V; Rossaint, R; Coburn, M

    2015-11-01

    Noble gases are chemically inert elements, some of which exert biological activity. Experimental neuroprotection in particular has been widely shown for xenon, argon and helium. The underlying mechanisms of action are not yet fully understood. Besides an interference with neuronal ion-gated channels and cellular signaling pathways as well as anti-apoptotic effects, the modulation of neuroinflammation seems to play a crucial role. This review presents the current knowledge on neuroprotection by noble gases with a focus on interactions with the neuronal-glial network and neuroinflammation and the perspectives on clinical applications. PMID:26329914

  1. Neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Selvaraju; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Adawi, Samir; Memon, Mushtaq A.; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Akbar, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical research has demonstrated that berry fruits can prevent age-related neurodegenerative diseases and improve motor and cognitive functions. The berry fruits are also capable of modulating signaling pathways involved in inflammation, cell survival, neurotransmission and enhancing neuroplasticity. The neuroprotective effects of berry fruits on neurodegenerative diseases are related to phytochemicals such as anthocyanin, caffeic acid, catechin, quercetin, kaempferol and tannin. In this review, we made an attempt to clearly describe the beneficial effects of various types of berries as promising neuroprotective agents. PMID:25317174

  2. Human alpha2-globin nonsense-mediated mRNA decay induced by a novel alpha-thalassaemia frameshift mutation at codon 22.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco J C; do Céu Silva, Maria; Picanço, Isabel; Seixas, Maria T; Ferrão, Anabela; Faustino, Paula; Romão, Luísa

    2006-04-01

    We describe a novel alpha-thalassaemia determinant in a 3-year-old girl presenting a mild microcytic and hypochromic anaemia, and normal haemoglobin A2 level. Molecular studies revealed heterozygosity for a novel microdeletion (-C) at codon 22 of the alpha2-globin gene. As the frameshift mutation generates a premature translation termination codon at position 48/49, we investigated the effect of the nonsense codon on the alpha2-globin gene expression. Although it does not affect RNA splicing, the premature nonsense codon induces accelerated mRNA degradation. To our knowledge, this is the first time the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay has been reported to occur in human alpha-globin mRNA.

  3. Clinical features and molecular analysis of the alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndromes. II. Cases without detectable abnormality of the alpha globin complex.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O; Zeitlin, H C; Lindenbaum, R H; Buckle, V J; Fischel-Ghodsian, N; Chui, D H; Gardner-Medwin, D; MacGillivray, M H; Weatherall, D J; Higgs, D R

    1990-01-01

    We have identified five unrelated patients, all of north European origin, who have hemoglobin H (Hb H) disease and profound mental handicap. Surprisingly, detailed molecular analysis of the alpha globin complex is normal in these subjects. Clinically, they present with a rather uniform constellation of abnormalities, notably severe mental handicap, microcephaly, relative hypertelorism, unusual facies and genital anomalies. Hematologically, their Hb H disease has subtly but distinctly milder properties than the recognized Mendelian forms of the disease. These common features suggest that these five "nondeletion" patients have a similar underlying mutation, quite distinct from the 16p13.3 deletion associated with alpha thalassemia and mild to moderate mental retardation described in the accompanying paper. We speculate that the locus of this underlying mutation is not closely linked to the alpha globin complex and may encode a trans-acting factor involved in the normal regulation of alpha globin expression. Images p[1130]-a Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:2339705

  4. Neuroprotective peptides fused to arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides: Neuroprotective mechanism likely mediated by peptide endocytic properties.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Bruno P; Milani, Diego; Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; O'Hare Doig, Ryan L; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Palmer, T Norman; Knuckey, Neville W

    2015-09-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that TAT and other arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have intrinsic neuroprotective properties in their own right. Examples, we have demonstrated that in addition to TAT, poly-arginine peptides (R8 to R18; containing 8-18 arginine residues) as well as some other arginine-rich peptides are neuroprotective in vitro (in neurons exposed to glutamic acid excitotoxicity and oxygen glucose deprivation) and in the case of R9 in vivo (after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat). Based on several lines of evidence, we propose that this neuroprotection is related to the peptide's endocytosis-inducing properties, with peptide charge and arginine residues being critical factors. Specifically, we propose that during peptide endocytosis neuronal cell surface structures such as ion channels and transporters are internalised, thereby reducing calcium influx associated with excitotoxicity and other receptor-mediated neurodamaging signalling pathways. We also hypothesise that a peptide cargo can act synergistically with TAT and other arginine-rich CPPs due to potentiation of the CPPs endocytic traits rather than by the cargo-peptide acting directly on its supposedly intended intracellular target. In this review, we systematically consider a number of studies that have used CPPs to deliver neuroprotective peptides to the central nervous system (CNS) following stroke and other neurological disorders. Consequently, we critically review evidence that supports our hypothesis that neuroprotection is mediated by carrier peptide endocytosis. In conclusion, we believe that there are strong grounds to regard arginine-rich peptides as a new class of neuroprotective molecules for the treatment of a range of neurological disorders.

  5. Stepwise colonization of the Andes by ruddy ducks and the evolution of novel β-globin variants.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Fuentes, V; Cortázar-Chinarro, M; Lozano-Jaramillo, M; McCracken, K G

    2013-03-01

    Andean uplift played a key role in Neotropical bird diversification, yet past dispersal and genetic adaptation to high-altitude environments remain little understood. Here we use multilocus population genetics to study population history and historical demographic processes in the ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), a stiff-tailed diving duck comprising three subspecies distributed from Canada to Tierra del Fuego and inhabiting wetlands from sea level to 4500 m in the Andes. We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA, four autosomal introns and three haemoglobin genes (α(A), α(D), β(A)) and used isolation-with-migration (IM) models to study gene flow between North America and South America, and between the tropical and southern Andes. Our analyses indicated that ruddy ducks dispersed first from North America to the tropical Andes, then from the tropical Andes to the southern Andes. While no nonsynonymous substitutions were found in either α globin gene, three amino acid substitutions were observed in the β(A) globin. Based on phylogenetic reconstruction and power analysis, the first β(A) substitution, found in all Andean individuals, was acquired when ruddy ducks dispersed from low altitude in North America to high altitude in the tropical Andes, whereas the two additional substitutions occurred more recently, when ruddy ducks dispersed from high altitude in the tropical Andes to low altitude in the southern Andes. This stepwise colonization pattern accompanied by polarized β(A) globin amino acid replacements suggest that ruddy ducks first acclimatized or adapted to the Andean highlands and then again to the lowlands. In addition, ruddy ducks colonized the Andean highlands via a less common route as compared to other waterbird species that colonized the Andes northwards from the southern cone of South America. PMID:23346994

  6. Origin and Ascendancy of a Chimeric Fusion Gene: The β/δ-Globin Gene of Paenungulate Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Sloan, Angela M.; Campbell, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    The δ-globin gene (HBD) of eutherian mammals exhibits a propensity for recombinational exchange with the closely linked β-globin gene (HBB) and has been independently converted by the HBB gene in multiple lineages. Here we report the presence of a chimeric β/δ fusion gene in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) that was created by unequal crossing-over between misaligned HBD and HBB paralogs. The recombinant chromosome that harbors the β/δ fusion gene in elephants is structurally similar to the “anti-Lepore” duplication mutant of humans (the reciprocal exchange product of the hemoglobin Lepore deletion mutant). However, the situation in the African elephant is unique in that the chimeric β/δ fusion gene supplanted the parental HBB gene and is therefore solely responsible for synthesizing the β-chain subunits of adult hemoglobin. A phylogenetic survey of β-like globin genes in afrotherian and xenarthran mammals revealed that the origin of the chimeric β/δ fusion gene and the concomitant inactivation of the HBB gene predated the radiation of “Paenungulata,” a clade of afrotherian mammals that includes three orders: Proboscidea (elephants), Sirenia (dugongs and manatees), and Hyracoidea (hyraxes). The reduced fitness of the human Hb Lepore deletion mutant helps to explain why independently derived β/δ fusion genes (which occur on an anti-Lepore chromosome) have been fixed in a number of mammalian lineages, whereas the reciprocal δ/β fusion gene (which occurs on a Lepore chromosome) has yet to be documented in any nonhuman mammal. This illustrates how the evolutionary fates of chimeric fusion genes can be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin. PMID:19332641

  7. Molecular cloning of the alpha-globin transcription factor CP2.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, L C; Swendeman, S L; Sheffery, M

    1992-01-01

    CP2, a transcription factor that binds the murine alpha-globin promoter, was purified and subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. Oligonucleotide primers derived from the sequence were used to obtain murine and human cDNA clones for the factor. The murine cDNA spans approximately 4 kb and contains two coextensive open reading frames (ORFs) which encode deduced polypeptides of 529 (ORF-1; molecular weight, 59,802) and 502 (ORF-2; molecular weight, 56,957) amino acids, slightly smaller than the purified factor as estimated from its mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels (64,000 to 66,000). The human cDNA contains a single ORF of 501 amino acids that is nearly contiguous with murine ORF-2. Indeed, comparison of deduced human and murine amino acid sequences shows that the two polypeptides are 96.4% identical. A strictly conserved region is rich in serine and threonine (17.5%) and in proline (11%) residues (S-T-P domain). This S-T-P domain is immediately amino terminal to a string of 10 glutamines (in the human sequence) or a tract of alternating glutamine and proline residues (in the mouse sequence). Bacterial expression of the full-length (502-amino-acid) murine factor or of a core region comprising amino acids 133 to 395 generated polypeptides with the DNA binding specificity of CP2. These results confirmed the cloning of CP2 and delimited the region sufficient for specific DNA sequence recognition. Antisera produced against the core region recognized polypeptide species with Mrs of 64,000 and 66,000 in immune blots of nuclear extracts prepared from both murine and human cell lines, consistent with the size of the purified factor. Lastly, a data base search revealed that amino acids 63 to 270 of the murine factor are distantly related to a domain in the Drosophila gene regulatory factor Elf-1. Images PMID:1732747

  8. Established epigenetic modifications determine the expression of developmentally regulated globin genes in somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Stanworth, S J; Roberts, N A; Sharpe, J A; Sloane-Stanley, J A; Wood, W G

    1995-01-01

    Somatic cell hybrids generated from transgenic mouse cells have been used to examine the developmental regulation of human gamma-to-beta-globin gene switching. In hybrids between mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells and transgenic erythroblasts taken at various stages of development, there was regulated expression of the human fetal gamma and adult beta genes, reproducing the in vivo pattern prior to fusion. Hybrids formed from embryonic blood cells produced predominantly gamma mRNA, whereas beta gene expression was observed in adult hybrids and a complete range of intermediate patterns was found in fetal liver hybrids. The adult environment of the MEL cells, therefore, did not appear to influence selective transcription from this gene complex. Irradiation of the embryonic erythroid cells prior to fusion resulted in hybrids containing only small fragments of donor chromosomes, but the pattern of gene expression did not differ from that of unirradiated hybrids. This finding suggests that continued expression of trans-acting factors from the donor erythroblasts is not necessary for continued expression of the human gamma gene in MEL cells. These results contrast with the lack of developmental regulation of the cluster after transfection of naked DNA into MEL cells and suggest that epigenetic processes established during normal development result in the gene cluster adopting a developmental stage-specific, stable conformation which is maintained through multiple rounds of replication and transcription in the MEL cell hybrids. On prolonged culture, hybrids that initially expressed only the gamma transgene switched to beta gene expression. The time period of switching, from approximately 10 to > 40 weeks, was similar to that seen previously in human fetal erythroblast x MEL cell hybrids but in this case bore no relationship to the time of in vivo switching. It seems unlikely, therefore, that switching in these hybrids is regulated by a developmental clock. PMID:7623793

  9. Haptoglobin Binding Stabilizes Hemoglobin Ferryl Iron and the Globin Radical on Tyrosine β145

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, Dominik J.; Buehler, Paul W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Silkstone, Gary; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Bulow, Leif; Alayash, Abdu I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Hemoglobin (Hb) becomes toxic when released from the erythrocyte. The acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp) binds avidly to Hb and decreases oxidative damage to Hb itself and to the surrounding proteins and lipids. However, the molecular mechanism underpinning Hp protection is to date unclear. The aim of this study was to use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, stopped flow optical spectrophotometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to explore the mechanism and specifically the role of specific tyrosine residues in this protection. Results: Following peroxide challenge Hb produces reactive oxidative intermediates in the form of ferryl heme and globin free radicals. Hp binding increases the steady state level of ferryl formation during Hb-catalyzed lipid peroxidation, while at the same time dramatically inhibiting the overall reaction rate. This enhanced ferryl stability is also seen in the absence of lipids and in the presence of external reductants. Hp binding is not accompanied by a decrease in the pK of ferryl protonation; the protonated ferryl species still forms, but is intrinsically less reactive. Ferryl stabilization is accompanied by a significant increase in the concentration of the peroxide-induced tyrosine free radical. EPR spectral parameters and mutagenesis studies suggest that this radical is located on tyrosine 145, the penultimate C-terminal amino acid on the beta Hb subunit. Innovation: Hp binding decreases both the ferryl iron and free radical reactivity of Hb. Conclusion: Hp protects against Hb-induced damage in the vasculature, not by preventing the primary reactivity of heme oxidants, but by rendering the resultant protein products less damaging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2264–2273. PMID:22702311

  10. Towards a "Golden Standard" for computing globin stability: Stability and structure sensitivity of myoglobin mutants.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-10-01

    Fast and accurate computation of protein stability is increasingly important for e.g. protein engineering and protein misfolding diseases, but no consensus methods exist for important proteins such as globins, and performance may depend on the type of structural input given. This paper reports benchmarking of six protein stability calculators (POPMUSIC 2.1, I-Mutant 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0, CUPSAT, SDM, and mCSM) against 134 experimental stability changes for mutations of sperm-whale myoglobin. Six different high-resolution structures were used to test structure sensitivity that may impair protein calculations. The trend accuracy of the methods decreased as I-Mutant 2.0 (R=0.64-0.65), SDM (R=0.57-0.60), POPMUSIC2.1 (R=0.54-0.57), I-Mutant 3.0 (R=0.53-0.55), mCSM (R=0.35-0.47), and CUPSAT (R=0.25-0.48). The mean signed errors increased as SDM

  11. Towards a "Golden Standard" for computing globin stability: Stability and structure sensitivity of myoglobin mutants.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-10-01

    Fast and accurate computation of protein stability is increasingly important for e.g. protein engineering and protein misfolding diseases, but no consensus methods exist for important proteins such as globins, and performance may depend on the type of structural input given. This paper reports benchmarking of six protein stability calculators (POPMUSIC 2.1, I-Mutant 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0, CUPSAT, SDM, and mCSM) against 134 experimental stability changes for mutations of sperm-whale myoglobin. Six different high-resolution structures were used to test structure sensitivity that may impair protein calculations. The trend accuracy of the methods decreased as I-Mutant 2.0 (R=0.64-0.65), SDM (R=0.57-0.60), POPMUSIC2.1 (R=0.54-0.57), I-Mutant 3.0 (R=0.53-0.55), mCSM (R=0.35-0.47), and CUPSAT (R=0.25-0.48). The mean signed errors increased as SDM

  12. Biochemical characterization and ligand binding properties of neuroglobin, a novel member of the globin family.

    PubMed

    Dewilde, S; Kiger, L; Burmester, T; Hankeln, T; Baudin-Creuza, V; Aerts, T; Marden, M C; Caubergs, R; Moens, L

    2001-10-19

    Neuroglobin is a recently discovered member of the globin superfamily that is suggested to enhance the O(2) supply of the vertebrate brain. Spectral measurements with human and mouse recombinant neuroglobin provide evidence for a hexacoordinated deoxy ferrous (Fe(2+)) form, indicating a His-Fe(2+)-His binding scheme. O(2) or CO can displace the endogenous protein ligand, which is identified as the distal histidine by mutagenesis. The ferric (Fe(3+)) form of neuroglobin is also hexacoordinated with the protein ligand E7-His and does not exhibit pH dependence. Flash photolysis studies show a high recombination rate (k(on)) and a slow dissociation rate (k(off)) for both O(2) and CO, indicating a high intrinsic affinity for these ligands. However, because the rate-limiting step in ligand combination with the deoxy hexacoordinated form involves the dissociation of the protein ligand, O(2) and CO binding is suggested to be slow in vivo. Because of this competition, the observed O(2) affinity of recombinant human neuroglobin is average (1 torr at 37 degrees C). Neuroglobin has a high autoxidation rate, resulting in an oxidation at 37 degrees C by air within a few minutes. The oxidation/reduction potential of mouse neuroglobin (E'(o) = -129 mV) lies within the physiological range. Under natural conditions, recombinant mouse neuroglobin occurs as a monomer with disulfide-dependent formation of dimers. The biochemical and kinetic characteristics are discussed in view of the possible functions of neuroglobin in the vertebrate brain. PMID:11473128

  13. Discovery of KLS-13019, a Cannabidiol-Derived Neuroprotective Agent, with Improved Potency, Safety, and Permeability.

    PubMed

    Kinney, William A; McDonnell, Mark E; Zhong, Hua Marlon; Liu, Chaomin; Yang, Lanyi; Ling, Wei; Qian, Tao; Chen, Yu; Cai, Zhijie; Petkanas, Dean; Brenneman, Douglas E

    2016-04-14

    Cannabidiol is the nonpsychoactive natural component of C. sativa that has been shown to be neuroprotective in multiple animal models. Our interest is to advance a therapeutic candidate for the orphan indication hepatic encephalopathy (HE). HE is a serious neurological disorder that occurs in patients with cirrhosis or liver failure. Although cannabidiol is effective in models of HE, it has limitations in terms of safety and oral bioavailability. Herein, we describe a series of side chain modified resorcinols that were designed for greater hydrophilicity and "drug likeness", while varying hydrogen bond donors, acceptors, architecture, basicity, neutrality, acidity, and polar surface area within the pendent group. Our primary screen evaluated the ability of the test agents to prevent damage to hippocampal neurons induced by ammonium acetate and ethanol at clinically relevant concentrations. Notably, KLS-13019 was 50-fold more potent and >400-fold safer than cannabidiol and exhibited an in vitro profile consistent with improved oral bioavailability. PMID:27096053

  14. Dynamics of α-globin locus chromatin structure and gene expression during erythroid differentiation of human CD34+ cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Milind C; Karmakar, Subhradip; Krause, Diane; Weissman, Sherman M

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study has been to establish serum free culture conditions for the ex vivo expansion and differentiation of human CD34+ cells into erythroid lineage and to study the chromatin structure, gene expression and transcription factor recruitment at the α–globin locus in the developing erythron. Methods A basal IMDM cell culture medium with 1% bovine serum albumin as a serum replacement and a combination of cytokines and growth factors was used for the expansion and differentiation of the CD34+ cells. Expression patterns of the alpha and beta like genes at various stages of erythropoiesis was studied by Reverse transcriptase (RT)-qPCR analysis, profile of key erythroid transcription factors was investigated by western blotting, and the chromatin structure and transcription factor recruitment at the alpha globin locus was investigated by ChIP-qPCR analysis. Results Human CD34+ cells in the serum free medium undergo near synchronous erythroid differentiation to yield large amount of cells at different differentiation stages. We observe distinct patterns of the histone modifications and transcription factor binding at the α-globin locus during erythroid differentiation of CD34+ cells. NF-E2 was present at upstream activator sites even before addition of erythropoietin (Epo), while bound GATA-1 was only detectable after Epo treatment. After seven days of erythropoietin treatment, H3K4Me2 modification uniformly increases throughout the α–globin locus. Acetylation at H3K9 and binding of Pol II, NF-E2 and GATA-1 were restricted to certain HS sites of the enhancer and theta gene, and were conspicuously low at the α-like globin promoters. Rearrangement of the insulator binding factor CTCF took place at and around the α-globin locus as CD34+ cells differentiated into erythroid pathway. Conclusion Our results indicate that remodeling of the upstream elements may be the primary event in activation of α–globin gene expression. Activation of

  15. A New δ-Globin Gene Variant: Hb A2-Fengshun [δ121(GH4)Glu→Lys (HBD: c.364G > A)].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin-Mei; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Xie, Xing-Mei; Li, Jian; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2016-06-01

    An elevated Hb A2 (α2δ2 level) is a diagnostic marker for heterozygous β-thalassemia (β-thal). Mutations in the δ-globin gene can cause decreased expression of Hb A2, compromising screening for heterozygous β-thal. In this report, we describe a novel missense mutation of the δ-globin [Hb A2-Fengshun or δ121(GH4)Glu→Lys, HBD: c.364G > A] in a Chinese individual who had coinherited a heterozygous β-thal with a normal Hb A2 level. PMID:27117573

  16. Hb Filottrano [codon 120 (-A)]: a novel frameshift mutation in exon 3 of the β-globin gene causing dominantly inherited β-thalassemia intermedia.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonio; Cappabianca, Maria Pia; Perri, Maria; Zaghis, Ivo; Mastropietro, Fabrizio; Ponzini, Donatella; Di Biagio, Paola; Piscitelli, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel frameshift mutation in exon 3 of the β-globin gene, that, in the heterozygous state, leads to a β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) phenotype (marked anemia, splenomegaly, hyperbilirubinemia, jaundice, unbalanced synthesis of α/non-α chains in a 34-year-old Italian woman. This frameshift mutation, due to the deletion of the first nucleotide (-A) at codon 120, results in a β-globin chain that is elongated to 156 amino acid residues. These highly unstable abnormal chains precipitate in the erythroblasts as inclusion bodies, thus causing inefficient erythropoiesis and ultimately resulting in the observed dominant clinical phenotype.

  17. A novel δ-globin gene mutation (HBD: c.323G>A) masking the diagnosis of β-thalassemia: a first report from India.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sachin; Edison, Eunice S; Mathews, Vikram; Shaji, R V

    2012-05-01

    An elevated HbA(2) (α2δ2) level (>3.5%) is a well-established diagnostic test for heterozygous β-thalassemia. Mutations in the δ-globin gene can cause decreased expression of HbA(2), resulting in heterozygous β-thalassemia with normal levels of HbA(2). In this report, we describe a novel missense mutation in δ-globin (HBD: c.323G>A, Gly > Asp) in an Indian family with heterozygous β-thalassemia with normal HbA(2) levels. PMID:22477537

  18. Neuroprotection as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a multifactorial progressive disease of the retina and a leading cause of vision loss. DR has long been regarded as a vascular disorder, although neuronal death and visual impairment appear before vascular lesions, suggesting an important role played by neurodegeneration in DR and the appropriateness of neuroprotective strategies. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the main target of current therapies, is likely to be one of the first responses to retinal hyperglycemic stress and VEGF may represent an important survival factor in early phases of DR. Of central importance for clinical trials is the detection of retinal neurodegeneration in the clinical setting, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography seems the most indicated technique. Many substances have been tested in animal studies for their neuroprotective properties and for possible use in humans. Perhaps, the most intriguing perspective is the use of endogenous neuroprotective substances or nutraceuticals. Together, the data point to the central role of neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of DR and indicate neuroprotection as an effective strategy for treating this disease. However, clinical trials to determine not only the effectiveness and safety but also the compliance of a noninvasive route of drug administration are needed. PMID:27123463

  19. Neuroprotective oleanane triterpenes from the roots of Bupleurum chinense.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan-Qi; Zhou, Le; Wang, Di; Wu, Jie; Li, Ling-Zhi; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Qing-Bo; Wu, Ying-Ying; Lin, Song; Yang, Jing-Yu; Song, Shao-Jiang; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2016-03-15

    The discovery of new natural compounds with pharmacological properties is an increasingly important field, and a continuous phytochemical investigation of the roots of Bupleurum chinense D.C. has led to the isolation of 17 triterpenoids, including three new oleanane triterpenes (1-3) together with 14 known ones. Their structures were determined on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectra as well as HR-ESI-MS data. The cytotoxicities of all compounds against five selected human cancer cell lines were assayed. Only compounds 9 and 14 exhibited moderate activities. Recently, a number of investigations have focused on the neuroprotective properties of triterpenoids in B. chinense. In order to expand our knowledge about this herb, the neuroprotective effects of compounds 1-17 against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal cell damage in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were evaluated. Compounds 1-3, 6-7 showed significant neuroprotective effects against H2O2-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. Preliminary structure-activity relationships (SARs) between neuroprotective effects and the isolates were also discussed. PMID:26883148

  20. Neuroprotective Activity of Hypericum perforatum and Its Major Components

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ana I.; Pinho, Cláudia; Sarmento, Bruno; Dias, Alberto C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum is a perennial plant, with worldwide distribution, commonly known as St. John’s wort. It has been used for centuries in traditional medicine for the treatment of several disorders, such as minor burns, anxiety, and mild to moderate depression. In the past years, its antidepressant properties have been extensively studied. Despite that, other H. perforatum biological activities, as its neuroprotective properties have also been evaluated. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the main biologically active compounds of H. perforatum, as for its chemistry, pharmacological activities, drug interactions and adverse reactions and gather scattered information about its neuroprotective abilities. As for this, it has been demonstrated that H. perforatum extracts and several of its major molecular components have the ability to protect against toxic insults, either directly, through neuroprotective mechanisms, or indirectly, through is antioxidant properties. H. perforatum has therefore the potential to become an effective neuroprotective therapeutic agent, despite further studies that need to be carried out. PMID:27462333

  1. Neuroprotective Activity of Hypericum perforatum and Its Major Components.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana I; Pinho, Cláudia; Sarmento, Bruno; Dias, Alberto C P

    2016-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum is a perennial plant, with worldwide distribution, commonly known as St. John's wort. It has been used for centuries in traditional medicine for the treatment of several disorders, such as minor burns, anxiety, and mild to moderate depression. In the past years, its antidepressant properties have been extensively studied. Despite that, other H. perforatum biological activities, as its neuroprotective properties have also been evaluated. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of the main biologically active compounds of H. perforatum, as for its chemistry, pharmacological activities, drug interactions and adverse reactions and gather scattered information about its neuroprotective abilities. As for this, it has been demonstrated that H. perforatum extracts and several of its major molecular components have the ability to protect against toxic insults, either directly, through neuroprotective mechanisms, or indirectly, through is antioxidant properties. H. perforatum has therefore the potential to become an effective neuroprotective therapeutic agent, despite further studies that need to be carried out. PMID:27462333

  2. Four new sesquiterpenes from Commiphora myrrha and their neuroprotective effects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Guo, Yuanqiang; Zhao, Peng; Guo, Ping; Ma, Yonggang; Xie, Chunfeng; Jin, Da-qing; Gui, Liping

    2012-06-01

    Four new sesquiterpenes, myrrhterpenoids K-N (1-4) have been isolated from the resin of Commiphora myrrha. Their structures and relative configurations were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (IR, ESIMS, HR-ESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR). Compounds 1 and 4 showed neuroprotective effects against MPP(+)-induced neuronal cell death in SH-SY5Y cells.

  3. Neuroprotective cadinane sesquiterpenes from the resinous exudates of Commiphora myrrha.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Guo, Yuanqiang; Zhao, Peng; Xie, Chunfeng; Jin, Da-qing; Hou, Wenbin; Zhang, Tiejun

    2011-12-01

    Three new cadinane sesquiterpenes, commiterpenes A-C, were isolated from the resinous exudates of Commiphora myrrha. Their structures and relative configurations were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (IR, ESIMS, HRESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR). All the isolated sesquiterpenes showed neuroprotective effects against MPP+-induced neuronal cell death in SH-SY5Y cells.

  4. Stuck at the bench: Potential natural neuroprotective compounds for concussion

    PubMed Central

    Petraglia, Anthony L.; Winkler, Ethan A.; Bailes, Julian E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: While numerous laboratory studies have searched for neuroprotective treatment approaches to traumatic brain injury, no therapies have successfully translated from the bench to the bedside. Concussion is a unique form of brain injury, in that the current mainstay of treatment focuses on both physical and cognitive rest. Treatments for concussion are lacking. The concept of neuro-prophylactic compounds or supplements is also an intriguing one, especially as we are learning more about the relationship of numerous sub-concussive blows and/or repetitive concussive impacts and the development of chronic neurodegenerative disease. The use of dietary supplements and herbal remedies has become more common place. Methods: A literature search was conducted with the objective of identifying and reviewing the pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the neuroprotective properties of a few of the more widely known compounds and supplements. Results: There are an abundance of pre-clinical studies demonstrating the neuroprotective properties of a variety of these compounds and we review some of those here. While there are an increasing number of well-designed studies investigating the therapeutic potential of these nutraceutical preparations, the clinical evidence is still fairly thin. Conclusion: There are encouraging results from laboratory studies demonstrating the multi-mechanistic neuroprotective properties of many naturally occurring compounds. Similarly, there are some intriguing clinical observational studies that potentially suggest both acute and chronic neuroprotective effects. Thus, there is a need for future trials exploring the potential therapeutic benefits of these compounds in the treatment of traumatic brain injury, particularly concussion. PMID:22059141

  5. Amelioration of murine sickle cell disease by nonablative conditioning and γ-globin gene-corrected bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Pestina, Tamara I; Hargrove, Phillip W; Zhao, Huifen; Mead, Paul E; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Weiss, Mitchell J; Wilber, Andrew; Persons, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe sickle cell disease (SCD) are candidates for gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but concomitant multi-organ disease may contraindicate pretransplant conditioning with full myeloablation. We tested whether nonmyeloablative conditioning, a regimen used successfully for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of adult SCD patients, allows engraftment of γ-globin gene-corrected cells to a therapeutic level in the Berkeley mouse model of SCD. Animals transplanted according to this regimen averaged 35% engraftment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells with an average vector copy < 2.0. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels ranged from 20 to 44% of total hemoglobin and approximately two-thirds of circulating red blood cells expressed HbF detected by immunofluorescence (F-cells). Gene therapy treatment of SCD mice ameliorated anemia, reduced hyperleukocytosis, improved renal function, and reduced iron accumulation in liver, spleen, and kidneys. Thus, modest levels of chimerism with donor cells expressing high levels of HbF from an insulated γ-globin lentiviral vector can improve the pathology of SCD in mice, thereby illustrating a potentially safe and effective strategy for gene therapy in humans. PMID:26665131

  6. (AC)n dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in 5' beta-globin gene in native and Mestizo Mexican populations.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza, R; Delgado, P; Arenas, D; Barrientos, C; Buentello, L; Loeza, F; Salamanca, F

    2001-12-01

    Repeated sequences are dispersed along the human genome. These sequences are useful as markers in diagnosis of inherited diseases, in forensic medicine, and in tracking the origin and evolution of human populations. The (AC)n repeated element is the most frequent in the human genome. In this paper, the (AC)n repeated element located in the 5' flanking region of the beta-globin gene was studied by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Four ethnic Mexican groups (Mixteca, Nahua, Otomí, Purépecha) and a Mestizo population were analyzed. We observed three alleles, A [(AC)16, B [(AC)14], and C [(AC)18], with a frequency of between 68.2% and 86.9%, 13.1% and 18.2%, and 6.7% and 13.7%, respectively. Allele C was present only in Purépecha and Mestizo groups. The absence of this allele in the other ethnic groups studied suggests that there is low genetic admixture of Purépecha and that this is a relatively isolated population. However, it could be that the C allele occurs in low frequencies in the other groups as a result of small sample sizes. The (AC)n repeat polymorphism in the beta-globin gene has not been previously studied in Amerindian populations.

  7. Characterization of a DNA binding activity in DNAse I hypersensitive site 4 of the human globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M; Kim, C; Gelinas, R

    1991-01-01

    A portion of the beta-globin Locus Control Region (LCR), which included DNAse I hypersensitive site 4 (HS4), was analyzed for its interactions with nuclear extracts and its contribution to LCR activity in a functional assay. In gel retardation assays, a short fragment from HS4 formed complexes with nuclear extracts from both erythroid and nonerythroid cells, and a core protected sequence 5'GACTGGC3' was revealed by DNAse I protection and methylation interference studies. This sequence resembles the binding sites of CCAAT-family members. Purified CP-2 but not CP-1 was shown to bind this HS4 sequence in a gel shift reaction, suggesting that the HS4 binding activity shares some sequence specificity with the CCAAT-factor family. Utilizing a transient expression assay in murine erythroleukemia cells, steady-state RNA levels were measured from pairs of LCR constructs linked to distinguishable beta-globin reporter genes. A short DNA fragment from HS4 which included the binding site for this novel binding activity accounted for most of the contribution to high level expression made by the entire HS4 region. Images PMID:1923823

  8. The beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in sickle cell anemia patients from Northeast Brazil: a clinical and molecular view.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Elisângela Vitória; Zanette, Angela; Lyra, Isa; Souza, Cyntia Cajado; Santos, Leandro Ferraz; Menezes, Joelma Figueiredo; Dupuit, Marie France; Almeida, Mari Ney Tavares; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Gonçalves, Marilda Souza

    2004-08-01

    The beta(S)-globin haplotypes were studied in 78 sickle cell Brazilian patients from Bahia, Northeast Brazil, that has a large population of African origin. Hemoglobin (Hb) profiles were developed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and beta(S)-globin gene haplotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques. We identified 44 (55.0%) patients with the CAR/Ben (Central African Republic/Benin) genotype, 16 (20.0%) Ben/Ben, 13 (16.2%) CAR/CAR and seven (8.8%) with other genotypes. Analyses of the phenotypes showed clinical differences related only to Hb F levels and blood transfusion therapy; the presence of -alpha(-3.7)-thalassemia (thal) demonstrated statistical significance when associated with hematocrit (p=0.044), MCV (p=0.0007), MCH (p=0.012) and spleen sequestration events. The haplotype diversity found in the present study can be justified by information about the origin of the slave traffic period in Bahia during the 19th century. The specific characteristics described among the Bahian sickle cell patients could be confirmed by increasing the number of patients with specific genotypes and further studies of genetic markers.

  9. A novel deletion/insertion caused by a replication error in the β-globin gene locus control region.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Meley, Roland; Pondarré, Corinne; Francina, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Deletions in the β-globin locus control region (β-LCR) lead to (εγδβ)(0)-thalassemia [(εγδβ)(0)-thal]. In patients suffering from these rare deletions, a normal hemoglobin (Hb), phenotype is found, contrasting with a hematological thalassemic phenotype. Multiplex-ligation probe amplification (MLPA) is an efficient tool to detect β-LCR deletions combined with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to pinpoint deletion breakpoints. We present here a novel 11,155 bp β-LCR deletion found in a French Caucasian patient which removes DNase I hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) to HS4 of the β-LCR. Interestingly, a 197 bp insertion of two inverted sequences issued from the HS2-HS3 inter-region is present and suggests a complex rearrangement during replication. Carriers of this type of thalassemia can be misdiagnosed as an α-thal trait. Consequently, a complete α- and β-globin gene cluster analysis is required to prevent a potentially damaging misdiagnosis in genetic counselling.

  10. Amelioration of murine sickle cell disease by nonablative conditioning and γ-globin gene-corrected bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    Pestina, Tamara I; Hargrove, Phillip W; Zhao, Huifen; Mead, Paul E; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Weiss, Mitchell J; Wilber, Andrew; Persons, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe sickle cell disease (SCD) are candidates for gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but concomitant multi-organ disease may contraindicate pretransplant conditioning with full myeloablation. We tested whether nonmyeloablative conditioning, a regimen used successfully for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of adult SCD patients, allows engraftment of γ-globin gene-corrected cells to a therapeutic level in the Berkeley mouse model of SCD. Animals transplanted according to this regimen averaged 35% engraftment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells with an average vector copy < 2.0. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels ranged from 20 to 44% of total hemoglobin and approximately two-thirds of circulating red blood cells expressed HbF detected by immunofluorescence (F-cells). Gene therapy treatment of SCD mice ameliorated anemia, reduced hyperleukocytosis, improved renal function, and reduced iron accumulation in liver, spleen, and kidneys. Thus, modest levels of chimerism with donor cells expressing high levels of HbF from an insulated γ-globin lentiviral vector can improve the pathology of SCD in mice, thereby illustrating a potentially safe and effective strategy for gene therapy in humans. PMID:26665131

  11. Amelioration of murine sickle cell disease by nonablative conditioning and γ-globin gene-corrected bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Pestina, Tamara I; Hargrove, Phillip W; Zhao, Huifen; Mead, Paul E; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Weiss, Mitchell J; Wilber, Andrew; Persons, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe sickle cell disease (SCD) are candidates for gene therapy using autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but concomitant multi-organ disease may contraindicate pretransplant conditioning with full myeloablation. We tested whether nonmyeloablative conditioning, a regimen used successfully for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of adult SCD patients, allows engraftment of γ-globin gene-corrected cells to a therapeutic level in the Berkeley mouse model of SCD. Animals transplanted according to this regimen averaged 35% engraftment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells with an average vector copy < 2.0. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels ranged from 20 to 44% of total hemoglobin and approximately two-thirds of circulating red blood cells expressed HbF detected by immunofluorescence (F-cells). Gene therapy treatment of SCD mice ameliorated anemia, reduced hyperleukocytosis, improved renal function, and reduced iron accumulation in liver, spleen, and kidneys. Thus, modest levels of chimerism with donor cells expressing high levels of HbF from an insulated γ-globin lentiviral vector can improve the pathology of SCD in mice, thereby illustrating a potentially safe and effective strategy for gene therapy in humans.

  12. Delayed globin synthesis leads to excess heme and the macrocytic anemia of Diamond Blackfan anemia and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhantao; Keel, Siobán B; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Li; Gerds, Aaron T; Li, Henry Y; Wood, Brent L; Scott, Bart L; Abkowitz, Janis L

    2016-05-11

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) are severe macrocytic anemias; although both are associated with impaired ribosome assembly, why the anemia occurs is not known. We cultured marrow cells from DBA (n = 3) and del(5q) MDS (n = 6) patients and determined how heme (a toxic chemical) and globin (a protein) are coordinated. We show that globin translation initiates slowly, whereas heme synthesis proceeds normally. This results in insufficient globin protein, excess heme and excess reactive oxygen species in early erythroid precursors, and CFU-E (colony-forming unit-erythroid)/proerythroblast cell death. The cells that can more rapidly and effectively export heme or can slow heme synthesis preferentially survive and appropriately mature. Consistent with these observations, treatment with 10 μM succinylacetone, a specific inhibitor of heme synthesis, improved the erythroid cell output of DBA and del(5q) MDS marrow cultures by 68 to 95% (P = 0.03 to 0.05), whereas the erythroid cell output of concurrent control marrow cultures decreased by 4 to 13%. Our studies demonstrate that erythropoiesis fails when heme exceeds globin. Our data further suggest that therapies that decrease heme synthesis (or facilitate heme export) could improve the red blood cell production of persons with DBA, del(5q) MDS, and perhaps other macrocytic anemias.

  13. Expression of a cellular gene cloned in herpes simplex virus: rabbit beta-globin is regulated as an early viral gene in infected fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, J R; Smibert, C; Everett, R D

    1987-01-01

    We constructed nondefective herpes simplex virus type 1 recombinants bearing the intact rabbit beta-globin gene inserted into the viral gene for thymidine kinase to study the expression of a cellular gene when it is present in the viral genome during lytic viral infections. The globin promoter was activated to high levels during productive infection of Vero cells, giving rise to properly spliced and processed cytoplasmic globin transcripts. Expression of globin RNA occurred with early kinetics, was not affected by blocking viral DNA replication, and was strongly inhibited by preventing viral immediate-early protein synthesis with cycloheximide. These results support the hypothesis that temporal control of herpes simplex virus early gene expression is accomplished by mechanisms that are not restricted to viral promoters. In addition, these data show that a cellular transcript can be correctly processed and can accumulate to high levels during viral infection; this indicates that the mechanisms of virally induced shutoff of host RNA accumulation and degradation of host mRNAs do not depend on sequence-specific differentiation between host and viral RNAs. These findings also suggest that herpesviruses have considerable potential as high-capacity gene transfer vectors for a variety of applications. Images PMID:3037101

  14. Regulated alpha-globin mRNA decay is a cytoplasmic event proceeding through 3'-to-5' exosome-dependent decapping.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy D; Wang, Zuoren; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2002-12-01

    The alpha-globin mRNA contains a C-rich stability element (CRE) in its 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) which is critical for the stability of this long-lived mRNA. A protein complex, termed the alpha-complex, forms on the CRE and has been shown to contribute to stabilization of the mRNA by at least two mechanisms, first by interacting with the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) to prevent deadenylation, and second by protecting the mRNA from attack by an erythroid endoribonuclease. In this report, we demonstrate that the alpha-globin 3' UTR can confer stability on a heterologous mRNA in cells, and this stability is dependent on the alpha-complex. Moreover, the stability was exclusively detected with cytoplasmic mRNA, suggesting that the regulation of alpha-globin mRNA stability is a cytoplasmic event. An additional mechanism by which the alpha-complex can confer stability on an RNA in vitro was also identified and shown to involve inhibition of 3' to 5' exonucleolytic degradation. Furthermore, using an in vitro mRNA decay system, we were able to follow the demise of the alpha-globin RNA and demonstrate that the decay was initiated by deadenylation followed by 3'-to-5' decay carried out by the exosome and ultimately hydrolysis of the residual cap structure.

  15. A new Frameshift mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α⁺-thalassemia: codon 43 (TTC>-TC or TTC>T-C).

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Barro, Claire; Francina, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We report a new mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α(+)-thalassemia (α(+)-thal) with a deletion of a single nucleotide (T) at amino acid residue 43 [HBA2:c.130delT or HBA2:c.131delT]. This frameshift deletion gives rise to a premature termination codon at codon 47.

  16. Delayed globin synthesis leads to excess heme and the macrocytic anemia of Diamond Blackfan anemia and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhantao; Keel, Siobán B; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Li; Gerds, Aaron T; Li, Henry Y; Wood, Brent L; Scott, Bart L; Abkowitz, Janis L

    2016-05-11

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) are severe macrocytic anemias; although both are associated with impaired ribosome assembly, why the anemia occurs is not known. We cultured marrow cells from DBA (n = 3) and del(5q) MDS (n = 6) patients and determined how heme (a toxic chemical) and globin (a protein) are coordinated. We show that globin translation initiates slowly, whereas heme synthesis proceeds normally. This results in insufficient globin protein, excess heme and excess reactive oxygen species in early erythroid precursors, and CFU-E (colony-forming unit-erythroid)/proerythroblast cell death. The cells that can more rapidly and effectively export heme or can slow heme synthesis preferentially survive and appropriately mature. Consistent with these observations, treatment with 10 μM succinylacetone, a specific inhibitor of heme synthesis, improved the erythroid cell output of DBA and del(5q) MDS marrow cultures by 68 to 95% (P = 0.03 to 0.05), whereas the erythroid cell output of concurrent control marrow cultures decreased by 4 to 13%. Our studies demonstrate that erythropoiesis fails when heme exceeds globin. Our data further suggest that therapies that decrease heme synthesis (or facilitate heme export) could improve the red blood cell production of persons with DBA, del(5q) MDS, and perhaps other macrocytic anemias. PMID:27169803

  17. Splicing and 3' end formation in the definition of nonsense-mediated decay-competent human beta-globin mRNPs.

    PubMed

    Neu-Yilik, G; Gehring, N H; Thermann, R; Frede, U; Hentze, M W; Kulozik, A E

    2001-02-01

    Premature translation termination codons are common causes of genetic disorders. mRNAs with such mutations are degraded by a surveillance mechanism termed nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), which represents a phylogenetically widely conserved post-transcriptional mechanism for the quality control of gene expression. How NMD-competent mRNPs are formed and specified remains a central question. Here, we have used human beta-globin mRNA as a model system to address the role of splicing and polyadenylation for human NMD. We show that (i) splicing is an indispensable component of the human beta-globin NMD pathway, which cannot be compensated for by exonic beta-globin 'failsafe' sequences; (ii) the spatial requirements of human beta-globin NMD, as signified by the maximal distance of the nonsense mutation to the final exon-exon junction, are less constrained than in yeast; and (iii) non-polyadenylated mRNAs with a histone 3' end are NMD competent. Thus, the formation of NMD-competent mRNP particles critically depends on splicing but does not require the presence of a poly(A) tail.

  18. Variation in Gamma-Globin Expression before and after Induction with Hydroxyurea Associated with BCL11A, KLF1 and TAL1

    PubMed Central

    Grieco, Amanda J.; Billett, Henny H.; Green, Nancy S.; Driscoll, M. Catherine; Bouhassira, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing γ-globin expression in a subset of fetal hemoglobin (α2γ2: HbF) expressing red blood cells (F-cells) and the mechanisms underlying the variability of response to hydroxyurea induced γ-globin expression in the treatment of sickle cell disease are not completely understood. Here we analyzed intra-person clonal populations of basophilic erythroblasts (baso-Es) derived from bone marrow common myeloid progenitors in serum free cultures and report the level of fetal hemoglobin production in F-cells negatively correlates with expression of BCL11A, KLF1 and TAL1. We then examined the effects of hydroxyurea on these three transcription factors and conclude that a successful induction of γ-globin includes a reduction in BCL11A, KLF1 and TAL1 expression. These data suggests that expression changes in this transcription factor network modulate γ-globin expression in F-cells during steady state erythropoiesis and after induction with hydroxyurea. PMID:26053062

  19. Delayed globin synthesis leads to excess heme and the macrocytic anemia of Diamond Blackfan anemia and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhantao; Keel, Siobán B.; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Li; Gerds, Aaron T.; Li, Henry Y.; Wood, Brent L.; Scott, Bart L.; Abkowitz, Janis L.

    2016-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) are severe macrocytic anemias; although both are associated with impaired ribosome assembly, why the anemia occurs is not known. We cultured marrow cells from DBA (n = 3) and del(5q) MDS (n = 6) patients and determined how heme (a toxic chemical) and globin (a protein) are coordinated. We show that globin translation initiates slowly, whereas heme synthesis proceeds normally. This results in insufficient globin protein, excess heme and excess reactive oxygen species in early erythroid precursors, and CFU-E (colony-forming unit–erythroid)/proerythroblast cell death. The cells that can more rapidly and effectively export heme or can slow heme synthesis preferentially survive and appropriately mature. Consistent with these observations, treatment with 10 mM succinylacetone, a specific inhibitor of heme synthesis, improved the erythroid cell output of DBA and del(5q) MDS marrow cultures by 68 to 95% (P = 0.03 to 0.05), whereas the erythroid cell output of concurrent control marrow cultures decreased by 4 to 13%. Our studies demonstrate that erythropoiesis fails when heme exceeds globin. Our data further suggest that therapies that decrease heme synthesis (or facilitate heme export) could improve the red blood cell production of persons with DBA, del(5q) MDS, and perhaps other macrocytic anemias. PMID:27169803

  20. NEUROPROTECTION FOR ISCHEMIC STROKE: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Myron D.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroprotection for ischemic stroke refers to strategies, applied singly or in combination, that antagonize the injurious biochemical and molecular events that eventuate in irreversible ischemic injury. There has been a recent explosion of interest in this field, with over 1000 experimental papers and over 400 clinical articles appearing within the past 6 years. These studies, in turn, are the outgrowth of three decades of investigative work to define the multiple mechanisms and mediators of ischemic brain injury, which constitute potential targets of neuroprotection. Rigorously conducted experimental studies in animal models of brain ischemia provide incontrovertible proof-of-principle that high-grade protection of the ischemic brain is an achievable goal. Nonetheless, many agents have been brought to clinical trial without a sufficiently compelling evidence-based pre-clinical foundation. At this writing, around 160 clinical trials of neuroprotection for ischemic stroke have been initiated. Of the approximately 120 completed trials, two-thirds were smaller early-phase safety-feasibility studies. The remaining one-third were typically larger (>200 subjects) phase II or III trials, but, disappointingly, only fewer than one-half of these administered neuroprotective therapy within the 4–6 hour therapeutic window within which efficacious neuroprotection is considered to be achievable. This fact alone helps to account for the abundance of “failed” trials. This review presents a close survey of the most extensively evaluated neuroprotective agents and classes and considers both the strengths and weakness of the pre-clinical evidence as well as the results and shortcomings of the clinical trials themselves. Among the agent-classes considered are calcium channel blockers; glutamate antagonists; GABA agonists; antioxidants/radical scavengers; phospholipid precursor; nitric oxide signal-transduction down-regulator; leukocyte inhibitors; hemodilution; and a miscellany

  1. Why the DNA self-depurination mechanism operates in HB-β but not in β-globin paralogs HB-δ, HB-ɛ1, HB-γ1 and HB-γ2.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Fresco, Jacques R

    2015-08-01

    The human β-globin, δ-globin and ɛ-globin genes contain almost identical coding strand sequences centered about codon 6 having potential to form a stem-loop with a 5'GAGG loop. Provided with a sufficiently stable stem, such a structure can self-catalyze depurination of the loop 5'G residue, leading to a potential mutation hotspot. Previously, we showed that such a hotspot exists about codon 6 of β-globin, with by far the highest incidence of mutations across the gene, including those responsible for 6 anemias (notably Sickle Cell Anemia) and β-thalassemias. In contrast, we show here that despite identical loop sequences, there is no mutational hotspot in the δ- or ɛ1-globin potential self-depurination sites, which differ by only one or two base pairs in the stem region from that of the β-globin gene. These differences result in either one or two additional mismatches in the potential 7-base pair-forming stem region, thereby weakening its stability, so that either DNA cruciform extrusion from the duplex is rendered ineffective or the lifetime of the stem-loop becomes too short to permit self-catalysis to occur. Having that same loop sequence, paralogs HB-γ1 and HB-γ2 totally lack stem-forming potential. Hence the absence in δ- and ɛ1-globin genes of a mutational hotspot in what must now be viewed as non-functional homologs of the self-depurination site in β-globin. Such stem-destabilizing variants appeared early among vertebrates and remained conserved among mammals and primates. Thus, this study has revealed conserved sequence determinants of self-catalytic DNA depurination associated with variability of mutation incidence among human β-globin paralogs.

  2. Why the DNA self-depurination mechanism operates in HB-β but not in β-globin paralogs HB-δ, HB-ɛ1, HB-γ1 and HB-γ2.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Fresco, Jacques R

    2015-08-01

    The human β-globin, δ-globin and ɛ-globin genes contain almost identical coding strand sequences centered about codon 6 having potential to form a stem-loop with a 5'GAGG loop. Provided with a sufficiently stable stem, such a structure can self-catalyze depurination of the loop 5'G residue, leading to a potential mutation hotspot. Previously, we showed that such a hotspot exists about codon 6 of β-globin, with by far the highest incidence of mutations across the gene, including those responsible for 6 anemias (notably Sickle Cell Anemia) and β-thalassemias. In contrast, we show here that despite identical loop sequences, there is no mutational hotspot in the δ- or ɛ1-globin potential self-depurination sites, which differ by only one or two base pairs in the stem region from that of the β-globin gene. These differences result in either one or two additional mismatches in the potential 7-base pair-forming stem region, thereby weakening its stability, so that either DNA cruciform extrusion from the duplex is rendered ineffective or the lifetime of the stem-loop becomes too short to permit self-catalysis to occur. Having that same loop sequence, paralogs HB-γ1 and HB-γ2 totally lack stem-forming potential. Hence the absence in δ- and ɛ1-globin genes of a mutational hotspot in what must now be viewed as non-functional homologs of the self-depurination site in β-globin. Such stem-destabilizing variants appeared early among vertebrates and remained conserved among mammals and primates. Thus, this study has revealed conserved sequence determinants of self-catalytic DNA depurination associated with variability of mutation incidence among human β-globin paralogs. PMID:26042536

  3. Post-ischemic salubrinal treatment results in a neuroprotective role in global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Anuncibay-Soto, Berta; Pérez-Rodríguez, Diego; Santos-Galdiano, María; Font, Enrique; Regueiro-Purriños, Marta; Fernández-López, Arsenio

    2016-07-01

    This study describes the neuroprotective effect of treatment with salubrinal 1 and 24 h following 15 min of ischemia in a two-vessel occlusion model of global cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this study was to determine if salubrinal, an enhancer of the unfolded protein response, reduces the neural damage modulating the inflammatory response. The study was performed in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal areas as well as in the cerebral cortex whose different vulnerability to ischemic damage is widely described. Characterization of proteins was made by western blot, immunofluorescence, and ELISA, whereas mRNA levels were measured by Quantitative PCR. The salubrinal treatment decreased the cell demise in CA1 at 7 days as well as the levels of matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9) in CA1 and cerebral cortex at 48 h and ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 cell adhesion molecules. However, increases in tumor necrosis factor α and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) inflammatory markers were observed at 24 h. Glial fibrillary acidic protein levels were not modified by salubrinal treatment in CA1 and cerebral cortex. We describe a neuroprotective effect of the post-ischemic treatment with salubrinal, measured as a decrease both in CA1 cell demise and in the blood-brain barrier impairment. We hypothesize that the ability of salubrinal to counteract the CA1 cell demise is because of a reduced ability of this structure to elicit unfolded protein response which would account for its greater ischemic vulnerability. Data of both treated and non-treated animals suggest that the neurovascular unit present a structure-dependent response to ischemia and a different course time for CA1/cerebral cortex compared with CA3. Finally, our study reveals a high responsiveness of endothelial cells to salubrinal in contrast to the limited responsiveness of astrocytes. The alleviation of ER stress by enhancing UPR with salubrinal treatment reduces the ischemic damage. This effect

  4. Post-ischemic salubrinal treatment results in a neuroprotective role in global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Anuncibay-Soto, Berta; Pérez-Rodríguez, Diego; Santos-Galdiano, María; Font, Enrique; Regueiro-Purriños, Marta; Fernández-López, Arsenio

    2016-07-01

    This study describes the neuroprotective effect of treatment with salubrinal 1 and 24 h following 15 min of ischemia in a two-vessel occlusion model of global cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this study was to determine if salubrinal, an enhancer of the unfolded protein response, reduces the neural damage modulating the inflammatory response. The study was performed in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal areas as well as in the cerebral cortex whose different vulnerability to ischemic damage is widely described. Characterization of proteins was made by western blot, immunofluorescence, and ELISA, whereas mRNA levels were measured by Quantitative PCR. The salubrinal treatment decreased the cell demise in CA1 at 7 days as well as the levels of matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9) in CA1 and cerebral cortex at 48 h and ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 cell adhesion molecules. However, increases in tumor necrosis factor α and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) inflammatory markers were observed at 24 h. Glial fibrillary acidic protein levels were not modified by salubrinal treatment in CA1 and cerebral cortex. We describe a neuroprotective effect of the post-ischemic treatment with salubrinal, measured as a decrease both in CA1 cell demise and in the blood-brain barrier impairment. We hypothesize that the ability of salubrinal to counteract the CA1 cell demise is because of a reduced ability of this structure to elicit unfolded protein response which would account for its greater ischemic vulnerability. Data of both treated and non-treated animals suggest that the neurovascular unit present a structure-dependent response to ischemia and a different course time for CA1/cerebral cortex compared with CA3. Finally, our study reveals a high responsiveness of endothelial cells to salubrinal in contrast to the limited responsiveness of astrocytes. The alleviation of ER stress by enhancing UPR with salubrinal treatment reduces the ischemic damage. This effect

  5. In vitro Splicing of Influenza Viral NS1 mRNA and NS1-β -globin Chimeras: Possible Mechanisms for the Control of Viral mRNA Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1986-08-01

    In influenza virus-infected cells, the splicing of the viral NS1 mRNA catalyzed by host nuclear enzymes is controlled so that the steady-state amount of the spliced NS2 mRNA is only 5-10% of that of the unspliced NS1 mRNA. Here we examine the splicing of NS1 mRNA in vitro, using nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We show that in addition to its consensus 5' and 3' splice sites, NS1 mRNA has an intron branch-point adenosine residue that was functional in lariat formation. Nonetheless, this RNA was not detectably spliced in vitro under conditions in which a human β -globin precursor was efficiently spliced. Using chimeric RNA precursors containing both NS1 and β -globin sequences, we show that the NS1 5' splice site was effectively utilized by the β -globin branch-point sequence and 3' splice site to form a spliced RNA, whereas the NS1 3' splice site did not function in detectable splicing in vitro, even in the presence of the β -globin branch-point sequence or in the presence of both the branch-point sequence and 5' exon and splice site from β -globin With the chimeric precursors that were not detectably spliced, as with NS1 mRNA itself, a low level of a lariat structure containing only intron and not 3' exon sequences was formed. The inability of the consensus 3' splice site of NS1 mRNA to function effectively in in vitro splicing suggests that this site is structurally inaccessible to components of the splicing machinery. Based on these results, we propose two mechanisms whereby NS1 mRNA splicing in infected cells is controlled via the accessibility of its 3' splice site.

  6. Experimental and theoretical study of the mechanism of hydrolysis of substituted phenyl hexanoates catalysed by globin in the presence of surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Selami; Arslan, Nevin; Kocakaya, Safak Ozhan; Pirinccioglu, Necmettin; Williams, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The bimolecular rate constants for the globin- and alkali-catalysed hydrolysis of substituted phenyl hexanoates in the absence and presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) obey Brønsted equations with β(lg) = -0.53 (globin-catalysed), -0.68 (globin-catalysed in CTAB), -0.34 (in water) and -0.74 (in CTAB), respectively. The slopes indicate that the microsolvation environments associated with the transition states of the catalysed reactions are different from those that occur in aqueous medium. The slope (-0.74) for the reaction in CTAB implies that it proceeds in a less polar medium. The larger β(lg) value (-0.53) obtained for the globin-catalysed reaction compared to that for the uncatalysed one may be attributed to either the less polar microenvironments of the transition states or the involvement of one of the imidazole groups as a nucleophile. The results from a study of the effect of pH on the reactivity provide evidence for the latter assumption. All of the ligands were docked into the hydrophobic pocket of the protein, and the resulting docking scores ranged from -30.76 to -23.61 kcal mol⁻¹. Molecular dynamic simulations and MM-PBSA/GBSA calculations performed for the complexes gave insight into the binding modes of globin to the esters, which are consistent with experimental results. The calculations yielded comparable free energies of binding to the experimental ones for 4-nitrophenyl and 4-chloro-2-nitrophenyl hexanoates. In conclusion, information obtained from the linear free-energy relationship is still very useful for elucidating the mechanisms of organic reactions, including enzyme-catalysed reactions. This approach is further supported by the utilization of computational tools.

  7. Site-specific base changes in the coding or promoter region of the human beta- and gamma-globin genes by single-stranded oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenxuan; Kren, Betsy T; Steer, Clifford J

    2005-08-15

    SSOs (single-stranded oligonucleotides) can mediate site-specific alteration of base-pairs in episomal and chromosomal target genes in mammalian cells. The TNE (targeted nucleotide exchange) can result in either repair or mutation of a gene sequence and is mediated through endogenous DNA repair pathway(s). Thus the approach provides a technique for the treatment of monogenic disorders associated with specific point mutations such as SCD (sickle cell disease). We studied the potential application of SSOs for SCD by introducing either an A to T substitution at the sixth codon of the human beta-globin gene (sickle locus) or a C to G mutation at -202 of the Ggamma-globin gene promoter region. The latter TNE is an alternative strategy to ameliorate the clinical manifestations of sickle cell anaemia by re-activating fetal haemoglobin gene expression in adult erythrocytes. A sensitive and valid PCR assay system was developed, which allows detection of point mutations as low as 0.01% at these sites. Using this system, TNE between 0.01 and 0.1% at the sickle locus or gamma-globin gene promoter region was detected after transfection with SSOs in cultured human cell lines. TNE in the Ggamma-globin promoter region exhibited varying degrees of strand bias that was dependent on SSO design and the cell's DNA mismatch repair activity. The results suggest that the endogenous DNA repair machinery may permit SSO correction of the sickle defect by modification of the beta- and/or gamma-globin genes.

  8. Neuroprotective Transcription Factors in Animal Models of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Blaudin de Thé, François-Xavier; Rekaik, Hocine; Prochiantz, Alain; Fuchs, Julia; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2016-01-01

    A number of transcription factors, including En1/2, Foxa1/2, Lmx1a/b, Nurr1, Otx2, and Pitx3, with key roles in midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neuron development, also regulate adult mDA neuron survival and physiology. Mouse models with targeted disruption of some of these genes display several features reminiscent of Parkinson disease (PD), in particular the selective and progressive loss of mDA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). The characterization of these animal models has provided valuable insights into various mechanisms of PD pathogenesis. Therefore, the dissection of the mechanisms and survival signalling pathways engaged by these transcription factors to protect mDA neuron from degeneration can suggest novel therapeutic strategies. The work on En1/2-mediated neuroprotection also highlights the potential of protein transduction technology for neuroprotective approaches in PD. PMID:26881122

  9. Neuroprotective effect of thalidomide on MPTP-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Guadalupe; Garcia, Esperanza; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Trejo-Solís, Cristina; Escamilla-Ramírez, Angel; Sotelo, Julio

    2015-03-01

    Thalidomide is a sedative with unique pharmacological properties; studies on epilepsy and brain ischemia have shown intense neuroprotective effects. We analyzed the effect of thalidomide treatment on the neurotoxicity caused by the administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahidropyridine (MPTP) in mice. Thalidomide was administered at two times; before and after the exposure to MPTP. In both circumstances thalidomide improved the neurotoxicity induced by MPTP as seen by a significant raise of the striatal contents of dopamine and simultaneous decrease of monoamine-oxidase-B (MAO-B). These results indicate that in the experimental model of Parkinson's disease the administration of thalidomide improves the functional damage on the nigrostriatal cell substratum as seen by the production of dopamine. This neuroprotective effect seems to be mediated by inhibition of excitotoxicity. Our results suggest that thalidomide could be investigated as potential adjuvant therapy for Parkinson's disease.

  10. Control of Intracellular Calcium Signaling as a Neuroprotective Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R. Scott; Goad, Daryl L.; Grillo, Michael A.; Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Both acute and chronic degenerative diseases of the nervous system reduce the viability and function of neurons through changes in intracellular calcium signaling. In particular, pathological increases in the intracellular calcium concentration promote such pathogenesis. Disease involvement of numerous regulators of intracellular calcium signaling located on the plasma membrane and intracellular organelles has been documented. Diverse groups of chemical compounds targeting ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors, pumps and enzymes have been identified as potential neuroprotectants. The present review summarizes the discovery, mechanisms and biological activity of neuroprotective molecules targeting proteins that control intracellular calcium signaling to preserve or restore structure and function of the nervous system. Disease relevance, clinical applications and new technologies for the identification of such molecules are being discussed. PMID:20335972

  11. Bioactive Compounds and Their Neuroprotective Effects in Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoon Sin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and impaired insulin signaling during the development of diabetes can cause diabetic complications, such as diabetic neuropathy, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Although various therapeutics are available for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, no absolute cure exists, and additional research is necessary to comprehensively understand the underlying pathophysiological pathways. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of bioactive compounds, i.e., flavonoids and vitamins, which may be effective as supplementary treatments for diabetes and its complications. In this review, we highlight the most recent reports about the mechanisms of action of bioactive compounds (flavonoids and vitamins) possessing potential neuroprotective properties in diabetic conditions. Additional clinical studies are required to determine the appropriate dose and duration of bioactive compound supplementation for neuroprotection in diabetic patients. PMID:27483315

  12. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue. PMID:25368644

  13. Bioactive Compounds and Their Neuroprotective Effects in Diabetic Complications.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoon Sin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and impaired insulin signaling during the development of diabetes can cause diabetic complications, such as diabetic neuropathy, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Although various therapeutics are available for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, no absolute cure exists, and additional research is necessary to comprehensively understand the underlying pathophysiological pathways. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of bioactive compounds, i.e., flavonoids and vitamins, which may be effective as supplementary treatments for diabetes and its complications. In this review, we highlight the most recent reports about the mechanisms of action of bioactive compounds (flavonoids and vitamins) possessing potential neuroprotective properties in diabetic conditions. Additional clinical studies are required to determine the appropriate dose and duration of bioactive compound supplementation for neuroprotection in diabetic patients. PMID:27483315

  14. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  15. Neuroprotective effects of resveratrol in Alzheimer disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rege, Shraddha D.; Geetha, Thangiah; Griffin, Gerald D.; Broderick, Tom L.; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive and behavioral abilities. Extracellular senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of AD. Researchers aim to analyze the molecular mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis; however, the therapeutic options available to treat this disease are inadequate. In the past few years, several studies have reported interesting insights about the neuroprotective properties of the polyphenolic compound resveratrol (3, 5, 4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) when used with in vitro and in vivo models of AD. The aim of this review is to focus on the neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of resveratrol on AD and its multiple potential mechanisms of action. In addition, because the naturally occurring forms of resveratrol have a very limited half-life in plasma, a description of potential analogs aimed at increasing the bioavailability in plasma is also discussed. PMID:25309423

  16. Olesoxime (TRO19622): A Novel Mitochondrial-Targeted Neuroprotective Compound

    PubMed Central

    Bordet, Thierry; Berna, Patrick; Abitbol, Jean-Louis; Pruss, Rebecca M.

    2010-01-01

    Olesoxime (TRO19622) is a novel mitochondrial-targeted neuroprotective compound undergoing a pivotal clinical efficacy study in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and also in development for Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). It belongs to a new family of cholesterol-oximes identified for its survival-promoting activity on purified motor neurons deprived of neurotrophic factors. Olesoxime targets proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane, concentrates at the mitochondria and prevents permeability transition pore opening mediated by, among other things, oxidative stress. Olesoxime has been shown to exert a potent neuroprotective effect in various in vitro and in vivo models. In particular olesoxime provided significant protection in experimental animal models of motor neuron disorders and more particularly ALS. Olesoxime is orally active, crosses the blood brain barrier, and is well tolerated. Collectively, its pharmacological properties designate olesoxime as a promising drug candidate for motor neuron diseases.

  17. The neuroprotective effect exerted by oligodendroglial progenitors on ischemically impaired hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Sypecka, Joanna; Sarnowska, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are the focus of intense research for the purpose of cell replacement therapies in acquired or inherited neurodegenerative disorders, accompanied by ongoing hypo/demyelination. Recently, it has been postulated that these glia-committed cells exhibit certain properties of neural stem cells. Advances in stem cell biology have shown that their therapeutic effect could be attributed to their ability to secret numerous active compounds which modify the local microenvironment making it more susceptible to restorative processes. To verify this hypothesis, we set up an ex vivo co-culture system of OPCs isolated from neonatal rat brain with organotypic hippocampal slices (OHC) injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The presence of OPCs in such co-cultures resulted in a significant neuroprotective effect manifesting itself as a decrease in cell death rate and as an extension of newly formed cells in ischemically impaired hippocampal slices. A microarray analysis of broad spectrum of trophic factors and cytokines expressed by OPCs was performed for the purpose of finding the factor(s) contributing to the observed effect. Three of them-BDNF, IL-10 and SCF-were selected for the subsequent functional assays. Our data revealed that BDNF released by OPCs is the potent factor that stimulates cell proliferation and survival in OHC subjected to OGD injury. At the same time, it was observed that IL-10 attenuates inflammatory processes by promoting the formation of the cells associated with the immunological response. Those neuroprotective qualities of oligodendroglia-biased progenitors significantly contribute to anticipating a successful cell replacement therapy. PMID:24085562

  18. Alzheimer’s Disease, Neuroprotection, and CNS Immunosenescence

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Wolfgang J.; Xue, Qing-Shan

    2012-01-01

    This review is focused on discussing in some detail possible neuroprotective functions of microglial cells. We strive to explain how loss of these essential microglial functions might contribute toward the development of characteristic neuropathological features that characterize Alzheimer’s disease. The conceptual framework guiding our thinking is provided by the hypothesis that microglial senescence accounts for impaired neuronal protection and consequent neurodegeneration. PMID:22822399

  19. Recent Updates in Neuroprotective and Neuroregenerative Potential of Centella asiatica

    PubMed Central

    Lokanathan, Yogeswaran; Omar, Norazzila; Ahmad Puzi, Nur Nabilah; Saim, Aminuddin; Hj Idrus, Ruszymah

    2016-01-01

    Centella asiatica, locally well known in Malaysia as pegaga, is a traditional herb that has been used widely in Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, and in the traditional medicine of other Southeast Asian countries including Malaysia. Although consumption of the plant is indicated for various illnesses, its potential neuroprotective properties have been well studied and documented. In addition to past studies, recent studies also discovered and/or reconfirmed that C. asiatica acts as an antioxidant, reducing the effect of oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. At the in vitro level, C. asiatica promotes dendrite arborisation and elongation, and also protects the neurons from apoptosis. In vivo studies have shown that the whole extract and also individual compounds of C. asiatica have a protective effect against various neurological diseases. Most of the in vivo studies on neuroprotective effects have focused on Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, learning and memory enhancement, neurotoxicity and other mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety, and epilepsy. Recent studies have embarked on finding the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by C. asiatica extract. However, the capability of C. asiatica in enhancing neuroregeneration has not been studied much and is limited to the regeneration of crushed sciatic nerves and protection from neuronal injury in hypoxia conditions. More studies are still needed to identify the compounds and the mechanism of action of C. asiatica that are particularly involved in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Furthermore, the extraction method, biochemical profile and dosage information of the C. asiatica extract need to be standardised to enhance the economic value of this traditional herb and to accelerate the entry of C. asiatica extracts into modern medicine. PMID:27540320

  20. Progesterone for Neuroprotection in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Courtney L.; Fidan, Emin; Stanley, Rachel M.; MHSA; Noje, Corina; Bayir, Hülya

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of the preclinical literature on progesterone for neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to describe unique features of developmental brain injury that should be considered when evaluating the therapeutic potential for progesterone treatment after pediatric TBI. Data Sources National Library of Medicine PubMed literature review. Data Selection The mechanisms of neuroprotection by progesterone are reviewed, and the preclinical literature using progesterone treatment in adult animal models of TBI are summarized. Unique features of the developing brain that could either enhance or limit the efficacy of neuroprotection by progesterone are discussed, and the limited preclinical literature using progesterone after acute injury to the developing brain is described. Finally, the current status of clinical trials of progesterone for adult TBI is reviewed. Data Extraction and Synthesis Progesterone is a pleotropic agent with beneficial effects on secondary injury cascades that occur after TBI, including cerebral edema, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity. More than 40 studies have used progesterone for treatment after TBI in adult animal models, with results summarized in tabular form. However, very few studies have evaluated progesterone in pediatric animal models of brain injury. To date, two human Phase II trials of progesterone for adult TBI have been published, and two multi-center Phase III trials are underway. Conclusions The unique features of the developing brain from that of a mature adult brain make it necessary to independently study progesterone in clinically relevant, immature animal models of TBI. Additional preclinical studies could lead to the development of a novel neuroprotective therapy that could reduce the long-term disability in head-injured children, and could potentially provide benefit in other forms of pediatric brain injury (global ischemia, stroke, statue epilepticus). PMID

  1. Neuroprotection for ischaemic stroke: current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Antonio; Ferrari, Federica; Villa, Roberto F

    2015-02-01

    Stroke is the third cause of death worldwide and the main cause of chronic, severe adult disability. We focus on acute ischaemic stroke, which accounts for approximately 80% of all strokes. The current therapy aims at restoring cerebral blood flow within a narrow time window in order to prevent damaging the "penumbra" which surrounds the infarct core. Intravenous thrombolysis remains the fundamental treatment worldwide, though not ideal for various restrictions and complications, limiting to 10% or less the percentage of patients treated within the appropriate time window. Neuroprotection is an alternative or adjunct approach to thrombolysis, targeting cerebral parenchyma in the acute ischaemic phase. Furthermore, neurorepair attempts to restore neuronal function in the after-stroke phase in those patients (treated or untreated) with significant impairment. In the past decades, the efficacy and safety of numerous candidate neuroprotective agents were shown in various animal stroke models. However, in clinical trials, promising pre-clinical studies have not been translated into positive outcomes. Our review will analyse the possible reasons for this failure and the new approaches and recommendations to overcome it, as well as novel strategies targeting additional events in ischaemia cascade. The combination of thrombolysis with pharmacological and non-pharmacological neuroprotective approaches has also been tested. Finally, the neurorepair strategy will be described with special emphasis on the role of cell-based therapies and ischaemic conditioning. Hopefully, the future therapy of ischaemic stroke will encompass a combination of neuroprotection (to stabilise penumbra), thrombolysis, antithrombotics (for secondary prevention) and neurorepair based on cell therapy plus rehabilitation.

  2. Recent Updates in Neuroprotective and Neuroregenerative Potential of Centella asiatica.

    PubMed

    Lokanathan, Yogeswaran; Omar, Norazzila; Ahmad Puzi, Nur Nabilah; Saim, Aminuddin; Hj Idrus, Ruszymah

    2016-01-01

    Centella asiatica, locally well known in Malaysia as pegaga, is a traditional herb that has been used widely in Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, and in the traditional medicine of other Southeast Asian countries including Malaysia. Although consumption of the plant is indicated for various illnesses, its potential neuroprotective properties have been well studied and documented. In addition to past studies, recent studies also discovered and/or reconfirmed that C. asiatica acts as an antioxidant, reducing the effect of oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. At the in vitro level, C. asiatica promotes dendrite arborisation and elongation, and also protects the neurons from apoptosis. In vivo studies have shown that the whole extract and also individual compounds of C. asiatica have a protective effect against various neurological diseases. Most of the in vivo studies on neuroprotective effects have focused on Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, learning and memory enhancement, neurotoxicity and other mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety, and epilepsy. Recent studies have embarked on finding the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by C. asiatica extract. However, the capability of C. asiatica in enhancing neuroregeneration has not been studied much and is limited to the regeneration of crushed sciatic nerves and protection from neuronal injury in hypoxia conditions. More studies are still needed to identify the compounds and the mechanism of action of C. asiatica that are particularly involved in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Furthermore, the extraction method, biochemical profile and dosage information of the C. asiatica extract need to be standardised to enhance the economic value of this traditional herb and to accelerate the entry of C. asiatica extracts into modern medicine. PMID:27540320

  3. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Cognitive Function in Midlife: Neuroprotection or Neuroselection?

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Daniel W.; Caspi, Avshalom; Israel, Salomon; Blumenthal, James A.; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if better cognitive functioning at midlife among more physically fit individuals reflects “neuroprotection,” in which fitness protects against age-related cognitive decline, or “neuroselection,” in which children with higher cognitive functioning select into more active lifestyles. Methods Children in the Dunedin Longitudinal Study (N=1,037) completed the Wechsler Intelligence Scales and the Trail-Making, Rey-Delayed-Recall, and Grooved-Pegboard tasks as children and again at midlife (age-38). Adult cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed using a submaximal exercise test to estimate maximum-oxygen-consumption-adjusted-for-body-weight in milliliters/minute/kilogram (VO2max). We tested if more-fit individuals had better cognitive functioning than their less-fit counterparts (which could be consistent with neuroprotection), and if better childhood cognitive functioning predisposed to better adult cardiorespiratory fitness (neuroselection). Finally, we examined possible mechanisms of neuroselection. Results Participants with better cardiorespiratory fitness had higher cognitive test scores at midlife. However, fitness-associated advantages in cognitive functioning were present already in childhood. After accounting for childhood-baseline performance on the same cognitive tests, there was no association between cardiorespiratory fitness and midlife cognitive functioning. Socioeconomic and health advantages in childhood, and healthier lifestyles during young adulthood explained most of the association between childhood cognitive functioning and adult cardiorespiratory fitness. Interpretation We found no evidence for a neuroprotective effect of cardiorespiratory fitness as of midlife. Instead, children with better cognitive functioning are selecting into healthier lives. Fitness interventions may enhance cognitive functioning. But, observational and experimental studies testing neuroprotective effects of physical fitness should consider

  4. Neuroprotection in Eye Disease: Developments in Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Andrew J.; Kaja, Simon; Sabates, Nelson R.; Koulen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cellular aging occurs by the lifelong accumulation of oxidative damage leading to neuronal apoptosis, termed ‘neurodegeneration’, and the functional deficits of aging. Loss of visual function is one of the most important quality of life measures for older adults. We discuss recent clinical and laboratory advances in the neuroprotective treatment of the aging eye with particular emphasis on the three major ocular neurodegenerative conditions: glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and diabetic retinopathy (DR). PMID:24279196

  5. p53 isoforms regulate astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Turnquist, C; Horikawa, I; Foran, E; Major, E O; Vojtesek, B; Lane, D P; Lu, X; Harris, B T; Harris, C C

    2016-09-01

    Bidirectional interactions between astrocytes and neurons have physiological roles in the central nervous system and an altered state or dysfunction of such interactions may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Astrocytes exert structural, metabolic and functional effects on neurons, which can be either neurotoxic or neuroprotective. Their neurotoxic effect is mediated via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) involving pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6), while their neuroprotective effect is attributed to neurotrophic growth factors (e.g., NGF). We here demonstrate that the p53 isoforms Δ133p53 and p53β are expressed in astrocytes and regulate their toxic and protective effects on neurons. Primary human astrocytes undergoing cellular senescence upon serial passaging in vitro showed diminished expression of Δ133p53 and increased p53β, which were attributed to the autophagic degradation and the SRSF3-mediated alternative RNA splicing, respectively. Early-passage astrocytes with Δ133p53 knockdown or p53β overexpression were induced to show SASP and to exert neurotoxicity in co-culture with neurons. Restored expression of Δ133p53 in near-senescent, otherwise neurotoxic astrocytes conferred them with neuroprotective activity through repression of SASP and induction of neurotrophic growth factors. Brain tissues from AD and ALS patients possessed increased numbers of senescent astrocytes and, like senescent astrocytes in vitro, showed decreased Δ133p53 and increased p53β expression, supporting that our in vitro findings recapitulate in vivo pathology of these neurodegenerative diseases. Our finding that Δ133p53 enhances the neuroprotective function of aged and senescent astrocytes suggests that the p53 isoforms and their regulatory mechanisms are potential targets for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27104929

  6. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD.

  7. Neuropharmacological Mechanisms Underlying the Neuroprotective Effects of Methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    Volz, T.J

    2008-01-01

    Methylphenidate is a psychostimulant that inhibits the neuronal dopamine transporter. In addition, methylphenidate has the intriguing ability to provide neuroprotection from the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine and perhaps also Parkinson’s disease; both of which may likely involve the abnormal accumulation of cytoplasmic dopamine inside dopaminergic neurons and the resulting formation of dopamine-associated reactive oxygen species. As delineated in this review, the neuroprotective effects of methylphenidate are due, at least in part, to its ability to attenuate or prevent this abnormal cytoplasmic dopamine accumulation through several possible neuropharmacological mechanisms. These may include 1) direct interactions between methylphenidate and the neuronal dopamine transporter which may attenuate or prevent the entry of methamphetamine into dopaminergic neurons and may also decrease the synthesis of cytoplasmic dopamine through a D2 receptor-mediated signal cascade process, and 2) indirect effects upon the functioning of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 which may increase vesicular dopamine sequestration through both vesicle trafficking and the kinetic upregulation of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 protein. Understanding these neuropharmacological mechanisms of methylphenidate neuroprotection may provide important insights into the physiologic regulation of dopaminergic systems as well as the pathophysiology of a variety of disorders involving abnormal dopamine disposition ranging from substance abuse to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. PMID:19587858

  8. New horizons for newborn brain protection: enhancing endogenous neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Hassell, K Jane; Ezzati, Mojgan; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Hausenloy, Derek J; Robertson, Nicola J

    2015-11-01

    Intrapartum-related events are the third leading cause of childhood mortality worldwide and result in one million neurodisabled survivors each year. Infants exposed to a perinatal insult typically present with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The contribution of pure hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) to NE has been debated; over the last decade, the sensitising effect of inflammation in the aetiology of NE and neurodisability is recognised. Therapeutic hypothermia is standard care for NE in high-income countries; however, its benefit in encephalopathic babies with sepsis or in those born following chorioamnionitis is unclear. It is now recognised that the phases of brain injury extend into a tertiary phase, which lasts for weeks to years after the initial insult and opens up new possibilities for therapy.There has been a recent focus on understanding endogenous neuroprotection and how to boost it or to supplement its effectors therapeutically once damage to the brain has occurred as in NE. In this review, we focus on strategies that can augment the body's own endogenous neuroprotection. We discuss in particular remote ischaemic postconditioning whereby endogenous brain tolerance can be activated through hypoxia/reperfusion stimuli started immediately after the index hypoxic-ischaemic insult. Therapeutic hypothermia, melatonin, erythropoietin and cannabinoids are examples of ways we can supplement the endogenous response to HI to obtain its full neuroprotective potential. Achieving the correct balance of interventions at the correct time in relation to the nature and stage of injury will be a significant challenge in the next decade. PMID:26063194

  9. Sevoflurane Preconditioning Confers Neuroprotection via Anti-apoptosis Effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailian; Shi, Hong; Yu, Qiong; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng; Gao, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia afforded by volatile anesthetic preconditioning (APC) has been demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro, yet the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We previously reported that repeated sevoflurane APC reduced infarct size in rats after focal ischemia. In this study, we investigated whether inhibition of apoptotic signaling cascades contributes to sevoflurane APC-induced neuroprotection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to ambient air or 2.4 % sevoflurane for 30 min per day for 4 consecutive days and then subjected to occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 60 min at 24 h after the last sevoflurane intervention. APC with sevoflurane markedly decreased apoptotic cell death in rat brains, which was accompanied by decreased caspase-3 cleavage and cytochrome c release. The apoptotic suppression was associated with increased ratios of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins over pro-apoptotic proteins and with decreased activation of JNK and p53 pathways. Thus, our data suggest that suppression of apoptotic cell death contributes to the neuroprotection against ischemic brain injury conferred by sevoflurane preconditioning. PMID:26463923

  10. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  11. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Nowrangi, Derek S; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2014-02-17

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential.

  12. Neuroprotective levels of IGF-1 exacerbate epileptogenesis after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu; Pimentel, Corrin; Walters, Katherine; Boller, Lauren; Ghiasvand, Shabnam; Liu, Jing; Staley, Kevin J.; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) is neuroprotective in animal models of brain injury, and has been considered as a potential therapeutic. Akt-mTOR and MAPK are downstream targets of IGF-1 signaling that are activated after brain injury. However, both brain injury and mTOR are linked to epilepsy, raising the possibility that IGF-1 may be epileptogenic. Here, we considered the role of IGF-1 in development of epilepsy after brain injury, using the organotypic hippocampal culture model of post-traumatic epileptogenesis. We found that IGF-1 was neuroprotective within a few days of injury but that long-term IGF-1 treatment was pro-epileptic. Pro-epileptic effects of IGF-1 were mediated by Akt-mTOR signaling. We also found that IGF-1 – mediated increase in epileptic activity led to neurotoxicity. The dualistic nature of effects of IGF-1 treatment demonstrates that anabolic enhancement through IGF-1 activation of mTOR cascade can be beneficial or harmful depending on the stage of the disease. Our findings suggest that epilepsy risk may need to be considered in the design of neuroprotective treatments for brain injury. PMID:27561791

  13. Curcumin: a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mythri, R B; Bharath, M M Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized as a movement disorder. The motor symptoms in PD arise due to selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the ventral midbrain thereby depleting the dopamine levels in the striatum. Most of the current pharmacotherapeutic approaches in PD are aimed at replenishing the striatal dopamine. Although these drugs provide symptomatic relief during early PD, many patients develop motor complications with long-term treatment. Further, PD medications do not effectively tackle tremor, postural instability and cognitive deficits. Most importantly, most of these drugs do not exhibit neuroprotective effects in patients. Consequently, novel therapies involving natural antioxidants and plant products/molecules with neuroprotective properties are being exploited for adjunctive therapy. Curcumin is a polyphenol and an active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a dietary spice used in Indian cuisine and medicine. Curcumin exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, crosses the blood-brain barrier and is neuroprotective in neurological disorders. Several studies in different experimental models of PD strongly support the clinical application of curcumin in PD. The current review explores the therapeutic potential of curcumin in PD. PMID:22211691

  14. Central Nervous System Agents for Ischemic Stroke: Neuroprotection Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Rachna S.; Mao, Lijuan; Zhou, Hua; Zhou, Shuanhu; Zeng, Jiang; Popp, A. John; Wang, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality and disability in the United States. Ischemic stroke constitutes 85% of all stroke cases. However, no effective treatment has been found to prevent damage to the brain in such cases except tissue plasminogen activator with narrow therapeutic window, and there is an unmet need to develop therapeutics for neuroprotection from ischemic stroke. Studies have shown that mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, immune modulation, and oxidative stress and mediators such as excitatory amino acids, nitric oxide, inflammatory mediators, neurotransmitters, reactive oxygen species, and withdrawal of trophic factors may lead to the development of the ischemic cascade. Hence, it is essential to develop neuroprotective agents targeting either the mechanisms or the mediators leading to development of ischemic stroke. This review focuses on central nervous system agents targeting these biochemical pathways and mediators of ischemic stroke, mainly those that counteract apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidation, and well as glutamate inhibitors which have been shown to provide neuroprotection in experimental animals. All these agents have been shown to improve neurological outcome after ischemic insult in experimental animals in vivo, organotypic brain slice/acute slice ex vivo, and cell cultures in vitro and may therefore aid in preventing long-term morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:21521165

  15. Docosahexaenoic acid confers enduring neuroprotection in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Belayev, Ludmila; Khoutorova, Larissa; Obenaus, Andre; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2014-03-15

    Recently we demonstrated that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is highly neuroprotective when animals were allowed to survive during one week. This study was conducted to establish whether the neuroprotection induced by DHA persists with chronic survival. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) and treated with DHA or saline at 3h after MCAo. Animals received neurobehavioral examination (composite neuroscore, rota-rod, beam walking and Y maze tests) followed by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology at 3 weeks. DHA improved composite neurologic score beginning on day 1 by 20%, which persisted throughout weeks 1-3 by 24-41% compared to the saline-treated group. DHA prolonged the latency in rota-rod on weeks 2-3 by 162-178%, enhanced balance performance in the beam walking test on weeks 1 and 2 by 42-51%, and decreased the number of entries in the Y maze test by 51% and spontaneous alteration by 53% on week 2 compared to the saline-treated group. DHA treatment reduced tissue loss (computed from T2-weighted images) by 24% and total and cortical infarct volumes by 46% and 54% compared to the saline-treated group. These results show that DHA confers enduring ischemic neuroprotection. PMID:24433927

  16. New horizons for newborn brain protection: enhancing endogenous neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, K Jane; Ezzati, Mojgan; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Hausenloy, Derek J; Robertson, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Intrapartum-related events are the third leading cause of childhood mortality worldwide and result in one million neurodisabled survivors each year. Infants exposed to a perinatal insult typically present with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The contribution of pure hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) to NE has been debated; over the last decade, the sensitising effect of inflammation in the aetiology of NE and neurodisability is recognised. Therapeutic hypothermia is standard care for NE in high-income countries; however, its benefit in encephalopathic babies with sepsis or in those born following chorioamnionitis is unclear. It is now recognised that the phases of brain injury extend into a tertiary phase, which lasts for weeks to years after the initial insult and opens up new possibilities for therapy. There has been a recent focus on understanding endogenous neuroprotection and how to boost it or to supplement its effectors therapeutically once damage to the brain has occurred as in NE. In this review, we focus on strategies that can augment the body's own endogenous neuroprotection. We discuss in particular remote ischaemic postconditioning whereby endogenous brain tolerance can be activated through hypoxia/reperfusion stimuli started immediately after the index hypoxic-ischaemic insult. Therapeutic hypothermia, melatonin, erythropoietin and cannabinoids are examples of ways we can supplement the endogenous response to HI to obtain its full neuroprotective potential. Achieving the correct balance of interventions at the correct time in relation to the nature and stage of injury will be a significant challenge in the next decade. PMID:26063194

  17. Mechanisms of Neuroprotection by Quercetin: Counteracting Oxidative Stress and More

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lucio G.; Garrick, Jacqueline M.; Roquè, Pamela J.; Pellacani, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Increasing interest has recently focused on determining whether several natural compounds, collectively referred to as nutraceuticals, may exert neuroprotective actions in the developing, adult, and aging nervous system. Quercetin, a polyphenol widely present in nature, has received the most attention in this regard. Several studies in vitro, in experimental animals and in humans, have provided supportive evidence for neuroprotective effects of quercetin, either against neurotoxic chemicals or in various models of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The exact mechanisms of such protective effects remain elusive, though many hypotheses have been formulated. In addition to a possible direct antioxidant effect, quercetin may also act by stimulating cellular defenses against oxidative stress. Two such pathways include the induction of Nrf2-ARE and induction of the antioxidant/anti-inflammatory enzyme paraoxonase 2 (PON2). In addition, quercetin has been shown to activate sirtuins (SIRT1), to induce autophagy, and to act as a phytoestrogen, all mechanisms by which quercetin may provide its neuroprotection. PMID:26904161

  18. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Hwang, Jae Sam; Seok, Heon; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Ho

    2014-06-06

    Highlights: • 11-mer peptide Lumbricusin, a defensin like peptide, is isolated from earthworm. • We here demonstrated that Lumbricusin has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. • p27 degradation by Lumbricusin mediates effects of Lumbricusin on neuronal cells. - Abstract: We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH{sub 2}-RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson’s disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27{sup Kip1} protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27{sup Kip1} significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27{sup Kip1} degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin.

  19. Adipose stromal cells-secreted neuroprotective media against neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, X; Zhao, L; Zhong, J; Gu, H; Feng, D; Johnstone, B H; March, K L; Farlow, M R; Du, Y

    2009-10-01

    Transplantation of pluripotent adipose stem/stromal cells (ASC) alleviates tissue damage and improves functional deficits in both stroke and cardiovascular disease animal models. Recent studies indicate that the primary mechanism of ASC-induced repair may not be directly related to tissue regeneration through differentiation, but rather through paracrine mechanisms provided by secreted pro-survival and repair-inducing trophic factors. In this study, we have found that ASC-conditioned medium (ASC-CM) potently protected cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) from apoptosis induced by serum and potassium deprivation. Neural cell protection was mostly attributable to activated caspase-3 and Akt-mediated neuroprotective pathway signaling. Specific neutralization of neurotrophic factor activity demonstrated that serum and potassium deprivation-induced Akt-mediated neuroprotection and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis were mainly modulated by IGF-1. These data suggest that of the many neuroprotective factors secreted by ASC, IGF-1 is the major factor that mediates protection against serum and potassium deprivation-induced CGN apoptosis. This study establishes a mechanistic basis supporting the therapeutic application of ASC for neurological disorders, specifically through paracrine support provided by trophic factor secretion. PMID:19549558

  20. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, José R.; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M.; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C.; Arrabal, María D.; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  1. Microglia trigger astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection via purinergic gliotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Youichi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Gachet, Christian; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2014-03-01

    Microglia are highly sensitive to even small changes in the brain environment, such as invasion of non-hazardous toxicants or the presymptomatic state of diseases. However, the physiological or pathophysiological consequences of their responses remain unknown. Here, we report that cultured microglia sense low concentrations of the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHglow) and provide neuroprotection against MeHg, for which astrocytes are also required. When exposed to MeHglow, microglia exocytosed ATP via p38 MAPK- and vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT)-dependent mechanisms. Astrocytes responded to the microglia-derived ATP via P2Y1 receptors and released interleukin-6 (IL-6), thereby protecting neurons against MeHglow. These neuroprotective actions were also observed in organotypic hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, but not in slices prepared from VNUT knockout or P2Y1 receptor knockout mice. These findings suggest that microglia sense and respond to even non-hazardous toxicants such as MeHglow and change their phenotype into a neuroprotective one, for which astrocytic support is required.

  2. Modified cyanobacteria

    DOEpatents

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  3. Neuroprotection (and lack of neuroprotection) afforded by a series of noble gases in an in vitro model of neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Noorulhuda; Rizvi, Maleeha; Gu, Jianteng; Adeyi, Olar; Tao, Guocai; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2009-09-01

    Xenon-induced neuroprotection has been well studied both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, the neuroprotective properties of the other noble gases, namely, krypton, argon, neon and helium, were explored in an in vitro model of neuronal injury. Pure neuronal cultures, derived from foetal BALB/c mice cortices, were provoked into injury by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultures were exposed to either nitrogen hypoxia or noble gas hypoxia in balanced salt solution devoid of glucose for 90min. The cultures were allowed to recover in normal culture medium for a further 24h in nitrogen or noble gas. The effect of noble gases on cell reducing ability in the absence of OGD was also investigated. Cell reducing ability was quantified via an MTT assay and expressed as a ratio of the control. The OGD caused a reduction in cell reducing ability to 0.56+/-0.04 of the control in the absence of noble gas (p<0.001). Like xenon (0.92+/-0.10; p<0.001), neuroprotection was afforded by argon (0.71+/-0.05; p<0.01). Neon and krypton did not have a protective effect under our experimental conditions. Helium had a detrimental effect on the cells. In the absence of OGD, krypton reduced the reducing ability of uninjured cells to 0.84+/-0.09 (p<0.01), but argon showed an improvement in reducing ability to 1.15+/-0.11 (p<0.05). Our data suggest that the cheap and widely available noble gas argon may have potential as a neuroprotectant for the future. PMID:19500647

  4. Neuroprotection (and lack of neuroprotection) afforded by a series of noble gases in an in vitro model of neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Noorulhuda; Rizvi, Maleeha; Gu, Jianteng; Adeyi, Olar; Tao, Guocai; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2009-09-01

    Xenon-induced neuroprotection has been well studied both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, the neuroprotective properties of the other noble gases, namely, krypton, argon, neon and helium, were explored in an in vitro model of neuronal injury. Pure neuronal cultures, derived from foetal BALB/c mice cortices, were provoked into injury by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultures were exposed to either nitrogen hypoxia or noble gas hypoxia in balanced salt solution devoid of glucose for 90min. The cultures were allowed to recover in normal culture medium for a further 24h in nitrogen or noble gas. The effect of noble gases on cell reducing ability in the absence of OGD was also investigated. Cell reducing ability was quantified via an MTT assay and expressed as a ratio of the control. The OGD caused a reduction in cell reducing ability to 0.56+/-0.04 of the control in the absence of noble gas (p<0.001). Like xenon (0.92+/-0.10; p<0.001), neuroprotection was afforded by argon (0.71+/-0.05; p<0.01). Neon and krypton did not have a protective effect under our experimental conditions. Helium had a detrimental effect on the cells. In the absence of OGD, krypton reduced the reducing ability of uninjured cells to 0.84+/-0.09 (p<0.01), but argon showed an improvement in reducing ability to 1.15+/-0.11 (p<0.05). Our data suggest that the cheap and widely available noble gas argon may have potential as a neuroprotectant for the future.

  5. BBB-Permeable, Neuroprotective, and Neurotrophic Polysaccharide, Midi-GAGR

    PubMed Central

    Makani, Vishruti; Jang, Yong-gil; Christopher, Kevin; Judy, Wesley; Eckstein, Jacob; Hensley, Kenneth; Chiaia, Nicolas; Kim, Dong-Shik; Park, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of efforts have been poured to find an effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Among those, neurotrophic peptides that regenerate neuronal structures and increase neuron survival show a promise in slowing neurodegeneration. However, the short plasma half-life and poor blood-brain-barrier (BBB)-permeability of neurotrophic peptides limit their in vivo efficacy. Thus, an alternative neurotrophic agent that has longer plasma half-life and better BBB-permeability has been sought for. Based on the recent findings of neuroprotective polysaccharides, we searched for a BBB-permeable neuroprotective polysaccharide among natural polysaccharides that are approved for human use. Then, we discovered midi-GAGR, a BBB-permeable, long plasma half-life, strong neuroprotective and neurotrophic polysaccharide. Midi-GAGR is a 4.7kD cleavage product of low acyl gellan gum that is approved by FDA for human use. Midi-GAGR protected rodent cortical neurons not only from the pathological concentrations of co-/post-treated free reactive radicals and Aβ42 peptide but also from activated microglial cells. Moreover, midi-GAGR showed a good neurotrophic effect; it enhanced neurite outgrowth and increased phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (pCREB) in the nuclei of primary cortical neurons. Furthermore, intra-nasally administered midi-GAGR penetrated the BBB and exerted its neurotrophic effect inside the brain for 24 h after one-time administration. Midi-GAGR appears to activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and its downstream neurotrophic signaling pathway for neuroprotection and CREB activation. Additionally, 14-day intranasal administration of midi-GAGR not only increased neuronal activity markers but also decreased hyperphosphorylated tau, a precursor of neurofibrillary tangle, in the brains of the AD mouse model, 3xTg-AD. Taken together, midi-GAGR with good BBB

  6. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the chiton Liolophura japonica and a phylogenetic tree for molluscan globins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Furukohri, T; Okamoto, S

    1993-02-01

    Myoglobin was isolated from the radular muscle of the chiton Liolophura japonica, a primitive archigastropodic mollusc. Liolophura contains three monomeric myoglobins (I, II, and III), and the complete amino acid sequence of myoglobin I has been determined. It is composed of 145 amino acid residues, and the molecular mass was calculated to be 16,070 D. The E7 distal histidine, which is replaced by valine or glutamine in several molluscan globins, is conserved in Liolophura myoglobin. The autoxidation rate at physiological conditions indicated that Liolophura oxymyoglobin is fairly stable when compared with other molluscan myoglobins. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura myoglobin shows low homology (11-21%) with molluscan dimeric myoglobins and hemoglobins, but shows higher homology (26-29%) with monomeric myoglobins from the gastropodic molluscs Aplysia, Dolabella, and Bursatella. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from 19 molluscan globin sequences. The tree separated them into two distinct clusters, a cluster for muscle myoglobins and a cluster for erythrocyte or gill hemoglobins. The myoglobin cluster is divided further into two subclusters, corresponding to monomeric and dimeric myoglobins, respectively. Liolophura myoglobin was placed on the branch of monomeric myoglobin lineage, showing that it diverged earlier from other monomeric myoglobins. The hemoglobin cluster is also divided into two subclusters. One cluster contains homodimeric, heterodimeric, tetrameric, and didomain chains of erythrocyte hemoglobins of the blood clams Anadara, Scapharca, and Barbatia. Of special interest is the other subcluster. It consists of three hemoglobin chains derived from the bacterial symbiontharboring clams Calyptogena and Lucina, in which hemoglobins are supposed to play an important role in maintaining the symbiosis with sulfide bacteria.

  7. Mechanism of microglia neuroprotection: Involvement of P2X7, TNFα, and valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Masuch, Annette; Shieh, Chu-Hsin; van Rooijen, Nico; van Calker, Dietrich; Biber, Knut

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that ramified microglia are neuroprotective in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced excitotoxicity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). The present study aimed to elucidate the underlying neuron-glia communication mechanism. It is shown here that pretreatment of OHSC with high concentrations of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) reduced NMDA-induced neuronal death only in presence of microglia. Specific agonists and antagonists identified the P2X7 receptor as neuroprotective receptor which was confirmed by absence of ATP-dependent neuroprotection in P2X7-deficient OHSC. Microglia replenished chimeric OHSC consisting of wild-type tissue replenished with P2X7-deficient microglia confirmed the involvement of microglial P2X7 receptor in neuroprotection. Stimulation of P2X7 in primary microglia induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release and blocking TNFα by a neutralizing antibody in OHSC abolished neuroprotection by ATP. OHSC from TNFα-deficient mice show increased exicitoxicity and activation of P2X7 did not rescue neuronal survival in the absence of TNFα. The neuroprotective effect of valproic acid (VPA) was strictly dependent on the presence of microglia and was mediated by upregulation of P2X7 in the cells. The present study demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroprotection depends on ATP-activated purine receptor P2X7 and induction of TNFα release. This neuroprotective pathway was strengthened by VPA elucidating a novel mechanism for the neuroprotective function of VPA.

  8. Identification through high-throughput screening of 4'-methoxyflavone and 3',4'-dimethoxyflavone as novel neuroprotective inhibitors of parthanatos

    PubMed Central

    Fatokun, A A; Liu, J O; Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The current lack of disease-modifying therapeutics to manage neurological and neurodegenerative conditions justifies the development of more efficacious agents. One distinct pathway leading to neuronal death in these conditions and which represents a very promising and attractive therapeutic target is parthanatos, involving overactivation of PARP-1. We therefore sought to identify small molecules that could be neuroprotective by targeting the pathway. Experimental Approach Using HeLa cells, we developed and optimized an assay for high-throughput screening of about 5120 small molecules. Structure–activity relationship (SAR) study was carried out in HeLa and SH-SY5Y cells for molecules related to the initial active compound. The neuroprotective ability of each active compound was tested in cortical neuronal cultures. Key Results 4'-Methoxyflavone (4MF) showed activity by preventing the decrease in cell viability of HeLa and SH-SY5Y cells caused by the DNA-alkylating agent, N-methyl-N‘-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), which induces parthanatos. A similar compound from the SAR study, 3',4'-dimethoxyflavone (DMF), also showed significant activity. Both compounds reduced the synthesis and accumulation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymer and protected cortical neurones against cell death induced by NMDA. Conclusions and Implications Our data reveal additional neuroprotective members of the flavone class of flavonoids and show that methoxylation of the parent flavone structure at position 4′ confers parthanatos-inhibiting activity while additional methoxylation at position 3′, reported by others to improve metabolic stability, does not destroy the activity. These molecules may therefore serve as leads for the development of novel neurotherapeutics for the management of neurological and neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:23550801

  9. High expression of human beta S- and alpha-globins in transgenic mice: erythrocyte abnormalities, organ damage, and the effect of hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Fabry, M E; Costantini, F; Pachnis, A; Suzuka, S M; Bank, N; Aynedjian, H S; Factor, S M; Nagel, R L

    1992-01-01

    A line of transgenic mice with two cointegrated transgenes, the human beta S- and alpha 2-globin genes, linked to the beta-globin locus control region was produced and bred with mice carrying a deletion of the mouse beta major-globin gene. In transgenic mice homozygous for the beta major deletion (alpha H beta S[beta MDD]; where alpha H is human alpha-globin and MD is mouse deletion), 72.5 +/- 2.4% (mean +/- SD) of the beta-chains are beta S and the ratio of alpha H- to beta S-globin was 0.73. Introduction of a heterozygous mouse alpha-globin deletion into mice homozygous for the beta major deletion (alpha H beta S[alpha MD beta MDD]) resulted in 65.1 +/- 8.5% beta S and a human alpha/beta ratio of 0.89 +/- 0.2. Sickling occurs in 95% of erythrocytes from alpha H beta S[beta MDD] mice after slow deoxygenation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed polymer fiber formation but not fascicles of fiber. Increased organ weight was noted in lung, spleen, and kidney of transgenic mice vs. controls that may be due to hypertrophy or increased blood volume in the lungs and/or increased tissue water content. The hemoglobin content of lung, spleen, and kidney was also elevated in transgenic animals due to trapped hemoglobin and/or increased blood volume. When transgenic and control mice were examined by magnetic resonance imaging at 9.4 tesla, some transgenic animals had enlarged kidneys with prolonged relaxation time, consistent with increased organ weight and water content. The glomerular filtration rate was elevated in transgenic animals, which is characteristic of young sickle cell patients. Furthermore, exposure to hypoxia resulted in significantly decreased hematocrit, increased erythrocyte density, and induced a urine-concentrating defect. We conclude that the transgenic mouse line reported here has chronic organ damage and further hematological and organ dysfunction can be induced by hypoxia. Images PMID:1465455

  10. Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibiting Fyn S-Nitrosylation on Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage to CA1 Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lingyun; Wei, Xuewen; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Guangyi; Qi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) can regulate signaling pathways via S-nitrosylation. Fyn can be post-translationally modified in many biological processes. In the present study, using a rat four-vessel-occlusion ischemic model, we aimed to assess whether Fyn could be S-nitrosylated and to evaluate the effects of Fyn S-nitrosylation on brain damage. In vitro, Fyn could be S-nitrosylated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, an exogenous NO donor), and in vivo, endogenous NO synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) could enhance Fyn S-nitrosylation. Application of GSNO, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, an inhibitor of neuronal NOS) and hydrogen maleate (MK-801, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist) could decrease the S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of Fyn induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Cresyl violet staining validated that these compounds exerted neuroprotective effects against the cerebral I/R-induced damage to hippocampal CA1 neurons. Taken together, in this study, we demonstrated that Fyn can be S-nitrosylated both in vitro and in vivo and that inhibiting S-nitrosylation can exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral I/R injury, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stroke and the development of novel treatment strategies. PMID:27420046

  11. Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibiting Fyn S-Nitrosylation on Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage to CA1 Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lingyun; Wei, Xuewen; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Guangyi; Qi, Suhua

    2016-07-12

    Nitric oxide (NO) can regulate signaling pathways via S-nitrosylation. Fyn can be post-translationally modified in many biological processes. In the present study, using a rat four-vessel-occlusion ischemic model, we aimed to assess whether Fyn could be S-nitrosylated and to evaluate the effects of Fyn S-nitrosylation on brain damage. In vitro, Fyn could be S-nitrosylated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, an exogenous NO donor), and in vivo, endogenous NO synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) could enhance Fyn S-nitrosylation. Application of GSNO, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, an inhibitor of neuronal NOS) and hydrogen maleate (MK-801, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist) could decrease the S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of Fyn induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Cresyl violet staining validated that these compounds exerted neuroprotective effects against the cerebral I/R-induced damage to hippocampal CA1 neurons. Taken together, in this study, we demonstrated that Fyn can be S-nitrosylated both in vitro and in vivo and that inhibiting S-nitrosylation can exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral I/R injury, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stroke and the development of novel treatment strategies.

  12. Neuroprotection by 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate in a 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Morroni, Fabiana; Sita, Giulia; Tarozzi, Andrea; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2014-11-17

    A number of pathogenic factors have been implicated in the progression of Parkinson׳s disease (PD), including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, excitotoxicity, and signals mediating apoptosis cascade. 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MSITC) is a major component in wasabi, a very popular spice in Japan and a member of the Brassica family of vegetables. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of 6-MSITC in a PD mouse model. Mice were treated with 6-MSITC (5mg/kg twice a week) for four weeks after the unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). On the 28th day, 6-OHDA-injected mice showed behavioral impairments, a significant decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and an increase in apoptosis. In addition, lesioned mice showed reduced glutathione levels and glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase activities. Notably, 6-MSITC demonstrated neuroprotective effects in our experimental model strongly related to the preservation of functional nigral dopaminergic neurons, which contributed to the reduction of motor dysfunction induced by 6-OHDA. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that the beneficial effects of 6-MSITC could be attributed to the decrease of apoptotic cell death and to the activation of glutathione-dependent antioxidant systems. These findings may render 6-MSITC as a promising molecule for further pharmacological studies on the investigation for disease-modifying treatment in PD. PMID:25257035

  13. Encapsulation of curcumin in polyelectrolyte nanocapsules and their neuroprotective activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Jantas, Danuta; Piotrowski, Marek; Staroń, Jakub; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Regulska, Magdalena; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility and low bioavailability of lipophilic drugs can be potentially improved with the use of delivery systems. In this study, encapsulation of nanoemulsion droplets was utilized to prepare curcumin nanocarriers. Nanosize droplets containing the drug were encapsulated in polyelectrolyte shells formed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes: poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA). The size of synthesized nanocapsules was around 100 nm. Their biocompatibility and neuroprotective effects were evaluated on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line using cell viability/toxicity assays (MTT reduction, LDH release). Statistically significant toxic effect was clearly observed for PLL coated nanocapsules (reduction in cell viability about 20%–60%), while nanocapsules with PLL/PGA coating did not evoke any detrimental effects on SH-SY5Y cells. Curcumin encapsulated in PLL/PGA showed similar neuroprotective activity against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage, as did 5 μM curcumin pre-dissolved in DMSO (about 16% of protection). Determination of concentration of curcumin in cell lysate confirmed that curcumin in nanocapsules has cell protective effect in lower concentrations (at least 20 times) than when given alone. Intracellular mechanisms of encapsulated curcumin-mediated protection engaged the prevention of the H2O2-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) but did not attenuate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. The obtained results indicate the utility of PLL/PGA shell nanocapsules as a promising, alternative way of curcumin delivery for neuroprotective purposes with improved efficiency and reduced toxicity.

  14. Encapsulation of curcumin in polyelectrolyte nanocapsules and their neuroprotective activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Jantas, Danuta; Piotrowski, Marek; Staroń, Jakub; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Regulska, Magdalena; Lasoń, Władysław; Warszyński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility and low bioavailability of lipophilic drugs can be potentially improved with the use of delivery systems. In this study, encapsulation of nanoemulsion droplets was utilized to prepare curcumin nanocarriers. Nanosize droplets containing the drug were encapsulated in polyelectrolyte shells formed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes: poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA). The size of synthesized nanocapsules was around 100 nm. Their biocompatibility and neuroprotective effects were evaluated on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line using cell viability/toxicity assays (MTT reduction, LDH release). Statistically significant toxic effect was clearly observed for PLL coated nanocapsules (reduction in cell viability about 20%-60%), while nanocapsules with PLL/PGA coating did not evoke any detrimental effects on SH-SY5Y cells. Curcumin encapsulated in PLL/PGA showed similar neuroprotective activity against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage, as did 5 μM curcumin pre-dissolved in DMSO (about 16% of protection). Determination of concentration of curcumin in cell lysate confirmed that curcumin in nanocapsules has cell protective effect in lower concentrations (at least 20 times) than when given alone. Intracellular mechanisms of encapsulated curcumin-mediated protection engaged the prevention of the H2O2-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) but did not attenuate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. The obtained results indicate the utility of PLL/PGA shell nanocapsules as a promising, alternative way of curcumin delivery for neuroprotective purposes with improved efficiency and reduced toxicity.

  15. Progesterone neuroprotection in traumatic CNS injury and motoneuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Alejandro F; Labombarda, Florencia; Gonzalez Deniselle, Maria Claudia; Gonzalez, Susana L; Garay, Laura; Meyer, Maria; Gargiulo, Gisella; Guennoun, Rachida; Schumacher, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Studies on the neuroprotective and promyelinating effects of progesterone in the nervous system are of great interest due to their potential clinical connotations. In peripheral neuropathies, progesterone and reduced derivatives promote remyelination, axonal regeneration and the recovery of function. In traumatic brain injury (TBI), progesterone has the ability to reduce edema and inflammatory cytokines, prevent neuronal loss and improve functional outcomes. Clinical trials have shown that short-and long-term progesterone treatment induces a significant improvement in the level of disability among patients with brain injury. In experimental spinal cord injury (SCI), molecular markers of functional motoneurons become impaired, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA, Na,K-ATPase mRNA, microtubule-associated protein 2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). SCI also produces motoneuron chromatolysis. Progesterone treatment restores the expression of these molecules while chromatolysis subsided. SCI also causes oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination. In this case, a short progesterone treatment enhances proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors into mature myelin-producing cells, whereas prolonged treatment increases a transcription factor (Olig1) needed to repair injury-induced demyelination. Progesterone neuroprotection has also been shown in motoneuron neurodegeneration. In Wobbler mice spinal cord, progesterone reverses the impaired expression of BDNF, ChAT and Na,K-ATPase, prevents vacuolar motoneuron degeneration and the development of mitochondrial abnormalities, while functionally increases muscle strength and the survival of Wobbler mice. Multiple mechanisms contribute to these progesterone effects, and the role played by classical nuclear receptors, extra nuclear receptors, membrane receptors, and the reduced metabolites of progesterone in neuroprotection and myelin formation remain an exciting field worth of exploration

  16. Neuroprotective efficacy of a proneurogenic compound after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Blaya, Meghan O; Bramlett, Helen M; Naidoo, Jacinth; Pieper, Andrew A; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2014-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by histopathological damage and long-term sensorimotor and cognitive dysfunction. Recent studies have reported the discovery of the P7C3 class of aminopropyl carbazole agents with potent neuroprotective properties for both newborn neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus and mature neurons in other regions of the central nervous system. This study tested, for the first time, whether the highly active P7C3-A20 compound would be neuroprotective, promote hippocampal neurogenesis, and improve functional outcomes after experimental TBI. Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to moderate fluid percussion brain injury were evaluated for quantitative immunohistochemical and behavioral changes after trauma. P7C3-A20 (10 mg/kg) or vehicle was initiated intraperitoneally 30 min postsurgery and twice per day every day thereafter for 7 days. Administration of P7C3-A20 significantly reduced overall contusion volume, preserved vulnerable anti-neuronal nuclei (NeuN)-positive pericontusional cortical neurons, and improved sensorimotor function 1 week after trauma. P7C3-A20 treatment also significantly increased both bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)- and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells within the subgranular zone of the ipsilateral dentate gyrus 1 week after TBI. Five weeks after TBI, animals treated with P7C3-A20 showed significantly increased BrdU/NeuN double-labeled neurons and improved cognitive function in the Morris water maze, compared to TBI-control animals. These results suggest that P7C3-A20 is neuroprotective and promotes endogenous reparative strategies after TBI. We propose that the chemical scaffold represented by P7C3-A20 provides a basis for optimizing and advancing new pharmacological agents for protecting patients against the early and chronic consequences of TBI. PMID:24070637

  17. Neurometabolic mechanisms for memory enhancement and neuroprotection of methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Julio C.; Bruchey, Aleksandra K.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the first review of the memory-enhancing and neuroprotective metabolic mechanisms of action of methylene blue in vivo. These mechanisms have important implications as a new neurobiological approach to improve normal memory and to treat memory impairment and neurodegeneration associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Methylene blue’s action is unique because its neurobiological effects are not determined by regular drug-receptor interactions or drug-response paradigms. Methylene blue shows a hormetic dose-response, with opposite effects at low and high doses. At low doses, methylene blue is an electron cycler in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, with unparalleled antioxidant and cell respiration-enhancing properties that affect the function of the nervous system in a versatile manner. A major role of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase on the memory-enhancing effects of methylene blue is supported by available data. The memory-enhancing effects have been associated with improvement of memory consolidation in a network-specific and use-dependent fashion. In addition, low doses of methylene blue have also been used for neuroprotection against mitochondrial dysfunction in humans and experimental models of disease. The unique auto-oxidizing property of methylene blue and its pleiotropic effects on a number of tissue oxidases explain its potent neuroprotective effects at low doses. The evidence reviewed supports a mechanistic role of low-dose methylene blue as a promising and safe intervention for improving memory and for the treatment of acute and chronic conditions characterized by increased oxidative stress, neurodegeneration and memory impairment. PMID:22067440

  18. The nucleotide sequence of the mouse embryonic beta-like y-globin messenger RNA as determined from cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Vanin, E F; Farace, M G; Gambari, R; Fantoni, A

    1981-12-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of two cloned cDNAs corresponding to the mRNA of mouse embryonic y2 globin. The combined overlapping sequences span a total of 480 bp, beginning at the codon corresponding to amino acido residue 21 and extending to the AATAAA sequence in the 3' untranslated region. Therefore, when the amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA is combined with the available amino acid sequence, a complete y2 protein sequence can be obtained. Comparisons, at the nucleotide level, between the known beta- and beta-like globin sequences and the y2 sequence show that the embryonic, fetal-adult duplication occurred approx. 160 million years (MY) ago and that the embryonic-fetal duplication occurred approx. 100 MY ago.

  19. A new alpha-globin variant with increased oxygen affinity in a Swiss family: Hb Frauenfeld [alpha 138(H21)Ser-->Phe, TCC>TTC (alpha 2)].

    PubMed

    Hochuli, Michel; Zurbriggen, Karin; Schmid, Marlis; Speer, Oliver; Rochat, Philippe; Frauchiger, Beat; Kleinert, Peter; Schmugge, Markus; Troxler, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A new alpha-globin mutation [alpha 138(H21)Ser-->Phe] was found in a 55-year-old male proband with an erythrocytosis known since his youth. Cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed an additional peak eluting slightly before Hb A indicating the presence of a variant. The peak area of the variant was approximately one-third that of Hb A suggesting an alpha-globin variant. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the mutation at the protein level. The variant is also detectable with isoelectric focusing and reversed phase HPLC. DNA analysis revealed a heterozygous sequence mutation at codon 138 of the alpha2 gene. A C>T transition at the second nucleotide of the codon indicated a Ser-->Phe exchange. The variant showed increased oxygen affinity and was named Hb Frauenfeld.

  20. A novel 26 bp deletion [HBB: c.20_45del26bp] in exon 1 of the β-globin gene causing β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Edison, Eunice S; Venkatesan, Rajkumar S; Govindanattar, Sankari Devi; George, Biju; Shaji, Ramachandran V

    2012-01-01

    Molecular characterization of β-thalassemia (β-thal) is essential in prevention and in understanding the biology of the disease. Deletion mutations are relatively uncommon in β-thal. In this report, we describe a novel 26 bp deletion from codon 6 to codon 14 in the β-globin in a consanguineous family from Tamil Nadu, India. This novel mutation causes a shift in the normal reading frame of the β-globin coding sequence, and consequently, a premature chain termination of translation due to the creation of a stop codon at the position of codon 21. The identification of this novel deletional mutation adds to the repertoire of β-thal mutations in India. PMID:22233277

  1. Neuroprotective therapy for argon-laser-induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai; Solberg, Yoram; Turetz, Yosef

    1999-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment of the central retina is often complicated by an immediate side effect of visual impairment, caused by the unavoidable laser-induced destruction of the normal tissue lying adjacent to the lesion and not affected directly by the laser beam. Furthermore, accidental laser injuries are at present untreatable. A neuroprotective therapy for salvaging the normal tissue might enhance the benefit obtained from treatment and allow safe perifoveal photocoagulation. We have developed a rat model for studying the efficacy of putative neuroprotective compounds in ameliorating laser-induced retinal damage. Four compounds were evaluated: the corticosteroid methylprednisolone, the glutamate-receptor blocker MK-801, the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, and the calcim-overload antagonist flunarizine. The study was carried out in two steps: in the first, the histopathological development of retinal laser injuries was studied. Argon laser lesions were inflicted in the retinas of 18 pigmented rats. The animals were sacrificed after 3, 20 or 60 days and their retinal lesions were evaluated under the light microscope. The laser injury mainly involved the outer layers of the retina, where it destroyed significant numbers of photoreceptor cells. Over time, evidence of two major histopathological processes was observed: traction of adjacent nomral retinal cells into the central area of the lesion forming an internal retinal bulging, and a retinal pigmented epithelial proliferative reaction associated with subretinal neovascularization and invations of the retinal lesion site by phagocytes. The neuroprotective effects of each of the four compounds were verified in a second step of the study. For each drug tested, 12 rats were irradiated wtih argon laser inflictions: six of them received the tested agent while the other six were treated with the corresponding vehicle. Twenty days after laser expsoure, the rats were sacrificed and their lesions were

  2. Clinical Neuroprotective Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Uchikado, Hisaaki; Morioka, Motohiro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is an enormous public health problem with an imperative need for more effective therapies. In therapies for ischemic stroke, tissue plasminogen activators, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are used mainly for their antithrombotic effects. However, free radical scavengers, minocycline and growth factors have shown neuroprotective effects in the treatment of stroke, while antihypertensive drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and hypoglycemic drugs have shown beneficial effects for the prevention of stroke. In the present review, we evaluate the treatment and prevention of stroke in light of clinical studies and discuss new anti-stroke effects other than the main effects of drugs, focusing on optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:22837724

  3. Neuroprotective naphthalene and flavan derivatives from Polygonum cuspidatum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu; Li, Fu-shuang; Feng, Zi-ming; Yang, Ya-nan; Jiang, Jian-shuang; Li, Li; Zhang, Pei-cheng

    2015-02-01

    Ten naphthalene derivatives including two unusual glycosides possessing a naphthalene-fused piceid via a [C8'-O-C6-C5-C7']-trans-dihydrofuran ring, two flavan derivatives, as well as sixteen known phenolic compounds, were isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum. The structures were determined by extensive NMR, MS, CD data, and chemical evidence. In the in vitro neuroprotective assays, at the concentration of 10 μM, five of these compounds exhibited significant effects against PC12 cells injured by rotenone. PMID:25553583

  4. Neuroprotective naphthalene and flavan derivatives from Polygonum cuspidatum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu; Li, Fu-shuang; Feng, Zi-ming; Yang, Ya-nan; Jiang, Jian-shuang; Li, Li; Zhang, Pei-cheng

    2015-02-01

    Ten naphthalene derivatives including two unusual glycosides possessing a naphthalene-fused piceid via a [C8'-O-C6-C5-C7']-trans-dihydrofuran ring, two flavan derivatives, as well as sixteen known phenolic compounds, were isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum. The structures were determined by extensive NMR, MS, CD data, and chemical evidence. In the in vitro neuroprotective assays, at the concentration of 10 μM, five of these compounds exhibited significant effects against PC12 cells injured by rotenone.

  5. Isoflavones with neuroprotective activities from fruits of Cudrania tricuspidata.

    PubMed

    Hiep, Nguyen Tuan; Kwon, Jaeyoung; Kim, Dong-Woo; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Hak-Ju; Mar, Woongchon; Lee, Dongho

    2015-03-01

    Ten isoflavones, cudraisoflavones B-K (1-10), together with 27 known isoflavones, were isolated from the EtOAc soluble extract of fruits of Cudrania tricuspidata. The structures of compounds 1-10 were elucidated on the basis of MS and NMR spectroscopic data, including 2D NMR experiments. Compounds 7-9 and three known (11-13) compounds showed neuroprotective activity against 6-hydroxydopamine induced cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, with EC50 values of 0.5-9.2 μM. PMID:25487308

  6. VNTR internal structure mapping at the {alpha}-globin 3{prime}HVR locus reveals a hierachy of related lineages in oceania

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, J.J.; Clegg, J.B.; Boyce, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Analysis of the {alpha}-globin gene complex in Oceania has revealed many different rearrangements which remove one of the adult globin genes. Frequencies of these deletion chromosomes are elevated by malarial resistance conferred by the resulting {alpha}-thalassaemia. One particular deletion chromosome, designated -{alpha}{sup 3.7}III, is found at high levels in Melanesia and Polynesia: RFLP haplotype analysis shows that this deletion is always found on chromosomes bearing the IIIa haplotype and is likely to be the product of one single rearrangement event. A subset of the -{alpha}{sup 3.7}III chromosomes carries a more recent mutation which generates the haemoglobin variant HbJ{sup Tongariki}. We have characterized the allelic variation at the 3{prime}HVR VNTR locus located 6 kb from the globin genes in each of these groups of chromosomes. We have determined the internal structure of these alleles by RFLP mapping of PCR-amplified DNA: within each group, the allelic diversity results from the insertion and/or deletion of small {open_quotes}motifs{close_quotes} of up to 6 adjacent repeats. Mapping of 3{prime}HVR alleles associated with other haplotypes reveals that these are composed of repeat arrays that are substantially different to those derived from IIIa chromosomes, indicating that interchromosomal recombination between heterologous haplotypes does not account for any of the diversity seen to date. We have recently shown that allelic size variation at the two VNTR loci flanking the {alpha}-globin complex is very closely linked to the haplotypes known to be present at this locus. Here we show that, within a haplotype, VNTR alleles are very closely related to each other on the basis of internal structure and demonstrate that intrachromosomal mutation processes involving small numbers of tandem repeats are the main cause of variation at this locus.

  7. α(+)-Thalassemia Due to a Frameshift Mutation of the α2-Globin Gene [codons 55/56 (+T) or HBA2: c.168dup].

    PubMed

    Waye, John S; Eng, Barry; Hanna, Meredith; Hohenadel, Betty-Ann; Nakamura, Lisa M; Walker, Lynda

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of α(+)-thalassemia (α(+)-thal) trait in a Chinese-Canadian family caused by a novel frameshift mutation of the α2-globin gene, specifically the duplication of a single nucleotide at amino acid codon 56 [HBA2: c.168dup]. The mutation results in substitution of a termination codon (TAA) for lysine (AAG) at amino acid position 56.

  8. Centella asiatica (L.) Urban: From Traditional Medicine to Modern Medicine with Neuroprotective Potential

    PubMed Central

    Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan

    2012-01-01

    This paper covers the studies relevant to neuroprotective activity of Centella asiatica (L.) Urban, also known as “Gotu Kola.” The plant is native to the Southeast Asia and has been used traditionally as brain tonic in ayurvedic medicine. The neuroprotective effect of C. asiatica has been searched using the key words “Centella, Centella asiatica, gotu kola, Asiatic pennywort, neuroprotection, and memory” through the electronic databases including Sciencedirect, Web of Science, Scopus, Pubmed, and Google Scholar. According to the literature survey, C. asiatica (gotu kola) has been reported to have a comprehensive neuroprotection by different modes of action such as enzyme inhibition, prevention of amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease, dopamine neurotoxicity in Parkinson's disease, and decreasing oxidative stress. Therefore, C. asiatica could be suggested to be a desired phytopharmaceutical with neuroprotective effect emerged from traditional medicine. PMID:22666298

  9. Concordance of a point mutation 5' to the A gamma-globin gene with A gamma beta + hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin in Greeks.

    PubMed

    Waber, P G; Bender, M A; Gelinas, R E; Kattamis, C; Karaklis, A; Sofroniadou, K; Stamatoyannopoulos, G; Collins, F S; Forget, B G; Kazazian, H H

    1986-02-01

    In the Greek A gamma beta + type of hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH), adult heterozygotes produce about 20% fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which is predominantly of the A gamma chain variety. The affected beta-globin gene cluster produces near normal amounts of beta-like globin, but in a A gamma to beta ratio of 20:80 instead of 0.5:99.5. Gelinas et al and Collins et al have shown a G to A change 117 nucleotides 5' to the A gamma gene in two Greeks with A gamma beta + HPFH. To demonstrate that this change is not a neutral polymorphism, we carried out hybridization with oligonucleotide probes (19mers) specific for the normal and the mutant sequences. While normal probe identified the A gamma fragment in genomic DNA of all subjects studied, mutant probe was positive only in Greeks with A gamma beta + HPFH. In sum, 108 beta-globin gene clusters of individuals without HPFH were negative when tested with mutant probe, but all 11 affected individuals of six families with Greek A gamma beta + HPFH (two previously sequenced and four new families) were positive with mutant probe. These data support the conclusion that the -117 mutation is causative of A gamma beta + HPFH in Greeks.

  10. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and HbF levels are not the only modulators of sickle cell disease in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Inati, A; Taher, A; Bou Alawi, W; Koussa, S; Kaspar, H; Shbaklo, H; Zalloua, P A

    2003-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder of the beta-globin chain. Despite the fact that all subjects with SCD have the same single base pair mutation, the severity of the clinical and hematological manifestations is extremely variable. This study examined for the first time in Lebanon the correlation between the clinical manifestation of SCD and the beta-globin gene haplotypes. The haplotypes of 50 patients diagnosed with SCD were determined using polymerase chain reaction amplification of fragments containing nine polymorphic restriction sites around and within the epsilon-Ggamma-Agamma-psibeta-delta-beta-globin gene complex. Most reported haplotypes were found in our population with the Benin haplotype as the most prevalent one. When the patients were divided according to their HbF levels into three groups (Group A: HbF < 5%, Group B: HbF between 5 and 15%, and Group C: HbF > 15%), surprisingly, the highest levels of HbF were associated with the most severe clinical cases. Our findings suggest that fetal hemoglobin levels are important but not the only parameters that affect the severity of the disease. In addition, the high levels of HbF in patients with CAR haplotypes did not seem to ameliorate the severity of symptoms, suggesting that genetic factors other than haplotypes are the major determinants of increased HbF levels in Lebanon.

  11. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations.

    PubMed

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease's high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics' assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions' setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning. PMID:27351925

  12. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations.

    PubMed

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease's high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics' assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions' setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning.

  13. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease’s high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics’ assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions’ setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning. PMID:27351925

  14. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Hwang, Jae Sam; Seok, Heon; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Ho

    2014-06-01

    We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH2-RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson's disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27(Kip1) protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27(Kip1) significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27(Kip1) degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin. PMID:24796676

  15. Neuronal networks provide rapid neuroprotection against spreading toxicity.

    PubMed

    Samson, Andrew J; Robertson, Graham; Zagnoni, Michele; Connolly, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    Acute secondary neuronal cell death, as seen in neurodegenerative disease, cerebral ischemia (stroke) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), drives spreading neurotoxicity into surrounding, undamaged, brain areas. This spreading toxicity occurs via two mechanisms, synaptic toxicity through hyperactivity, and excitotoxicity following the accumulation of extracellular glutamate. To date, there are no fast-acting therapeutic tools capable of terminating secondary spreading toxicity within a time frame relevant to the emergency treatment of stroke or TBI patients. Here, using hippocampal neurons (DIV 15-20) cultured in microfluidic devices in order to deliver a localized excitotoxic insult, we replicate secondary spreading toxicity and demonstrate that this process is driven by GluN2B receptors. In addition to the modeling of spreading toxicity, this approach has uncovered a previously unknown, fast acting, GluN2A-dependent neuroprotective signaling mechanism. This mechanism utilizes the innate capacity of surrounding neuronal networks to provide protection against both forms of spreading neuronal toxicity, synaptic hyperactivity and direct glutamate excitotoxicity. Importantly, network neuroprotection against spreading toxicity can be effectively stimulated after an excitotoxic insult has been delivered, and may identify a new therapeutic window to limit brain damage. PMID:27650924

  16. [Neuroprotection of herbs promoting EPO on cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Bai, Zhen-ya; Zhang, Fei-yan; Xu, Xiao-yu

    2015-06-01

    Amounts of researches show that EPO is characterized with neurotrophic and neuroprotective manner, especially in brain stroke, which attracts a large numbers of researchers to study it. With the accumulating researches on its neuroprotection, many related mechanisms were revealed, such as antioxidant, anti-apoptosis, angiogenesis, anti-inflammatory, which suggests a multiple targets role of EPO on brain stroke. However, because of the high risk of thromboembolism in clinical administration of rhEPO and its analogs, the herbs are potential to be a replacer for its less side effects. Many researchers suggested that a larger of herbs were founded having the action of increasing the endogenous EPO in the model of anemia and cerebral ischemia. At the same time, there herbs were also proved that they had the action of against cerebral ischemia while some without considering the role of EPO in the reports. Considering of the action of promoting EPO of these herbs and the neural protection of EPO, this essay mainly summarizes the studies of herbs promoting EPO in the cerebral ischemia and discusses the mechanism of regulating the EPO of these herbs, for the aim of finding the potential drugs against cerebral ischemia. PMID:26591507

  17. Neuroprotective measures in children with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shruti; Branco, Ricardo Garcia

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in children. Severe TBI is a leading cause of death and often leads to life changing disabilities in survivors. The modern management of severe TBI in children on intensive care unit focuses on preventing secondary brain injury to improve outcome. Standard neuroprotective measures are based on management of intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) to optimize the cerebral blood flow and oxygenation, with the intention to avoid and minimise secondary brain injury. In this article, we review the current trends in management of severe TBI in children, detailing the general and specific measures followed to achieve the desired ICP and CPP goals. We discuss the often limited evidence for these therapeutic interventions in children, extrapolation of data from adults, and current recommendation from paediatric guidelines. We also review the recent advances in understanding the intracranial physiology and neuroprotective therapies, the current research focus on advanced and multi-modal neuromonitoring, and potential new therapeutic and prognostic targets. PMID:26855892

  18. Plant-derived neuroprotective agents in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wenyu; Zhuang, Wenxin; Zhou, Shuanhu; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common degenerative disorders of the central nervous system among the elderly. The disease is caused by the slow deterioration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Treatment strategies to protect dopaminergic neurons from progressive damage have received much attention. However there is no effective treatment for PD. Traditional Chinese medicines have shown potential clinical efficacy in attenuating the progression of PD. Increasing evidence indicates that constituents of some Chinese herbs include resveratrol, curcumin, and ginsenoside can be neuroprotective. Since pathologic processes in PD including inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and genetic factors lead to neuronal degeneration, and these Chinese herbs can protect dopaminergic neurons from neuronal degeneration, in this article, we review the neuroprotective roles of these herbs and summarize their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic effects in PD. In addition, we discuss their possible mechanisms of action in in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, with their low toxicity and side-effects, have become the potential therapeutic interventions for prevention and treatment of PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26328004

  19. Chemical Modification of the Multi-Target Neuroprotective Compound Fisetin

    PubMed Central

    Chiruta, Chandramouli; Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Maher, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many factors are implicated in age-related CNS disorders making it unlikely that modulating only a single factor will provide effective treatment. Perhaps a better approach is to identify small molecules that have multiple biological activities relevant to the maintenance of brain function. Recently, we identified an orally active, neuroprotective and cognition-enhancing molecule, the flavonoid fisetin, that is effective in several animal models of CNS disorders. Fisetin has direct antioxidant activity and can also increase the intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH), the major endogenous antioxidant. In addition, fisetin has both neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory activity. However, its relatively high EC50 in cell based assays, low lipophilicity, high tPSA and poor bioavailability suggest that there is room for medicinal chemical improvement. Here we describe a multi-tiered approach to screening that has allowed us to identify fisetin derivatives with significantly enhanced activity in an in vitro neuroprotection model while at the same time maintaining other key activities. PMID:22192055

  20. New Approaches to Neuroprotection in Infant Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    ALBERS, ERIN L.; BICHELL, DAVID P.; MCLAUGHLIN, BETHANN

    2010-01-01

    Advances in surgical techniques and perioperative management have led to dramatic improvements in outcomes for children with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). As the number of survivors continues to grow, clinicians are becoming increasingly aware that adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes after surgical repair of CHD represent a significant cause of morbidity, with widespread neuropsychologic deficits in as many as 50% of these children by the time they reach school age. Modifications of intra-operative management have yet to measurably impact long-term neurologic outcomes. However, exciting advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of cellular injury and of the events that mediate endogenous cellular protection have provided a variety of new potential targets for the assessment, prevention, and treatment of neurologic injury in patients with CHD. In this review, we will discuss the unique challenges to developing neuroprotective strategies in children with CHD and consider how multisystem approaches to neuroprotection, such as ischemic preconditioning, will be the focus of ongoing efforts to develop new diagnostic tools and therapies. Although significant challenges remain, tremendous opportunity exists for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that can serve to limit neurologic injury and ultimately improve outcomes for infants and children with CHD. PMID:20351657

  1. Neuroprotection for the new millennium. Matchmaking pharmacology and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    A major theme of the 1990s in the pathophysiology of nervous system injury has been the multifactorial etiology of irreversible injury. Multiple causes imply multiple opportunities for therapeutic intervention--hence the abandonment of the "magic bullet" single pharmacologic agent for neuroprotection in favor of pharmacologic "cocktails". A second theme of the 1990s has been the progress in technology for neuroprotection, minimally- or non-invasive monitoring as well as treatment. Cardiac stenting has eliminated the need, in many cases, for open heart surgery; deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease has offered significant improvement in quality of life for many who had exhausted cocktail drug treatment for their disease. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus offers a novel treatment for Parkinson's disease where a technological advance may actually be an intervention with effects that are normally expected from pharmacologic agents. Rather than merely "jamming" the nervous system circuits involved in Parkinson's disease, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus appears to improve the neurotransmitter imbalance that lies at the heart of Parkinson's disease. It may also slow the progression of the disease. Given the example of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus for Parkinson's disease, in future one may expect other technological or "hardware" interventions to influence the programming or "software" of the nervous system's physiologic response in certain disease states.

  2. Ethoxyquin provides neuroprotection against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Reed, Nicole; Mi, Ruifa; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido; Hoke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Ethoxyquin was recently identified as a neuroprotective compound against toxic neuropathies and efficacy was demonstrated against paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. In this study we examined the efficacy of ethoxyquin in preventing neurotoxicity of cisplatin in rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and explored its mechanism of action. Ethoxyquin prevented neurotoxicity of cisplatin in vitro in a sensory neuronal cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. In vivo, chronic co-administration of ethoxyquin partially abrogated cisplatin-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological abnormalities. Furthermore, ethoxyquin did not interfere with cisplatin’s ability to induce tumor cell death in ovarian cancer cell line in vitro and in vivo. Finally, ethoxyquin reduced the levels of two client proteins (SF3B2 and ataxin-2) of a chaperone protein, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) when co-administered with cisplatin in vitro. These results implied that the neuroprotective effect of ethoxyquin is mediated through these two client proteins of Hsp90. In fact, reducing levels of SF3B2 in tissue-cultured neurons was effective against neurotoxicity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that ethoxyquin or other compounds that inhibit chaperone activity of Hsp90 and reduce levels of its client protein, SF3B2 may be developed as an adjuvant therapy to prevent neurotoxicity in cisplatin-based chemotherapy protocols. PMID:27350330

  3. Neuroprotective role of the TREK-1 channel in decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Vallee, Nicolas; Meckler, Cédric; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen supersaturation and bubble formation can occur in the vascular system after diving, leading to death and nervous disorders from decompression sickness (DCS). Bubbles alter the vascular endothelium, activate platelets, and lead to focal ischemia with neurological damage mediated by the mechanosensitive TREK-1 neuronal potassium ion channel that sets pre- and postsynaptic resting membrane potentials. We report a neuroprotective effect associated with TREK-1. C57Bl6 mice were subjected to decompression from a simulated 90 msw dive. Of 143 mice that were wild type (WT) for TREK-1, 51.7% showed no DCS, 27.3% failed a grip test, and 21.0% died. Of 88 TREK-1 knockouts (KO), 26.1% showed no DCS, 42.0% failed a grip test, and 31.8% died. Mice that did not express TREK-1 had lower DCS resistance and were more likely to develop neurological symptoms. We conclude that the TREK-1 potassium channel was neuroprotective for DCS. PMID:22323654

  4. Neuronal networks provide rapid neuroprotection against spreading toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Andrew J.; Robertson, Graham; Zagnoni, Michele; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    Acute secondary neuronal cell death, as seen in neurodegenerative disease, cerebral ischemia (stroke) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), drives spreading neurotoxicity into surrounding, undamaged, brain areas. This spreading toxicity occurs via two mechanisms, synaptic toxicity through hyperactivity, and excitotoxicity following the accumulation of extracellular glutamate. To date, there are no fast-acting therapeutic tools capable of terminating secondary spreading toxicity within a time frame relevant to the emergency treatment of stroke or TBI patients. Here, using hippocampal neurons (DIV 15–20) cultured in microfluidic devices in order to deliver a localized excitotoxic insult, we replicate secondary spreading toxicity and demonstrate that this process is driven by GluN2B receptors. In addition to the modeling of spreading toxicity, this approach has uncovered a previously unknown, fast acting, GluN2A-dependent neuroprotective signaling mechanism. This mechanism utilizes the innate capacity of surrounding neuronal networks to provide protection against both forms of spreading neuronal toxicity, synaptic hyperactivity and direct glutamate excitotoxicity. Importantly, network neuroprotection against spreading toxicity can be effectively stimulated after an excitotoxic insult has been delivered, and may identify a new therapeutic window to limit brain damage. PMID:27650924

  5. Neuroprotective effects of geranylgeranylacetone in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaorui; Faden, Alan I; Loane, David J; Lipinski, Marta M; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Stoica, Bogdan A

    2013-12-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) is an inducer of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) that has been used clinically for many years as an antiulcer treatment. It is centrally active after oral administration and is neuroprotective in experimental brain ischemia/stroke models. We examined the effects of single oral GGA before treatment (800 mg/kg, 48 hours before trauma) or after treatment (800 mg/kg, 3 hours after trauma) on long-term functional recovery and histologic outcomes after moderate-level controlled cortical impact, an experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) model in mice. The GGA pretreatment increased the number of HSP70(+) cells and attenuated posttraumatic α-fodrin cleavage, a marker of apoptotic cell death. It also improved sensorimotor performance on a beam walk task; enhanced recovery of cognitive/affective function in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests; and improved outcomes using a composite neuroscore. Furthermore, GGA pretreatment reduced the lesion size and neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex when compared with vehicle-treated TBI controls. Notably, GGA was also effective in a posttreatment paradigm, showing significant improvements in sensorimotor function, and reducing cortical neuronal loss. Given these neuroprotective actions and considering its longstanding clinical use, GGA should be considered for the clinical treatment of TBI. PMID:23942364

  6. Neuroprotective effect of melatonin in experimentally induced hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Vornicescu, Corina; Boşca, Bianca; Crişan, Doiniţa; Yacoob, Sumaya; Stan, Nora; Filip, Adriana; Şovrea, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (MEL) is an endogenous neurohormone with many biological functions, including a powerful antioxidant effect. The aim of the present study was to determine whether MEL protects the brain tissue from the oxidative stress induced by hypobaric hypoxia (HH) in vivo. This study was performed on Wistar rats randomly assigned in four groups, according to the pressure conditions and treatment: Group 1: normoxia and placebo; Group 2: HH and placebo; Group 3: normoxia and MEL; and Group 4: HH and MEL. The following aspects were evaluated: cognitive function (space reference and memory), oxidative stress parameters - serum and brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels -, and brain tissue macroscopic and microscopic morphological changes. Exposure to oxidative stress results in cognitive dysfunctions and biochemical alterations: significant increase of MDA and reduction of GSH in both serum and brain tissue. The most important morphological changes were observed in Group 2: increased cellularity, loss of pericellular haloes, shrunken neurons with scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic, pyknotic or absent nuclei; reactive gliosis, edema and blood-brain barrier alterations could also be observed in some areas. MEL treatment significantly diminished all these effects. Our results suggest that melatonin is a neuroprotective antioxidant both in normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia that can prevent and counteract the deleterious effects of oxidative stress (neuronal death, reactive astrogliosis, memory impairment and cognitive dysfunctions). Dietary supplements containing melatonin might be useful neuroprotective agents for the therapy of hypoxia-induced consequences. PMID:24399008

  7. Neuroprotective Activity of Coptisine from Coptis chinensis (Franch)

    PubMed Central

    Friedemann, Thomas; Schumacher, Udo; Tao, Yi; Leung, Alexander Kai-Man; Schröder, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Coptis chinensis rhizomes (CR) are one important ingredient of traditional Chinese herbal formulas such as San-Huang-Xie-Xin-Tang which is used for treatment of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Recent studies suggest that the extract of CR might be a potential therapeutic agent for amelioration of neurological disorders associated with oxidative stress. In the present study we aimed at revealing the main active compound(s) of the CR extract and at investigating the mechanism of action. Four main alkaloids of the CR extract (berberine, coptisine, jatrorrhizine, and palmatine) were selected for this study. Results showed that out of those alkaloids only pretreatment with coptisine significantly attenuated tert-butylhydroperoxide induced reduction of cell viability, increased rate of apoptosis, and declined mitochondrial membrane potential. Elisa assay and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) gene expression was downregulated by coptisine, which could explain the neuroprotective effect, hypothetically, by strengthening the thioredoxin defense system against oxidative stress and attenuation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (Ask1) mediated apoptotic signaling. A comparison between coptisine and CR extract identified coptisine as the main single component responsible for the neuroprotective effect. Based on the results the CR extract and coptisine are promising candidate agents for prevention or improvement of diabetic neuropathy and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26229546

  8. Normobaric hyperoxia-based neuroprotective therapies in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability due to disturbance of blood supply to the brain. As brain is highly sensitive to hypoxia, insufficient oxygen supply is a critical event contributing to ischemic brain injury. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO) that aims to enhance oxygen delivery to hypoxic tissues has long been considered as a logical neuroprotective therapy for ischemic stroke. To date, many possible mechanisms have been reported to elucidate NBO’s neuroprotection, such as improving tissue oxygenation, increasing cerebral blood flow, reducing oxidative stress and protecting the blood brain barrier. As ischemic stroke triggers a battery of damaging events, combining NBO with other agents or treatments that target multiple mechanisms of injury may achieve better outcome than individual treatment alone. More importantly, time loss is brain loss in acute cerebral ischemia. NBO can be a rapid therapy to attenuate or slow down the evolution of ischemic tissues towards necrosis and therefore “buy time” for reperfusion therapies. This article summarizes the current literatures on NBO as a simple, widely accessible, and potentially cost-effective therapeutic strategy for treatment of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23298701

  9. [Neuroprotection of herbs promoting EPO on cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Bai, Zhen-ya; Zhang, Fei-yan; Xu, Xiao-yu

    2015-06-01

    Amounts of researches show that EPO is characterized with neurotrophic and neuroprotective manner, especially in brain stroke, which attracts a large numbers of researchers to study it. With the accumulating researches on its neuroprotection, many related mechanisms were revealed, such as antioxidant, anti-apoptosis, angiogenesis, anti-inflammatory, which suggests a multiple targets role of EPO on brain stroke. However, because of the high risk of thromboembolism in clinical administration of rhEPO and its analogs, the herbs are potential to be a replacer for its less side effects. Many researchers suggested that a larger of herbs were founded having the action of increasing the endogenous EPO in the model of anemia and cerebral ischemia. At the same time, there herbs were also proved that they had the action of against cerebral ischemia while some without considering the role of EPO in the reports. Considering of the action of promoting EPO of these herbs and the neural protection of EPO, this essay mainly summarizes the studies of herbs promoting EPO in the cerebral ischemia and discusses the mechanism of regulating the EPO of these herbs, for the aim of finding the potential drugs against cerebral ischemia.

  10. In vitro neuroprotective activities of compounds from Angelica shikokiana Makino.

    PubMed

    Mira, Amira; Yamashita, Shuntaro; Katakura, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-03-16

    Angelica shikokiana is widely marketed in Japan as a dietary food supplement. With a focus on neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, the aerial part was extracted and through bio-guided fractionation, fifteen compounds [α-glutinol, β-amyrin, kaempferol, luteolin, quercetin, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, methyl chlorogenate, chlorogenic acid, hyuganin E, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde, β-sitosterol-3-O-glucoside, adenosine (isolated for the first time from A. shikokiana), isoepoxypteryxin and isopteryxin] were isolated. Isolated compounds were evaluated for in vitro neuroprotection using acetylcholine esterase inhibitory, protection against hydrogen peroxide and amyloid β peptide (Aβ25-35)-induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells, scavenging of hydroxyl radicals and intracellular reactive oxygen species and thioflavin T assays. Quercetin showed the strongest AChE inhibition (IC50 value = 35.5 µM) through binding to His-440 and Tyr-70 residues at the catalytic and anionic sites of acetylcholine esterase, respectively. Chlorogenic acid, its methyl ester, quercetin and luteolin could significantly protect neuro-2A cells against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity and scavenge hydroxyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species. Kaempferol-3-O-rutinoiside, hyuganin E and isoepoxypteryxin significantly decreased Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity and Th-T fluorescence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about neuroprotection of hyuganin E and isoepoxypteryxin against Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity.

  11. Neuronal networks provide rapid neuroprotection against spreading toxicity.

    PubMed

    Samson, Andrew J; Robertson, Graham; Zagnoni, Michele; Connolly, Christopher N

    2016-09-21

    Acute secondary neuronal cell death, as seen in neurodegenerative disease, cerebral ischemia (stroke) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), drives spreading neurotoxicity into surrounding, undamaged, brain areas. This spreading toxicity occurs via two mechanisms, synaptic toxicity through hyperactivity, and excitotoxicity following the accumulation of extracellular glutamate. To date, there are no fast-acting therapeutic tools capable of terminating secondary spreading toxicity within a time frame relevant to the emergency treatment of stroke or TBI patients. Here, using hippocampal neurons (DIV 15-20) cultured in microfluidic devices in order to deliver a localized excitotoxic insult, we replicate secondary spreading toxicity and demonstrate that this process is driven by GluN2B receptors. In addition to the modeling of spreading toxicity, this approach has uncovered a previously unknown, fast acting, GluN2A-dependent neuroprotective signaling mechanism. This mechanism utilizes the innate capacity of surrounding neuronal networks to provide protection against both forms of spreading neuronal toxicity, synaptic hyperactivity and direct glutamate excitotoxicity. Importantly, network neuroprotection against spreading toxicity can be effectively stimulated after an excitotoxic insult has been delivered, and may identify a new therapeutic window to limit brain damage.

  12. Neuroprotective potential of ceftriaxone in in vitro models of stroke.

    PubMed

    Lipski, J; Wan, C K; Bai, J Z; Pi, R; Li, D; Donnelly, D

    2007-05-11

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters are considered an important target for neuroprotective therapies as the function of these transporters is abnormal in stroke and other neurological disorders associated with excitotoxicity. Recently, Rothstein et al., [Rothstein JD, Patel S, Regan MR, Haenggeli C, Huang YH, Bergles DE, Jin L, Dykes Hoberg M, Vidensky S, Chung DS, Toan SV, Bruijn LI, Su ZZ, Gupta P, Fisher PB (2005) Beta-lactam antibiotics offer neuroprotection by increasing glutamate transporter expression. Nature 433:73-77] reported that beta-lactam antibiotics (including ceftriaxone, which easily crosses the blood-brain barrier) increase glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) expression and reduce cell death resulting from oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in dissociated embryonic cortical cultures. To determine whether a similar neuroprotective mechanism operates in more mature neurons, which show a different pattern of response to ischemia than primary cultures, we exposed acute hippocampal slices obtained from rats treated with ceftriaxone for 5 days (200 mg/kg; i.p.) to OGD. Whole-cell patch clamp recording of glutamate-induced N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) currents from CA1 pyramidal neurons showed a larger potentiation of these currents after application of 15 microM dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA; a potent blocker of glutamate transporters) in ceftriaxone-injected animals than in untreated animals, indicating increased glutamate transporter activity. Western blot analysis did not reveal GLT-1 upregulation in the hippocampus. Delay to OGD-induced hypoxic spreading depression (HSD) recorded in slices obtained from ceftriaxone-treated rats was longer (6.3+/-0.2 vs. 5.2+/-0.2 min; P<0.001) than that in the control group, demonstrating a neuroprotective action of the antibiotic in this model. The effect of ceftriaxone was also tested in organotypic hippocampal slices obtained from P7-9 rats (>14 days in vitro). OGD or glutamate (3.5-5.0 mM) damaged CA1

  13. Anaesthetic-related neuroprotection: intravenous or inhalational agents?

    PubMed

    Schifilliti, Daniela; Grasso, Giovanni; Conti, Alfredo; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    In designing the anaesthetic plan for patients undergoing surgery, the choice of anaesthetic agent may often appear irrelevant and the best results obtained by the use of a technique or a drug with which the anaesthesia care provider is familiar. Nevertheless, in those surgical procedures (cardiopulmonary bypass, carotid surgery and cerebral aneurysm surgery) and clinical situations (subarachnoid haemorrhage, stroke, brain trauma and post-cardiac arrest resuscitation) where protecting the CNS is a priority, the choice of anaesthetic drug assumes a fundamental role. Treating patients with a neuroprotective agent may be a consideration in improving overall neurological outcome. Therefore, a clear understanding of the relative degree of protection provided by various agents becomes essential in deciding on the most appropriate anaesthetic treatment geared to these objectives. This article surveys the current literature on the effects of the most commonly used anaesthetic drugs (volatile and gaseous inhalation, and intravenous agents) with regard to their role in neuroprotection. A systematic search was performed in the MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINHAL®) and Cochrane Library databases using the following keywords: 'brain' (with the limits 'newborn' or 'infant' or 'child' or 'neonate' or 'neonatal' or 'animals') AND 'neurodegeneration' or 'apoptosis' or 'toxicity' or 'neuroprotection' in combination with individual drug names ('halothane', 'isoflurane', 'desflurane', 'sevoflurane', 'nitrous oxide', 'xenon', 'barbiturates', 'thiopental', 'propofol', 'ketamine'). Over 600 abstracts for articles published from January 1980 to April 2010, including studies in animals, humans and in vitro, were examined, but just over 100 of them were considered and reviewed for quality. Taken as a whole, the available data appear to indicate that anaesthetic drugs such as barbiturates, propofol, xenon and most volatile anaesthetics (halothane

  14. Treatment with lutein provides neuroprotection in mice subjected to transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Xuan; Liu, Ting; Dai, Xue-Ling; Zheng, Qiu-Sheng; Hui, Bo-Di; Jiang, Zhao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Lutein is known to be a nonprovitamin A carotenoid found in broccoli and spinach. The aim of present study was to investigate whether lutein can protect brain against ischemic injury by reducing oxidative stress. Male ICR mice were randomly divided into five experimental groups: model group, sham group, lutein high, middle, and low-dose groups (30, 15, and 7.5 mg/kg). Mice were subjected to a 2-h middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion for 22 h. The reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio, antioxidant enzyme activities, malondialdehyde (MDA), and the carbonyl content in oxidatively modified proteins in brain tissue were determined with colorimetric method. The 8-hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) expression was measured by immunohistochemistry assay, and the neuron apoptosis was detected by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. Then, the neurological deficit scores were measured at last. Treatment of lutein significantly elevated the ratio of GSH/GSSG as well as activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase and obviously decreased the contents of MDA, brain carbonyl, the expression of 8-OHdG, the number of apoptotic cells, and neurological deficit scores. Our results demonstrate that administration of lutein affords strong neuroprotective effect against transient cerebral ischemic injury and that the effect might be associated with its antioxidant property.

  15. Detection of a major gene for heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin after accounting for genetic modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Thein, S.L.; Weatherall, D.J. ); Sampietro, M.; Rohde, K.; Rochette, J.; Lathrop, G.M.; Demenais, F.

    1994-02-01

    [open quotes]Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin[close quotes] (HPFH) is the term used to describe the genetically determined persistence of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production into adult life, in the absence of any related hematological disorder. Whereas some forms are caused by mutations in the [beta]-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11, others segregate independently. While the latter are of particular interest with respect to the regulation of globin gene switching, it has not been possible to determine their chromosomal location, mainly because their mode of inheritance is not clear, but also because several other factors are known to modify Hb F production. The authors have examined a large Asian Indian pedigree which includes individuals with heterocellular HPFH associated with [beta]-thalassemia and/or [alpha]-thalassemia. Segregation analysis was conducted on the HPFH trait FC, defined to be the percentage of Hb F-containing cells (F-cells), using the class D regressive model. The results provide evidence for the presence of a major gene, dominant or codominant, which controls the FC values with residual familial correlations. The major gene was detected when the effects of genetic modifiers, notably [beta]-thalassemia and the XmnI-[sup G][gamma] polymorphism, are accounted for in this analysis. Linkage with the [beta]-globin gene cluster is excluded. The transmission of the FC values in this pedigree is informative enough to allow detection of linkage with an appropriate marker(s). The analytical approach outlined in this study, using simple regression to allow for genetic modifiers and thus allowing the mode of inheritance of a trait to be dissected out, may be useful as a model for segregation and linkage analyses of other complex phenotypes. 39 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Detection of a major gene for heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin after accounting for genetic modifiers.

    PubMed

    Thein, S L; Sampietro, M; Rohde, K; Rochette, J; Weatherall, D J; Lathrop, G M; Demenais, F

    1994-02-01

    "Heterocellular hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin" (HPFH) is the term used to describe the genetically determined persistence of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production into adult life, in the absence of any related hematological disorder. Whereas some forms are caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11, others segregate independently. While the latter are of particular interest with respect to the regulation of globin gene switching, it has not been possible to determine their chromosomal location, mainly because their mode of inheritance is not clear, but also because several other factors are known to modify Hb F production. We have examined a large Asian Indian pedigree which includes individuals with heterocellular HPFH associated with beta-thalassemia and/or alpha-thalassemia. Segregation analysis was conducted on the HPFH trait FC, defined to be the percentage of Hb F-containing cells (F-cells), using the class D regressive model. Our results provide evidence for the presence of a major gene, dominant or codominant, which controls the FC values with residual familial correlations. The major gene was detected when the effects of genetic modifiers, notably beta-thalassemia and the XmnI-G gamma polymorphism, are accounted for in the analysis. Linkage with the beta-globin gene cluster is excluded. The transmission of the FC values in this pedigree is informative enough to allow detection of linkage with an appropriate marker(s). The analytical approach outlined in this study, using simple regression to allow for genetic modifiers and thus allowing the mode of inheritance of a trait to be dissected out, may be useful as a model for segregation and linkage analyses of other complex phenotypes. PMID:7508182

  17. Inhibition of Splicing but not Cleavage at the 5' Splice Site by Truncating Human β -globin Pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furdon, Paul J.; Kole, Ryszard

    1986-02-01

    Human β -globin mRNAs truncated in the second exon or in the first intron have been processed in vitro in a HeLa cell nuclear extract. Transcripts containing a fragment of the second exon as short as 53 nucleotides are efficiently spliced, whereas transcripts truncated 24 or 14 nucleotides downstream from the 3' splice site are spliced inefficiently, if at all. All of these transcripts, however, are efficiently and accurately cleaved at the 5' splice site. In contrast, RNA truncated in the first intron, 54 nucleotides upstream from the 3' splice site, is not processed at all. These findings suggest that cleavage at the 5' splice site and subsequent splicing steps--i.e., cleavage at the 3' splice site and exon ligation--need not be coupled. Anti-Sm serum inhibits the complete splicing reaction and cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting involvement of certain ribonucleoprotein particles in the cleavage reaction. ATP and Mg2+ are required for cleavage at the 5' splice site at concentrations similar to those for the complete splicing reaction.

  18. Chicken β-globin insulators fail to shield the nkx2.5 promoter from integration site effects in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Grajevskaja, Viktorija; Balciuniene, Jorune; Balciunas, Darius

    2013-12-01

    Genetic lineage tracing and conditional mutagenesis are developmental genetics techniques reliant on precise tissue-specific expression of transgenes. In the mouse, high specificity is usually achieved by inserting the transgene into the locus of interest through homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. In the zebrafish, DNA containing the transgenic construct is randomly integrated into the genome, usually through transposon-mediated transgenesis. Expression of such transgenes is affected by regulatory features surrounding the integration site from general accessibility of chromatin to tissue-specific enhancers. We tested if the 1.2 kb cHS4 insulators derived from the chicken β-globin locus can shield a transgene from chromosomal position effects in the zebrafish genome. As our test promoters, we used two different-length versions of the zebrafish nkx2.5. We found that flanking a transgenic construct by cHS4 insulation sequences leads to overall increase in the expression of nkx2.5:mRFP. However, we also observed a very high degree of variability of mRFP expression, indicating that cHS4 insulators fail to protect nkx2.5:mRFP from falling under the control of enhancers in the vicinity of integration site.

  19. Phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes from DNA sequences in the Psi eta-globin region

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, M.M.; Slightom, J.L.; Goodman, M.

    1987-10-16

    Sequences from the upstream and downstream flanking DNA regions of the Psi eta-globin locus in Pan troglodytes (common chimpanzee), Gorilla gorilla (gorilla), and Pongo pygmaeus (orangutan, the closest living relative to Homo, Pan, and Gorilla) provided further data for evaluating the phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes. These newly sequenced orthologs (an additional 4.9 kilobase pairs (kbp) for each species) were combined with published Psi eta-gene sequences and then compared to the same orthologous stretch (a continuous 7.1-kbp region) available for humans. Phylogenetic analysis of these nucleotide sequences by the parsimony method indicated (i) that human and chimpanzee are more closely related to each other than either is to gorilla and (ii) that the slowdown in the rate of sequence evolution evident in higher primates is especially pronounced in humans. These results indicate that features unique to African apes (but not to humans) are primitive and that even local molecular clocks should be applied with caution.

  20. Mutation in the US -globin gene detected in the progeny of a female mouse treated with ethylnitrosourea

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, S.E.; Johnson, F.M.; Skow, L.C.; Popp, D.; Barnett, L.B.; Popp, R.A.

    1985-09-01

    A mouse with a variant hemoglobin was discovered during electrophoretic screening of (C57BL/6J x DBA/2J) F1 progeny of females treated with ethylnitrosourea. The variant trait was transmitted as a simple Mendelian alternate at the Hbb locus in all crosses except those involving the original carrier of the mutation. The proband mouse which received the mutation directly from the mutagen-treated parent was a germinal mosaic for the mutant and normal Hbb/sup s/ alleles. The mutant allele was designated Hbb/sup s2/. The mutant haplotype specifies both an electrophoretically fast hemoglobin band and a hemoglobin band in the normal US /sup single/ hemoglobin position. A comparison of the relative concentrations of the two hemoglobins in Hbb/sup s2/ mice demonstrates preferential expression of the mutant gene. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the variant US -globin revealed that the valine at position 60 was changed to glutamic acid. The simplest mutation mechanisms for such an alteration is A x T T x A transversion.

  1. Dual effects of neuroprotection and neurotoxicity by general anesthetics: Role of intracellular calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Huafeng; Inan, Saadet

    2013-01-01

    Although general anesthetics have long been considered neuroprotective, there are growing concerns about neurotoxicity. Preclinical studies clearly demonstrated that commonly used general anesthetics are both neuroprotective and neurotoxic, with unclear mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that differential activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, a calcium release channel located on the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), play important role on determining the fate of neuroprotection or neurotoxicity by general anesthetics. General anesthetics at low concentrations for short duration are sublethal stress factors which induce endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms and provide neuroprotection via adequate activation of InsP3R and moderate calcium release from ER. On the other hand, general anesthetics at high concentrations for prolonged duration are lethal stress factors which induce neuronal damage by over activation of InsP3R and excessive and abnormal Ca2+ release from ER. This review emphasizes the duel effects of both neuroprotection and neurotoxicity via differential regulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis by commonly used general anesthetics and recommends strategy to maximize neuroprotective but minimize neurotoxic effects of general anesthetics. PMID:23721657

  2. Estrogen receptor variant ER-α36 is involved in estrogen neuroprotection against oxidative toxicity.

    PubMed

    Han, S; Zhao, B; Pan, X; Song, Z; Liu, J; Gong, Y; Wang, M

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that estrogen exerts neuroprotective effect against various neuronal damages. However, the estrogen receptor (ER) that mediates estrogen neuroprotection has not been well established. In this study, we investigated the potential receptor that mediates estrogen neuroprotection and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was chosen as an agent in our study to mimic free radicals that are often involved in the pathogenesis of many degenerative diseases. We found that in human SY5Y and IMR-32 cells, the estrogen neuroprotection against H2O2 toxicity was abrogated by knockdown of a variant of estrogen receptor-α, ER-α36. We also studied the rapid estrogen signaling mediated by ER-α36 in neuroprotective effect and found the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling mediated by ER-α36 is involved in estrogen neuroprotection. We also found that GPER, an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, is not involved in ER-α36-mediated rapid estrogen response. Our study thus demonstrates that ER-α36-mediated rapid estrogen signaling is involved in the neuroprotection activity of estrogen against oxidative toxicity. PMID:26383254

  3. Hot spots and future directions of research on the neuroprotective effects of nimodipine.

    PubMed

    Li, Runhui

    2014-11-01

    Calcium antagonists are widely used in the clinical treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disease because of their vascular and neuroprotective effects. Nimodipine, a typical calcium antagonist, can cross the blood-brain barrier and act selectively at neurons and blood vessels of target tissues, thus exerting neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present study was to explore the hot spots and future trends of research on the neuroprotective effects of nimodipine. We retrieved 425 articles on the neuroprotective effects of nimodipine that were indexed in the Web of the Science database between 2000 and 2014. The retrieved articles were analyzed using document analysis reporting and the derived information function in the Web of Science, and the information visualization software CiteSpace III. The reference co-citation network was plotted, and the high frequency key words in these publications were used to analyze the research fronts and development trends for nimodipine neuroprotection. According to these co-citation clusters, the research front of nimodipine neuroprotection is the use of randomized controlled trials to study nimodipine intervention of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Using time zone view analysis on hot spots labeled with a key word, the areas of interest in the field of nimodipine neuroprotection are nimodipine pharmacology and therapeutics, blood-brain barrier, trials, and anti-angiospasm.

  4. Food, nutrigenomics, and neurodegeneration--neuroprotection by what you eat!

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Pinto, Luigi; Binienda, Zbigniew; Ali, Syed

    2013-10-01

    Diet in human health is no longer simple nutrition, but in light of recent research, especially nutrigenomics, it is linked via evolution and genetics to cell health status capable of modulating apoptosis, detoxification, and appropriate gene response. Nutritional deficiency and disease especially lack of vitamins and minerals is well known, but more recently, epidemiological studies suggest a role of fruits and vegetables, as well as essential fatty acids and even red wine (French paradox), in protection against disease. In the early 1990s, various research groups started considering the use of antioxidants (e.g., melatonin, resveratrol, green tea, lipoic acid) and metabolic compounds (e.g., nicotinamide, acetyl-L-carnitine, creatine, coenzyme Q10) as possible candidates in neuroprotection. They were of course considered on par with snake oil salesman (women) at the time. The positive actions of nutritional supplements, minerals, and plant extracts in disease prevention are now mainstream and commercial health claims being made are subject to regulation in most countries. Apart from efficacy and finding, the right dosages, the safety, and especially the level of purification and lack of contamination are all issues that are important as their use becomes widespread. From the mechanistic point of view, most of the time these substances replenish the body's deficiency and restore normal function. However, they also exert actions that are not sensu stricto nutritive and could be considered pharmacological especially that, at times, higher intake than recommended (RDA) is needed to see these effects. Free radicals and neuroinflammation processes underlie many neurodegenerative conditions, even Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Curcumin, carotenoids, acetyl-L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, vitamin D, and polyphenols and other nutraceuticals have the potential to target multiple pathways in these conditions. In summary, augmenting neuroprotective pathways using

  5. Superior neuroprotective effects of cerebrolysin in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of hyperthermia-induced brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, the incidence of heat stroke and associated brain pathology are increasing Worldwide. More than half of the world's population are living in areas associated with high environmental heat especially during the summer seasons. Thus, new research is needed using novel drug targets to achieve neuroprotection in heat-induced brain pathology. Previous research from our laboratory showed that the pathophysiology of brain injuries following heat stroke are exacerbated by chronic intoxication of engineered nanoparticles of small sizes (50-60 nm) following identical heat exposure in rats. Interestingly, in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals the known neuroprotective agents in standard doses failed to induce effective neuroprotection. This suggests that the dose-response of the drugs either requires modification or new therapeutic agents are needed to provide better neuroprotection in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals after heat stroke. This review is focused on the use of cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors and active peptide fragments, in relation to other neuroprotective agents normally used to treat ischemic stroke in clinics in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain damage in heat stroke. It appears that cerebrolysin exerts the most superior neuroprotective effects in heat stress as compared to other neuroprotective agents on brain pathology in normal rats. Interestingly, to induce effective neuroprotection in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology a double dose of cerebrolysin is needed. On the other hand, double doses of the other drugs were quite ineffective in reducing brain damage. These observations suggest that the drug type and doses are important factors in attenuating nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology in heat stroke. The functional significance and possible mechanisms of drug-induced neuroprotection in nanoparticle-treated, heat-stressed rats are discussed.

  6. Neuroprotective action of cycloheximide involves induction of bcl-2 and antioxidant pathways.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, K; Estus, S; Fu, W; Mark, R J; Mattson, M P

    1997-03-10

    The ability of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to prevent neuronal death in different paradigms has been interpreted to indicate that the cell death process requires synthesis of "killer" proteins. On the other hand, data indicate that neurotrophic factors protect neurons in the same death paradigms by inducing expression of neuroprotective gene products. We now provide evidence that in embryonic rat hippocampal cell cultures, CHX protects neurons against oxidative insults by a mechanism involving induction of neuroprotective gene products including the antiapoptotic gene bcl-2 and antioxidant enzymes. Neuronal survival after exposure to glutamate, FeSO4, and amyloid beta-peptide was increased in cultures pretreated with CHX at concentrations of 50-500 nM; higher and lower concentrations were ineffective. Neuroprotective concentrations of CHX caused only a moderate (20-40%) reduction in overall protein synthesis, and induced an increase in c-fos, c-jun, and bcl-2 mRNAs and protein levels as determined by reverse transcription-PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry, respectively. At neuroprotective CHX concentrations, levels of c-fos heteronuclear RNA increased in parallel with c-fos mRNA, indicating that CHX acts by inducing transcription. Neuroprotective concentrations of CHX suppressed accumulation of H2O2 induced by FeSO4, suggesting activation of antioxidant pathways. Treatment of cultures with an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide directed against bcl-2 mRNA decreased Bcl-2 protein levels and significantly reduced the neuroprotective action of CHX, suggesting that induction of Bcl-2 expression was mechanistically involved in the neuroprotective actions of CHX. In addition, activity levels of the antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, Mn-superoxide dismutase, and catalase were significantly increased in cultures exposed to neuroprotective levels of CHX. Our data suggest that low concentrations of CHX can promote neuron survival by

  7. Postischemic, systemic administration of polyamine-modified superoxide dismutase reduces hippocampal CA1 neurodegeneration in rat global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wengenack, T M; Curran, G L; Poduslo, J F

    1997-04-18

    Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) have shown neuroprotective effects in animal models of cerebral ischemia, but only at very high doses. Modifications to increase the plasma half-life or blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of SOD have resulted in limited neuroprotective effects. No one has demonstrated neuroprotection with postischemic administration. The specific aim of the present study was to administer systemically a polyamine-modified SOD, having increased BBB permeability and preserved enzymatic activity, following global cerebral ischemia in rats and analyze the effects on the selective vulnerability of CA1 hippocampal neurons. Following 12 min of four-vessel occlusion, global cerebral ischemia, male Wistar rats were dosed (i.v.) with either saline, native SOD (5000 U/kg), polyamine-modified SOD (5000 U/kg), or enzymatically inactive, polyamine-modified SOD (2.1 mg/kg) twice daily for 3 days. Neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neurons were assessed using standard histological methods. Saline-treated animals had very few remaining CA1 neurons (1.44 +/- 0.60 neurons/reticle; x +/- S.E.M.) compared to sham rats (58.57 +/- 0.69). Native (10.38 +/- 2.96) or inactive, polyamine-modified SOD (7.32 +/- 2.68) did not show significant neuroprotective effects. Polyamine-modified SOD, however, resulted in the survival of significantly more CA1 neurons (24.61 +/- 5.90; P < 0.01). Postischemic, systemic administration of polyamine-modified SOD, having increased BBB permeability and preserved enzymatic activity, significantly reduced hippocampal CA1 neuron loss following global cerebral ischemia. Similar modification of other antioxidant enzymes and neurotrophic factors with polyamines may provide a useful technique for the systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins across the BBB for the treatment of stroke and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:9134958

  8. A randomized Phase I/II Trial of HQK-1001, an oral fetal globin gene inducer, in β–thalassaemia intermedia and HbE/β–thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Fucharoen, Suthat; Inati, Adlette; Siritanaratku, Noppadol; Thein, Swee Lay; Wargin, William C.; Koussa, Suzanne; Taher, Ali; Chaneim, Nattawara; Boosalis, Michael; Berenson, Ronald; Perrine, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    β–thalassemia intermedia syndromes (BTI) cause hemolytic anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis, and widespread complications. Higher fetal globin expression within genotypes reduces globin imbalance and ameliorates anemia. Sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate (HQK-1001), an orally bioavailable short-chain fatty acid derivative, induces γ-globin expression experimentally and is well-tolerated in normal subjects. Accordingly, a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, Phase I/II trial was performed in 21 adult BTI patients (14 with HbE/β0 thalassemia and 7 with β+/β0 thalassemia intermedia, to determine effective doses for fetal globin induction, safety, and tolerability. HQK-1001 or placebo were administered once daily for 8 weeks at four dose levels (10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/kg/day), and subjects were monitored for laboratory and clinical events. Pharmacokinetic profiles demonstrated a t1/2 of 10–12 hours. Adverse events with HQK-1001 treatment were not significantly different from placebo treatment. Median HbF increased with the 20 mg/kg treatment doses above baseline levels by 6.6% and 0.44 g/dL (p <0.01) in 8/9 subjects; total hemoglobin (Hgb) increased by a mean of 1.1 gm/dL in 4/9 subjects. These findings identify a safe oral therapeutic which induces fetal globin in BTI. Further investigation of HQK-1001 with longer dosing to definitively evaluate its hematologic potential appears warranted. PMID:23530969

  9. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  10. Methylprednisolone exerts neuroprotective effects by regulating autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Shu-rui; Wu, Meng-yao; Gao, Kai; Li, Yuan-long; Wang, Hong-yu; Li, Chen-yuan; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone markedly reduces autophagy and apoptosis after secondary spinal cord injury. Here, we investigated whether pretreatment of cells with methylprednisolone would protect neuron-like cells from subsequent oxidative damage via suppression of autophagy and apoptosis. Cultured N2a cells were pretreated with 10 µM methylprednisolone for 30 minutes, then exposed to 100 µM H2O2 for 24 hours. Inverted phase contrast microscope images, MTT assay, flow cytometry and western blot results showed that, compared to cells exposed to 100 µM H2O2 alone, cells pretreated with methylprednisolone had a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells, maintained a healthy morphology, and showed downregulation of autophagic protein light chain 3B and Beclin-1 protein expression. These findings indicate that methylprednisolone exerted neuroprotective effects against oxidative damage by suppressing autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:27335569

  11. From neurogenesis to neuroprotection in the epilepsy: signalling by erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Castaneda-Arellano, Rolando; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo I; Bitar-Alatorre, Emilio W; Rivera-Cervantes, Martha C

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disorder characterised by recurrent seizures and molecular events, including the activation of early expression genes and the post-translational modifications of functional proteins. These events lead to changes in neurogenesis, mossy fibre sprouting, network reorganisation and neuronal death. The role of these events is currently a matter of great debate, especially as they relate to protection, repair, or further brain injury. In recent years, accumulating data have supported the idea that erythropoietin (EPO) regulates biological processes including neuroprotection and neurogenesis in several diseases, such as epilepsy. This review summarises the role of EPO in some of the molecular mechanisms involved in these events that could direct a more detailed approach for its use as a therapeutic alternative in reducing epileptic seizures. PMID:24896364

  12. Fluoxetine is neuroprotective in slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haipeng; Grajales-Reyes, Gary E; Alicea-Vázquez, Vivianette; Grajales-Reyes, Jose G; Robinson, KaReisha; Pytel, Peter; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-08-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that caused mutations in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) affecting neuromuscular transmission. Leaky AChRs lead to Ca(2+) overload and degeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) attributed to activation of cysteine proteases and apoptotic changes of synaptic nuclei. Here we use transgenic mouse models expressing two different mutations found in SCS to demonstrate that inhibition of prolonged opening of mutant AChRs using fluoxetine not only improves motor performance and neuromuscular transmission but also prevents Ca(2+) overload, the activation of cysteine proteases, calpain, caspase-3 and 9 at endplates, and as a consequence, reduces subsynaptic DNA damage at endplates, suggesting a long term benefit to therapy. These studies suggest that prolonged treatment of SCS patients with open ion channel blockers that preferentially block mutant AChRs is neuroprotective.

  13. Fluoxetine is neuroprotective in slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haipeng; Grajales-Reyes, E.; Vázquez, Vivianette Alicea; Robinson, KaReisha; Pytel, Peter; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused mutations in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) affecting neuromuscular transmission. Leaky AChRs lead to Ca2+ overload and degeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) attributed to activation of cysteine proteases and apoptotic changes of synaptic nuclei. Here we use transgenic mouse models expressing two different mutations found in SCS to demonstrate that inhibition of prolonged opening of mutant AChRs using fluoxetine not only improves motor performance and neuromuscular transmission but also prevents Ca2+ overload, activation of cysteine proteases, calpain, caspase-3 and 9 at endplates, and as a consequence, reduces subsynaptic DNA damage at endplates, suggesting a long term benefit to therapy. These studies suggest that prolonged treatment of SCS patients with open ion channel blockers that preferentially block mutant AChRs is neuroprotective. PMID:25448156

  14. Traumatic brain injury: neuroprotective anaesthetic techniques, an update.

    PubMed

    Tawfeeq, Nasser A; Halawani, Mohammed M; Al-Faridi, Khulood; Aal-Shaya, Wa'el A; Taha, Wa'el S

    2009-11-01

    Traumatic brain injuries remain an area of great challenge to both neurosurgeons and neuroanaesthesiologists. The management of these injuries starts at the scene of the accident. However, strategies for preventing secondary brain injury and its sequelae are continuing to evolve. These strategies include the use of pharmacological and nonpharmacological techniques. Preventing hypoxia and the use of hypertonic saline have been shown to have favourable results on the outcome of these injuries. The use of isoflurane has been shown to have a neuronprotective effect. Propofol is thought to be the future drug of choice because of its neuroprotective properties, although these still need to be further proven through research. In this review an understanding of the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury will be outlined in order to understand the effects of pharmacological and nonpharmacological agents on secondary brain injury. PMID:19895957

  15. Neuroprotective effect of piperine on primarily cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fu, Min; Sun, Zhao-Hui; Zuo, Huan-Cong

    2010-01-01

    It was previously reported that piperine (PIP) significantly blocks convulsions induced by intracerebroventricular injection of threshold doses of kainate, but had no or only slight effects on convulsions induced by L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate and guanidinosuccinate. In traditional Chinese medicine, black pepper has been used for epileptic treatment; however, the exact mechanism is still unclear. We reported here in that appropriate concentration of PIP effectively inhibites the synchronized oscillation of intracellular calcium in rat hippocampal neuronal networks and represses spontaneous synaptic activities in terms of spontaneous synaptic currents (SSC) and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC). Moreover, pretreatment with PIP expects protective effect on glutamate-induced decrease of cell viability and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. These data suggest that the neuroprotective effects of PIP might be associated with suppression of synchronization of neuronal networks, presynaptic glutamic acid release, and Ca(2+) overloading.

  16. Novel and Neuroprotective Tetranortriterpenoids from Chinese Mangrove Xylocarpus granatum Koenig

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen-Fang; Kurtán, Tibor; Mándi, Attila; Gu, Yu-Cheng; Yao, Li-Gong; Xin, Guo-Rong; Li, Xu-Wen; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Eight new tetranortriterpenoids (1–8) were isolated from the twigs and leaves of the Chinese mangrove plant Xylocarpus granatum, together with four related known ones (9–12). The structures of new compounds were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of 9-epixylogranatin A (1) was determined by time-dependent density functional theory-electronic circular dichroism (TDDFT-ECD) calculations of the solution conformers. Xylogranatumin A (2) represents the first example of the 9, 10-seco limonoid with an unprecedented oxygen-bridged B ring (2,7-dioxabicyclo[2.2.1]-heptane). All the isolates were evaluated for the in vitro neuroprotective activity, both compounds 11 and 12 displayed moderate effects against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells at the concentration of 10 μM, with an increase in cell viability of 12.0% and 11.6%, respectively. PMID:27658619

  17. Effects of dimethyl fumarate on neuroprotection and immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate is a promising novel oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. These effects are presumed to originate from a combination of immunomodulatory and neuroprotective mechanisms. We aimed to clarify whether neuroprotective concentrations of dimethyl fumarate have immunomodulatory effects. Findings We determined time- and concentration-dependent effects of dimethyl fumarate and its metabolite monomethyl fumarate on viability in a model of endogenous neuronal oxidative stress and clarified the mechanism of action by quantitating cellular glutathione content and recycling, nuclear translocation of transcription factors, and the expression of antioxidant genes. We compared this with changes in the cytokine profiles released by stimulated splenocytes measured by ELISPOT technology and analyzed the interactions between neuronal and immune cells and neuronal function and viability in cell death assays and multi-electrode arrays. Our observations show that dimethyl fumarate causes short-lived oxidative stress, which leads to increased levels and nuclear localization of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and a subsequent increase in glutathione synthesis and recycling in neuronal cells. Concentrations that were cytoprotective in neuronal cells had no negative effects on viability of splenocytes but suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines in cultures from C57BL/6 and SJL mice and had no effects on neuronal activity in multi-electrode arrays. Conclusions These results suggest that immunomodulatory concentrations of dimethyl fumarate can reduce oxidative stress without altering neuronal network activity. PMID:22769044

  18. Neuroprotective Copper Bis(thiosemicarbazonato) Complexes Promote Neurite Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bica, Laura; Liddell, Jeffrey R.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Duncan, Clare; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Volitakis, Irene; Paterson, Brett M.; Cappai, Roberto; Grubman, Alexandra; Camakaris, James; Crouch, Peter J.; White, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato)-copper complex, CuII(gtsm) on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes) in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that CuII(gtsm) induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex, CuII(atsm), but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by CuII(gtsm) was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75–99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM CuII(gtsm) treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that CuII(gtsm) inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor) resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM CuII(gtsm), suggesting a potential link between CuII(gtsm)-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes. PMID:24587210

  19. Neuroprotection by urokinase plasminogen activator in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunsil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Seo, Jung-Woo; Byun, Catherine Jeonghae; Chung, Sun-Ju; Suh, Dae Chul; Carmeliet, Peter; Koh, Jae-Young; Kim, Jong S; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2012-04-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), which are both used for thrombolytic treatment of acute ischemic stroke, are serine proteases that convert plasminogen to active plasmin. Although recent experimental evidences have raised controversy about the neurotoxic versus neuroprotective roles of tPA in acute brain injury, uPA remains unexplored in this context. In this study, we evaluated the effect of uPA on neuronal death in the hippocampus of mice after kainate-induced seizures. In the normal brain, uPA was localized to both nuclei and cytosol of neurons. Following severe kainate-induced seizures, uPA completely disappeared in degenerating neurons, whereas uPA-expressing astrocytes substantially increased, suggesting reactive astrogliosis. uPA-knockout mice were more vulnerable to kainate-induced neuronal death than wild-type mice. Consistent with this, inhibition of uPA by intracerebral injection of the uPA inhibitor UK122 increased the level of neuronal death. In contrast, prior administration of recombinant uPA significantly attenuated neuronal death. Collectively, these results indicate that uPA renders neurons resistant to kainate-induced excitotoxicity. Moreover, recombinant uPA suppressed cell death in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons exposed to H2O2, zinc, or various excitotoxins, suggesting that uPA protects against neuronal injuries mediated by the glutamate receptor, or by oxidation- or zinc-induced death signaling pathways. Considering that tPA may facilitate neurodegeneration in acute brain injury, we suggest that uPA, as a neuroprotectant, might be beneficial for the treatment of acute brain injuries such as ischemic stroke.

  20. Can imaging techniques measure neuroprotection and remyelination in multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert

    2007-05-29

    MRI is the most important paraclinical measure for assessing and monitoring the pathologic changes implicated in the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional MRI sequences, such as T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced and spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, are unable to provide full details about the degree of inflammation and underlying neurodegenerative changes. Newer nonconventional MRI techniques have the potential to detect clinical impairment, disease progression, accumulation of disability, and the neuroprotective effects of treatment. Unenhanced T1-weighted imaging can reveal hypointense black holes, a measure of chronic neurodegeneration. Two- and three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences allow better identification of cortical lesions. Ultrahigh-field strength MRI has the potential to detect subpial cortical and deep gray matter lesions. Magnetization transfer imaging is increasingly used to characterize the evolution of MS lesions and normal-appearing brain tissue. Evidence suggests that the dynamics of magnetization transfer changes correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provides details on tissue biochemistry, metabolism, and function, also has the capacity to reveal neuroprotective mechanisms. By measuring the motion of water, diffusion imaging can provide information about the orientation, size, and geometry of tissue damage in white and gray matter. Functional MRI may help clarify the brain's plasticity-dependent compensatory mechanisms in patients with MS. High-resolution microautoradiography and new contrast agents are proving to be sensitive means for characterizing molecular markers of disease activity, such as activated microglia and macrophages. Optical coherence tomography, a new research technique, makes it possible to investigate relevant physiologic systems that provide accurate measures of tissue changes secondary to the MS disease process