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Sample records for modulate helical organ

  1. WVD2 and WDL1 modulate helical organ growth and anisotropic cell expansion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Christen Y L; Pearlman, Rebecca S; Silo-Suh, Laura; Hilson, Pierre; Carroll, Kathleen L; Masson, Patrick H

    2003-02-01

    Wild-type Arabidopsis roots develop a wavy pattern of growth on tilted agar surfaces. For many Arabidopsis ecotypes, roots also grow askew on such surfaces, typically slanting to the right of the gravity vector. We identified a mutant, wvd2-1, that displays suppressed root waving and leftward root slanting under these conditions. These phenotypes arise from transcriptional activation of the novel WAVE-DAMPENED2 (WVD2) gene by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in mutant plants. Seedlings overexpressing WVD2 exhibit constitutive right-handed helical growth in both roots and etiolated hypocotyls, whereas the petioles of WVD2-overexpressing rosette leaves exhibit left-handed twisting. Moreover, the anisotropic expansion of cells is impaired, resulting in the formation of shorter and stockier organs. In roots, the phenotype is accompanied by a change in the arrangement of cortical microtubules within peripheral cap cells and cells at the basal end of the elongation zone. WVD2 transcripts are detectable by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in multiple organs of wild-type plants. Its predicted gene product contains a conserved region named "KLEEK," which is found only in plant proteins. The Arabidopsis genome possesses seven other genes predicted to encode KLEEK-containing products. Overexpression of one of these genes, WVD2-LIKE 1, which encodes a protein with regions of similarity to WVD2 extending beyond the KLEEK domain, results in phenotypes that are highly similar to wvd2-1. Silencing of WVD2 and its paralogs results in enhanced root skewing in the wild-type direction. Our observations suggest that at least two members of this gene family may modulate both rotational polarity and anisotropic cell expansion during organ growth.

  2. WVD2 and WDL1 modulate helical organ growth and anisotropic cell expansion in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, Christen Y L.; Pearlman, Rebecca S.; Silo-Suh, Laura; Hilson, Pierre; Carroll, Kathleen L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    Wild-type Arabidopsis roots develop a wavy pattern of growth on tilted agar surfaces. For many Arabidopsis ecotypes, roots also grow askew on such surfaces, typically slanting to the right of the gravity vector. We identified a mutant, wvd2-1, that displays suppressed root waving and leftward root slanting under these conditions. These phenotypes arise from transcriptional activation of the novel WAVE-DAMPENED2 (WVD2) gene by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in mutant plants. Seedlings overexpressing WVD2 exhibit constitutive right-handed helical growth in both roots and etiolated hypocotyls, whereas the petioles of WVD2-overexpressing rosette leaves exhibit left-handed twisting. Moreover, the anisotropic expansion of cells is impaired, resulting in the formation of shorter and stockier organs. In roots, the phenotype is accompanied by a change in the arrangement of cortical microtubules within peripheral cap cells and cells at the basal end of the elongation zone. WVD2 transcripts are detectable by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in multiple organs of wild-type plants. Its predicted gene product contains a conserved region named "KLEEK," which is found only in plant proteins. The Arabidopsis genome possesses seven other genes predicted to encode KLEEK-containing products. Overexpression of one of these genes, WVD2-LIKE 1, which encodes a protein with regions of similarity to WVD2 extending beyond the KLEEK domain, results in phenotypes that are highly similar to wvd2-1. Silencing of WVD2 and its paralogs results in enhanced root skewing in the wild-type direction. Our observations suggest that at least two members of this gene family may modulate both rotational polarity and anisotropic cell expansion during organ growth.

  3. Helical growth in plant organs: mechanisms and significance.

    PubMed

    Smyth, David R

    2016-09-15

    Many plants show some form of helical growth, such as the circular searching movements of growing stems and other organs (circumnutation), tendril coiling, leaf and bud reversal (resupination), petal arrangement (contortion) and leaf blade twisting. Recent genetic findings have revealed that such helical growth may be associated with helical arrays of cortical microtubules and of overlying cellulose microfibrils. An alternative mechanism of coiling that is based on differential contraction within a bilayer has also recently been identified and underlies at least some of these growth patterns. Here, I provide an overview of the genes and cellular processes that underlie helical patterning. I also discuss the diversity of helical growth patterns in plants, highlighting their potential adaptive significance and comparing them with helical growth patterns in animals. PMID:27624832

  4. Self-organization of protein with helical domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, Zakhar M.; Melker, Alexander I.

    2002-02-01

    In this contribution, we report on a study of the self- organization of isolated polypeptides. The process is computer simulated by the method of molecular dynamics. We observed that the helical structures have a very impotent role in the protein self-organization. We have found conditions under which such structures to be stable. The process and result of self-organization under these conditions were sharply different from others, unable to maintain the helical structures. The structures obtained have a strong resemblance to the native conformations of the corresponding real proteins in a case of proteins composed by helical domains.

  5. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-05-15

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube currentxrotation time)/pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning.

  6. Helical organization of blood coagulation factor VIII on lipid nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jaimy; Dalm, Daniela; Koyfman, Alexey Y; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM)(1) is a powerful approach to investigate the functional structure of proteins and complexes in a hydrated state and membrane environment(2). Coagulation Factor VIII (FVIII)(3) is a multi-domain blood plasma glycoprotein. Defect or deficiency of FVIII is the cause for Hemophilia type A - a severe bleeding disorder. Upon proteolytic activation, FVIII binds to the serine protease Factor IXa on the negatively charged platelet membrane, which is critical for normal blood clotting(4). Despite the pivotal role FVIII plays in coagulation, structural information for its membrane-bound state is incomplete(5). Recombinant FVIII concentrate is the most effective drug against Hemophilia type A and commercially available FVIII can be expressed as human or porcine, both forming functional complexes with human Factor IXa(6,7). In this study we present a combination of Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM), lipid nanotechnology and structure analysis applied to resolve the membrane-bound structure of two highly homologous FVIII forms: human and porcine. The methodology developed in our laboratory to helically organize the two functional recombinant FVIII forms on negatively charged lipid nanotubes (LNT) is described. The representative results demonstrate that our approach is sufficiently sensitive to define the differences in the helical organization between the two highly homologous in sequence (86% sequence identity) proteins. Detailed protocols for the helical organization, Cryo-EM and electron tomography (ET) data acquisition are given. The two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure analysis applied to obtain the 3D reconstructions of human and porcine FVIII-LNT is discussed. The presented human and porcine FVIII-LNT structures show the potential of the proposed methodology to calculate the functional, membrane-bound organization of blood coagulation Factor VIII at high resolution.

  7. Helical Organization of Blood Coagulation Factor VIII on Lipid Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Koyfman, Alexey Y.; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM)1 is a powerful approach to investigate the functional structure of proteins and complexes in a hydrated state and membrane environment2. Coagulation Factor VIII (FVIII)3 is a multi-domain blood plasma glycoprotein. Defect or deficiency of FVIII is the cause for Hemophilia type A - a severe bleeding disorder. Upon proteolytic activation, FVIII binds to the serine protease Factor IXa on the negatively charged platelet membrane, which is critical for normal blood clotting4. Despite the pivotal role FVIII plays in coagulation, structural information for its membrane-bound state is incomplete5. Recombinant FVIII concentrate is the most effective drug against Hemophilia type A and commercially available FVIII can be expressed as human or porcine, both forming functional complexes with human Factor IXa6,7. In this study we present a combination of Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM), lipid nanotechnology and structure analysis applied to resolve the membrane-bound structure of two highly homologous FVIII forms: human and porcine. The methodology developed in our laboratory to helically organize the two functional recombinant FVIII forms on negatively charged lipid nanotubes (LNT) is described. The representative results demonstrate that our approach is sufficiently sensitive to define the differences in the helical organization between the two highly homologous in sequence (86% sequence identity) proteins. Detailed protocols for the helical organization, Cryo-EM and electron tomography (ET) data acquisition are given. The two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure analysis applied to obtain the 3D reconstructions of human and porcine FVIII-LNT is discussed. The presented human and porcine FVIII-LNT structures show the potential of the proposed methodology to calculate the functional, membrane-bound organization of blood coagulation Factor VIII at high resolution. PMID:24961276

  8. Comparison of arc-modulated cone beam therapy and helical tomotherapy for three different types of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Silke; Sterzing, Florian; Nill, Simeon; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Debus, Juergen; Oelfke, Uwe

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Arc-modulated cone beam therapy (AMCBT) is a fast treatment technique deliverable in a single rotation with a conventional C-arm shaped linac. In this planning study, the authors assess the dosimetric properties of single-arc therapy in comparison to helical tomotherapy for three different tumor types. Methods: Treatment plans for three patients with prostate carcinoma, three patients with anal cancer, and three patients with head and neck cancer were optimized for helical tomotherapy and AMCBT. The dosimetric comparison of the two techniques is based on physical quantities derived from dose-volume histograms. Results: For prostate cancer, the quality of dose distributions calculated for AMCBT was of equal quality as that generated for tomotherapy with the additional benefits of a faster delivery and a lower integral dose. For highly complex geometries, the plan quality achievable with helical tomotherapy could not be achieved with arc-modulated cone beam therapy. Conclusions: Rotation therapy with a conventional linac in a single arc is capable to deliver a high and homogeneous dose to the target and spare organs at risk. Advantages of this technique are a fast treatment time and a lower integral dose in comparison to helical tomotherapy. For highly complex cases, e.g., with several target regions, the dose shaping capabilities of AMCBT are inferior to those of tomotherapy. However, treatment plans for AMCBT were also clinically acceptable.

  9. Homochiral helical metal-organic frameworks of group 1 metals.

    PubMed

    Reger, Daniel L; Leitner, Andrew; Smith, Mark D; Tran, T Thao; Halasyamani, P Shiv

    2013-09-01

    The reactions of (S)-2-(1,8-naphthalimido)propanoic acid (HL(ala)) and (S)-2-(1,8-naphthalimido)-3-hydroxypropanoic acid (HL(ser)), protonated forms of ligands that contain a carboxylate donor group, an enantiopure chiral center, and a 1,8-naphthalimide π···π stacking supramolecular tecton and in the case of HL(ser) an alcohol functional group, with the appropriate alkali metal hydroxide followed by a variety of crystallization methods leads to the formation of crystalline K(L(ala))(MeOH) (1), K(L(ala))(H2O) (2), Na(L(ala))(H2O) (3), KL(ser) (4), CsL(ser) (5), and CsL(ala) (6). Each of these new complexes has a solid state structure based on six-coordinate metals linked into homochiral helical rod secondary building unit (SBU) central cores. In addition to the bonding of the carboxylate and solvent (in the case of L(ser) the ligand alcohol) to the metals, both oxygens on the 1,8-naphthalimide act as donor groups. One naphthalimide oxygen bonds to the same helical rod SBU as the carboxylate group of that ligand forming a chelate ring. The other naphthalimide oxygen bonds to adjacent SBUs. In complexes 1-3, this inter-rod link has a square arrangement bonding four other rods forming a three-dimensional enantiopure metal-organic framework (MOF) structure, whereas in 4-6 this link has a linear arrangement bonding two other rods forming a two-dimensional, sheet structure. In the latter case, the third dimension is supported exclusively by interdigitated π···π stacking interactions of the naphthalimide supramolecular tecton, forming enantiopure supramolecular MOF solids. Compounds 1-3 lose the coordinated solvent when heating above 100 °C. For 1, the polycrystalline powder reverts to 1 only by recrystallization from methanol, whereas compounds 2 and 3 undergo gas/solid, single-crystal to single-crystal transformations to form dehydrated compounds 2* and 3*, and rehydration occurs when crystals of these new complexes are left out in air. The reversible single

  10. Hierarchical Helical Order in the Twisted Growth of Plant Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hirofumi

    2012-09-01

    The molecular and cellular basis of left-right asymmetry in plant morphogenesis is a fundamental issue in biology. A rapidly elongating root or hypocotyl of twisting mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits a helical growth with a handedness opposite to that of the underlying cortical microtubule arrays in epidermal cells. However, how such a hierarchical helical order emerges is currently unknown. We propose a model for investigating macroscopic chiral asymmetry in Arabidopsis mutants. Our elastic model suggests that the helical pattern observed is a direct consequence of the simultaneous presence of anisotropic growth and tilting of cortical microtubule arrays. We predict that the root helical pitch angle is a function of the microtubule helical angle and elastic moduli of the tissues. The proposed model is versatile and is potentially important for other biological systems ranging from protein fibrous structures to tree trunks.

  11. Alpha-turn mimetics: short peptide alpha-helices composed of cyclic metallopentapeptide modules.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Michael J; Beyer, Renée L; Hoang, Huy N; Lakdawala, Ami S; Snyder, James P; Oliver, Warren V; Robertson, Tom A; Appleton, Trevor G; Fairlie, David P

    2004-04-21

    Alpha-Helices are key structural components of proteins and important recognition motifs in biology. Short peptides (helical sequences are rarely helical away from their stabilizing protein environments. New techniques for stabilizing short peptide helices could be valuable for studying protein folding, modeling proteins, creating artificial proteins, and may aid the design of inhibitors or mimics of protein function. This study reports the facile incorporation of 3- and 4-alpha turns in 10-15 residue peptides through formation in situ of multiple cyclic metallopeptide modules [Pd(en)(H*XXXH*)](2+). The nonhelical peptides Ac-H*ELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2) (1), Ac-H*ELTH*AVTDYH*ELTH*-NH(2) (2), and Ac-H*AAAH*HELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2) (3) (H is histidine-methylated at imidazole-N3) react in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or water with 2, 2, and 3 molar equivalents, respectively, of [Pd(en)(NO(3))(2)] to form exclusively [Pd(2)(en)(2)(Ac-H*ELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2))](4+) (4), [Pd(2)(en)(2)(Ac-H*ELTH*AVTDYH*ELTH*-NH(2))](4+) (5), and [Pd(3)(en)(3)(Ac-H*AAAH*HELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2))](6+) (6), characterized by mass spectrometry, 1D and 2D (1)H- and 1D (15)N-NMR spectroscopy. Despite the presence of multiple histidines and other possible metal-binding residues in these peptides, 2D (1)H NMR spectra reveal that Pd(en)(2+) is remarkably specific in coordinating to imidazole-N1 of only (i, i + 4) pairs of histidines (i.e., only those separated by three amino acids), resulting in 4-6 made up of cyclic metallopentapeptide modules ([Pd(en)(H*XXXH*)](2+))(n), n = 2, 2, 3, respectively, each cycle being a 22-membered ring. We have previously shown that a single metallopentapeptide can nucleate alpha-helicity (Kelso et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 421-424.). We now demonstrate its use as an alpha-turn-mimicking module for the facile conversion of unstructured short peptides into helices of macrocycles and provide 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data, structure

  12. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part II: Transient and Modulated Flow Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Fautrelle, Yves; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Baltaretu, Florin

    2016-08-01

    The present study considers the transient and modulated flow behaviors of liquid metal driven by a helical permanent magnetic field. The transient process, in which the fluid at rest experiences an increase in the angular velocity, is observed both in secondary and global axial flow with duration time less than 1 second. The flow fields are measured quantitatively to reveal the evolution of the transient flow, and the transient process is due to the variation of the electromagnetic force. Besides, the modulated flow behaviors of global axial flow, which is significantly different from that of secondary flow, is expected to avoid flow-induced macrosegregation in solidification process if the modulated time is suitable because its direction reversed periodically with the modulated helical stirrer. In addition, an optimal modulation frequency, under which the magnetic field could efficiently stir the solute at the solidification front, exists both in secondary and global axial flow (0.1 Hz and 0.625 Hz, respectively). Future investigations will focus on additional metallic alloy solidification experiments.

  13. Aichi Cancer Center Initial Experience of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Using Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kodaira, Takeshi Tomita, Natsuo; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of helical tomotherapy (HT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From June 2006 to June 2007, 20 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with HT with (n = 18) or without (n = 2) systemic chemotherapy. The primary tumor and involved lymph node (PTV1) were prescribed 70 Gy and the prophylactic region 54 Gy at D95, respectively. The majority of patients received 2 Gy per fraction for PTV1 in 35 fractions. Parotid function was evaluated using quantitative scintigraphy at pretreatment, and posttreatment at 3 months and 1 year later. Results: The median patient age was 53 years, ranging from 15 to 83. Our cohort included 5, 8, 4, 2, and 1 patients with disease Stages IIB, III, IVA, IVB, and IVC, respectively. Histopathological record revealed two for World Health Organization Type I and 18 for Type 2 or 3. The median duration time for treatment preparation was 9.5 days, and all plans were thought to be acceptable regarding dose constraints of both the planning target volume and organ at risk. All patients completed their treatment procedure of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). All patients achieved clinical remission after IMRT. The majority of patients had Grade 3 or higher toxicity of skin, mucosa, and neutropenia. At the median follow-up of 10.9 months, two patients recurred, and one patient died from cardiac disease. Parotid gland function at 1 year after completion of IMRT was significantly improved compared with that at 3 months. Conclusion: HT was clinically effective in terms of IMRT planning and utility for patients with nasopharyngeal cancer.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Helical Tomotherapy in Nasopharynx Cancer: Planning Comparison and NTCP Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Widesott, Lamberto Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio; Dell'Oca, Italo; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo; Schwarz, Marco

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for nasopharynx cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost approach. Methods and Materials: The data from 6 patients who had previously been treated with HT were used. A three-beam IMPT technique was optimized in the Hyperion treatment planning system, simulating a 'beam scanning' technique. HT was planned using the tomotherapy treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 66 Gy in 30 fractions to planning target volume (PTV1; GTV and enlarged nodes) and 54 Gy to PTV2 subclinical, electively treated nodes. Normal tissue complication probability calculation was performed for the parotids and larynx. Results: Very similar PTVs coverage and homogeneity of the target dose distribution for IMPT and HT were found. The conformity index was significantly lower for protons than for photons (1.19 vs. 1.42, respectively). The mean dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid glands decreased by 6.4 Gy and 5.6 Gy, respectively, with IMPT. The volume of mucosa and esophagus receiving {>=}20 Gy and {>=}30 Gy with IMPT was significantly lower than with HT. The average volume of larynx receiving {>=}50 Gy was significantly lower with HT, while for thyroid, it was comparable. The volume receiving {>=}30, {>=}20, and {>=}10 Gy in total body volume decreased with IMPT by 14.5%, 19.4%, and 23.1%, respectively. The normal tissue complication probability for the parotid glands was significantly lower with IMPT for all sets of parameters; however, we also estimated an almost full recovery of the contralateral parotid with HT. The normal tissue complication probability for the larynx was not significantly different between the two irradiation techniques. Conclusion: Excellent target coverage, homogeneity within the PTVs, and sparing of the organs at risk were reached with both modalities. IMPT allows for better sparing of most organs at

  15. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  16. Tropical cyclogenesis: a numerical diagnosis based on helical flow organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levina, G. V.; Montgomery, M. T.

    2014-10-01

    A numerical diagnosis for tropical cyclogenesis is proposed based on nearcloud-resolving atmospheric simulation. Calculation and analyses of helical and energetic characteristics together with hydro- and thermodynamic flow fields allow the diagnosis of tropical cyclogenesis as an event when the primary and secondary circulations become linked on system scales thereby making the nascent large-scale vortex helical. A key process of vertical vorticity generation from horizontal components and its amplification by special convective coherent structures - Vortical Hot Towers (VHTs) - is highlighted. The process is found to be a pathway for generation of a velocity field with linked vortex lines of horizontal and vertical vorticity on local and system scales. The role of VHTs as connectors of the primary and secondary circulation is emphasized.

  17. SmartArc-Based Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison With Both Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, Stefania; Wu, BinBin; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Fusco, Vincenzo; Ricchetti, Francesco; Wong, John; McNutt, Todd

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for oropharyngeal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach. Methods and Materials: Eight patients treated with IMRT were selected at random. Plans were computed for both IMRT and VMAT-S (using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta Infinity linac) along with HT. A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high-risk, and microscopic low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. Results: VMAT-S target coverage was close to that achieved by IMRT, but inferior to HT. The conformity and homogeneity within the PTV were improved for HT over all strategies. Sparing of the organs at risk (OAR) was achieved with all modalities. VMAT-S (along with HT) shortened delivery time (mean, -38%) and reduced MU/fx (mean, -28%) compared with IMRT. Conclusion: VMAT-S represents an attractive solution because of the shorter delivery time and the lower number of MU/fx compared with IMRT. However, in this complex clinical setting, current VMAT-S does not appear to provide any distinct advantage compared with helical tomotherapy.

  18. The Effect of Loops on the Structural Organization of α-Helical Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tastan, Oznur; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2009-01-01

    Loops connecting the transmembrane (TM) α-helices in membrane proteins are expected to affect the structural organization of the thereby connected helices and the helical bundles as a whole. This effect, which has been largely ignored previously, is studied here by analyzing the x-ray structures of 41 α-helical membrane proteins. First we define the loop flexibility ratio, R, and find that 53% of the loops are stretched, where a stretched loop constrains the distance between the two connected helices. The significance of this constraining effect is supported by experiments carried out with bacteriorhodopsin and rhodopsin, in which cutting or eliminating their (predominately stretched) loops has led to a decrease in protein stability, and for rhodopsin, in most cases, also to the destruction of the structure. We show that for nonstretched loops in the extramembranous regions, the fraction of hydrophobic residues is comparable to that for soluble proteins; furthermore (as is also the case for soluble proteins), the hydrophobic residues in these regions are preferentially buried. This is expected to lead to the compact structural organization of the loops, which is transferred to the TM helices, causing them to assemble. We argue that a soluble protein complexed with a membrane protein similarly promotes compactness; other properties of such complexes are also studied. We calculate complementary attractive interactions between helices, including hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions of sequential motifs, such as GXXXG. The relative and combined effects of all these factors on the association of the TM helices are discussed and protein structures with only a few of these factors are analyzed. Our study emphasizes the need for classifying membrane proteins into groups according to structural organization. This classification should be considered when procedures for structural analysis or prediction are developed and applied. Detailed analysis of each structure

  19. Modulated phases and upsilon points in a spin model with helical ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Kazuo

    1992-09-01

    The ground state of a one-dimensional, classical XY model with competing nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions, a sixfold anisotropy, and an external field is studied. The model shows various modulated phases, depending on the values of the model parameters. Evidence is found that the ground-state phase diagram of this model contains upsilon points, multicritical points of a new class recently discussed by Bassler, Sasaki, and Griffiths. The phase diagram has a self-similar structure near these points, filled with multitudes of "mixed phases" whose spin configurations consist of segments of helical and fan structures separated by interfaces between them.

  20. Helical polycarbodiimide cloaking of carbon nanotubes enables inter-nanotube exciton energy transfer modulation.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki-Uprety, Januka; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2014-11-01

    The use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as near-infrared optical probes and sensors require the ability to simultaneously modulate nanotube fluorescence and functionally derivatize the nanotube surface using noncovalent methods. We synthesized a small library of polycarbodiimides to noncovalently encapsulate SWCNTs with a diverse set of functional coatings, enabling their suspension in aqueous solution. These polymers, known to adopt helical conformations, exhibited ordered surface coverage on the nanotubes and allowed systematic modulation of nanotube optical properties, producing up to 12-fold differences in photoluminescence efficiency. Polymer cloaking of the fluorescent nanotubes facilitated the first instance of controllable and reversible internanotube exciton energy transfer, allowing kinetic measurements of dynamic self-assembly and disassembly.

  1. The formation of organogels and helical nanofibers from simple organic salts.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yuya; Hoshino, Norihisa; Takeda, Takashi; Moritomo, Hiroki; Kawamata, Jun; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki

    2014-12-01

    Simple organic salts based on aniline-derived cations and D-tartrate anions formed organogels and helical nanofibers. The organic salt (p-fluoroanilinium)(D-tartrate) was found to generate an organogel despite the absence of a hydrophobic alkyl chain, whereas (p-iodoanilinium)(D-tartrate) formed helical nanofibers in braided ropelike structures through a rolling-up process. The helicity of these nanofibers could be reversed by changing the growth solvent. The driving forces responsible for the formation of the nanofibers were determined to be 1D OH⋅⋅⋅O(-) hydrogen-bonding interactions between D-tartrate anions and π stacking of anilinium cations, as well as steric hindrance between the hydrogen-bonded chains.

  2. Light-Directed Dynamic Chirality Inversion in Functional Self-Organized Helical Superstructures.

    PubMed

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2016-02-24

    Helical superstructures are widely observed in nature, in synthetic polymers, and in supramolecular assemblies. Controlling the chirality (the handedness) of dynamic helical superstructures of molecular and macromolecular systems by external stimuli is a challenging task, but is of great fundamental significance with appealing morphology-dependent applications. Light-driven chirality inversion in self-organized helical superstructures (i.e. cholesteric, chiral nematic liquid crystals) is currently in the limelight because inversion of the handedness alters the chirality of the circularly polarized light that they selectively reflect, which has wide potential for application. Here we discuss the recent developments toward inversion of the handedness of cholesteric liquid crystals enabled by photoisomerizable chiral molecular switches or motors. Different classes of chiral photoresponsive dopants (guests) capable of conferring light-driven reversible chirality inversion of helical superstructures fabricated from different nematic hosts are discussed. Rational molecular designs of chiral molecular switches toward endowing handedness inversion to the induced helical superstructures of cholesteric liquid crystals are highlighted. This Review is concluded by throwing light on the challenges and opportunities in this emerging frontier, and it is expected to provide useful guidelines toward the development of self-organized soft materials with stimuli-directed chirality inversion capability and multifunctional host-guest systems.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry of the head and neck: A comparison of treatment plans using linear accelerator-based IMRT and helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Ke . E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu; Molloy, Janelle A.; Read, Paul W.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To date, most intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery has occurred using linear accelerators (linacs), although helical tomotherapy has become commercially available. To quantify the dosimetric difference, we compared linac-based and helical tomotherapy-based treatment plans for IMRT of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We compared the dosimetry findings of 10 patients who had oropharyngeal carcinoma. Five patients each had cancers in the base of the tongue and tonsil. Each plan was independently optimized using either the CORVUS planning system (Nomos Corporation, Sewickly, PA), commissioned for a Varian 2300 CD linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 1-cm multileaf collimator leaves, or helical tomotherapy. The resulting treatment plans were evaluated by comparing the dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), dose uniformity, and normal tissue complication probabilities. Results: Helical tomotherapy plans showed improvement of critical structure avoidance and target dose uniformity for all patients. The average equivalent uniform dose reduction for organs at risk (OARs) surrounding the base of tongue and the tonsil were 17.4% and 27.14% respectively. An 80% reduction in normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid glands was observed in the tomotherapy plans relative to the linac-based plans. The standard deviation of the planning target volume dose was reduced by 71%. In our clinic, we use the combined dose-volume histograms for each class of plans as a reference goal for helical tomotherapy treatment planning optimization. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy provides improved dose homogeneity and normal structure dose compared with linac-based IMRT in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma resulting in a reduced risk for complications from focal hotspots within the planning target volume and for the adjacent parotid glands.

  4. Conversion of Nonporous Helical Cadmium Organic Famework to a Porous Form

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zhi-Gang; Cai, Yue-Peng; Fang, Hua-Cai; Zhou, Zheng-Yuan; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Tian, Jian; Liu, Jun; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2010-08-07

    Two novel cadmium–organic frameworks containing achiral multiwalled helical nanotubular channels, [Cd(HImDC)(S)]n (S = Im(1) and Py(2)), have been synthesized and characterized using single crystal X-ray diffraction, in which 1 converts to 2 upon refluxing 1 in pyridine solution with noticeable porosity and hydrogen uptake at medium pressure.

  5. A Porous Metal-Organic Framework with Helical Chain Building Units Exhibiting Facile Transition from Micro- to Meso-porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jinhee; Li, Jian-Rong; Carolina Sañudo, E.; Yuan, Daqiang; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2012-01-01

    A metal–organic framework (MOF) with helical channels has been constructed by bridging helical chain secondary building units with 2,6-di-p-carboxyphenyl-4,4'-bipyridine ligands. The activated MOF shows permanent porosity and gas adsorption selectivity. Remarkably, the MOF exhibits a facile transition from micro- to meso-porosity.

  6. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kinhikar, Rajesh Ashok; Ghadi, Yogesh G.; Sahoo, Priyadarshini; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Agarwal, Jaiprakash

    2015-01-01

    To compare the treatment plans generated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung, twenty patients with medically inoperable (early nonsmall cell lung cancer) were retrospectively reviewed for dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery techniques (3DCRT, IMRT, and HT). A dose of 6 Gy per fraction in 8 fractions was prescribed to deliver 95% of the prescription dose to 95% volume of planning target volume (PTV). Plan quality was assessed using conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). Doses to critical organs were assessed. Mean CI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.19 (standard deviation [SD] 0.13), 1.18 (SD 0.11), and 1.08 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean HI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.14 (SD 0.05), 1.08 (SD 0.02), and 1.07 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean R50% values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 8.5 (SD 0.35), 7.04 (SD 0.45), and 5.43 (SD 0.29), respectively. D2cm was found superior with IMRT and HT. Significant sparing of critical organs can be achieved with highly conformal techniques (IMRT and HT) without compromising the PTV conformity and homogeneity. PMID:26865754

  7. Bis(haloBODIPYs) with Labile Helicity: Valuable Simple Organic Molecules That Enable Circularly Polarized Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Ray, César; Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Ortiz, María J; López-Arbeloa, Íñigo; Bañuelos, Jorge; Cohovi, Komlan D; Lunkley, Jamie L; Muller, Gilles; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-06-20

    Simple organic molecules (SOM) based on bis(haloBODIPY) are shown to enable circularly polarized luminescence (CPL), giving rise to a new structural design for technologically valuable CPL-SOMs. The established design comprises together synthetic accessibility, labile helicity, possibility of reversing the handedness of the circularly polarized emission, and reactive functional groups, making it unique and attractive as advantageous platform for the development of smart CPL-SOMs.

  8. An unusual helical micro-organism found in the gut lumen of human subjects.

    PubMed

    Collins, A J; Notarianni, L J; Potter, U J

    1999-04-01

    An earlier report described the discovery of a micro-organism in the form of a double helix in human small bowel biopsies. Mucosal biopsies of the stomach and small bowel obtained from patients with rheumatic diseases and dyspepsia by enteroscopy and gastroscopy were fixed for scanning electron microscopy to investigate the organism further. In 62% of biopsies, an organism in the form of a double helix with bifid ends, 5-30 microm long, was found lying free on the surface of the mucosa. The organism has been demonstrated in the stomach, duodenum and small bowel. Flagella were never seen to be associated with the organism. In spite of its helical form, the organism lacks many of the factors associated with spirochaete morphology. It is suggested that this, as yet unnamed organism, may be found throughout the length of the digestive tract. Its pathological significance is not known.

  9. Folding stability modulation of the villin headpiece helical subdomain by 4-fluorophenylalanine and 4-methylphenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Lin; Shih, Ting-Chia; Horng, Jia-Cherng

    2015-11-01

    HP36, the helical subdomain of villin headpiece, contains a hydrophobic core composed of three phenylalanine residues (Phe47, Phe51, and Phe58). Hydrophobic effects and electrostatic interactions were shown to be the critical factors in stabilizing this core and the global structure. To assess the interactions among Phe47, Phe51, and Phe58 residues and investigate how they affect the folding stability, we implanted 4-fluorophenylalanine (Z) and 4-methylphenylalanine (X) into the hydrophobic core of HP36. We chemically synthesized HP36 and its seven variants including four single mutants whose Phe51 or Phe58 was replaced with Z or X, and three double mutants whose Phe51 and Phe58 were both substituted. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements show that the variants exhibit a native HP36 like fold, of which F51Z and three double mutants are more stable than the wild type. Molecular modeling provided detailed interaction energy within the phenylalanine residues, revealing that electrostatic interactions dominate the stability modulation upon the introduction of 4-fluorophenylalanine and 4-methylphenylalanine. Our results show that these two non-natural amino acids can successfully tune the interactions in a relatively compact hydrophobic core and the folding stability without inducing dramatic steric effects. Such an approach may be applied to other folded motifs or proteins.

  10. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl; Jabbour, Salma K.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  11. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy using static ports of tomotherapy (TomoDirect): comparison with the TomoHelical mode

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose With the new mode of Tomotherapy, irradiation can be delivered using static ports of the TomoDirect mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of TomoDirect plans compared to conventional TomoHelical plans. Methods TomoDirect and TomoHelical plans were compared in 46 patients with a prostate, thoracic wall or lung tumor. The mean target dose was used as the prescription dose. The minimum coverage dose of 95% of the target (D95%), conformity index (CI), uniformity index (UI), dose distribution in organs at risk and treatment time were evaluated. For TomoDirect, 2 to 5 static ports were used depending on the tumor location. Results For the prostate target volume, TomoDirect plans could not reduce the rectal dose and required a longer treatment time than TomoHelical. For the thoracic wall target volume, the V5Gy of the lung or liver was lower in TomoDirect than in TomoHelical (p = 0.02). For the lung target volume, TomoDirect yielded higher CI (p = 0.009) but smaller V5Gy of the lung (p = 0.005) than TomoHelical. Treatment time did not differ significantly between the thoracic wall and lung plans. Conclusion Prostate cancers should be treated with the TomoHelical mode. Considering the risk of low-dose radiation to the lung, the TomoDirect mode could be an option for thoracic wall and lung tumors. PMID:23517931

  12. SmartArc-based volumetric modulated arc therapy for endometrial cancer: a dosimetric comparison with helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S) to achieve radiation delivery efficiency higher than that of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) when treating endometrial cancer, while maintaining plan quality. Methods Nine patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively studied. Three plans per patient were generated for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT. The dose distributions for the planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Results The average homogeneity index was 1.06, 1.10 and 1.07 for the VMAT-S, IMRT and HT plans, respectively. The V40 for the rectum, bladder and pelvis bone decreased by 9.0%, 3.0% and 3.0%, respectively, in the VMAT-S plan relative to the IMRT plan. The target coverage and sparing of OARs were comparable between the VMAT-S and HT plans. The average MU was 823, 1105 and 8403 for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT, respectively; the average delivery time was 2.6, 8.6 and 9.5 minutes, respectively. Conclusions For endometrial cancer, the VMAT-S plan provided comparable quality with significantly shorter delivery time and fewer MUs than with the IMRT and HT plans. In addition, more homogeneous PTV coverage and superior sparing of OARs in the medium to high dose region were observed in the VMAT-S relative to the IMRT plan. PMID:24175929

  13. Propeller-like hydrogen-bonded banana-melamine complexes inducing helical supramolecular organizations.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Joaquín; Puig, Laura; Romero, Pilar; Serrano, José Luis; Sierra, Teresa

    2006-04-01

    The results of the study presented here show a new example of the use of liquid crystals and the interactions involved in the mesomorphic state to build up complex molecular organizations. We have pursued a design strategy in which hydrogen bonding allows the combination of the pi-stacking tendency of melamine and the lateral interaction capability of V-shaped molecules, which has been extensively demonstrated through nematic, smectic, or columnar mesophases. This combination addresses the formation of columnar arrangements with inherent helical organization. In this work, nonmesomorphic as well as mesomorphic V-shaped acids, with a structure similar to banana liquid crystals, have been complexed to a 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine derivative in a proportion 3 to 1, respectively. Hydrogen-bonded supramolecules whose formation and stability in solution have been proven by infrared and NMR techniques have been thus obtained. DOSY experiments have allowed us to assess in solution the presence of the complexes and their tetrameric composition. All the complexes display mesogenic ability, and their mesomorphic organization has been studied by X-ray diffraction and CD spectroscopy. Results allow us to propose a helical columnar model for the mesophase originated from a propeller-like conformation of the supramolecular complexes.

  14. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Single-Arc Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy: A Collaborative Dosimetric Comparison Between Two Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi; Tang, Grace; Welsh, James S.; Mohiuddin, Majid M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Yu, Cedric X.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Both helical tomotherapy (HT) and single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) deliver radiation using rotational beams with multileaf collimators. We report a dual-institution study comparing dosimetric aspects of these two modalities. Methods and Materials: Eight patients each were selected from the University of Maryland (UMM) and the University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Riverview (UWR), for a total of 16 cases. Four cancer sites including brain, head and neck (HN), lung, and prostate were selected. Single-arc IMAT plans were generated at UMM using Varian RapidArc (RA), and HT plans were generated at UWR using Hi-Art II TomoTherapy. All 16 cases were planned based on the identical anatomic contours, prescriptions, and planning objectives. All plans were swapped for analysis at the same time after final approval. Dose indices for targets and critical organs were compared based on dose-volume histograms, the beam-on time, monitor units, and estimated leakage dose. After the disclosure of comparison results, replanning was done for both techniques to minimize diversity in optimization focus from different operators. Results: For the 16 cases compared, the average beam-on time was 1.4 minutes for RA and 4.8 minutes for HT plans. HT provided better target dose homogeneity (7.6% for RA and 4.2% for HT) with a lower maximum dose (110% for RA and 105% for HT). Dose conformation numbers were comparable, with RA being superior to HT (0.67 vs. 0.60). The doses to normal tissues using these two techniques were comparable, with HT showing lower doses for more critical structures. After planning comparison results were exchanged, both techniques demonstrated improvements in dose distributions or treatment delivery times. Conclusions: Both techniques created highly conformal plans that met or exceeded the planning goals. The delivery time and total monitor units were lower in RA than in HT plans, whereas HT provided higher target dose uniformity.

  15. Helical tomotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: New therapeutic arms in the breast cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Olivier; Kirova, Youlia M; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Costa, Emilie; Lemanski, Claire; Bourgier, Celine; Riou, Olivier; Tiberi, David; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyse clinical and dosimetric results of helical tomotherapy (HT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in complex adjuvant breast and nodes irradiation. METHODS Seventy-three patients were included (31 HT and 42 VMAT). Dose were 63.8 Gy (HT) and 63.2 Gy (VMAT) in the tumour bed, 52.2 Gy in the breast, 50.4 Gy in supraclavicular nodes (SCN) and internal mammary chain (IMC) with HT and 52.2 Gy and 49.3 Gy in IMC and SCN with VMAT in 29 fractions. Margins to particle tracking velocimetry were greater in the VMAT cohort (7 mm vs 5 mm). RESULTS For the HT cohort, the coverage of clinical target volumes was as follows: Tumour bed: 99.4% ± 2.4%; breast: 98.4% ± 4.3%; SCN: 99.5% ± 1.2%; IMC: 96.5% ± 13.9%. For the VMAT cohort, the coverage was as follows: Tumour bed: 99.7% ± 0.5%, breast: 99.3% ± 0.7%; SCN: 99.6% ± 1.4%; IMC: 99.3% ± 3%. For ipsilateral lung, Dmean and V20 were 13.6 ± 1.2 Gy, 21.1% ± 5% (HT) and 13.6 ± 1.4 Gy, 20.1% ± 3.2% (VMAT). Dmean and V30 of the heart were 7.4 ± 1.4 Gy, 1% ± 1% (HT) and 10.3 ± 4.2 Gy, 2.5% ± 3.9% (VMAT). For controlateral breast Dmean was 3.6 ± 0.2 Gy (HT) and 4.6 ± 0.9 Gy (VMAT). Acute skin toxicity grade 3 was 5% in the two cohorts. CONCLUSION HT and VMAT in complex adjuvant breast irradiation allow a good coverage of target volumes with an acceptable acute tolerance. A longer follow-up is needed to assess the impact of low doses to healthy tissues.

  16. Helical tomotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: New therapeutic arms in the breast cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Olivier; Kirova, Youlia M; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Costa, Emilie; Lemanski, Claire; Bourgier, Celine; Riou, Olivier; Tiberi, David; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyse clinical and dosimetric results of helical tomotherapy (HT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in complex adjuvant breast and nodes irradiation. METHODS Seventy-three patients were included (31 HT and 42 VMAT). Dose were 63.8 Gy (HT) and 63.2 Gy (VMAT) in the tumour bed, 52.2 Gy in the breast, 50.4 Gy in supraclavicular nodes (SCN) and internal mammary chain (IMC) with HT and 52.2 Gy and 49.3 Gy in IMC and SCN with VMAT in 29 fractions. Margins to particle tracking velocimetry were greater in the VMAT cohort (7 mm vs 5 mm). RESULTS For the HT cohort, the coverage of clinical target volumes was as follows: Tumour bed: 99.4% ± 2.4%; breast: 98.4% ± 4.3%; SCN: 99.5% ± 1.2%; IMC: 96.5% ± 13.9%. For the VMAT cohort, the coverage was as follows: Tumour bed: 99.7% ± 0.5%, breast: 99.3% ± 0.7%; SCN: 99.6% ± 1.4%; IMC: 99.3% ± 3%. For ipsilateral lung, Dmean and V20 were 13.6 ± 1.2 Gy, 21.1% ± 5% (HT) and 13.6 ± 1.4 Gy, 20.1% ± 3.2% (VMAT). Dmean and V30 of the heart were 7.4 ± 1.4 Gy, 1% ± 1% (HT) and 10.3 ± 4.2 Gy, 2.5% ± 3.9% (VMAT). For controlateral breast Dmean was 3.6 ± 0.2 Gy (HT) and 4.6 ± 0.9 Gy (VMAT). Acute skin toxicity grade 3 was 5% in the two cohorts. CONCLUSION HT and VMAT in complex adjuvant breast irradiation allow a good coverage of target volumes with an acceptable acute tolerance. A longer follow-up is needed to assess the impact of low doses to healthy tissues. PMID:27648167

  17. Effects of Geometric Parameters on Swimming of Micro Organisms with Single Helical Flagellum in Circular Channels

    PubMed Central

    Acemoglu, Alperen; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2014-01-01

    We present a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the swimming of micro organisms with a single helical flagellum in circular channels. The CFD model is developed to obtain numerical solutions of Stokes equations in three dimensions, validated with experiments reported in literature, and used to analyze the effects of geometric parameters, such as the helical radius, wavelength, radii of the channel and the tail and the tail length on forward and lateral swimming velocities, rotation rates, and the efficiency of the swimmer. Optimal shapes for the speed and the power efficiency are reported. Effects of Brownian motion and electrostatic interactions are excluded to emphasize the role of hydrodynamic forces on lateral velocities and rotations on the trajectory of swimmers. For thin flagella, as the channel radius decreases, forward velocity and the power efficiency of the swimmer decreases as well; however, for thick flagella, there is an optimal radius of the channel that maximizes the velocity and the efficiency depending on other geometric parameters. Lateral motion of the swimmer is suppressed as the channel is constricted below a critical radius, for which the magnitude of the lateral velocity reaches a maximum. Results contribute significantly to the understanding of the swimming of bacteria in micro channels and capillary tubes. PMID:24703315

  18. Minimally Constrained Model of Self-Organized Helical States in Reversed-Field Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, G. R.; Hudson, S. R.; Terranova, D.; Franz, P.; Dewar, R. L.; Hole, M. J.

    2013-08-01

    We show that the self-organized single-helical-axis (SHAx) and double-axis (DAx) states in reversed field pinches can be reproduced in a minimally constrained equilibrium model using only five parameters. This is a significant reduction on previous representations of the SHAx which have required an infinite number of constraints. The DAx state, which has a nontrivial topology, has not previously been reproduced using an equilibrium model that preserves this topological structure. We show that both states are a consequence of transport barrier formation in the plasma core, in agreement with experimental results. We take the limit of zero pressure in this work, although the model is also valid for finite pressure.

  19. On the performances of Intensity Modulated Protons, RapidArc and Helical Tomotherapy for selected paediatric cases

    PubMed Central

    Fogliata, Antonella; Yartsev, Slav; Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Wyttenbach, Rolf; Bauman, Glenn; Cozzi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Background To evaluate the performance of three different advanced treatment techniques on a group of complex paediatric cancer cases. Methods CT images and volumes of interest of five patients were used to design plans for Helical Tomotherapy (HT), RapidArc (RA) and Intensity Modulated Proton therapy (IMP). The tumour types were: extraosseous, intrathoracic Ewing Sarcoma; mediastinal Rhabdomyosarcoma; metastastis of base of skull with bone, para-nasal and left eye infiltration from Nephroblastoma of right kidney; metastatic Rhabdomyosarcoma of the anus; Wilm's tumour of the left kidney with multiple liver metastases. Cases were selected for their complexity regardless the treatment intent and stage. Prescribed doses ranged from 18 to 53.2 Gy, with four cases planned using a Simultaneous Integrated Boost strategy. Results were analysed in terms of dose distributions and dose volume histograms. Results For all patients, IMP plans lead to superior sparing of organs at risk and normal healthy tissue, where in particular the integral dose is halved with respect to photon techniques. In terms of conformity and of spillage of high doses outside targets (external index (EI)), all three techniques were comparable; CI90% ranged from 1.0 to 2.3 and EI from 0 to 5%. Concerning target homogeneity, IMP showed a variance (D5%–D95%) measured on the inner target volume (highest dose prescription) ranging from 5.9 to 13.3%, RA from 5.3 to 11.8%, and HT from 4.0 to 12.2%. The range of minimum significant dose to the same target was: (72.2%, 89.9%) for IMP, (86.7%, 94.1%) for RA, and (79.4%, 94.8%) for HT. Similarly, for maximum significant doses: (103.8%, 109.4%) for IMP, (103.2%, 107.4%) for RA, and (102.4%, 117.2%) for HT. Treatment times (beam-on time) ranged from 123 to 129 s for RA and from 146 to 387 s for HT. Conclusion Five complex pediatric cases were selected as representative examples to compare three advanced radiation delivery techniques. While differences were noted

  20. Assessing the Role of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Relative to IMRT and Helical Tomotherapy in the Management of Localized, Locally Advanced, and Post-Operative Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Melanie T.M.; Blake, Samuel J.; Batchelar, Deidre L.; Cheung, Patrick; Mah, Katherine

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To quantify differences in treatment delivery efficiency and dosimetry between step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five prostate cancer patients were selected retrospectively for this planning study. Treatment plans were generated for: prostate alone (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5), prostate bed (n = 5), and prostate bed + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5). Target coverage, dose homogeneity, integral dose, monitor units (MU), and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) were compared across techniques. Time required to deliver each plan was measured. Results: The dosimetric quality of IMRT, VMAT, and HT plans were comparable for target coverage (planning target volume V95%, clinical target volume V100% all >98.7%) and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) for all treatment groups. Although HT resulted in a slightly higher integral dose and mean doses to the OAR, it yielded a lower maximum dose to all OAR examined. VMAT resulted in reductions in treatment times over IMRT (mean = 75%) and HT (mean = 70%). VMAT required 15-38% fewer monitor units than IMRT over all treatment volumes, with the reduction per fraction ranging from 100-423 MU from the smallest to largest volumes. Conclusions: VMAT improves efficiency of delivery for equivalent dosimetric quality as IMRT and HT across various prostate cancer treatment volumes in the intact and postoperative settings.

  1. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lei; Zhang, Xin Xin; Feng, Lin Chun; Chen, Jing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Hai Xia; Xu, Shou Ping; Xie, Chuan Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods Between August 2011 and September 2013, 132 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled for a prospective phase II study. The prescription doses delivered to the gross tumor volume (pGTVnx) and positive lymph nodes (pGTVnd), the high risk planning target volume (PTV1), and the low risk planning target volume (PTV2), were 67.5 Gy (2.25 Gy/F), 60 Gy (2.0 Gy/F), and 54 Gy (1.8 Gy/F), in 30 fractions, respectively. Acute toxicities were evaluated according to the established RTOG/EORTC criteria. This group of patients was compared with the 190 patients in the retrospective P70 study, who were treated between September 2004 and August 2009 with helical tomotherapy, with a dose of 70-74 Gy/33F/6.5W delivered to pGTVnx and pGTVnd. Results The median follow-up was 23.7 (12–38) months. Acute radiation related side-effects were mainly problems graded as 1 or 2. Only a small number of patients suffered from grade 4 leucopenia (4.5%) or thrombocytopenia (2.3%). The local relapse-free survival (LRFS), nodal relapse-free survival (NRFS), local-nodal relapse-free survival (LNRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 96.7%, 95.5%, 92.2%, 92.7% and 93.2%, at 2 years, respectively, with no significant difference compared with the P70 study. Conclusions Smart delivered via the helical tomotherapy technique appears to be associated with an acceptable acute toxicity profile and favorable short-term outcomes for patients with NPC. Long-term toxicities and patient outcomes are under investigation. PMID:27247555

  2. Recognition of the Helical Structure of β-1,4-Galactan by a New Family of Carbohydrate-binding Modules*

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Melissa; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Kaneko, Satoshi; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Willats, William G. T.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    The microbial enzymes that depolymerize plant cell wall polysaccharides, ultimately promoting energy liberation and carbon recycling, are typically complex in their modularity and often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Here, through analysis of an unknown module from a Thermotoga maritima endo-β-1,4-galactanase, we identify a new family of CBMs that are most frequently found appended to proteins with β-1,4-galactanase activity. Polysaccharide microarray screening, immunofluorescence microscopy, and biochemical analysis of the isolated module demonstrate the specificity of the module, here called TmCBM61, for β-1,4-linked galactose-containing ligands, making it the founding member of family CBM61. The ultra-high resolution x-ray crystal structures of TmCBM61 (0.95 and 1.4 Å resolution) in complex with β-1,4-galactotriose reveal the molecular basis of the specificity of the CBM for β-1,4-galactan. Analysis of these structures provides insight into the recognition of an unexpected helical galactan conformation through a mode of binding that resembles the recognition of starch. PMID:20826814

  3. Trifluoroethanol modulates amyloid formation by the all α-helical URN1 FF domain.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Patrizia; Castillo, Virginia; Ventura, Salvador

    2013-08-30

    Amyloid fibril formation is implicated in different human diseases. The transition between native α-helices and nonnative intermolecular β-sheets has been suggested to be a trigger of fibrillation in different conformational diseases. The FF domain of the URN1 splicing factor (URN1-FF) is a small all-α protein that populates a molten globule (MG) at low pH. Despite the fact that this conformation maintains most of the domain native secondary structure, it progressively converts into β-sheet enriched and highly ordered amyloid fibrils. In this study, we investigated if 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) induced conformational changes that affect URN1-FF amyloid formation. Despite TFE having been shown to induce or increase the aggregation of both globular and disordered proteins at moderate concentrations, we demonstrate here that in the case of URN1-FF it reinforces its intrinsic α-helical structure, which competes the formation of aggregated assemblies. In addition, we show that TFE induces conformational diversity in URN1-FF fibrils, in such a way that the fibrils formed in the presence and absence of the cosolvent represent different polymorphs. It is suggested that the effect of TFE on both the soluble and aggregated states of URN1-FF depends on its ability to facilitate hydrogen bonding.

  4. Organ and effective doses in newborn patients during helical multislice computed tomography examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staton, Robert J.; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Matt D.; Hintenlang, David E.; Arreola, Manuel M.; Williams, Jonathon L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-10-01

    In this study, two computational phantoms of the newborn patient were used to assess individual organ doses and effective doses delivered during head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and torso examinations using the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 helical multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scanner. The stylized phantom used to model the patient anatomy was the revised ORNL newborn phantom by Han et al (2006 Health Phys.90 337). The tomographic phantom used in the study was that developed by Nipper et al (2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 3143) as recently revised by Staton et al (2006 Med. Phys. 33 3283). The stylized model was implemented within the MCNP5 radiation transport code, while the tomographic phantom was incorporated within the EGSnrc code. In both codes, the x-ray source was modelled as a fan beam originating from the focal spot at a fan angle of 52° and a focal-spot-to-axis distance of 57 cm. The helical path of the source was explicitly modelled based on variations in collimator setting (12 mm or 24 mm), detector pitch and scan length. Tube potentials of 80, 100 and 120 kVp were considered in this study. Beam profile data were acquired using radiological film measurements on a 16 cm PMMA phantom, which yielded effective beam widths of 14.7 mm and 26.8 mm for collimator settings of 12 mm and 24 mm, respectively. Values of absolute organ absorbed dose were determined via the use of normalization factors defined as the ratio of the CTDI100 measured in-phantom and that determined by Monte Carlo simulation of the PMMA phantom and ion chamber. Across various technique factors, effective dose differences between the stylized and tomographic phantoms ranged from +2% to +9% for head exams, -4% to -2% for chest exams, +8% to +24% for abdominal exams, -16% to -12% for pelvic exams and -7% to 0% for chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) exams. In many cases, however, relatively close agreement in effective dose was accomplished at the expense of compensating errors in individual organ

  5. ModuleOrganizer: detecting modules in families of transposable elements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most known eukaryotic genomes contain mobile copied elements called transposable elements. In some species, these elements account for the majority of the genome sequence. They have been subject to many mutations and other genomic events (copies, deletions, captures) during transposition. The identification of these transformations remains a difficult issue. The study of families of transposable elements is generally founded on a multiple alignment of their sequences, a critical step that is adapted to transposons containing mostly localized nucleotide mutations. Many transposons that have lost their protein-coding capacity have undergone more complex rearrangements, needing the development of more complex methods in order to characterize the architecture of sequence variations. Results In this study, we introduce the concept of a transposable element module, a flexible motif present in at least two sequences of a family of transposable elements and built on a succession of maximal repeats. The paper proposes an assembly method working on a set of exact maximal repeats of a set of sequences to create such modules. It results in a graphical view of sequences segmented into modules, a representation that allows a flexible analysis of the transformations that have occurred between them. We have chosen as a demonstration data set in depth analysis of the transposable element Foldback in Drosophila melanogaster. Comparison with multiple alignment methods shows that our method is more sensitive for highly variable sequences. The study of this family and the two other families AtREP21 and SIDER2 reveals new copies of very different sizes and various combinations of modules which show the potential of our method. Conclusions ModuleOrganizer is available on the Genouest bioinformatics center at http://moduleorganizer.genouest.org PMID:20860790

  6. Organ and effective doses in pediatric patients undergoing helical multislice computed tomography examination

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Staton, Robert J.; Hintenlang, David E.; Arreola, Manuel M.; Williams, Jonathon L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-05-15

    As multidetector computed tomography (CT) serves as an increasingly frequent diagnostic modality, radiation risks to patients became a greater concern, especially for children due to their inherently higher radiosensitivity to stochastic radiation damage. Current dose evaluation protocols include the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) or point detector measurements using anthropomorphic phantoms that do not sufficiently provide accurate information of the organ-averaged absorbed dose and corresponding effective dose to pediatric patients. In this study, organ and effective doses to pediatric patients under helical multislice computed tomography (MSCT) examinations were evaluated using an extensive series of anthropomorphic computational phantoms and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. Ten pediatric phantoms, five stylized (equation-based) ORNL phantoms (newborn, 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year) and five tomographic (voxel-based) UF phantoms (9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male, and 14-year male) were implemented into MCNPX for simulation, where a source subroutine was written to explicitly simulate the helical motion of the CT x-ray source and the fan beam angle and collimator width. Ionization chamber measurements were performed and used to normalize the Monte Carlo simulation results. On average, for the same tube current setting, a tube potential of 100 kVp resulted in effective doses that were 105% higher than seen at 80 kVp, and 210% higher at 120 kVp regardless of phantom type. Overall, the ORNL phantom series was shown to yield values of effective dose that were reasonably consistent with those of the gender-specific UF phantom series for CT examinations of the head, pelvis, and torso. However, the ORNL phantoms consistently overestimated values of the effective dose as seen in the UF phantom for MSCT scans of the chest, and underestimated values of the effective dose for abdominal CT scans. These discrepancies increased

  7. SU-E-T-371: Validation of Organ Doses Delivered During Craniospinal Irradiation with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Andujar, A; Chen, J; Garcia, A; Haas-Kogan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: New techniques have been developed to deliver more conformal treatments to the craniospinal axis. One concern, however, is the widespread low dose delivered and implications for possible late effects. The purpose of this work is for the first time to validate the organ doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS), including out-of-field doses for a pediatric craniospinal treatment (CSI). Methods: A CSI plan prescribed to 23.4 Gy and a posterior fossa boost plan to 30.6 Gy (total dose 54.0 Gy) was developed for a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom representing a 13 yearold- child. For the CSI plan, the planning target volumes (PTV) consisted of the brain and spinal cord with 2 mm and 5 mm expansions, respectively. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured and included in the plan optimization. The plans were delivered on a helical tomotherapy unit. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the dose at 54 positions within the PTV and OARs. Results: For the CSI treatment, the mean percent difference between TPS dose calculations and measurements was 5% for the PTV and 10% for the OARs. For the boost, the average was 3% for the PTV. The percent difference for the OARs, which lie outside the field and received a small fraction of the prescription dose, varied from 15% to 200%. However in terms of absolute dose, the average difference between measurement and TPS per treatment Gy was 2 cGy/Gy and 3 mGy/Gy for the CSI and boost plans, respectively. Conclusion: There was good agreement between doses calculated by the TPS and measurements for the CSI treatment. Higher percent differences were observed for out-of-field doses in the boost plan, but absolute dose differences were very small compared to the prescription dose. These findings can help in the estimation of late effects after radiotherapy for pediatric patients.

  8. Optically active microspheres constructed by helical substituted polyacetylene and used for adsorption of organic compounds in aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Junya; Song, Ci; Deng, Jianping

    2014-11-12

    This article reports optically active microspheres consisting of chiral helical substituted polyacetylene and β-cyclodextrin-derivative (β-CD-A). The microspheres showed remarkable adsorption toward various organic compounds in water. To prepare the microspheres, an acetylenic-derived helical macro-monomer was synthesized and then underwent aqueous suspension copolymerization with octadecyl acrylate and butyl acrylate by using azobis(isobutyronitrile) as initiator and β-CD-A simultaneously as comonomer and cross-linking agent. The helical macro-monomer chains enabled the microspheres to exhibit desirable enantio-differentiating adsorption capacity toward chiral compounds respectively dissolved in organic solvent, dispersed in water, and dissolved in water. The saturated absorbency toward (R)-(+)- and (S)-(-)-1-phenylethylamine was 29 and 12 mg · g(-1), respectively. The microspheres also showed large oil absorbency (e.g., 22 g · g(-1) CCl4) and a large adsorption toward methyl red (as a model for organic dyes) dispersed in water. The presence of β-CD-A moieties improved the adsorption performance of the microspheres. The present optically active microspheres open a new approach for preparing adsorbents particularly chiral adsorbents with potentials for wastewater treatment. PMID:25290256

  9. The thermodynamics of the self-assembly of covalently linked oligomeric naphthalenediimides into helical organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tambara, Koujiro; Olsen, John-Carl; Hansen, David E; Pantoş, G Dan

    2014-01-28

    The mechanism and thermodynamic functions of the self-assembly of a family of covalently linked oligomeric naphthalenediimides (NDIs) were investigated through variable-temperature NMR and CD studies. The NDIs were shown to self-assemble into helical supramolecular nanotubes via an isodesmic polymerisation mechanism, and regardless of the oligomer length a surprising entropy-enthalpy compensation was observed. PMID:24287562

  10. Assessment of Extended-Field Radiotherapy for Stage IIIC Endometrial Cancer Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Jidong Mackenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Pervez, Nadeem; Dundas, George; Urtasun, Raul; Pearcey, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) plans for pelvic and para-aortic RT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients; and to evaluate the integral dose (ID) received by critical structures within the radiation fields. Methods and Materials: We selected 10 patients with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. For each patient, three plans were created with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HT. The IMRT and HT plans were both optimized to keep the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) the same as that with 3D-CRT. The dosimetry and ID for the critical structures were compared. A paired two-tailed Student t test was used for data analysis. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plans, the IMRT plans resulted in lower IDs in the organs at risk (OARs), ranging from -3.49% to -17.59%. The HT plans showed a similar result except that the ID for the bowel increased 0.27%. The IMRT and HT plans both increased the IDs to normal tissue (see and text for definition), pelvic bone, and spine (range, 3.31-19.7%). The IMRT and HT dosimetry showed superior PTV coverage and better OAR sparing than the 3D-CRT dosimetry. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed similar PTV coverage, lower Ids, and a decreased dose to most OARs. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated RT and HT appear to achieve excellent PTV coverage and better sparing of OARs, but at the expense of increased IDs to normal tissue and skeleton. HT allows for additional improvement in dosimetry and sparing of most OARs.

  11. The organization of the microtubule associated protein tau in Alzheimer paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    Ruben, G C; Iqbal, K; Grundke-Iqbal, I; Johnson, J E

    1993-01-29

    The structural relationship of the microtubule associated protein tau to paired helical filaments (PHF) was examined by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) without treatment with any chemical fixatives. Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) were isolated in the absence of detergent from Alzheimer diseased brains, were freeze-dried, and were vertically platinum-carbon replicated for TEM. The PHF we observed made one helical turn (L) in 74 +/- 8.5 nm and had a wide region (W) of 14.8 +/- 0.6 nm similar to PHF previously modeled with a periodic morphology. The PHF thin region (T) measured approximately 2.4 nm, approximately 4.9 nm, approximately 7.4 nm and approximately 9.7 nm and the most often observed width was approximately 2.4 nm. No surface features regularly divide the PHF into two filaments. Morphologically the PHF are thin helical ribbons with an often observed thickness of approximately 2.4 nm. At high magnification, approximately 1.0 nm and some approximately 0.4 nm strands identical to normal and denatured tau monomer covered PHF surfaces and were aggregated in non-periodic fashion. Bovine tau polymer approximately 2.1 nm diameter filaments, trapped on a filter, were partially heat denatured and showed some of the morphological features of PHF.

  12. Superiority of helical tomotherapy on liver sparing and dose escalation in hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison study of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianqian; Wang, Renben; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Linzhi; Zhu, Kunli; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Jiang, Shumei; Qi, Zhonghua; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the difference of liver sparing and dose escalation between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and methods Sixteen unresectable HCC patients were enrolled in this study. First, some evaluation factors of 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT plans were calculated with prescription dose at 50 Gy/25 fractions. Then, the doses were increased using HT or IMRT independently until either the plans reached 70 Gy or any normal tissue reached the dose limit according to quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic criteria. Results The conformal index of 3DCRT was lower than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001), and the homogeneity index of 3DCRT was higher than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001). HT took the longest treatment time (P<0.001). For V50% (fraction of normal liver treated to at least 50% of the isocenter dose) of the normal liver, there was a significant difference: 3DCRT > IMRT > HT (P<0.001). HT had a lower Dmean (mean dose) and V20 (Vn, the percentage of organ volume receiving ≥n Gy) of liver compared with 3DCRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or IMRT (P=0.508 and P=0.007, respectively). Dmean of nontarget normal liver and V30 of liver were higher for 3DCRT than IMRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or HT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively). Seven patients in IMRT (43.75%) and nine patients in HT (56.25%) reached the isodose 70 Gy, meeting the dose limit of the organs at risk. Conclusion HT may provide significantly better liver sparing and allow more patients to achieve higher prescription dose in HCC radiotherapy. PMID:27445485

  13. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer Patients: An Intraindividual Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Marnitz, Simone; Lukarski, Dusko; Koehler, Christhardt; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Ebert, Andreas; Budach, Volker; Schneider, Achim; Stromberger, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional IMRT for primary chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty cervical cancer patients undergoing primary chemoradiation received radiation with HT; 10 patients underwent pelvic irradiation (PEL) and 10 extended-field irradiation (EXT). For treatment planning, the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) concept was applied. Tumor, pelvic, with or without para-aortic lymph nodes were defined as planning target volume A (PTV-A) with a prescribed dose of 1.8/50.4 Gy (28 fractions). The SIB dose for the parametrium (PTV-B), was 2.12/59.36 Gy. The lower target constraints were 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the target volume, and the upper dose constraint was 107%. The irradiated small-bowel volumes were kept as low as possible. For every HT plan, a conventional IMRT plan was calculated and compared with regard to dose-volume histogram, conformity index and conformity number, and homogeneity index. Results: Both techniques allowed excellent target volume coverage and sufficient SB sparing. Conformity index and conformity number results for both PTV-A and PTV-B, homogeneity index for PTV-B, and SB sparing for V45, V50, Dmax, and D1% were significantly better with HT. SB sparing was significantly better for conventional IMRT at low doses (V10). Conclusions: Both HT and conventional IMRT provide optimal treatment of cervical cancer patients. The HT technique was significantly favored with regard to target conformity, homogeneity, and SB sparing. Randomized trials are needed to assess the oncological outcome, toxicity, and clinical relevance of these differences.

  14. Alpha-helical regions of the protein molecule as organic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprun, Anatol D.; Shmeleva, Liudmyla V.

    2014-05-01

    An α-helical region of protein molecule was considered in a model of nanotube. The molecule is in conditions of quantum excitations. Such model corresponds to a one-dimensional molecular nanocrystal with three molecules in an elementary cell at the presence of excitation. For the analysis of different types of conformational response of the α-helical area of the protein molecule on excitation, the nonlinear response of this area to the intramolecular quantum excitation caused by hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is taken into account. It has been established that in the simplest case, three types of excitation are realized. As estimates show, each of them `serves' different kinds of protein. The symmetrical type of excitation, most likely, is realized in the reduction of traversal-striped skeletal muscles. It has the highest excitation energy. This well protects from casual actions. Antisymmetric excitations have intermediate energy (between symmetrical and asymmetrical). They, most likely, are realized in membranous and nucleic proteins. It is shown that the conformational response of the α-helical region of the protein is (in angstroms) a quantity of order N c /5, where N c is the number of spiral turns. For the number of turns typical in this case: N c ~ 10, displacement compounds are a quantity of order 2 Å. It qualitatively corresponds to observable values. Asymmetrical excitations have the lowest energy. Therefore, most likely, they are realized in enzymatic proteins. It was shown that at this type of excitation, the bending of the α-helix is formally directed to the opposite side with respect to the antisymmetric excitations. Also, it has a greater value than the antisymmetric case for N c ≤ 14 and smaller for N c > 14.

  15. Co-assembly of Zn(SPh){sub 2} and organic linkers into helical and zig-zag polymer chains

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yi; Yu Lingmin; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Blair, Richard G.; Zhang Qichun

    2012-07-15

    Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers, single helicate [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(TPyTA)(EG)]{sub n} (EG=ethylene glycol) (1) and zig-zag structure [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(BPyVB)]{sub n} (2), were synthesized under solvothermal conditions at 150 Degree-Sign C or room temperature by the co-assembly of Zn(SPh){sub 2} and organic linkers such as 2,4,6-tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPyTA) and 1,3-bis(trans-4-pyridylvinyl)benzene (BPyVB). X-ray crystallography study reveals that both polymers 1 and 2 crystallize in space group P2{sub 1}/c of the monoclinic system. The solid-state UV-vis absorption spectra show that 1 and 2 have maxium absorption onsets at 400 nm and 420 nm, respectively. TGA analysis indicates that 1 and 2 are stable up to 110 Degree-Sign C and 210 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers, single helicate [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(TPyTA)(EG)]{sub n} (1) and zig-zag structure [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(BPyVB)]{sub n} (2), were synthesized. Solid-state UV-vis absorptions show that 1 and 2 have maxium absorption onsets at 400 nm and 420 nm, respectively. TGA analysis indicates that 1 and 2 are stable up to 110 Degree-Sign C and 210 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers have been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TPyTA results in helical structures in 1 while BPyVB leads to zig-zag chains in 2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid-state UV-vis absorption spectra and TGA analysis of the title polymers were studied.

  16. Construction of Covalent Organic Nanotubes by Light-Induced Cross-Linking of Diacetylene-Based Helical Polymers.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kaho; Hong, Liu; Nishihara, Taishi; Nakanishi, Yusuke; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Kitaura, Ryo; Ousaka, Naoki; Yashima, Eiji; Ito, Hideto; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-08-31

    Organic nanotubes (ONTs) are tubular nanostructures composed of small molecules or macromolecules that have found various applications including ion sensor/channels, gas absorption, and photovoltaics. While most ONTs are constructed by self-assembly processes based on weak noncovalent interactions, this unique property gives rise to the inherent instability of their tubular structures. Herein, we report a simple "helix-to-tube" strategy to construct robust, covalent ONTs from easily accessible poly(m-phenylene diethynylene)s (poly-PDEs) possessing chiral amide side chains that can adopt a helical conformation through hydrogen-bonding interactions. The helically folded poly-PDEs subsequently undergo light-induced cross-linking at longitudinally aligned 1,3-butadiyne moieties across the whole helix to form covalent tubes (ONTs) both in solution and solid phases. The structures of poly-PDEs and covalent ONTs were characterized by spectroscopic analyses, diffraction analysis, and microscopic analyses. We envisage that this simple yet powerful "helix-to-tube" strategy will generate a range of ONT-based materials by introducing functional moieties into a monomer. PMID:27486790

  17. Form and Function: An Organic Chemistry Module. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Bruce; Mazzocchi, Paul; Hearle, Robert

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide science teachers with the necessary guidance and suggestions for teaching organic chemistry. In this book, the diverse field of organic chemistry modules is introduced. The material in this book can be integrated with the other modules in a sequence that helps students to see that chemistry is a unified…

  18. Self-organized helical equilibria as a new paradigm for ohmically heated fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Piovesan, P.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.; Zuin, M.; Alfier, A.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gobbin, M.; Innocente, P.; Marrelli, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Puiatti, M. E.; Spolaore, M.; Valisa, M.; Vianello, N.; Martin, P.; Martin, P.; Apolloni, L.; Puiatti, M. E.; Adamek, J.; Agostini, M.; Alfier, A.; Annibaldi, S. V.; Antoni, V.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Baruzzo, M.; Bettini, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Brombin, M.; Brotankova, J.; Buffa, A.; Buratti, P.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavinato, M.; Chapman, B. E.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; de Lorenzi, A.; de Masi, G.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Ferro, A.; Franz, P.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Grando, L.; Guazzotto, L.; Guo, S. C.; Igochine, V.; Innocente, P.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lorenzini, R.; Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martini, S.; Martines, E.; McCollam, K.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Novello, L.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, L.; Pizzimenti, A.; Pomaro, N.; Predebon, I.; Reusch, J. A.; Rostagni, G.; Rubinacci, G.; Sarff, J. S.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spizzo, G.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Toigo, V.; Valisa, M.; Vianello, N.; Villone, F.; White, R. B.; Yadikin, D.; Zaccaria, P.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zohm, H.; Zuin, M.

    2009-08-01

    In the quest for new energy sources, the research on controlled thermonuclear fusion has been boosted by the start of the construction phase of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). ITER is based on the tokamak magnetic configuration, which is the best performing one in terms of energy confinement. Alternative concepts are however actively researched, which in the long term could be considered for a second generation of reactors. Here, we show results concerning one of these configurations, the reversed-field pinch (RFP). By increasing the plasma current, a spontaneous transition to a helical equilibrium occurs, with a change of magnetic topology. Partially conserved magnetic flux surfaces emerge within residual magnetic chaos, resulting in the onset of a transport barrier. This is a structural change and sheds new light on the potential of the RFP as the basis for a low-magnetic-field ohmic fusion reactor.

  19. Hippocampal-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy: A 'How-To' Technique Using Helical Tomotherapy and Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tewatia, Dinesh; Rowley, Howard; Kuo, John S.; Khuntia, Deepak; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Sparing the hippocampus during cranial irradiation poses important technical challenges with respect to contouring and treatment planning. Herein we report our preliminary experience with whole-brain radiotherapy using hippocampal sparing for patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five anonymous patients previously treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing were reviewed. The hippocampus was contoured, and hippocampal avoidance regions were created using a 5-mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Helical tomotherapy and linear accelerator (LINAC)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans were generated for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: On average, the hippocampal avoidance volume was 3.3 cm{sup 3}, occupying 2.1% of the whole-brain planned target volume. Helical tomotherapy spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 5.5 Gy and maximum dose of 12.8 Gy. LINAC-based IMRT spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 7.8 Gy and maximum dose of 15.3 Gy. On a per-fraction basis, mean dose to the hippocampus (normalized to 2-Gy fractions) was reduced by 87% to 0.49 Gy{sub 2} using helical tomotherapy and by 81% to 0.73 Gy{sub 2} using LINAC-based IMRT. Target coverage and homogeneity was acceptable with both IMRT modalities, with differences largely attributed to more rapid dose fall-off with helical tomotherapy. Conclusion: Modern IMRT techniques allow for sparing of the hippocampus with acceptable target coverage and homogeneity. Based on compelling preclinical evidence, a Phase II cooperative group trial has been developed to test the postulated neurocognitive benefit.

  20. Helicenes as All-in-One Organic Materials for Application in OLEDs: Synthesis and Diverse Applications of Carbo- and Aza[5]helical Diamines.

    PubMed

    Jhulki, Samik; Mishra, Abhaya Kumar; Chow, Tahsin J; Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha

    2016-06-27

    A set of eight helical diamines were designed and synthesized to demonstrate their relevance as all-in-one materials for multifarious applications in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), that is, as hole-transporting materials (HTMs), EMs, bifunctional hole transporting + emissive materials, and host materials. Azahelical diamines function very well as HTMs. Indeed, with high Tg values (127-214 °C), they are superior alternatives to popular N,N'-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB). All the helical diamines exhibit emissive properties when employed in nondoped as well as doped devices, the performance characteristics being superior in the latter. One of the carbohelical diamines (CHTPA) serves the dual function of hole transport as well as emission in simple double-layer devices; the efficiencies observed were better by quite some margin than those of other emissive helicenes reported. The twisting endows helical diamines with significantly high triplet energies such that they also function as host materials for red and green phosphors, that is, [Ir(btp)2 acac] (btp=2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridine; acac=acetylacetonate) and [Ir(ppy)3 ] (ppy=2-phenylpyridine), respectively. The results of device fabrications demonstrate how helicity/ helical scaffold may be diligently exploited to create molecular systems for maneuvering diverse applications in OLEDs. PMID:27244223

  1. Helicenes as All-in-One Organic Materials for Application in OLEDs: Synthesis and Diverse Applications of Carbo- and Aza[5]helical Diamines.

    PubMed

    Jhulki, Samik; Mishra, Abhaya Kumar; Chow, Tahsin J; Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha

    2016-06-27

    A set of eight helical diamines were designed and synthesized to demonstrate their relevance as all-in-one materials for multifarious applications in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), that is, as hole-transporting materials (HTMs), EMs, bifunctional hole transporting + emissive materials, and host materials. Azahelical diamines function very well as HTMs. Indeed, with high Tg values (127-214 °C), they are superior alternatives to popular N,N'-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB). All the helical diamines exhibit emissive properties when employed in nondoped as well as doped devices, the performance characteristics being superior in the latter. One of the carbohelical diamines (CHTPA) serves the dual function of hole transport as well as emission in simple double-layer devices; the efficiencies observed were better by quite some margin than those of other emissive helicenes reported. The twisting endows helical diamines with significantly high triplet energies such that they also function as host materials for red and green phosphors, that is, [Ir(btp)2 acac] (btp=2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridine; acac=acetylacetonate) and [Ir(ppy)3 ] (ppy=2-phenylpyridine), respectively. The results of device fabrications demonstrate how helicity/ helical scaffold may be diligently exploited to create molecular systems for maneuvering diverse applications in OLEDs.

  2. Dose as a function of liver volume and planning target volume in helical tomotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy-based stereotactic body radiation therapy for hepatic metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, Joseph M.; Reish, Andrew G.; Sheng Ke; Larner, James M.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Read, Paul W. . E-mail: PWR3U@virginia.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for local control of tumors metastatic to the liver. Multi-institutional Phase II trials are examining 60 Gy in 3 fractions delivered by linac-based, 3D-conformal IMRT. HiArt Helical TomoTherapy is a treatment unit that delivers co-planar helical IMRT that is capable of image-guided SBRT. We hypothesized that the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) delivered to a lesion by Helical TomoTherapy-based SBRT could be predicted based on the planning target volume (PTV) and liver volume. Methods and Materials: To test this, we performed inverse treatment planning and analyzed the dosimetry for multiple hypothetical liver gross tumor volumes (GTV) with conventional PTV expansions. Inverse planning was carried out to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy to be delivered in 3 fractions based on the dose constraint that 700 cc of normal liver would receive less than 15 Gy. Results: Regression analysis indicated a linear relationship between the MTD, the PTV and the liver volume, supporting our hypothesis. A predictive equation was generated, which was found to have an accuracy of {+-}3 Gy. In addition, dose constraints based on proximity to other normal tissues were tested. Inverse planning for PTVs located at varying distances from the heart, small bowel, and spinal cord revealed a predictable decrease in the MTD as the PTV increased in size or approached normal organs. Conclusions: These data provide a framework for predicting the likely MTD for patients considered for Helical TomoTherapy liver SBRT.

  3. Technology for the Organic Chemist: Three Exploratory Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteb, John J.; McNulty, LuAnne M.; Magers, John; Morgan, Paul; Wilson, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to use computer-based technology is an essential skill set for students majoring in chemistry. This exercise details the introduction of appropriate uses for this technology in the organic chemistry series. The incorporation of chemically appropriate online resources (module 1), scientific databases (module 2), and the use of a…

  4. Module organization and variance in protein-protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lee, Tsai-Ling; Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Wei; Lo, Yu-Shu; Lin, Chih-Ta; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2015-03-01

    A module is a group of closely related proteins that act in concert to perform specific biological functions through protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that occur in time and space. However, the underlying module organization and variance remain unclear. In this study, we collected module templates to infer respective module families, including 58,041 homologous modules in 1,678 species, and PPI families using searches of complete genomic database. We then derived PPI evolution scores and interface evolution scores to describe the module elements, including core and ring components. Functions of core components were highly correlated with those of essential genes. In comparison with ring components, core proteins/PPIs were conserved across multiple species. Subsequently, protein/module variance of PPI networks confirmed that core components form dynamic network hubs and play key roles in various biological functions. Based on the analyses of gene essentiality, module variance, and gene co-expression, we summarize the observations of module organization and variance as follows: 1) a module consists of core and ring components; 2) core components perform major biological functions and collaborate with ring components to execute certain functions in some cases; 3) core components are more conserved and essential during organizational changes in different biological states or conditions.

  5. Information Identification and Organization. Student Study Guide. Module II: Organization and Acquisition of Information and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolvin, Boyd M.; West, Sharon

    This second module in a three module program examines the types of materials and services that are available in a community information center or library and the tools or sources for obtaining them. The module covers: ways in which books and other materials are arranged and organized; descriptions of library catalogs and the basic information…

  6. A Dual Modulated Homochiral Helical Nanofilament Phase with Local Columnar Ordering Formed by Bent Core Liquid Crystals: Effects of Molecular Chirality.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Salamonczyk, Miroslaw; Jákli, Antal; Hegmann, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    Helical nanofilament (HNF) phases form as a result of an intralayer mismatch between top and bottom molecular halves in bent-core liquid crystals (BC-LCs) that is relieved by local saddle-splay geometry. HNFs are immensely attractive for photovoltaic and chiral separation applications and as templates for the chiral spatial assembly of guest molecules. Here, the synthesis and characterization of two unichiral BC-LCs and one racemic mixture with tris-biphenyl-diester cores featuring chiral (R,R) and (S,S) or racemic 2-octyloxy aliphatic side chains are presented. In comparison to the achiral compound with linear side chains forming an intralayer modulated HNF phase (HNFmod ), synchrotron small angle X-ray diffraction indicates that the unichiral derivatives form a dual modulated HNF phase with intra- as well as interlayer modulations (HNFmod2 ) suggesting a columnar local structure of the nanofilaments. Transmission electron microscopy and circular dichroism spectropolarimetry confirm that the unichiral materials exclusively form homochiral HNFs with a twist sense-matching secondary twist. A contact preparation provides the first example of two identical chiral liquid crystal phases only differing in their handedness that do not mix and form an achiral liquid crystal phase with an entirely different structure in the contact zone.

  7. A Dual Modulated Homochiral Helical Nanofilament Phase with Local Columnar Ordering Formed by Bent Core Liquid Crystals: Effects of Molecular Chirality.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Salamonczyk, Miroslaw; Jákli, Antal; Hegmann, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    Helical nanofilament (HNF) phases form as a result of an intralayer mismatch between top and bottom molecular halves in bent-core liquid crystals (BC-LCs) that is relieved by local saddle-splay geometry. HNFs are immensely attractive for photovoltaic and chiral separation applications and as templates for the chiral spatial assembly of guest molecules. Here, the synthesis and characterization of two unichiral BC-LCs and one racemic mixture with tris-biphenyl-diester cores featuring chiral (R,R) and (S,S) or racemic 2-octyloxy aliphatic side chains are presented. In comparison to the achiral compound with linear side chains forming an intralayer modulated HNF phase (HNFmod ), synchrotron small angle X-ray diffraction indicates that the unichiral derivatives form a dual modulated HNF phase with intra- as well as interlayer modulations (HNFmod2 ) suggesting a columnar local structure of the nanofilaments. Transmission electron microscopy and circular dichroism spectropolarimetry confirm that the unichiral materials exclusively form homochiral HNFs with a twist sense-matching secondary twist. A contact preparation provides the first example of two identical chiral liquid crystal phases only differing in their handedness that do not mix and form an achiral liquid crystal phase with an entirely different structure in the contact zone. PMID:27334846

  8. Biomimetic Taste Receptors with Chiral Recognition by Photoluminescent Metal-Organic Frameworks Chelated with Polyaniline Helices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tu; Lin, Tsung Yan; Lee, Hung Lin; Chang, Yun Hsuan; Tsai, Yee Chen

    2016-01-22

    The adsorption of phenylaniline (Phe) enantiomers on (+)-polyaniline (PAN)-chelated [In(OH)(bdc)]n microcrystals was carefully designed and studied by using the Job titration, circular dichroism, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photoluminescence to mimic heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors in selective, but not specific, ligand binding with chiral recognition and signal transduction. Six essential working principles across different length scales are unraveled: 1) a chiral (+)-PAN (host), 2) specific sites for Phe-(+)/PAN (guest-host) binding, 3) a conformational change of (+)-PAN after binding with Phe enantiomers, 4) different degrees of packing for (+)-PAN, 5) interactions between (+)-PAN and the underlying signal-generating framework (i.e., [In(OH)(bdc)]n microcrystals), and 6) a systematic photoluminescent signal combination by using principal-component analysis from the other three polymer-chelated metal-organic frameworkds (MOFs), such as poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), sodium alginate (SA), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to enhance the selectivity and discrimination capabilities.

  9. Re-irradiation of unresectable recurrent head and neck cancer: using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Songmi; Yoo, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Yoon; Han, Chi Wha; Kim, Ki Jun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Re-irradiation (re-RT) is considered a treatment option for inoperable locoregionally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) after prior radiotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent HNC. Materials and Methods Patients diagnosed with recurrent HNC and received re-RT were retrospectively reviewed. Primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were locoregional control and toxicities. Results The median follow-up period of total 9 patients was 18.7 months (range, 4.1 to 76 months) and that of 3 alive patients was 49 months (range, 47 to 76 months). Median dose of first radiotherapy and re-RT was 64.8 and 47.5 Gy10. Median cumulative dose of the two courses of radiotherapy was 116.3 Gy10 (range, 91.8 to 128.9 Gy10) while the median interval between the two courses of radiation was 25 months (range, 4 to 137 months). The response rate after re-RT of the evaluated 8 patients was 75% (complete response, 4; partial response, 2). Median locoregional relapse-free survival after re-RT was 11.9 months (range, 3.4 to 75.1 months) and 5 patients eventually presented with treatment failure (in-field failure, 2; in- and out-field failure, 2; out-field failure, 1). Median OS of the 8 patients was 20.3 months (range, 4.1 to 75.1 months). One- and two-year OS rates were 62.5% and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 leucopenia developed in one patient as acute toxicity, and grade 2 osteonecrosis and trismus as chronic toxicity in another patient. Conclusion Re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy for previously irradiated patients with unresectable locoregionally recurrent HNC may be a feasible treatment option with long-term survival and acceptable toxicities. PMID:24501708

  10. Electrically modulated diffraction gratings in organic chromophore thin films.

    PubMed

    Kutuvantavida, Y; Williams, Grant V M; Bhuiyan, M D H

    2014-04-20

    An electrically modulated diffraction grating has been demonstrated in poled polymer thin films containing the organic nonlinear optical chromophore, PYR-3 (2-{3-Cyano-4-[3-(1-decyl-1 H-pyridin-4-ylidene)-propenyl]-5,5-dimethy l-5 H-furan-2-ylidene}-malononitrile), and amorphous polycarbonate. A dc electric field induced change in the diffraction efficiency of up to 9% was observed. The diffraction efficiency modulation was likely due to an electric field induced change in the film thickness via a piezoelectric effect rather than via an electronic linear electro-optic effect.

  11. Dosimetric study and in-vivo dose verification for conformal avoidance treatment of anal adenocarcinoma using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han Chunhui . E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of using helical tomotherapy for conformal avoidance treatment of anal adenocarcinoma. We retrospectively generated step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT) plans and helical tomotherapy plans for two anal cancer patients, one male and one female, who were treated by the sIMRT technique. Dose parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs-at-risk (OARs) were compared between the sIMRT and the helical tomotherapy plans. The helical tomotherapy plans showed better dose homogeneity in the PTV, better dose conformity around the PTV, and, therefore, better sparing of nearby OARs compared with the sIMRT plans. In-vivo skin dose measurements were performed during conformal avoidance helical tomotherapy treatment of an anal cancer patient to verify adequate delivery of skin dose and sparing of OARs.

  12. Helical modulation of the electrostatic plasma potential due to edge magnetic islands induced by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaccio, G. Spizzo, G.; Schmitz, O. Frerichs, H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Evans, T. E.; White, R. B.

    2015-10-15

    The electrostatic response of the edge plasma to a magnetic island induced by resonant magnetic perturbations to the plasma edge of the circular limiter tokamak TEXTOR is analyzed. Measurements of plasma potential are interpreted by simulations with the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT. We find a strong correlation between the magnetic field topology and the poloidal modulation of the measured plasma potential. The ion and electron drifts yield a predominantly electron driven radial diffusion when approaching the island X-point while ion diffusivities are generally an order of magnitude smaller. This causes a strong radial electric field structure pointing outward from the island O-point. The good agreement found between measured and modeled plasma potential connected to the enhanced radial particle diffusivities supports that a magnetic island in the edge of a tokamak plasma can act as convective cell. We show in detail that the particular, non-ambipolar drifts of electrons and ions in a 3D magnetic topology account for these effects. An analytical model for the plasma potential is implemented in the code ORBIT, and analyses of ion and electron radial diffusion show that both ion- and electron-dominated transport regimes can exist, which are known as ion and electron root solutions in stellarators. This finding and comparison with reversed field pinch studies and stellarator literature suggest that the role of magnetic islands as convective cells and hence as major radial particle transport drivers could be a generic mechanism in 3D plasma boundary layers.

  13. The Structure and Organization within the Membrane of the Helices Composing the Pore-Forming Domain of Bacillus thuringiensis δ -Endotoxin are Consistent with an ``Umbrella-Like'' Structure of the Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Ehud; La Rocca, Paolo; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Shai, Yechiel

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of membrane insertion and the structural organization of pores formed by Bacillus thuringiensis δ -endotoxin. We determined the relative affinities for membranes of peptides corresponding to the seven helices that compose the toxin pore-forming domain, their modes of membrane interaction, their structures within membranes, and their orientations relative to the membrane normal. In addition, we used resonance energy transfer measurements of all possible combinatorial pairs of membrane-bound helices to map the network of interactions between helices in their membrane-bound state. The interaction of the helices with the bilayer membrane was also probed by a Monte Carlo simulation protocol to determine lowest-energy orientations. Our results are consistent with a situation in which helices α 4 and α 5 insert into the membrane as a helical hairpin in an antiparallel manner, while the other helices lie on the membrane surface like the ribs of an umbrella (the ``umbrella model''). Our results also support the suggestion that α 7 may serve as a binding sensor to initiate the structural rearrangement of the pore-forming domain.

  14. A 3D chiral metal-organic framework based on left-handed helices containing 3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing; Yang, Tian-Yi; Feng, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Zong-Hui; Xu, Ling

    2015-10-15

    A chiral metal-organic framework, [Cu(atr)(OH)]·0.5H{sub 2}O·0.5en (1) (Hatr=3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole, en=ethylenediamine), was constructed via diffusion reaction of the achiral Hatr ligand and CuSO{sub 4} as starting materials. Compound 1 crystallizes in the chiral space group P3{sub 2}21 and features a porous metal-organic framework with 44.1% solvent-accessible volume fabricated by left-handed helices with a pitch height of l{sub p}=10.442 Å. Six helices gather around in a cycle forming a large honeycomb channel with a 6.58 Å inner diameter. Cu(II) center and atr{sup ‒} ligand regarded as 3-connected nodes, compound 1 can be simplified to a 3-c uninodal (4.12{sup 2}) (qtz-h) topological network. A gradual decreasing in the magnetic moment depending on temperature decreasing indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction in 1. The powder XRD confirms the bulk sample is a single crystal pure phase, and the thermogravimetric analysis shows the thermal stability of 1 is up to ca. 240 °C. - Highlights: • The present 3D chiral MOF is built from achiral Hatr ligand. • Six left-handed helices gather into a honeycomb channel in chiral sp P3{sub 2}21. • Compound 1 shows a 3-c uninodal (4.12{sup 2}) or qtz-h topological network. • Compound 1 indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction.

  15. A 3D chiral metal-organic framework based on left-handed helices containing 3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Yang, Tian-Yi; Feng, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Zong-Hui; Xu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    A chiral metal-organic framework, [Cu(atr)(OH)]·0.5H2O·0.5en (1) (Hatr=3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole, en=ethylenediamine), was constructed via diffusion reaction of the achiral Hatr ligand and CuSO4 as starting materials. Compound 1 crystallizes in the chiral space group P3221 and features a porous metal-organic framework with 44.1% solvent-accessible volume fabricated by left-handed helices with a pitch height of lp=10.442 Å. Six helices gather around in a cycle forming a large honeycomb channel with a 6.58 Å inner diameter. Cu(II) center and atr‒ ligand regarded as 3-connected nodes, compound 1 can be simplified to a 3-c uninodal {4.122} (qtz-h) topological network. A gradual decreasing in the magnetic moment depending on temperature decreasing indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction in 1. The powder XRD confirms the bulk sample is a single crystal pure phase, and the thermogravimetric analysis shows the thermal stability of 1 is up to ca. 240 °C.

  16. A two-fold interpenetrating 3D metal-organic framework material constructed from helical chains linked via 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yiming; Zhao Zhenguo; Wu Xiaoyuan; Zhang Qisheng; Chen Lijuan; Wang Fei; Chen Shanci; Lu Canzhong

    2008-12-15

    A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound {l_brace}[Ag(L){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (1) has been synthesized by self-assembly of 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz (L=4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz=3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole) and Ag{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} under hydrothermal conditions. It crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/acd with a=21.406(4) A, b=21.406(4) A, c=36.298(8) A, Z=32. X-ray single-crystal diffraction reveals that 1 has a three-dimensional framework with an unprecedented alternate left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net. Photoluminescent investigation reveals that the title compound displays interesting emissions in a wide region, which shows that the title compound may be a good potential candidate as a photoelectric material. - Graphical abstract: A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound [Ag(4,4'-bpz){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}] shows unprecedented alternating left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net.

  17. Determination of W boson helicity fractions in top quark decays in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at CDF Run II and production of endcap modules for the ATLAS Silicon Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, Shulamit

    2007-01-01

    The thesis presented here includes two parts. The first part discusses the production of endcap modules for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker at the University of Geneva. The ATLAS experiment is one of the two multi-purpose experiments being built at the LHC at CERN. The University of Geneva invested extensive efforts to create an excellent and efficient module production site, in which 655 endcap outer modules were constructed. The complexity and extreme requirements for 10 years of LHC operation with a high resolution, high efficiency, low noise tracking system resulted in an extremely careful, time consuming production and quality assurance of every single module. At design luminosity about 1000 particles will pass through the tracking system each 25 ns. In addition to requiring fast tracking techniques, the high particle flux causes significant radiation damage. Therefore, modules have to be constructed within tight and accurate mechanical and electrical specification. A description of the ATLAS experiment and the ATLAS Semiconductor tracker is presented, followed by a detailed overview of the module production at the University of Geneva. My personal contribution to the endcap module production at the University of Geneva was taking part, together with other physicists, in selecting components to be assembled to a module, including hybrid reception tests, measuring the I-V curve of the sensors and the modules at different stages of the production, thermal cycling the modules and performing electrical readout tests as an initial quality assurance of the modules before they were shipped to CERN. An elaborated description of all of these activities is given in this thesis. At the beginning of the production period the author developed a statistics package which enabled us to monitor the rate and quality of the module production. This package was then used widely by the ATLAS SCT institutes that built endcap modules of any type, and kept being improved and updated

  18. Ligand Symmetry Modulation for Designing Mixed-Ligand Metal-Organic Frameworks: Gas Sorption and Luminescence Sensing Properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di-Ming; Tian, Jia-Yue; Liu, Chun-Sen

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of a new mixed-linker Zn(II)-based metal-organic framework (MOF), {[Zn2(atz)2(bpydb)](DMA)8}n (1) (atz = deprotonated 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, bpydb = deprotonated 4,4'-(4,4'-bipyridine-2,6-diyl) dibenzoic acid, DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide), through symmetry modulation of a triazole ligand. The desymmetrized triazole linkers not only bond to the Zn(II) ions to result in a new helical Zn-triazolate chain building unit but also lead to the formation of a highly porous framework (N2 uptake: 617 cm(3)/g; BET surface area: 2393 m(2)/g) with 1D helical channels. The adsorption properties of desolved 1 were investigated by H2, C2H2, CO2, and CH4 sorption experiments, which showed that 1 exhibited high uptake capacity for H2 at 77 K and C2H2 around room temperature. More importantly, the high C2H2 uptake capacity but low binding energy makes this MOF a promising candidate for effective C2H2 capture from C2H2/CO2 and C2H2/CH4 mixed gases with low regenerative energy cost. In addition, 1 shows potential application for the luminescence sensing of small aromatic molecules picric acid (PA) and p-xylene (PX). PMID:27494087

  19. Molecular organization of amyloid protofilament-like assembly of betabellin 15D: helical array of beta-sandwiches.

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Hideyo; Bond, Jeremy E; Deverin, Sean P; Lim, Amareth; Costello, Catherine E; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2002-01-01

    Betabellin is a 32-residue peptide engineered to fold into a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet protein. Upon air oxidation, the betabellin peptides can fold and assemble into a disulfide-bridged homodimer, or beta-sandwich, of 64 residues. Recent biophysical and ultrastructural studies indicate that betabellin 15D (B15D) (a homodimer of HSLTAKIpkLTFSIAphTYTCAVpkYTAKVSH, where p = DPro, k = DLys, and h = DHis) forms unbranched, 35-A wide assemblies that resemble the protofilaments of amyloid fibers. In the present study, we have analyzed in detail the X-ray diffraction patterns of B15D prepared from acetonitrile. The fiber diffraction analysis indicated that the B15D fibril was composed of a double helix defined by the selection rule l = n + 7m (where l is even, and n and m are any integers), and having a 199-A period and pitch, 28-A rise per unit, and 10-A radius. This helical model is equivalent to a reverse-handed, single helix with half the period and defined by the selection rule l = -3n + 7m (where l is any integer). The asymmetric unit is the single B15D beta-sandwich molecule. These results suggest that the betabellin assembly that models the protofilaments of amyloid fibers is made up of discrete subunits on a helical array. Multiple intersheet hydrogen bonds in the axial direction and intersandwich polar interactions in the lateral direction stabilize the array. PMID:12202394

  20. Formation of functional super-helical assemblies by constrained single heptad repeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sudipta; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Lampel, Ayala; Bram, Yaron; Lipstman, Sophia; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-10-01

    Inspired by the key role of super-helical motifs in molecular self-organization, several tandem heptad repeat peptides were used as building blocks to form well-ordered supramolecular nano-assemblies. However, the need for stable helical structures limits the length of the smallest described units to three heptad repeats. Here we describe the first-ever self-assembling single heptad repeat module, based on the ability of the non-coded α-aminoisobutyric acid to stabilize very short peptides in helical conformation. A conformationally constrained peptide comprised of aromatic, but not aliphatic, residues, at the first and fourth positions formed helical fibrillar assemblies. Single crystal X-ray analysis of the peptide demonstrates super-helical packing in which phenylalanine residues formed an `aromatic zipper' arrangement at the molecular interface. The modification of the minimal building block with positively charged residues results in tight DNA binding ascribed to the combined factors of helicity, hydrophobicity and charge. The design of these peptides defines a new direction for assembly of super-helical nanostructures by minimal molecular elements.

  1. Laminar circuit organization and response modulation in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Olivas, Nicholas D.; Quintanar-Zilinskas, Victor; Nenadic, Zoran; Xu, Xiangmin

    2012-01-01

    The mouse has become an increasingly important animal model for visual system studies, but few studies have investigated local functional circuit organization of mouse visual cortex. Here we used our newly developed mapping technique combining laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) with fast voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging to examine the spatial organization and temporal dynamics of laminar circuit responses in living slice preparations of mouse primary visual cortex (V1). During experiments, LSPS using caged glutamate provided spatially restricted neuronal activation in a specific cortical layer, and evoked responses from the stimulated layer to its functionally connected regions were detected by VSD imaging. In this study, we first provided a detailed analysis of spatiotemporal activation patterns at specific V1 laminar locations and measured local circuit connectivity. Then we examined the role of cortical inhibition in the propagation of evoked cortical responses by comparing circuit activity patterns in control and in the presence of GABAa receptor antagonists. We found that GABAergic inhibition was critical in restricting layer-specific excitatory activity spread and maintaining topographical projections. In addition, we investigated how AMPA and NMDA receptors influenced cortical responses and found that blocking AMPA receptors abolished interlaminar functional projections, and the NMDA receptor activity was important in controlling visual cortical circuit excitability and modulating activity propagation. The NMDA receptor antagonist reduced neuronal population activity in time-dependent and laminar-specific manners. Finally, we used the quantitative information derived from the mapping experiments and presented computational modeling analysis of V1 circuit organization. Taken together, the present study has provided important new information about mouse V1 circuit organization and response modulation. PMID:23060751

  2. Laminar circuit organization and response modulation in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Olivas, Nicholas D; Quintanar-Zilinskas, Victor; Nenadic, Zoran; Xu, Xiangmin

    2012-01-01

    The mouse has become an increasingly important animal model for visual system studies, but few studies have investigated local functional circuit organization of mouse visual cortex. Here we used our newly developed mapping technique combining laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) with fast voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging to examine the spatial organization and temporal dynamics of laminar circuit responses in living slice preparations of mouse primary visual cortex (V1). During experiments, LSPS using caged glutamate provided spatially restricted neuronal activation in a specific cortical layer, and evoked responses from the stimulated layer to its functionally connected regions were detected by VSD imaging. In this study, we first provided a detailed analysis of spatiotemporal activation patterns at specific V1 laminar locations and measured local circuit connectivity. Then we examined the role of cortical inhibition in the propagation of evoked cortical responses by comparing circuit activity patterns in control and in the presence of GABAa receptor antagonists. We found that GABAergic inhibition was critical in restricting layer-specific excitatory activity spread and maintaining topographical projections. In addition, we investigated how AMPA and NMDA receptors influenced cortical responses and found that blocking AMPA receptors abolished interlaminar functional projections, and the NMDA receptor activity was important in controlling visual cortical circuit excitability and modulating activity propagation. The NMDA receptor antagonist reduced neuronal population activity in time-dependent and laminar-specific manners. Finally, we used the quantitative information derived from the mapping experiments and presented computational modeling analysis of V1 circuit organization. Taken together, the present study has provided important new information about mouse V1 circuit organization and response modulation.

  3. Probing and controlling liquid crystal helical nanofilaments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenhui; Wang, Cheng; Young, Anthony; Liu, Feng; Gunkel, Ilja; Chen, Dong; Walba, David; Maclennan, Joseph; Clark, Noel; Hexemer, Alexander

    2015-05-13

    We report the first in situ measurement of the helical pitch of the helical nanofilament B4 phase of bent-core liquid crystals using linearly polarized, resonant soft X-ray scattering at the carbon K-edge. A strong, anisotropic scattering peak corresponding to the half-pitch of the twisted smectic layer structure was observed. The equilibrium helical half-pitch of NOBOW is found to be 120 nm, essentially independent of temperature. However, the helical pitch can be tuned by mixing guest organic molecules with the bent-core host, followed by thermal annealing.

  4. SU-E-T-197: Helical Cranial-Spinal Treatments with a Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Templeton, A; Turian, J; Chu, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) of systemic disease requires a high level of beam intensity modulation to reduce dose to bone marrow and other critical structures. Current helical delivery machines can take 30 minutes or more of beam-on time to complete these treatments. This pilot study aims to test the feasibility of performing helical treatments with a conventional linear accelerator using longitudinal couch travel during multiple gantry revolutions. Methods: The VMAT optimization package of the Eclipse 10.0 treatment planning system was used to optimize pseudo-helical CSI plans of 5 clinical patient scans. Each gantry revolution was divided into three 120° arcs with each isocenter shifted longitudinally. Treatments requiring more than the maximum 10 arcs used multiple plans with each plan after the first being optimized including the dose of the others (Figure 1). The beam pitch was varied between 0.2 and 0.9 (couch speed 5- 20cm/revolution and field width of 22cm) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared to tomotherapy plans. Results: Viable pseudo-helical plans were achieved using Eclipse. Decreasing the pitch from 0.9 to 0.2 lowered the maximum lens dose by 40%, the mean bone marrow dose by 2.1% and the maximum esophagus dose by 17.5%. (Figure 2). Linac-based helical plans showed dose results comparable to tomotherapy delivery for both target coverage and critical organ sparing, with the D50 of bone marrow and esophagus respectively 12% and 31% lower in the helical linear accelerator plan (Figure 3). Total mean beam-on time for the linear accelerator plan was 8.3 minutes, 54% faster than the tomotherapy average for the same plans. Conclusions: This pilot study has demonstrated the feasibility of planning pseudo-helical treatments for CSI targets using a conventional linac and dynamic couch movement, and supports the ongoing development of true helical optimization and delivery.

  5. Reducing radiation dose to selected organs by selecting the tube start angle in MDCT helical scans: A Monte Carlo based study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Di; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Angel, Erin; Turner, Adam C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Previous work has demonstrated that there are significant dose variations with a sinusoidal pattern on the peripheral of a CTDI 32 cm phantom or on the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom when helical CT scanning is performed, resulting in the creation of ''hot'' spots or ''cold'' spots. The purpose of this work was to perform preliminary investigations into the feasibility of exploiting these variations to reduce dose to selected radiosensitive organs solely by varying the tube start angle in CT scans. Methods: Radiation dose to several radiosensitive organs (including breasts, thyroid, uterus, gonads, and eye lenses) resulting from MDCT scans were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models, including GSF's Baby, Child, and Irene. Dose to fetus was also estimated using four pregnant female models based on CT images of the pregnant patients. Whole-body scans were simulated using 120 kVp, 300 mAs, both 28.8 and 40 mm nominal collimations, and pitch values of 1.5, 1.0, and 0.75 under a wide range of start angles (0 deg. - 340 deg. in 20 deg. increments). The relationship between tube start angle and organ dose was examined for each organ, and the potential dose reduction was calculated. Results: Some organs exhibit a strong dose variation, depending on the tube start angle. For small peripheral organs (e.g., the eye lenses of the Baby phantom at pitch 1.5 with 40 mm collimation), the minimum dose can be 41% lower than the maximum dose, depending on the tube start angle. In general, larger dose reductions occur for smaller peripheral organs in smaller patients when wider collimation is used. Pitch 1.5 and pitch 0.75 have different mechanisms of dose reduction. For pitch 1.5 scans, the dose is usually lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x-ray tube is posterior to the patient when it passes the longitudinal location of the organ. For pitch 0.75 scans, the dose is lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x

  6. A series connection architecture for large-area organic photovoltaic modules with a 7.5% module efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Soonil; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Geunjin; Lee, Seongyu; Kim, Seok; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Jinho; Yi, Minjin; Kim, Junghwan; Back, Hyungcheol; Kim, Jae-Ryoung; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of organic photovoltaic modules via printing techniques has been the greatest challenge for their commercial manufacture. Current module architecture, which is based on a monolithic geometry consisting of serially interconnecting stripe-patterned subcells with finite widths, requires highly sophisticated patterning processes that significantly increase the complexity of printing production lines and cause serious reductions in module efficiency due to so-called aperture loss in series connection regions. Herein we demonstrate an innovative module structure that can simultaneously reduce both patterning processes and aperture loss. By using a charge recombination feature that occurs at contacts between electron- and hole-transport layers, we devise a series connection method that facilitates module fabrication without patterning the charge transport layers. With the successive deposition of component layers using slot-die and doctor-blade printing techniques, we achieve a high module efficiency reaching 7.5% with area of 4.15 cm2.

  7. A series connection architecture for large-area organic photovoltaic modules with a 7.5% module efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soonil; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Geunjin; Lee, Seongyu; Kim, Seok; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Jinho; Yi, Minjin; Kim, Junghwan; Back, Hyungcheol; Kim, Jae-Ryoung; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of organic photovoltaic modules via printing techniques has been the greatest challenge for their commercial manufacture. Current module architecture, which is based on a monolithic geometry consisting of serially interconnecting stripe-patterned subcells with finite widths, requires highly sophisticated patterning processes that significantly increase the complexity of printing production lines and cause serious reductions in module efficiency due to so-called aperture loss in series connection regions. Herein we demonstrate an innovative module structure that can simultaneously reduce both patterning processes and aperture loss. By using a charge recombination feature that occurs at contacts between electron- and hole-transport layers, we devise a series connection method that facilitates module fabrication without patterning the charge transport layers. With the successive deposition of component layers using slot-die and doctor-blade printing techniques, we achieve a high module efficiency reaching 7.5% with area of 4.15 cm(2).

  8. Helicity content and tokamak applications of helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1986-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is approximately conserved by the turbulence associated with resistive instabilities of plasmas. To generalize the application of the concept of helicity, the helicity content of an arbitrary bounded region of space will be defined. The definition has the virtues that both the helicity content and its time derivative have simple expressions in terms of the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes, the average toroidal loop voltage and the electric potential on the bounding surface, and the volume integral of E-B. The application of the helicity concept to tokamak plasmas is illustrated by a discussion of so-called MHD current drive, an example of a stable tokamak q profile with q less than one in the center, and a discussion of the possibility of a natural steady-state tokamak due to the bootstrap current coupling to tearing instabilities.

  9. Analysis of dose distribution and risk of pneumonitis in stereotactic body radiation therapy for centrally located lung tumors: a comparison of robotic radiosurgery, helical tomotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Kannarunimit, Danita; Descovich, Martina; Garcia, Aaron; Chen, Josephine; Weinberg, Vivian; Mcguinness, Christopher; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Murnane, John; Gottschalk, Alexander R; Yom, Sue S

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to central lung tumors is associated with normal -tissue toxicity. Highly conformal technologies may reduce the risk of complications. This study compares physical dose characteristics and anticipated risks of radiation pneumonitis (RP) among three SBRT modalities: robotic radiosurgery (RR), helical tomotherapy (HT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Nine patients with central lung tumors ≤5 cm were compared. RR, HT and VMAT plans were developed per RTOG 0831. Dosimetric comparisons included target coverage, conformity index, heterogeneity index, gradient index, maximal dose at 2 cm from target (D2 cm), and dose-volume parameters for organs at risk (OARs). Efficiency endpoints included total beam-on time and monitor units. RP risk was derived from Lyman-Kutcher-Burman modeling on in-house software. The average GTV and PTV were 11.6 ± 7.86 cm(3) and 36.8 ± 18.1 cm(3). All techniques resulted in similar target coverage (p = 0.64) and dose conformity (p = 0.88). While RR had sharper fall-off gradient (p = 0.002) and lower D2 cm (p = 0.02), HT and VMAT produced greater homogeneity (p < 0.001) and delivery efficiency (p = 0.001). RP risk predicted from whole or contralateral lung volumes was less than 10%, but was 2-3 times higher using ipsilateral volumes. Using whole (p = 0.04, p = 0.02) or ipsilateral (p = 0.004, p = 0.0008) volumes, RR and VMAT had a lower risk of RP than HT. Using contralateral volumes, RR had the lowest RP risk (p = 0.0002, p = 0.0003 versus HT, VMAT). RR, HT and VMAT were able to provide clinically acceptable plans following the guidelines provided by RTOG 0813. All techniques provided similar coverage and conformity. RR seemed to produce a lower RP risk for a scenario of small PTV-OAR overlap and small PTV. VMAT and HT produced greater homogeneity, potentially desirable for a large PTV-OAR overlap. VMAT probably yields the lowest RP risk for a large

  10. Structure and interactions of biological helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Lee, Dominic J.; Leikin, Sergey; Wynveen, Aaron

    2007-07-01

    Helices are essential building blocks of living organisms, be they molecular fragments of proteins ( α -helices), macromolecules (DNA and collagen), or multimolecular assemblies (microtubules and viruses). Their interactions are involved in packing of meters of genetic material within cells and phage heads, recognition of homologous genes in recombination and DNA repair, stability of tissues, and many other processes. Helical molecules form a variety of mesophases in vivo and in vitro. Recent structural studies, direct measurements of intermolecular forces, single-molecule manipulations, and other experiments have accumulated a wealth of information and revealed many puzzling physical phenomena. It is becoming increasingly clear that in many cases the physics of biological helices cannot be described by theories that treat them as simple, unstructured polyelectrolytes. The present article focuses on the most important and interesting aspects of the physics of structured macromolecules, highlighting various manifestations of the helical motif in their structure, elasticity, interactions with counterions, aggregation, and poly- and mesomorphic transitions.

  11. Land Application of Wastes: An Educational Program. Organic Matter - Module 17, Objectives, and Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, W. W.; And Others

    This module sketches out the impact of sewage organic matter on soils. For convenience, that organic matter is separated into the readily decomposable compounds and the more resistant material (volatile suspended solids, refractory organics, and sludges). The fates of those organics are reviewed along with loading rates and recommended soil…

  12. Comparison of the dosimetries of 3-dimensions Radiotherapy (3D-RT) with linear accelerator and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in children irradiated for neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intensity modulated radiotherapy is an efficient radiotherapy technique to increase dose in target volumes and decrease irradiation dose in organs at risk. This last objective is mainly relevant in children. However, previous results suggested that IMRT could increase low dose, factor of risk for secondary radiation induced cancer. This study was performed to compare dose distributions with 3D-radiotherapy (3D-RT) and IMRT with tomotherapy (HT) in children with neuroblastoma. Seven children with neuroblastoma were irradiated. Treatment plans were calculated for 3D-RT, and for HT. For the volume of interest, the PTV-V95% and conformity index were calculated. Dose constraints of all the organs at risk and integral dose were compared. Results The conformity index was statistically better for HT than for 3D-RT. PTV-V95% constraint was reached in 6 cases with HT compared to 2 cases with 3D-RT. For the ipsilateral kidney of the tumor, the V12 Gy constraint was reached for 3 patients with both methods. The values were lower with HT than with 3D-RT in two cases and higher in one case. The threshold was not reached for one patient with either technique, but the value was lower with HT than with 3D-RT. For the contralateral kidney of the tumors, the V12 Gy constraint was reached for all patients with both methods. The values were lower with HT than with 3D-RT in 5 of 7 children, equal in one patient and higher in one patient. The organ-at-risk volumes receiving low doses were significantly lower with 3D-RT but larger for the highest doses, compared to those irradiated with HT. The integral doses were not different. Conclusions IMRT with HT allows a better conformity treatment, a more frequently acceptable PTV-V95% than 3D-RT and, concomitantly, a better shielding of the kidneys. The integral doses are comparable between both techniques but consideration of differences in dose distribution between the two techniques, for the organs at risk, has to be taken in

  13. Poly(isophthalic acid)(ethylene oxide) as a Macromolecular Modulator for Metal-Organic Polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng-Hao; Wang, Le; Trueblood, Jonathan V; Grassian, Vicki H; Cohen, Seth M

    2016-08-01

    A new strategy was developed by using a polymer ligand, poly(isophthalic acid)(ethylene oxide), to modulate the growth of metal-organic polyhedra (MOP) crystals. This macromolecular modulator can effectively control the crystal habit of several different Cu24L24 (L = isophthalic acid derivatives) MOPs. The polymer also directed the formation of MOP structures under reaction conditions that only produce metal-organic frameworks in the absence of modulator. Moreover, the polymer also enabled the deposition of MOP crystals on glass surfaces. This macromolecular modulator strategy provides an innovative approach to control the morphology and assembly of MOP particles. PMID:27400759

  14. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  15. Helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    Ideal fluid flow conserves a special quantity known as helicity, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. Helicity can be understood as a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines of the flow, providing an important geometric tool to study diverse physical systems such as turbulent fluids and plasmas. Since superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, a natural question arises: Is there an extra conserved quantity akin to helicity in superfluids? We address the question of a ''superfluid helicity'' theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  16. Highly efficient terahertz wave modulators by photo-excitation of organics/silicon bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyung Keun; Kang, Chul; Hwang, In-Wook; Yoon, Youngwoon; Lee, Kiejin; Kee, Chul-Sik; Lee, Joong Wook

    2014-07-07

    Using hybrid bilayer systems comprising a molecular organic semiconductor and silicon, we achieve optically controllable active terahertz (THz) modulators that exhibit extremely high modulation efficiencies. A modulation efficiency of 98% is achieved from thermally annealed C{sub 60}/silicon bilayers, due to the rapid photo-induced electron transfer from the excited states of the silicon onto the C{sub 60} layer. Furthermore, we demonstrate the broadband modulation of THz waves. The cut-off condition of the system that is determined by the formation of efficient charge separation by the photo-excitation is highly variable, changing the system from insulating to metallic. The phenomenon enables an extremely high modulation bandwidth and rates of electromagnetic waves of interest. The realization of near-perfect modulation efficiency in THz frequencies opens up the possibilities of utilizing active modulators for THz spectroscopy and communications.

  17. Can We Spare the Pancreas and Other Abdominal Organs at Risk? A Comparison of Conformal Radiotherapy, Helical Tomotherapy and Proton Beam Therapy in Pediatric Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Jouglar, Emmanuel; Wagner, Antoine; Delpon, Grégory; Campion, Loïc; Meingan, Philippe; Bernier, Valérie; Demoor-Goldschmidt, Charlotte; Mahé, Marc-André; Lacornerie, Thomas; Supiot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Late abdominal irradiation toxicity during childhood included renal damage, hepatic toxicity and secondary diabetes mellitus. We compared the potential of conformal radiotherapy (CRT), helical tomotherapy (HT) and proton beam therapy (PBT) to spare the abdominal organs at risk (pancreas, kidneys and liver- OAR) in children undergoing abdominal irradiation. Methods We selected children with abdominal tumors who received more than 10 Gy to the abdomen. Treatment plans were calculated in order to keep the dose to abdominal OAR as low as possible while maintaining the same planned target volume (PTV) coverage. Dosimetric values were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results The dose distribution of 20 clinical cases with a median age of 8 years (range 1–14) were calculated with different doses to the PTV: 5 medulloblastomas (36 Gy), 3 left-sided and 2 right-sided nephroblastomas (14.4 Gy to the tumor + 10.8 Gy boost to para-aortic lymphnodes), 1 left-sided and 4 right-sided or midline neuroblastomas (21 Gy) and 5 Hodgkin lymphomas (19.8 Gy to the para-aortic lymphnodes and spleen). HT significantly reduced the mean dose to the whole pancreas (WP), the pancreatic tail (PT) and to the ipsilateral kidney compared to CRT. PBT reduced the mean dose to the WP and PT compared to both CRT and HT especially in midline and right-sided tumors. PBT decreased the mean dose to the ispilateral kidney but also to the contralateral kidney and the liver compared to CRT. Low dose to normal tissue was similar or increased with HT whereas integral dose and the volume of normal tissue receiving at least 5 and 10 Gy were reduced with PBT compared to CRT and HT. Conclusion In children undergoing abdominal irradiation therapy, proton beam therapy reduces the dose to abdominal OAR while sparing normal tissue by limiting low dose irradiation. PMID:27764132

  18. Double Helical Fluid Containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Brian

    2003-11-01

    In the absence of gravity or at micro-scales, helical wires can support cylindrical volumes of fluid of infinite length, making them convenient as conduits. However, fixed contact line double helical fluid volumes have the additional property that they can be drained to zero volume without loss of stability to constant pressure disturbances. Thus the two-wire support is a convenient microgravity or micro-scale container as well as conduit. For evenly spaced wires, continuous draining of a cylindrical volume to zero is possible for double helices ranging from moderate pitch to the parallel wire case. Double helices of steeper pitch are stable as cylinders and at zero volume, but are unstable for some range of intermediate volumes. This unstable zone is very strongly dependent on the offset between the helical wires, varying rapidly for offsets other than 180 degrees. Preliminary experimental results validate the theoretical predictions.

  19. [Examination of motion artifacts for helical and non-helical scanning modes in head CT].

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Ichiro; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Terakawa, Shoichi; Hara, Takanori; Miura, Yohei

    2011-01-01

    For head computed tomography (CT), non-helical scanning has been recommended even in the widely used multi-slice CT (MSCT). Also, an acute stroke imaging standardization group has recommended the non-helical mode in Japan. However, no detailed comparison has been reported for current MSCT with more than 16 slices. In this study, we compared the non-helical and helical modes for head CT, focusing on temporal resolution and motion artifacts. The temporal resolution was evaluated by using temporal sensitivity profiles (TSPs) measured using a temporal impulse method. In both modes, the TSPs and temporal modulation transfer factors (MTFs) were measured for various pitch factors using 64-slice CT (Aquilion 64, Toshiba). Two motion phantoms were scanned to evaluate motion artifacts, and then quantitative analyses for motion artifacts and helical artifacts were performed by measuring multiple regions of interest (ROIs) in the phantom images. In addition, the rates of artifact occurrence for retrospective clinical cases were compared. The temporal resolution increased as the pitch factor was increased. Remarkable streak artifacts appeared in the non-helical images of the motion phantom, in spite of the equivalent effective temporal resolution. In clinical analysis, results consistent with the phantom studies were shown. These results indicated that the low pitch helical mode would be effective for emergency head CT with patient movement.

  20. Toward engineering functional organ modules by additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Marga, Francoise; Jakab, Karoly; Khatiwala, Chirag; Shepherd, Benjamin; Dorfman, Scott; Hubbard, Bradley; Colbert, Stephen; Gabor, Forgacs

    2012-06-01

    Tissue engineering is emerging as a possible alternative to methods aimed at alleviating the growing demand for replacement tissues and organs. A major pillar of most tissue engineering approaches is the scaffold, a biocompatible network of synthetic or natural polymers, which serves as an extracellular matrix mimic for cells. When the scaffold is seeded with cells it is supposed to provide the appropriate biomechanical and biochemical conditions for cell proliferation and eventual tissue formation. Numerous approaches have been used to fabricate scaffolds with ever-growing complexity. Recently, novel approaches have been pursued that do not rely on artificial scaffolds. The most promising ones utilize matrices of decellularized organs or methods based on multicellular self-assembly, such as sheet-based and bioprinting-based technologies. We briefly overview some of the scaffold-free approaches and detail one that employs biological self-assembly and bioprinting. We describe the technology and its specific applications to engineer vascular and nerve grafts.

  1. Helical superconducting black holes.

    PubMed

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  2. Feasibility and efficacy of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer in comparison with conventionally fractionated 3D-CRT

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian; Huang, Yan; Chen, Yixing; Shi, Shiming; Ye, Luxi; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Background The standard treatment for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still 60 Gy in conventional fractions combined with concurrent chemotherapy; however, the resulting local controls are disappointing. The aim of this study was to compare and assess the feasibility and efficacy of hypofractionated chemoradiotherapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional fractionation as opposed to using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for stage III NSCLC. Methods Sixty-nine patients with stage III (AJCC 7th edition) NSCLC who underwent definitive radiation treatment at our institution between July 2011 and November 2013 were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. A dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions was delivered in the HT group (n=34), whereas 60 Gy in 30 fractions in the 3D-CRT group (n=35). Primary endpoints were toxicity, overall response rate, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results The median follow-up period was 26.4 months. V20 (P=0.005), V30 (P=0.001), V40 (P=0.004), mean lung dose (P=0.000) and max dose of spinal cord (P=0.005) were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group. There was no significant difference in the incidences of acute radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ grade 2 between the two groups, whereas the incidences of acute radiation esophagitis ≥ grade 2 were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.027). Two-year overall response rate was significantly higher in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.015). One- and 2-year OS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (95.0% and 68.7%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (85.5% and 47.6%, respectively; P=0.0236). One- and 2-year PFS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (57.8% and 26.3%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (32.7% and 11.4%, respectively; P=0.0351). Univariate analysis indicated that performance status (PS), T stage and radiotherapy technique were significant

  3. RM-SORN: a reward-modulated self-organizing recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Aswolinskiy, Witali; Pipa, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Neural plasticity plays an important role in learning and memory. Reward-modulation of plasticity offers an explanation for the ability of the brain to adapt its neural activity to achieve a rewarded goal. Here, we define a neural network model that learns through the interaction of Intrinsic Plasticity (IP) and reward-modulated Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). IP enables the network to explore possible output sequences and STDP, modulated by reward, reinforces the creation of the rewarded output sequences. The model is tested on tasks for prediction, recall, non-linear computation, pattern recognition, and sequence generation. It achieves performance comparable to networks trained with supervised learning, while using simple, biologically motivated plasticity rules, and rewarding strategies. The results confirm the importance of investigating the interaction of several plasticity rules in the context of reward-modulated learning and whether reward-modulated self-organization can explain the amazing capabilities of the brain.

  4. RM-SORN: a reward-modulated self-organizing recurrent neural network

    PubMed Central

    Aswolinskiy, Witali; Pipa, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Neural plasticity plays an important role in learning and memory. Reward-modulation of plasticity offers an explanation for the ability of the brain to adapt its neural activity to achieve a rewarded goal. Here, we define a neural network model that learns through the interaction of Intrinsic Plasticity (IP) and reward-modulated Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). IP enables the network to explore possible output sequences and STDP, modulated by reward, reinforces the creation of the rewarded output sequences. The model is tested on tasks for prediction, recall, non-linear computation, pattern recognition, and sequence generation. It achieves performance comparable to networks trained with supervised learning, while using simple, biologically motivated plasticity rules, and rewarding strategies. The results confirm the importance of investigating the interaction of several plasticity rules in the context of reward-modulated learning and whether reward-modulated self-organization can explain the amazing capabilities of the brain. PMID:25852533

  5. Electro-Optic Modulator Based on Organic Planar Waveguide Integrated with Prism Coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the project, as they were formulated in the proposal, are the following: (1) Design and development of novel electro-optic modulator using single crystalline film of highly efficient electro-optic organic material integrated with prism coupler; (2) Experimental characterization of the figures-of-merit of the modulator. It is expected to perform with an extinction ratio of 10 dB at a driving signal of 5 V; (3) Conclusions on feasibility of the modulator as an element of data communication systems of future generations. The accomplishments of the project are the following: (1) The design of the electro-optic modulator based on a single crystalline film of organic material NPP has been explored; (2) The evaluation of the figures-of-merit of the electro-optic modulator has been performed; (3) Based on the results of characterization of the figures-of-merit, the conclusion was made that the modulator based on a thin film of NPP is feasible and has a great potential of being used in optic communication with a modulation bandwidth of up to 100 GHz and a driving voltage of the order of 3 to 5 V.

  6. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.; Wilmot-Smith, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for magnetic fields that connect two boundaries without null points, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field connectivity and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term that is evaluated at the field line endpoints, namely, the scalar product of the generalized field line velocity and the vector potential. Furthermore, the flux integral of this term over certain areas is very small compared to the integral of the unsigned quantity, which indicates that changes of field line helicity happen in a well-organized pairwise manner. It follows that reconnection is very efficient at redistributing helicity in complex magnetic fields despite having little effect on the total helicity.

  7. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A. J. B. Hornig, G.; Wilmot-Smith, A. L.; Yeates, A. R.

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for magnetic fields that connect two boundaries without null points, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field connectivity and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term that is evaluated at the field line endpoints, namely, the scalar product of the generalized field line velocity and the vector potential. Furthermore, the flux integral of this term over certain areas is very small compared to the integral of the unsigned quantity, which indicates that changes of field line helicity happen in a well-organized pairwise manner. It follows that reconnection is very efficient at redistributing helicity in complex magnetic fields despite having little effect on the total helicity.

  8. Thermoelectric Analysis for Helical Power Generation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangning; Fujisaka, Takeyuki; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a three-dimensional helical thermoelectric generation (TEG) system is examined by exposing it to a temperature difference with hot and cold sources. The helical paths for the two thermal fluids give the TEG device the potential to efficiently convert thermal energy. The characteristic performance of the helical system is numerically analyzed by using the finite-volume method in a compact system. The helical system is compared with a straight system in which all the thermoelectric (TE) elements present equivalent geometry. The difference in the TE performance between the two systems is not significant when the TE surfaces are maintained at constant temperatures. Both the electromotive force and the current in the TEG system increase linearly with the temperature difference Δ T applied at the two module surfaces. The current preferentially flows through a main path determined by the geometry of the TE element. The merits of the helical design are its compactness, space saving, and smooth fluid flow due to gravity, compared with the straight system.

  9. Model of multi-modal cortical processing: coherent learning in self-organizing modules.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Olivier; Frezza-Buet, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    In this paper (An abbreviated version of some portions of this article appeared in reference Menard and Frezza-Buet (Menard, O., & Frezza-Buet, H. (2004). Rewarded multi-modal neuronal self-organization: Example of the arm reaching movement. In: Proceedings of international conference on advances in intelligent systems theory and application.), as part of the IJCNN 2005 conference proceedings, published under the IEEE copyright.), an original self-organizing model is presented, with experiments highlighting its ability to be used in different frameworks, as phonetic coding dependent on semantics and arm-reaching. The model relies on the coupling of the learning processes that stand at different self-organizing modules, and exhibits dynamics that can be discussed in terms of the binding of different modalities, scattered over the different modules. Such a binding property is based on an emerging constraint of keeping consistency between the modules. This process is induced by partial connectivity and appropriate neural field competition mechanisms.

  10. SPIRAL2 Determines Plant Microtubule Organization by Modulating Microtubule Severing

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Raymond; Chomicki, Guillaume; Kumar, Manoj; Carr, Paul; Turner, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary One of the defining characteristics of plant growth and morphology is the pivotal role of cell expansion. While the mechanical properties of the cell wall determine both the extent and direction of cell expansion, the cortical microtubule array plays a critical role in cell wall organization and, consequently, determining directional (anisotropic) cell expansion [1–6]. The microtubule-severing enzyme katanin is essential for plants to form aligned microtubule arrays [7–10]; however, increasing severing activity alone is not sufficient to drive microtubule alignment [11]. Here, we demonstrate that katanin activity depends upon the behavior of the microtubule-associated protein (MAP) SPIRAL2 (SPR2). Petiole cells in the cotyledon epidermis exhibit well-aligned microtubule arrays, whereas adjacent pavement cells exhibit unaligned arrays, even though SPR2 is found at similar levels in both cell types. In pavement cells, however, SPR2 accumulates at microtubule crossover sites, where it stabilizes these crossovers and prevents severing. In contrast, in the adjacent petiole cells, SPR2 is constantly moving along the microtubules, exposing crossover sites that become substrates for severing. Consequently, our study reveals a novel mechanism whereby microtubule organization is determined by dynamics and localization of a MAP that regulates where and when microtubule severing occurs. PMID:24055158

  11. Coordination chemistry strategies for dynamic helicates: time-programmable chirality switching with labile and inert metal helicates.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hiroyuki; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    'Chirality switching' is one of the most important chemical processes controlling many biological systems. DNAs and proteins often work as time-programmed functional helices, in which specific external stimuli alter the helical direction and tune the time scale of subsequent events. Although a variety of organic foldamers and their hybrids with natural helices have been developed, we highlight coordination chemistry strategies for development of structurally and functionally defined metal helicates. These metal helicates have characteristic coordination geometries, redox reactivities and spectroscopic/magnetic properties as well as complex chiralities. Several kinds of inert metal helicates maintain rigid helical structures and their stereoisomers are separable by optical resolution techniques, while labile metal helicates offer dynamic inversion of their helical structures via non-covalent interactions with external chemical signals. The latter particularly have dynamically ordered helical structures, which are controlled by the combinations of metal centres and chiral ligands. They further function as time-programmable switches of chirality-derived dynamic rotations, translations, stretching and shape flipping, which are useful applications in nanoscience and related technology.

  12. Organic-based electro-optic modulators for microwave photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, David

    As cutting-edge microwave photonic systems with higher complexity and stringent device requirement are being developed, the demand higher performance modulators with lower drive voltages and higher bandwidth is beginning to overtake the physical limitations of existing modulators based in LiNbO3. To address this growing demand, groundbreaking work in the field of organic electro-optic materials has been achieved over the past 10--15 years that has resulted in materials with electro-optic coefficients up to 10 times that of LiNbO3 and with demonstrated response times into the THz regime. This dissertation details work towards developing low drive-voltage, high bandwidth organic-based electro-optic modulators to support next generation microwave photonic systems. Initial efforts were focused on designing an organic electro-optic material based low frequency phase modulator and developing a fabrication procedure that successfully integrates the material without compromising its electro optic activity. Additionally a procedure for inducing the high electro-optic activity in the waveguide core through a process known as 'poling' was developed. The phase modulators were then characterized to confirm the expected high electro-optic activity and correspondingly low drive voltages. To transition from low frequency modulation to broadband operation it was necessary to gather some dielectric information of the waveguide materials for RF design. Because traditional RF dielectric constant measurements assume thick substrates on the order of 100s of microns, a modified microstrip ring resonator technique was developed to measure the dielectric constant of thin, polymer waveguide films on the order of 10 mum out to 110 GHz. A high frequency traveling wave microstrip modulator was then designed and optimized for operation up to 50 GHz, and efforts were turned towards RF packaging of the microstrip modulators for practical utilization and integration. To feed the RF signals a

  13. Water tuned the helical nanostructures and supramolecular chirality in organogels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changxia; Jin, Qingxian; Lv, Kai; Zhang, Li; Liu, Minghua

    2014-04-11

    Water was found to tune the self-assembled nanostructures of a cationic amphiphile in organic solvents from nanofibers to helical tapes, helical tubes and chiral nanotwists with various pitch lengths depending on water content. Inversion of CD spectra was observed in the water-triggered polar and non-polar solvent gels.

  14. Prospective optimization of CT under tube current modulation: I. organ dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    In an environment in which computed tomography (CT) has become an indispensable diagnostic tool employed with great frequency, dose concerns at the population level have become a subject of public attention. In that regard, optimizing radiation dose has become a core problem to the CT community. As a fundamental step to optimize radiation dose, it is crucial to effectively quantify radiation dose for a given CT exam. Such dose estimates need to be patient-specific to reflect individual radiation burden. It further needs to be prospective so that the scanning parameters can be dynamically adjusted before the scan is performed. The purpose of this study was to prospectively estimate organ dose in abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose coefficients ( hfixed ) for fixed tube current were first estimated using a validated Monte Carlo simulation program and 58 computational phantoms. To account for the effect of TCM scheme, a weighted CTDIvol was computed for each organ based on the tube current modulation profile. The organ dose was predicted by multiplying the weighted CTDIvol with the organ dose coefficients ( hfixed ). To quantify prediction accuracy, each predicted organ dose was compared with organ dose simulated from Monte Carlo program with TCM profile explicitly modeled. The predicted organ dose showed good agreement with simulated organ dose across all organs and modulation strengths. For an average CTDIvol of a CT exam of 10 mGy, the absolute median error across all organs were 0.64 mGy (-0.21 and 0.97 for 25th and 75th percentiles, respectively). The percentage differences (normalized by CTDIvol of the exam) were within 15%. This study developed a quantitative model to predict organ dose under clinical abdominopelvic scans. Such information may aid in the optimization of CT protocols.

  15. Organ dose conversion coefficients for tube current modulated CT protocols for an adult population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wanyi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Zhang, Yakun; Segars, William Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), patient-specific organ dose can be estimated using pre-calculated organ dose conversion coefficients (organ dose normalized by CTDIvol, h factor) database, taking into account patient size and scan coverage. The conversion coefficients have been previously estimated for routine body protocol classes, grouped by scan coverage, across an adult population for fixed tube current modulated CT. The coefficients, however, do not include the widely utilized tube current (mA) modulation scheme, which significantly impacts organ dose. This study aims to extend the h factors and the corresponding dose length product (DLP) to create effective dose conversion coefficients (k factor) database incorporating various tube current modulation strengths. Fifty-eight extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were included in this study representing population anatomy variation in clinical practice. Four mA profiles, representing weak to strong mA dependency on body attenuation, were generated for each phantom and protocol class. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the organ dose. The organ dose and effective dose was further normalized by CTDIvol and DLP to derive the h factors and k factors, respectively. The h factors and k factors were summarized in an exponential regression model as a function of body size. Such a population-based mathematical model can provide a comprehensive organ dose estimation given body size and CTDIvol. The model was integrated into an iPhone app XCATdose version 2, enhancing the 1st version based upon fixed tube current modulation. With the organ dose calculator, physicists, physicians, and patients can conveniently estimate organ dose.

  16. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  17. Low-cost organic pulse sources for integrated optical modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jussi A.; Rantala, Juha T.

    2001-05-01

    The transient and steady state performance of organic light- emitting devices (OLEDs) has been investigated with a view towards suitability for pulse sources. The rise and fall times of the electroluminescence of the different structures and materials were afforded special attention. The tested devices cover single and multi-layer structures with different layer thicknesses. Both molecular and polymeric- based devices were tested. Molecular materials used in the OLEDs were N, N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD) as a hole transporter, tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate) aluminum (Alq3) as an electron transporter/emitter and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) as a hole blocking material. Poly)2-methoxy, 5-(2'-ethyl-hexoxy)-1,4- phenylene-vinylene) (MEH-PPV) and poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrene) (PEDOT/PSS) were the polymeric materials used in the devices. The effect of the driving voltage on the response time and the current density in transients was under investigation. In addition, changes in the response time were studied, when the bias voltage was applied.

  18. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed "lowest supercomplex" (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh's disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  19. Helicity, Reconnection, and Dynamo Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Hantao

    1998-11-01

    The inter-relationships between magnetic helicity, magnetic reconnection, and dynamo effects are discussed. In laboratory experiments, where two plasmas are driven to merge, the helicity content of each plasma strongly affects the reconnection rate, as well as the shape of the diffusion region. Conversely, magnetic reconnection events also strongly affect the global helicity, resulting in efficient helicity cancellation (but not dissipation) during counter-helicity reconnection and a finite helicity increase or decrease (but less efficiently than dissipation of magnetic energy) during co-helicity reconnection. Close relationships also exist between magnetic helicity and dynamo effects. The turbulent electromotive force along the mean magnetic field (alpha-effect), due to either electrostatic turbulence or the electron diamagnetic effect, transports mean-field helicity across space without dissipation. This has been supported by direct measurements of helicity flux in a laboratory plasma. When the dynamo effect is driven by electromagnetic turbulence, helicity in the turbulent field is converted to mean-field helicity. In all cases, however, dynamo processes conserve total helicity except for a small battery effect, consistent with the observation that the helicity is approximately conserved during magnetic relaxation.

  20. Significance of bending restraints for the stability of helical polymer conformations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Matthew J; Bachmann, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We performed parallel-tempering Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the formation and stability of helical tertiary structures for flexible and semiflexible polymers, employing a generic coarse-grained model. Structural conformations exhibit helical order with tertiary ordering into single helices, multiple helical segments organized into bundles, and disorganized helical arrangements. For both bending-restrained semiflexible and bending-unrestrained flexible helical polymers, the stability of the structural phases is discussed systematically by means of hyperphase diagrams parametrized by suitable order parameters, temperature, and torsion strength. This exploration lends insight into the restricted flexibility of biological polymers such as double-stranded DNA and proteins.

  1. Significance of bending restraints for the stability of helical polymer conformations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Matthew J; Bachmann, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We performed parallel-tempering Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the formation and stability of helical tertiary structures for flexible and semiflexible polymers, employing a generic coarse-grained model. Structural conformations exhibit helical order with tertiary ordering into single helices, multiple helical segments organized into bundles, and disorganized helical arrangements. For both bending-restrained semiflexible and bending-unrestrained flexible helical polymers, the stability of the structural phases is discussed systematically by means of hyperphase diagrams parametrized by suitable order parameters, temperature, and torsion strength. This exploration lends insight into the restricted flexibility of biological polymers such as double-stranded DNA and proteins. PMID:27415311

  2. Significance of bending restraints for the stability of helical polymer conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Matthew J.; Bachmann, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We performed parallel-tempering Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the formation and stability of helical tertiary structures for flexible and semiflexible polymers, employing a generic coarse-grained model. Structural conformations exhibit helical order with tertiary ordering into single helices, multiple helical segments organized into bundles, and disorganized helical arrangements. For both bending-restrained semiflexible and bending-unrestrained flexible helical polymers, the stability of the structural phases is discussed systematically by means of hyperphase diagrams parametrized by suitable order parameters, temperature, and torsion strength. This exploration lends insight into the restricted flexibility of biological polymers such as double-stranded DNA and proteins.

  3. Helical tomotherapy superficial dose measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Chester R.; Seibert, Rebecca M.; Robison, Benjamin; Mitchell, Martha

    2007-08-15

    Helical tomotherapy is a treatment technique that is delivered from a 6 MV fan beam that traces a helical path while the couch moves linearly into the bore. In order to increase the treatment delivery dose rate, helical tomotherapy systems do not have a flattening filter. As such, the dose distributions near the surface of the patient may be considerably different from other forms of intensity-modulated delivery. The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions near the surface for helical tomotherapy plans with a varying separation between the target volume and the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom. A hypothetical planning target volume (PTV) was defined on an anthropomorphic head phantom to simulate a 2.0 Gy per fraction IMRT parotid-sparing head and neck treatment of the upper neck nodes. A total of six target volumes were created with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm of separation between the surface of the phantom and the outer edge of the PTV. Superficial doses were measured for each of the treatment deliveries using film placed in the head phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on the phantom's surface underneath an immobilization mask. In the 0 mm test case where the PTV extends to the phantom surface, the mean TLD dose was 1.73{+-}0.10 Gy (or 86.6{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose). The measured superficial dose decreases to 1.23{+-}0.10 Gy (61.5{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose) for a PTV-surface separation of 5 mm. The doses measured by the TLDs indicated that the tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimates superficial doses by 8.9{+-}3.2%. The radiographic film dose for the 0 mm test case was 1.73{+-}0.07 Gy, as compared to the calculated dose of 1.78{+-}0.05 Gy. Given the results of the TLD and film measurements, the superficial calculated doses are overestimated between 3% and 13%. Without the use of bolus, tumor volumes that extend to the surface may be underdosed. As such, it is recommended that bolus be added for these

  4. Modulation by Amino Acids: Toward Superior Control in the Synthesis of Zirconium Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Gutov, Oleksii V; Molina, Sonia; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Shafir, Alexandr

    2016-09-12

    The synthesis of zirconium metal-organic frameworks (Zr MOFs) modulated by various amino acids, including l-proline, glycine, and l-phenylalanine, is shown to be a straightforward approach toward functional-group incorporation and particle-size control. High yields in Zr-MOF synthesis are achieved by employing 5 equivalents of the modulator at 120 °C. At lower temperatures, the method provides a series of Zr MOFs with increased particle size, including many suitable for single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Furthermore, amino acid modulators can be incorporated at defect sites in Zr MOFs with an amino acid/ligand ratio of up to 1:1, depending on the ligand structure and reaction conditions. The MOFs obtained through amino acid modulation exhibit an improved CO2 -capture capacity relative to nonfunctionalized materials. PMID:27482849

  5. Modulation by Amino Acids: Toward Superior Control in the Synthesis of Zirconium Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Gutov, Oleksii V; Molina, Sonia; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Shafir, Alexandr

    2016-09-12

    The synthesis of zirconium metal-organic frameworks (Zr MOFs) modulated by various amino acids, including l-proline, glycine, and l-phenylalanine, is shown to be a straightforward approach toward functional-group incorporation and particle-size control. High yields in Zr-MOF synthesis are achieved by employing 5 equivalents of the modulator at 120 °C. At lower temperatures, the method provides a series of Zr MOFs with increased particle size, including many suitable for single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Furthermore, amino acid modulators can be incorporated at defect sites in Zr MOFs with an amino acid/ligand ratio of up to 1:1, depending on the ligand structure and reaction conditions. The MOFs obtained through amino acid modulation exhibit an improved CO2 -capture capacity relative to nonfunctionalized materials.

  6. Helical plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  7. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  8. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  9. Helical-D pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    A stabilized pinch configuration is described, consisting of a D-shaped plasma cross section wrapped tightly around a guiding axis. The {open_quotes}helical-D{close_quotes} geometry produces a very large axial (toroidal) transform of magnetic line direction that reverses the pitch of the magnetic lines without the need of azimuthal (poloidal) plasma current. Thus, there is no need of a {open_quotes}dynamo{close_quotes} process and its associated fluctuations. The resulting configuration has the high magnetic shear and pitch reversal of the reversed field pinch (RFP). (Pitch = P = qR, where R = major radius). A helical-D pinch might demonstrate good confinement at q << 1.

  10. Prospective estimation of organ dose in CT under tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) has been widely used worldwide as a tool for medical diagnosis and imaging. However, despite its significant clinical benefits, CT radiation dose at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern. In this light, optimizing radiation dose has become a core responsibility for the CT community. As a fundamental step to manage and optimize dose, it may be beneficial to have accurate and prospective knowledge about the radiation dose for an individual patient. In this study, the authors developed a framework to prospectively estimate organ dose for chest and abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: The organ dose is mainly dependent on two key factors: patient anatomy and irradiation field. A prediction process was developed to accurately model both factors. To model the anatomical diversity and complexity in the patient population, the authors used a previously developed library of computational phantoms with broad distributions of sizes, ages, and genders. A selected clinical patient, represented by a computational phantom in the study, was optimally matched with another computational phantom in the library to obtain a representation of the patient’s anatomy. To model the irradiation field, a previously validated Monte Carlo program was used to model CT scanner systems. The tube current profiles were modeled using a ray-tracing program as previously reported that theoretically emulated the variability of modulation profiles from major CT machine manufacturers Li et al., [Phys. Med. Biol. 59, 4525–4548 (2014)]. The prediction of organ dose was achieved using the following process: (1) CTDI{sub vol}-normalized-organ dose coefficients (h{sub organ}) for fixed tube current were first estimated as the prediction basis for the computational phantoms; (2) each computation phantom, regarded as a clinical patient, was optimally matched with one computational phantom in the library; (3

  11. Josephson junction through a disordered topological insulator with helical magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Alexander; Alidoust, Mohammad; Loss, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We study supercurrent and proximity vortices in a Josephson junction made of disordered surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator with a proximity induced in-plane helical magnetization. In a regime where the rotation period of helical magnetization is larger than the junction width, we find supercurrent 0 -π crossovers as a function of junction thickness, magnetization strength, and parameters inherent to the helical modulation and surface states. The supercurrent reversals are associated with proximity induced vortices, nucleated along the junction width, where the number of vortices and their locations can be manipulated by means of the superconducting phase difference and the parameters mentioned above.

  12. Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

    2011-12-05

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in a

  13. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W Paul; Dixon, Robert L; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460–7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18–70 years, weight range: 60–180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients (hOrgan) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate (CTDIvol)organ, convolution values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying (CTDIvol)organ, convolution with the organ dose coefficients (hOrgan). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled. The discrepancy between the estimated organ dose and dose simulated using TCM Monte Carlo program was quantified. We further compared the

  14. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Dixon, Robert L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460–7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18–70 years, weight range: 60–180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} with the organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled

  15. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Dixon, Robert L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460-7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18-70 years, weight range: 60-180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} with the organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled. The

  16. Helicity and celestial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffatt, H. K.

    2016-06-01

    This informal article discusses the central role of magnetic and kinetic helicity in relation to the evolution of magnetic fields in geophysical and astrophysical contexts. It is argued that the very existence of magnetic fields of the intensity and scale observed is attributable in large part to the chirality of the background turbulence or random-wave field of flow, the simplest measure of this chirality being non-vanishing helicity. Such flows are responsible for the generation of large-scale magnetic fields which themselves exhibit magnetic helicity. In the geophysical context, the turbulence has a `magnetostrophic' character in which the force balance is primarily that between buoyancy forces, Coriolis forces and Lorentz forces associated with the dynamo-generated magnetic field; the dominant nonlinearity here arises from the convective transport of buoyant elements erupting from the `mushy zone' at the inner core boundary. At the opposite extreme, in a highly conducting low-density plasma, the near-invariance of magnetic field topology (and of associated helicity) presents the challenging problem of `magnetic relaxation under topological constraints', of central importance both in astrophysical contexts and in controlled-fusion plasma dynamics. These problems are reviewed and open issues, particularly concerning saturation mechanisms, are reconsidered.

  17. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Tejpal

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit most from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.

  18. Helical Tomotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Whole Pelvis Irradiation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: Dosimetric, Normal Tissue Complication Probability, and Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Widesott, Lamberto; Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio; Lomax, Antony J.; Amichetti, Maurizio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Soukup, Martin; Schneider, Ralf; Hug, Eugen; Di Muzio, Nadia; Calandrino, Riccardo; Schwarz, Marco

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for high-risk prostate cancer (HRPCa) patients. Methods and Materials: The plans of 8 patients with HRPCa treated with HT were compared with IMPT plans with two quasilateral fields set up (-100{sup o}; 100{sup o}) and optimized with the Hyperion treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 74.2 Gy/Gy relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) in 28 fractions on planning target volumes (PTVs)3-4 (P + proximal seminal vesicles), 65.5 Gy/Gy(RBE) on PTV2 (distal seminal vesicles and rectum/prostate overlapping), and 51.8 Gy/Gy(RBE) to PTV1 (pelvic lymph nodes). Normal tissue calculation probability (NTCP) calculations were performed for the rectum, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was estimated for the bowel cavity, penile bulb and bladder. Results: A slightly better PTV coverage and homogeneity of target dose distribution with IMPT was found: the percentage of PTV volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%}) was on average >97% in HT and >99% in IMPT. The conformity indexes were significantly lower for protons than for photons, and there was a statistically significant reduction of the IMPT dosimetric parameters, up to 50 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the rectum and bowel and 60 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the bladder. The NTCP values for the rectum were higher in HT for all the sets of parameters, but the gain was small and in only a few cases statistically significant. Conclusions: Comparable PTV coverage was observed. Based on NTCP calculation, IMPT is expected to allow a small reduction in rectal toxicity, and a significant dosimetric gain with IMPT, both in medium-dose and in low-dose range in all OARs, was observed.

  19. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  20. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. P.; Dixon, R. L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Among the various metrics that quantify radiation dose in computed tomography (CT), organ dose is one of the most representative quantities reflecting patient-specific radiation burden.1 Accurate estimation of organ dose requires one to effectively model the patient anatomy and the irradiation field. As illustrated in previous studies, the patient anatomy factor can be modeled using a library of computational phantoms with representative body habitus.2 However, the modeling of irradiation field can be practically challenging, especially for CT exams performed with tube current modulation. The central challenge is to effectively quantify the scatter irradiation field created by the dynamic change of tube current. In this study, we present a convolution-based technique to effectively quantify the primary and scatter irradiation field for TCM examinations. The organ dose for a given clinical patient can then be rapidly determined using the convolution-based method, a patient-matching technique, and a library of computational phantoms. 58 adult patients were included in this study (age range: 18-70 y.o., weight range: 60-180 kg). One computational phantom was created based on the clinical images of each patient. Each patient was optimally matched against one of the remaining 57 computational phantoms using a leave-one-out strategy. For each computational phantom, the organ dose coefficients (CTDIvol-normalized organ dose) under fixed tube current were simulated using a validated Monte Carlo simulation program. Such organ dose coefficients were multiplied by a scaling factor, (CTDIvol )organ, convolution that quantifies the regional irradiation field. The convolution-based organ dose was compared with the organ dose simulated from Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled on the original phantom created based on patient images. The estimation error was within 10% across all organs and modulation profiles for abdominopelvic examination. This strategy

  1. CURRENT AND KINETIC HELICITY OF LONG-LIVED ACTIVITY COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Komm, Rudolf; Gosain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    We study long-lived activity complexes and their current helicity at the solar surface and their kinetic helicity below the surface. The current helicity has been determined from synoptic vector magnetograms from the NSO/SOLIS facility, and the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows has been determined with ring-diagram analysis applied to full-disk Dopplergrams from NSO/GONG and SDO/HMI. Current and kinetic helicity of activity complexes follow the hemispheric helicity rule with mainly positive values (78%; 78%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 31%) in the southern hemisphere and negative ones (80%; 93%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 22% and 14%, respectively) in the northern hemisphere. The locations with the dominant sign of kinetic helicity derived from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and SDO/HMI data are more organized than those of the secondary sign even if they are not part of an activity complex, while locations with the secondary sign are more fragmented. This is the case for both hemispheres even for the northern one where it is not as obvious visually due to the large amount of magnetic activity present as compared to the southern hemisphere. The current helicity shows a similar behavior. The dominant sign of current helicity is the same as that of kinetic helicity for the majority of the activity complexes (83% with a 95% confidence level of 15%). During the 24 Carrington rotations analyzed here, there is at least one longitude in each hemisphere where activity complexes occur repeatedly throughout the epoch. These ''active'' longitudes are identifiable as locations of strong current and kinetic helicity of the same sign.

  2. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles. PMID:26367106

  3. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles.

  4. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles.

  5. Organ Function as a Modulator of Organ Formation: Lessons from Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michelle M; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2016-01-01

    Organogenesis requires an intricate balance between cell differentiation and tissue growth to generate a complex and fully functional organ. However, organogenesis is not solely driven by genetic inputs, as the development of several organ systems requires their own functionality. This theme is particularly evident in the developing heart as progression of cardiac development is accompanied by increased and altered hemodynamic forces. In the absence or disruption of these forces, heart development is abnormal, suggesting that the heart must sense these changes and respond appropriately. Here, we discuss concepts of how embryonic heart function contributes to heart development using lessons learned mostly from studies in zebrafish. PMID:26969993

  6. Organ Function as a Modulator of Organ Formation: Lessons from Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michelle M; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2016-01-01

    Organogenesis requires an intricate balance between cell differentiation and tissue growth to generate a complex and fully functional organ. However, organogenesis is not solely driven by genetic inputs, as the development of several organ systems requires their own functionality. This theme is particularly evident in the developing heart as progression of cardiac development is accompanied by increased and altered hemodynamic forces. In the absence or disruption of these forces, heart development is abnormal, suggesting that the heart must sense these changes and respond appropriately. Here, we discuss concepts of how embryonic heart function contributes to heart development using lessons learned mostly from studies in zebrafish.

  7. Flexible organic tandem solar modules: a story of up-scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyropoulos, George D.; Kubis, Peter; Li, Ning; Lucera, Luca; Salvador, Michael; Baran, Derya; Machui, Florian; Ameri, Tayebeh; Voigt, Monika M.; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2014-10-01

    The competition in the field of solar energy between Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs) and several Inorganic Photovoltaic technologies is continuously increasing to reach the ultimate purpose of energy supply from inexpensive and easily manufactured solar cell units. Solution-processed printing techniques on flexible substrates attach a tremendous opportunity to the OPVs for the accomplishment of low-cost and large area applications. Furthermore, tandem architectures came to boost up even more OPVs by increasing the photon-harvesting properties of the device. In this work, we demonstrate the road of realizing flexible organic tandem solar modules constructed by a fully roll-to-roll compatible processing. The modules exhibit an efficiency of 5.4% with geometrical fill factors beyond 80% and minimized interconnection-resistance losses. The processing involves low temperature (<70 °C), coating methods compatible with slot die coating and high speed and precision laser patterning.

  8. Human Superior Temporal Gyrus Organization of Spectrotemporal Modulation Tuning Derived from Speech Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Hullett, Patrick W.; Hamilton, Liberty S.; Mesgarani, Nima; Schreiner, Christoph E.

    2016-01-01

    The human superior temporal gyrus (STG) is critical for speech perception, yet the organization of spectrotemporal processing of speech within the STG is not well understood. Here, to characterize the spatial organization of spectrotemporal processing of speech across human STG, we use high-density cortical surface field potential recordings while participants listened to natural continuous speech. While synthetic broad-band stimuli did not yield sustained activation of the STG, spectrotemporal receptive fields could be reconstructed from vigorous responses to speech stimuli. We find that the human STG displays a robust anterior–posterior spatial distribution of spectrotemporal tuning in which the posterior STG is tuned for temporally fast varying speech sounds that have relatively constant energy across the frequency axis (low spectral modulation) while the anterior STG is tuned for temporally slow varying speech sounds that have a high degree of spectral variation across the frequency axis (high spectral modulation). This work illustrates organization of spectrotemporal processing in the human STG, and illuminates processing of ethologically relevant speech signals in a region of the brain specialized for speech perception. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Considerable evidence has implicated the human superior temporal gyrus (STG) in speech processing. However, the gross organization of spectrotemporal processing of speech within the STG is not well characterized. Here we use natural speech stimuli and advanced receptive field characterization methods to show that spectrotemporal features within speech are well organized along the posterior-to-anterior axis of the human STG. These findings demonstrate robust functional organization based on spectrotemporal modulation content, and illustrate that much of the encoded information in the STG represents the physical acoustic properties of speech stimuli. PMID:26865624

  9. Whole-organism screening for modulators of fasting metabolism using transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gut, Philipp; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2015-01-01

    Organismal energy homeostasis is maintained by complex interorgan communications making the discovery of novel drugs against metabolic diseases challenging using traditional high-throughput approaches in vitro. Here, we describe a method that rapidly identifies small molecules with an impact on organismal energy balance in vivo. Specifically, we developed a whole-organism screen for modulators of fasting metabolism using transgenic bioluminescence-reporter zebrafish for the gluconeogenic gene phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase 1 (pck1).

  10. Regulation of plant lateral-organ growth by modulating cell number and size.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Jo; Lenhard, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Leaves and floral organs grow to distinct, species-specific sizes and shapes. Research over the last few years has increased our understanding of how genetic pathways modulate cell proliferation and cell expansion to determine these sizes and shapes. In particular, the timing of proliferation arrest is an important point of control for organ size, and work on the regulators involved is showing how this control is achieved mechanistically and integrates environmental information. We are also beginning to understand how growth differs in different organs to produce their characteristic shapes, and how growth is integrated between different tissues that make up plant organs. Lastly, components of the general machinery in eukaryotic cells have been identified as having important roles in growth control.

  11. Helically linked mirror arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, P.

    1986-08-01

    A scheme is described for helical linking of mirror sections, which endeavors to combine the better features of toroidal and mirror devices by eliminating the longitudinal loss of mirror machines, having moderately high average ..beta.. and steady state operation. This scheme is aimed at a device, with closed magnetic surfaces having rotational transform for equilibrium, one or more axisymmetric straight sections for reduced radial loss, a simple geometrical axis for the links and an overall positive magnetic well depth for stability. We start by describing several other attempts at linking of mirror sections, made both in the past and the present. Then a description of our helically linked mirror scheme is given. This example has three identical straight sections connected by three sections having helical geometric axes. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic field and single-particle orbits in them leads to the conclusion that most of the passing particles would be confined in the device and they would have orbits independent of pitch angle under certain conditions. Numerical results are presented, which agree well with the theoretical results as far as passing particle orbits are concerned.

  12. Image-guided total marrow and total lymphatic irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E. . E-mail: Schultheiss@coh.org; Wong, Jeffrey; Liu, An; Olivera, Gustavo; Somlo, George

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a treatment technique to spare normal tissue and allow dose escalation in total body irradiation (TBI). We have developed intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for the total marrow irradiation (TMI), total lymphatic irradiation, or total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: For TBI, we typically use 12 Gy in 10 fractions delivered at an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD). Using helical tomotherapy, it is possible to deliver equally effective doses to the bone marrow and lymphatics while sparing normal organs to a significant degree. In the TMI patients, whole body skeletal bone, including the ribs and sternum, comprise the treatment target. In the total lymphatic irradiation, the target is expanded to include the spleen and major lymph node areas. Sanctuary sites for disease (brain and testes) are included when clinically indicated. Spared organs include the lungs, esophagus, parotid glands, eyes, oral cavity, liver, kidneys, stomach, small and large intestine, bladder, and ovaries. Results: With TBI, all normal organs received the TBI dose; with TMI, total lymphatic irradiation, and total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation, the visceral organs are spared. For the first 6 patients treated with TMI, the median dose to organs at risk averaged 51% lower than would be achieved with TBI. By putting greater weight on the avoidance of specific organs, greater sparing was possible. Conclusion: Sparing of normal tissues and dose escalation is possible using helical tomotherapy. Late effects such as radiation pneumonitis, veno-occlusive disease, cataracts, neurocognitive effects, and the development of second tumors should be diminished in severity and frequency according to the dose reduction realized for the organs at risk.

  13. Mediastinal irradiation in a patient affected by lung carcinoma after heart transplantation: Helical tomotherapy versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Vincenzo; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Toledo, Diego; Senese, Rossana; Francomacaro, Ferdinando; Muto, Matteo; Muto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients who have undergone solid organ transplants are known to have an increased risk of neoplasia compared with the general population. We report our experience using mediastinal irradiation with helical tomotherapy versus three‐dimensional conformal radiation therapy to treat a patient with lung carcinoma 15 years after heart transplantation. Our dosimetric evaluation showed no particular difference between the techniques, with the exception of some organs. Mediastinal irradiation after heart transplantation is feasible and should be considered after evaluation of the risk. Conformal radiotherapy or intensity‐modulated radiotherapy appears to be the appropriate treatment in heart‐transplanted oncologic patients. PMID:27148425

  14. Mediastinal irradiation in a patient affected by lung carcinoma after heart transplantation: Helical tomotherapy versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Francesca M; Iorio, Vincenzo; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Toledo, Diego; Senese, Rossana; Francomacaro, Ferdinando; Muto, Matteo; Muto, Paolo

    2016-04-26

    Patients who have undergone solid organ transplants are known to have an increased risk of neoplasia compared with the general population. We report our experience using mediastinal irradiation with helical tomotherapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to treat a patient with lung carcinoma 15 years after heart transplantation. Our dosimetric evaluation showed no particular difference between the techniques, with the exception of some organs. Mediastinal irradiation after heart transplantation is feasible and should be considered after evaluation of the risk. Conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy appears to be the appropriate treatment in heart-transplanted oncologic patients.

  15. Antenna-coupled silicon-organic hybrid integrated photonic crystal modulator for broadband electromagnetic wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Hosseini, Amir; Subbaraman, Harish; Wang, Shiyi; Zhan, Qiwen; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.; Chung, Chi-jui; Yan, Hai; Pan, Zeyu; Nelson, Robert L.; Lee, Charles Y.; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    The detection and measurement of electromagnetic fields have attracted significant amounts of attention in recent years. Traditional electronic electromagnetic field sensors use large active conductive probes which perturb the field to be measured and also make the devices bulky. In order to address these problems, integrated photonic electromagnetic field sensors have been developed, in which an optical signal is modulated by an RF signal collected by a miniaturized antenna. In this work, we design, fabricate and characterize a compact, broadband and highly sensitive integrated photonic electromagnetic field sensor based on a silicon-organic hybrid modulator driven by a bowtie antenna. The large electro-optic (EO) coefficient of organic polymer, the slow-light effects in the silicon slot photonic crystal waveguide (PCW), and the broadband field enhancement provided by the bowtie antenna, are all combined to enhance the interaction of microwaves and optical waves, enabling a high EO modulation efficiency and thus a high sensitivity. The modulator is experimentally demonstrated with a record-high effective in-device EO modulation efficiency of r33=1230pm/V. Modulation response up to 40GHz is measured, with a 3-dB bandwidth of 11GHz. The slot PCW has an interaction length of 300μm, and the bowtie antenna has an area smaller than 1cm2. The bowtie antenna in the device is experimentally demonstrated to have a broadband characteristics with a central resonance frequency of 10GHz, as well as a large beam width which enables the detection of electromagnetic waves from a large range of incident angles. The sensor is experimentally demonstrated with a minimum detectable electromagnetic power density of 8.4mW/m2 at 8.4GHz, corresponding to a minimum detectable electric field of 2.5V/m and an ultra-high sensitivity of 0.000027V/m Hz-1/2 ever demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first silicon-organic hybrid device and also the first PCW device used for the

  16. Ultrafast modulation of polarization amplitude by terahertz fields in electronic-type organic ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Yada, Hiroyuki; Yamakawa, Hiromichi; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Ferroelectrics sometimes show large electro-optical and non-linear optical effects, available for polarization rotation and frequency conversion of light, respectively. If the amplitude of ferroelectric polarization is modulated in the picosecond time domain, terahertz repetition of optical switching via electro-optical and non-linear optical effects would be achieved. Here we show that polarization amplitude can be rapidly modulated by a terahertz electric field in an organic ferroelectric, tetrathiafulvalene-p-chloranil (TTF-CA). In this compound, alternately stacked donor (TTF) and acceptor (CA) molecules are dimerized via the spin-Peierls mechanism, and charge transfer within each dimer results in a new type of ferroelectricity called electronic-type ferroelectricity. Using a terahertz field, the intradimer charge transfer is strongly modulated, producing a subpicosecond change in the macroscopic polarization, which is demonstrated by transient reflectivity and second-harmonic generation measurements. Subsequently, coherent oscillation of the dimeric molecular displacements occur, which is explained by the modulation of the spin moment of each molecule.

  17. Helicity transport through the photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuck, P. W.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M.

    2013-12-01

    Solar eruptions are driven by energy and helicity transported through the photosphere and into the Corona. However, the mechanism by which helicity is transferred from the solar dynamo to coronal structures is pooly understood. We recast the Berger and Field (1984) helicity transport equation in manifestly gauge invariant form and examine the individual terms leading to the transport of helicity through the emergence of closed field, and twisting and tangling of potential fields. These theoretical results are applied to erupting active regions observed by SDO/HMI. The plasma velocity fields in the photosphere, necessary for computing energy and helicity fluxes are determined using an upgraded version of DAVE4VM that incorporates the spherical geometry of the solar images. We find that the bulk of the helicity into the corona is injected by twisting motions, and we discuss the implications of our results for understanding coronal activity. This work was supported, in part, by NASA.

  18. Helicity transport through the photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuck, P. W.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M.

    2013-05-01

    Solar eruptions are driven by energy and helicity transported through the photosphere and into the Corona. However, the mechanism by which helicity is transferred from the solar dynamo to coronal structures is pooly understood. We recast the Berger and Field (1984) helicity transport equation in manifestly gauge invariant form and examine the individual terms leading to the transport of helicity through the emergence of closed field, and twisting and tangling of potential fields. These theoretical results are applied to erupting active regions observed by SDO/HMI. The plasma velocity fields in the photosphere, necessary for computing energy and helicity fluxes are determined using an upgraded version of DAVE4VM that incorporates the spherical geometry of the solar images. We find that the bulk of the helicity into the corona is injected by twisting motions, and we discuss the implications of our results for understanding coronal activity.

  19. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule.

    PubMed

    Slade, Michael C; Raker, Jeffrey R; Kobilka, Brandon; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2014-01-14

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world.

  20. Electron-beam nanopatterning and spectral modulation of organic molecular light-emitting single crystals.

    PubMed

    Persano, Luana; Camposeo, Andrea; Pisignano, Dario; Burini, Andrea; Spearman, Peter; Tavazzi, Silvia

    2014-02-18

    The nanopatterning of light-emitting molecular crystals with semiconducting properties can be crucial for the development of future optoelectronic and nanoelectronic devices based on organic materials. In this respect, electron-beam writing is a powerful tool to realize patterns at the nanoscale, but it is still rarely applied to active organic materials. Here, sub-100-nm-scale nanopatterning is performed on the surface of quaterthiophene monocrystals by direct maskless electron-beam writing. Gratings are produced on organic crystals with periods ranging from 80 nm to 1 μm and single-line lateral dimensions ranging from 20 to 500 nm, with electron-beam exposure doses between 100 and 1500 μC/cm(2). The morphological and texturing properties of the pattern are discussed, together with the interaction mechanisms between the electron beam and the crystal. The resulting modulation of the light emission is consistent with Bragg scattering from the patterned periodic features.

  1. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world. PMID:24501431

  2. Biomimetic Hierarchical Assembly of Helical Supraparticles from Chiral Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunlong; Marson, Ryan L; van Anders, Greg; Zhu, Jian; Ma, Guanxiang; Ercius, Peter; Sun, Kai; Yeom, Bongjun; Glotzer, Sharon C; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2016-03-22

    Chiroptical materials found in butterflies, beetles, stomatopod crustaceans, and other creatures are attributed to biocomposites with helical motifs and multiscale hierarchical organization. These structurally sophisticated materials self-assemble from primitive nanoscale building blocks, a process that is simpler and more energy efficient than many top-down methods currently used to produce similarly sized three-dimensional materials. Here, we report that molecular-scale chirality of a CdTe nanoparticle surface can be translated to nanoscale helical assemblies, leading to chiroptical activity in the visible electromagnetic range. Chiral CdTe nanoparticles coated with cysteine self-organize around Te cores to produce helical supraparticles. D-/L-Form of the amino acid determines the dominant left/right helicity of the supraparticles. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with a helical pair-potential confirm the assembly mechanism and the origin of its enantioselectivity, providing a framework for engineering three-dimensional chiral materials by self-assembly. The helical supraparticles further self-organize into lamellar crystals with liquid crystalline order, demonstrating the possibility of hierarchical organization and with multiple structural motifs and length scales determined by molecular-scale asymmetry of nanoparticle interactions.

  3. Conservation of helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    Helicity arises as a special conserved quantity in ideal fluids, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. As a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines, Helicity provides an important tool for studying a wide variety of physical systems such as plasmas and turbulent fluids. Superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, making it natural to ask whether their knottedness is similarly preserved. We address the conservation of helicity in superfluids theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  4. Extraordinary Separation of Acetylene-Containing Mixtures with Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open O Donor Sites and Tunable Robustness through Control of the Helical Chain Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zizhu; Zhang, Zhangjing; Liu, Lizhen; Li, Ziyin; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Yu; Chen, Banglin; Krishna, Rajamani; Xiang, Shengchang

    2016-04-11

    Acetylene separation is a very important but challenging industrial separation task. Here, through the solvothermal reaction of CuI and 5-triazole isophthalic acid in different solvents, two metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, FJU-21 and FJU-22) with open O donor sites and controllable robustness have been obtained for acetylene separation. They contain the same paddle-wheel {Cu2(COO2)4} nodes and metal-ligand connection modes, but with different helical chains as secondary building units (SBUs), leading to different structural robustness for the MOFs. FJU-21 and FJU-22 are the first examples in which the MOFs' robustness is controlled by adjusting the helical chain SBUs. Good robustness gives the activated FJU-22 a, which has higher surface area and gas uptakes than the flexible FJU-21 a. Importantly, FJU-22 a shows extraordinary separation of acetylene mixtures under ambient conditions. The separation capacity of FJU-22 a for 50:50 C2H2/CO2 mixtures is about twice that of the high-capacity HOF-3, and its actual separation selectivity for C2H2/C2H4 mixtures containing 1% acetylene is the highest among reported porous materials. Based on first-principles calculations, the extraordinary separation performance of C2H2 for FJU-22 a was attributed to hydrogen-bonding interactions between the C2H2 molecules with the open O donors on the wall, which provide better recognition ability for C2H2 than other functional sites, including open metal sites and amino groups.

  5. Working with Our Publics. In-Service Education for Cooperative Extension. Module 5. Working with Groups and Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Betty L.

    This module is the fifth in an inservice education series for extension professionals that consists of seven independent training modules. Its purpose is to provide the conceptual foundation and practical skills needed to work effectively with groups and organizations. Five units cover networking, communicating one-to-one, moving up and down and…

  6. Wheel-running activity modulates circadian organization and the daily rhythm of eating behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pendergast, Julie S.; Branecky, Katrina L.; Huang, Roya; Niswender, Kevin D.; Yamazaki, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of high-fat diet acutely alters the daily rhythm of eating behavior and circadian organization (the phase relationship between oscillators in central and peripheral tissues) in mice. Voluntary wheel-running activity counteracts the obesogenic effects of high-fat diet and also modulates circadian rhythms in mice. In this study, we sought to determine whether voluntary wheel-running activity could prevent the proximate effects of high-fat diet consumption on circadian organization and behavioral rhythms in mice. Mice were housed with locked or freely rotating running wheels and fed chow or high-fat diet for 1 week and rhythms of locomotor activity, eating behavior, and molecular timekeeping (PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE luminescence rhythms) in ex vivo tissues were measured. Wheel-running activity delayed the phase of the liver rhythm by 4 h in both chow- and high-fat diet-fed mice. The delayed liver phase was specific to wheel-running activity since an enriched environment without the running wheel did not alter the phase of the liver rhythm. In addition, wheel-running activity modulated the effect of high-fat diet consumption on the daily rhythm of eating behavior. While high-fat diet consumption caused eating events to be more evenly dispersed across the 24 h-day in both locked-wheel and wheel-running mice, the effect of high-fat diet was much less pronounced in wheel-running mice. Together these data demonstrate that wheel-running activity is a salient factor that modulates liver phase and eating behavior rhythms in both chow- and high-fat-diet fed mice. Wheel-running activity in mice is both a source of exercise and a self-motivating, rewarding behavior. Understanding the putative reward-related mechanisms whereby wheel-running activity alters circadian rhythms could have implications for human obesity since palatable food and exercise may modulate similar reward circuits. PMID:24624109

  7. Wheel-running activity modulates circadian organization and the daily rhythm of eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, Julie S; Branecky, Katrina L; Huang, Roya; Niswender, Kevin D; Yamazaki, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of high-fat diet acutely alters the daily rhythm of eating behavior and circadian organization (the phase relationship between oscillators in central and peripheral tissues) in mice. Voluntary wheel-running activity counteracts the obesogenic effects of high-fat diet and also modulates circadian rhythms in mice. In this study, we sought to determine whether voluntary wheel-running activity could prevent the proximate effects of high-fat diet consumption on circadian organization and behavioral rhythms in mice. Mice were housed with locked or freely rotating running wheels and fed chow or high-fat diet for 1 week and rhythms of locomotor activity, eating behavior, and molecular timekeeping (PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE luminescence rhythms) in ex vivo tissues were measured. Wheel-running activity delayed the phase of the liver rhythm by 4 h in both chow- and high-fat diet-fed mice. The delayed liver phase was specific to wheel-running activity since an enriched environment without the running wheel did not alter the phase of the liver rhythm. In addition, wheel-running activity modulated the effect of high-fat diet consumption on the daily rhythm of eating behavior. While high-fat diet consumption caused eating events to be more evenly dispersed across the 24 h-day in both locked-wheel and wheel-running mice, the effect of high-fat diet was much less pronounced in wheel-running mice. Together these data demonstrate that wheel-running activity is a salient factor that modulates liver phase and eating behavior rhythms in both chow- and high-fat-diet fed mice. Wheel-running activity in mice is both a source of exercise and a self-motivating, rewarding behavior. Understanding the putative reward-related mechanisms whereby wheel-running activity alters circadian rhythms could have implications for human obesity since palatable food and exercise may modulate similar reward circuits.

  8. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Lovrincic, Robert; Yu, Xi; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J.; Rezus, Yves L. A.; Nayak, Pabitra K.; Fonari, Alexandr; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Cahen, David

    2015-01-01

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500–1,700 cm−1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron–phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials. PMID:26246039

  9. Intensity-modulated scanning Kelvin probe microscopy for probing recombination in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guozheng; Glaz, Micah S; Ma, Fei; Ju, Huanxin; Ginger, David S

    2014-10-28

    We study surface photovoltage decays on sub-millisecond time scales in organic solar cells using intensity-modulated scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM). Using polymer/fullerene (poly[N-9"-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)]/[6,6]-phenyl C71-butyric acid methyl ester, PCDTBT/PC71BM) bulk heterojunction devices as a test case, we show that the decay lifetimes measured by SKPM depend on the intensity of the background illumination. We propose that this intensity dependence is related to the well-known carrier-density-dependent recombination kinetics in organic bulk heterojunction materials. We perform transient photovoltage (TPV) and charge extraction (CE) measurements on the PCDTBT/PC71BM blends to extract the carrier-density dependence of the recombination lifetime in our samples, and we find that the device TPV and CE data are in good agreement with the intensity and frequency dependence observed via SKPM. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of intensity-modulated SKPM to probe local recombination rates due to buried interfaces in organic photovoltaics (OPVs). We measure the differences in photovoltage decay lifetimes over regions of an OPV cell fabricated on an indium tin oxide electrode patterned with two different phosphonic acid monolayers known to affect carrier lifetime.

  10. Helicity-Density And Normalized-Helicity Maps Of Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, David; Levy, Yuval; Seginer, Arnan

    1991-01-01

    Maps of helicity density and normalized helicity useful as graphical representations of important features of three-dimensional flow fields containg vortexes. Emphasize complicated and important parts of flow field, identify vortexes, differentiate between primary and secondary vortexes, indicate sense of swirling motion, locate free singular points, and trace vortex-core streamlines emanating from these points.

  11. Modulation of volatile organic compound formation in the Mycodiesel-producing endophyte Hypoxylon sp. CI-4.

    PubMed

    Ul-Hassan, Syed Riyaz; Strobel, Gary A; Booth, Eric; Knighton, Berk; Floerchinger, Cody; Sears, Joe

    2012-02-01

    An endophytic Hypoxylon sp. (strain CI-4) producing a wide spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including 1,8-cineole, 1-methyl-1,4-cyclohexadiene and cyclohexane, 1,2,4-tris(methylene), was selected as a candidate for the modulation of VOC production. This was done in order to learn if the production of these and other VOCs can be affected by using agents that may modulate the epigenetics of the fungus. Many of the VOCs made by this organism are of interest because of their high energy densities and thus the potential they might have as Mycodiesel fuels. Strain CI-4 was exposed to the epigenetic modulators suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, a histone deacetylase) and 5-azacytidine (AZA, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor). After these treatments the organism displayed striking cultural changes, including variations in pigmentation, growth rates and odour, in addition to significant differences in the bioactivities of the VOCs. The resulting variants were designated CI4-B, CI4-AZA and CI4-SAHA. GC/MS analyses of the VOCs produced by the variants showed considerable variation, with the emergence of several compounds not previously observed in the wild-type, particularly an array of tentatively identified terpenes such as α-thujene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, α-terpinolene and β-selinene, in addition to several primary and secondary alkanes, alkenes, organic acids and derivatives of benzene. Proton transfer reaction mass spectroscopic analyses showed a marked increase in the ratio of ethanol (mass 47) to the total mass of all other ionizable VOCs, from ~0.6 in the untreated strain CI-4 to ~0.8 in CI-4 grown in the presence of AZA. Strain CI4-B was created by exposure of the fungus to 100 µM SAHA; upon removal of the epigenetic modulator from the culture medium, it did not revert to the wild-type phenotype. Results of this study have implications for understanding why there may be a wide range of VOCs found in various isolates of this fungus in nature.

  12. Total scalp irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Nigel . E-mail: nporton@facstaff.wisc.edu; Jaradat, Hazim; Welsh, James; Tome, Wolfgang

    2005-09-30

    Homogeneous irradiation of the scalp poses technical and dosimetric challenges due to the extensive, superficial, curved treatment volume. Conventional treatments on a linear accelerator use multiple matched electron fields or a combination of electron and photon fields. Problems with these techniques include dose heterogeneity in the target due to varying source-to-skin distance (SSD) and angle of beam incidence, significant dose to the brain, and the potential for overdose or underdose at match lines between the fields. Linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans have similar problems. This work presents treatment plans for total scalp irradiation on a helical tomotherapy machine. Helical tomotherapy is well-suited for scalp irradiation because it has the ability to deliver beamlets that are tangential to the scalp at all points. Helical tomotherapy also avoids problems associated with field matching and use of more than one modality. Tomotherapy treatment plans were generated and are compared to plans for treatment of the same patient on a linac. The resulting tomotherapy plans show more homogeneous target dose and improved critical structure dose when compared to state-of-the-art linac techniques. Target equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the best tomotherapy plan was slightly higher than for the linac plan, while the volume of brain tissue receiving over 30 Gy was reduced by two thirds. Furthermore, the tomotherapy plan can be more reliably delivered than linac treatments, because the patient is aligned prior to each treatment based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)

  13. Bifurcated helical core equilibrium states in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Schmitz, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tobias, B. J.; Lazarus, E. A.; Turco, F.; Lanctot, M. J.; Evans, T. E.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferlé, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Halpern, F. D.; Tran, T. M.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Pochelon, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Lao, L.; Luce, T. C.; Buttery, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Petty, C. C.; van Zeeland, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hanson, J. M.; Lütjens, H.

    2013-07-01

    Tokamaks with weak to moderate reversed central shear in which the minimum inverse rotational transform (safety factor) qmin is in the neighbourhood of unity can trigger bifurcated magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states, one of which is similar to a saturated ideal internal kink mode. Peaked prescribed pressure profiles reproduce the ‘snake’ structures observed in many tokamaks which has led to a novel explanation of the snake as a bifurcated equilibrium state. Snake equilibrium structures are computed in simulations of the tokamak à configuration variable (TCV), DIII-D and mega amp spherical torus (MAST) tokamaks. The internal helical deformations only weakly modulate the plasma-vacuum interface which is more sensitive to ripple and resonant magnetic perturbations. On the other hand, the external perturbations do not alter the helical core deformation in a significant manner. The confinement of fast particles in MAST simulations deteriorate with the amplitude of the helical core distortion. These three-dimensional bifurcated solutions constitute a paradigm shift that motivates the applications of tools developed for stellarator research in tokamak physics investigations.

  14. Helical Tomotherapy-Based STAT RT: Dosimetric Evaluation for Clinical Implementation of a Rapid Radiation Palliation Program

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Alyson; Dunlap, Neal; Sheng, Ke; Geezey, Constance; Turner, Benton; Blackhall, Leslie; Weiss, Geoffrey; Lappinen, Eric; Larner, James M.; Read, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy-based STAT radiation therapy (RT) uses an efficient software algorithm for rapid intensity-modulated treatment planning, enabling conformal radiation treatment plans to be generated on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans for CT simulation, treatment planning, and treatment delivery in one session. We compared helical tomotherapy-based STAT RT dosimetry with standard linac-based 3D conformal plans and standard helical tomotherapy-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry for palliative treatments of whole brain, a central obstructive lung mass, multilevel spine disease, and a hip metastasis. Specifically, we compared the conformality, homogeneity, and dose with regional organs at risk (OARs) for each plan as an initial step in the clinical implementation of a STAT RT rapid radiation palliation program. Hypothetical planning target volumes (PTVs) were contoured on an anthropomorphic phantom in the lung, spine, brain, and hip. Treatment plans were created using three planning techniques: 3D conformal on Pinnacle{sup 3}, helical tomotherapy, and helical tomotherapy-based STAT RT. Plan homogeneity, conformality, and dose to OARs were analyzed and compared. STAT RT and tomotherapy improved conformality indices for spine and lung plans (CI spine = 1.21, 1.17; CI lung = 1.20, 1.07, respectively) in comparison with standard palliative anteroposterior/posteroanterior (AP/PA) treatment plans (CI spine = 7.01, CI lung = 7.30), with better sparing of heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. For palliative whole-brain radiotherapy, STAT RT and tomotherapy reduced maximum and mean doses to the orbits and lens (maximum/mean lens dose: STAT RT = 2.94/2.65 Gy, tomotherapy = 3.13/2.80 Gy, Lateral opposed fields = 7.02/3.65 Gy), with an increased dose to the scalp (mean scalp dose: STAT RT = 16.19 Gy, tomotherapy = 15.61 Gy, lateral opposed fields = 14.01 Gy). For bony metastatic hip lesions, conformality with both tomotherapy techniques (CI

  15. Helical Tomotherapy for Parotid Gland Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae Kyu; Rosen, Isaac I.; Gibbons, John P.; Fields, Robert S.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate helical tomotherapy (HT) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a postoperative treatment for parotid gland tumors. Methods and Materials: Helical tomotherapy plans were developed for 4 patients previously treated with segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) IMRT. A primary planning target volume (PTV64) and two secondary PTVs (PTV60, PTV54) were defined. The clinical goals from the SMLC plans were applied as closely as possible to the HT planning. The SMLC plans included bolus, whereas HT plans did not. Results: In general, the HT plans showed better target coverage and target dose homogeneity. The minimum doses to the desired coverage volume were greater, on average, in the HT plans for all the targets. Minimum PTV doses were larger, on average, in the HT plans by 4.6 Gy (p = 0.03), 4.8 Gy (p = 0.06), and 4.9 Gy (p = 0.06) for PTV64, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively. Maximum PTV doses were smaller, on average, by 2.9 Gy (p = 0.23), 3.2 Gy (p = 0.02), and 3.6 Gy (p = 0.03) for PTV64, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively. Average dose homogeneity index was statistically smaller in the HT plans, and conformity index was larger for PTV64 in 3 patients. Tumor control probabilities were higher for 3 of the 4 patients. Sparing of normal structures was comparable for the two techniques. There were no significant differences between the normal tissue complication probabilities for the HT and SMLC plans. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy treatment plans were comparable to or slightly better than SMLC plans. Helical tomotherapy is an effective alternative to SMLC IMRT for treatment of parotid tumors.

  16. Magnetic design constraints of helical solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-01-30

    Helical solenoids have been proposed as an option for a Helical Cooling Channel for muons in a proposed Muon Collider. Helical solenoids can provide the required three main field components: solenoidal, helical dipole, and a helical gradient. In general terms, the last two are a function of many geometric parameters: coil aperture, coil radial and longitudinal dimensions, helix period and orbit radius. In this paper, we present design studies of a Helical Solenoid, addressing the geometric tunability limits and auxiliary correction system.

  17. Helicity patterns on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, A.

    Solar magnetic fields exhibit hemispheric preference for negative (pos- itive) helicity in northern (southern) hemisphere. The hemispheric he- licity rule, however, is not very strong, - the patterns of opposite sign helicity were observed on different spatial scales in each hemisphere. For instance, many individual sunspots exhibit patches of opposite he- licity inside the single polarity field. There are also helicity patterns on scales larger than the size of typical active region. Such patterns were observed in distribution of active regions with abnormal (for a give hemisphere) helicity, in large-scale photospheric magnetic fields and coronal flux systems. We will review the observations of large-scale pat- terns of helicity in solar atmosphere and their possible relationship with (sub-)photospheric processes. The emphasis will be on large-scale pho- tospheric magnetic field and solar corona.

  18. An evaluation of organ dose modulation on a GE optima CT660-computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Matthew T; Loader, Robert J; Stevens, Gregory C; Rowles, Nick P

    2016-01-01

    Organ Dose Modulation or ODM (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) was evaluated to characterize changes in CTDIvol, image noise, effective dose, and organ dose saving to patients. Three separate investigations were completed: a tube current modulation phantom was scanned with and without ODM, a CTDIvol phantom was scanned with ODM, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed. ODM was found to reduce the CTDIvol by approximately 20% whilst increasing the noise by approximately 14%. This was reflected in the dose distribution, where the anterior peripheral dose was reduced by approximately 40% whilst the identical poste-rior dose remained largely unaffected. Enabling ODM for the entire scan would reduce the effective dose by approximately 24%; however, this saving reduces to 5% if the images are matched for CTDIvol. These savings mostly originated from reductions in dose to the stomach, breasts, colon, bladder, and liver. ODM has the effect of a global reduction in CTDIvol with an associated increase in image noise. The benefit of ODM was found to be reduced when the dose-saving contribution from the reduced CTDIvol was removed. Given that there is a higher contribution to effective dose throughout the body from the anterior projections, consideration should be given to applying ODM throughout. PMID:27167255

  19. A common rejection module (CRM) for acute rejection across multiple organs identifies novel therapeutics for organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Purvesh; Roedder, Silke; Kimura, Naoyuki; De Vusser, Katrien; Morgan, Alexander A; Gong, Yongquan; Fischbein, Michael P; Robbins, Robert C; Naesens, Maarten; Butte, Atul J; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2013-10-21

    Using meta-analysis of eight independent transplant datasets (236 graft biopsy samples) from four organs, we identified a common rejection module (CRM) consisting of 11 genes that were significantly overexpressed in acute rejection (AR) across all transplanted organs. The CRM genes could diagnose AR with high specificity and sensitivity in three additional independent cohorts (794 samples). In another two independent cohorts (151 renal transplant biopsies), the CRM genes correlated with the extent of graft injury and predicted future injury to a graft using protocol biopsies. Inferred drug mechanisms from the literature suggested that two FDA-approved drugs (atorvastatin and dasatinib), approved for nontransplant indications, could regulate specific CRM genes and reduce the number of graft-infiltrating cells during AR. We treated mice with HLA-mismatched mouse cardiac transplant with atorvastatin and dasatinib and showed reduction of the CRM genes, significant reduction of graft-infiltrating cells, and extended graft survival. We further validated the beneficial effect of atorvastatin on graft survival by retrospective analysis of electronic medical records of a single-center cohort of 2,515 renal transplant patients followed for up to 22 yr. In conclusion, we identified a CRM in transplantation that provides new opportunities for diagnosis, drug repositioning, and rational drug design.

  20. Modulated synthesis of Zr-based metal-organic frameworks: from nano to single crystals.

    PubMed

    Schaate, Andreas; Roy, Pascal; Godt, Adelheid; Lippke, Jann; Waltz, Florian; Wiebcke, Michael; Behrens, Peter

    2011-06-01

    We present an investigation on the influence of benzoic acid, acetic acid, and water on the syntheses of the Zr-based metal-organic frameworks Zr-bdc (UiO-66), Zr-bdc-NH(2) (UiO-66-NH(2)), Zr-bpdc (UiO-67), and Zr-tpdc-NH(2) (UiO-68-NH(2)) (H(2) bdc: terephthalic acid, H(2) bpdc: biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H(2) tpdc: terphenyl-4,4''-dicarboxylic acid). By varying the amount of benzoic or acetic acid, the synthesis of Zr-bdc can be modulated. With increasing concentration of the modulator, the products change from intergrown to individual crystals, the size of which can be tuned. Addition of benzoic acid also affects the size and morphology of Zr-bpdc and, additionally, makes the synthesis of Zr-bpdc highly reproducible. The control of crystal and particle size is proven by powder XRD, SEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Ar sorption experiments show that the materials from modulated syntheses can be activated and that they exhibit high specific surface areas. Water proved to be essential for the formation of well-ordered Zr-bdc-NH(2) . Zr-tpdc-NH(2), a material with a structure analogous to that of Zr-bdc and Zr-bpdc, but with the longer, functionalized linker 2'-amino-1,1':4',1''-terphenyl-4,4''-dicarboxylic acid, was obtained as single crystals. This allowed the first single-crystal structural analysis of a Zr-based metal-organic framework.

  1. Assessment of three-dimensional set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tejpal; Upasani, Maheshkumar; Master, Zubin; Patil, Anita; Phurailatpam, Reena; Nojin, Siji; Kannan, Sadhana; Godasastri, Jayant; Jalali, Rakesh

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess three-dimensional (3D) set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for supine craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients were immobilized in a customized 4-clamp thermoplastic head mask with or without whole-body vacuum cradle. Set-up was based primarily on a set of cranial fiducial markers. MVCT scans were acquired and co-registered with planning scan separately at three different levels (brain, upper, and lower spine) at every fraction. Only translational displacements were analysed, wherein positive sign denotes deviation in anterior, left, and superior direction; while negative sign denotes deviation in posterior, right, and inferior direction. Mean displacements, systematic, and random errors of the study population were calculated at all three levels separately. Local residual uncertainty of the upper and lower spine was also derived assuming perfect co-registration of the skull. Set-up margins for clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) were derived at these three levels separately using published margin recipes. Data from 1868 co-registrations in 674 fractions on 33 patients was included. The mean displacements in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions were -1.21, -1.36, and 1.38 mm; -1.25, -0.34, and 0.65 mm; and -1.47, -2.78, and 0.22 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lumbar spine respectively. The corresponding 3D vector of displacement was 2.28; 1.45; and 3.15 mm respectively. There was a distinct systematic trend towards increasing inaccuracy from the brain towards the lower spine. Using Stroom's formula, the minimum recommended CTV to PTV margins in absence of daily image-guidance were 6.5; 7.0; and 9.5 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lower spine respectively. This increased to 7.5; 8.5; and 11.5 mm using van Herk's formula. Subset and sensitivity analyses

  2. The Advanced Helical Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-10-26

    A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.

  3. Modulation of stratum corneum lipid composition and organization of human skin equivalents by specific medium supplements.

    PubMed

    Thakoersing, Varsha S; van Smeden, Jeroen; Boiten, Walter A; Gooris, Gert S; Mulder, Aat A; Vreeken, Rob J; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2015-09-01

    Our in-house human skin equivalents contain all stratum corneum (SC) barrier lipid classes, but have a reduced level of free fatty acids (FAs), of which a part is mono-unsaturated. These differences lead to an altered SC lipid organization and thereby a reduced barrier function compared to human skin. In this study, we aimed to improve the SC FA composition and, consequently, the SC lipid organization of the Leiden epidermal model (LEM) by specific medium supplements. The standard FA mixture (consisting of palmitic, linoleic and arachidonic acids) supplemented to the medium was modified, by replacing protonated palmitic acid with deuterated palmitic acid or by the addition of deuterated arachidic acid to the mixture, to determine whether FAs are taken up from the medium and are incorporated into SC of LEM. Furthermore, supplementation of the total FA mixture or that of palmitic acid alone was increased four times to examine whether this improves the SC FA composition and lipid organization of LEM. The results demonstrate that the deuterated FAs are taken up into LEMs and are subsequently elongated and incorporated in their SC. However, a fourfold increase in palmitic acid supplementation does not change the SC FA composition or lipid organization of LEM. Increasing the concentration of the total FA mixture in the medium resulted in a decreased level of very long chain FAs and an increased level of mono-unsaturated FAs, which lead to deteriorated SC lipid properties. These results indicate that SC lipid properties can be modulated by specific medium supplements.

  4. A Halogen-Bond-Induced Triple Helicate Encapsulates Iodide.

    PubMed

    Massena, Casey J; Wageling, Nicholas B; Decato, Daniel A; Martin Rodriguez, Enrique; Rose, Ariana M; Berryman, Orion B

    2016-09-26

    The self-assembly of higher-order anion helicates in solution remains an elusive goal. Herein, we present the first triple helicate to encapsulate iodide in organic and aqueous media as well as the solid state. The triple helicate self-assembles from three tricationic arylethynyl strands and resembles a tubular anion channel lined with nine halogen bond donors. Eight strong iodine⋅⋅⋅iodide halogen bonds and numerous buried π-surfaces endow the triplex with remarkable stability, even at elevated temperatures. We suggest that the natural rise of a single-strand helix renders its linear halogen-bond donors non-convergent. Thus, the stringent linearity of halogen bonding is a powerful tool for the synthesis of multi-strand anion helicates. PMID:27411932

  5. The noncompetitive blocker ( sup 3 H)chlorpromazine labels three amino acids of the acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit: Implications for the alpha-helical organization of regions MII and for the structure of the ion channel

    SciTech Connect

    Revah, F.; Galzi, J.L.; Giraudat, J.; Haumont, P.Y.; Lederer, F.; Changeux, J.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Labeling studies of Torpedo marmorata nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with the noncompetitive channel blocker ({sup 3}H)chlorpromazine have led to the initial identification of amino acids plausibly participating to the walls of the ion channel on the alpha, beta, and delta subunits. We report here results obtained with the gamma subunit, which bring additional information on the structure of the channel. After photolabeling of the membrane-bound receptor under equilibrium conditions in the presence of agonist and with or without phencyclidine (a specific ligand for the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers), the purified labeled gamma subunit was digested with trypsin, and the resulting fragments were fractionated by HPLC. Sequence analysis of peptide mixtures containing various amounts of highly hydrophobic fragments showed that three amino acids are labeled by ({sup 3}H)chlorpromazine in a phencyclidine-sensitive manner: Thr-253, Ser-257, and Leu-260. These residues all belong to the hydrophobic and putative transmembrane region MII of the gamma subunit. Their distribution along the sequence is consistent with an alpha-helical organization of this segment. The ({sup 3}H)chlorpromazine-labeled amino acids are conserved at homologous positions in the known sequences of other ligand-gated ion channels and may, thus, play a critical role in ion-transport mechanisms.

  6. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomothearpy and linac-based IMRT in whole abdomen radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young-nam; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Jang, Hong Seok; Song, Jin Ho; Choi, Byung Ock; Cho, Seok Goo; Jung, Ji-Young; Kay, Chul Seung

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in radiotherapy techniques have allowed a significant improvement in the therapeutic ratio of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) through linear-accelerator (Linac) based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT). IMRT has been shown to reduce the dose to organs at risk (OAR) while adequately treating the tumor volume. HT operates by adjusting 51 beam directions, couch speed, pitch and shapes of a binary multileaf collimator (MLC), with the purpose of clinically increasing the befit to the patient. We incorporated helical tomotherapy as a new modality for WAI for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients whose disease involved the intestine and the mesenteric lymph nodes. Excellent tumor coverage with effective sparing of normal organ sparings, and homogeneous dose distribution could be achieved. This study dosimetrically compared HT and linac-based IMRT by using several indices, including the conformity index (CI) and the homogeneity index (HI) for the planning target volume (PTV), as well as the, max dose and the mean dose and the quality index (QI) for five organs at risk (OARs). The HI and the CI were used to compare the quality of target coverage while the QI was used compare the dosimetric performans for OAR systems. The target coverages between the two systems were similar, but the most QIs were lower than 1, what means that HT is batter at sparing OARs than IMRT. Tomotherapy enabled excellent target coverage, effective sparing of normal tissues, and homogeneous dose distribution without severe acute toxicity.

  7. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Hantao

    1999-04-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo alpha-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is elcetrostatic or due to the elcetron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity expect for a battery effect which vanishes in the limit of magnetohydrodynamics. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  8. Magnetic Helical Microswimmers in Poiseuille Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acemoglu, Alperen; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the motion of artificial magnetic microswimmers which mimic the swimming of natural organisms at low Reynolds numbers. Artificial magnetic microswimmers consist of a rigidly connected helical tail and a magnetic head. Magnetic swimmers are actuated with three orthogonal electromagnetic coil pairs. The swimmer motion is examined in the laminar flow which is introduced to channel with syringe pump. We recorded videos for forward (pusher-like swimming / in the head direction) and backward (puller-like swimming / in the tail direction) motion of swimmers. Swimmers have non-stable helical trajectories for forward motion and stable straight trajectories for backward motion. The flow effects on trajectories are observed for swimmers with different geometric parameters in the circular channels. Experiment results show that helical wavelengths of the trajectories are affected with the flow. Additionally, the flow has more pronounced effect on the trajectories of the swimmers in wide channels. Moreover, circular confinement in narrow channels leads to more stable trajectories; in wide channels swimmers follow complex trajectories. A CFD model is used to compare experiments with simulations and to analyze the effects of hydrodynamic interactions.

  9. Development of an Organic Rankine-Cycle power module for a small community solar thermal power experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiceniuk, T.

    1985-01-01

    An organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) power module was developed for use in a multimodule solar power plant to be built and operated in a small community. Many successful components and subsystems, including the reciever, power conversion subsystem, energy transport subsystem, and control subsystem, were tested. Tests were performed on a complete power module using a test bed concentrator in place of the proposed concentrator. All major single-module program functional objectives were met and the multimodule operation presented no apparent problems. The hermetically sealed, self-contained, ORC power conversion unit subsequently successfully completed a 300-hour endurance run with no evidence of wear or operating problems.

  10. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Yue Bun Pun, Edwin; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices. PMID:26354497

  11. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  12. Comparative α-helicity of cyclic pentapeptides in water.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Aline D; Hoang, Huy N; Kok, W Mei; Diness, Frederik; Gupta, Praveer; Hill, Timothy A; Driver, Russell W; Price, David A; Liras, Spiros; Fairlie, David P

    2014-07-01

    Helix-constrained polypeptides have attracted great interest for modulating protein-protein interactions (PPI). It is not known which are the most effective helix-inducing strategies for designing PPI agonists/antagonists. Cyclization linkers (X1-X5) were compared here, using circular dichroism and 2D NMR spectroscopy, for α-helix induction in simple model pentapeptides, Ac-cyclo(1,5)-[X1-Ala-Ala-Ala-X5]-NH2, in water. In this very stringent test of helix induction, a Lys1→Asp5 lactam linker conferred greatest α-helicity, hydrocarbon and triazole linkers induced a mix of α- and 3₁₀-helicity, while thio- and dithioether linkers produced less helicity. The lactam-linked cyclic pentapeptide was also the most effective α-helix nucleator attached to a 13-residue model peptide.

  13. Tunable Helical Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi; Dai, Eric; Zheng, Huang

    2014-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has begun to inspire innovations in science and engineering. For example, K. Miura led the study of a paper folding pattern in regards to deployment of solar panels to outer space, resulting in more efficient packing and unpacking of the solar panels into tightly constrained spaces. In this work, we study the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami pattern. The pattern created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius, and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. In our work, we relate the six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. In addition, we demonstrate that the morphogenesis of such folding pattern can be modeled through finite element analysis. We hope our research into the diagonal fold brings insight into the potential scientific and engineering applications of origami and spark further research into how the traditional paper art can be applied as a simple, inexpensive model for complex problems.

  14. Magnetic Helicity, Tilt, and Twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Berger, Mitchell A.; Nindos, Alexander; Norton, Aimee A.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia

    2014-12-01

    Since its introduction to astro- and solar physics, the concept of helicity has proven to be useful in providing critical insights into physics of various processes from astrophysical dynamos, to magnetic reconnection and eruptive phenomena. Signature of helicity was also detected in many solar features, including orientation of solar active regions, or Joy's law. Here we provide a summary of both solar phenomena and consider mutual relationship and its importance for the evolution of solar magnetic fields.

  15. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2016-05-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d -dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for p p →H +0 , 1, 2 jets, p p →W /Z /γ +0 , 1, 2 jets, and p p →2 , 3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e+e- and e-p collisions.

  16. omega-Helices in proteins.

    PubMed

    Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Matsushima, Norio

    2010-05-01

    A modification of the alpha-helix, termed the omega-helix, has four residues in one turn of a helix. We searched the omega-helix in proteins by the HELFIT program which determines the helical parameters-pitch, residues per turn, radius, and handedness-and p = rmsd/(N - 1)(1/2) estimating helical regularity, where "rmsd" is the root mean square deviation from the best fit helix and "N" is helix length. A total of 1,496 regular alpha-helices 6-9 residues long with p < or = 0.10 A were identified from 866 protein chains. The statistical analysis provides a strong evidence that the frequency distribution of helices versus n indicates the bimodality of typical alpha-helix and omega-helix. Sixty-two right handed omega-helices identified (7.2% of proteins) show non-planarity of the peptide groups. There is amino acid preference of Asp and Cys. These observations and analyses insist that the omega-helices occur really in proteins.

  17. omega-Helices in proteins.

    PubMed

    Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Matsushima, Norio

    2010-05-01

    A modification of the alpha-helix, termed the omega-helix, has four residues in one turn of a helix. We searched the omega-helix in proteins by the HELFIT program which determines the helical parameters-pitch, residues per turn, radius, and handedness-and p = rmsd/(N - 1)(1/2) estimating helical regularity, where "rmsd" is the root mean square deviation from the best fit helix and "N" is helix length. A total of 1,496 regular alpha-helices 6-9 residues long with p < or = 0.10 A were identified from 866 protein chains. The statistical analysis provides a strong evidence that the frequency distribution of helices versus n indicates the bimodality of typical alpha-helix and omega-helix. Sixty-two right handed omega-helices identified (7.2% of proteins) show non-planarity of the peptide groups. There is amino acid preference of Asp and Cys. These observations and analyses insist that the omega-helices occur really in proteins. PMID:20496104

  18. Design principles for Bernal spirals and helices with tunable pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejer, Szilard N.; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Wales, David J.

    2014-07-01

    Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment.Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00324a

  19. Light Modulates the Biosynthesis and Organization of Cyanobacterial Carbon Fixation Machinery through Photosynthetic Electron Flow.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaqi; Casella, Selene; Fang, Yi; Huang, Fang; Faulkner, Matthew; Barrett, Steve; Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved effective adaptive mechanisms to improve photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. The central CO2-fixing machinery is the carboxysome, which is composed of an icosahedral proteinaceous shell encapsulating the key carbon fixation enzyme, Rubisco, in the interior. Controlled biosynthesis and ordered organization of carboxysomes are vital to the CO2-fixing activity of cyanobacterial cells. However, little is known about how carboxysome biosynthesis and spatial positioning are physiologically regulated to adjust to dynamic changes in the environment. Here, we used fluorescence tagging and live-cell confocal fluorescence imaging to explore the biosynthesis and subcellular localization of β-carboxysomes within a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, in response to light variation. We demonstrated that β-carboxysome biosynthesis is accelerated in response to increasing light intensity, thereby enhancing the carbon fixation activity of the cell. Inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow impairs the accumulation of carboxysomes, indicating a close coordination between β-carboxysome biogenesis and photosynthetic electron transport. Likewise, the spatial organization of carboxysomes in the cell correlates with the redox state of photosynthetic electron transport chain. This study provides essential knowledge for us to modulate the β-carboxysome biosynthesis and function in cyanobacteria. In translational terms, the knowledge is instrumental for design and synthetic engineering of functional carboxysomes into higher plants to improve photosynthesis performance and CO2 fixation.

  20. TRF1 and TRF2 binding to telomeres is modulated by nucleosomal organization.

    PubMed

    Galati, Alessandra; Micheli, Emanuela; Alicata, Claudia; Ingegnere, Tiziano; Cicconi, Alessandro; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric; Cacchione, Stefano

    2015-07-13

    The ends of eukaryotic chromosomes need to be protected from the activation of a DNA damage response that leads the cell to replicative senescence or apoptosis. In mammals, protection is accomplished by a six-factor complex named shelterin, which organizes the terminal TTAGGG repeats in a still ill-defined structure, the telomere. The stable interaction of shelterin with telomeres mainly depends on the binding of two of its components, TRF1 and TRF2, to double-stranded telomeric repeats. Tethering of TRF proteins to telomeres occurs in a chromatin environment characterized by a very compact nucleosomal organization. In this work we show that binding of TRF1 and TRF2 to telomeric sequences is modulated by the histone octamer. By means of in vitro models, we found that TRF2 binding is strongly hampered by the presence of telomeric nucleosomes, whereas TRF1 binds efficiently to telomeric DNA in a nucleosomal context and is able to remodel telomeric nucleosomal arrays. Our results indicate that the different behavior of TRF proteins partly depends on the interaction with histone tails of their divergent N-terminal domains. We propose that the interplay between the histone octamer and TRF proteins plays a role in the steps leading to telomere deprotection.

  1. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary

  2. The formation of helical mesoporous silica nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaobing; Pei, Xianfeng; Zhao, Huanyu; Chen, Yuanli; Guo, Yongmin; Li, Baozong; Hanabusa, Kenji; Yang, Yonggang

    2008-08-01

    Three chiral cationic gelators were synthesized. They can form translucent hydrogels in pure water. These hydrogels become highly viscous liquids under strong stirring. Mesoporous silica nanotubes with coiled pore channels in the walls were prepared using the self-assemblies of these gelators as templates. The mechanism of the formation of this hierarchical nanostructure was studied using transmission electron microscopy at different reaction times. The results indicated that there are some interactions between the silica source and the gelator. The morphologies of the self-assemblies of gelators changed gradually during the sol-gel transcription process. It seems that the silica source directed the organic self-assemblies into helical nanostructures.

  3. Dose as a Function of Lung Volume and Planned Treatment Volume in Helical Tomotherapy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Small Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, Joseph M.; Romney, Davis A.; Reish, Andrew G.; Cai Jing; Sheng Ke; Jones, David R.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M. . E-mail: JML2P@virginia.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the limitations of Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy (Middleton, WI) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung lesions, and to provide an initial report on patients treated with this method. Stereotactic body radiotherapy was shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for early-stage, non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0236 protocol is currently evaluating three-dimensional conformal SBRT that delivers 60 Gy in three fractions. Methods and Materials: Inverse treatment planning for hypothetical lung gross tumor volumes (GTV) and planned treatment volume (PTV) expansions were performed. We tested the hypothesis that the maximum acceptable dose (MAD) to be delivered to the lesion by SBRT could be predicted by PTV and lung volume. Dose constraints on normal tissue were as designated by the RTOG protocol. Inverse planning was performed to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy. Results: Regression analysis of the data obtained indicated a linear relationship between MAD, PTV, and lung volume. This generated two equations which may be useful predictive tools. Seven patients with Stage I and II NSCLC treated at University of Virginia with this method tolerated the treatment extremely well, and suffered no greater than grade I toxicity, with no evidence of disease recurrence in follow-up from 2-20 months. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy SBRT for lung lesions is well-tolerated. In addition, the likely MAD for patients considered for this type of treatment can be predicted by PTV and lung volume.

  4. The relationship between organ dose and patient size in tube current modulated adult thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Zhang, Di; Yang, Jeffrey; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2012-03-01

    Recently published AAPM Task Group 204 developed conversion coefficients that use scanner reported CTDIvol to estimate dose to the center of patient undergoing fixed tube current body exam. However, most performed CT exams use TCM to reduce dose to patients. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between organ dose and a variety of patient size metrics in adult chest CT scans that use tube current modulation (TCM). Monte Carlo simulations were performed for 32 voxelized models with contoured lungs and glandular breasts tissue, consisting of females and males. These simulations made use of patient's actual TCM data to estimate organ dose. Using image data, different size metrics were calculated, these measurements were all performed on one slice, at the level of patient's nipple. Estimated doses were normalized by scanner-reported CTDIvol and plotted versus different metrics. CTDIvol values were plotted versus different metrics to look at scanner's output versus size. The metrics performed similarly in terms of correlating with organ dose. Looking at each gender separately, for male models normalized lung dose showed a better linear correlation (r2=0.91) with effective diameter, while female models showed higher correlation (r2=0.59) with the anterior-posterior measurement. There was essentially no correlation observed between size and CTDIvol-normalized breast dose. However, a linear relationship was observed between absolute breast dose and size. Dose to lungs and breasts were consistently higher in females with similar size as males which could be due to shape and composition differences between genders in the thoracic region.

  5. Fabry-Perot Interferometer-Based Electrooptic Modulator using LiNbO3 and Organic Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, C.; Frazier, D.; Penn, B.; Abdeldayem, H.; Sharma, A.; Yelleswarapu, C.; Leyderman, Alexander; Correa, Margarita; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report the study of a Fabry-Perot electro-optical modulator using thin crystalline film NPP, and Crystalline LiNbO3. We are able to observe 14, and 60 percent degree of modulation. Measurements were carried using a standard lock-in amplifier with a silicon detector. The proposal to design a Fabry-Perot electro-optic modulator with an intracavity electro-optically active organic material was based on the initial results using poled polymer thin films. The main feature of the proposed device is the observation that in traditional electrooptic modulators like a Packets cell, it requires few kilovolts of driving voltage to cause a 3 dB modulation even in high figure-of-merit electrooptic materials like LiNbO3. The driving voltage for the modulator can be reduced to as low as 10 volts by introducing the electrooptic material inside die resonant cavity of a Fabry-Perot modulator. This is because the transmission of the Fabry-Perot cavity varies nonlinearly with the change of refractive index or phase of light due to applied electric field.

  6. Selective control for helical microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsamba, Panayiota; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    One of the greatest aspirations for artificial microswimmers is their application in non-invasive medicine. For any practical use, adequate mechanisms enabling control of multiple artificial swimmers is of paramount importance. Here we propose a multi-helical, freely-jointed motor as a novel selective control mechanism. We show that the nonlinear step-out behavior of a magnetized helix driven by a rotating magnetic field can be exploited, when used in conjunction with other helices, to obtain a velocity profile that is non-negligible only within a chosen interval of operating frequencies. Specifically, the force balance between the competing opposite-handed helices is tuned to give no net motion at low frequencies while in the middle frequency range, the swimming velocity increases monotonically with the driving frequency if two opposite helices are used, thereby allowing speed adjustment by varying the driving frequency. We illustrate this idea in detail on a two-helix system, and demonstrate how to generalize to N helices, both numerically and theoretically. We finish by explaining how to solve the inverse problem and design an artificial swimmer with an arbitrarily-complex velocity vs. frequency relationship.

  7. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  8. The silicatein propeptide acts as inhibitor/modulator of self-organization during spicule axial filament formation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Muth, Sandra; Gietzen, Sabine; Korzhev, Michael; Grebenjuk, Vlad A; Wiens, Matthias; Schloßmacher, Ute; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-04-01

    Silicateins are crucial enzymes that are involved in formation of the inorganic biosilica scaffold of the spicular skeleton of siliceous sponges. We show that silicatein acquires its structure-guiding and enzymatically active state by processing of silicatein from pro-silicatein to the mature enzyme. A recombinant propeptide (PROP) of silicatein from the siliceous demosponge Suberites domuncula was prepared, and antibodies were raised against the peptide. In sponge tissue, these antibodies reacted with both surface structures and the central region of the spicules. Using phage display expression, spicule-binding 12-mer peptides were identified that are rich in histidine residues. In the predicted tertiary structure of PROP, these histidine residues are only present in the α-helical region. The recombinant PROP was found to inhibit self-assembly of silicatein molecules. By light scattering, it was shown that, in the presence of 4 m urea, the recombinant silicatein is obtained in the mono/oligomeric form with a hydrodynamic radius of 4 nm, while lower urea concentrations promote self-aggregation and assembly of the protein. Finally, it is shown that the enzymatic activity of silicatein is abolished by PROP in silicatein samples that predominantly contain mono- or oligomeric silicatein particles, but the enzyme is not affected if present in the filamentous aggregated form. It is concluded that the functions of silicatein, acting as a structural template for its biosilica product and as an enzyme, are modulated and controlled by its propeptide.

  9. Organization of the polarization splay modulated smectic liquid crystal phase by topographic confinement

    PubMed Central

    Ki Yoon, Dong; Deb, Rajdeep; Chen, Dong; Körblova, Eva; Shao, Renfan; Ishikawa, Ken; Rao, Nandiraju V. S.; Walba, David M.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Clark, Noel A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the topographic patterning of surfaces by lithography and nanoimprinting has emerged as a new and powerful tool for producing single structural domains of liquid crystals and other soft materials. Here the use of surface topography is extended to the organization of liquid crystals of bent-core molecules, soft materials that, on the one hand, exhibit a rich, exciting, and intensely studied array of novel phases, but that, on the other hand, have proved very difficult to align. Among the most notorious in this regard are the polarization splay modulated (B7) phases, in which the symmetry-required preference for ferroelectric polarization to be locally bouquet-like or “splayed” is expressed. Filling space with splay of a single sign requires defects and in the B7 splay is accommodated in the form of periodic splay stripes spaced by defects and coupled to smectic layer undulations. Upon cooling from the isotropic phase this structure grows via a first order transition in the form of an exotic array of twisted filaments and focal conic defects that are influenced very little by classic alignment methods. By contrast, growth under conditions of confinement in rectangular topographic channels is found to produce completely new growth morphology, generating highly ordered periodic layering patterns. The resulting macroscopic order will be of great use in further exploration of the physical properties of bent-core phases and offers a route for application of difficult-to-align soft materials as are encountered in organic electronic and optical applications. PMID:21098307

  10. Shaping organs by a wingless-int/Notch/nonmuscle myosin module which orients feather bud elongation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Chen, Meng; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Wu, Ping; Nie, Qing; Widelitz, Randall; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    How organs are shaped to specific forms is a fundamental issue in developmental biology. To address this question, we used the repetitive, periodic pattern of feather morphogenesis on chicken skin as a model. Avian feathers within a single tract extend from dome-shaped primordia to thin conical structures with a common axis of orientation. From a systems biology perspective, the process is precise and robust. Using tissue transplantation assays, we demonstrate that a “zone of polarizing activity,” localized in the posterior feather bud, is necessary and sufficient to mediate the directional elongation. This region contains a spatially well-defined nuclear β-catenin zone, which is induced by wingless-int (Wnt)7a protein diffusing in from posterior bud epithelium. Misexpressing nuclear β-catenin randomizes feather polarity. This dermal nuclear β-catenin zone, surrounded by Notch1 positive dermal cells, induces Jagged1. Inhibition of Notch signaling disrupts the spatial configuration of the nuclear β-catenin zone and leads to randomized feather polarity. Mathematical modeling predicts that lateral inhibition, mediated by Notch signaling, functions to reduce Wnt7a gradient variations and fluctuations to form the sharp boundary observed for the dermal β-catenin zone. This zone is also enriched for nonmuscle myosin IIB. Suppressing nonmuscle myosin IIB disrupts directional cell rearrangements and abolishes feather bud elongation. These data suggest that a unique molecular module involving chemical–mechanical coupling converts a pliable chemical gradient to a precise domain, ready for subsequent mechanical action, thus defining the position, boundary, and duration of localized morphogenetic activity that molds the shape of growing organs. PMID:23576731

  11. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    SciTech Connect

    Buniy, Roman V.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  12. Activation of Aurora-A is essential for neuronal migration via modulation of microtubule organization.

    PubMed

    Takitoh, Takako; Kumamoto, Kanako; Wang, Chen-Chi; Sato, Makoto; Toba, Shiori; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Hirotsune, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Neuronal migration is a critical feature to ensure proper location and wiring of neurons during cortical development. Postmitotic neurons migrate from the ventricular zone into the cortical plate to establish neuronal lamina in an "inside-out" gradient of maturation. Here, we report that the mitotic kinase Aurora-A is critical for the regulation of microtubule organization during neuronal migration via an Aurora-A-NDEL1 pathway in the mouse. Suppression of Aurora-A activity by inhibitors or siRNA resulted in severe impairment of neuronal migration of granular neurons. In addition, in utero injection of the Aurora-A kinase-dead mutant provoked defective migration of cortical neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrated that suppression of Aurora-A impaired microtubule modulation in migrating neurons. Interestingly, suppression of CDK5 by an inhibitor or siRNA reduced Aurora-A activity and NDEL1 phosphorylation by Aurora-A, which led to defective neuronal migration. We found that CDK5RAP2 is a key molecule that mediates functional interaction and is essential for centrosomal targeting of Aurora-A. Our observations demonstrated novel and surprising cross talk between Aurora-A and CDK5 during neuronal migration. PMID:22875938

  13. Organic cation transporter 3 modulates murine basophil functions by controlling intracellular histamine levels

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Elke; Machavoine, François; Pléau, Jean-Marie; Bertron, Anne-France; Thurmond, Robin L.; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takehiko; Schinkel, Alfred H.; Dy, Michel

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we identify the bidirectional organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3/Slc22a3) as the molecule responsible for histamine uptake by murine basophils. We demonstrate that OCT3 participates in the control of basophil functions because exogenous histamine can inhibit its own synthesis—and that of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, and IL-13—through this means of transport. Furthermore, ligands of H3/H4 histamine receptors or OCT3 inhibit histamine uptake, and outward transport of newly synthesized histamine. By doing so, they increase the histamine content of basophils, which explains why they mimic the effect of exogenous histamine. These drugs were no longer effective in histamine-free histidine decarboxylase (HDC)-deficient mice, in contrast with histamine itself. Histamine was not taken up and lost its inhibitory effect in mice deficient for OCT3, which proved its specific involvement. Intracellular histamine levels were increased strongly in IL-3–induced OCT3−/− bone marrow basophils, and explained why they generated fewer cytokines than their wild-type counterpart. Their production was enhanced when histamine synthesis was blocked by the specific HDC inhibitor α-fluoro-methyl histidine, and underscored the determinant role of histamine in the inhibitory effect. We postulate that pharmacologic modulation of histamine transport might become instrumental in the control of basophil functions during allergic diseases. PMID:16061728

  14. Highly efficient low color temperature organic LED using blend carrier modulation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yao-Ching; Chen, Szu-Hao; Shen, Shih-Ming; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Jou, Jwo-Huei

    2012-10-01

    Color temperature (CT) of light has great effect on human physiology and psychology, and low CT light, minimizing melatonin suppression and decreasing the risk of breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. We demonstrates the incorporation of a blend carrier modulation interlayer (CML) between emissive layers to improve the device performance of low CT organic light emitting diodes, which exhibits an external quantum efficiency of 22.7% and 36 lm W-1 (54 cd A-1) with 1880 K at 100 cd m-2, or 20.8% and 29 lm W-1 (50 cd A-1) with 1940 K at 1000 cd m-2. The result shows a CT much lower than that of incandescent bulbs, which is 2500 K with 15 lmW-1 efficiency, and even as low as that of candles, which is 2000 K with 0.1 lmW-1. The high efficiency of the proposed device may be attributed to its CML, which helps effectively distribute the entering carriers into the available recombination zones.

  15. Constraints on Sensitivity to Auditory Modulation in the Perceptual Organization of Speech

    PubMed Central

    Remez, Robert E.; Thomas, Emily F.; Wycoff, Andrea M.; Giglio, Rebecca E.; Crank, Aislinn T.; Cheimets, Chloe B.; Koinis, Stavroula M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The perception of speech requires the integration of sensory details from a rapidly fading trace of a time-varying spectrum. This effortful cognitive function has been difficult to assess. New tests measuring intelligibility of sine-wave replicas of speech provided an assay of this critical function in normal hearing young adults. Method Four time-varying sinusoids replicated the frequency and amplitude variation of the natural resonances of spoken sentences. The temporal tolerance of perceptual integration of speech was measured by determining the effect on intelligibility of desynchronizing a single sine-wave component in each sentence. This method was applied in tests in which the sentences were temporally compressed or expanded over a 40% range. Results Desynchrony was harmful to perceptual integration over a narrow temporal range, indicating that modulation sensitivity is keyed to a rate of 20 Hz. No effect of variation in speech rate was observed on the intelligibility measure, whether rate was accelerated or decelerated relative to the natural rate. Conclusion Performance measures of desynchrony tolerance did not vary when speech rate was accelerated or decelerated, revealing constraints on integration that are arguably primitive, sensory, auditory, and fixed. Because these are not adaptable, they limit the potential for perceptual learning in this aspect of perceptual organization. Implications for describing the elderly listener are noted. PMID:26683038

  16. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-07-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We developed a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along nonconvex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implemented the method with a compact and robust integrated optics approach by fabricating micro-optical structures on quartz glass plates to perform the spatial phase and amplitude modulation to the incident light, generating beam trajectories highly consistent with prediction. The theoretical and implementation methods can in principle be extended to the construction of accelerating beams with a wide variety of nonconvex trajectories, thereby opening up a route of manipulating light beams for fundamental research and practical applications.

  17. Brownian motion of helical flagella.

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, H; Saito, N

    1979-07-01

    We develops a theory of the Brownian motion of a rigid helical object such as bacterial flagella. The statistical properties of the random forces acting on the helical object are discussed and the coefficients of the correlations of the random forces are determined. The averages , and are also calculated where z and theta are the position along and angle around the helix axis respectively. Although the theory is limited to short time interval, direct comparison with experiment is possible by using the recently developed cinematography technique. PMID:16997210

  18. Helical supersolid phases in spin-orbit-coupled bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Guo; Yang, Shi-Jie

    2016-04-01

    We study the ground-state phases of a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate loaded in a two-dimensional optical lattice. We find three types of helical supersolid phases, which are dependent on the anisotropy of the spin-orbit coupling with respect to the relative strength of the y and x directions. The period of density modulation increases with the strength of the spin-orbit coupling.

  19. A fixed-jaw method to protect critical organs during intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiayun; Chen, Xinyuan; Huang, Manni; Dai, Jianrong

    2014-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plays an important role in cancer radiotherapy. For some patients being treated with IMRT, the extremely low tolerances of critical organs (such as lens, ovaries, and testicles) cannot be met during treatment planning. The aim of this article is to introduce a new planning method to overcome that problem. In current planning practice, jaw positions are automatically set to cover all target volumes by the planning system (e.g., Pinnacle{sup 3} system). Because of such settings, critical organs may be fully blocked by the multileaf collimator (MLC), but they still sit in the field that is shaped by collimator jaws. These critical organs receive doses from the transmission and leakage of MLC leaves. We manually fixed jaw positions to block them to further reduce such doses. This method has been used for different treatment sites in our clinic, and it was thoroughly evaluated in patients with radical hysterectomy plus ovarian transposition after surgery. For each patient, 2 treatment plans were designed with the same optimization parameters: the original plan with automatically chosen jaw positions (called O-plan) and the plan with fixed-jaw positions (named F-plan). In the F-plan, the jaws were manually fixed to block the ovaries. For target coverage, the mean conformity index (CI) of the F-plan (1.28 ± 0.02) was remarkably lower than that of the O-plan (1.53 ± 0.09) (p < 0.05). The F-plan and the O-plan performed similarly in target dose homogeneity. Meanwhile, for the critical organ sparing, the mean dose of both ovaries were much lower in the F-plan than that in the O-plan (p < 0.05). The V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40} of bladder were also lower in the F-plan (93.57 ± 1.98, 73.99 ± 5.76, and 42.33 ± 3.7, respectively) than those in the O-plan (97.98 ± 1.11, 85.07 ± 4.04, and 49.71 ± 3.63, respectively) (p < 0.05). The maximum dose to the spinal cord planning organ at risk (OAR) volume (PRV) in the O-plan (3940

  20. Non-axisymmetric Electrostatic Helicity Injection into the HIST Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, M.; Akamatsu, T.; Kagei, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Uyama, T.

    2000-10-01

    Studies of helicity injection physics including the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo and self-organizing phenomena are very important in the spherical torus (ST) and spheromak research. In the HIST experiment, we have found that the intermittent generation of plasma current on ST by coaxial helicity injection (CHI) is responsible for repetitive plasmoid injection from the coaxial gun. We have verified that helicity balance is satisfied during the axisymmetric plasmoid injection process. In order to investigate furthermore the important role of helicity by varying the topology of the system, i.e. symmetry breaking, we perform non-axisymmetric electrostatic helicity injection experiments on FACT and HIST using Compact Torus (CT) injector. CT injector can inject the spheromak with both particle and helicity into the ST plasma from the outboard side. A long-lived spheromak tends to relax to the m=1 helical state in the entrance/drift tube of the CT injector. If we can maintain the m=1 helical configuration there in a steady state, so helicity is continuously transported from the injector toward the outer edge of ST, resulting in current drive through MHD relaxation. In the FACT-ST experiment, we observed that the toroidal current is amplified during spheromak injection, and also investigated the behavoir of the spheromak injected in the ST plasma.

  1. Self-assembling phenylpropyl ether dendronized helical polyphenylacetylenes.

    PubMed

    Percec, Virgil; Peterca, Mihai; Rudick, Jonathan G; Aqad, Emad; Imam, Mohammad R; Heiney, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    The first example of a self-assembling phenylpropyl ether based dendronized polymer has been reported and its preferred helical handedness has been determined. Dendronized polymer poly(10) and its nondendritic analogue poly(8) are high-cis-content polyphenylacetylenes (PPAs) prepared by using [Rh(nbd)Cl]2/NEt3 (nbd: 2,5-norbornadiene). Both polymers possess a stereocenter in their side chain, which selects a preferred helical handedness. Based on negative exciton chirality observed in the CD spectra of poly(10), we have designated this molecule as a right-handed helical polymer, which persists over a wide temperature range. Poly(10) self-organizes into both Phiioh and Phih lattices in bulk. The Phiioh-to-Phih transition is associated with thermoreversible cis-cisoidal to cis-transoidal isomerization of the helical PPA, accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the column diameter and a decrease in the pi-stacking correlation length along the column. A model for the right-handed helical dendronized PPA has been proposed wherein dendrons from adjacent column strata interdigitate to effectively fill space.

  2. [Helical (spiral or swirling) blood flow in cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Kirsanov, R I; Kulikov, V P

    2013-01-01

    In article covers theoretical preconditions for the hypothesis about helical (spiral or swirling) blood flow in cardiovascular system followed by its experimental corroboration. The role of the modern blood flow visualization methods--such as Color Doppler ultrasound and magnetic-resonance angiography--in registration and investigation of the regularities of the given phenomenon is described. The data describing the known parameters of helical blood flow--such as direction of the rotation and its quantitative parameters in large arteries--are given. The main hypotheses for flow screw mechanisms are considered from the point of view of cardiovascular system structural organization. Biological role of helical blood flow is discussed, in respect of which there are diametrically opposed points of view, which consider it as a physiological phenomenon on one side, and as a patogenetic factor of atherosclerosis development on the other.

  3. Self-assembly of magnetite nanocubes into helical superstructures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurvinder; Chan, Henry; Baskin, Artem; Gelman, Elijah; Repnin, Nikita; Král, Petr; Klajn, Rafal

    2014-09-01

    Organizing inorganic nanocrystals into complex architectures is challenging and typically relies on preexisting templates, such as properly folded DNA or polypeptide chains. We found that under carefully controlled conditions, cubic nanocrystals of magnetite self-assemble into arrays of helical superstructures in a template-free manner with >99% yield. Computer simulations revealed that the formation of helices is determined by the interplay of van der Waals and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, Zeeman coupling, and entropic forces and can be attributed to spontaneous formation of chiral nanocube clusters. Neighboring helices within their densely packed ensembles tended to adopt the same handedness in order to maximize packing, thus revealing a novel mechanism of symmetry breaking and chirality amplification. PMID:25061133

  4. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Helical Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Egelman, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    The field of three-dimensional electron microscopy began more than 45 years ago with a reconstruction of a helical phage tail, and helical polymers continue to be important objects for three-dimensional reconstruction due to the centrality of helical protein and nucleoprotein polymers in all aspects of biology. We are now witnessing a fundamental revolution in this area, made possible by direct electron detectors, which has led to near-atomic resolution for a number of important helical structures. Most importantly, the possibility of achieving such resolution routinely for a vast number of helical samples is within our reach. One of the main problems in helical reconstruction, ambiguities in assigning the helical symmetry, is overcome when one reaches a resolution where secondary structure is clearly visible. However, obstacles still exist due to the intrinsic variability within many helical filaments. PMID:25912526

  5. Three-dimensional reconstruction of helical polymers.

    PubMed

    Egelman, Edward H

    2015-09-01

    The field of three-dimensional electron microscopy began more than 45years ago with a reconstruction of a helical phage tail, and helical polymers continue to be important objects for three-dimensional reconstruction due to the centrality of helical protein and nucleoprotein polymers in all aspects of biology. We are now witnessing a fundamental revolution in this area, made possible by direct electron detectors, which has led to near-atomic resolution for a number of important helical structures. Most importantly, the possibility of achieving such resolution routinely for a vast number of helical samples is within our reach. One of the main problems in helical reconstruction, ambiguities in assigning the helical symmetry, is overcome when one reaches a resolution where secondary structure is clearly visible. However, obstacles still exist due to the intrinsic variability within many helical filaments.

  6. The transport of relative canonical helicity

    SciTech Connect

    You, S.

    2012-09-15

    The evolution of relative canonical helicity is examined in the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic formalism. Canonical helicity is defined here as the helicity of the plasma species' canonical momentum. The species' canonical helicity are coupled together and can be converted from one into the other while the total gauge-invariant relative canonical helicity remains globally invariant. The conversion is driven by enthalpy differences at a surface common to ion and electron canonical flux tubes. The model provides an explanation for why the threshold for bifurcation in counter-helicity merging depends on the size parameter. The size parameter determines whether magnetic helicity annihilation channels enthalpy into the magnetic flux tube or into the vorticity flow tube components of the canonical flux tube. The transport of relative canonical helicity constrains the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields, and provides a more general framework for driving flows and currents from enthalpy or inductive boundary conditions.

  7. Baryogenesis from decaying magnetic helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Kohei; Long, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    As a result of the Standard Model chiral anomalies, baryon number is violated in the early Universe in the presence of a hypermagnetic field with varying helicity. We investigate whether the matter/antimatter asymmetry of the Universe can be created from the decaying helicity of a primordial (hyper)magnetic field before and after the electroweak phase transition. In this model, baryogenesis occurs without (B -L )-violation, since the (B +L ) asymmetry generated by the hypermagnetic field counteracts the washout by electroweak sphalerons. At the electroweak crossover, the hypermagnetic field becomes an electromagnetic field, which does not source (B +L ). Although the sphalerons remain in equilibrium for a time, washout is avoided since the decaying magnetic helicity sources chirality. The relic baryon asymmetry is fixed when the electroweak sphaleron freezes out. Under reasonable assumptions, a baryon asymmetry of nB/s ≃4 ×10-12 can be generated from a maximally helical, right-handed (hyper)magnetic field that has a field strength of B0≃10-14 Gauss and coherence length of λ0≃1 pc today. Relaxing an assumption that relates λ0 to B0, the model predicts nB/s ≳10-10, which could potentially explain the observed baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  8. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-15

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Pa{sup -1}), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability ({approx}10 {mu}m), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact ({approx}20 {mu}m without the plug-in support), light ({approx}5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range ({approx}{mu}N) and high resolution ({approx}nN) force sensors.

  9. GABAergic modulation of serotonin release in the rat subfornical organ area.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Nomura, Masahiko; Tanaka, Junichi

    2016-09-01

    The present study was carried out to examine whether γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor mechanisms are involved in the release of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the subfornical organ (SFO) using intracerebral microdialysis techniques. Perfusion with the GABA receptor antagonists as well as agonists was performed in the region of the SFO through a microdialysis probe and extracellular concentrations of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured in freely moving rats. Perfusion with the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 and 50μM), but not the GABAB receptor antagonist phaclofen (10 and 50μM), increased dialysate 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in the SFO area, suggesting that the GABAergic system may tonically inhibit the 5-HT release in the SFO area through GABAA receptors. Higher perfusion with the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (50μM) or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (250μM) decreased extracellular levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in the SFO area. Nonhypotensive hypovolemia induced by subcutaneous injection of polyethylene glycol (PEG, 30%, 5ml) significantly enhanced the 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in the SFO area. The enhanced 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels elicited the PEG treatment were reduced by perfusion with muscimol (10μM), but not by baclofen (50μM). These results show the involvement of both GABAA and GABAB receptors in the modulation of the 5-HT release in the SFO area, and imply that the GABAA receptor mechanism may be importance for the serotonergic regulatory system of body fluid balance. PMID:27453060

  10. Numerical investigations of turbulent flow characteristics in helically finned pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, F.; Andersson, H. I.

    2011-12-01

    A helical fin in a circular pipe is a means to generate swirling flow and the swirling motion will in turn modulate the turbulence field. This paper reports on a direct numerical simulation aimed to explore such flow phenomena. The full Navier-Stokes equations expressed in a cylindrical coordinate system are integrated numerically in time and the helical fin is embedded in the structured grid by means of an immersed boundary method. The statistically steady three-dimensional flow field exhibits a helical symmetry with an azimuthal mean velocity which amounts to about 50% of the axial mean velocity component. The variation of the mean flow over the cross-sections can be explained by the variations of the nine non-zero components of the Reynolds stress tensor. Particular attention is paid to the contribution of the Reynolds stresses to the skin-friction coefficient. Appreciable levels of fluctuating helicity are observed in the vicinity of the pipe wall and reflect that the swirling motion breaks the structural symmetry in conventional pipe flow.

  11. Standard and Nonstandard Craniospinal Radiotherapy Using Helical TomoTherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, William; Brodeur, Marylene; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To show the advantages of planning and delivering craniospinal radiotherapy with helical TomoTherapy (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI) by presenting 4 cases treated at our institution. Methods and Materials: We first present a standard case of craniospinal irradiation in a patient with recurrent myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) and follow this with 2 cases requiring differential dosing to multiple target volumes. One of these, a patient with recurrent medulloblastoma, required a lower dose to be delivered to the posterior fossa because the patient had been previously irradiated to the full dose, and the other required concurrent boosts to leptomeningeal metastases as part of his treatment for newly diagnosed MPE. The final case presented is a patient with pronounced scoliosis who required spinal irradiation for recurrent MPE. Results: The four cases presented were planned and treated successfully with Helical Tomotherapy. Conclusions: Helical TomoTherapy delivers continuous arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy that gives high conformality and excellent dose homogeneity for the target volumes. Increased healthy tissue sparing is achieved at higher doses albeit at the expense of larger volumes of tissue receiving lower doses. Helical TomoTherapy allows for differential dosing of multiple targets, resulting in very elegant dose distributions. Daily megavoltage computed tomography imaging allows for precision of patient positioning, permitting a reduction in planning margins and increased healthy tissue sparing in comparison with standard techniques.

  12. Modulating the rate of charge transport in a metal-organic framework thin film using host:guest chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hod, Idan; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-01-28

    Herein we demonstrate the use of host-guest chemistry to modulate rates of charge transport in metal-organic framework (MOF) films. The kinetics of site-to-site of charge hopping and, in turn, the overall redox conductivity, of a ferrocene-modified MOF can be altered by up to 30-fold by coupling electron exchange to the oxidation-state-dependent formation of inclusion complexes between cyclodextrin and channel-tethered metallocenes.

  13. Test results of an organic Rankine-cycle power module for a small community solar thermal power experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    The organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) power conversion assembly was tested. Qualification testing of the electrical transport subsystem was also completed. Test objectives were to verify compatibility of all system elements with emphasis on control of the power conversion assembly, to evaluate the performance and efficiency of the components, and to validate operating procedures. After 34 hours of power generation under a wide range of conditions, the net module efficiency exceeded 18% after accounting for all parasitic losses.

  14. Characteristics of InAs/AlGaAs self-organized quantum dot modulation doped field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J.; Kamath, K.; Brock, T.; Bhattacharya, P.

    1998-06-01

    We have investigated the dc characteristics of InGaAs/AlGaAs modulation doped field effect transistors in which a layer of self-organized InAs quantum dots is inserted adjacent to the pseudomorphic quantum well channel. Distinct steps and a negative differential resistance are observed in the current-voltage characteristics at room temperature and lower temperatures. These are attributed to conduction through the bound states in the quantum dots.

  15. Measurement-guided volumetric dose reconstruction for helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin; Wolf, Theresa; Mueller, Richard; Geurts, Mark; Opp, Daniel; Moros, Eduardo; Zhang, Geoffrey; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that dose delivered by a conventional linear accelerator using IMRT or VMAT can be reconstructed - on patient or phantom datasets - using helical diode array measurements and a technique called planned dose perturbation (PDP). This allows meaningful and intuitive analysis of the agreement between the planned and delivered dose, including direct comparison of the dose-volume histograms. While conceptually similar to modulated arc techniques, helical tomotherapy introduces significant challenges to the PDP formalism, arising primarily from TomoTherapy delivery dynamics. The temporal characteristics of the delivery are of the same order or shorter than the dosimeter's update interval (50 ms). Additionally, the prevalence of often small and complex segments, particularly with the 1 cm Y jaw setting, lead to challenges related to detector spacing. Here, we present and test a novel method of tomotherapy-PDP (TPDP) designed to meet these challenges. One of the novel techniques introduced for TPDP is organization of the subbeams into larger subunits called sectors, which assures more robust synchronization of the measurement and delivery dynamics. Another important change is the optional application of a correction based on ion chamber (IC) measurements in the phantom. The TPDP method was validated by direct comparisons to the IC and an independent, biplanar diode array dosimeter previously evaluated for tomotherapy delivery quality assurance. Nineteen plans with varying complexity were analyzed for the 2.5 cm tomotherapy jaw setting and 18 for the 1 cm opening. The dose differences between the TPDP and IC were 1.0% ± 1.1% and 1.1% ± 1.1%, for 2.5 and 1.0 cm jaw plans, respectively. Gamma analysis agreement rates between TPDP and the independent array were: 99.1%± 1.8% (using 3% global normalization/3 mm criteria) and 93.4% ± 7.1% (using 2% global/2 mm) for the 2.5 cm jaw plans; for 1 cm plans, they were 95.2% ± 6.7% (3% G/3) and 83.8%

  16. Low Cost, Light Weight SOlar Modules Based on Organic Photovoltaic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Russell Gaudiana; David GInley; Robert Birkmeyer

    2009-09-20

    Objectives - In order to produce solar modules for rooftop applications the performance and the lifetime must be improved to 5% - 7% and >10 year life. Task 1 Stability - (1) Flexible modules are stable to 1000 hrs at 65 C/85%RH, (2) Flexible modules in glass are stable to >2000 hrs at 85 C/85%RH (no decrease in performance); (3) Adhesive + filler helps stabilize modules; and (4) Solution coatable barriers exhibit good WVTR; work in-progress. Task 2 Performance: n-type charge carriers - (1) N-type polymers could not be synthesized; and (2) More than 30 fullerene derivatives synthesized and tested, Several deep LUMO derivatives accept charge from deep LUMO polymers, higher voltage observed, Improvement in cell efficiency not observed, morphology problem. Task 3 Performance: grid electrode - (1) Exceeded flatness and roughness goals; (2) Exceeds sheet resistance goals; (3) Achieved %T goals; and (4) Performance equivalent to ITO - 2% Efficiency ( av.); work in-progress.

  17. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-01-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths. PMID:25387544

  18. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-11-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths.

  19. Alzheimer paired helical filaments (PHFs) studied by high-resolution TEM: what can vertical Pt-C replication tell us about the organization of the pronase-digested PHF core?

    PubMed

    Ruben, George C; Novak, Michal; Edwards, Patricia C; Iqbal, Khalid

    2005-07-01

    Untreated paired helical filaments (PHFs) and pronase-digested PHF-core filaments were stereoscopically imaged with a freeze-drying vertical platinum-carbon replication preparation method for TEM. The untreated PHF have an average wide region (W) = 22.8 +/- 2.4 nm, a narrow region (T) = 10.6 +/- 1.7 nm, and a helical turn period (L) = 78.6 +/- 13.4. The surfaces of the untreated PHF's fuzzy coat appears disorganized. The widths of the pronase-treated PHF-core filaments were significantly reduced (W(d) = 14.8 +/- 1.2 nm, T(d) = 5.7 +/- 1.0 nm, and L(d) = 75.4 +/- 17 nm). The surfaces of the untreated PHF contained approximately 1.1 nm strands, the same size as tau monomer ( approximately 1.0 nm). The pronase-digested PHF cores mostly contained approximately 1.6 +/- 0.3 nm strands although strand diameters ranged from 0.6-2.5 nm. The strands sometimes appear to be wrapped around the filament axis; less often, they appear to be roughly parallel to the PHF axis, and otherwise appear to be randomly oriented. Images of pronase-digested PHF core images are discussed in relation to the core's biochemical composition, its proposed beta structure, and structural subunit models. Images of the untreated and the pronase-digested PHF support a helical ribbon morphology.

  20. Structural basis by which alternative splicing modulates the organizer activity of FGF8 in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Li, James Y.H.; Bromleigh, Carrie; Eliseenkova, Anna V.; Ibrahimi, Omar A.; Lao, Zhimin; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J.; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2006-01-01

    Two of the four human FGF8 splice isoforms, FGF8a and FGF8b, are expressed in the mid-hindbrain region during development. Although the only difference between these isoforms is the presence of an additional 11 amino acids at the N terminus of FGF8b, these isoforms possess remarkably different abilities to pattern the midbrain and anterior hindbrain. To reveal the structural basis by which alternative splicing modulates the organizing activity of FGF8, we solved the crystal structure of FGF8b in complex with the “c” splice isoform of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2c). Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we also characterized the receptor-binding specificity of FGF8a and FGF8b, the “b” isoform of FGF17 (FGF17b), and FGF18. The FGF8b-FGFR2c structure shows that alternative splicing permits a single additional contact between phenylalanine 32 (F32) of FGF8b and a hydrophobic groove within Ig domain 3 of the receptor that is also present in FGFR1c, FGFR3c, and FGFR4. Consistent with the structure, mutation of F32 to alanine reduces the affinity of FGF8b toward all these receptors to levels characteristic of FGF8a. More importantly, analysis of the mid-hindbrain patterning ability of the FGF8bF32A mutant in chick embryos and murine midbrain explants shows that this mutation functionally converts FGF8b to FGF8a. Moreover, our data suggest that the intermediate receptor-binding affinities of FGF17b and FGF18, relative to FGF8a and FGF8b, also account for the distinct patterning abilities of these two ligands. We also show that the mode of FGF8 receptor-binding specificity is distinct from that of other FGFs and provide the first biochemical evidence for a physiological FGF8b-FGFR1c interaction during mid-hindbrain development. Consistent with the indispensable role of FGF8 in embryonic development, we show that the FGF8 mode of receptor binding appeared as early as in nematodes and has been preserved throughout evolution. PMID:16384934

  1. Structural Basis by Which Alternative Splicing Modulates the Organizer Activity of FGF8 in the Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen,S.; Li, J.; Eliseenkova, A.; Ibrahimi, O.; Lao, Z.; Zhang, F.; Linhardt, R.; Joyner, A.; Mohammadi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Two of the four human FGF8 splice isoforms, FGF8a and FGF8b, are expressed in the mid-hindbrain region during development. Although the only difference between these isoforms is the presence of an additional 11 amino acids at the N terminus of FGF8b, these isoforms possess remarkably different abilities to pattern the midbrain and anterior hindbrain. To reveal the structural basis by which alternative splicing modulates the organizing activity of FGF8, we solved the crystal structure of FGF8b in complex with the 'c' splice isoform of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2c). Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we also characterized the receptor-binding specificity of FGF8a and FGF8b, the 'b' isoform of FGF17 (FGF17b), and FGF18. The FGF8b-FGFR2c structure shows that alternative splicing permits a single additional contact between phenylalanine 32 (F32) of FGF8b and a hydrophobic groove within Ig domain 3 of the receptor that is also present in FGFR1c, FGFR3c, and FGFR4. Consistent with the structure, mutation of F32 to alanine reduces the affinity of FGF8b toward all these receptors to levels characteristic of FGF8a. More importantly, analysis of the mid-hindbrain patterning ability of the FGF8b{sup F32A} mutant in chick embryos and murine midbrain explants shows that this mutation functionally converts FGF8b to FGF8a. Moreover, our data suggest that the intermediate receptor-binding affinities of FGF17b and FGF18, relative to FGF8a and FGF8b, also account for the distinct patterning abilities of these two ligands. We also show that the mode of FGF8 receptor-binding specificity is distinct from that of other FGFs and provide the first biochemical evidence for a physiological FGF8b-FGFR1c interaction during mid-hindbrain development. Consistent with the indispensable role of FGF8 in embryonic development, we show that the FGF8 mode of receptor binding appeared as early as in nematodes and has been preserved throughout evolution.

  2. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  3. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  4. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  5. Architecture of the Mediator head module

    SciTech Connect

    Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Calero, Guillermo; Cai, Gang; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Yamada, Kentaro; Cardelli, Francesco; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Berger, Imre; Kornberg, Guy Lorch; Asturias, Francisco J.; Kornberg, Roger D.; Takagi, Yuichiro

    2011-09-06

    Mediator is a key regulator of eukaryotic transcription, connecting activators and repressors bound to regulatory DNA elements with RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator comprises 25 subunits with a total mass of more than one megadalton (refs 5, 6) and is organized into three modules, called head, middle/arm and tail. Our understanding of Mediator assembly and its role in regulating transcription has been impeded so far by limited structural information. Here we report the crystal structure of the essential Mediator head module (seven subunits, with a mass of 223 kilodaltons) at a resolution of 4.3 angstroms. Our structure reveals three distinct domains, with the integrity of the complex centred on a bundle of ten helices from five different head subunits. An intricate pattern of interactions within this helical bundle ensures the stable assembly of the head subunits and provides the binding sites for general transcription factors and Pol II. Our structural and functional data suggest that the head module juxtaposes transcription factor IIH and the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest subunit of Pol II, thereby facilitating phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of Pol II. Our results reveal architectural principles underlying the role of Mediator in the regulation of gene expression.

  6. Realizing topological stability of magnetic helices in exchange-coupled multilayers for all-spin-based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fust, Sergej; Mukherjee, Saumya; Paul, Neelima; Stahn, Jochen; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Böni, Peter; Paul, Amitesh

    2016-09-01

    Topologically stabilized spin configurations like helices in the form of planar domain walls (DWs) or vortex-like structures with magnetic functionalities are more often a theoretical prediction rather than experimental realization. In this paper we report on the exchange coupling and helical phase characteristics within Dy-Fe multilayers. The magnetic hysteresis loops with temperature show an exchange bias field of around 1.0 kOe at 10 K. Polarized neutron reflectivity reveal (i) ferrimagnetic alignment of the layers at low fields forming twisted magnetic helices and a more complicated but stable continuous helical arrangement at higher fields (ii) direct evidence of helices in the form of planar 2π-DWs within both layers of Fe and Dy. The helices within the Fe layers are topologically stabilized by the reasonably strong induced in-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Dy and the exchange coupling at the Fe-Dy interfaces. The helices in Dy are plausibly reminiscent of the helical ordering at higher temperatures induced by the field history and interfacial strain. Stability of the helical order even at large fields have resulted in an effective modulation of the periodicity of the spin-density like waves and subsequent increase in storage energy. This opens broad perspectives for future scientific and technological applications in increasing the energy density for systems in the field of all-spin-based engineering which has the potential for energy-storing elements on nanometer length scales.

  7. Realizing topological stability of magnetic helices in exchange-coupled multilayers for all-spin-based system

    PubMed Central

    Fust, Sergej; Mukherjee, Saumya; Paul, Neelima; Stahn, Jochen; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Böni, Peter; Paul, Amitesh

    2016-01-01

    Topologically stabilized spin configurations like helices in the form of planar domain walls (DWs) or vortex-like structures with magnetic functionalities are more often a theoretical prediction rather than experimental realization. In this paper we report on the exchange coupling and helical phase characteristics within Dy-Fe multilayers. The magnetic hysteresis loops with temperature show an exchange bias field of around 1.0 kOe at 10 K. Polarized neutron reflectivity reveal (i) ferrimagnetic alignment of the layers at low fields forming twisted magnetic helices and a more complicated but stable continuous helical arrangement at higher fields (ii) direct evidence of helices in the form of planar 2π-DWs within both layers of Fe and Dy. The helices within the Fe layers are topologically stabilized by the reasonably strong induced in-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Dy and the exchange coupling at the Fe-Dy interfaces. The helices in Dy are plausibly reminiscent of the helical ordering at higher temperatures induced by the field history and interfacial strain. Stability of the helical order even at large fields have resulted in an effective modulation of the periodicity of the spin-density like waves and subsequent increase in storage energy. This opens broad perspectives for future scientific and technological applications in increasing the energy density for systems in the field of all-spin-based engineering which has the potential for energy-storing elements on nanometer length scales. PMID:27677227

  8. Broadband energy-efficient optical modulation by hybrid integration of silicon nanophotonics and organic electro-optic polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Hosseini, Amir; Subbaraman, Harish; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.; Chung, Chi-jui; Yan, Hai; Pan, Zeyu; Nelson, Robert L.; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon-organic hybrid integrated devices have emerging applications ranging from high-speed optical interconnects to photonic electromagnetic-field sensors. Silicon slot photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) filled with electro-optic (EO) polymers combine the slow-light effect in PCWs with the high polarizability of EO polymers, which promises the realization of high-performance optical modulators. In this paper, a broadband, power-efficient, low-dispersion, and compact optical modulator based on an EO polymer filled silicon slot PCW is presented. A small voltage-length product of Vπ×L=0.282V×mm is achieved, corresponding to an unprecedented record-high effective in-device EO coefficient (r33) of 1230pm/V. Assisted by a backside gate voltage, the modulation response up to 50GHz is observed, with a 3-dB bandwidth of 15GHz, and the estimated energy consumption is 94.4fJ/bit at 10Gbit/s. Furthermore, lattice-shifted PCWs are utilized to enhance the optical bandwidth by a factor of ~10X over other modulators based on non-band-engineered PCWs and ring-resonators.

  9. The reduction in Monte Carlo calculated organ doses from CT with tube current modulation using WILLIAM, a voxel model of seven year-old anatomy.

    PubMed

    Caon, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The construction of a voxel model of seven year-old male anatomy from a low resolution whole body CT scan acquired with a PET-CT scanner is described. The model is referred to as WILLIAM. The model was used to compare the Monte Carlo calculated relative organ doses with and without tube current modulation from simulated CAP and chest CT examinations. Tube current modulation was simulated in both the angular (x-y plane) and axial (along the z axis) senses. For organs that are located wholly within the scanned anatomy, significant relative dose reductions of approximately 43 to 62 % were calculated when tube current modulation was simulated compared to Monte Carlo calculations that did not include tube current modulation. Organs located outside of the directly irradiated anatomy, experienced a decrease in their relative dose of between 33 and 38 % when tube current modulation was simulated.

  10. Mutual interplay of non-covalent interactions in modulating the geometry of organic linkers in their salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripuramallu, Bharat Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Two ion-pair compounds (Hhfipbb)2·(H2px2ampy) (1) and (H2pxph)·(4-Hptz)2 (2) have been synthesized, based on the ligands 4,4‧-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)-bis(benzoic acid) (H2hfipbb), 1,4-bis(2-pyridylaminomethyl)benzene (px2ampy), p-xylylenediphosphonic acid (H4pxph) and (5-(4-pyridyl) tetrazole) (4-ptz). Both the compounds 1 and 2 are characterized by routine elemental analyses, IR-, thermogravimetric studies and unambiguously characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The mutual supramolecular interactions, exhibited by the individual ligands in the organic salts, modulate their geometries to form higher dimensional supramolecular architectures in the crystals of organic salts 1 and 2. In compound 1, the di-cation H2px2ampy2+ modulates its potential hydrogen donor sites in a cis conformation to form a R22(8) hetero synthon with carboxylate oxygen atoms of singly deprotonated Hhfipbb1- anion and thereby restricts the twisting between two benzene rings in the Hhfipbb1- skeleton to form 3D intricate supramolecular architecture. The trans-conformations of H4pxph (compound 2) forms 1D chain through R22(8) homo synthons, which extends to a 3D porous supramolecular network through interactions with 4-Hptz+ cations (by twisting them). The ion components, that are present in both compounds, modulate their geometry from their classical geometries, displayed by them in the metal coordination architectures and inorganic salts.

  11. The Strip-Hippo Pathway Regulates Synaptic Terminal Formation by Modulating Actin Organization at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Synapses.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chisako; Saito, Yoshie; Umehara, Tomoki; Kamimura, Keisuke; Maeda, Nobuaki; Mosca, Timothy J; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2016-08-30

    Synapse formation requires the precise coordination of axon elongation, cytoskeletal stability, and diverse modes of cell signaling. The underlying mechanisms of this interplay, however, remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Strip, a component of the striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex that regulates these processes, is required to ensure the proper development of synaptic boutons at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. In doing so, Strip negatively regulates the activity of the Hippo (Hpo) pathway, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ size whose role in synapse formation is currently unappreciated. Strip functions genetically with Enabled, an actin assembly/elongation factor and the presumptive downstream target of Hpo signaling, to modulate local actin organization at synaptic termini. This regulation occurs independently of the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie, the canonical downstream target of the Hpo pathway. Our study identifies a previously unanticipated role of the Strip-Hippo pathway in synaptic development, linking cell signaling to actin organization. PMID:27545887

  12. Investigation of dose homogeneity for loose helical tomotherapy delivery in the context of breath-hold radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bryan; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-05-01

    Loose helical delivery is a potential solution to account for respiration-driven tumour motion in helical tomotherapy (HT). In this approach, a treatment is divided into a set of interlaced 'loose' helices commencing at different gantry angles. Each loose helix covers the entire target length in one gantry rotation during a single breath-hold. The dosimetric characteristics of loose helical delivery were investigated by delivering a 6 MV photon beam in a HT-like manner. Multiple scenarios of conventional 'tight' HT and loose helical deliveries were modelled in treatment planning software, and carried out experimentally with Kodak EDR2 film. The advantage of loose helical delivery lies in its ability to produce a more homogeneous dose distribution by eliminating the 'thread' effect—an inherent characteristic of HT, which results in dose modulations away from the axis of gantry rotation. However, loose helical delivery was also subjected to undesirable dose modulations in the direction of couch motion (termed 'beating' effect), when the ratio between the number of beam projections per gantry rotation (n) and pitch factor (p) was a non-integer. The magnitude of dose modulations decreased with an increasing n/p ratio. The results suggest that for the current HT unit (n = 51), dose modulations could be kept under 5% by selecting a pitch factor smaller than 7. A pitch factor of this magnitude should be able to treat a target up to 30 cm in length. Loose helical delivery should increase the total session time only by a factor of 2, while the planning time should stay the same since the total number of beam projections remains unchanged. Considering its dosimetric advantage and clinical practicality, loose helical delivery is a promising solution for the future HT treatments of respiration-driven targets.

  13. Mechanism of optical terahertz-transmission modulation in an organic/inorganic semiconductor interface and its application to active metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Tatsunosuke; Takagi, Ryosuke; Takano, Keisuke; Hangyo, Masanori

    2013-11-15

    Terahertz (THz) transmission modulation through copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)-coated Si under various laser light irradiation conditions was investigated using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The charge carrier transfer from Si to CuPc is crucial for photo-induced metallization, and the thickness of the CuPc layer is a critical parameter for achieving high charge carrier density for metallization. Transmission through a split-ring resonator array metamaterial, fabricated on CuPc-coated Si, can be efficiently modulated by laser light irradiation. Our findings may open the way for various types of metamaterials using organic conjugated materials that are suitable for easy device fabrication using printing technologies. PMID:24322092

  14. Remarkable improvement in microwave absorption by cloaking a micro-scaled tetrapod hollow with helical carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xian; Chen, Xiangnan; Zhou, Zuowan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Man; Xu, Xiaoling; Lu, Jun; Li, Qiming; Wang, Yong; Gou, Jihua; Hui, David

    2015-02-01

    Helical nanofibers are prepared through in situ growth on the surface of a tetrapod-shaped ZnO whisker (T-ZnO), by employing a precursor decomposition method then adding substrate. After heat treatment at 900 °C under argon, this new composite material, named helical nanofiber-T-ZnO, undergoes a significant change in morphology and structure. The T-ZnO transforms from a solid tetrapod ZnO to a micro-scaled tetrapod hollow carbon film by reduction of the organic fiber at 900 °C. Besides, helical carbon nanofibers, generated from the carbonization of helical nanofibers, maintain the helical morphology. Interestingly, HCNFs with the T-hollow exhibit remarkable improvement in electromagnetic wave loss compared with the pure helical nanofibers. The enhanced loss ability may arise from the efficient dielectric friction, interface effect in the complex nanostructures and the micro-scaled tetrapod-hollow structure.

  15. ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF MACHINERY DEALERSHIPS. AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY--SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE NUMBER 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A 16-UNIT SERIES DESIGNED TO HELP TEACHERS PREPARE POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS FOR AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY OCCUPATIONS AS PARTS MEN, MECHANICS, MECHANIC'S HELPERS, AND SERVICE SUPERVISORS, THIS MODULE AIMS TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE IMPORTANCE, METHODS, JOBS, AND JOB FUNCTIONS OF RETAIL AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY DEALERSHIPS. IT WAS DESIGNED…

  16. Miniaturized low-power electro-optic modulator based on silicon integrated nanophotonics and organic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Hosseini, Amir; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-10-01

    We design and demonstrate a compact, low-power, low-dispersion and broadband optical modulator based on electro-optic (EO) polymer refilled silicon slot photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). The EO polymer is engineered for large EO activity and near-infrared transparency. The half-wave switching-voltage is measured to be Vπ=0.97±0.02V over optical spectrum range of 8nm, corresponding to a record-high effective in-device r33 of 1190pm/V and Vπ×L of 0.291±0.006V×mm in a push-pull configuration. Excluding the slow-light effect, we estimate the EO polymer is poled with an ultra-high efficiency of 89pm/V in the slot. In addition, to achieve high-speed modulation, silicon PCW is selectively doped to reduce RC time delay. The 3-dB RF bandwidth of the modulator is measured to be 11GHz, and a modulation response up to 40GHz is observed.

  17. DEMONSTRATION OF PILOT-SCALE PERVAPORATION SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND REMOVAL FROM A SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION FLUID. II. HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANE MODULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale demonstration of pervaporation-based removal of volatile organic compounds from a surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) fluid has been conducted at USEPA's Test & Evaluation Facility using hollow fiber membrane modules. The membranes consisted of microporous...

  18. Insights into the Hendra virus NTAIL-XD complex: Evidence for a parallel organization of the helical MoRE at the XD surface stabilized by a combination of hydrophobic and polar interactions.

    PubMed

    Erales, Jenny; Beltrandi, Matilde; Roche, Jennifer; Maté, Maria; Longhi, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    The Hendra virus is a member of the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The nucleoprotein, which consists of a structured core and of a C-terminal intrinsically disordered domain (N(TAIL)), encapsidates the viral genome within a helical nucleocapsid. N(TAIL) partly protrudes from the surface of the nucleocapsid being thus capable of interacting with the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Interaction with XD implies a molecular recognition element (MoRE) that is located within N(TAIL) residues 470-490, and that undergoes α-helical folding. The MoRE has been proposed to be embedded in the hydrophobic groove delimited by helices α2 and α3 of XD, although experimental data could not discriminate between a parallel and an antiparallel orientation of the MoRE. Previous studies also showed that if the binding interface is enriched in hydrophobic residues, charged residues located close to the interface might play a role in complex formation. Here, we targeted for site directed mutagenesis two acidic and two basic residues within XD and N(TAIL). ITC studies showed that electrostatics plays a crucial role in complex formation and pointed a parallel orientation of the MoRE as more likely. Further support for a parallel orientation was afforded by SAXS studies that made use of two chimeric constructs in which XD and the MoRE were covalently linked to each other. Altogether, these studies unveiled the multiparametric nature of the interactions established within this complex and contribute to shed light onto the molecular features of protein interfaces involving intrinsically disordered regions.

  19. Mechanics of helical mesostructures from polymer-nanoparticle hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Jonathan; Lawrence, Jimmy; Grason, Gregory; Emrick, Todd; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    We describe the fabrication and mechanics of polymer and nanoparticle (NP)-based high-aspect ratio mesostructures, which we refer to as ribbons, with nm-scale cross-sections and up to cm-scale lengths. When placed into a fluid like water, interfacial tension associated with the ribbons' intrinsic geometric asymmetry balances the elastic cost of bending, turning ribbons into helices with tunable preferred curvature. This universal, elastocapillary-based mechanism enables the reversible formation of helices from a variety of polymer and NP compositions, as demonstrated with specific examples of poly(methyl methacrylate), CdSe quantum dots, and gold NPs with polystyrene-azide or undecene ligands. Using custom-designed characterization methods, we quantitatively show that helices are highly stretchable with force-displacement relationships described by a nonlinear spring of finite extensibility. At small strains, these helices generate nN forces, affording mesostructures with a stiffness similar to single polymer chains (ca. 10-6 N/m), and when fully stretched, they display properties similar to synthetic polymer nanofibers. These mesostructures offer a novel platform for engineering tunable materials with a broad range of mechanical properties and organic or inorganic functionality.

  20. Morphology and ultrastructure of helical and nonhelical strains of Spiroplasma citri.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, R; Burgess, J; Plaskitt, K A

    1980-01-01

    Cells of the nonhelical strain of Spiroplasma citri underwent changes of morphology comparable to those which occurred in the normal helical strain. Cells of the nonhelical strain had the same ultrastructural features as helical cells and released long flexible fibrils similar to those seen in other spiroplasmas. Nonhelical organisms showed an increased tendency to aggregate, forming cell clusters of an unusual annular form. The cytoplasmic membrane of the nonhelical strain lacked a single protein present in all helical strains. Loss of helicity associated with the senescence of spiroplasma cells was not accompanied by the disappearance of this protein. Differences in colony morphology were shown to be a consequence of motility, and a technique was developed which facilitated the identification of nonmotile organisms. Images PMID:7380813

  1. Helicity in dynamical processes in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, Michael; Maksimenkov, Leonid; Khapaev, Alexey; Chkhetiani, Otto

    2016-04-01

    In modern geophysical fluid dynamics and dynamic meteorology, a notable interest is observed to the notion of helicity ("kinetic helicity" to be distinguished from "magnetic helicity" widely used in magnetohydrodynamics, astrophysics and Solar physics), which is defined by the scalar product of 3D vectors of velocity and vorticity. In this contribution, we bring together different, both known in the literature and novel formulations of the helicity balance equation, by also taking into account the effects of air compressibility and Earth rotation. Equations and relationships are presented that are valid under different approximations customarily made in the dynamic meteorology, e.g. Boussinesq approximation, quasi-static approximation, quasi-geostrophic approximation. An emphasis is placed on the helicity budget analysis in large-scale atmospheric motions. An explicit expression is presented for the rate of helicity injection from the free atmosphere into a non-linear Ekman boundary layer. This injection is shown to be exactly balanced by the helicity viscous destruction within the boundary layer. It is conjectured that this helicity injection may characterize the intensity of atmospheric circulation in extratropical latitudes of both terrestrial hemispheres. Examples are provided based on re-analyses data. Vertical distribution of helicity and superhelicity in different Ekman boundary layers is also discussed.

  2. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  3. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-01

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. We also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks can be assembled.

  4. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.; Hayashi, K.; Sun, X.; Schuck, P. W.

    2014-04-10

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferred in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.

  5. Intermolecular electronic coupling in organic molecular thin films measured by temperature modulation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Abhishek; Jin, Y; Chan, P. K. L.; Shtein, Max; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature modulation spectroscopy is used to obtain the temperature dependences of oscillator strength, exciton transition energy, and line width for a copper phthalocyanine thin film. With increasing temperature, the oscillator strength exhibits a pronounced decrease for charge transfer (CT) excitons, making this technique suitable for differentiating exciton types. From the measured magnitude and temperature dependence of the CT oscillator strength, we obtain estimates for the intermolecular electronic coupling and its exponential decay coefficient.

  6. Modules for Introducing Organometallic Reactions: A Bridge between Organic and Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic reactions have become increasingly important in the synthesis of organic molecules. A new approach has been developed to introduce organometallic chemistry, along with organic and inorganic chemistry, at the foundational level. This change highlights applications of organometallic chemistry that have dramatically…

  7. A growth factor-induced, spatially organizing cytoskeletal module enables rapid and persistent fibroblast migration

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katrin; Vilela, Marco; Jeon, Noo Li; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pertz, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary Directional migration requires robust front/back polarity. We find that fibroblasts treated with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and pre-polarized by plating on a fibronectin line substrate, exhibit persistent migration for hours. This does not occur in the absence of PDGF, or on uniformly-coated fibronectin substrates. Persistent migration arises from establishment of two functional modules at cell front and back. At the front, formation of a zone containing podosome-like structures (PLS), dynamically correlates with low RhoA and myosin activity, and absence of a contractile lamella. At the back, myosin contractility specifically controls tail retraction with minimal crosstalk to the front module. The PLS zone is maintained in a dynamic steady state that preserves size and position relative to the cell front, allowing for long term coordination of front and back modules. We propose that front/back uncoupling achieved by the PLS zone is crucial for persistent migration in absence of directional cues. PMID:25268172

  8. Impact of helical boundary conditions on nonlinear 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veranda, M.; Bonfiglio, D.; Cappello, S.; Chacón, L.; Escande, D. F.

    2013-07-01

    Helical self-organized reversed-field pinch (RFP) regimes emerge both numerically—in 3D visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations—and experimentally, as in the RFX-mod device at high current (IP above 1 MA). These states, called quasi-single helicity (QSH) states, are characterized by the action of a MHD mode that impresses a quasi-helical symmetry to the system, thus allowing a high degree of magnetic chaos healing. This is in contrast with the multiple helicity (MH) states, where magnetic fluctuations create a chaotic magnetic field degrading the confinement properties of the RFP. This paper reports an extensive numerical study performed in the frame of 3D visco-resistive MHD which considers the effect of helical magnetic boundary conditions, i.e. of a finite value of the radial magnetic field at the edge (magnetic perturbation, MP). We show that the system can be driven to a selected QSH state starting from both spontaneous QSH and MH regimes. In particular, a high enough MP can force a QSH helical self-organization with a helicity different from the spontaneous one. Moreover, MH states can be turned into QSH states with a selected helicity. A threshold in the amplitude of MP is observed above which is able to influence the system. Analysis of the magnetic topology of these simulations indicates that the dominant helical mode is able to temporarily sustain conserved magnetic structures in the core of the plasma. The region occupied by conserved magnetic surfaces increases reducing secondary modes' amplitude to experimental-like values.

  9. Neurocardiovascular instability may modulate end-organ damage: A review of this hypothesis investigating the eye and manifestations of NCVI.

    PubMed

    Ní Bhuachalla, Bláithín; McGarrigle, Christine A; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2015-11-01

    Neurocardiovascular instability (NCVI) represents age-related changes in blood pressure and heart rate behaviour. It has been associated with increased leukoaraiosis in the brain and also conditions which are likely to be are related to cerebral end-organ damage, such as stroke and falls. The eye is a 'window' into the brain and cardiovascular (CV) system, changes in retinal microvasculature being independently predictive of cardiovascular events. The eye is highly vascular, having two circulatory systems and as such the ideal target end-organ to investigate NCVI and early end-organ damage. The retinal and choroidal circulations of the eye would be vulnerable to NCVI if ocular vasoregulation becomes impaired with age, particularly given the high metabolic activity of the retina. The choroid is predominantly extrinsically regulated by the autonomic nervous system. In patients with NCVI, autonomic dysfunction is more common and thus impairment of the tightly regulated ocular microcirculation may indeed be compromised. We review the evidence for the hypothesis that NCVI may modulate end-organ cardiovascular pathology and that the eye is the ideal target organ to monitor this.

  10. The Dosimetric Consequences of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: The Impact of Organ Motion, Deformation and Tumour Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Karen Siah Huey

    Hypothesis: In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervix cancer, the dose received by the tumour target and surrounding normal tissues is significantly different to that indicated by a single static plan. Rationale: The optimal use of IMRT in cervix cancer requires a greater attention to clinical target volume (CTV) definition and tumour & normal organ motion to assure maximum tumour control with the fewest side effects. Research Aims: 1) Generate consensus CTV contouring guidelines for cervix cancer; 2) Evaluate intra-pelvic tumour and organ dynamics during radiotherapy; 3) Analyze the dose consequences of intra-pelvic organ dynamics on different radiotherapy strategies. Results: Consensus CTV definitions were generated using experts-in-the-field. Substantial changes in tumour volume and organ motion, resulted in significant reductions in accumulated dose to tumour targets and variability in accumulated dose to surrounding normal tissues. Significance: Formalized CTV definitions for cervix cancer is important in ensuring consistent standards of practice. Complex and unpredictable tumour and organ dynamics mandates daily soft-tissue image guidance if IMRT is used. To maximize the benefits of IMRT for cervix cancer, a strategy of adaptation is necessary.

  11. Self-Assembled Silica Nanostructures: Simultaneous Discrimination of Handedness, Pitch and Diameter of Helical Silica Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Oh, C Y; Kim, D Y; Jin, S M; Kim, T K; Kim, J P; Jeong, E D; Hyun, M H; Sim, E K; Lee, Y C; Jin, J S

    2016-02-01

    The left- and right-handed helical silica nanostructures were obtained with the aid of organic templates, the formation of the nanostructures might follow a co-operation self-assembly mechanism. The chirality of the organogel self-assemblies was successfully transcribed in to the silica. The helical pitch and pore size of the silica nanotubes sensitively depended on the optical purity of the neutral gelator in the reaction mixtures. PMID:27433714

  12. cMonkey2: Automated, systematic, integrated detection of co-regulated gene modules for any organism

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, David J.; Plaisier, Christopher L.; Wu, Wei-Ju; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2015-01-01

    The cMonkey integrated biclustering algorithm identifies conditionally co-regulated modules of genes (biclusters). cMonkey integrates various orthogonal pieces of information which support evidence of gene co-regulation, and optimizes biclusters to be supported simultaneously by one or more of these prior constraints. The algorithm served as the cornerstone for constructing the first global, predictive Environmental Gene Regulatory Influence Network (EGRIN) model for a free-living cell, and has now been applied to many more organisms. However, due to its computational inefficiencies, long run-time and complexity of various input data types, cMonkey was not readily usable by the wider community. To address these primary concerns, we have significantly updated the cMonkey algorithm and refactored its implementation, improving its usability and extendibility. These improvements provide a fully functioning and user-friendly platform for building co-regulated gene modules and the tools necessary for their exploration and interpretation. We show, via three separate analyses of data for E. coli, M. tuberculosis and H. sapiens, that the updated algorithm and inclusion of novel scoring functions for new data types (e.g. ChIP-seq and transcription factor over-expression [TFOE]) improve discovery of biologically informative co-regulated modules. The complete cMonkey2 software package, including source code, is available at https://github.com/baliga-lab/cmonkey2. PMID:25873626

  13. A high performance all-organic flexural piezo-FET and nanogenerator via nanoscale soft-interface strain modulation.

    PubMed

    Dhakras, Dipti; Gawli, Yogesh; Chhatre, Shraddha; Wadgaonkar, Prakash; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-11-01

    Flexural strain fields are encountered in a wide variety of situations and invite novel device designs for their effective use in sensing, actuating, as well as energy harvesting (nanogenerator) applications. In this work we demonstrate an interesting all-organic device design comprising an electrospun P(VDF-TrFE) fiber-mat built directly on a conducting PANI film, which is also grown on a flexible PET substrate, for flexural piezo-FET and nanogenerator applications. Orders of magnitude stronger modulation of electrical transport in PANI film is realized in this device as compared to the case of a similar device but with a uniform spin-coated P(VDF-TrFE) film. We find that in the flexural mode of operation, the interaction between the laterally modulated nanoscale strain field distributions created by the fibers and the applied coherent strain field strongly influences the carrier transport in PANI. The transport modulation is suggested to occur due to strain-induced conformational changes in P(VDF-TrFE) leading to changes in carrier localization-delocalization. We further show that the fiber-mat based device system also works as an efficient nanogenerator capable of delivering power for low power applications.

  14. Spatial modulation spectroscopy for imaging and quantitative analysis of single dye-doped organic nanoparticles inside cells.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Mary Sajini; Devkota, Tuphan; Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K; Smith, Bradley D; Hartland, Gregory V

    2015-06-01

    Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer.

  15. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinase Activities toward Peptomeric Triple-Helical Substrates.

    PubMed

    Stawikowski, Maciej J; Stawikowska, Roma; Fields, Gregg B

    2015-05-19

    Although collagenolytic matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) possess common domain organizations, there are subtle differences in their processing of collagenous triple-helical substrates. In this study, we have incorporated peptoid residues into collagen model triple-helical peptides and examined MMP activities toward these peptomeric chimeras. Several different peptoid residues were incorporated into triple-helical substrates at subsites P3, P1, P1', and P10' individually or in combination, and the effects of the peptoid residues were evaluated on the activities of full-length MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-13, and MMP-14/MT1-MMP. Most peptomers showed little discrimination between MMPs. However, a peptomer containing N-methyl Gly (sarcosine) in the P1' subsite and N-isobutyl Gly (NLeu) in the P10' subsite was hydrolyzed efficiently only by MMP-13 [nomenclature relative to the α1(I)772-786 sequence]. Cleavage site analysis showed hydrolysis at the Gly-Gln bond, indicating a shifted binding of the triple helix compared to the parent sequence. Favorable hydrolysis by MMP-13 was not due to sequence specificity or instability of the substrate triple helix but rather was based on the specific interactions of the P7' peptoid residue with the MMP-13 hemopexin-like domain. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer triple-helical peptomer was constructed and found to be readily processed by MMP-13, not cleaved by MMP-1 and MMP-8, and weakly hydrolyzed by MT1-MMP. The influence of the triple-helical structure containing peptoid residues on the interaction between MMP subsites and individual substrate residues may provide additional information about the mechanism of collagenolysis, the understanding of collagen specificity, and the design of selective MMP probes.

  16. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  17. Spheromak Power and Helicity Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    2000-05-18

    This note addresses the division of gun power and helicity between the open line volume and the closed flux surface volume in a steady state flux core spheromak. Our assumptions are that fine scale turbulence maintains each region close to a Taylor state, {mu}{sub o}J = {lambda}B. The gun region that feeds these two volumes surrounded by a flux conserver is shown topologically below. (The actual geometry is toroidal). Flux and current from the magnetized gun flow on open lines around the entire closed surface containing the spheromak. The gun current flows down the potential gradient, the potential difference between the two ends of each line being the gun voltage. Here, the gun voltage excludes the sheath drops at each end. When these volumes have different values of {lambda} (ratio of {mu}{sub o}B{sup -2}j {center_dot} B in each region) in the open line volume V{sub 1} and the closed spheromak volume V{sub 2} the efficiency of transferring the gun power to the spheromak to sustain the ohmic loss is the {lambda}-ratio of these regions, in the limit V{sub 1} << V{sub 2}. This result follows immediately from helicity balance in that limit. Here we give an accounting of all the gun power, and do not assume a small edge (open line) region.

  18. Binding of copper(II) ions to the polyproline II helices of PEVK modules of the giant elastic protein titin as revealed by ESI-MS, CD, and NMR.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kan; Wang, Kuan

    2003-10-01

    Titin, a family of giant elastic proteins, constitutes an elastic sarcomere matrix in striated muscle. In the I-band region of the sarcomere, the titin PEVK segment acts as a molecular spring to generate elasticity as well as sites of adhesion with parallel thin filaments. Previously, we reported that PEVK consists of tandem repeats of 28 residue modules and that the "polyproline II-coil" motif is the fundamental conformational motif of the PEVK module. In order to characterize the factors that may affect and alter the PPII-coil conformational motifs, we have initiated a systematic study of the interaction with divalent cations (Cu2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+) and a conformational profile of PEVK peptides (a representative 28-mer peptide PR: PEPPKEVVPEKKAPVAPPKKPEVPPVKV and its subfragments PR1: kvPEPPKEVVPE, PR2: VPEKKAPVAPPK, PR3: KPEVPPVKV). UV-Vis absorption difference spectra and CD spectra showed that Cu2+ bound to PR1 with high affinity (20 microM), while its binding to PR2 and PR3 as well as the binding of other cations to all four peptides were of lower affinity (>100 microM). Conformational studies by CD revealed that Cu2+ binding to PR1 resulted in a polyproline II to turn transition up to a 1:2 PR1/Cu2+ ratio and a coil to turn transition at higher Cu2+ concentration. ESI-MS provided the stoichiometry of PEVK peptide-Cu2+ complexes at both low and high ion strength, confirming the specific high affinity binding of Cu2+ to PR1 and PR. Furthermore, NMR and ESI-MS/MS fragmentation analysis elucidated the binding sites of the PEVK peptide-Cu2+ complexes at (-2)KVPE2, 8VPE10, 13APV15, and 22EVP24. A potential application of Cu2+ binding in peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry was also revealed. We conclude that Cu2+ binds and bends PEVK peptides to a beta-turn-like structure at specific sites. The specific targeting of Cu2+ towards PPII is likely to be of significant value in elucidating the roles of PPII in titin elasticity as well as in interactions of

  19. Pulse-modulated multilevel data storage in an organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoul; van Breemen, Albert J J M; Khikhlovskyi, Vsevolod; Kemerink, Martijn; Janssen, Rene A J; Gelinck, Gerwin H

    2016-04-15

    We demonstrate multilevel data storage in organic ferroelectric resistive memory diodes consisting of a phase-separated blend of P(VDF-TrFE) and a semiconducting polymer. The dynamic behaviour of the organic ferroelectric memory diode can be described in terms of the inhomogeneous field mechanism (IFM) model where the ferroelectric components are regarded as an assembly of randomly distributed regions with independent polarisation kinetics governed by a time-dependent local field. This allows us to write and non-destructively read stable multilevel polarisation states in the organic memory diode using controlled programming pulses. The resulting 2-bit data storage per memory element doubles the storage density of the organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode without increasing its technological complexity, thus reducing the cost per bit.

  20. Pulse-modulated multilevel data storage in an organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoul; van Breemen, Albert J J M; Khikhlovskyi, Vsevolod; Kemerink, Martijn; Janssen, Rene A J; Gelinck, Gerwin H

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate multilevel data storage in organic ferroelectric resistive memory diodes consisting of a phase-separated blend of P(VDF-TrFE) and a semiconducting polymer. The dynamic behaviour of the organic ferroelectric memory diode can be described in terms of the inhomogeneous field mechanism (IFM) model where the ferroelectric components are regarded as an assembly of randomly distributed regions with independent polarisation kinetics governed by a time-dependent local field. This allows us to write and non-destructively read stable multilevel polarisation states in the organic memory diode using controlled programming pulses. The resulting 2-bit data storage per memory element doubles the storage density of the organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode without increasing its technological complexity, thus reducing the cost per bit. PMID:27080264

  1. Pulse-modulated multilevel data storage in an organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiyoul; van Breemen, Albert J. J. M.; Khikhlovskyi, Vsevolod; Kemerink, Martijn; Janssen, Rene A. J.; Gelinck, Gerwin H.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate multilevel data storage in organic ferroelectric resistive memory diodes consisting of a phase-separated blend of P(VDF-TrFE) and a semiconducting polymer. The dynamic behaviour of the organic ferroelectric memory diode can be described in terms of the inhomogeneous field mechanism (IFM) model where the ferroelectric components are regarded as an assembly of randomly distributed regions with independent polarisation kinetics governed by a time-dependent local field. This allows us to write and non-destructively read stable multilevel polarisation states in the organic memory diode using controlled programming pulses. The resulting 2-bit data storage per memory element doubles the storage density of the organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode without increasing its technological complexity, thus reducing the cost per bit.

  2. Pulse-modulated multilevel data storage in an organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyoul; van Breemen, Albert J. J. M.; Khikhlovskyi, Vsevolod; Kemerink, Martijn; Janssen, Rene A. J.; Gelinck, Gerwin H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate multilevel data storage in organic ferroelectric resistive memory diodes consisting of a phase-separated blend of P(VDF-TrFE) and a semiconducting polymer. The dynamic behaviour of the organic ferroelectric memory diode can be described in terms of the inhomogeneous field mechanism (IFM) model where the ferroelectric components are regarded as an assembly of randomly distributed regions with independent polarisation kinetics governed by a time-dependent local field. This allows us to write and non-destructively read stable multilevel polarisation states in the organic memory diode using controlled programming pulses. The resulting 2-bit data storage per memory element doubles the storage density of the organic ferroelectric resistive memory diode without increasing its technological complexity, thus reducing the cost per bit. PMID:27080264

  3. Modulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isozymes by organ development and high long-term salinity in the halophyte Cakile maritima.

    PubMed

    Houmani, Hayet; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Palma, José M; Abdelly, Chedly; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. This enzyme is considered to be a first line of defense for controlling the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the number and type of SOD isozymes were identified in the principal organs (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds) of Cakile maritima. We also analyzed the way in which the activity of these SOD isozymes is modulated during development and under high long-term salinity (400 mM NaCl) stress conditions. The data indicate that this plant contains a total of ten SOD isozymes: two Mn-SODs, one Fe-SOD, and seven CuZn-SODs, with the Fe-SOD being the most prominent isozyme in the different organs analyzed. Moreover, the modulation of SOD isozymes, particularly CuZn-SODs, was only detected during development and under severe salinity stress conditions. These data suggest that, in C. maritima, the occurrence of these CuZn-SODs in roots and leaves plays an adaptive role since this CuZn-SOD isozyme might replace the diminished Fe-SOD activity under salinity stress to overcome this adverse environmental condition. PMID:26159565

  4. Ab initio molecular-replacement phasing for symmetric helical membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strop, Pavel; Brzustowicz, Michael R.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining phases for X-ray diffraction data can be a rate-limiting step in structure determination. Taking advantage of constraints specific to membrane proteins, an ab initio molecular-replacement method has been developed for phasing X-ray diffraction data for symmetric helical membrane proteins without prior knowledge of their structure or heavy-atom derivatives. The described method is based on generating all possible orientations of idealized transmembrane helices and using each model in a molecular-replacement search. The number of models is significantly reduced by taking advantage of geometrical and structural restraints specific to membrane proteins. The top molecular-replacement results are evaluated based on noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) map correlation, OMIT map correlation and R free value after refinement of a polyalanine model. The feasibility of this approach is illustrated by phasing the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) with only 4 Å diffraction data. No prior structural knowledge was used other than the number of transmembrane helices. The search produced the correct spatial organization and the position in the asymmetric unit of all transmembrane helices of MscL. The resulting electron-density maps were of sufficient quality to automatically build all helical segments of MscL including the cytoplasmic domain. The method does not require high-resolution diffraction data and can be used to obtain phases for symmetrical helical membrane proteins with one or two helices per monomer. PMID:17242512

  5. Increasing the size of an aromatic helical foldamer cavity by strand intercalation.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Michael L; Pirotte, Geert; Kauffmann, Brice; Ferrand, Yann; Huc, Ivan

    2014-11-24

    The postsynthetic modulation of capsules based on helical aromatic oligoamide foldamers would be a powerful approach for controlling their receptor properties without altering the initial monomer sequences. With the goal of developing a method to increase the size of a cavity within a helix, a single-helical foldamer capsule was synthesized with a wide-diameter central segment that was designed to intercalate with a second shorter helical strand. Despite the formation of stable double-helical homodimers (K(dim)>10(7) M(-1)) by the shorter strand, when it was mixed with the single-helical capsule sequence, a cross-hybridized double helix was formed with K(a)>10(5) M(-1). This strategy makes it possible to direct the formation of double-helical heterodimers. On the basis of solution- and solid-state structural data, this intercalation resulted in an increase in the central-cavity size to give a new interior volume of approximately 150 Å(3). PMID:25284711

  6. Hydrodynamic characteristics of the helical flow pump.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kohei; Hosoda, Kyohei; Nishida, Masahiro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ariyoshi, Koki; Inoue, Yusuke; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Sato, Masami; Hara, Sintaro; Lee, Xinyang; Wu, Sheng-Yuan; Imachi, Kou; Abe, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) was invented to be an ideal pump for developing the TAH and the helical flow TAH (HFTAH) using two HFPs has been developed. However, since the HFP is quite a new pump, hydrodynamic characteristics inside the pump are not clarified. To analyze hydrodynamic characteristics of the HFP, flow visualization study using the particle image velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics analysis were performed. The experimental and computational models were developed to simulate the left HFP of the HFTAH and distributions of flow velocity vectors, shear stress and pressure inside the pump were examined. In distribution of flow velocity vectors, the vortexes in the vane were observed, which indicated that the HFP has a novel and quite unique working principle in which centrifugal force rotates the fluid in the helical volutes and the fluid is transferred from the inlet to the outlet helical volutes according to the helical structure. In distribution of shear stress, the highest shear stress that was considered to be occurred by the shunt flow across the impeller was found around the entrance of the inlet helical volute. However, it was not so high to cause hemolysis. This shunt flow is thought to be improved by redesigning the inlet and outlet helical volutes. In distribution of pressure, negative pressure was found near the entrance of the inlet helical volute. However, it was not high. Negative pressure is thought to be reduced with an improvement in the design of the impeller or the vane shape. PMID:25784463

  7. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  8. Simplified Fabrication of Helical Copper Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A simplified technique has been devised for fabricating helical antennas for use in experiments on radio-frequency generation and acceleration of plasmas. These antennas are typically made of copper (for electrical conductivity) and must have a specific helical shape and precise diameter.

  9. Modulation of mesenchymal stem cell actin organization on conventional microcarriers for proliferation and differentiation in stirred bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sart, Sébastien; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Agathos, Spiros N

    2013-07-01

    Tissue engineering applications require an appropriate combination of a cell population, biochemical factors and scaffold materials. In this field, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) emerge as an attractive cell population, due to their ready availability and their potential to be differentiated into various mesodermal cell types. Commercially available microcarriers have been recently recognized as an efficient tool for the propagation of such cells compared to traditional monolayer culture, enabling efficient scale-up and serving as a cell delivery system. The organization of actin as well as the induction of its effectors was previously shown to affect dramatically both proliferation and differentiation of MSCs in monolayer culture. To achieve mass scale production of differentiated cells derived from MSCs in scalable stirred bioreactors, this work aims at rationally screening microcarriers based on the characterization of actin organization. First, among the various supports tested, gelatin-based microcarriers were found to be most suitable for MSC expansion, due to their best-adapted actin organization compared to monolayer cultures. Secondly, the proper actin organization on Cultispher-S was closely linked to its ability to bind serum adhesion molecules enabling Rho GTPase activation. Finally, by modulating actin behaviour, it was feasible to efficiently guide MSC differentiation on microcarriers. Taken together, these results show that controlling actin behaviour is a good strategy toward mass scale sequential expansion followed by differentiation of MSCs in a microcarrier based bioreactor.

  10. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids modulate large-scale systems organization in the rhesus macaque brain.

    PubMed

    Grayson, David S; Kroenke, Christopher D; Neuringer, Martha; Fair, Damien A

    2014-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for healthy brain and retinal development and have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. This study used resting-state functional connectivity MRI to define the large-scale organization of the rhesus macaque brain and changes associated with differences in lifetime ω-3 fatty acid intake. Monkeys fed docosahexaenoic acid, the long-chain ω-3 fatty acid abundant in neural membranes, had cortical modular organization resembling the healthy human brain. In contrast, those with low levels of dietary ω-3 fatty acids had decreased functional connectivity within the early visual pathway and throughout higher-order associational cortex and showed impairment of distributed cortical networks. Our findings illustrate the similarity in modular cortical organization between the healthy human and macaque brain and support the notion that ω-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in developing and/or maintaining distributed, large-scale brain systems, including those essential for normal cognitive function.

  11. Designing artificial photosynthetic devices using hybrid organic-inorganic modules based on polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Symes, Mark D; Cogdell, Richard J; Cronin, Leroy

    2013-08-13

    Artificial photosynthesis aims at capturing solar energy and using it to produce storable fuels. However, while there is reason to be optimistic that such approaches can deliver higher energy conversion efficiencies than natural photosynthetic systems, many serious challenges remain to be addressed. Perhaps chief among these is the issue of device stability. Almost all approaches to artificial photosynthesis employ easily oxidized organic molecules as light harvesters or in catalytic centres, frequently in solution with highly oxidizing species. The 'elephant in the room' in this regard is that oxidation of these organic moieties is likely to occur at least as rapidly as oxidation of water, meaning that current device performance is severely curtailed. Herein, we discuss one possible solution to this problem: using self-assembling organic-polyoxometalate hybrid structures to produce compartments inside which the individual component reactions of photosynthesis can occur without such a high incidence of deleterious side reactions.

  12. Collective instabilities of the electron beam in magnetic fields of a helical undulator and solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A. S.; Inozemtsev, N. I.

    1989-03-01

    The collective instabilities of a continuous electron beam propagating in the magnetic fields of a helical undulator and solenoid are analyzed theoretically in the framework of a one-dimensional model. Modulation of charge density is investigated along with modulation of the transverse velocity of the electrons by an electromagnetic wave. A dispersion equation describing the collective-excitation spectrum is obtained, and analyzed in the hydrodynamic approximation for two-, three-, and four-wave interaction.

  13. Differential responses of sugar, organic acids and anthocyanins to source-sink modulation in Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese grapevines

    PubMed Central

    Bobeica, Natalia; Poni, Stefano; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Renaud, Christel; Gomès, Eric; Delrot, Serge; Dai, Zhanwu

    2015-01-01

    Grape berry composition mainly consists of primary and secondary metabolites. Both are sensitive to environment and viticultural management. As a consequence, climate change can affect berry composition and modify wine quality and typicity. Leaf removal techniques can impact berry composition by modulating the source-to-sink balance and, in turn, may mitigate some undesired effects due to climate change. The present study investigated the balance between technological maturity parameters such as sugars and organic acids, and phenolic maturity parameters such as anthocyanins in response to source-sink modulation. Sugar, organic acid, and anthocyanin profiles were compared under two contrasting carbon supply levels in berries of cv. Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese collected at 9 and 14 developmental stages respectively. In addition, whole-canopy net carbon exchange rate was monitored for Sangiovese vines and a mathematic model was used to calculate the balance between carbon fixation and berry sugar accumulation. Carbon limitation affected neither berry size nor the concentration of organic acids at harvest. However, it significantly reduced the accumulation of sugars and total anthocyanins in both cultivars. Most interestingly, carbon limitation decreased total anthocyanin concentration by 84.3% as compared to the non source-limited control, whereas it decreased sugar concentration only by 27.1%. This suggests that carbon limitation led to a strong imbalance between sugars and anthocyanins. Moreover, carbon limitation affected anthocyanin profiles in a cultivar dependent manner. Mathematical analysis of carbon-balance indicated that berries used a higher proportion of fixed carbon for sugar accumulation under carbon limitation (76.9%) than under carbon sufficiency (48%). Thus, under carbon limitation, the grape berry can manage the metabolic fate of carbon in such a way that sugar accumulation is maintained at the expense of secondary metabolites. PMID:26074942

  14. Differential responses of sugar, organic acids and anthocyanins to source-sink modulation in Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese grapevines.

    PubMed

    Bobeica, Natalia; Poni, Stefano; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Renaud, Christel; Gomès, Eric; Delrot, Serge; Dai, Zhanwu

    2015-01-01

    Grape berry composition mainly consists of primary and secondary metabolites. Both are sensitive to environment and viticultural management. As a consequence, climate change can affect berry composition and modify wine quality and typicity. Leaf removal techniques can impact berry composition by modulating the source-to-sink balance and, in turn, may mitigate some undesired effects due to climate change. The present study investigated the balance between technological maturity parameters such as sugars and organic acids, and phenolic maturity parameters such as anthocyanins in response to source-sink modulation. Sugar, organic acid, and anthocyanin profiles were compared under two contrasting carbon supply levels in berries of cv. Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese collected at 9 and 14 developmental stages respectively. In addition, whole-canopy net carbon exchange rate was monitored for Sangiovese vines and a mathematic model was used to calculate the balance between carbon fixation and berry sugar accumulation. Carbon limitation affected neither berry size nor the concentration of organic acids at harvest. However, it significantly reduced the accumulation of sugars and total anthocyanins in both cultivars. Most interestingly, carbon limitation decreased total anthocyanin concentration by 84.3% as compared to the non source-limited control, whereas it decreased sugar concentration only by 27.1%. This suggests that carbon limitation led to a strong imbalance between sugars and anthocyanins. Moreover, carbon limitation affected anthocyanin profiles in a cultivar dependent manner. Mathematical analysis of carbon-balance indicated that berries used a higher proportion of fixed carbon for sugar accumulation under carbon limitation (76.9%) than under carbon sufficiency (48%). Thus, under carbon limitation, the grape berry can manage the metabolic fate of carbon in such a way that sugar accumulation is maintained at the expense of secondary metabolites. PMID:26074942

  15. Effects of Organic Molecules with Different Structures and Absorption Bandwidth on Modulating Photoresponse of MoS2 Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanmin; Zheng, Wei; Qiu, Yunfeng; Hu, PingAn

    2016-09-01

    Organic dye molecules possessing modulated optical absorption bandwidth and molecular structures can be utilized as sensitizing species for the enhancement of photodetector performance of semiconductor via photoinduced charge transfer mechanism. MoS2 photodetector were modified by drop-casting of methyl orange (MO), rhodamine 6G (R6G), and methylene blue (MB) with different molecular structures and extinction coefficients, and enhanced photodetector performance in terms of photocurrent, photoresponsity, photodetectivity, and external quantum efficiency were obtained after modification of MO, R6G, and MB, respectively. Furthermore, dyes showed different modulating abilities for photodetector performance after combination with MoS2, mainly due to the variation of molecular structures and optical absorption bandwidth. Among tested dyes, deposition of MB onto monolayer MoS2 grown by CVD resulted in photocurrent ∼20 times as high as pristine MoS2 due to favorable photoinduced charge transfer of photoexcited electrons from flat MB molecules to the MoS2 layer. Meanwhile, the corresponding photoresponsivity, photodetectivity, and an external quantum efficiency are 9.09 A W(1-), 2.2 × 10(11) Jones, 1729% at 610 nm, respectively. Photoinduced electron-transfer measurements of the pristine MoS2 and dye-modified MoS2 indicated the n-doping effect of dye molecules on the MoS2. Additionally, surface-enhanced Raman measurements also confirmed the direct correlation with charge transfer between organic dyes and MoS2 taking into account the chemically enhanced Raman scattering mechanism. Present work provides a new clue for the manipulation of high-performance of two-dimensional layered semiconductor-based photodetector via the combination of organic dyes. PMID:27530058

  16. Effects of Organic Molecules with Different Structures and Absorption Bandwidth on Modulating Photoresponse of MoS2 Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanmin; Zheng, Wei; Qiu, Yunfeng; Hu, PingAn

    2016-09-01

    Organic dye molecules possessing modulated optical absorption bandwidth and molecular structures can be utilized as sensitizing species for the enhancement of photodetector performance of semiconductor via photoinduced charge transfer mechanism. MoS2 photodetector were modified by drop-casting of methyl orange (MO), rhodamine 6G (R6G), and methylene blue (MB) with different molecular structures and extinction coefficients, and enhanced photodetector performance in terms of photocurrent, photoresponsity, photodetectivity, and external quantum efficiency were obtained after modification of MO, R6G, and MB, respectively. Furthermore, dyes showed different modulating abilities for photodetector performance after combination with MoS2, mainly due to the variation of molecular structures and optical absorption bandwidth. Among tested dyes, deposition of MB onto monolayer MoS2 grown by CVD resulted in photocurrent ∼20 times as high as pristine MoS2 due to favorable photoinduced charge transfer of photoexcited electrons from flat MB molecules to the MoS2 layer. Meanwhile, the corresponding photoresponsivity, photodetectivity, and an external quantum efficiency are 9.09 A W(1-), 2.2 × 10(11) Jones, 1729% at 610 nm, respectively. Photoinduced electron-transfer measurements of the pristine MoS2 and dye-modified MoS2 indicated the n-doping effect of dye molecules on the MoS2. Additionally, surface-enhanced Raman measurements also confirmed the direct correlation with charge transfer between organic dyes and MoS2 taking into account the chemically enhanced Raman scattering mechanism. Present work provides a new clue for the manipulation of high-performance of two-dimensional layered semiconductor-based photodetector via the combination of organic dyes.

  17. Volatile Organic Compounds Identified in Post-Flight Air Analysis of the Multipurpose Logistics Module from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, B.; Wheeler, R.

    Bioregenerative systems involve storing and processing waste along with atmospheric management. The MPLM, Multipurpose Logistics Module, is a reusable logistics carrier and primary delivery system used to resupply the International Space Station (ISS) and return Station cargo that requires a pressurized environment. The cylindrical module is approximately 6.4 meters long, 4.6 meters in diameter, and weighs almost 4,082kg. The module provides storage and additional workspace for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. It can carry up to 9,072 kg of supplies, science experiments, spare parts and other logistical components for ISS. There is concern for a potentially hazardous condition caused by contamination of the atmosphere in the MPLM upon return from orbit. This would be largely due to unforeseen spills or container leakage. This has led to the need for special care in handling the returned module prior to processing the module for its next flight. Prior to opening the MPLM, atmospheric samples are analyzed for trace volatile organic compounds, VOC's. It is noted that our analyses also reflect the atmosphere in the ISS on that day of closure. With the re turn of STS-108, 12th ISS Flight (UF1), the analysis showed 24 PPM of methane. This corresponds to the high levels on space station during a time period when the air filtration system was shut off. Chemical characterization of atmospheres on the ISS and MPLM provide useful information for concerns with plant growth experiments on ISS. Work with closed plant growth chambers show potential for VOC's to accumulate to toxic levels for plants. The ethylene levels for 4 MPLM analyses over the course on one year were measured at, 0.070, 0.017, 0.012 and 0.007 PPM. Phytochemical such as ethylene are detected with natural plant physiological events such as flowering and as a result of plant damage or from decaying food. A build up of VOC's may contribute to phytotoxic effects for the plant growth experiments or

  18. Best packing of identical helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Youngsik; Hong, Kyungpyo; Kim, Hyoungjun; No, Sungjong; Oh, Seungsang

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we prove the unique existence of a ropelength-minimizing conformation of the θ-spun double helix in a mathematically rigorous way, and find the minimal ropelength {{{Rop}}}* (θ )=-\\tfrac{8π }{t} where t is the unique solution in [-θ ,0] of the equation 2-2\\cos (t+θ )={t}2. Using this result, the pitch angles of the standard, triple and quadruple helices are around 39.3771^\\circ , 42.8354^\\circ and 43.8351^\\circ , respectively, which are almost identical with the approximated pitch angles of the zero-twist structures previously known by Olsen and Bohr. We also find the ropelength of the standard N-helix.

  19. The quantum Hall effect helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2015-04-16

    The quantum Hall effect in semiconductor heterostructures is explained by two signs in the angular momentum j=l±s and g=(2j+1)/(2l+1) along with the Landau factor (n+1/2). These modifications in the existing theories explain all of the fractional charges. The helicity which is the sign of the product of the linear momentum with the spin p.s plays an important role for the understanding of the data at high magnetic fields. In particular it is found that particles with positive sign in the spin move in one direction and those with negative sign move in another direction which explains the up and down stream motion of the particles.

  20. Thermal deformation of helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Fei, Ye-tai; Liu, Shan-lin

    2010-08-01

    The analytical equation for the thermal field of a helical gear under normal working condition in a stable thermal field is established using mathematical physics, and the thermal deformation of the gear can be computed using this equation. The variations of gear geometric parameters, such as radial dimension, tooth depth, spiral angle, pressure angle, flank clearance and etc., are investigated with respect to the temperature change. According to the analytical and computational results obtained using the equation, the thermal deformation of the gear is strongly dependent on the choice of parameters, which is also confirmed using simulation software (COMSOL Multiphysic software). This is significant for the improvement of the rotation precision and working efficiency of screw gears.

  1. Marine Organisms in the Classroom. Project CAPE [Teaching Module] SC1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Carolyn H.; Weston, Toni

    Nine lessons which involve the use of marine organisms in the classroom are presented in this seventh-grade biology unit. The unit offers instructors alternative ways of meeting common life science goals. It is not meant to be an extra curriculum added to the normal course load, but was developed to consolidate a group of activities designed for…

  2. The xanthophyll cycle pigments, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin, modulate molecular organization of the photosynthetic antenna complex LHCII.

    PubMed

    Janik, Ewa; Bednarska, Joanna; Zubik, Monika; Sowinski, Karol; Luchowski, Rafal; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2016-02-15

    The effect of violaxanthin and zeaxanthin, two main carotenoids of the xanthophyll cycle, on molecular organization of LHCII, the principal photosynthetic antenna complex of plants, was studied in a model system based on lipid-protein membranes, by means of analysis of 77 K chlorophyll a fluorescence and "native" electrophoresis. Violaxanthin was found to promote trimeric organization of LHCII, contrary to zeaxanthin which was found to destabilize trimeric structures. Moreover, violaxanthin was found to induce decomposition of oligomeric LHCII structures formed in the lipid phase and characterized by the fluorescence emission band at 715 nm. Both pigments promoted formation of two-component supramolecular structures of LHCII and xanthophylls. The violaxanthin-stabilized structures were composed mostly of LHCII trimers while, the zeaxanthin-stabilized supramolecular structures of LHCII showed more complex organization which depended periodically on the xanthophyll content. The effect of the xanthophyll cycle pigments on molecular organization of LHCII was analyzed based on the results of molecular modeling and discussed in terms of a physiological meaning of this mechanism. Supramolecular structures of LHCII stabilized by violaxanthin, prevent uncontrolled oligomerization of LHCII, potentially leading to excitation quenching, therefore can be considered as structures protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against energy loses at low light intensities.

  3. Adding helicity to inflationary magnetogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Caprini, Chiara; Sorbo, Lorenzo E-mail: sorbo@physics.umass.edu

    2014-10-01

    The most studied mechanism of inflationary magnetogenesis relies on the time-dependence of the coefficient of the gauge kinetic term F{sub μν} F{sup μν}. Unfortunately, only extremely finely tuned versions of the model can consistently generate the cosmological magnetic fields required by observations. We propose a generalization of this model, where also the pseudoscalar invariant F{sub μν}  F-tilde {sup μν} is multiplied by a time dependent function. The new parity violating term allows more freedom in tuning the amplitude of the field at the end of inflation. Moreover, it leads to a helical magnetic field that is amplified at large scales by magnetohydrodynamical processes during the radiation dominated epoch. As a consequence, our model can satisfy the observational lower bounds on fields in the intergalactic medium, while providing a seed for the galactic dynamo, if inflation occurs at an energy scale ranging from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 10} GeV. Such energy scale is well below that suggested by the recent BICEP2 result, if the latter is due to primordial tensor modes. However, the gauge field is a source of tensors during inflation and generates a spectrum of gravitational waves that can give a sizable tensor to scalar ratio r=O(0.2) even if inflation occurs at low energies. This system therefore evades the Lyth bound. For smaller values of r, lower values of the inflationary energy scale are required. The model predicts fully helical cosmological magnetic fields and a chiral spectrum of primordial gravitational waves.

  4. A Common Representative Intermediates (CRI) mechanism for VOC degradation. Part 3: Development of a secondary organic aerosol module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utembe, S. R.; Watson, L. A.; Shallcross, D. E.; Jenkin, M. E.

    A Photochemical Trajectory Model (PTM), containing the Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.1 (MCM v3.1) coupled with an optimised representation of gas-aerosol absorptive partitioning of 365 oxygenated product species, has been used to simulate mass concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) for the conditions of the TORCH-2003 campaign in the south-east UK in late July and August 2003. A comprehensive reference dataset of 50 case study arrival events (and 4750 associated hourly air mass history events) has been compiled, which considers the base case conditions and scenarios in which emissions of anthropogenic pollution have been reduced by factors of up to 100. The relative contributions of SOA derived from anthropogenic and biogenic precursors are presented for the range of conditions, and the composition of these simulated components is discussed in terms of average molecular formulae, atomic ratios (H/C, O/C and N/C) and organic aerosol mass to organic carbon mass ratios (OM/OC), which are compared to reported measurements. The MCM v3.1 dataset has been used as a reference benchmark for development and optimisation of a reduced (14 species) SOA module for use with version 2 the Common Representative Intermediates mechanism (CRI v2), described in the first of two preceding companion papers [Jenkin, M.E., Watson, L.A., Utembe, S.R., Shallcross, D.E., 2008a. A Common Representative Intermediates (CRI) mechanism for VOC degradation. Part 1: gas phase mechanism development. Atmospheric Environment, 42, pp. 7185-7195. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2008.07.028.]. The resultant version of the PTM containing CRI v2 and the reduced SOA module has been used to simulate the entire TORCH-2003 campaign at hourly resolution, and the contributions of SOA derived from anthropogenic and biogenic precursors are presented and discussed. The reduced SOA module is also shown to be compatible with the most reduced CRI variant (CRI v2-R5), described in the second of two preceding

  5. Electronic Structure Modulation of Metal–Organic Frameworks for Hybrid Devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The study of metal–organic frameworks has largely been motivated by their structural and chemical diversity; however, these materials also possess rich physics, including optical, electronic, and magnetic activity. If these materials are to be employed in devices, it is necessary to develop an understanding of their solid-state behavior. We report an approach to calculate the effect of strain on the band structure of porous frameworks. The origin of the bidirectional absolute deformation potentials can be described from perturbations of the organic and inorganic building blocks. The unified approach allows us to propose several uses for hybrid materials, beyond their traditionally posited applications, including gas sensing, photoelectrochemistry, and as hybrid transistors. PMID:25436990

  6. Visualizing mechanical modulation of nanoscale organization of cell-matrix adhesions.

    PubMed

    Ou, Guanqing; Thakar, Dhruv; Tung, Jason C; Miroshnikova, Yekaterina A; Dufort, Christopher C; Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex; Weaver, Valerie M

    2016-07-11

    The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix influence cell signaling to regulate key cellular processes, including differentiation, apoptosis, and transformation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction is contingent upon our ability to visualize the effect of altered matrix properties on the nanoscale organization of proteins involved in this signalling. The development of super-resolution imaging techniques has afforded researchers unprecedented ability to probe the organization and localization of proteins within the cell. However, most of these methods require use of substrates like glass or silicon wafers, which are artificially rigid. In light of a growing body of literature demonstrating the importance of mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix in regulating many aspects of cellular behavior and signaling, we have developed a system that allows scanning angle interference microscopy on a mechanically tunable substrate. We describe its implementation in detail and provide examples of how it may be used to aide investigations into the effect of substrate rigidity on intracellular signaling. PMID:27334548

  7. Resistive switching and voltage induced modulation of tunneling magnetoresistance in nanosized perpendicular organic spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göckeritz, Robert; Homonnay, Nico; Müller, Alexander; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Schmidt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional perpendicular organic spin valves have been fabricated. The devices based on an La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Alq3/Co trilayer show resistive switching of up to 4-5 orders of magnitude and magnetoresistance as high as -70% the latter even changing sign when voltage pulses are applied. This combination of phenomena is typically observed in multiferroic tunnel junctions where it is attributed to magnetoelectric coupling between a ferromagnet and a ferroelectric material. Modeling indicates that here the switching originates from a modification of the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 surface. This modification influences the tunneling of charge carriers and thus both the electrical resistance and the tunneling magnetoresistance which occurs at pinholes in the organic layer.

  8. Organic trace mineral supplementation enhances local and systemic innate immune responses and modulates oxidative stress in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, H; Yitbarek, A; Munyaka, P; Alizadeh, M; Cleaver, A; Camelo-Jaimes, G; Wang, P; O, K; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C

    2016-03-01

    The effect of organic trace mineral supplementation on performance, intestinal morphology, immune organ weights (bursa of Fabricius and spleen), expression of innate immune response related genes, blood heterophils/lymphocytes ratio, chemical metabolic panel, natural antibodies (IgG), and oxidative stress of broiler chickens was studied. A total of 1,080 day-old male broilers were assigned to 1 of 3 dietary treatments, which included basal diet with Monensin (control), control diet supplemented with bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD), and BMD diet supplemented with organic trace minerals (OTM). No difference in feed conversion ratio was observed among treatments; ileum histomorphological analysis showed a lower crypt depth, higher villi height/crypt depth ratio, and lower villi width in the OTM treatment compared to control. Furthermore, OTM treatment resulted in higher uric acid and lower plasma malondehaldehyde (MDA), indicating lower oxidative stress. Gene expression analysis showed that OTM treatment resulted in up-regulations of TLR2 bin the ileum, and TLR2b, TLR4, and IL-12p35 in the bursa of Fabricius, and down-regulation of TLR2b and TLR4 in the cecal tonsils. In the spleen, OTM treatment resulted in up-regulation of IL-10. In conclusion, OTM supplementation to broiler diets may have beneficial effects on intestinal development, immune system status, and survival by improving ileum histomorphological parameters, modulation of Toll-like receptors and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and decreasing level of MDA, which in conjunction could enhance health status. PMID:26740133

  9. SU-E-I-37: Eye Lens Dose Reduction From CT Scan Using Organ Based Tube Current Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Liu, T; Xu, X; Wu, J; Zhuo, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the eye lens dose reduction by CT scan with organ based tube current modulation (OBTCM) using GPU Monte Carlo code ARCHER-CT. Methods: 36 X-ray sources and bowtie filters were placed around the patient head with the projection angle interval of 10° for one rotation of CT scan, each projection was simulated respectively. The voxel eye models with high resolution(0.1mm*0.1mm*0.1mm) were used in the simulation and different tube voltage including 80kVp, 100kVp, 120kVp and 140kVp were taken into consideration. Results: The radiation doses to the eye lens increased with the tube voltage raised from 80kVp to 140kVp, and the dose results from 0° (AP) direction are much higher than those from 180° (PA) direction for all the 4 different tube voltage investigated. This 360° projection dose characteristic enables organ based TCM, which can reduce the eye lens dose by more than 55%. Conclusion: As the eye lens belongs to superficial tissues, its radiation dose to external exposure like CT is direction sensitive, and this characteristic feature makes organ based TCM to be an effective way to reduce the eye lens dose, so more clinical use of this technique were recommended. National Nature Science Foundation of China(No.11475047)

  10. Modulation of immune responses following solid organ transplantation by microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Nayan J.; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Ramachandran, Sabarinathan; Crippin, Jeffrey; Chapman, William; Mohanakumar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplantation, an accepted treatment for end stage organ failure, is often complicated by allograft rejection and disease recurrence. In this review we will discuss the potential role of microRNAs in allograft immunity especially leading to rejection of the transplanted organ. microRNAs (miRNAs), originally identified in C. elegans, are short non-coding 21–24 nucleotide sequences that bind to its complementary sequences in functional messenger RNAs and inhibits post-translational processes through RNA duplex formation resulting in gene silencing (Lau et al., 2001). Gene specific translational silencing by miRNAs regulates pathways for immune responses such as development of innate immunity, inflammation, T-cell and B-cell differentiation and signaling that are implicated in various stages of allograft rejection. miRNAs also play a role in development of post-transplant complicacies like fibrosis, cirrhosis, carcinogenesis often leading to graft loss and poor patient outcome. Recent advancements in the methods for detecting and quantifying miRNA in tissue biopsies, as well as in serum and urine samples, has led to identification of specific miRNA signatures in patients with allograft rejection and have been utilized to predict allograft status and survival. Therefore, miRNAs play a significant role in post-transplant events including allograft rejection, disease recurrence and tumor development impacting patient outcome. PMID:23036474

  11. UV-patternable inorganic-organic hybrid materials tailored for use in electro-optic modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmelhuber, Roland; DeRose, Christopher C.; Norwood, Robert A.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2008-08-01

    Passive sol-gel materials play an important role in the development of electro-optic(EO) polymer-based modulators, because of their variety of available refractive indices. They can be used to form passive waveguide transitions to minimize coupling loss or as cladding layers for the EO polymer. The demands for these two applications are different. For waveguide transitions the most important factor is the optical loss. Cladding layers should have a relatively high conductivity at elevated temperatures to improve poling efficiency. Both demands are addressed in this study. The synthesis of low loss (down to 0.45 dB/cm) sol-gel materials is shown. Slab waveguides as well as ridge waveguides were fabricated and characterized by liquid prism measurements and cut-back loss measurements, respectively. For use in cladding layers surrounding the EO polymer, materials with higher conductivity were developed. The conductivity of the materials was increased, (3•10-9 S/m) through the use of a silane, which allows in situ formation of proton donating functionalities. All developed materials can be used as solvent free resins, which enables classic photolithography as well as patterning by UV-imprinting. The available refractive index range (at 1.55 μm) is from 1.495 to 1.562.

  12. Time-Domain Quaternary-Weighted Pulse Width Modulation Driving Method for Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun-Sang; Kuk, Seung-Hee; Han, Min-Koo

    2008-03-01

    We proposed a new digital driving method and its pixel structure for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays employing time-domain quaternary-weighted pulse width modulation. In the new digital driving method, the luminance of AMOLED displays is accurately determined by averaging photon flux to the desired level over a frame period. The proposed pixel was verified by spice simulation and the output linearity between the grayscale and the OLED current was successfully achieved. In the proposed digital driving pixel, the timing margin was increased and the effect on luminance of AMOLED displays by the troublesome variation of the thin-film transistors (TFTs) was suppressed without additional compensation schemes.

  13. Study of Novel Slow Wave Circuit for Miniaturized Millimeter Wave Helical Traveling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhu, Xiaofang; Liao, Li; Yang, Zhonghai; Zeng, Baoqing; Yao, Lieming

    2006-07-01

    Two kinds of novel helical slow wave circuit, supported by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond, are presented. They are applying in miniaturized millimeter wave helical traveling wave tube. Cold test characteristic of these circuits are simulated by MAFIA code. Higher performances are achieved with smaller size, compared with conventional circuit supported by BeO rods. The nonlinear analysis is implemented by Beam and Wave Interaction (BWI) module, which is a part of TWTCAD Integrated Framework. Results have been found to be consistent with the expectation. It should be wider apply in microwave and millimeter wave vacuum electronic devices.

  14. Monte Carlo calculation of helical tomotherapy dose delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yingli; Mackenzie, M.; Kirkby, C.; Fallone, B. G.

    2008-08-15

    Helical tomotherapy delivers intensity modulated radiation therapy using a binary multileaf collimator (MLC) to modulate a fan beam of radiation. This delivery occurs while the linac gantry and treatment couch are both in constant motion, so the beam describes, from a patient/phantom perspective, a spiral or helix of dose. The planning system models this continuous delivery as a large number (51) of discrete gantry positions per rotation, and given the small jaw/fan width setting typically used (1 or 2.5 cm) and the number of overlapping rotations used to cover the target (pitch often <0.5), the treatment planning system (TPS) potentially employs a very large number of static beam directions and leaf opening configurations to model the modulated fields. All dose calculations performed by the system employ a convolution/superposition model. In this work the authors perform a full Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation of tomotherapy deliveries to phantom computed tomography (CT) data sets to verify the TPS calculations. All MC calculations are performed with the EGSnrc-based MC simulation codes, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. Simulations are performed by taking the sinogram (leaf opening versus time) of the treatment plan and decomposing it into 51 different projections per rotation, as does the TPS, each of which is segmented further into multiple MLC opening configurations, each with different weights that correspond to leaf opening times. Then the projection is simulated by the summing of all of the opening configurations, and the overall rotational treatment is simulated by the summing of all of the projection simulations. Commissioning of the source model was verified by comparing measured and simulated values for the percent depth dose and beam profiles shapes for various jaw settings. The accuracy of the MLC leaf width and tongue and groove spacing were verified by comparing measured and simulated values for the MLC leakage and a picket fence pattern. The validated source

  15. The feasibility of a regional CTDI{sub vol} to estimate organ dose from tube current modulated CT exams

    SciTech Connect

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun J.; Lu, Peiyun; McMillan, Kyle L.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In AAPM Task Group 204, the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was developed by providing size adjustment factors which are applied to the Computed Tomography (CT) standardized dose metric, CTDI{sub vol}. However, that work focused on fixed tube current scans and did not specifically address tube current modulation (TCM) scans, which are currently the majority of clinical scans performed. The purpose of this study was to extend the SSDE concept to account for TCM by investigating the feasibility of using anatomic and organ specific regions of scanner output to improve accuracy of dose estimates. Methods: Thirty-nine adult abdomen/pelvis and 32 chest scans from clinically indicated CT exams acquired on a multidetector CT using TCM were obtained with Institutional Review Board approval for generating voxelized models. Along with image data, raw projection data were obtained to extract TCM functions for use in Monte Carlo simulations. Patient size was calculated using the effective diameter described in TG 204. In addition, the scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol} (CTDI{sub vol,global}) was obtained for each patient, which is based on the average tube current across the entire scan. For the abdomen/pelvis scans, liver, spleen, and kidneys were manually segmented from the patient datasets; for the chest scans, lungs and for female models only, glandular breast tissue were segmented. For each patient organ doses were estimated using Monte Carlo Methods. To investigate the utility of regional measures of scanner output, regional and organ anatomic boundaries were identified from image data and used to calculate regional and organ-specific average tube current values. From these regional and organ-specific averages, CTDI{sub vol} values, referred to as regional and organ-specific CTDI{sub vol}, were calculated for each patient. Using an approach similar to TG 204, all CTDI{sub vol} values were used to normalize simulated organ doses; and the ability of each normalized

  16. Helical tubuland diols: a synthetic and crystal engineering quest.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Roger

    2009-01-20

    Despite many advances in recent years, crystal engineering remains a risky venture. A successful outcome requires manipulation of the noncovalent bonding and properties such as size, shape, repulsion, attraction, polarity, and chirality. In this Account, we describe the interplay of crystal engineering and synthetic organic chemistry required to develop the family of helical tubuland diol hosts, the members of which exhibit a wide range of tube dimensions and inclusion properties. Certain alicyclic dialcohols crystallize with a hydrogen-bonded network structure, termed the helical tubuland lattice, in space group P3(1)21 (or its enantiomorph P3(2)21). Double helices of diol molecules surround parallel tubes that contain guest molecules, which are included on the basis of size and shape rather than functional group. The crystal structure of (diol)(3).(chloroacetic acid)(1.2) is illustrative. These chiral helical tubulate lattice inclusion compounds are formed when the racemic host diol is allowed to crystallize from solution. Complete enantiomer separation occurs during this process, producing a 1:1 mixture of pure (+)- and pure (-)-crystals (a conglomerate). The challenge of creating this family of compounds required the development of much synthetic chemistry, in particular new pathways to alicyclic ring systems with specific substitution patterns. It was also necessary to understand and control the supramolecular properties of the diol molecules. What makes the original compound tick, and why did it behave in this remarkable manner, when most of its structural neighbors crystallize totally differently? The synthesis of new helical tubuland diols requires not just preparation of a new molecular structure but also a transplant of the original unchanged hydrogen-bonding supramolecular synthon. Synthesis of the specific crystal space group is necessary. This was achieved by defining structural characteristics, termed molecular determinants, which are essential for

  17. Spatial modulation spectroscopy for imaging and quantitative analysis of single dye-doped organic nanoparticles inside cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadas, Mary Sajini; Devkota, Tuphan; Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K.; Smith, Bradley D.; Hartland, Gregory V.

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer.Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  18. Enhanced helical swimming in Boger fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, Francisco; Mendez-Rojano, Rodrigo; Zenit, Roberto; Lauga, Eric

    2014-11-01

    We conduct experiments with force-free magnetically-driven helical swimmers in Newtonian and viscoelastic (Boger) fluids. In order assess the effect of viscoelasticity on the swimming performance, we conduct experiments for swimmers with different helical tail geometries. We use helices with the same wave length and total length but vary the angle of the helix. As previously reported by the computational study of Spagniole and collaborators, we found that the swimming performance can either increase, decrease or remain unchanged, depending on the geometry of the tail. With the right geometry, the enhancement can be up to a factor of two.

  19. Helices in the wake of precipitation fronts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shibi; Lagzi, István; Molnár, Ferenc; Rácz, Zoltán

    2013-08-01

    A theoretical study of the emergence of helices in the wake of precipitation fronts is presented. The precipitation dynamics is described by the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the fronts are obtained by quenching the system into a linearly unstable state. Confining the process onto the surface of a cylinder and using the pulled-front formalism, our analytical calculations show that there are front solutions that propagate into the unstable state and leave behind a helical structure. We find that helical patterns emerge only if the radius of the cylinder R is larger than a critical value R>R(c), in agreement with recent experiments. PMID:24032809

  20. Helical flux ropes in solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1990-01-01

    The present numerical method for the computation of force-free, cancelling magnetic structures shows that flux cancellation at the neutral line in a sheared magnetic arcade generates helical field lines that can support a prominence's plasma. With increasing flux cancellation, the axis of the helical fields moves to greater heights; this is suggestive of a prominence eruption. Two alternative scenarios are proposed for the formation of polar crown prominences which yield the correct axial magnetic field sign. Both models are noted to retain the formation of helical flux tubes through flux cancellation as their key feature.

  1. Steering Chiral Swimmers along Noisy Helical Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-08-01

    Chemotaxis along helical paths towards a target releasing a chemoattractant is found in sperm cells and many microorganisms. We discuss the stochastic differential geometry of the noisy helical swimming path of a chiral swimmer. A chiral swimmer equipped with a simple feedback system can navigate in a concentration gradient of chemoattractant. We derive an effective equation for the alignment of helical paths with a concentration gradient which is related to the alignment of a dipole in an external field and discuss the chemotaxis index.

  2. Developmental programming: postnatal estradiol modulation of prenatally organized reproductive neuroendocrine function in sheep.

    PubMed

    Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Cardoso, Rodolfo C; Herkimer, Carol; Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2016-08-01

    Gestational testosterone (TS) excess, acting via both the androgenic and estrogenic pathways, advances puberty and disrupts the neuroendocrine estradiol (E2) feedback and periovulatory hormonal dynamics in female sheep. These prenatally programmed defects may be subject to postnatal modifications by continued organizational and/or activational effects of steroids. This study investigated (1) the organizational contribution of prenatal estrogen excess and (2) the impact of postnatal exposure to E2 in modulating the effects of prenatal androgen excess (TS and dihydrotestosterone (DHT)) on puberty, neuroendocrine feedback mechanisms, and periovulatory hormonal dynamics in sheep. Pregnant Suffolk sheep were treated with TS, DHT, E2, or E2 plus DHT (ED) from days 30 to 90 of gestation. A subset of the control (C), TS, and DHT female offspring received a constant-release E2 implant postnatally. Findings revealed that (1) prenatal E2-treatment failed to reproduce the neuroendocrine disruptions predicted to be programmed by the estrogenic pathway and (2) prenatal E2D-treatment did not adequately replicate the reproductive neuroendocrine defects induced by prenatal TS excess. More importantly, continuous postnatal E2-treatment, while delaying the onset of puberty and reducing the inhibitory effects of E2 on tonic luteinizing hormone (LH) release, failed to amplify the E2-positive feedback and periovulatory defects induced by prenatal TS-treatment. Our results indicate that disruptions in E2-positive feedback mechanisms and periovulatory gonadotropin secretion induced by prenatal TS-treatment are programmed predominantly during the prenatal life with postnatal exposure to E2 excess not contributing further to these disruptions.

  3. Parotid Gland Sparing With Helical Tomotherapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Voordeckers, Mia; Farrag, Ashraf; Everaert, Hendrik; Tournel, Koen; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the ability of helical tomotherapy to spare the function of the parotid glands in patients with head-and-neck cancer by analyzing dose-volume histograms, salivary gland scintigraphy, and quality of life assessment. Methods and Materials: Data from 76 consecutive patients treated with helical tomotherapy (Hi-Art Tomotherapy) at University Hospital Brussel were analyzed. During planning, priority was given to planning target volume (PTV) coverage: {>=}95% of the dose must be delivered to {>=}95% of the PTV. Elective nodal regions received 54 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). A dose of 70.5 Gy (2.35 Gy/fraction) was prescribed to the primary tumor and pathologic lymph nodes (simultaneous integrated boost scheme). Objective scoring of salivary excretion was performed by salivary gland scintigraphy. Subjective scoring of salivary gland function was evaluated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 (QLQ-C30) and Quality of Life Questionnaire-Head and Neck 35 (H and N35). Results: Analysis of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) showed excellent coverage of the PTV. The volume of PTV receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (V95%) was 99.4 (range, 96.3-99.9). DVH analysis of parotid gland showed a median value of the mean parotid dose of 32.1 Gy (range, 17.5-70.3 Gy). The median parotid volume receiving a dose <26 Gy was 51.2%. Quality of life evaluation demonstrated an initial deterioration of almost all scales and items in QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H and N35. Most items improved in time, and some reached baseline values 18 months after treatment. Conclusion: DVH analysis, scintigraphic evaluation of parotid function, and quality of life assessment of our patient group showed that helical tomotherapy makes it possible to preserve parotid gland function without compromising disease control. We recommend mean parotid doses of <34 Gy and doses <26 Gy to a maximum 47% of the parotid

  4. A non-classical view of the modulation of mineral precipitation by organic additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Ruiz-Agudo, Cristina; Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Putnis, Christine; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Questions persist on the mechanisms of crystallization of sparingly soluble minerals such as calcium carbonate, calcium oxalate or barium sulphate. Compared to CaCO3, the mechanisms of nucleation and growth in the CaC2O4-H2O or BaSO4-H2O systems have received less attention. These phases are important due to their relevance as biominerals and/or unwanted mineral deposits in technological applications. Growing evidence suggests that sparingly soluble salts form by non-classical nucleation and growth pathways, where pre-nucleation ion associates and amorphous (solid or liquid) precursor phase(s) play a critical role (e.g. Rodríguez-Navarro et al. (2015), Ruiz-Agudo et al. (2015)). Indeed the identification of pre-nucleation species in these systems and their strong interactions with organic compounds (Verch et al. 2011) raises the possibility that the control of organics on biomineralization may begin even earlier than previously thought. A sound knowledge of the physical mechanisms by which acidic macromolecules affect nucleation and early growth may offer general insights concerning the molecular control of biomineralization, as well as being critical for improving strategies to control unwanted mineral deposition or for the synthesis of biomimetic materials. Here we present investigations on the initial stages of the precipitation of these relevant minerals in organic-free solutions to identify the precipitation pathway and to look for any potential precursor phase(s) to the final, crystalline polymorph. As well, we explore the effects that several acidic organic compounds have on the different precipitation stages identified. We find that organic additives such as citric acid, polyacrilic acid or a commercial copolymer of maleic acid/allyl sulfonic acid with phosphonate groups can be active at modifying pre-nucleation stages (destabilizing of pre-nucleation species or hampering the aggregation and growth of pre-nucleation associates) and subsequently strongly

  5. Metal-Organic Frameworks Modulated by Doping Er(3+) for Up-Conversion Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xindan; Li, Bin; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Liming; Zhao, Haifeng

    2016-07-13

    Here we present metal-organic frameworks prepared by a one-step synthesis method, possessing both architectural properties of MOF building and up-conversion luminescence of rare earth Er(3+) (hereafter denoted as Up-MOFs). Up-MOFs have characteristic up-conversion emissions at 520, 540, and 651 nm under the excitation of 980 nm owing to the multiple photon absorption. The up-conversion mechanism of these Up-MOFs has been discussed, and it can be attributed to the excited state absorption process. The design and synthesis of Up-MOF materials possessing near-infrared region excitation and up-conversion luminescence are fully expected to be candidates for the advancement of applications in bioimaging, sensors, optoelectronics, and energy conversion/storage devices.

  6. Modulation of sialic acid levels among some organs during insulin resistance or hyperglycemic states.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Abdulkadir, Aisha; Onojah, Alice; Sani, Lawal; Adamu, Auwal; Abdullahi, Hadiza

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a possible connection between insulin resistance and chronic hyperglycemia with membrane sialic acid content. In this study, the effects of high (20% ad libitum) fructose and glucose feeding on the sialic acid levels of some organs were investigated in rats. The blood glucose levels of the high fructose- and glucose-fed rats were consistently and significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the normal control throughout the experiment. Free serum sialic acid and total hepatic sialic acid levels were elevated in the high fructose- and glucose-fed rats compared to normal control, but only the data for the high glucose-fed group were significantly (P < 0.05) different from the normal control. Conversely, a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the pancreatic sialic acid level was observed in high glucose-fed group compared to normal control. Also, the high fructose-fed rats had lower, but insignificant (P > 0.05), pancreatic sialic acid level than the normal control. On the other hand, high fructose and glucose feeding did not significantly (P > 0.05) affect the sialic acid levels of the skeletal muscle and heart, though a tendency to increase the sialic acid level was evident in the heart. In the kidney, the sialic acid level was significantly (P < 0.05) increased in both high fructose- and glucose-fed groups. It was concluded that the liver and kidney tend to stimulate sialic acid synthesis, while the pancreas downregulate sialic acids synthesis and/or promote sialic acid release from glycoconjugates. Also, these organs may contribute to high-serum sialic acid level observed during diabetes. PMID:26468092

  7. Attenuation-based size metric for estimating organ dose to patients undergoing tube current modulated CT exams

    SciTech Connect

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Lu, Peiyun; Kim, Hyun J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Task Group 204 introduced effective diameter (ED) as the patient size metric used to correlate size-specific-dose-estimates. However, this size metric fails to account for patient attenuation properties and has been suggested to be replaced by an attenuation-based size metric, water equivalent diameter (D{sub W}). The purpose of this study is to investigate different size metrics, effective diameter, and water equivalent diameter, in combination with regional descriptions of scanner output to establish the most appropriate size metric to be used as a predictor for organ dose in tube current modulated CT exams. Methods: 101 thoracic and 82 abdomen/pelvis scans from clinically indicated CT exams were collected retrospectively from a multidetector row CT (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) with Institutional Review Board approval to generate voxelized patient models. Fully irradiated organs (lung and breasts in thoracic scans and liver, kidneys, and spleen in abdominal scans) were segmented and used as tally regions in Monte Carlo simulations for reporting organ dose. Along with image data, raw projection data were collected to obtain tube current information for simulating tube current modulation scans using Monte Carlo methods. Additionally, previously described patient size metrics [ED, D{sub W}, and approximated water equivalent diameter (D{sub Wa})] were calculated for each patient and reported in three different ways: a single value averaged over the entire scan, a single value averaged over the region of interest, and a single value from a location in the middle of the scan volume. Organ doses were normalized by an appropriate mAs weighted CTDI{sub vol} to reflect regional variation of tube current. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlations between normalized organ doses and each size metric. Results: For the abdominal organs, the correlations between normalized organ dose and size metric were overall slightly higher for all three

  8. Dissecting π-helices: sequence, structure and function.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Bansal, Manju

    2015-11-01

    A new procedure for the identification of regular secondary structures using a C(α) trace has identified 659 π-helices in 3582 protein chains, solved at high resolution. Taking advantage of this significantly expanded database of π-helices, we have analysed the functional and structural roles of π-helices and determined the position-wise amino acid propensity within and around them. These helices range from 5 to 18 residues in length with the average twist and rise being 85.2 ± 7.2° and 1.28 ± 0.31 Å, respectively. A total of 546 (~ 83%) out of 659 π-helices occur in conjunction with α-helices, with 101 π-helices being interspersed between two α-helices. The majority of interspersed π-helices were found to be conserved across a large number of structures within a protein family and produce a significant bend in the overall helical segment as well as local distortions in the neighbouring α-helices. The presence of a π-helical fragment leads to appropriate orientation of the constituent residues, so as to facilitate favourable interactions and also help in proper folding of the protein chain. In addition to intra helical 6→1 N-H···O hydrogen bonds, π-helices are also stabilized by several other non-bonded interactions. π-Helices show distinct positional residue preferences, which are different from those of α-helices.

  9. Emergence of helicity in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Mininni, Pablo D.; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2013-03-01

    We perform numerical simulations of decaying rotating stratified turbulence and show, in the Boussinesq framework, that helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation), as observed in supercell storms and hurricanes, is spontaneously created due to an interplay between buoyancy and rotation common to large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows. Helicity emerges from the joint action of eddies and of inertia-gravity waves (with inertia and gravity with respective associated frequencies f and N), and it occurs when the waves are sufficiently strong. For N/f<3 the amount of helicity produced is correctly predicted by a quasilinear balance equation. Outside this regime, and up to the highest Reynolds number obtained in this study, namely Re≈10000, helicity production is found to be persistent for N/f as large as ≈17, and for ReFr2 and ReRo2, respectively, as large as ≈100 and ≈24000.

  10. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    DOE PAGES

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-24

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. In conclusion, we also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks canmore » be assembled.« less

  11. Passive micromixers with dual helical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keyin; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Zhao, Yulong; Meng, Xiangwei; Shan, Chao; Li, Yanyang

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) micromixer with cross-linked double helical microchannels is studied to achieve rapid mixing of fluids at low Reynolds numbers (Re). The 3D micromixer takes full advantages of the chaotic advection model with helical microchannels; meanwhile, the proposed crossing structure of double helical microchannels enables two flow patterns of repelling flow and straight flow in the fluids to promote the agitation effect. The complex 3D micromixer is realized by an improved femtosecond laser wet etching (FLWE) technology embedded in fused silica. The mixing results show that cross-linked double helical microchannels can achieve excellent mixing within 3 cycles (300 μm) over a wide range of low Re (1.5×10-3~600), which compare well with the conventional passive micromixers. This highly-effective micromixer is hoped to contribute to the integration of microfluidic systems.

  12. Nano-clustering of ligands on surrogate antigen presenting cells modulates T cell membrane adhesion and organization.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Pierre; Pi, Fuwei; Lellouch, Annemarie C; Limozin, Laurent; Sengupta, Kheya

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the adhesion and molecular organization of the plasma membrane of T lymphocytes interacting with a surrogate antigen presenting cell comprising glass supported ordered arrays of antibody (α-CD3) nano-dots dispersed in a non-adhesive matrix of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The local membrane adhesion and topography, as well as the distribution of the T cell receptors (TCRs) and the kinase ZAP-70, are influenced by dot-geometry, whereas the cell spreading area is determined by the overall average density of the ligands rather than specific characteristics of the dots. TCR clusters are recruited preferentially to the nano-dots and the TCR cluster size distribution has a weak dot-size dependence. On the patterns, the clusters are larger, more numerous, and more enriched in TCRs, as compared to the homogeneously distributed ligands at comparable concentrations. These observations support the idea that non-ligated TCRs residing in the non-adhered parts of the proximal membrane are able to diffuse and enrich the existing clusters at the ligand dots. However, long distance transport is impaired and cluster centralization in the form of a central supramolecular cluster (cSMAC) is not observed. Time-lapse imaging of early cell-surface contacts indicates that the ZAP-70 microclusters are directly recruited to the site of the antibody dots and this process is concomitant with membrane adhesion. These results together point to a complex interplay of adhesion, molecular organization and activation in response to spatially modulated stimulation.

  13. miR-8 modulates cytoskeletal regulators to influence cell survival and epithelial organization in Drosophila wings.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Kelsey; Rachmaninoff, Nicholas; Moncada, Kea; Pula, Katharine; Kennell, Jennifer; Buttitta, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The miR-200 microRNA family plays important tumor suppressive roles. The sole Drosophila miR-200 ortholog, miR-8 plays conserved roles in Wingless, Notch and Insulin signaling - pathways linked to tumorigenesis, yet homozygous null animals are viable and often appear morphologically normal. We observed that wing tissues mosaic for miR-8 levels by genetic loss or gain of function exhibited patterns of cell death consistent with a role for miR-8 in modulating cell survival in vivo. Here we show that miR-8 levels impact several actin cytoskeletal regulators that can affect cell survival and epithelial organization. We show that loss of miR-8 can confer resistance to apoptosis independent of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition while the persistence of cells expressing high levels of miR-8 in the wing epithelium leads to increased JNK signaling, aberrant expression of extracellular matrix remodeling proteins and disruption of proper wing epithelial organization. Altogether our results suggest that very low as well as very high levels of miR-8 can contribute to hallmarks associated with cancer, suggesting approaches to increase miR-200 microRNAs in cancer treatment should be moderate. PMID:26902111

  14. Light Modulates the Biosynthesis and Organization of Cyanobacterial Carbon Fixation Machinery through Photosynthetic Electron Flow1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaqi; Casella, Selene

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved effective adaptive mechanisms to improve photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. The central CO2-fixing machinery is the carboxysome, which is composed of an icosahedral proteinaceous shell encapsulating the key carbon fixation enzyme, Rubisco, in the interior. Controlled biosynthesis and ordered organization of carboxysomes are vital to the CO2-fixing activity of cyanobacterial cells. However, little is known about how carboxysome biosynthesis and spatial positioning are physiologically regulated to adjust to dynamic changes in the environment. Here, we used fluorescence tagging and live-cell confocal fluorescence imaging to explore the biosynthesis and subcellular localization of β-carboxysomes within a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, in response to light variation. We demonstrated that β-carboxysome biosynthesis is accelerated in response to increasing light intensity, thereby enhancing the carbon fixation activity of the cell. Inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow impairs the accumulation of carboxysomes, indicating a close coordination between β-carboxysome biogenesis and photosynthetic electron transport. Likewise, the spatial organization of carboxysomes in the cell correlates with the redox state of photosynthetic electron transport chain. This study provides essential knowledge for us to modulate the β-carboxysome biosynthesis and function in cyanobacteria. In translational terms, the knowledge is instrumental for design and synthetic engineering of functional carboxysomes into higher plants to improve photosynthesis performance and CO2 fixation. PMID:26956667

  15. Establishment of the Commissioning Procedure for Modifying the Beam Model of Helical Tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Koji; Iwata, Manabu; Nakabayashi, Tadashi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugi, Kentaro; Kubota, Takashi; Yokoi, Kazushi; Nakashima, Kuniyasu; Kodaira, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Although much evidence about the helical tomotherapy system are available, there is not a document about the procedure of quality assurance (QA) for changing the beam model. This study establishes the commissioning procedure for modifying the beam model of helical tomotherapy. Firstly, some intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were created, and compared them with the calculated dose and the measured dose. Secondly, the absorbed doses to water in the machine-specific reference field and the plan-class specific reference field with a protocol in Japan; Standard Dosimetry of Absorbed Dose to Water in External Beam Radiotherapy (Standard Dosimetry 12) were measured. Thirdly, we reconfirmed patient-specific quality assurance. The recommended commissioning procedure after the change of the beam model was shown through three verification processes. This report would be helpful for not only changing the beam model of helical tomotherapy but also introducing Standard Dosimetry 12 to a clinic. PMID:27440704

  16. Establishment of the Commissioning Procedure for Modifying the Beam Model of Helical Tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Koji; Iwata, Manabu; Nakabayashi, Tadashi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugi, Kentaro; Kubota, Takashi; Yokoi, Kazushi; Nakashima, Kuniyasu; Kodaira, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Although much evidence about the helical tomotherapy system are available, there is not a document about the procedure of quality assurance (QA) for changing the beam model. This study establishes the commissioning procedure for modifying the beam model of helical tomotherapy. Firstly, some intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were created, and compared them with the calculated dose and the measured dose. Secondly, the absorbed doses to water in the machine-specific reference field and the plan-class specific reference field with a protocol in Japan; Standard Dosimetry of Absorbed Dose to Water in External Beam Radiotherapy (Standard Dosimetry 12) were measured. Thirdly, we reconfirmed patient-specific quality assurance. The recommended commissioning procedure after the change of the beam model was shown through three verification processes. This report would be helpful for not only changing the beam model of helical tomotherapy but also introducing Standard Dosimetry 12 to a clinic.

  17. Motion of multiple helical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar

    2015-11-01

    In 1912 Joukowsky deduced that in an unbounded ideal fluid a set of helical vortices--when these are equal, coaxial and symmetrically arranged--would translate and rotate steadily while the vortices preserve their form and relative position. Each vortex is an infinite tube whose cross-section is circular (with radius a) and whose centerline is a helix of pitch L and radius R. The motion is thus determined by three non-dimensional parameters only: the number of vortices N, the vortex radius α = a / R and the vortex pitch τ = L / 2 πR . Here, we express the linear and angular velocities of the vortices as the sum of the mutually induced velocities found by Okulov (2004) and the self-induced velocities found by Velasco Fuentes (2015). We verified that our results are accurate over the whole range of values of the vortices' pitch and radius by numerically computing the vortex motion with two smoothed versions of the Biot-Savart law. It was found that the translation velocity U grows with the number of vortices (N) but decreases as the vortices' radius and pitch (a and τ, respectively) increase; in contrast, the rotation velocity Ω grows with N and a but has a local minimum around τ = 1 for fixed values of N and a.

  18. Spheromak Power and Helicity Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    2000-05-18

    This note addresses the division of gun power and helicity between the open line volume and the closed flux surface volume in a steady state flux core spheromak. Our assumptions are that fine scale turbulence maintains each region close to an axisymmetric Taylor state, {mu}{sub o}j = {lambda}B. The gun region that feeds these two volumes surrounded by a flux conserver is shown topologically below. (The actual geometry is toroidal). Flux and current from the magnetized gun flow on open lines around the entire closed surface containing the spheromak. The gun current flows down the potential gradient, the potential difference between the two ends of each line being the gun voltage. Here, the gun voltage excludes the sheath drops at each end. These volumes have different values of {lambda} in each region (open line volume V{sub 1} and closed spheromak volume V{sub 2}) and we want to calculate the efficiency of transferring the gun power to the spheromak to sustain the ohmic loss in steady state.

  19. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  20. Studies of Solar Helicity Using Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, Mona J.; Pevstov, Alexei A.

    1999-01-01

    observations of photospheric magnetic fields made with vector magnetographs have been used recently to study solar helicity. In this paper we indicate what can and cannot be derived from vector magnetograms, and point out some potential problems in these data that could affect the calculations of 'helicity'. Among these problems are magnetic saturation, Faraday rotation, low spectral resolution, and the method of resolving the ambiguity in the azimuth.

  1. Duality and helicity: A symplectic viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbistan, M.; Duval, C.; Horváthy, P. A.; Zhang, P.-M.

    2016-10-01

    The theorem which says that helicity is the conserved quantity associated with the duality symmetry of the vacuum Maxwell equations is proved by viewing electromagnetism as an infinite dimensional symplectic system. In fact, it is shown that helicity is the moment map of duality acting as an SO (2) group of canonical transformations on the symplectic space of all solutions of the vacuum Maxwell equations.

  2. Systematic investigation of organic photovoltaic cell charge injection/performance modulation by dipolar organosilane interfacial layers.

    PubMed

    Song, Charles Kiseok; White, Alicia C; Zeng, Li; Leever, Benjamin J; Clark, Michael D; Emery, Jonathan D; Lou, Sylvia J; Timalsina, Amod; Chen, Lin X; Bedzyk, Michael J; Marks, Tobin J

    2013-09-25

    With the goal of investigating and enhancing anode performance in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, the glass/tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) anodes are modified with a series of robust silane-tethered bis(fluoroaryl)amines to form self-assembled interfacial layers (IFLs). The modified ITO anodes are characterized by contact angle measurements, X-ray reflectivity, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. These techniques reveal the presence of hydrophobic amorphous monolayers of 6.68 to 9.76 Å thickness, and modified anode work functions ranging from 4.66 to 5.27 eV. Two series of glass/ITO/IFL/active layer/LiF/Al BHJ OPVs are fabricated with the active layer = poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PC71BM) or poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)-carbonyl]thi-eno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  3. Modulation of persistent organic pollutant toxicity through nutritional intervention: emerging opportunities in biomedicine and environmental remediation.

    PubMed

    Petriello, Michael C; Newsome, Bradley J; Dziubla, Thomas D; Hilt, J Zach; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar; Hennig, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    Environmental pollution is increasing worldwide, and there is evidence that exposure to halogenated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls can contribute to the pathology of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. Pollutant removal from contaminated sites and subsequent pollutant degradation are critical for reducing the long-term health risks associated with exposure. However, complete remediation of a toxicant from the environment is very difficult and cost-prohibitive. Furthermore, remediation technologies often result in the generation of secondary toxicants. Considering these circumstances, environmentally-friendly and sustainable remediation technologies and biomedical solutions to reduce vulnerability to environmental chemical insults need to be explored to reduce the overall health risks associated with exposure to environmental pollutants. We propose that positive lifestyle changes such as healthful nutrition and consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables or bioactive nutrients with antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory properties will reduce the body's vulnerability to environmental stressors and thus reduce toxicant-mediated disease pathologies. Interestingly, emerging evidence now implicates the incorporation of bioactive nutrients, such as plant-derived polyphenols, in technologies focused on the capture, sensing and remediation of halogenated POPs. We propose that human nutritional intervention in concert with the use of natural polyphenol sensing and remediation platforms may provide a sensible means to develop primary and long-term prevention strategies of diseases associated with many environmental toxic insults including halogenated POPs.

  4. Organic electronics for precise delivery of neurotransmitters to modulate mammalian sensory function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Daniel T.; Kurup, Sindhulakshmi; Larsson, Karin C.; Hori, Ryusuke; Tybrandt, Klas; Goiny, Michel; Jager, Edwin W. H.; Berggren, Magnus; Canlon, Barbara; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2009-09-01

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the pathophysiology, molecular targets and therapies for the treatment of a variety of nervous-system disorders. Particular therapies involve electrical sensing and stimulation of neural activity, and significant effort has therefore been devoted to the refinement of neural electrodes. However, direct electrical interfacing suffers from some inherent problems, such as the inability to discriminate amongst cell types. Thus, there is a need for novel devices to specifically interface nerve cells. Here, we demonstrate an organic electronic device capable of precisely delivering neurotransmitters in vitro and in vivo. In converting electronic addressing into delivery of neurotransmitters, the device mimics the nerve synapse. Using the peripheral auditory system, we show that out of a diverse population of cells, the device can selectively stimulate nerve cells responding to a specific neurotransmitter. This is achieved by precise electronic control of electrophoretic migration through a polymer film. This mechanism provides several sought-after features for regulation of cell signalling: exact dosage determination through electrochemical relationships, minimally disruptive delivery due to lack of fluid flow, and on-off switching. This technology has great potential as a therapeutic platform and could help accelerate the development of therapeutic strategies for nervous-system disorders.

  5. Modulation polarimetry of the topological effect in gold-organic nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grynko, D. A.; Barabash, Yu. M.; Maksimenko, L. S.; Matyash, I. E.; Mishchuk, O. N.; Rudenko, S. P.; Serdega, B. K.

    2012-11-01

    The phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance in composite films consisting of gold nanoclusters in matrices of organic molecular materials calix[4]arene and poly(N-vinylcarbazole) has been investigated. The internal reflection coefficients R {/s 2} and R {/p 2} of s- and p-polarized light and their physical difference ρ = R {/s 2} - R {/p 2} have been measured according to the Kretschmann scheme as a function of the angle of light incidence θ at different wavelengths λ in the range 400-1000 nm. The angular characteristics reflect the cluster structure of the films, which is confirmed by electron microscopy. A topological size effect has been revealed. This effect is associated with the dependence of the excitation energy efficiency of surface plasmons on the azimuth of the linearly polarized light, the shape, and the distribution of nanoclusters in the coordinate space. The dependences ρ(λ) demonstrate that the local plasmon resonance is excited by both s- and p-polarized light, whereas the polariton resonance is excited by s-polarized light. The sign of the curvature of the dependence ρ(θ) determines the predominance of the excitation energy efficiency of electromagnetic modes with one of the two states of polarization of the excitation radiation.

  6. Modulation of gramicidin channel conformation and organization by hydrophobic mismatch in saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Devaki A; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-05-01

    The matching of hydrophobic lengths of integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer is an important factor that influences both structure and function of integral membrane proteins. The ion channel gramicidin is known to be uniquely sensitive to membrane properties such as bilayer thickness and membrane mechanical properties. The functionally important carboxy terminal tryptophan residues of gramicidin display conformation-dependent fluorescence which can be used to monitor gramicidin conformations in membranes [S.S. Rawat, D.A. Kelkar, A. Chattopadhyay, Monitoring gramicidin conformations in membranes: a fluorescence approach, Biophys. J. 87 (2004) 831-843]. We have examined the effect of hydrophobic mismatch on the conformation and organization of gramicidin in saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers of varying thickness utilizing the intrinsic conformation-dependent tryptophan fluorescence. Our results utilizing steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic approaches, in combination with circular dichroism spectroscopy, show that gramicidin remains predominantly in the channel conformation and gramicidin tryptophans are at the membrane interfacial region over a range of mismatch conditions. Interestingly, gramicidin conformation shifts toward non-channel conformations in extremely thick gel phase membranes although it is not excluded from the membrane. In addition, experiments utilizing self quenching of tryptophan fluorescence indicate peptide aggregation in thicker gel phase membranes.

  7. Conformational transitions in peptides containing two putative alpha-helices of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Kaneko, K; Nguyen, J T; Livshits, T L; Baldwin, M A; Cohen, F E; James, T L; Prusiner, S B

    1995-07-21

    Prions are composed largely, if not entirely, of the scrapie isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc). Conversion of the cellular isoform (PrPC) to PrPSc is accompanied by a diminution in the alpha-helical content and an increase in the beta-sheet structure. To investigate the structural basis of this transition, peptide fragments corresponding to Syrian hamster PrP residues 90 to 145 and 109 to 141, which contain the most conserved residues of the prion protein and the first two putative alpha-helical regions in a PrPC model, were studied using infrared spectroscopy and circular dichroism. The peptides could be induced to form alpha-helical structures in aqueous solutions in the presence of organic solvents, such as trifluoroethanol and hexafluoroisopropanol, or detergents, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl phosphocholine. NaCl at physiological concentration or acetonitrile induced the peptides to acquire substantial beta-sheet. The intermolecular nature of the beta-sheet was evident in the formation of rod-shaped polymers as detected by electron microscopy. Resistance to hydrolysis by proteinase K and epitope mapping argue that the beta-sheet structures were formed by the interaction of residues lying between 109 and 141. A similar range of residues was shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to be capable of forming alpha-helices. The alpha-helical structures seem to require a hydrophobic support from either intermolecular interactions or the hydrophobic environment provided by micelles, in agreement with the predicted hydrophobic nature of the packing surface among the four putative helices of PrPC and the outer surfaces of the first two helices. Our results suggest that perturbation of the packing environment of the highly conserved residues is a possible mechanism for triggering the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc where alpha-helices appear to be converted into beta-sheets.

  8. Fourier-Bessel reconstruction of helical assemblies.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ruben; Rice, William J; Stokes, David L

    2010-01-01

    Helical symmetry is commonly used for building macromolecular assemblies. Helical symmetry is naturally present in viruses and cytoskeletal filaments and also occurs during crystallization of isolated proteins, such as Ca-ATPase and the nicotinic acetyl choline receptor. Structure determination of helical assemblies by electron microscopy has a long history dating back to the original work on three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. A helix offers distinct advantages for structure determination. Not only can one improve resolution by averaging across the constituent subunits, but each helical assembly provides multiple views of these subunits and thus provides a complete 3D data set. This review focuses on Fourier methods of helical reconstruction, covering the theoretical background, a step-by-step guide to the process, and a practical example based on previous work with Ca-ATPase. Given recent results from helical reconstructions at atomic resolution and the development of graphical user interfaces to aid in the process, these methods are likely to continue to make an important contribution to the field of structural biology. PMID:20888960

  9. Gluons in glueballs: Spin or helicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Vincent; Buisseret, Fabien; Semay, Claude

    2008-06-01

    In the past decade, lattice QCD has been able to compute the low-lying glueball spectrum with accuracy. Like other effective approaches of QCD, potential models still have difficulties to cope with gluonic hadrons. Assuming that glueballs are bound states of valence gluons with zero current mass, it is readily understood that the use of a potential model, intrinsically noncovariant, could be problematic in this case. The main challenge for this kind of model is actually to find a way to introduce properly the more relevant degree of freedom of the gluon: spin or helicity. In this work, we use the so-called helicity formalism of Jacob and Wick to describe two-gluon glueballs. We show, in particular, that this helicity formalism exactly reproduces the J{sup PC} numbers which are observed in lattice QCD when the constituent gluons have a helicity-1, without introducing extra states as is the case in most of the potential models. These extra states appear when gluons are seen as spin-1 particles. Using a simple spinless Salpeter model with Cornell potential within the helicity formalism, we obtain a glueball mass spectrum which is in good agreement with lattice QCD predictions for helicity-1 gluons provided instanton-induced interactions are taken into account.

  10. Helicity Annihilation in Trefoil Reconnection: Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Robert M.

    2015-11-01

    The simulated evolution and self-reconnection of a perturbed trefoil vortex knot is compared to the experiment. To have a single initial reconnection, as in the experiments, the trefoil is perturbed by 4 weak vortex rings. Visualizations show that the simulations and experiments undergo similar topological changes. Quantitative comparisons using the helicity and global topological number show that both are preserved for a long period before reconnection begins, as in the experiments. Unlike the experiments, once reconnection begins, a significant fraction of the helicity is dissipated and the global topological number changes by a discrete amount in a fixed time. Helicity spectra and physical space correlations show that the change in helicity is associated with the appearance of negative helicity at lower wavenumbers and in the outer regions of the trefoil. Furthermore, using a range of Reynolds numbers, with the highest comparable to the experiments, it is demonstrated that a Reynolds number independent fraction of the initial helicity is dissipated in a finite time. This observation does not violate any current mathematics restricting the strong growth of Navier-Stokes norms as the viscosity goes to zero due to the structure of the trefoil.

  11. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  12. Total marrow irradiation using Helical TomoTherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Fernandez, Lourdes Maria

    Clinical dose response data of human tumours are limited or restricted to a radiation dose range determined by the level of toxicity to the normal tissues. This is the case for the most common disseminated plasma cell neoplasm, multiple myeloma, where the maximum dose deliverable to the entire bony skeleton using a standard total body irradiation (TBI) technique is limited to about 12 Gy. This study is part of scientific background of a phase I/II dose escalation clinical trial for multiple myeloma using image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to deliver high dose to the entire volume of bone marrow with Helical TomoTherapy (HT). This relatively new technology can deliver highly conformal dose distributions to complex target shapes while reducing the dose to critical normal tissues. In this study tools for comparing and predicting the effectiveness of different approaches to total marrow irradiation (TMI) using HT were provided. The expected dose response for plasma cell neoplasms was computed and a radiobiological evaluation of different treatment cohorts in a dose escalating study was performed. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability (TCP) models were applied to an actual TMI treatment plan for a patient and the implications of using different longitudinal field widths were assessed. The optimum dose was ˜39 Gy for which a predicted tumour control of 95% (+/-3%) was obtained, with a predicted 3% (0, 8%) occurrence of radiation pneumonitis. Tissue sparing was seen by using smaller field widths only in the organs of the head. This suggests it would be beneficial to use the small fields in the head only since using small fields for the whole treatment would lead to long treatment times. In TMI it may be necessary to junction two longitudinally adjacent treatment volumes to form a contiguous planning target volume PTV. For instance, this is the case when a different SUP-INF spatial resolution is required or when

  13. Estimation of breast dose saving potential using a breast positioning technique for organ-based tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wanyi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sturgeon, Gregory; Agasthya, Greeshma; Segars, William Paul; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    In thoracic CT, organ-based tube current modulation (OTCM) reduces breast dose by lowering the tube current in the 120° anterior dose reduction zone of patients. However, in practice the breasts usually expand to an angle larger than the dose reduction zone. This work aims to simulate a breast positioning technique (BPT) to constrain the breast tissue to within the dose reduction zone for OTCM and to evaluate the corresponding potential reduction in breast dose. Thirteen female anthropomorphic computational phantoms were studied (age range: 27-65 y.o., weight range: 52-105.8 kg). Each phantom was modeled in the supine position with and without application of the BPT. Attenuation-based tube current (ATCM, reference mA) was generated by a ray-tracing program, taking into account the patient attenuation change in the longitudinal and angular plane (CAREDose4D, Siemens Healthcare). OTCM was generated by reducing the mA to 20% between +/- 60° anterior of the patient and increasing the mA in the remaining projections correspondingly (X-CARE, Siemens Healthcare) to maintain the mean tube current. Breast tissue dose was estimated using a validated Monte Carlo program for a commercial scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). Compared to standard tube current modulation, breast dose was significantly reduced using OTCM by 19.8+/-4.7%. With the BPT, breast dose was reduced by an additional 20.4+/-6.5% to 37.1+/-6.9%, using the same CTDIvol. BPT was more effective for phantoms simulating women with larger breasts with the average breast dose reduction of 30.2%, 39.2%, and 49.2% from OTCMBP to ATCM, using the same CTDIvol for phantoms with 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 kg breasts, respectively. This study shows that a specially designed BPT improves the effectiveness of OTCM.

  14. Modulation of microRNA expression by volatile organic compounds in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Li, Chonglei; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yihe

    2014-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one of main pollutants indoors. Exposure to VOCs is associated with cancer, asthma disease, and multiple chemical allergies. Despite the adverse health effects of VOCs, the molecular mechanisms underlying VOCs-induced disease remain largely unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, may influence cellular disease state. To investigate whether lung miRNA expression profiles in mice are modified by VOCs mixture exposure, 44 male Kunming mice were exposed in 4 similar static chambers, 0 (control) and 3 different doses of VOCs mixture (groups 1-3). The concentrations of VOCs mixture were as follows: formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and xylene 3.0 + 3.3 + 6.0 + 6.0 mg/m(3) , 5.0 + 5.5 + 10.0 + 10.0 mg/m(3) , 10.0 + 11.0 + 20.0 + 20.0 mg/m(3) , respectively, which corresponded to 30, 50, and 100 times of indoor air quality standard in China, after exposure to 2 weeks (2 h/day, 5 days/week). Small RNAs in lung and protein isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected and analyzed for miRNA expression using microarray analysis and for interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. VOCs exposure altered the miRNA expression profiles in lung in mice. Specifically, 69 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in VOCs-exposed samples versus controls. Functional annotation analysis of the predicted miRNA transcript targets revealed that VOCs exposure potentially alters signaling pathways associated with cancer, chemokine signaling, Wnt signaling, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, and cell adhesion molecules. IL-8 isolated from BALF and nitric oxide synthase of lung increased significantly, whereas GSH of lung decreased significantly in mice exposed to VOCs. These results indicate that inhalation of VOCs alters miRNA patterns that regulate gene expression, potentially leading to the initiation of cancer and inflammatory

  15. A unified convention for biological assemblies with helical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    A new representation of helical structure by four parameters, [n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, twist, rise], is able to generate an entire helical construct from asymmetric units, including cases of helical assembly with a seam. Assemblies with helical symmetry can be conveniently formulated in many distinct ways. Here, a new convention is presented which unifies the two most commonly used helical systems for generating helical assemblies from asymmetric units determined by X-ray fibre diffraction and EM imaging. A helical assembly is viewed as being composed of identical repetitive units in a one- or two-dimensional lattice, named 1-D and 2-D helical systems, respectively. The unification suggests that a new helical description with only four parameters [n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, twist, rise], which is called the augmented 1-D helical system, can generate the complete set of helical arrangements, including coverage of helical discontinuities (seams). A unified four-parameter characterization implies similar parameters for similar assemblies, can eliminate errors in reproducing structures of helical assemblies and facilitates the generation of polymorphic ensembles from helical atomic models or EM density maps. Further, guidelines are provided for such a unique description that reflects the structural signature of an assembly, as well as rules for manipulating the helical symmetry presentation.

  16. The functioning of the haemocyanin of the terrestrial christmas island red crab gecarcoidea natalis and roles for organic modulators

    PubMed

    Adamczewska; Morris

    1998-12-01

    Gecarcoidea natalis is a land crab that migrates annually several kilometres to breed. The O2-binding properties of haemocyanin in G. natalis were investigated in vitro to test the idea that the O2-binding properties of the haemocyanin of land crabs are not dependent on circulating modulators and to provide a model of haemocyanin functioning during exercise. The affinity of the haemocyanin for O2 decreased with increasing temperature (change in the heat of oxygenation; capdelta H=-59 kJ mol-1). The haemocyanin of G. natalis apparently differs from that of other terrestrial crabs in showing haemocyanin O2 modulation by both organic and inorganic molecules. Haemocyanin O2-affinity was not affected by Mg2+ but was sensitive to changes in Ca2+ concentration ( capdelta logP50/ capdelta log[Ca]=-0.61, where P50 is the partial pressure of O2 required for half-maximal O2 binding). The Bohr factor was modest ( &phgr; =-0.26+/-0.03, N=4, in whole haemolymph at 25 degreesC) and there was no specific effect of CO2 on the O2-binding properties of the haemocyanin. An increase in urate concentration increased haemocyanin O2-affinity, but the effect was linear ( capdelta logP50/ capdelta [urate]=-0.06) and not logarithmic as is the case in other species. The effect of l-lactate on the haemocyanin O2-affinity in G. natalis was unique among the crustaceans, because an increase in l-lactate concentration decreased the haemocyanin O2-affinity. The effect of l-lactate on haemocyanin O2-affinity ( capdelta logP50/ capdelta log[lactate]) was time-dependent and decreased from a maximum of 0.044 on day 1 to 0.001 after 4 days of storage at 4 degreesC. The presence of an unknown dialysable and unstable factor in the haemolymph is postulated to explain the time-dependent effect of l-lactate on haemocyanin O2-binding properties. Model oxygen equilibrium curves constructed for in vivo conditions showed that the reverse effect of l-lactate was advantageous by decreasing the O2-affinity of the

  17. Modulation of Exciton Generation in Organic Active Planar pn Heterojunction: Toward Low Driving Voltage and High-Efficiency OLEDs Employing Conventional and Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Emitters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongcheng; Liu, Kunkun; Gan, Lin; Liu, Ming; Gao, Kuo; Xie, Gaozhan; Ma, Yuguang; Cao, Yong; Su, Shi-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) combining low driving voltage and high efficiency are designed by employing conventional and thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters through modulation of excitons generated at the planar p-n heterojunction region. To date, this approach enables the highest power efficiency for yellow-green emitting fluorescent OLEDs with a simplified structure.

  18. The influence of helical background fields on current helicity and electromotive force of magnetoconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, G.; Küker, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the empirical finding that the known hemispheric rules for the current helicity at the solar surface are not strict, we demonstrate the excitation of small-scale current helicity by the influence of large-scale helical magnetic background fields on nonrotating magnetoconvection. This is shown within a quasilinear analytic theory of driven turbulence and by nonlinear simulations of magnetoconvection that the resulting small-scale current helicity has the same sign as the large-scale current helicity, while the ratio of both pseudoscalars is of the order of the magnetic Reynolds number of the convection. The same models do not provide finite values of the small-scale kinetic helicity. On the other hand, a turbulence-induced electromotive force is produced including the diamagnetic pumping term, as well as the eddy diffusivity but, however, no α effect. It has thus been argued that the relations for the simultaneous existence of small-scale current helicity and α effect do not hold for the model of nonrotating magnetoconvection under consideration. Calculations for various values of the magnetic Prandtl number demonstrate that, for the considered diffusivities, the current helicity increases for growing magnetic Reynolds number, which is not true for the velocity of the diamagnetic pumping, which is in agreement with the results of the quasilinear analytical approximation.

  19. Interactive properties of human glioblastoma cells with brain neurons in culture and neuronal modulation of glial laminin organization.

    PubMed

    Faria, Jane; Romão, Luciana; Martins, Sheila; Alves, Tércia; Mendes, Fabio A; de Faria, Giselle Pinto; Hollanda, Rosenilde; Takiya, Christina; Chimelli, Leila; Morandi, Veronica; de Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Abreu, Jose Garcia; Moura Neto, Vivaldo

    2006-12-01

    The harmonious development of the central nervous system depends on the interactions of the neuronal and glial cells. Extracellular matrix elements play important roles in these interactions, especially laminin produced by astrocytes, which has been shown to be a good substrate for neuron growth and axonal guidance. Glioblastomas are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors and may be astrocytes in origin. As normal laminin-producing glial cells are the preferential substrate for neurons, and glial tumors have been shown to produce laminin, we questioned whether glioblastoma retained the same normal glial-neuron interactive properties with respect to neuronal growth and differentiation. Then, rat neurons were co-cultured onto rat normal astrocytes or onto three human glioblastoma cell lines obtained from neurosurgery. The co-culture confirmed that human glioblastoma cells as well as astrocytes maintained the ability to support neuritogenesis, but non-neural normal or tumoral cells failed to do so. However, glioblastoma cells did not distinguish embryonic from post-natal neurons in relation to neurite pattern in the co-cultures, as normal astrocytes did. Further, the laminin organization on both normal and tumoral glial cells was altered from a filamentous arrangement to a mixed punctuate/filamentous pattern when in co-culture with neurons. Together, these results suggest that glioblastoma cells could identify neuronal cells as partners, to support their growth and induce complex neurites, but they lost the normal glia property to distinguish neuronal age. In addition, our results show for the first time that neurons modulate the organization of astrocytes and glioblastoma laminin on the extracellular matrix.

  20. Strategies for Online Organ Motion Correction for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer: Prostate, Rectum, and Bladder Dose Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan; Lakeman, Annemarie; Nijkamp, Jasper; Bois, Josien de; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify and evaluate the accumulated prostate, rectum, and bladder dose for several strategies including rotational organ motion correction for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer using realistic organ motion data. Methods and Materials: Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans of 19 prostate patients were used. Per patient, two IMRT plans with different uniform margins were created. To quantify prostate and seminal vesicle motion, repeat CT clinical target volumes (CTVs) were matched onto the planning CTV using deformable registration. Four different strategies, from online setup to full motion correction, were simulated. Rotations were corrected for using gantry and collimator angle adjustments. Prostate, rectum, and bladder doses were accumulated for each patient, plan, and strategy. Minimum CTV dose (D{sub min}), rectum equivalent uniform dose (EUD, n = 0.13), and bladder surface receiving >=78 Gy (S78), were calculated. Results: With online CTV translation correction, a 7-mm margin was sufficient (i.e., D{sub min} >= 95% of the prescribed dose for all patients). A 4-mm margin required additional rotational correction. Margin reduction lowered the rectum EUD(n = 0.13) by approx2.6 Gy, and the bladder S78 by approx1.9%. Conclusions: With online correction of both translations and rotations, a 4-mm margin was sufficient for 15 of 19 patients, whereas the remaining four patients had an underdosed CTV volume <1%. Margin reduction combined with online corrections resulted in a similar or lower dose to the rectum and bladder. The more advanced the correction strategy, the better the planned and accumulated dose agreed.

  1. Magnetically modulated electroluminescence from hybrid organic/inorganic light-emitting diodes based on electron donor-acceptor exciplex blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zhiyong; Baniya, Sangita; Zhang, Chuang; Sun, Dali; Vardeny, Z. Valy

    2016-03-01

    We report room temperature magnetically modulated electroluminescence from a hybrid organic/inorganic light-emitting diode (h-OLED), in which an inorganic magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with large room temperature magnetoresistance is coupled to an N,N,N ',N '-Tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)benzidine (MeO-TPD): tris-[3-(3-pyridyl)mesityl]borane (3TPYMB) [D-A] based OLED that shows thermally activated delayed luminescence. The exciplex-based OLED provides two spin-mixing channels: upper energy channel of polaron pairs and lower energy channel of exciplexes. In operation, the large resistance mismatch between the MTJ and OLED components is suppressed due to the non-linear I-V characteristic of the OLED. This leads to enhanced giant magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) at room temperature. We measured MEL of ~ 75% at ambient conditions. Supported by SAMSUNG Global Research Outreach (GRO) program, and also by the NSF-Material Science & Engineering Center (MRSEC) program at the University of Utah (DMR-1121252).

  2. Optimization of helical tomotherapy treatment plans for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorov, G.; Kron, T.; Wong, E.; Chen, J.; Sollazzo, J.; Rodrigues, G.

    2003-07-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a novel treatment approach where the ring gantry irradiation geometry of a helical CT scanner is combined with an intensity-modulated megavoltage x-ray fan beam. An inverse treatment planning system (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison) was used to optimize the treatment plans for ten randomly selected prostate patients. Five different sets of margins (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 mm uniform 3D margins and a non-uniform margin of 5 to 10 mm) were employed for the prostate (GTV2) and seminal vesicles (GTV1). The dose distribution was evaluated in targets, rectum, bladder and femoral heads. HT plans are characterized by a rapid dose fall off around the target in all directions resulting in low doses (less than 30% of the dose at ICRU reference point) to the femurs in all cases. Up to a margin of 5 mm for target structures, it was always possible to satisfy the requirements for dose delivery set by RTOG protocol P-0126. Using a 'class solution', HT plans require minimal operator interaction and result in excellent sparing of normal structures in prostate radiotherapy.

  3. Evaluation of helicity generation in the tropical storm Gonu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Majid M.; Khansalari, Sakineh; Azadi, Majid

    2016-06-01

    Helicity is a valuable dynamical concept for the study of rotating flows. Consequently helicity flux, indicative of the source or sink of helicity, owns comparable importance. In this study, while reviewing the existing methods, a mathematical relation between helicity and helicity-flux is introduced, discussed and examined. The computed values of helicity and helicity fluxes in an actual case, using the classical and this proposed method are compared. The down-stream helicity flux including sources and sinks of helicity is considered for the tropical storm Gonu that occurred over the coasts of Oman and Iran on June 2-7, 2007. Results show that the buoyancy, through the upper troposphere down to a height within boundary layer, is the main source in producing helicity, and surface friction from earth surface up to a height within boundary layer, is the main dissipating element of helicity. The dominance of buoyancy forcing over the dissipative friction forcing results in generation of vortex or enhancement of it after bouncing the land. Furthermore, the increase (decrease) of helicity results in an increase (decrease) in the height of the level in which maximum helicity flux occurs. It is suggested that the maximum helicity flux occurs at the top of the turbulent boundary layer, so that the height of boundary layer could be obtained.

  4. Fabrication and experimentation of FRP helical spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekanthappa, J.; Shiva Shankar, G. S.; Amith, B. M.; Gagan, M.

    2016-09-01

    In present scenario, the automobile industry sector is showing increased interest in reducing the unsprung weight of the automobile & hence increasing the fuel Efficiency. One of the feasible sub systems of a vehicle where weight reduction may be attempted is vehicle- suspension system. Usage of composite material is a proven way to lower the component weight without any compromise in strength. The composite materials are having high specific strength, more elastic strain energy storage capacity in comparison with those of steel. Therefore, helical coil spring made of steel is replaceable by composite cylindrical helical coil spring. This research aims at preparing a re-usable mandrel (mould) of Mild steel, developing a setup for fabrication, fabrication of FRP helical spring using continuous glass fibers and Epoxy Resin (Polymer). Experimentation has been conducted on fabricated FRP helical spring to determine its strength parameters & for failure analysis. It is found that spring stiffness (K) of Glass/Epoxy helical-spring is greater than steel-coil spring with reduced weight.

  5. Helical Tomotherapy in Children and Adolescents: Dosimetric Comparisons, Opportunities and Issues

    PubMed Central

    Mascarin, Maurizio; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Coassin, Elisa; Drigo, Annalisa; Chiovati, Paola; Dassie, Andrea; Franchin, Giovanni; Minatel, Emilio; Trovò, Mauro Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    Helical Tomotherapy (HT) is a highly conformal image-guided radiation technique, introduced into clinical routine in 2006 at the Centro di Riferimento Oncologico Aviano (Italy). With this new technology, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is delivered using a helicoidal method. Here we present our dosimetric experiences using HT in 100 children, adolescents and young adults treated from May 2006 to February 2011. The median age of the patients was 13 years (range 1–24). The most common treated site was the central nervous system (50; of these, 24 were craniospinal irradiations), followed by thorax (22), head and neck (10), abdomen and pelvis (11), and limbs (7). The use of HT was calculated in accordance to the target dose conformation, the target size and shape, the dose to critical organs adjacent to the target, simultaneous treatment of multiple targets, and re-irradiation. HT has demonstrated to improve target volume dose homogeneity and the sparing of critical structures, when compared to 3D Linac-based radiotherapy (RT). In standard cases this technique represented a comparable alternative to IMRT delivered with conventional linear accelerator. In certain cases (e.g., craniospinal and pleural treatments) only HT generated adequate treatment plans with good target volume coverage. However, the gain in target conformality should be balanced with the spread of low-doses to distant areas. This remains an open issue for the potential risk of secondary malignancies (SMNs) and longer follow-up is mandatory. PMID:24213120

  6. Working member of a helical downhole motor for drilling wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kochnev, A.M.; Vshivkov, A.N.; Goldobin, V.B.

    1993-06-22

    A working member of a helical downhole motor is described for drilling wells comprising: separate tubular sections having helical teeth arranged in succession and interconnected by connecting elements, each connecting element having the form of a ring, rigidly secured at the tubular sections and having helical teeth of a pitch and a direction equal to a pitch and a direction, respectively, of the helical teeth of the tubular sections, whereas a profile of the helical teeth of the ring is equidistant to a profile of the helical teeth of the sections.

  7. Electric field-induced transport modulation in VO2 FETs with high-k oxide/organic parylene-C hybrid gate dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tingting; Kanki, Teruo; Fujiwara, Kohei; Chikanari, Masashi; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2016-02-01

    We report on the observation of reversible and immediate resistance switching by high-k oxide Ta2O5/organic parylene-C hybrid dielectric-gated VO2 thin films. Resistance change ratios at various temperatures in the insulating regime were demonstrated to occur in the vicinity of phase transition temperature. We also found an asymmetric hole-electron carrier modulation related to the suppression of phase transition temperature. The results in this research provide a possibility for clarifying the origin of metal-insulator transition in VO2 through the electrostatic field-induced transport modulation.

  8. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Otto G.; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction-diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general.

  9. Nondispersive optical activity of meshed helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Sung; Kim, Teun-Teun; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Kyungjin; Min, Bumki

    2014-11-17

    Extreme optical properties can be realized by the strong resonant response of metamaterials consisting of subwavelength-scale metallic resonators. However, highly dispersive optical properties resulting from strong resonances have impeded the broadband operation required for frequency-independent optical components or devices. Here we demonstrate that strong, flat broadband optical activity with high transparency can be obtained with meshed helical metamaterials in which metallic helical structures are networked and arranged to have fourfold rotational symmetry around the propagation axis. This nondispersive optical activity originates from the Drude-like response as well as the fourfold rotational symmetry of the meshed helical metamaterials. The theoretical concept is validated in a microwave experiment in which flat broadband optical activity with a designed magnitude of 45° per layer of metamaterial is measured. The broadband capabilities of chiral metamaterials may provide opportunities in the design of various broadband optical systems and applications.

  10. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Otto G.; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction–diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general.

  11. Manipulation of wavefront using helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhaokun; Tao, Huan; Zhao, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Helical metamaterials, a kind of 3-dimensional structure, has relatively strong coupling effect among the helical nano-wires. Therefore, it is expected to be a good candidate for generating phase shift and controlling wavefront with high efficiency. In this paper, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we studied the phase shift properties in the helical metamaterials. It is found that the phase shift occurs for both transmitted and reflected light waves. And the maximum of reflection coefficients can reach over 60%. In addition, the phase shift (φ) is dispersionless in the range of 600 nm to 860 nm, that is, it is only dominated by the initial angle (θ) of the helix. The relationship between them is φ = ± 2θ. Using Jones calculus we give a further explanation for these properties. Finally, by arranging the helixes in an array with a constant phase gradient, the phenomenon of anomalous refraction was also observed in a broad wavelength range.

  12. Structural Transition from Helices to Hemihelices

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tianxiang; Bertoldi, Katia; Clarke, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Helices are amongst the most common structures in nature and in some cases, such as tethered plant tendrils, a more complex but related shape, the hemihelix forms. In its simplest form it consists of two helices of opposite chirality joined by a perversion. A recent, simple experiment using elastomer strips reveals that hemihelices with multiple reversals of chirality can also occur, a richness not anticipated by existing analyses. Here, we show through analysis and experiments that the transition from a helical to a hemihelical shape, as well as the number of perversions, depends on the height to width ratio of the strip's cross-section. Our findings provides the basis for the deterministic manufacture of a variety of complex three-dimensional shapes from flat strips. PMID:24759785

  13. Helicity and singular structures in fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, H. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Helicity is, like energy, a quadratic invariant of the Euler equations of ideal fluid flow, although, unlike energy, it is not sign definite. In physical terms, it represents the degree of linkage of the vortex lines of a flow, conserved when conditions are such that these vortex lines are frozen in the fluid. Some basic properties of helicity are reviewed, with particular reference to (i) its crucial role in the dynamo excitation of magnetic fields in cosmic systems; (ii) its bearing on the existence of Euler flows of arbitrarily complex streamline topology; (iii) the constraining role of the analogous magnetic helicity in the determination of stable knotted minimum-energy magnetostatic structures; and (iv) its role in depleting nonlinearity in the Navier-Stokes equations, with implications for the coherent structures and energy cascade of turbulence. In a final section, some singular phenomena in low Reynolds number flows are briefly described. PMID:24520175

  14. Heat Loss by Helicity Injection II

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K

    2006-04-25

    Arguments are reviewed showing that helicity transport always flattens the temperature profile, yielding unit current amplification in SSPX and flat temperature profiles in RFP's whenever the dynamo is active. The argument is based on transport theory yielding a hyper-resistivity {Lambda} {approx} (c{sup 2}/{omega}{sub pc}{sup 2}){chi}{sub c} with electron thermal diffusivity {chi}{sub c}, valid for any process producing a random-walk in electron constants of motion in the unperturbed field. The theory could be tested by deriving {Lambda} from helicity transport in SSPX, by analogy with recent analysis yielding {chi}{sub c} from heat transport. If the predicted ratio {Lambda}/{chi}{sub c} is confirmed, efforts to increase current amplification in SSPX must be based on scenario scenarios consistent with slow helicity transport compared to heat s transport (pulsed reactor, multipulse, neutral beam injection).

  15. The SAM domain of polyhomeotic forms a helical polymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chongwoo A; Gingery, Mari; Pilpa, Rosemarie M; Bowie, James U

    2002-06-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are important in the maintenance of stable repression patterns during development. Several PcG members contain a protein protein interaction module called a SAM domain (also known as SPM, PNT and HLH). Here we report the high-resolution structure of the SAM domain of polyhomeotic (Ph). Ph-SAM forms a helical polymer structure, providing a likely mechanism for the extension of PcG complexes. The structure of the polymer resembles that formed by the SAM domain of another transcriptional repressor, TEL. The formation of these polymer structures by SAM domains in two divergent repressors suggests a conserved mode of repression involving a higher order chromatin structure.

  16. Primordial magnetic helicity from stochastic electric currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, Esteban; Kandus, Alejandra

    2014-04-01

    We study the possibility that primordial magnetic fields generated in the transition between inflation and reheating posses magnetic helicity, HM. The fields are induced by stochastic currents of scalar charged particles created during the mentioned transition. We estimate the rms value of the induced magnetic helicity by computing different four-point scalar quantum electrodynamics Feynman diagrams. For any considered volume, the magnetic flux across its boundaries is in principle not null, which means that the magnetic helicity in those regions is gauge dependent. We use the prescription given by Berger and Field and interpret our result as the difference between two magnetic configurations that coincide in the exterior volume. In this case, the magnetic helicity gives only the number of magnetic links inside the considered volume. We calculate a concrete value of HM for large scales and analyze the distribution of magnetic defects as a function of the scale. Those defects correspond to regular as well as random fields in the considered volume. We find that the fractal dimension of the distribution of topological defects is D=1/2. We also study if the regular fields induced on large scales are helical, finding that they are and that the associated number of magnetic defects is independent of the scale. In this case, the fractal dimension is D=0. We finally estimate the intensity of fields induced at the horizon scale of reheating and evolve them until the decoupling of matter and radiation under the hypothesis of the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity. The resulting intensity is high enough and the coherence length long enough to have an impact on the subsequent process of structure formation.

  17. Equilibrium calculations for helical axis stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.

    1984-04-01

    An average method based on a vacuum flux coordinate system is presented. This average method permits the study of helical axis stellarators with toroidally dominated shifts. An ordering is introduced, and to lowest order the toroidally averaged equilibrium equations are reduced to a Grad-Shafranov equation. Also, to lowest order, a Poisson-type equation is obtained for the toroidally varying corrections to the equilibium. By including these corrections, systems that are toroidally dominated, but with significant helical distortion to the equilibrium, may be studied. Numerical solutions of the average method equations are shown to agree well with three-dimensional calculations.

  18. Toward high-resolution computational design of helical membrane protein structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Patrick; Senes, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The computational design of α-helical membrane proteins is still in its infancy but has made important progress. De novo design has produced stable, specific and active minimalistic oligomeric systems. Computational re-engineering can improve stability and modulate the function of natural membrane proteins. Currently, the major hurdle for the field is not computational, but the experimental characterization of the designs. The emergence of new structural methods for membrane proteins will accelerate progress PMID:27273630

  19. Conversion from mutual helicity to self-helicity observed with IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. P.; Peter, H.; Chen, F.; Zhang, J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. In the upper atmosphere of the Sun observations show convincing evidence for crossing and twisted structures, which are interpreted as mutual helicity and self-helicity. Aims: We use observations with the new Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to show the conversion of mutual helicity into self-helicity in coronal structures on the Sun. Methods: Using far UV spectra and slit-jaw images from IRIS and coronal images and magnetograms from SDO, we investigated the evolution of two crossing loops in an active region, in particular, the properties of the Si IV line profile in cool loops. Results: In the early stage two cool loops cross each other and accordingly have mutual helicity. The Doppler shifts in the loops indicate that they wind around each other. As a consequence, near the crossing point of the loops (interchange) reconnection sets in, which heats the plasma. This is consistent with the observed increase of the line width and of the appearance of the loops at higher temperatures. After this interaction, the two new loops run in parallel, and in one of them shows a clear spectral tilt of the Si IV line profile. This is indicative of a helical (twisting) motion, which is the same as to say that the loop has self-helicity. Conclusions: The high spatial and spectral resolution of IRIS allowed us to see the conversion of mutual helicity to self-helicity in the (interchange) reconnection of two loops. This is observational evidence for earlier theoretical speculations. Movie associated with Fig. 1 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Helically Chiral N,N,O,O-Boron-Chelated Dipyrromethenes.

    PubMed

    Alnoman, Rua B; Rihn, Sandra; O'Connor, Daniel C; Black, Fiona A; Costello, Bernard; Waddell, Paul G; Clegg, William; Peacock, Robert D; Herrebout, Wouter; Knight, Julian G; Hall, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Helically chiral N,N,O,O-boron chelated dipyrromethenes showed solution-phase circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) in the red region of the visible spectrum (λem (max) from 621 to 663 nm). The parent dipyrromethene is desymmetrised through O chelation of boron by the 3,5-ortho-phenolic substituents, inducing a helical chirality in the fluorophore. The combination of high luminescence dissymmetry factors (|glum | up to 4.7 ×10(-3) ) and fluorescence quantum yields (ΦF up to 0.73) gave exceptionally efficient circularly polarized red emission from these simple small organic fluorophores, enabling future application in CPL-based bioimaging.

  1. Solid-state Marx based two-switch voltage modulator for the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, L. M.; Silva, J. Fernando; Canacsinh, H.; Ferrão, N.; Mendes, C.; Soares, R.; Schipper, J.; Fowler, A.

    2010-07-01

    A new circuit topology is proposed to replace the actual pulse transformer and thyratron based resonant modulator that supplies the 60 kV target potential for the ion acceleration of the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator, the stability of which is critical for the mass resolution downstream separator, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The improved modulator uses two solid-state switches working together, each one based on the Marx generator concept, operating as series and parallel switches, reducing the stress on the series stacked semiconductors, and also as auxiliary pulse generator in order to fulfill the target requirements. Preliminary results of a 10 kV prototype, using 1200 V insulated gate bipolar transistors and capacitors in the solid-state Marx circuits, ten stages each, with an electrical equivalent circuit of the target, are presented, demonstrating both the improved voltage stability and pulse flexibility potential wanted for this new modulator.

  2. Solid-state Marx based two-switch voltage modulator for the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research.

    PubMed

    Redondo, L M; Silva, J Fernando; Canacsinh, H; Ferrão, N; Mendes, C; Soares, R; Schipper, J; Fowler, A

    2010-07-01

    A new circuit topology is proposed to replace the actual pulse transformer and thyratron based resonant modulator that supplies the 60 kV target potential for the ion acceleration of the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator, the stability of which is critical for the mass resolution downstream separator, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The improved modulator uses two solid-state switches working together, each one based on the Marx generator concept, operating as series and parallel switches, reducing the stress on the series stacked semiconductors, and also as auxiliary pulse generator in order to fulfill the target requirements. Preliminary results of a 10 kV prototype, using 1200 V insulated gate bipolar transistors and capacitors in the solid-state Marx circuits, ten stages each, with an electrical equivalent circuit of the target, are presented, demonstrating both the improved voltage stability and pulse flexibility potential wanted for this new modulator.

  3. Analyzing the effectiveness of flare dispensing programs against pulse width modulation seekers using self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Š.

    2013-10-01

    Infrared guided missile seekers utilizing pulse width modulation in target tracking is one of the threats against air platforms. To be able to achieve a "soft-kill" protection of own platform against these type of threats, one needs to examine carefully the seeker operating principle with its special electronic counter-counter measure (ECCM) capability. One of the cost-effective ways of soft kill protection is to use flare decoys in accordance with an optimized dispensing program. Such an optimization requires a good understanding of the threat seeker, capabilities of the air platform and engagement scenario information between them. Modeling and simulation is very powerful tool to achieve a valuable insight and understand the underlying phenomenology. A careful interpretation of simulation results is crucial to infer valuable conclusions from the data. In such an interpretation there are lots of factors (features) which affect the results. Therefore, powerful statistical tools and pattern recognition algorithms are of special interest in the analysis. In this paper, we show how self-organizing maps (SOMs), which is one of those powerful tools, can be used in analyzing the effectiveness of various flare dispensing programs against a PWM seeker. We perform several Monte Carlo runs for a typical engagement scenario in a MATLAB-based simulation environment. In each run, we randomly change the flare dispending program and obtain corresponding class: "successful" or "unsuccessful", depending on whether the corresponding flare dispensing program deceives the seeker or not, respectively. Then, in the analysis phase, we use SOMs to interpret and visualize the results.

  4. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Organ-at-Risk Exposure and a Low-Gradient Junctioning Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, Joshua B.; Grant, Jonathan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Pidikiti, Rajesh; Mahajan, Anita; Grosshans, David R.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare field junction robustness and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) during craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to conventional passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients, 5 adult and 5 pediatric patients, previously treated with PSPT-based CSI were selected for comparison. Anterior oblique cranial fields, using a superior couch rotation, and posterior spinal fields were used for IMPT planning. To facilitate low-gradient field junctioning along the spine, the inverse-planning IMPT technique was divided into 3 stages. Dose indices describing target coverage and normal tissue dose, in silico error modeling, and film dosimetry were used to assess plan quality. Results: Field junction robustness along the spine was improved using the staged IMPT planning technique, reducing the worst case impact of a 4-mm setup error from 25% in PSPT to <5% of prescription dose. This was verified by film dosimetry for clinical delivery. Exclusive of thyroid dose in adult patients, IMPT plans demonstrated sparing of organs at risk as good or better than PSPT. Coverage of the cribriform plate for pediatric (V95% [percentage of volume of the target receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose]; 87 ± 11 vs 92 ± 7) and adult (V95%; 94 ± 7 vs 100 ± 1) patients and the clinical target in pediatric (V95%; 98 ± 2 vs 100 ± 1) and adult (V95%; 100 ± 1 vs 100 ± 1) patients for PSPT and IMPT plans, respectively, were comparable or improved. For adult patients, IMPT target dose inhomogeneity was increased, as determined by heterogeneity index (HI) and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC). IMPT lowered maximum spinal cord dose, improved spinal dose homogeneity, and reduced exposure to other OARs. Conclusions: IMPT has the potential to improve CSI plan quality and the homogeneity of intrafractional dose at match lines. The IMPT approach developed may also simplify treatments and reduce

  5. Poster — Thur Eve — 35: The impact of intensity- and energy-modulated photon radiotherapy (XMRT) optimization on a variety of organ geometries

    SciTech Connect

    McGeachy, P.; Villarreal-Barajas, J. E.; Khan, R.; Zinchenko, Y.

    2014-08-15

    We previously reported on a novel, modulated in both energy and intensity; photon radiotherapy (XMRT) optimization technique. The purpose of this investigation was to test this XMRT optimization against conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization on four different organ test geometries. All geometries mimicked clinically relevant scenarios. Both IMRT and XMRT were based on a linear programming approach where the objective function was the mean dose to healthy organs and organ-specific linear dose-point constraints were used. For IMRT, the beam energy was fixed to 6 MV while XMRT optimized in terms of both 6 and 18 MV beams. All plans consisted of a seven beam coplanar arrangement. All organ geometries were contoured on a 25cm diameter cylindrical water phantom in open source radiotherapy research software known as CERR. Solutions for both IMRT and XMRT were obtained for each geometry using a numerical solver Gurobi. Analyzing the quality of the solutions was done by comparing dose distributions and dose volume histograms calculated using CERR. For all four geometries, IMRT and XMRT solutions were comparable in terms of target coverage. For two of the geometries, IMRT provided an advantage in terms of reduced dose to the healthy structures. XMRT showed improved dose reduction to healthy organs for one geometry and a comparable dose distribution to IMRT for the remaining geometry. The inability to exploit the benefits of using multiple energies may be attributed to limited water phantom diameter and having the majority of the organs in close proximity to the transverse axis.

  6. Estimating 3D movements from 2D observations using a continuous model of helical swimming.

    PubMed

    Gurarie, Eliezer; Grünbaum, Daniel; Nishizaki, Michael T

    2011-06-01

    Helical swimming is among the most common movement behaviors in a wide range of microorganisms, and these movements have direct impacts on distributions, aggregations, encounter rates with prey, and many other fundamental ecological processes. Microscopy and video technology enable the automated acquisition of large amounts of tracking data; however, these data are typically two-dimensional. The difficulty of quantifying the third movement component complicates understanding of the biomechanical causes and ecological consequences of helical swimming. We present a versatile continuous stochastic model-the correlated velocity helical movement (CVHM) model-that characterizes helical swimming with intrinsic randomness and autocorrelation. The model separates an organism's instantaneous velocity into a slowly varying advective component and a perpendicularly oriented rotation, with velocities, magnitude of stochasticity, and autocorrelation scales defined for both components. All but one of the parameters of the 3D model can be estimated directly from a two-dimensional projection of helical movement with no numerical fitting, making it computationally very efficient. As a case study, we estimate swimming parameters from videotaped trajectories of a toxic unicellular alga, Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae). The algae were reared from five strains originally collected from locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, where they have caused Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). We use the CVHM model to quantify cell-level and strain-level differences in all movement parameters, demonstrating the utility of the model for identifying strains that are difficult to distinguish by other means. PMID:20725795

  7. A field theory approach to the evolution of canonical helicity and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S.

    2016-07-01

    A redefinition of the Lagrangian of a multi-particle system in fields reformulates the single-particle, kinetic, and fluid equations governing fluid and plasma dynamics as a single set of generalized Maxwell's equations and Ohm's law for canonical force-fields. The Lagrangian includes new terms representing the coupling between the motion of particle distributions, between distributions and electromagnetic fields, with relativistic contributions. The formulation shows that the concepts of self-organization and canonical helicity transport are applicable across single-particle, kinetic, and fluid regimes, at classical and relativistic scales. The theory gives the basis for comparing canonical helicity change to energy change in general systems. For example, in a fixed, isolated system subject to non-conservative forces, a species' canonical helicity changes less than total energy only if gradients in density or distribution function are shallow.

  8. The effect of angular and longitudinal tube current modulations on the estimation of organ and effective doses in x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Straten, Marcel van; Deak, Paul; Shrimpton, Paul C.; Kalender, Willi A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Tube current modulation (TCM) is one of the recent developments in multislice CT that has proven to reduce the patient radiation dose without affecting the image quality. Presently established methods and published coefficients for estimating organ doses from the dose measured free in air on the axis of rotation or in the CT dose index (CTDI) dosimetry phantoms do not take into account this relatively new development in CT scanner design and technology. Based on these organ dose coefficients effective dose estimates can be made. The estimates are not strictly valid for CT scanning protocols utilizing TCM. In this study, the authors investigated the need to take TCM into account when estimating organ and effective dose values. Methods: A whole-body adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson Rando) was scanned with a multislice CT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) utilizing TCM (CareDose4D). Tube voltage was 120 kV, beam collimation 19.2 mm, and pitch 1. A voxelized patient model was used to define the tissues and organs in the phantom. Tube current values as a function of tube angle were obtained from the raw data for each individual tube rotation of the scan. These values were used together with the Monte Carlo dosimetry tool IMPACTMC (VAMP GmbH, Erlangen, Germany) to calculate organ dose values both with and without account of TCM. Angular and longitudinal modulations were investigated separately. Finally, corresponding effective dose conversion coefficients were determined for both cases according to the updated 2007 recommendations of the ICRP. Results: TCM amplitude was greatest in the shoulder and pelvic regions. Consequently, dose distributions and organ dose values for particular cross sections changed considerably when taking angular modulation into account. The effective dose conversion coefficients were up to 11% lower for a single rotation in the shoulder region and 17% lower in the pelvis when taking angular TCM into

  9. Development of a European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Module to Assess the Quality of Life of Patients With Proctitis After Pelvic Radiotherapy for Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Spry, Nigel; Halkett, Georgia Aoun, Samar; Spry, Jane; Yeoh, Eric

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To describe the development of a proctitis-specific quality-of-life module to supplement the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). Methods and Materials: The module was developed according to EORTC guidelines, which consisted of an extensive literature review to identify previously described issues and interviews conducted with seven health professionals and 10 patients to rationalize the item list for construction into a provisional module. The module developed was then pretested with 28 patients and five health professionals. Results: The final module contains 21-items that are suitable to obtain information about the patients' quality of life after high-dose pelvic irradiation. The questionnaire has now been translated into four languages and commenced field testing in late 2007. Conclusions: The EORTC QLQ-C30, supplemented by EORTC QLQ-PRT21, will enable health professionals to more accurately monitor the side effects that patients experience after pelvic irradiation.

  10. A Prospective Evaluation of Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, Glenn ||. E-mail: glenn.bauman@lhsc.on.ca; Yartsev, Slav; Rodrigues, George ||; Lewis, Craig; Hammond, Alex; Perera, Francisco; Ash, Robert, Dar, A. Rashid |; Venkatesan, Varagur M. |; Yu, Edward; Lock, Michael; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake ||; Baily, Laura; Coad, Terry C; Trenka, Kris C.; Warr, Barbara; Kron, Tomas

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To report results from two clinical trials evaluating helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Patients were enrolled in one of two prospective trials of HT (one for palliative and one for radical treatment). Both an HT plan and a companion three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan were generated. Pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography was used for daily image guidance. Results: From September 2004 to January 2006, a total of 61 sites in 60 patients were treated. In all but one case, a clinically acceptable tomotherapy plan for treatment was generated. Helical tomotherapy plans were subjectively equivalent or superior to 3D-CRT in 95% of plans. Helical tomotherapy was deemed equivalent or superior in two thirds of dose-volume point comparisons. In cases of inferiority, differences were either clinically insignificant and/or reflected deliberate tradeoffs to optimize the HT plan. Overall imaging and treatment time (median) was 27 min (range, 16-91 min). According to a patient questionnaire, 78% of patients were satisfied to very satisfied with the treatment process. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy demonstrated clear advantages over conventional 3D-CRT in this diverse patient group. The prospective trials were helpful in deploying this technology in a busy clinical setting.

  11. Helicity as a Component of Filament Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. H.; Gaizauskas, V.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we seek the origin of the axial component of the magnetic field in filaments by adapting theory to observations. A previous paper (Mackay, Gaizauskas, and van Ballegooijen, 2000) showed that surface flows acting on potential magnetic fields for 27 days the maximum time between the emergence of magnetic flux and the formation of large filaments between the resulting activity complexes cannot explain the chirality or inverse polarity nature of the observed filaments. We show that the inclusion of initial helicity, for which there is observational evidence, in the flux transport model results in sufficiently strong dextral fields of inverse polarity to account for the existence and length of an observed filament within the allotted time. The simulations even produce a large length of dextral chirality when just small amounts of helicity are included in the initial configuration. The modeling suggests that the axial field component in filaments can result from a combination of surface (flux transport) and sub-surface (helicity) effects acting together. Here surface effects convert the large-scale helicity emerging in active regions into a smaller-scale magnetic-field component parallel to the polarity inversion line so as to form a magnetic configuration suitable for a filament.

  12. Magnetic Helicity of Alfven Simple Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Gary M.; Hu, Q.; Dasgupta, B.; Zank, G. P.; Roberts, D.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic helicity of fully nonlinear, multi-dimensional Alfven simple waves are investigated, by using relative helicity formulae and also by using an approach involving poloidal and toroidal decomposition of the magnetic field and magnetic vector potential. Different methods to calculate the magnetic vector potential are used, including the homotopy and Biot-Savart formulas. Two basic Alfven modes are identified: (a) the plane 1D Alfven simple wave given in standard texts, in which the Alfven wave propagates along the z-axis, with wave phase varphi=k_0(z-lambda t), where k_0 is the wave number and lambda is the group velocity of the wave, and (b)\\ the generalized Barnes (1976) simple Alfven wave in which the wave normal {bf n} moves in a circle in the xy-plane perpendicular to the mean field, which is directed along the z-axis. The plane Alfven wave (a) is analogous to the slab Alfven mode and the generalized Barnes solution (b) is analogous to the 2D mode in Alfvenic, incompressible turbulence. The helicity characteristics of these two basic Alfven modes are distinct. The helicity characteristics of more general multi-dimensional simple Alfven waves are also investigated. Applications to nonlinear Aifvenic fluctuations and structures observed in the solar wind are discussed.

  13. Magnetic Helicity of Alfven Simple Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Hu, Q.; Dasgupta, B.; Zank, G. P.; Roberts, D.

    2010-12-01

    The magnetic helicity of fully nonlinear, multi-dimensional Alfven simple waves are investigated, by using relative helicity formulae and also by using an approach involving poloidal and toroidal decomposition of the magnetic field and magnetic vector potential. Different methods to calculate the magnetic vector potential are used, including the homotopy and Biot-Savart formulas. Two basic Alfven modes are identified: (a) the plane 1D Alfven simple wave given in standard texts, in which the Alfven wave propagates along the z-axis, with wave phase \\varphi=k0(z-λ t), where k0 is the wave number and λ is the group velocity of the wave, and (b) the generalized Barnes (1976) simple Alfvén wave in which the wave normal n moves in a circle in the xy-plane perpendicular to the mean field, which is directed along the z-axis. The plane Alfven wave (a) is analogous to the slab Alfven mode and the generalized Barnes solution (b) is analogous to the 2D mode in Alfvenic, incompressible turbulence. The helicity characteristics of these two basic Alfven modes are distinct. The helicity characteristics of more general multi-dimensional simple Alfven waves are also investigated. Applications to nonlinear Alfvenic fluctuations and structures observed in the solar wind are discussed.

  14. Multislice helical CT: image temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Hui, H; Pan, T; Shen, Y

    2000-05-01

    A multislice helical computed tomography (CT) halfscan (HS) reconstruction algorithm is proposed for cardiac applications. The imaging performances (in terms of the temporal resolution, z-axis resolution, image noise, and image artifacts) of the HS algorithm are compared to the existing algorithms using theoretical models and clinical data. A theoretical model of the temporal resolution performance (in terms of the temporal sensitivity profile) is established for helical CT, in general, i.e., for any number of detector rows and any reconstruction algorithm used. It is concluded that the HS reconstruction results in improved image temporal resolution than the corresponding 180 degrees LI (linear interpolation) reconstruction and is more immune to the inconsistent data problem induced by cardiac motions. The temporal resolution of multislice helical CT with the HS algorithm is comparable to that of single-slice helical CT with the HS algorithm. In practice, the 180 degrees LI and HS-LI algorithms can be used in parallel to generate two image sets from the same scan acquisition, one (180 degrees LI) for improved z-resolution and noises, and the other (HS-LI) for improved image temporal resolution.

  15. QCD Evolution of Helicity and Transversity TMDs

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  16. Deformation of flexible micro helices under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daieff, Marine; Lindner, Anke; Du Roure, Olivia; Morozov, Alexander; Pham, Jonathan; Crosby, Alfred

    The interaction of small helices with fluids is important because of its relevance to both fundamental science and technological applications, such as swimming microrobots or microflow sensors. Helically shaped flagella are also exploited by swimming microorganisms to move through their surrounding fluids. Here we study experimentally the deformation of flexible helical ribbons under flow in a microfluidic channel. The size of the helix is typically microscale for the diameter and nanoscale for the thickness. We focus on two different aspects: the overall shape of the helix and the viscous frictional properties. The frictional coefficients determined by our experiments are consistent with calculated values in the context of resistive force theory. Deformation of helices by viscous flow is well-described by non-linear finite extensibility. Due to the non-uniform distribution of the pitch under distributed loading, we identify both linear and nonlinear behavior along the contour length of a single helix. Utilizing our system, we explore the impact of non-Newtonian fluid properties on the mechanics of helix-fluid interactions.

  17. Phase diagram of two interacting helical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Raul A.; Gutman, D. B.; Carr, Sam T.

    2016-06-01

    We consider two coupled time-reversal-invariant helical edge modes of the same helicity, such as would occur on two stacked quantum spin Hall insulators. In the presence of interaction, the low-energy physics is described by two collective modes, one corresponding to the total current flowing around the edge and the other one describing relative fluctuations between the two edges. We find that quite generically, the relative mode becomes gapped at low temperatures, but only when tunneling between the two helical modes is nonzero. There are two distinct possibilities for the gapped state depending on the relative size of different interactions. If the intraedge interaction is stronger than the interedge interaction, the state is characterized as a spin-nematic phase. However, in the opposite limit, when the interaction between the helical edge modes is strong compared to the interaction within each mode, a spin-density wave forms, with emergent topological properties. First, the gap protects the conducting phase against localization by weak nonmagnetic impurities; second, the protected phase hosts localized zero modes on the ends of the edge that may be created by sufficiently strong nonmagnetic impurities.

  18. Artificial, parallel, left-handed DNA helices.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan; Li, Xiang; Li, Yingmei; Wang, Guansong; Mao, Chengde

    2012-12-19

    This communication reports an engineered DNA architecture. It contains multiple domains of half-turn-long, standard B-DNA duplexes. While each helical domain is right-handed and its two component strands are antiparallel, the global architecture is left-handed and the two component DNA strands are oriented parallel to each other.

  19. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-06

    The present invention generates stellarator fields having favorable properties (magnetic well and large rotational transform) by a simple coil system consisting only of unlinked planar non-circular coils. At large rotational transform toroidal effects on magnetic well and rotational transform are small and can be ignored. We do so herein, specializing in straight helical systems.

  20. Caulobacter crescentus exploits its helical cell body to swim efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Mendoza, Marcos; Valenzuela, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    How an organism gets its shape remains an open question of fundamental science. In this study, we measure the 3D shape of a bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, using a computational graphic technique for free-swimming microorganisms to analyze thousands of image frames of the same individual bacterium. Rather than having a crescent shape, the cell body of the organism is found to be twisted with a helical pitch angle around 45 degrees. Moreover, the detailed size and geometry of the cell body, matches the optimized cell body obtained by the slender body theory for swimming at fixed power. This result sheds new light on the shape evolution of microorganisms, and suggests that C. crescentus has adapted to its natural habitat of fresh-water lakes and streams, lacking nutrients.

  1. Two-dimensional surface chirality control by solvent-induced helicity inversion of a helical polyacetylene on graphite.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shin-ichiro; Okoshi, Kento; Kumaki, Jiro; Yashima, Eiji

    2006-05-01

    We report the direct evidence for the macromolecular helicity inversion of a helical poly(phenylacetylene) bearing l- or d-alanine pendants with a long alkyl chain in different solvents by atomic force microscopy observations of the diastereomeric helical structures. The diastereomeric helical poly(phenylacetylene)s induced in polar and nonpolar solvents self-assembled into ordered, two-dimensional helix bundles with controlled molecular packing, helical pitch, and handedness on graphite upon exposure of each solvent. The macromolecular helicity deposited on graphite from a polar solvent further inverted to the opposite handedness by exposure to a specific nonpolar solvent, and these changes in the surface chirality based on the inversion of helicity could be visualized by atomic force microscopy with molecular resolution, and the results were quantified by X-ray diffraction of the oriented liquid crystalline, diastereomeric helical polymer films.

  2. The Effects of Spatial Smoothing on Solar Magnetic Helicity and the Hemispheric Helicity Sign Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch Ocker, Stella; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The hemispheric sign rule for solar magnetic helicity, which states that negative/positive helicity occurs preferentially in the northern/southern hemisphere, provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. However, previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been significantly affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulent motions. Using Hinode/SOT-SP data spanning from 2006 to 2012, we studied the effects of two important data processing steps that imitate the effects of atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values that are weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We applied these processing techniques to the helicity distribution maps for active regions NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, along with the average helicities of 36 active regions, in order to imitate and understand the effects of seeing from atmospheric turbulence. We found that rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, Gaussian smoothing and noise reduction enhanced existing trends by pushing outliers towards the mean or removing them altogether. We also found that, when separated for weak and strong magnetic fields, the average helicities of the 36 active regions conformed to the hemisphere rule for weak field helicities and breached the rule for strong field helicities. In general, we found that data processing did not affect whether the hemisphere rule held for data taken from space-based instruments, and thus that seeing from atmospheric turbulence did not significantly affect previous studies' ground-based results on the hemisphere rule. This work was carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  3. Modulating adsorption and stability properties in pillared metal-organic frameworks: a model system for understanding ligand effects.

    PubMed

    Burtch, Nicholas C; Walton, Krista S

    2015-11-17

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are nanoporous materials with highly tunable properties that make them ideal for a wide array of adsorption applications. Through careful choice of metal and ligand precursors, one can target the specific functionality and pore characteristics desired for the application of interest. However, among the wide array of MOFs reported in the literature, there are varying trends in the effects that ligand identity has on the adsorption, chemical stability, and intrinsic framework dynamics of the material. This is largely due to ligand effects being strongly coupled with structural properties arising from the differing topologies among frameworks. Given the important role such properties play in dictating adsorbent performance, understanding these effects will be critical for the design of next generation functional materials. Pillared MOFs are ideal platforms for understanding how ligand properties can affect the adsorption, stability, and framework dynamics in MOFs. In this Account, we highlight our recent work demonstrating how experiment and simulation can be used to understand the important role ligand identity plays in governing the properties of isostructural MOFs containing interconnected layers pillared by bridging ligands. Changing the identity of the linear, ditopic ligand in either the 2-D layer or the pillaring third dimension allows targeted modulation of the chemical functionality, porosity, and interpenetration of the framework. We will discuss how these characteristics can have important consequences on the adsorption, chemical stability, and dynamic properties of pillared MOFs. The structures discussed in this Account comprise the greatest diversity of isostructural MOFs whose stability properties have been studied, allowing valuable insight into how ligand properties dictate the chemical stability of isostructural frameworks. We also discuss how functional groups can affect adsorbate energetics at their most favorable

  4. A database for estimating organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans for arbitrary spectra and angular tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rupcich, Franco; Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a database for estimating organ dose in a voxelized patient model for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT acquisitions with any spectra and angular tube current modulation setting. The database enables organ dose estimation for existing and novel acquisition techniques without requiring Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The study simulated transport of monoenergetic photons between 5 and 150 keV for 1000 projections over 360 Degree-Sign through anthropomorphic voxelized female chest and head (0 Degree-Sign and 30 Degree-Sign tilt) phantoms and standard head and body CTDI dosimetry cylinders. The simulations resulted in tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs quantifying the organ dose per emitted photon for each incident photon energy and projection angle for coronary angiography and brain perfusion acquisitions. The values in a table can be multiplied by an incident spectrum and number of photons at each projection angle and then summed across all energies and angles to estimate total organ dose. Scanner-specific organ dose may be approximated by normalizing the database-estimated organ dose by the database-estimated CTDI{sub vol} and multiplying by a physical CTDI{sub vol} measurement. Two examples are provided demonstrating how to use the tables to estimate relative organ dose. In the first, the change in breast and lung dose during coronary angiography CT scans is calculated for reduced kVp, angular tube current modulation, and partial angle scanning protocols relative to a reference protocol. In the second example, the change in dose to the eye lens is calculated for a brain perfusion CT acquisition in which the gantry is tilted 30 Degree-Sign relative to a nontilted scan. Results: Our database provides tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans. Validation results indicate

  5. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    PubMed

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch.

  6. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    PubMed

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch. PMID:11488494

  7. Autonomously folded α-helical lockers promote RNAi*

    PubMed Central

    Guyader, Christian P. E.; Lamarre, Baptiste; De Santis, Emiliana; Noble, James E.; Slater, Nigel K.; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is an indispensable research tool with a substantial therapeutic potential. However, the complete transition of the approach to an applied capability remains hampered due to poorly understood relationships between siRNA delivery and gene suppression. Here we propose that interfacial tertiary contacts between α-helices can regulate siRNA cytoplasmic delivery and RNAi. We introduce a rationale of helical amphipathic lockers that differentiates autonomously folded helices, which promote gene silencing, from helices folded with siRNA, which do not. Each of the helical designs can deliver siRNA into cells via energy-dependent endocytosis, while only autonomously folded helices with pre-locked hydrophobic interfaces were able to promote statistically appreciable gene silencing. We propose that it is the amphipathic locking of interfacing helices prior to binding to siRNA that enables RNAi. The rationale offers structurally balanced amphipathic scaffolds to advance the exploitation of functional RNAi. PMID:27721465

  8. Autonomously folded α-helical lockers promote RNAi*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyader, Christian P. E.; Lamarre, Baptiste; de Santis, Emiliana; Noble, James E.; Slater, Nigel K.; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2016-10-01

    RNAi is an indispensable research tool with a substantial therapeutic potential. However, the complete transition of the approach to an applied capability remains hampered due to poorly understood relationships between siRNA delivery and gene suppression. Here we propose that interfacial tertiary contacts between α-helices can regulate siRNA cytoplasmic delivery and RNAi. We introduce a rationale of helical amphipathic lockers that differentiates autonomously folded helices, which promote gene silencing, from helices folded with siRNA, which do not. Each of the helical designs can deliver siRNA into cells via energy-dependent endocytosis, while only autonomously folded helices with pre-locked hydrophobic interfaces were able to promote statistically appreciable gene silencing. We propose that it is the amphipathic locking of interfacing helices prior to binding to siRNA that enables RNAi. The rationale offers structurally balanced amphipathic scaffolds to advance the exploitation of functional RNAi.

  9. Three-dimensional control of the helical axis of a chiral nematic liquid crystal by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yannian; Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Wang, Ling; Bunning, Timothy J.; Li, Quan

    2016-03-01

    Chiral nematic liquid crystals—otherwise referred to as cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs)—are self-organized helical superstructures that find practical application in, for example, thermography, reflective displays, tuneable colour filters and mirrorless lasing. Dynamic, remote and three-dimensional control over the helical axis of CLCs is desirable, but challenging. For example, the orientation of the helical axis relative to the substrate can be changed from perpendicular to parallel by applying an alternating-current electric field, by changing the anchoring conditions of the substrate, or by altering the topography of the substrate’s surface; separately, in-plane rotation of the helical axis parallel to the substrate can be driven by a direct-current field. Here we report three-dimensional manipulation of the helical axis of a CLC, together with inversion of its handedness, achieved solely with a light stimulus. We use this technique to carry out light-activated, wide-area, reversible two-dimensional beam steering—previously accomplished using complex integrated systems and optical phased arrays. During the three-dimensional manipulation by light, the helical axis undergoes, in sequence, a reversible transition from perpendicular to parallel, followed by in-plane rotation on the substrate surface. Such reversible manipulation depends on experimental parameters such as cell thickness, surface anchoring condition, and pitch length. Because there is no thermal relaxation, the system can be driven either forwards or backwards from any light-activated intermediate state. We also describe reversible photocontrol between a two-dimensional diffraction state, a one-dimensional diffraction state and a diffraction ‘off’ state in a bilayer cell.

  10. Three-dimensional control of the helical axis of a chiral nematic liquid crystal by light.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi-gang; Li, Yannian; Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Wang, Ling; Bunning, Timothy J; Li, Quan

    2016-03-17

    Chiral nematic liquid crystals--otherwise referred to as cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs)--are self-organized helical superstructures that find practical application in, for example, thermography, reflective displays, tuneable colour filters and mirrorless lasing. Dynamic, remote and three-dimensional control over the helical axis of CLCs is desirable, but challenging. For example, the orientation of the helical axis relative to the substrate can be changed from perpendicular to parallel by applying an alternating-current electric field, by changing the anchoring conditions of the substrate, or by altering the topography of the substrate's surface; separately, in-plane rotation of the helical axis parallel to the substrate can be driven by a direct-current field. Here we report three-dimensional manipulation of the helical axis of a CLC, together with inversion of its handedness, achieved solely with a light stimulus. We use this technique to carry out light-activated, wide-area, reversible two-dimensional beam steering--previously accomplished using complex integrated systems and optical phased arrays. During the three-dimensional manipulation by light, the helical axis undergoes, in sequence, a reversible transition from perpendicular to parallel, followed by in-plane rotation on the substrate surface. Such reversible manipulation depends on experimental parameters such as cell thickness, surface anchoring condition, and pitch length. Because there is no thermal relaxation, the system can be driven either forwards or backwards from any light-activated intermediate state. We also describe reversible photocontrol between a two-dimensional diffraction state, a one-dimensional diffraction state and a diffraction 'off' state in a bilayer cell. PMID:26950601

  11. Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a list of aerospace organizations and other groups that provides educators with assistance and information in specific areas. Both government and nongovernment organizations are included. (Author/SA)

  12. Efficient optical terahertz-transmission modulation in solution-processable organic semiconductor thin films on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Tatsunosuke; Mori, Hiroki; Inose, Yuto; Kuromiya, Shota; Takano, Keisuke; Nakajima, Makoto; Hangyo, Masanori

    2016-03-01

    Terahertz (THz)-transmission modulation through the Si substrate coated with four π-conjugated materials under various laser light irradiation conditions was investigated using THz time-domain spectroscopy. Two of the π-conjugated low molecules, the [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), and two of the π-conjugated polymer materials, poly[5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-2-methoxycyanoterephthalyliden] (MEH-CN-PPV) and poly(benzimidazobenzophenanthroline) (BBL), were investigated. Among these materials, PCBM and TIPS-pentacene showed higher modulation efficiencies and it was also shown that thermal annealing is quite effective in obtaining THz modulation efficiencies higher than those previously reported for copper phthalocyanine. Utilizing these solution-processable π-conjugated materials, various types of THz materials and devices could be fabricated by printing technologies. Our findings may open the way to fabricating various types of THz active devices.

  13. Structure of the olfactory receptor organs, their GABAergic neural pathways, and modulation of mating behavior, in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Kruangkum, Thanapong; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Vanichviriyakit, Rapeepun; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Anuracpreeda, Panat; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Hanna, Peter J; Sobhon, Prasert

    2013-06-01

    In the giant male prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, the olfactory system is thought to be the main pathway for modulating sexual behavior through pheromone perception. In this report, we first used gross anatomical, histological, and SEM methods to describe the structures of the olfactory receptors (sensilla setae), their neural pathways, and possible role in modulating mating behavior. On the surfaces of antennule and antenna filaments there are four types of sensory receptors, viz single spike-like setae, single flagellum-like setae, multiple flagella-like setae, and aesthetascs (ASs). The ASs, which had previously been proposed to be odor receptor setae, are found only on the short filament of lateral antennule (slAn). Each AS on the slAn connects with olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), whose axons form an outer central antennule nerve (ocAnNv), which then connects with the olfactory neutrophil (ON) of the brain. Thus, the slAn is the major olfactory organ that conveys sensory inputs from each AS to the ON within the deutocerebrum. GABA immunoreactivity was present in ASs, neurons of ORNs, inner central antennular, lateral tegumentary nerve, ocAnNv and the ON, inferring that GABA is the likely neurotransmitter in modulating olfaction. Disruption of the slAn by ablation or covering with Vaseline, resulted in significant reduction of mating behavior, indicating that this organ is crucial for sex pheromone perception. Identification of the active pheromones and further bioassays are now being performed.

  14. Perturbative electron heat transport experiments in a quasi-helically symmetric stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, G. M.; Likin, K. M.; Faber, B. J.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Anderson, D. T.

    2013-10-01

    Results from perturbative heat transport experiments on the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX) will be presented and compared to linear gyrokinetic predictions from the GENE code made in collaboration with the PPPL. A gyrotron capable of modulating 200 kW at frequencies up to 6 kHZ was installed to perform these experiments. The electron temperature response to 6% ECRH modulation is monitored with a 16 channel ECE system. The measured stiffness in the electron heat flux, 1 <=χeHP /χePB <= 4 , is higher than the gyrokinetic prediction for the quasi-helically symmetric configuration of HSX. The measured stiffness decreases and comes into better agreement with gyrokinetic results with increasing ECRH power per particle. This reduction of stiffness is accompanied by decreased broadband density fluctuations measured through reflectometry. These results will be compared to perturbative heat transport experiments in which the quasi-helical symmetry is intentionally degraded to test the effect of neoclassical transport on stiffness in the electron heat flux.

  15. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, O. B.; Scott, D. J.; Bailey, I. R.; Barber, D. P.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Brummitt, A.; Carr, S.; Clarke, J. A.; Cooke, P.; Dainton, J. B.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Malysheva, L. I.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Rochford, J.; Department of Physics, University of Liverpool Oxford St. Liverpool L69 7ZE; Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD

    2007-07-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of {approx}10 MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of {approx}100 nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4-6 mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100-200 m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  16. Electronic structure calculations on helical conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Juan D; Serna, Andrei; Guerra, Doris; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2010-10-21

    We present a study of the electronic structure and derived properties of polyfurane (PFu), polypyrrol (PPy), and polythiophene (PTh). Two spatial arrangements are considered: trans chain (tc-PFu, tc-PPy, tc-PTh) and cis α-helical (α-PFu, α-PPy, α-PTh). Even at the small sizes considered here, helical conformations appear to be stable. Band gaps of pure, undoped oligomers fall into the semiconductor range. Density of states (DOS) analysis suggest dense valence and conduction bands. Bond length alternation analysis predicts almost complete delocalization of the π clouds in all spatial arrangements. Doping with electron donors or electron-withdrawing impurities reduces all band gaps close to the metallic regime in addition to increasing the DOS for the valence and conduction bands.

  17. Properties of dc helicity injected tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Ono, M.; Forest, C.B.; Greene, G.J.; Hwang, Y.S.; Park, H.K. ); Taylor, R.J.; Pribyl, P.A.; Evans, J.D.; Lai, K.F.; Liberati, J.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Several dc helicity injection experiments using an electron beam technique have been conducted on the Current Drive Experiment (CDX) (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 59}, 2165 (1987)) and the Continuous Current Tokamak (CCT) (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 63}, 2365 (1989)). The data strongly suggest that tokamak plasmas are being formed and maintained by this method. The largest currents driven to date are 1 kA in CDX ({ital q}{sub {ital a}} =5) and 6 kA in CCT ({ital q}{sub {ital a}} =3.5). An initial comparison of discharge properties with helicity theory indicates rough agreement. Current drive energy efficiencies are 9% and 23% of Ohmic efficiency in two cases analyzed. Strong radial electric fields are observed in these plasmas that cause poloidal rotation and, possibly, improved confinement.

  18. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

  19. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  20. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  1. A Helical Magnet Design for RHIC^*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willen, E.; Gupta, R.; Kelly, E.; Muratore, J.

    1997-05-01

    Helical dipole magnets are required in a project for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to control and preserve the beam polarization in order to allow the collision of polarized proton beams. The project requires superconducting magnets with a 100 mm coil aperture and a 4 Tesla field in which the field rotates 360 degrees over a distance of 2.4 meters. A design restraint is that the magnets operate at relatively low current (less than 500 amperes) in order to minimize the heat load from the current leads. A magnet has been developed that uses a small diameter superconducting cable wound into helical grooves machined into a thick-walled aluminum cylinder. The design and test results of this prototype magnet will be described. ^*Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. Guided wave helical ultrasonic tomography of pipes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Kevin R; Hinders, Mark K

    2003-08-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT) that uses guided ultrasonic waves along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms that have been developed by seismologists for what they call "cross borehole" tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel the various helical criss-cross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar criss-cross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. In this paper we demonstrate HUT via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced.

  3. Coherent electron transport in a helical nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guo-Hua; Wang, Yong-Long; Du, Long; Jiang, Hua; Kang, Guang-Zhen; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-09-01

    The quantum dynamics of carriers bound to helical tube surfaces is investigated in a thin-layer quantization scheme. By numerically solving the open-boundary Schrödinger equation in curvilinear coordinates, geometric effect on the coherent transmission spectra is analysed in the case of single propagating mode as well as multimode. It is shown that, the coiling endows the helical nanotube with different transport properties from a bent cylindrical surface. Fano resonance appears as a purely geometric effect in the conductance, the corresponding energy of quasibound state is obviously influenced by the torsion and length of the nanotube. We also find new plateaus in the conductance. The transport of double-degenerate mode in this geometry is reminiscent of the Zeeman coupling between the magnetic field and spin angular momentum in quasi-one-dimensional structure.

  4. Automatic generation of tree level helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, T.; Long, W. F.

    1994-11-01

    The program MadGraph is presented which automatically generates postscript Feynman diagrams and Fortran code to calculate arbitrary tree level helicity amplitudes by calling HELAS[1] subroutines. The program is written in Fortran and is available in Unix and VMS versions. MadGraph currently includes standard model interactions of QCD and QFD, but is easily modified to include additional models such as supersymmetry.

  5. Automatic generation of tree level helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, T.; Long, W. F.

    1994-07-01

    The program MadGraph is presented which automatically generates postscript Feynman diagrams and Fortran code to calculate arbitrary tree level helicity amplitudes by calling HELAS[1] subroutines. The program is written in Fortran and is available in Unix and VMS versions. MadGraph currently includes standard model interactions of QCD and QFD, but is easily modified to include additional models such as supersymmetry.

  6. Field of a helical Siberian Snake

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1995-02-01

    To preserve the spin polarization of a beam of high energy protons in a circular accelerator, magnets with periodic magnetic field, called Siberian Snakes are being used. Recently, it was proposed to build Siberian Snakes with superconducting helical dipoles. In a helical, or twisted dipole, the magnetic field is perpendicular to the axis of the helix and rotates around it as one proceeds along the magnet. In an engineering study of a 4 Tesla helical snake, the coil geometry is derived, by twisting, from the geometry of a cosine superconducting dipole. While waiting for magnetic measurement data on such a prototype, an analytical expression for the field of the helice is important, to calculate the particle trajectories and the spin precession in the helix. This model will also allow to determine the optical characteristics of the snake, as an insertion in the lattice of the accelerator. In particular, one can calculate the integrated multipoles through the magnet and the equivalent transfer matrix. An expression for the field in the helix body, i.e., excluding the fringe field was given in a classical paper. An alternate expression can be found by elaborating on the treatment of the field of a transverse wiggler obtained under the rather general conditions that the variables are separable. This expression exactly satisfies Maxwell`s div and curl equations for a stationary field, {del} {center_dot} B = 0, {del} x B = 0. This approach is useful in that it will allow one to use much of the work already done on the problem of inserting wigglers and undulators in the lattice of a circular accelerator.

  7. Bacteria that glide with helical tracks

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Beiyan; McBride, Mark J.; Chen, Jing; Zusman, David R.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria glide smoothly on surfaces, but with no discernable propulsive organelles on their surface. Recent experiments with Myxococcus xanthus and Flavobacterium johnsoniae show that both distantly related bacterial species glide utilizing proteins that move in helical tracks, albeit with significantly different motility mechanisms. Both species utilize proton motive force for movement. However, the motors that power gliding in M. xanthus have been identified, while the F. johnsoniae motors remain to be discovered. PMID:24556443

  8. Helical Cerenkov effect, a novel radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Soln, J. )

    1994-10-01

    The observability of the helical Cerenkov effect as a novel radiation source is discussed. Depending on the value of the index of refraction of the medium, the strength of the uniform magnetic field, and the electron beam energy, helical Cerenkov radiation can occur in the same spectral regions as the ordinary Cerenkov effect, that is, from microwave to visible wavelengths. From the kinematics point of view, the author argues that for a microwave wavelength of 10[sup [minus]1] cm this effect should be observable in a medium with an index of refraction of 1.4, with a beam energy of 3 MeV, and a uniform magnetic field of 4 T. On the specific level, however, for the sake of simplicity, he discusses the observability of this effect for visible light with the central wavelength of 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] cm which can be achieved with 2 MeV in beam energy, silica aerogel as a medium (with an index of refraction of 1.075), and uniform magnetic fields from 5 to 10 T. For a 10-T magnetic field, he calculates that in the visible region of 250 to 750 nm an electron will produce a photon per 10 cm of traveled length. As to the stimulated helical Cerenkov emission, the author estimates that respectable gains are possible even if the beam passes close to the dielectric rather than through it. In addition to being potentially a new radiation source, the helical Cerenkov effect could possibly be used as a detector of radiation by energetic electrons that are trapped in a medium by strong magnetic fields.

  9. Listeria's right-handed helical rocket-tail trajectories: mechanistic implications for force generation in actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Zeile, William L; Zhang, Fangliang; Dickinson, Richard B; Purich, Daniel L

    2005-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes forms right-handed helical rocket tail trajectories during actin-based motility in cell-free extracts, and this stereochemical feature is consistent with actoclampin's affinity-modulated, clamped-filament elongation model [Dickinson and Purich, 2002: Biophys J 82:605-617]. In that mechanism, right-handed torque is generated by an end-tracking molecular motor, each comprised of a filament barbed end and clamping protein that processively traces the right-handed helix of its filament partner. By contrast, torque is not a predicted property of those models (e.g., elastic propulsion, elastic Brownian ratchet, tethered ratchet, and insertional polymerization models) requiring filament barbed ends to depart/detach from the motile object's surface during/after each monomer-addition step. Helical trajectories also explain why Listeria undergoes longitudinal-axis rotation on a length-scale matching the helical periodicity of Listeria's rocket tails.

  10. Overview of the Helicity Injected Torus Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Hamp, W. T.; Izzo, V. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Redd, A. J.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.

    2004-11-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI) spheromak experiment (HIT-SI) [Jarboe, Fus. Tech., (36)1, p.85, 1999] addresses critical issues for spheromaks, including current drive, operation at high beta, and confinement. HIT-SI features an optimal high-beta plasma shape and current profile, steady-state operation, minimal plasma-wall interaction, and injected power always flowing into the plasma. HIT-SI has a ``bow-tie'' shaped 1 cm thick Cu flux conserver with major radius R = 0.33 m and axial extent of 0.57 m. A half torus helicity injector at each end of the flux conserver produces conjugate sinusoidal flux (4 MW peak) and loop voltages (20 MW peak) at 5 kHz by IGBT-based switching power amplifiers. Injector flux and loop voltages are phase controlled to maintain power flow always inward. Insulating breaks for the oscillating flux and loop voltage are provided by a novel double viton o-ring system. HIT-SI uses the diagnostic suite previously used by the HIT-II experiment, (presented in an accompanying poster.) Results and 3D MHD simulations will be presented.

  11. Helical swimming in viscoelastic and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Many bacteria swim by rotating helical flagella. These cells often live in polymer suspensions, which are viscoelastic. Recently there have been several theoretical and experimental studies showing that viscoelasticity can either enhance or suppress propulsion, depending on the details of the microswimmer. To help clarify this situation, we study experimentally the motility of the flagellum using a scaled-up model system - a motorized helical coil that rotates along its axial direction. A free-swimming speed is obtained when the net force on the helix is zero. When the helix is immersed in a viscoelastic (Boger) fluid, we find an increase in the force-free swimming speed as compared with the Newtonian case. The enhancement is maximized at a Deborah number of approximately one, and the magnitude depends not only on the elasticity of the fluid but also on the geometry of the helix. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss how spatial confinements, such as a porous medium, affect the flagellated swimming. For clarity, the porous media are modeled as cylindrical cavities with solid walls. A modified boundary element method allows us to investigate a situation that the helical flagella are very close to the wall, with high spatial resolution and relatively low computational cost. To our surprise, at fixed power consumption, a highly coiled flagellum swims faster in narrower confinements, while an elongated flagellum swims faster in a cavity with a wider opening. We try understanding these effects with simple physical pictures.

  12. Mechanical Resonances of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Dickel, D.; Pillai, B.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL®) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f2/f1 was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers.

  13. Helical antimicrobial polypeptides with radial amphiphilicity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Menghua; Lee, Michelle W.; Mansbach, Rachael A.; Song, Ziyuan; Bao, Yan; Peek, Richard M.; Yao, Catherine; Chen, Lin-Feng; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Cheng, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    α-Helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) generally have facially amphiphilic structures that may lead to undesired peptide interactions with blood proteins and self-aggregation due to exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Here we report the design of a class of cationic, helical homo-polypeptide antimicrobials with a hydrophobic internal helical core and a charged exterior shell, possessing unprecedented radial amphiphilicity. The radially amphiphilic structure enables the polypeptide to bind effectively to the negatively charged bacterial surface and exhibit high antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, the shielding of the hydrophobic core by the charged exterior shell decreases nonspecific interactions with eukaryotic cells, as evidenced by low hemolytic activity, and protects the polypeptide backbone from proteolytic degradation. The radially amphiphilic polypeptides can also be used as effective adjuvants, allowing improved permeation of commercial antibiotics in bacteria and enhanced antimicrobial activity by one to two orders of magnitude. Designing AMPs bearing this unprecedented, unique radially amphiphilic structure represents an alternative direction of AMP development; radially amphiphilic polypeptides may become a general platform for developing AMPs to treat drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:26460016

  14. Mechanical Resonances of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Saini, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Dickel, D.; Pillai, B.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL®) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f2/f1 was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers. PMID:24986377

  15. Buckling transition in long α-helices

    SciTech Connect

    Palenčár, Peter; Bleha, Tomáš

    2014-11-07

    The treatment of bending and buckling of stiff biopolymer filaments by the popular worm-like chain model does not provide adequate understanding of these processes at the microscopic level. Thus, we have used the atomistic molecular-dynamic simulations and the Amber03 force field to examine the compression buckling of α-helix (AH) filaments at room temperature. It was found that the buckling instability occurs in AHs at the critical force f{sub c} in the range of tens of pN depending on the AH length. The decrease of the force f{sub c} with the contour length follows the prediction of the classic thin rod theory. At the force f{sub c} the helical filament undergoes the swift and irreversible transition from the smoothly bent structure to the buckled one. A sharp kink in the AH contour arises at the transition, accompanied by the disruption of the hydrogen bonds in its vicinity. The kink defect brings in an effective softening of the AH molecule at buckling. Nonbonded interactions between helical branches drive the rearrangement of a kinked AH into the ultimate buckled structure of a compact helical hairpin described earlier in the literature.

  16. Manipulation of wavefront using helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhaokun; Tao, Huan; Zhao, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Helical metamaterials, a kind of 3-dimensional structure, has relatively strong coupling effect among the helical nano-wires. Therefore, it is expected to be a good candidate for generating phase shift and controlling wavefront with high efficiency. In this paper, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we studied the phase shift properties in the helical metamaterials. It is found that the phase shift occurs for both transmitted and reflected light waves. And the maximum of reflection coefficients can reach over 60%. In addition, the phase shift (φ) is dispersionless in the range of 600 nm to 860 nm, that is, it is only dominated by the initial angle (θ) of the helix. The relationship between them is φ = ± 2θ. Using Jones calculus we give a further explanation for these properties. Finally, by arranging the helixes in an array with a constant phase gradient, the phenomenon of anomalous refraction was also observed in a broad wavelength range. PMID:27505790

  17. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  18. Quantifying foot deformation using finite helical angle.

    PubMed

    Pothrat, Claude; Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Viehweger, Elke; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2015-10-15

    Foot intrinsic motion originates from the combination of numerous joint motions giving this segment a high adaptive ability. Existing foot kinematic models are mostly focused on analyzing small scale foot bone to bone motions which require both complex experimental methodology and complex interpretative work to assess the global foot functionality. This study proposes a method to assess the total foot deformation by calculating a helical angle from the relative motions of the rearfoot and the forefoot. This method required a limited number of retro-reflective markers placed on the foot and was tested for five different movements (walking, forefoot impact running, heel impact running, 90° cutting, and 180° U-turn) and 12 participants. Overtime intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the helical angle pattern repeatability for each movement. Our results indicated that the method was suitable to identify the different motions as different amplitudes of helical angle were observed according to the flexibility required in each movement. Moreover, the results showed that the repeatability could be used to identify the mastering of each motion as this repeatability was high for well mastered movements. Together with existing methods, this new protocol could be applied to fully assess foot function in sport or clinical contexts.

  19. Crystallographic insight-guided nanoarchitectonics and conductivity modulation of an n-type organic semiconductor through peptide conjugation.

    PubMed

    Pandeeswar, M; Khare, Harshavardhan; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Govindaraju, T

    2015-05-14

    Crystallographic insight-guided nanoarchitectonics of peptide-conjugated naphthalene diimide (NDI) is described. In a bio-inspired approach, non-proteinogenic α-amino isobutyric acid (Aib)- and alanine (Ala)-derived peptides orchestrated the 1D achiral and 2D chiral molecular ordering of NDI, respectively, which resulted in modulation of nanoscale morphology, chiroptical and conductivity properties. PMID:25876756

  20. Biophysical determinants for cellular uptake of hydrocarbon-stapled peptide helices.

    PubMed

    Bird, Gregory H; Mazzola, Emanuele; Opoku-Nsiah, Kwadwo; Lammert, Margaret A; Godes, Marina; Neuberg, Donna S; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-stapled peptides are a class of bioactive alpha-helical ligands developed to dissect and target protein interactions. While there is consensus that stapled peptides can be effective chemical tools for investigating protein regulation, their broader utility for therapeutic modulation of intracellular interactions remains an active area of study. In particular, the design principles for generating cell-permeable stapled peptides are empiric, yet consistent intracellular access is essential to in vivo application. Here, we used an unbiased statistical approach to determine which biophysical parameters dictate the uptake of stapled-peptide libraries. We found that staple placement at the amphipathic boundary combined with optimal hydrophobic and helical content are the key drivers of cellular uptake, whereas excess hydrophobicity and positive charge at isolated amino acid positions can trigger membrane lysis at elevated peptide dosing. Our results provide a design roadmap for maximizing the potential to generate cell-permeable stapled peptides with on-mechanism cellular activity. PMID:27547919

  1. 3D imaging and mechanical modeling of helical buckling in Medicago truncatula plant roots.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jesse L; Noar, Roslyn D; Packer, Michael S; Harrison, Maria J; Henley, Christopher L; Cohen, Itai; Gerbode, Sharon J

    2012-10-16

    We study the primary root growth of wild-type Medicago truncatula plants in heterogeneous environments using 3D time-lapse imaging. The growth medium is a transparent hydrogel consisting of a stiff lower layer and a compliant upper layer. We find that the roots deform into a helical shape just above the gel layer interface before penetrating into the lower layer. This geometry is interpreted as a combination of growth-induced mechanical buckling modulated by the growth medium and a simultaneous twisting near the root tip. We study the helical morphology as the modulus of the upper gel layer is varied and demonstrate that the size of the deformation varies with gel stiffness as expected by a mathematical model based on the theory of buckled rods. Moreover, we show that plant-to-plant variations can be accounted for by biomechanically plausible values of the model parameters.

  2. Refined modeling of superconducting double helical coils using finite element analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinon, S.; Fabbricatore, P.

    2012-06-01

    Double helical coils are becoming more and more attractive for accelerator magnets and other applications. Conceptually, a sinusoidal modulation of the longitudinal position of the turns allows virtually any multipolar field to be produced and maximizes the effectiveness of the supplied ampere turns. Being intrinsically three-dimensional, the modeling of such structures is very complicated, and several approaches, with different degrees of complexity, can be used. In this paper we present various possibilities for solving the magnetostatic problem of a double helical coil, through both finite element analyses and direct integration of the Biot-Savart law, showing the limits and advantages of each solution and the corresponding information which can be derived.

  3. Pseudo-phase Diagram of Cholesterol-Rich Filamentous, Helical Ribbon, and Crystal Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnikova, Y. A.; Elsenbeck, M.; Ou, Guanqing; Zastavker, Y. V.; Kashuri, K.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2009-03-01

    Optical and calorimetric techniques are employed to study temperature and concentration dependence of three self-assembled microstructure types formed in Chemically Defined Lipid Concentrate (CDLC): filaments, helical ribbons, and crystals. CDLC consists of cholesterol, bilayer-forming amphiphiles, and micelle-forming amphiphiles in water, and is considered to be a model system for cholesterol crystallization in gallbladder bile. Phase contrast and DIC microscopy indicate the presence of all three microstructure types in all samples studied. Optically observed structural evolution indicates that filaments first bend to form helical ribbons followed by clustering and ``straightening'' of these structures into short and increasingly thickening filaments that dissolve with increasing temperature. Complementary calorimetric studies (differential-scanning and modulation) reveal thermal signatures that correspond to this observed structural evolution, which occurs throughout a large region of metastable chemical coexistence. These results suggest that a pseudo-phase diagram for the microstructures formed in CDLC may be developed to explain the observed behavior of the system.

  4. Intracellular segment between transmembrane helices S0 and S1 of BK channel α subunit contains two amphipathic helices connected by a flexible loop

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Lai, Chaohua; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •The loop between S0 and S1 of BK channel was overexpressed and purified in DPC. •NMR studies indicated BK-IS1 contained two helices connected by a flexible loop. •Mg{sup 2+} titration of BK-IS1 indicated two possible binding sites of divalent ions. -- Abstract: The BK channel, a tetrameric potassium channel with very high conductance, has a central role in numerous physiological functions. The BK channel can be activated by intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, as well as by membrane depolarization. Unlike other tetrameric potassium channels, the BK channel has seven transmembrane helices (S0–S6) including an extra helix S0. The intracellular segment between S0 and S1 (BK-IS1) is essential to BK channel functions and Asp99 in BK-IS1 is reported to be responsible for Mg{sup 2+} coordination. In this study, BK-IS1 (44–113) was over-expressed using a bacterial system and purified in the presence of detergent micelles for multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies. Backbone resonance assignment and secondary structure analysis showed that BK-IS1 contains two amphipathic helices connected by a 36-residue loop. Amide {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE analysis indicated that the loop is very flexible, while the two amphipathic helices are possibly stabilized through interaction with the membrane. A solution NMR-based titration assay of BK-IS1 was performed with various concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}. Two residues (Thr45 and Leu46) with chemical shift changes were observed but no, or very minor, chemical shift difference was observed for Asp99, indicating a possible site for binding divalent ions or other modulation partners.

  5. ICPP: Results from Helical Axis Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, B. D.

    2000-10-01

    Helical axis stellarators produce magnetic surfaces of high rotational transform and moderate shear solely by means of external currents, with the promise of high β. Several machines with quite different toroidal, helical, and ``bumpy'' Fourier components of magnetic field are now operating. The H-1 Heliac (1m, 1Tesla: Canberra, Australia), an M=3, low aspect ratio flexible heliac has been operated up to 0.5 Tesla with RF heating up to Ti ~ 100eV. Confinement transitions observed in this plasma exhibit many features of improved confinement regimes in tokamaks obtained at much larger power. ECH at 28GHz is being commissioned, and results from a suite of scattering, scalar and vector tomographic and multipoint probe and optical measurements will be presented. The M=4 Flexible Heliac ``TJ-II'' (1.5m, 1.2T: CIEMAT, Madrid) has accumulated a database of ECH plasma (1T) for a variety of configurations, (iota ~ 1.3--2.24) and a comprehensive set of diagnostics. Temperatures up to 2keV were measured by Thomson scattering/ECE. Observations include stored energy dependence, evidence of internal transport barriers, ELM-like bursts of magnetic activity and E×B sheared flows near rational surfaces in the plasma boundary. A new advanced configuration, the helical-axis heliotron, ``Heliotron J'' (1.2m, 1.5T: IAE, Kyoto University), the successor to Heliotron E, uses a ``bumpy'' magnetic component to improve high-energy particle confinement and reduce neoclassical transport. A combination of toroidal and helical coils produces a range of configurations. First plasma was successfully produced on December 1999, by ECH at 53GHz(2ω_ce). Following field mapping and final installation of diagnostics, the full experiment will start July 2000. The Helically Symmetric Experiment, ``HSX'' (Univ. Wisconsin, Madison) employs computer optimized non-planar coils to exploit a quasi-symmetry that minimizes toroidal magnetic field harmonics, confirmed by recent mapping of the drift orbits

  6. Cryo-EM Structure Determination Using Segmented Helical Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fromm, S A; Sachse, C

    2016-01-01

    Treating helices as single-particle-like segments followed by helical image reconstruction has become the method of choice for high-resolution structure determination of well-ordered helical viruses as well as flexible filaments. In this review, we will illustrate how the combination of latest hardware developments with optimized image processing routines have led to a series of near-atomic resolution structures of helical assemblies. Originally, the treatment of helices as a sequence of segments followed by Fourier-Bessel reconstruction revealed the potential to determine near-atomic resolution structures from helical specimens. In the meantime, real-space image processing of helices in a stack of single particles was developed and enabled the structure determination of specimens that resisted classical Fourier helical reconstruction and also facilitated high-resolution structure determination. Despite the progress in real-space analysis, the combination of Fourier and real-space processing is still commonly used to better estimate the symmetry parameters as the imposition of the correct helical symmetry is essential for high-resolution structure determination. Recent hardware advancement by the introduction of direct electron detectors has significantly enhanced the image quality and together with improved image processing procedures has made segmented helical reconstruction a very productive cryo-EM structure determination method.

  7. Faraday signature of magnetic helicity from reduced depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, Axel; Stepanov, Rodion

    2014-05-10

    Using one-dimensional models, we show that a helical magnetic field with an appropriate sign of helicity can compensate the Faraday depolarization resulting from the superposition of Faraday-rotated polarization planes from a spatially extended source. For radio emission from a helical magnetic field, the polarization as a function of the square of the wavelength becomes asymmetric with respect to zero. Mathematically speaking, the resulting emission occurs then either at observable or at unobservable (imaginary) wavelengths. We demonstrate that rotation measure (RM) synthesis allows for the reconstruction of the underlying Faraday dispersion function in the former case, but not in the latter. The presence of positive magnetic helicity can thus be detected by observing positive RM in highly polarized regions in the sky and negative RM in weakly polarized regions. Conversely, negative magnetic helicity can be detected by observing negative RM in highly polarized regions and positive RM in weakly polarized regions. The simultaneous presence of two magnetic constituents with opposite signs of helicity is shown to possess signatures that can be quantified through polarization peaks at specific wavelengths and the gradient of the phase of the Faraday dispersion function. Similar polarization peaks can tentatively also be identified for the bi-helical magnetic fields that are generated self-consistently by a dynamo from helically forced turbulence, even though the magnetic energy spectrum is then continuous. Finally, we discuss the possibility of detecting magnetic fields with helical and non-helical properties in external galaxies using the Square Kilometre Array.

  8. Cryo-EM Structure Determination Using Segmented Helical Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fromm, S A; Sachse, C

    2016-01-01

    Treating helices as single-particle-like segments followed by helical image reconstruction has become the method of choice for high-resolution structure determination of well-ordered helical viruses as well as flexible filaments. In this review, we will illustrate how the combination of latest hardware developments with optimized image processing routines have led to a series of near-atomic resolution structures of helical assemblies. Originally, the treatment of helices as a sequence of segments followed by Fourier-Bessel reconstruction revealed the potential to determine near-atomic resolution structures from helical specimens. In the meantime, real-space image processing of helices in a stack of single particles was developed and enabled the structure determination of specimens that resisted classical Fourier helical reconstruction and also facilitated high-resolution structure determination. Despite the progress in real-space analysis, the combination of Fourier and real-space processing is still commonly used to better estimate the symmetry parameters as the imposition of the correct helical symmetry is essential for high-resolution structure determination. Recent hardware advancement by the introduction of direct electron detectors has significantly enhanced the image quality and together with improved image processing procedures has made segmented helical reconstruction a very productive cryo-EM structure determination method. PMID:27572732

  9. SMART Observation of Magnetic Helicity in Solar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, M.; Kitai, R.; Shibata, K.

    2006-08-01

    We examined the magnetic helicity of solar filaments from their structure in the chromosphere and corona. The H-alpha telescope of the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope (SMART) observed 239 intermediate filaments from 2005 July 1 to 2006 May 15. The intermediate filament usually locates between two active regions. Using these images, we identified the filament spine and its barbs, and determined the chromospheric filament helicity from the mean angle between each barbs and a spine. We found that 71% (78 of 110) of intermediate filaments in the northern hemisphere are negative helicity and 67% (87 of 129) of filaments in the southern hemisphere are positive, which agreed with the well-known hemispheric tendency of the magnetic helicity. Additionally, we studied the coronal helicity of intermediate filaments. The coronal filament helicity is defined as the crossing angle of threads formed a filament. The helicity pattern of coronal filaments obtained with EIT/SOHO 171A also shows the helicity hemispheric tendency. Namely, 65% (71 of 110) of coronal filaments in the northern hemisphere exhibit negative helicity and the 65% (84 of 129) of filaments in the southern hemisphere show negative helicity. These data were observed in the same day with the SMART H-alpha data. Moreover, we found 12 filament eruptions in our data. The 7 of 12 filaments show the clear opposite sign of the hemispheric tendency of the magnetic helicity. The helicity seems to be change during temporal evolution. This results suggest that filament instability may be driven by the opposite sign helicity injection from the foot point of the barb.

  10. New Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Galtier, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Hall magnetohydrodynamics is a mono-fluid plasma model appropriate for probing Final{some of the} physical processes (other than pure kinetic effects) at length scales smaller than the scales of standard MHD. In sub-ionic space plasma turbulence (e.g. the solar wind) this fluid model has been proved to be useful. Three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses three inviscid invariants which are the total energy, the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. In this presentation, we would like to discuss new exact relations for helicities (magnetic helicities and generalized helicities) which are derived for homogeneous stationary (not necessarily isotropic) Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e. the scalar product of two different increments and are written simply as ηM = di < δ ( {b} × {j}) \\cdot δ {b} >, with ηM the average magnetic helicity flux rate, {b} the magnetic field, {j} the current and ± ηG = < δ ( {v} × {Ω} ) \\cdot δ {Ω} > , with ηM the average generalized helicity flux rate, {v} the fluid velocity and {Ω} = {b} + dI {ω} being the generalized helicity where ω is simply the fluid vorticity ( = nabla × {v}). It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding helicities even in case of an anisotropic plasma turbulence. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations. The newly derived relations also show that like energy, a non-zero helicity flux can only be associated to a departure of Beltrami flow state. {Reference} S. Banerjee & S. Galtier, {Chiral Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence} (submitted).

  11. Effect of sinusoidal modulated currents and acute hypoxia on corticosterone content and activity of certain dehydrogenases in tissues of different rat organs during hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melik-Aslanova, L. L.; Frenkel, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    The state of hypokinesia in rats was reproduced by keeping them for 30 days in special box cages that restricted their mobility in all directions. Results show the resistance to acute hypoxic hypoxia is increased. This is linked to the considerable rise in the reduced level of corticosterone in different organs and the succinate dehydrogenase activity in the liver and brain. The letter indicated the primary oxidation of succinate, which has great importance in the adaptation of the oxidative metabolism to acute oxygen insufficiency. The use of sinusoidal modulated currents in the period of hypokinesia promotes normalization of the indices for resistance of the rats to acute hypoxia.

  12. Resistive Interchange Modes Destabilized by Helically Trapped Energetic Ions in a Helical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X. D.; Toi, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ohdachi, S.; Ido, T.; Tanaka, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshinuma, M.; Ogawa, K.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Isobe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Ozaki, T.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, R.; Shimizu, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Tsuchiya, H.

    2015-04-01

    A new bursting m =1 /n =1 instability (m ,n : poloidal and toroidal mode numbers) with rapid frequency chirping down has been observed for the first time in a helical plasma with intense perpendicular neutral beam injection. This is destabilized in the plasma peripheral region by resonant interaction between helically trapped energetic ions and the resistive interchange mode. A large radial electric field is induced near the edge due to enhanced radial transport of the trapped energetic ions by the mode, and leads to clear change in toroidal plasma flow, suppression of microturbulence, and triggering an improvement of bulk plasma confinement.

  13. Optical gating with organic building blocks. A quantitative model for the fluorescence modulation of photochromic perylene bisimide dithienylcyclopentene triads

    PubMed Central

    Pärs, Martti; Gradmann, Michael; Gräf, Katja; Bauer, Peter; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Köhler, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the capability of molecular triads, consisting of two strong fluorophores that were covalently linked to a photochromic molecule, for optical gating. Therefore we monitored the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophores as a function of the isomeric state of the photoswitch. From the analysis of our data we develop a kinetic model that allows us to predict quantitatively the degree of the fluorescence modulation as a function of the mutual intensities of the lasers that are used to induce the fluorescence and the switching of the photochromic unit. We find that the achievable contrast for the modulation of the fluorescence depends mainly on the intensity ratio of the two light beams and appears to be very robust against absolute changes of these intensities. The latter result provides valuable information for the development of all-optical circuits which would require to handle different signal strengths for the input and output levels. PMID:24614963

  14. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a specific…

  16. Triangular prism-shaped β-peptoid helices as unique biomimetic scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Jonas S.; Harris, Pernille; Fristrup, Peter; Olsen, Christian A.

    2015-01-01

    β-Peptoids are peptidomimetics based on N-alkylated β-aminopropionic acid residues (or N-alkyl-β-alanines). This type of peptide mimic has previously been incorporated in biologically active ligands and has been hypothesized to be able to exhibit foldamer properties. Here we show, for the first time, that β-peptoids can be tuned to fold into stable helical structures. We provide high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of homomeric β-peptoid hexamers, which reveal right-handed helical conformations with exactly three residues per turn and a helical pitch of 9.6–9.8 Å between turns. The presence of folded conformations in solution is supported by circular dichroism spectroscopy showing length- and solvent dependency, and molecular dynamics simulations provide further support for a stabilized helical secondary structure in organic solvent. We thus outline a framework for future design of novel biomimetics that display functional groups with high accuracy in three dimensions, which has potential for development of new functional materials. PMID:25943784

  17. Dispersion phenomena in helical flow in a concentric annulus.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Seok; Brenner, Howard

    2009-12-14

    We examined dispersion phenomena of solutes in helical flow in a concentric annulus through a multiscale approach. The helical flow was developed by the combination of the Poiseuille flow and Couette flow. Here, we present an analytic model that can address the multidimensional Taylor dispersion in the helical flow under a lateral field of thermophoresis (or thermal diffusion) in the gapwise direction. Macroscopic parameters including the average solute velocity and dispersivity were analyzed using relevant microscopic physicochemical properties. The mathematically obtained results were validated by the numerical simulation carried out in this study. The findings show that macrotransport processes are robust and straightforward to handle multidimensional dispersion phenomena of solutes in helical flow. This study is expected to provide a theoretical platform for applications of helical flow such as tube exchangers, oil drilling, and multidimensional field flow fractionations (e.g., helical flow field flow fractionation). PMID:20001025

  18. Dispersion phenomena in helical flow in a concentric annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Seok; Brenner, Howard

    2009-12-01

    We examined dispersion phenomena of solutes in helical flow in a concentric annulus through a multiscale approach. The helical flow was developed by the combination of the Poiseuille flow and Couette flow. Here, we present an analytic model that can address the multidimensional Taylor dispersion in the helical flow under a lateral field of thermophoresis (or thermal diffusion) in the gapwise direction. Macroscopic parameters including the average solute velocity and dispersivity were analyzed using relevant microscopic physicochemical properties. The mathematically obtained results were validated by the numerical simulation carried out in this study. The findings show that macrotransport processes are robust and straightforward to handle multidimensional dispersion phenomena of solutes in helical flow. This study is expected to provide a theoretical platform for applications of helical flow such as tube exchangers, oil drilling, and multidimensional field flow fractionations (e.g., helical flow field flow fractionation).

  19. Dispersion phenomena in helical flow in a concentric annulus.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Seok; Brenner, Howard

    2009-12-14

    We examined dispersion phenomena of solutes in helical flow in a concentric annulus through a multiscale approach. The helical flow was developed by the combination of the Poiseuille flow and Couette flow. Here, we present an analytic model that can address the multidimensional Taylor dispersion in the helical flow under a lateral field of thermophoresis (or thermal diffusion) in the gapwise direction. Macroscopic parameters including the average solute velocity and dispersivity were analyzed using relevant microscopic physicochemical properties. The mathematically obtained results were validated by the numerical simulation carried out in this study. The findings show that macrotransport processes are robust and straightforward to handle multidimensional dispersion phenomena of solutes in helical flow. This study is expected to provide a theoretical platform for applications of helical flow such as tube exchangers, oil drilling, and multidimensional field flow fractionations (e.g., helical flow field flow fractionation).

  20. Helicity Inferences Stemming from a Mean-Field Solar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, Valery

    The global magnetic field of the Sun is generated by dynamo instability that stems from interactions of magnetic field with the large and small-scale flows. Theoretically, it is expected that such interactions produce a helical magnetic field which evolves following to magnetic helicity conservation law. We discuss some consequences of magnetic helicity conservation for the mean-field solar dynamo. We also discuss the observational aspect of the problem including the recent results about observations of the current helicity of solar active regions, the magnetic helicity of the global magnetic field as revealed by SOHO/MDI observations, and the problem of magnetic helicity transport from the solar convection zone to the outer atmosphere.

  1. Density of states of helically symmetric boron carbon nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A C M; Bezerra, C G; Lawlor, J A; Ferreira, M S

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the existence of helical wrapping patterns in composite nanotube systems, in this work we study the effects of the helical incorporation of carbon atoms in boron nitride nanotubes. We consider the substitutional carbon atoms distributed in stripes forming helical patterns along the nanotube axis. The density of states and energy band gap were calculated adopting Green function formalism by using the Rubio-Sancho technique in order to solve the matrix Dyson equation. We report the effects of the helical atomic distribution of carbon atoms on the behaviour of the density of states and the energy band gap. In particular, we show that the electronic energy band gap displays a non-monotonical dependence on the helical pattern, oscillating as a function of the helical angle θ.

  2. Helical Growth of the Arabidopsis Mutant tortifolia2 Does Not Depend on Cell Division Patterns but Involves Handed Twisting of Isolated Cells[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Buschmann, Henrik; Hauptmann, Monika; Niessing, Dierk; Lloyd, Clive W.; Schäffner, Anton R.

    2009-01-01

    Several factors regulate plant organ growth polarity. tortifolia2 (tor2), a right-handed helical growth mutant, has a conservative replacement of Arg-2 with Lys in the α-tubulin 4 protein. Based on a published high-resolution (2.89 Å) tubulin structure, we predict that Arg-2 of α-tubulin forms hydrogen bonds with the GTPase domain of β-tubulin, and structural modeling suggests that these contacts are interrupted in tor2. Consistent with this, we found that microtubule dynamicity is reduced in the tor2 background. We investigated the developmental origin of the helical growth phenotype using tor2. One hypothesis predicts that cell division patterns cause helical organ growth in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. However, cell division patterns of tor2 root tips appear normal. Experimental uncoupling of cell division and expansion suggests that helical organ growth is based on cell elongation defects only. Another hypothesis is that twisting is due to inequalities in expansion of epidermal and cortical tissues. However, freely growing leaf trichomes of tor2 mutants show right-handed twisting and cortical microtubules form left-handed helices as early as the unbranched stage of trichome development. Trichome twisting is inverted in double mutants with tor3, a left-handed mutant. Single tor2 suspension cells also exhibit handed twisting. Thus, twisting of tor2 mutant organs appears to be a higher-order expression of the helical expansion of individual cells. PMID:19638477

  3. A versatile, non genetically modified organism (GMO)-based strategy for controlling low-producer mutants in Bordetella pertussis cultures using antigenic modulation.

    PubMed

    Goffin, Philippe; Slock, Thomas; Smessaert, Vincent; De Rop, Philippe; Dehottay, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    The uncontrolled presence of non-producer mutants negatively affects bioprocesses. In Bordetella pertussis cultures, avirulent mutants emerge spontaneously and accumulate. We characterized the dynamics of accumulation using high-throughput growth assays and competition experiments between virulent and avirulent (bvg(-) ) isolates. A fitness advantage of bvg(-) cells was identified as the main driver for bvg(-) accumulation under conditions of high virulence factor production. Conversely, under conditions that reduce their expression (antigenic modulation), bvg(-) takeover could be avoided. A control strategy was derived, which consists in applying modulating conditions whenever virulence factor production is not required. It has a wide range of applications, from routine laboratory operations to vaccine manufacturing, where pertussis toxin yields were increased 1.4-fold by performing early pre-culture steps in modulating conditions. Because it only requires subtle modifications of the culture medium and does not involve genetic modifications, this strategy is applicable to any B. pertussis isolate, and should facilitate regulatory acceptance of process changes for vaccine production. Strategies based on the same concept, could be derived for other industrially relevant micro-organisms. This study illustrates how a sound scientific understanding of physiological principles can be turned into a practical application for the bioprocess industry, in alignment with Quality by Design principles.

  4. A versatile, non genetically modified organism (GMO)-based strategy for controlling low-producer mutants in Bordetella pertussis cultures using antigenic modulation.

    PubMed

    Goffin, Philippe; Slock, Thomas; Smessaert, Vincent; De Rop, Philippe; Dehottay, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    The uncontrolled presence of non-producer mutants negatively affects bioprocesses. In Bordetella pertussis cultures, avirulent mutants emerge spontaneously and accumulate. We characterized the dynamics of accumulation using high-throughput growth assays and competition experiments between virulent and avirulent (bvg(-) ) isolates. A fitness advantage of bvg(-) cells was identified as the main driver for bvg(-) accumulation under conditions of high virulence factor production. Conversely, under conditions that reduce their expression (antigenic modulation), bvg(-) takeover could be avoided. A control strategy was derived, which consists in applying modulating conditions whenever virulence factor production is not required. It has a wide range of applications, from routine laboratory operations to vaccine manufacturing, where pertussis toxin yields were increased 1.4-fold by performing early pre-culture steps in modulating conditions. Because it only requires subtle modifications of the culture medium and does not involve genetic modifications, this strategy is applicable to any B. pertussis isolate, and should facilitate regulatory acceptance of process changes for vaccine production. Strategies based on the same concept, could be derived for other industrially relevant micro-organisms. This study illustrates how a sound scientific understanding of physiological principles can be turned into a practical application for the bioprocess industry, in alignment with Quality by Design principles. PMID:26014907

  5. Non-Kolmogorov cascade of helicity-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kessar, Mouloud; Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion; Balarac, Guillaume

    2015-09-01

    We solve the Navier-Stokes equations with two simultaneous forcings. One forcing is applied at a given large scale and it injects energy. The other forcing is applied at all scales belonging to the inertial range and it injects helicity. In this way we can vary the degree of turbulence helicity from nonhelical to maximally helical. We find that increasing the rate of helicity injection does not change the energy flux. On the other hand, the level of total energy is strongly increased and the energy spectrum gets steeper. The energy spectrum spans from a Kolmogorov scaling law k^{-5/3} for a nonhelical turbulence, to a non-Kolmogorov scaling law k^{-7/3} for a maximally helical turbulence. In the latter case we find that the characteristic time of the turbulence is not the turnover time but a time based on the helicity injection rate. We also analyze the results in terms of helical modes decomposition. For a maximally helical turbulence one type of helical mode is found to be much more energetic than the other one, by several orders of magnitude. The energy cascade of the most energetic type of helical mode results from the sum of two fluxes. One flux is negative and can be understood in terms of a decimated model. This negative flux, however, is not sufficient to lead an inverse energy cascade. Indeed, the other flux involving the least energetic type of helical mode is positive and the largest. The least energetic type of helical mode is then essential and cannot be neglected.

  6. On the Origin of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lirong; Alexander, David

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-three active regions associated with pronounced sigmoidal structure in Yohkoh soft X-ray observations are selected to investigate the origin of magnetic helicity in the solar corona. We calculate the radial magnetic flux of each polarity, the rate of magnetic helicity injection, and total flux of the helicity injection (Δ HLCT) over 4-5 days using MDI 96 minute line-of-sight magnetograms and a local correlation tracking technique. We also estimate the contribution from differential rotation to the overall helicity budget (Δ Hrot). It is found that of the seven active regions for which the flux emergence exceeds 1.0 × 1022 Mx, six exhibited a helicity flux injection exceeding 1.0 × 1043 Mx2 (i.e., Δ H = Δ HLCT - Δ Hrot). Moreover, the rate of helicity injection and the total helicity flux are larger (smaller) during periods of more (less) increase of magnetic flux. Of the remaining 16 active regions, with flux emergence less than 1022 Mx, only 4 had significant injection of helicity, exceeding 1043 Mx2. Typical contributions from differential rotation over the same period were 2-3 times smaller than that of the strong magnetic field emergence. These statistical results signify that the strong emergence of magnetic field is the most important origin of the coronal helicity, while horizontal motions and differential rotation are insufficient to explain the measured helicity injection flux. Furthermore, the study of the helicity injection in nineteen newly emerging active regions confirms the result on the important role played by strong magnetic flux emergence in controlling the injection of magnetic helicity into the solar corona.

  7. Ureterolithiasis: classical and atypical findings on unenhanced helical computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vaswani, Kuldeep K; El-Dieb, Adam; Vitellas, Kenneth M; Bennett, William F; Bova, James G

    2002-03-01

    Evaluation of patients with acute flank pain using helical computed tomography (CT) is a well-accepted, rapid, and safe procedure in the emergency setting. Various primary and secondary signs are described in the literature for evaluation of these patients. Our purpose is to demonstrate both the classical findings associated with ureteral calculi on unenhanced helical CT and atypical findings and potential pitfalls. We also provide readers with a systematic approach to interpreting unenhanced helical CT scans performed for acute flank pain.

  8. Helical structure of Bordetella pertussis fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Steven, A C; Bisher, M E; Trus, B L; Thomas, D; Zhang, J M; Cowell, J L

    1986-01-01

    The helical structures of Bordetella pertussis fimbriae of serotypes 2 and 6 were determined by optical diffraction analysis of electron micrographs of negatively stained paracrystalline bundles of purified fimbriae. The fimbrial structure is based on an axial repeat of 13 nm that contains five repeating units in two complete turns of a single-start helix. This structure was confirmed by direct measurements of mass per unit length for individual fimbriae performed by dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy of unstained specimens. These data further established that the helically repeating unit is a monomer of fimbrial protein (Mr congruent to 22,000 for type 2 and Mr congruent to 21,500 for type 6). Radial density profiles calculated from the scanning transmission electron micrographs showed that the fimbria has peak density at its center, i.e., no axial channel, consistent with the results of conventional negative-staining electron microscopy. The radial profile gives an outermost diameter of approximately 7.5 nm, although the peripheral density is, on average, diffuse, allowing sufficient intercalation between adjacent fimbriae to give a center-to-center spacing of approximately 5.5 nm in the paracrystals. Despite serological and biochemical differences between type 2 and type 6 fimbriae, the packing arrangements of their fimbrial subunits are identical. From this observation, we infer that the respective subunits may have in common conserved regions whose packing dictates the helical geometry of the fimbria. It is plausible that a similar mechanism may underlie the phenomenon of phase variations in other systems of bacterial fimbriae. Images PMID:2875062

  9. The helical decomposition and the instability assumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, Fabian A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations show that the triadic transfer function T(k,p,q) peaks sharply when q (or p) is much smaller than k. The triadic transfer function T(k,p,q) gives the rate of energy input into wave number k from all interactions with modes of wave number p and q, where k, p, q form a triangle. This observation was thought to suggest that energy is cascaded downscale through non-local interactions with local transfer and that there was a strong connection between large and small scales. Both suggestions were in contradiction with the classical Kolmogorov picture of the energy cascade. The helical decomposition was found useful in distinguishing between kinematically independent interactions. That analysis has gone beyond the question of non-local interaction with local transfer. In particular, an assumption about the statistical direction of triadic energy transfer in any kinematically independent interaction was introduced (the instability assumption). That assumption is not necessary for the conclusions about non-local interactions with local transfer recalled above. In the case of turbulence under rapid rotation, the instability assumption leads to the prediction that energy is transferred in spectral space from the poles of the rotation axis toward the equator. The instability assumption is thought to be of general validity for any type of triad interactions (e.g. internal waves). The helical decomposition and the instability assumption offer detailed information about the homogeneous statistical dynamics of the Navier-Stokes equations. The objective was to explore the validity of the instability assumption and to study the contributions of the various types of helical interactions to the energy cascade and the subgrid-scale eddy-viscosity. This was done in the context of spectral closures of the Direct Interaction or Quasi-Normal type.

  10. Helical Magnetic Fields from Sphaleron Decay and Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Copi, Craig J.; Ferrer, Francesc; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Achucarro, Ana

    2008-10-24

    Many models of baryogenesis rely on anomalous particle physics processes to give baryon number violation. By numerically evolving the electroweak equations on a lattice, we show that baryogenesis in these models creates helical cosmic magnetic fields, though the helicity created is smaller than earlier analytical estimates. After a transitory period, electroweak dynamics is found to conserve the Chern-Simons number and the total electromagnetic helicity. We argue that baryogenesis could lead to magnetic fields of nano-Gauss strength today on astrophysical length scales. In addition to being astrophysically relevant, such helical magnetic fields can provide an independent probe of baryogenesis and CP violation in particle physics.

  11. Helical Magnetic Fields from Sphaleron Decay and Baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copi, Craig J.; Ferrer, Francesc; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Achúcarro, Ana

    2008-10-01

    Many models of baryogenesis rely on anomalous particle physics processes to give baryon number violation. By numerically evolving the electroweak equations on a lattice, we show that baryogenesis in these models creates helical cosmic magnetic fields, though the helicity created is smaller than earlier analytical estimates. After a transitory period, electroweak dynamics is found to conserve the Chern-Simons number and the total electromagnetic helicity. We argue that baryogenesis could lead to magnetic fields of nano-Gauss strength today on astrophysical length scales. In addition to being astrophysically relevant, such helical magnetic fields can provide an independent probe of baryogenesis and CP violation in particle physics.

  12. Applying of helicity in an analysis of a severe sandstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jian-hong; Wang, Jin-song; Feng, Jian-ying; Chang, Yue; Liu, Xiao-li

    2005-08-01

    The helicity of a severe sandstorm happened in Northwest China was analyzed by using global reanalysis grid data of NCEP/NCAR for 4 times a day. As an important physical parameter in analyzing and predicting severe convective weather, the helicity also has good indication in the forecasting of sandstorm. The distribution of helicity over the sandstorm area was negative at higher levels and positive at lower levels. There was definite relationship between the evolvement of helicity's negative value at higher levels and the occurrence of sandstorm.

  13. The global distribution of magnetic helicity in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.

    2016-10-01

    By defining an appropriate field line helicity, we apply the powerful concept of magnetic helicity to the problem of global magnetic field evolution in the Sun's corona. As an ideal-magnetohydrodynamic invariant, the field line helicity is a meaningful measure of how magnetic helicity is distributed within the coronal volume. It may be interpreted, for each magnetic field line, as a magnetic flux linking with that field line. Using magneto-frictional simulations, we investigate how field line helicity evolves in the non-potential corona as a result of shearing by large-scale motions on the solar surface. On open magnetic field lines, the helicity injected by the Sun is largely output to the solar wind, provided that the coronal relaxation is sufficiently fast. But on closed magnetic field lines, helicity is able to build up. We find that the field line helicity is non-uniformly distributed, and is highly concentrated in twisted magnetic flux ropes. Eruption of these flux ropes is shown to lead to sudden bursts of helicity output, in contrast to the steady flux along the open magnetic field lines. Movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Spin transport in helical biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz, Elena; Gutierrez, Rafael

    2014-08-20

    Motivated by the recent experimental demonstration of spin selective effects in monolayers of double-stranded DNA oligomers, our work presents a minimal model to describe electron transmission through helical fields. Our model highlight that the lack of inversion symmetry due to the chirality of the potential is a key factor which will lead to a high spin-polarization (SP). We also study the stability of the SP against fluctuations of the electronic structure induced by static disorder affecting the on-site energies. In the energy regions where the spin-filtering occurs, our results remain stable against moderate disorders although the SP is slightly reduced.

  15. Helicon wave excitation with helical antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Light, M.; Chen, F.F.

    1995-04-01

    Components of the wave magnetic field in a helicon discharge have been measured with a single-turn, coaxial magnetic probe. Left- and right-handed helical antennas, as well as plane-polarized antennas, were used; and the results were compared with the field patterns computed for a nonuniform plasma. The results show that the right-hand circularly polarized mode is preferentially excited with all antennas, even those designed to excite the left-hand mode. For right-hand excitation, the radial amplitude profiles are in excellent agreement with computations. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Generalized unitarity and six-dimensional helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Zvi; Dennen, Tristan; Huang, Yu-tin; Ita, Harald; Carrasco, John Joseph

    2011-04-15

    We combine the unitarity method with the six-dimensional helicity formalism of Cheung and O'Connell to construct loop-level scattering amplitudes. As a first example, we construct dimensionally regularized QCD one-loop four-point amplitudes. As a nontrivial multiloop example, we confirm that the recently constructed four-loop four-point amplitude of N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory, including nonplanar contributions, is valid for dimensions D{<=}6. We comment on the connection of our approach to the recently discussed Higgs infrared regulator and on dual conformal properties in six dimensions.

  17. [Helical CT of urinary tract: clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Roy, C; Tuchmann, C; Guth, S; Lang, H; Saussine, C; Jacqmin, D

    2000-09-01

    Helical CT is the most useful imaging modality to evaluate kidney diseases. Different imaging protocols are used to assess the correct diagnosis in each clinical situation. The nephrographic phase (between 90 and 100 s of delay after injection) is more accurate than the cortical phase (between 30 and 40 s of delay) to depict and characterise small renal masses. Multiplanar and 3D reconstruction are useful to plan partial kidney surgery or percutaneous surgery of lithiasis. In emergency, spiral CT, if available, is suitable to assess renal colic. Spiral CT is the best modality to evaluate traumatic kidney.

  18. Inverse moments equilibria for helical anisotropic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Hirshman, S. P.; Depassier, M. C.

    1987-11-01

    An energy functional is devised for magnetic confinement schemes that have anisotropic plasma pressure. The minimization of this energy functional is demonstrated to reproduce components of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force balance relation in systems with helical symmetry. An iterative steepest descent procedure is applied to the Fourier moments of the inverse magnetic flux coordinates to minimize the total energy and thus generate anisotropic pressure MHD equilibria. Applications to straight ELMO Snaky Torus (NTIS Document No. DE-84002406) configurations that have a magnetic well on the outermost flux surfaces have been obtained.

  19. Helical Luttinger liquid in topological insulator nanowires.

    PubMed

    Egger, R; Zazunov, A; Yeyati, A Levy

    2010-09-24

    We derive and analyze the effective low-energy theory for interacting electrons in a cylindrical nanowire made of a strong topological insulator. Three different approaches provide a consistent picture for the band structure, where surface states forming inside the bulk gap correspond to one-dimensional bands indexed by total angular momentum. When a half-integer magnetic flux pierces the nanowire, we find a strongly correlated helical Luttinger liquid topologically protected against weak disorder. We describe how transport experiments can detect this state.

  20. Dissipation of Energy, Cross Helicity, and Magnetic Helicity in Ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluie, Hussein; Eyink, Gregory L.; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2007-11-01

    The ``invariants'' of ideal MHD--energy, cross helicity, and magnetic helicity--need not be conserved in the limit of zero viscosity and resistivity if the solution fields become singular. This is observed to occur in MHD turbulence, where the effective dissipation is due to nonlinear cascade of the invariants to small-scales. We study the large-scale balances of the three invariants via a ``coarse-graining'' approach related to Wilson-Kadanoff renormalization group. The ideal dissipation in this framework is due to ``turbulent stress'' and ``turbulent EMF'' generated by eliminated plasma motions below the coarse-graining length. We derive upper bounds on these turbulent contributions to the MHD equations and improve the necessary conditions of [1] for ideal dissipation. In particular, we show that the conditions for turbulent dissipation/forward cascade of magnetic helicity are so severe--infinite 3rd-order moments of the velocity & magnetic fields!--that they are unlikely to ever naturally occur. We also establish local balance equations in space-time of the three invariants, both for measurable ``coarsed-grained'' variables and also for ``bare'' fields. On this basis we give physical interpretations of the turbulent cascades, in terms of work concepts for energy and in terms of topological linkage [2] for the two helicities. [1] Caflisch et al. 1997 Comm. Math. Phys. 184, 443-455 [2] Moffatt, H. K. 1969 J. Fluid Mech. 35, 117-129.

  1. Monte Carlo calculation of VMAT and helical tomotherapy dose distributions for lung stereotactic treatments with intra-fraction motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belec, J.; Clark, B. G.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to calculate realistic dose distributions that include the continuous deformation of organs and continuous motion of machine using 4D Monte Carlo methods for both volumetric modulated arc therapy and helical tomotherapy treatments. As part of a previous study, we presented a method to perform position-probability-sampled Monte Carlo dose calculations in the BEAMnrc and DOSXZYnrc user codes of EGSnrc. In this study, the DOSXYZnrc user code was further modified to account for the continuous intra-fraction deformation of the patient geometry. We implemented in the user code a method to update the transport grid densities as a function of time and map the energy deposited in the time dependent transport grid back to a reference grid. We provide information on the measurements performed to validate the implementation of this method and present an example of the application of the method for lung stereotactic treatments with intra-fraction motion. The results show that breathing motion is properly addressed with the internal target volume method for the cases studied.

  2. Permanent polarization and charge distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs): Insights from near-infrared charge-modulation spectroscopy of an operating OLED

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Alfred P.; Haskins, Terri L.; Young, Ralph H.; Rothberg, Lewis J.

    2014-03-21

    Vapor-deposited Alq{sub 3} layers typically possess a strong permanent electrical polarization, whereas NPB layers do not. (Alq{sub 3} is tris(8-quinolinolato)aluminum(III); NPB is 4,4′-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]biphenyl.) The cause is a net orientation of the Alq{sub 3} molecules with their large dipole moments. Here we report on consequences for an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with an NPB hole-transport layer and Alq{sub 3} electron-transport layer. The discontinuous polarization at the NPB|Alq{sub 3} interface has the same effect as a sheet of immobile negative charge there. It is more than compensated by a large concentration of injected holes (NPB{sup +}) when the OLED is running. We discuss the implications and consequences for the quantum efficiency and the drive voltage of this OLED and others. We also speculate on possible consequences of permanent polarization in organic photovoltaic devices. The concentration of NPB{sup +} was measured by charge-modulation spectroscopy (CMS) in the near infrared, where the NPB{sup +} has a strong absorption band, supplemented by differential-capacitance and current-voltage measurements. Unlike CMS in the visible, this method avoids complications from modulation of the electroluminescence and electroabsorption.

  3. Roll-to-roll printed silver nanowires for increased stability of flexible ITO-free organic solar cell modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Reis Benatto, Gisele A.; Roth, Bérenger; Corazza, Michael; Søndergaard, Roar R.; Gevorgyan, Suren A.; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C.

    2015-12-01

    We report the use of roll-to-roll printed silver nanowire networks as front electrodes for fully roll-to-roll processed flexible indium-tin-oxide (ITO) free OPV modules. We prepared devices with two types of back electrodes, a simple PEDOT:PSS back electrode and a PEDOT:PSS back electrode with a printed silver grid in order to simultaneously explore the influence of the back electrode structure on the operational stability of the modules that did not include any UV-protection. We subjected the devices to stability testing under a number of protocols recommended by the international summit on OPV stability (ISOS). We explored accelerated ISOS-D-2, ISOS-D-3, ISOS-L-2, ISOS-L-3, ISOS-O-1 and ISOS-O-2 testing protocols and compared the performance to previous reports employing the same testing protocols on devices with PEDOT:PSS instead of the silver nanowires in the front electrode. We find significantly increased operational stability across all ISOS testing protocols over the course of the study and conclude that replacement of PEDOT:PSS in the front electrode with silver nanowires increase operational stability by up to 1000%. The duration of the tests were in the range of 140-360 days. The comparison of front and back electrode stability in this study shows that the modules with silver nanowire front electrodes together with a composite back electrode comprising PEDOT:PSS and a silver grid present the best operational stability.

  4. Fumarate and cytosolic pH as modulators of the synthesis or consumption of C(4) organic acids through NADP-malic enzyme in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Arias, Cintia Lucía; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Drincovich, María Fabiana; Gerrard Wheeler, Mariel Claudia

    2013-02-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a plant species that accumulates high levels of organic acids and uses them as carbon, energy and reducing power sources. Among the enzymes that metabolize these compounds, one of the most important ones is malic enzyme (ME). A. thaliana contains four malic enzymes (NADP-ME 1-4) to catalyze the reversible oxidative decarboxylation of malate in the presence of NADP. NADP-ME2 is the only one located in the cell cytosol of all Arabidopsis organs providing most of the total NADP-ME activity. In the present work, the regulation of this key enzyme by fumarate was investigated by kinetic assays, structural analysis and a site-directed mutagenesis approach. The final effect of this metabolite on NADP-ME2 forward activity not only depends on fumarate and substrate concentrations but also on the pH of the reaction medium. Fumarate produced an increase in NADP-ME2 activity by binding to an allosteric site. However at higher concentrations, fumarate caused a competitive inhibition, excluding the substrate malate from binding to the active site. The characterization of ME2-R115A mutant, which is not activated by fumarate, confirms this hypothesis. In addition, the reverse reaction (reductive carboxylation of pyruvate) is also modulated by fumarate, but in a different way. The results indicate pH-dependence of the fumarate modulation with opposite behavior on the two activities analyzed. Thereby, the coordinated action of fumarate over the direct and reverse reactions would allow a precise and specific modulation of the metabolic flux through this enzyme, leading to the synthesis or degradation of C(4) compounds under certain conditions. Thus, the physiological context might be exerting an accurate control of ME activity in planta, through changes in metabolite and substrate concentrations and cytosolic pH.

  5. Dependence of mobility on density of gap states in organics by GAMEaS-gate modulated activation energy spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Woo-young; Lang, David V.; Butko, Vladimir Y.; Chi, Xiaoliu; Lashley, Jason C.; Ramirez, Arthur P.

    2008-09-01

    We develop a broadly applicable transport-based technique, gate modulated activation energy spectroscopy (GAMEaS), for determining the density of states (DOS) in an energy gap. GAMEaS is applied to field-effect transistors (FETs) made from different single crystal oligomer semiconductors. We find that there are two distinct types of band tails, deep and shallow, depending on the crystallization process. The exponential band tails of the localized DOS are characterized by their slope with the highest mobility FETs having a value of 29 eV-1 close to 1/kBT at 300 K.

  6. Dynamic Jaws and Dynamic Couch in Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sterzing, Florian; Uhl, Matthias; Hauswald, Henrik; Schubert, Kai; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Chen Yu; Lu Weiguo; Mackie, Rock; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus; Oliveira, Gustavo

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the next generation of helical tomotherapy delivery with dynamic jaw and dynamic couch movements. Methods and Materials: The new technique of dynamic jaw and dynamic couch movements is described, and a comparative planning study is performed. Ten nasopharyngeal cancer patients with skull base infiltration were chosen for this comparison of longitudinal dose profiles using regular tomotherapy delivery, running-start-stop treatment, and dynamic jaw and dynamic couch delivery. A multifocal simultaneous integrated boost concept was used (70.4Gy to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes; 57.4Gy to the bilateral cervical lymphatic drainage pathways, 32 fractions). Target coverage, conformity, homogeneity, sparing of organs at risk, integral dose, and radiation delivery time were evaluated. Results: Mean parotid dose for all different deliveries was between 24.8 and 26.1Gy, without significant differences. The mean integral dose was lowered by 6.3% by using the dynamic technique, in comparison with a 2.5-cm-field width for regular delivery and 16.7% with 5-cm-field width for regular delivery. Dynamic jaw and couch movements reduced the calculated radiation time by 66% of the time required with regular 2.5-cm-field width delivery (199 sec vs. 595 sec, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The current delivery mode of helical tomotherapy produces dose distributions with conformal avoidance of parotid glands, brain stem, and spinal cord. The new technology with dynamic jaw and couch movements improves the plan quality by reducing the dose penumbra and thereby reducing the integral dose. In addition, radiation time is reduced by 66% of the regular delivery time.

  7. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  8. Vaporization-condensation-recrystallization process-mediated synthesis of helical m-aminobenzoic acid nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seok Min; Hwang, In-Chul; Shin, Namsoo; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Sang Joo; Lee, Jin Yong; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2007-11-01

    One-dimensional (1D) helical organic nanostructures were synthesized by a modified vapor-solid (VS) process, called the vaporization-condensation-recrystallization (VCR) process. The conventional solution-phase synthetic methods generally mediate self-assemblies of repeating unit molecules. To provide enough intermolecular interaction forces among the unit molecules, such strategy requires specific designs and syntheses of complex unit molecules as they possess numerous functional groups including phenyl rings, hydroxyl groups, long aliphatic chains, etc. On the contrary, we found that small and simple organic molecules, for example, m-ABA, could be self-assembled by the VCR process, resulting in 1D helical organic nanostructures. When m-aminobenzoic acid (m-ABA) powders were vaporized and transported to be condensed on a cooler region, the condensates were recrystallized into 1D helical nanobelts. Each step of the VCR process was confirmed from control experiments performed by varying reaction times, substrate types, and reaction temperatures. Powder XRD data, SAED analysis, and theoretical calculations revealed that dimers of m-ABA molecules have repeating units, and the growth axis of m-ABA nanohelices is [100].

  9. Optically pure, water-stable metallo-helical ‘flexicate’ assemblies with antibiotic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howson, Suzanne E.; Bolhuis, Albert; Brabec, Viktor; Clarkson, Guy J.; Malina, Jaroslav; Rodger, Alison; Scott, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The helicates—chiral assemblies of two or more metal atoms linked by short or relatively rigid multidentate organic ligands—may be regarded as non-peptide mimetics of α-helices because they are of comparable size and have shown some relevant biological activity. Unfortunately, these beautiful helical compounds have remained difficult to use in the medicinal arena because they contain mixtures of isomers, cannot be optimized for specific purposes, are insoluble, or are too difficult to synthesize. Instead, we have now prepared thermodynamically stable single enantiomers of monometallic units connected by organic linkers. Our highly adaptable self-assembly approach enables the rapid preparation of ranges of water-stable, helicate-like compounds with high stereochemical purity. One such iron(II) ‘flexicate’ system exhibits specific interactions with DNA, promising antimicrobial activity against a Gram-positive bacterium (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA252), but also, unusually, a Gram-negative bacterium (Escherichia coli, MC4100), as well as low toxicity towards a non-mammalian model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans).

  10. Harnessing the Unique Structural Properties of Isolated α-Helices*

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Carter J.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-01-01

    The α-helix is a ubiquitous secondary structural element that is almost exclusively observed in proteins when stabilized by tertiary or quaternary interactions. However, beginning with the unexpected observations of α-helix formation in the isolated C-peptide in ribonuclease A, there is growing evidence that a significant percentage (0.2%) of all proteins contain isolated stable single α-helical domains (SAH). These SAH domains provide unique structural features essential for normal protein function. A subset of SAH domains contain a characteristic ER/K motif, composed of a repeating sequence of ∼4 consecutive glutamic acids followed by ∼4 consecutive basic arginine or lysine (R/K) residues. The ER/K α-helix, also termed the ER/K linker, has been extensively characterized in the context of the myosin family of molecular motors and is emerging as a versatile structural element for protein and cellular engineering applications. Here, we review the structure and function of SAH domains, as well as the tools to identify them in natural proteins. We conclude with a discussion of recent studies that have successfully used the modular ER/K linker for engineering chimeric myosin proteins with altered mechanical properties, as well as synthetic polypeptides that can be used to monitor and systematically modulate protein interactions within cells. PMID:25059657

  11. Multifrequency Force Microscopy of Helical Protein Assembly on a Virus

    PubMed Central

    Calò, Annalisa; Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Stoliar, Pablo; De Sancho, David; Santos, Sergio; Verdaguer, Albert; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy techniques have been extensively used to investigate the structure of soft, biological matter at the nanoscale, from very thin membranes to small objects, like viruses. Electron microscopy techniques allow for obtaining extraordinary resolution by averaging signals from multiple identical structures. In contrast, atomic force microscopy (AFM) collects data from single entities. Here, it is possible to finely modulate the interaction with the samples, in order to be sensitive to their top surface, avoiding mechanical deformations. However, most biological surfaces are highly curved, such as fibers or tubes, and ultimate details of their surface are in the vicinity of steep height variations. This limits lateral resolution, even when sharp probes are used. We overcome this problem by using multifrequency force microscopy on a textbook example, the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV). We achieved unprecedented resolution in local maps of amplitude and phase shift of the second excited mode, recorded together with sample topography. Our data, which combine multifrequency imaging and Fourier analysis, confirm the structure deduced from averaging techniques (XRD, cryoEM) for surface features of single virus particles, down to the helical pitch of the coat protein subunits, 2.3 nm. Remarkably, multifrequency AFM images do not require any image postprocessing. PMID:26915629

  12. Helical tomotherapy optimized planning parameters for nasopharyngeal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yawichai, K.; Chitapanarux, I.; Wanwilairat, S.

    2016-03-01

    Helical TomoTherapy(HT) planning depends on optimize parameters including field width (FW), pitch factor (PF) and modulation factor (MF). These optimize parameters are effect to quality of plans and treatment time. The aim of this study was to find the optimized parameters which compromise between plan quality and treatment times. Six nasopharyngeal cancer patients were used. For each patient data set, 18 treatment plans consisted of different optimize parameters combination (FW=5.0, 2.5, 1.0 cm; PF=0.43, 0.287, 0.215; MF2.0, 3.0) were created. The identical optimization procedure followed ICRU83 recommendations. The average D50 of both parotid glands and treatment times per fraction were compared for all plans. The study show treatment plan with FW1.0 cm showed the lowest average D50 of both parotid glands. The treatment time increased inversely to FW. The FW1.0 cm the average treatment time was 4 times longer than FW5.0 cm. PF was very little influence on the average D50 of both parotid glands. Finally, MF increased from 2.0 to 3.0 the average D50 of both parotid glands was slightly decreased. However, the average treatment time was increased 22.28%. For routine nasopharyngeal cancer patients with HT, we suggest the planning optimization parameters consist of FW=5.0 cm, PF=0.43 and MF=2.0.

  13. Helicity of the Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2009-11-01

    Magnetic helicity is a physical quantity that measures the degree of linkages and twistedness in the field lines. It is given by a volume integral over the scalar product of magnetic field B and its vector potential A. Direct computation of magnetic helicity in the solar atmosphere is not possible due to two reasons. First, we do not have the observations at different heights in the solar atmosphere to compute the volume integral. Second, the vector potential A is non-unique owing to gauge variance. Many researchers incorrectly inferred twist, a component of magnetic helicity, from the force-free parameter α. We clarified the physical meaning of α and its relation with the magnetic helicity. Also, a direct method is proposed for the computation of global α values of sunspots. An analytical bipole was generated to study the effect of polarimetric noise on the estimation of various magnetic parameters. We find that the effect of polarimetric noise, present in the recent vector magnetograms e.g., from Hinode (Solar Optical Telescope/Spectro- Polarimeter (SOT/SP)), on the magnetic parameters like α and magnetic energy, is negligible. We examined the fine structures of local current and α in the sunspots. Local α patches of opposite signs are present in the umbra of each sunspot. The amplitude of the spatial variation of local α in the umbra is typically of the order of the global α of the sunspot. We find that the local α and current are distributed as alternately positive and negative filaments in the penumbra. The amplitude of azimuthal variation of the local α in the penumbra is approximately an order of magnitude larger than that in the umbra. The contributions of the local positive and negative currents and α in the penumbra cancel each other giving almost no contribution for their global values for whole sunspot. We have introduced the concept of signed shear angle (SSA) for sunspots and establish its importance for non force

  14. Gyrotron beam generation with helical magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. H.; Sedlak, C. A.

    1983-08-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation into the basic properties of a new type of electron gun for generating high transverse velocity beams, the bifilar helix - Pierce gun or H-gun. The H-gun differs significantly from presently used magnetron injection guns (MIGs) in that first a laminar, low transverse velocity beam is formed and then transverse velocity is imparted by propagating the beam through the magnetic field of a bifilar helix. In order to evaluate the H-gun, an analytic and computational study was conducted to examine the relationships between the magnetic fields (axial and helical), and the beam properties after existing the helical field. The effects of the helix field entrance profile, the helix-axial field gyroresonance, and helix field gradients have been taken into account in the investigation. Based on the results of this research, conditions have been specified which will produce a high transverse velocity beam with low axial velocity spread. In particular, it has been found that an adiabatic helix entrance profile can provide a flexible means of generating high quality beams for gyro-devices.

  15. Determining How Magnetic Helicity Injection Really Works

    SciTech Connect

    Paul M. Bellan

    2001-10-09

    OAK-B135 The goal of the Caltech program is to determine how helicity injection works by investigating the actual dynamics and topological evolution associated with magnetic relaxation. A new coaxial helicity injection source has been constructed and brought into operation. The key feature of this source is that it has maximum geometric simplicity. Besides being important for fusion research, this work also has astrophysical implications. Photos obtained using high-speed cameras show a clear sequence of events in the formation process. In particular, they show initial merging/reconnection processes, jet-like expansion, kinking, and separation of the plasma from the source. Various diagnostics have been developed, including laser induced fluorescence and soft x-ray detection using high speed diodes. Gas valves have been improved and a patent disclosure relating to puffed gas valves has been filed. Presentations on this work have been given in the form of invited talks at several university physics departments that were previously unfamiliar with laboratory plasma experiments.

  16. Cosmic acceleration and the helicity-0 graviton

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Pirtskhalava, David

    2011-05-15

    We explore cosmology in the decoupling limit of a nonlinear covariant extension of Fierz-Pauli massive gravity obtained recently in arXiv:1007.0443. In this limit the theory is a scalar-tensor model of a unique form defined by symmetries. We find that it admits a self-accelerated solution, with the Hubble parameter set by the graviton mass. The negative pressure causing the acceleration is due to a condensate of the helicity-0 component of the massive graviton, and the background evolution, in the approximation used, is indistinguishable from the {Lambda}CDM model. Fluctuations about the self-accelerated background are stable for a certain range of parameters involved. Most surprisingly, the fluctuation of the helicity-0 field above its background decouples from an arbitrary source in the linearized theory. We also show how massive gravity can remarkably screen an arbitrarily large cosmological constant in the decoupling limit, while evading issues with ghosts. The obtained static solution is stable against small perturbations, suggesting that the degravitation of the vacuum energy is possible in the full theory. Interestingly, however, this mechanism postpones the Vainshtein effect to shorter distance scales. Hence, fifth force measurements severely constrain the value of the cosmological constant that can be neutralized, making this scheme phenomenologically not viable for solving the old cosmological constant problem. We briefly speculate on a possible way out of this issue.

  17. Microwave Studies of Perfluoropentane and its Helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Bohn, Robert K.; Montgomery, John A.; , Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Unlike hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons are helical in their all-trans most stable conformations. A definitive experimental determination of the helical angle has not been accomplished because single crystal X-ray studies are not available due to the lack of suitable crystallization solvents, but a value of 17^° from exactly trans is generally accepted from X-ray fiber studies. Using a pulsed-jet Fourier Transform microwave spectrometer, we have observed and assigned the rotational spectra of the lowest energy all-anti C_2 symmetry form of perfluoro-n-pentane and all three of its ^{13}C isotopomers. A, B, and C values of the parent species are 990.6394(4) MHz, 314.00020(14) MHz, and 304.37034(14) MHz, respectively. A range of effective r_0 structures incorporating various model constraints are consistent with about 16^° torsion and a Kraitchman analysis of the parent and ^{13}C species gives 13.3^°. Ab initio calculations are consistent with the experimental results.

  18. Neutrino helicity reversal and fundamental symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.; Wundt, B. J.

    2014-07-01

    A rather elusive helicity reversal occurs in a gedanken experiment in which a massive left-handed Dirac neutrino, traveling at a velocity u < c, is overtaken on a highway by a speeding vehicle (traveling at velocity v with u < v < c). Namely, after passing the neutrino, looking back, one would see a right-handed neutrino (which has never been observed in nature). The Lorentz-invariant mass of the right-handed neutrino is still the same as before the passing. The gedanken experiment thus implies the existence of right-handed, light neutrinos, which are not completely sterile. Furthermore, overtaking a bunch of massive right-handed Dirac neutrinos leads to gradual de-sterilization. We discuss the helicity reversal and the concomitant sterilization and de-sterilization mechanisms by way of an illustrative example calculation, with a special emphasis on massive Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. We contrast the formalism with a modified Dirac neutrino described by a Dirac equation with a pseudoscalar mass term proportional to the fifth current.

  19. Long polypeptide 310-helices at atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Bavoso, Alfonso; Benedetti, Ettore; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Pavone, Vincenzo; Pedone, Carlo; Toniolo, Claudio; Bonora, Gian Maria

    1986-01-01

    The crystal-state preferred conformation of the terminally blocked homooctapeptide from the Cα,α-dimethylated α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residue, pBrBz-(Aib)8-OBut, in which pBrBz is para-bromobenzoyl and OBut is tert-butoxy, determined by x-ray diffraction analysis using direct methods, was found to be a 310-helix stabilized by six consecutive intramolecular N—H....O=C hydrogen bonds of the C10-III (or III′) type. This is the first observation at atomic resolution of a regular 310-helix longer than two complete turns. The solid-state structural analysis was extended to the terminally blocked, α-aminoisobutyric acid-rich octapeptide corresponding to the 2-9 sequence of the peptaibol antibiotics emerimicins III and IV, pBrBz-Aib3-L-Val-Gly-L-Leu-Aib2-OMe. Again, this peptide adopts a (right-handed) 310-helical structure, although slightly distorted at the level of the L-leucine residue. The role of specific amino acid sequence and peptide main-chain length in stabilizing either the 310- or the α-helical conformation and their possible implications on the nature of the channel formed by peptaibol antibiotics in the membrane are also briefly discussed. PMID:16593674

  20. Quantification of a Helical Origami Fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Eric; Han, Xiaomin; Chen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has served as a source of inspiration for innovations in science and engineering. Here, we present the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami fold. The origami structure created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, local bistability and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern generated by the fold closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. We use six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. Finally, we present a mathematical model of the local bistability of the twisting origami fold. Our study elucidates the mechanisms behind the helical coiling and local bistability of the twisting origami fold, with potential applications in robotics and deployable structures. Acknowledgment to Branco Weiss Fellowship for funding.