Science.gov

Sample records for modulates acetylcholinesterase activity

  1. Pre-treatment with ebselen and vitamin E modulate acetylcholinesterase activity: interaction with demyelinating agents.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Cinthia M; Spanevello, Roselia; Ahmed, Musthaq; Pereira, Luciane B; Gonçalves, Jamile F; Corrêa, Maisa; Schmatz, Roberta; Stefanello, Naiara; Leal, Daniela B R; Mazzanti, Alexandre; Ramos, Adriano T; Martins, Tessie B; Danesi, Cristiane Cademartori; Graça, Dominguita L; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C

    2009-02-01

    The ethidium bromide (EB) demyelinating model was associated with vitamin E (Vit E) and ebselen (Ebs) treatment to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the striatum (ST), hippocampus (HP), cerebral cortex (CC) and erythrocytes. Rats were divided into seven groups: I-Control (saline), II-(canola); III-(Ebs), IV-(Vit E); V-(EB); VI-(EB+Ebs) and VII-(EB+Vit E). At 3 days after the EB injection, AChE activity in the CC and HC was significantly reduced in groups III, IV, V, VI and VII (p<0.05) and in the ST it was reduced in groups III and V (p<0.05) when compared to the control group. At 21 days after the EB injection, AChE activity in the CC was significantly reduced in groups III, IV and V, while in groups VI and VII a significant increase was observed when compared to the control group. In the HC and ST, AChE activity was significantly reduced in groups V, VI and VII when compared to the control group (p<0.05). In the erythrocytes, at 3 days after the EB injection, AChE activity was significantly reduced in groups III, IV, V, VI and VII and at 21 days there was a significant reduction only in groups VI and VII (p<0.05) when compared to the control group. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that Ebs and Vit E interfere with the cholinergic neurotransmission by altering AChE activity in the different brain regions and in the erythrocytes. Furthermore, treatment with Vit E and Ebs protected against the demyelination lesion caused by EB. In this context, we can suggest that ebselen and Vit E should be considered potential therapeutics and scientific tools to be investigated in brain disorders associated with demyelinating events.

  2. Acrylonitrile has Distinct Hormetic Effects on Acetyl-Cholinesterase Activity in Mouse Brain and Blood that are Modulated by Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Yuanqing, He; Suhua, Wang; Guangwei, Xing; Chunlan, Ren; Hai, Qian; Wenrong, Xu; Rongzhu, Lu; Aschner, Michael; Milatovic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Acrylonitrile(AN) is a neurotoxin both in animals and humans, but its effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity remain controversial. This study aimed to determine the dose-response effects of AN on AChE activity and the modulatory role of ethanol pre-treatment. A total of 144 Kunming mice were randomly divided into 18 groups: nine groups received 5% ethanol in their drinking water, and the remaining nine groups received regular tap water. One week later, both the ethanol and tap water only groups were given an intraperitoneal injection of AN at the following doses: 0 (control), 0.156, 0.3125, 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 or 20 mg AN/kg body weight. AChE activity was determined on whole blood and brain 24 h later. Blood AChE activity was higher in AN-injected mice than in controls at all doses. AChE activity in blood increased in a dose-dependent manner, peaking at 0.156 mg/kg, after which a gradual decrease ensued, displaying a β-typed dose-response relationship. In contrast, brain AChE activity, following a single AN injection, was consistently lower than in control mice, and continued to fall up to a dose of 0.313 mg/kg, and thereafter increased gradually with higher doses. Mice receiving a 20 mg/kg dose of AN exhibited AChE brain activity indistinguishable from that of control mice, demonstrating a typical U-typed dose-response relationship. The activity of AChE in the blood and brain of the AN + ethanol-treated groups displayed a shift to the right, and the magnitude of the decrease in AChE activity induced by AN was attenuated relative to the AN-only group. These results suggest that AN affects AChE activity in both mouse blood and brain in a hormetic manner. Pretreatment with ethanol modifies the effect of AN on AChE, indicating that parent AN has a more prominent role than its metabolites in modulating enzyme activity. PMID:23550232

  3. Guarana (Paullinia cupana) ameliorates memory impairment and modulates acetylcholinesterase activity in Poloxamer-407-induced hyperlipidemia in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ruchel, Jader B; Braun, Josiane B S; Adefegha, Stephen A; Guedes Manzoni, Alessandra; Abdalla, Fátima H; de Oliveira, Juliana S; Trelles, Kelly; Signor, Cristiane; Lopes, Sônia T A; da Silva, Cássia B; Castilhos, Lívia G; Rubin, Maribel A; Leal, Daniela B R

    2017-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a risk factor for the development of cognitive dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Natural compounds have recently received special attention in relation to the treatment of disease due to their low cost and wide margin of safety. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the possible preventive effect of guarana powder (Paullinia cupana) on memory impairment and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the brain structures of rats with Poloxamer-407-induced hyperlipidemia. Adult male Wistar rats were pretreated with guarana (12.5, 25 and 50mg/kg/day) and caffeine (0.2mg/kg/day) by gavage for a period of 30days. Simvastatin (0.04mg/kg) was administered as a comparative standard. Acute hyperlipidemia was induced with intraperitoneal injections of 500mg/kg of Poloxamer-407. Memory tests and evaluations of anxiety were performed. The cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum were separated to assess acetylcholinesterase activity. Our results revealed that guarana powder was able to reduce the levels of TC and LDL-C in a manner similar to simvastatin. Guarana powder also partially reduced the liver damage caused by hyperlipidemia. Guarana was able to prevent changes in the activity of AChE and improve memory impairment due to hyperlipidemia. Guarana powder may therefore be a source of promising phytochemicals that can be used as adjuvant therapy in the management of hyperlipidemia and cognitive disorders.

  4. Pre-treatment with curcumin modulates acetylcholinesterase activity and proinflammatory cytokines in rats infected with Trypanosoma evansi.

    PubMed

    Wolkmer, Patrícia; Silva, Cássia B da; Paim, Francine C; Duarte, Marta M M F; Castro, Verônica; Palma, Heloisa E; França, Raqueli T; Felin, Diandra V; Siqueira, Lucas C; Lopes, Sonia T A; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Monteiro, Silvia G; Mazzanti, Cinthia M

    2013-04-01

    The potent activity against Trypanosomes and health beneficial effects of curcumin (Cur) has been demonstrated in various experimental models. In this study, we evaluated the in vivo effect of Cur as trypanocide and as potential anti-inflammatory agent, through the evaluation of immunomodulatory mechanisms in rats infected with Trypanosoma evansi. Daily oral Cur was administered at doses of 0, 20 or 60mg/kg as preventive treatment (30 and 15days pre infection) and as treatment (post infection). The treatment of the groups continued until the day of euthanasia. Fifteen days after inoculation, parasitemia, plasma proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) and blood acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) were analyzed. Pretreatment with Cur reduced parasitemia and lethality. Cur inhibited AChE activity and improved immunological response by cytokines proinflammatory, fundamental during T. evansi infection. We found that Cur is not so important as an antitrypanosomal activity but as immunomodulator agent. These findings reveal that the preventive use of Cur stimulates anti-inflammatory mechanisms, reducing an excessive inflammatory response.

  5. Acetylcholinesterase modulates neurite outgrowth on fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Giordano, C; Poiana, G; Augusti-Tocco, G; Biagioni, S

    2007-05-04

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been reported to be involved in the modulation of neurite outgrowth. To understand the role played by different domains, we transfected neuroblastoma cells with three constructs containing the invariant region of AChE, differing in the exon encoding the C-terminus and therefore in AChE cellular fate and localization. All isoforms increased neurite extension, suggesting the involvement of the invariant domain [A. De Jaco, G. Augusti-Tocco, S. Biagioni, Alternative AChE molecular forms exhibit similar ability to induce neurite outgrowth, J. Neurosci. Res. 70 (2002) 756-765]. The peripheral anionic site (PAS) is encoded by invariant exons and represents the domain involved in non-cholinergic functions of AChE. Masking of PAS with fasciculin results in a significant decrease of neurite outgrowth in all clones overexpressing AChE. A strong reduction was also observed when clones were cultured on fibronectin. Treatment of clones with fasciculin, therefore masking PAS, abolished the fibronectin-induced reduction. The inhibition of the catalytic site cannot revert the fibronectin effect. Finally, when clones were cultured on fibronectin in the presence of heparin, a ligand of fibronectin, the inhibitory effect was completely reversed. Our results indicate that PAS could directly or indirectly mediate AChE/fibronectin interactions.

  6. Acetylcholinesterase activity in Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Denker, Elsa; Chatonnet, Arnaud; Rabet, Nicolas

    2008-09-25

    Cholinesterase activity is known in representatives of all living organisms phyla but the origin of the cholinergic system as known in bilaterian animals is still undeciphered. In particular the implication of cholinesterases in the nervous system of non-bilaterian Metazoa is not well known. We thus chose to investigate this activity in the Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria) medusa. In toto histochemical staining revealed an acetylcholinesterase activity in the tentacle bulbs but not in the nervous system. Sequences homologous to acetylcholinesterase were searched within Clytia ESTs and compared to other sequences found in public databases.

  7. Lower Acetylcholinesterase Activity among Children Living with Flower Plantation Workers

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Lopez, Jose R.; Jacobs, David R.; Himes, John H.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Lazovich, DeAnn; Gunnar, Megan

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children of workers exposed to pesticides are at risk of secondary pesticide exposure. We evaluated the potential for lower acetylcholinesterase activity in children cohabiting with fresh-cut flower plantation workers, which would be expected from organophosphate and carbamate insecticide exposure. Parental home surveys were performed and acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in 277 children aged 4–9 years in the study of Secondary Exposure to Pesticides among Infants, Children and Adolescents (ESPINA). Participants lived in a rural county in Ecuador with substantial flower plantation activity. RESULTS Mean acetylcholinesterase activity was 3.14 U/ml, standard deviation (SD): 0.49. It was lower by 0.09 U/ml (95% confidence interval (CI) −0.19, −0.001) in children of flower workers (57% of participants) than non-flower workers’ children, after adjustment for gender, age, height-for-age, hemoglobin concentration, income, pesticide use within household lot, pesticide use by contiguous neighbors, examination date and residence distance to nearest flower plantation. Using a 4 level polychotomous acetylcholinesterase activity dependent variable, flower worker cohabitation (vs. not) had odds ratio 3.39 (95% CI 1.19, 9.64) for being <15th percentile compared to the highest tertile. Children cohabitating for ≥5 years (vs. never) had OR of 4.11 (95% CI: 1.17, 14.38) of AChE activity within <15th percentile compared to the highest tertile. CONCLUSIONS Cohabitation with a flower worker was related to lower acetylcholinesterase activity in children. This supports the hypothesis that the amount of take-home pesticides from flower workers suffices to decrease acetylcholinesterase activity, with lower activity associated with longer exposure. PMID:22405996

  8. Production of Enzymatically Active Human Acetylcholinesterase in E. Coli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    AD-A282 703 lE1l1lm11I AD( CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-90-C-0107 TITLE: PRODUCTION OF ENZYMATICALLY ACTIVE HUMAN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE IN E . COLI PRINCIPAL...FUNDING NUMBERS Production of Enzymatically Active Human Contract No. Acetylcholinesterase in E . coli DAMD17-90-C-0107 6. AUTHOR(S) M. Gorecki, Ph.D. and M...S493pMFL-52Ser - Run #1 37 Table 8: Summary of reconstitution and purification of rhAChE derived from E . coli S493pMFL-52Ser - Run #2 38 Table 9

  9. Active Acetylcholinesterase Immobilization on a Functionalized Silicon Surface.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, K; Sam, S; Gouget-Laemmel, A C; Henry de Villeneuve, C; Moraillon, A; Ozanam, F; Yang, J; Kermad, A; Ghellai, N; Gabouze, N

    2015-08-04

    In this work, we studied the attachment of active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme on a silicon substrate as a potential biomarker for the detection of organophosphorous (OP) pesticides. A multistep functionalization strategy was developed on a crystalline silicon surface: a carboxylic acid-terminated monolayer was grafted onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface by photochemical hydrosilylation, and then AChE was covalently attached through amide bonds using an activation EDC/NHS process. Each step of the modification was quantitatively characterized by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated-total-reflection geometry (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The kinetics of enzyme immobilization was investigated using in situ real-time infrared spectroscopy. The enzymatic activity of immobilized acetylcholinesterase enzymes was determined with a colorimetric test. The surface concentration of active AChE was estimated to be Γ = 1.72 × 10(10) cm(-2).

  10. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for organophosphates binding to acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Ruark, Christopher D; Hack, C Eric; Robinson, Peter J; Anderson, Paul E; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2013-02-01

    Organophosphates are a group of pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents that inhibit acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of the excitatory neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Numerous structural variants exist for this chemical class, and data regarding their toxicity can be difficult to obtain in a timely fashion. At the same time, their use as pesticides and military weapons is widespread, which presents a major concern and challenge in evaluating human toxicity. To address this concern, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) was developed to predict pentavalent organophosphate oxon human acetylcholinesterase bimolecular rate constants. A database of 278 three-dimensional structures and their bimolecular rates was developed from 15 peer-reviewed publications. A database of simplified molecular input line entry notations and their respective acetylcholinesterase bimolecular rate constants are listed in Supplementary Material, Table I. The database was quite diverse, spanning 7 log units of activity. In order to describe their structure, 675 molecular descriptors were calculated using AMPAC 8.0 and CODESSA 2.7.10. Orthogonal projection to latent structures regression, bootstrap leave-random-many-out cross-validation and y-randomization were used to develop an externally validated consensus QSAR model. The domain of applicability was assessed by the William's plot. Six external compounds were outside the warning leverage indicating potential model extrapolation. A number of compounds had residuals >2 or <-2, indicating potential outliers or activity cliffs. The results show that the HOMO-LUMO energy gap contributed most significantly to the binding affinity. A mean training R (2) of 0.80, a mean test set R (2) of 0.76 and a consensus external test set R (2) of 0.66 were achieved using the QSAR. The training and external test set RMSE values were found to be 0.76 and 0.88. The results suggest that this QSAR model can be used in

  11. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with seizures.

    PubMed

    Chai, Orit; Sommer, Adi; Zimmerman, Gabriel; Soreq, Hermona; Friedman, Alon; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Aroch, Itamar; Shamir, Merav H

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies in animal models have focused on the role of cholinergic elements, mainly acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the 'readthrough' acetylcholinesterase isoform (AChE-R), in seizures. A prospective double-masked study was conducted to assess the activity of AChE and AChE-R in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 26 dogs post-seizure, 28 dogs with intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) and 16 healthy dogs. AChE was also measured in the serum in the post-seizure and IVDD groups. The results showed no significant differences in CSF AChE among the three groups. AChE-R was not detected in any dog and AChE in the serum was similar between groups. This preliminary study provides new information on AChE and AChE-R in the CSF and sera of dogs following naturally-occurring seizures.

  12. Modulation of the Immune Response by Nematode Secreted Acetylcholinesterase Revealed by Heterologous Expression in Trypanosoma musculi

    PubMed Central

    Vaux, Rachel; Schnoeller, Corinna; Berkachy, Rita; Roberts, Luke B.; Hagen, Jana; Gounaris, Kleoniki

    2016-01-01

    Nematode parasites secrete molecules which regulate the mammalian immune system, but their genetic intractability is a major impediment to identifying and characterising the biological effects of these molecules. We describe here a novel system for heterologous expression of helminth secreted proteins in the natural parasite of mice, Trypanosoma musculi, which can be used to analyse putative immunomodulatory functions. Trypanosomes were engineered to express a secreted acetylcholinesterase from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Infection of mice with transgenic parasites expressing acetylcholinesterase resulted in truncated infection, with trypanosomes cleared early from the circulation. Analysis of cellular phenotypes indicated that exposure to acetylcholinesterase in vivo promoted classical activation of macrophages (M1), with elevated production of nitric oxide and lowered arginase activity. This most likely occurred due to the altered cytokine environment, as splenocytes from mice infected with T. musculi expressing acetylcholinesterase showed enhanced production of IFNγ and TNFα, with diminished IL-4, IL-13 and IL-5. These results suggest that one of the functions of nematode secreted acetylcholinesterase may be to alter the cytokine environment in order to inhibit development of M2 macrophages which are deleterious to parasite survival. Transgenic T. musculi represents a valuable new vehicle to screen for novel immunoregulatory proteins by extracellular delivery in vivo to the murine host. PMID:27802350

  13. Induction of plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice challenged with organophosphorus poisons

    SciTech Connect

    Duysen, Ellen G.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2011-09-01

    The restoration of plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice following inhibition by organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents has been attributed to synthesis of new enzyme. It is generally assumed that activity levels return to normal, are stable and do not exceed the normal level. We have observed over the past 10 years that recovery of acetylcholinesterase activity levels in mice treated with organophosphorus agents (OP) exceeds pretreatment levels and remains elevated for up to 2 months. The most dramatic case was in mice treated with tri-cresyl phosphate and tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate, where plasma acetylcholinesterase activity rebounded to a level 250% higher than the pretreatment activity. The present report summarizes our observations on plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice treated with chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos oxon, diazinon, tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate, tri-cresyl phosphate, tabun thiocholine, parathion, dichlorvos, and diisopropylfluorophosphate. We have developed a hypothesis to explain the excess acetylcholinesterase activity, based on published observations. We hypothesize that acetylcholinesterase activity is induced when cells undergo apoptosis and that consequently there is a rise in the level of plasma acetylcholinesterase. - Highlights: > Acetylcholinesterase activity is induced by organophosphorus agents. > AChE induction is related to apoptosis. > Induction of AChE activity by OP is independent of BChE.

  14. Effect of fluorocarbons on acetylcholinesterase activity and some counter measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W.; Parker, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    An isolated vagal sympathetic heart system has been successfully used for the study of the effect of fluorocarbons (FCs) on cardiac performance and in situ enzyme activity. Dichlorodifluoromethane sensitizes this preparation to sympathetic stimulation and to exogenous epinephrine challenge. Partial and complete A-V block and even cardiac arrest have been induced by epinephrine challenge in the FC sensitized heart. Potassium chloride alone restores the rhythmicity but not the normal contractility of the heart in such a situation. Addition of glucose will, however, completely restore the normal function of the heart which is sensitized by dichlorodifluoromethane. The ED 50 values of acetylcholinesterase activity which are used as a measure of relative effectiveness of fluorocarbons are compared with the maximum permissible concentration. Kinetic studies indicate that all the fluorocarbons tested so far are noncompetitive.

  15. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of uleine from Himatanthus lancifolius.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Cláudia; Correia, Beatriz L; Stinghen, Andréa E M; Santos, Cid A M

    2010-01-01

    Application of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors is the primary treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Alkaloids, such as physostigmine, galanthamine, and huperzine A, play an important role as AChE inhibitors. The aim of this work was to evaluate Himatanthus lancifolius (Muell. Arg.) Woodson, a Brazilian species of Apocynaceae, and its main indole alkaloid uleine, in order to identify new AChE inhibitors. The plant fluid extract, fractions, and uleine were tested for AChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's colorimetric method for thin-layer chromatography (TLC), 96-well microplates, and also Marston's TLC colorimetric method. Both TLC assays showed similar results. At 5 mg/mL, the fluid extract inhibited the AChE enzyme by (50.71 +/- 8.2)%. The ethyl acetate fraction exhibited the highest level of AChE inhibition, followed by the dichloromethane fraction. The isolated alkaloid uleine displayed an IC50 value of 0.45 microM.

  16. Unbalanced acetylcholinesterase activity in larynx squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Castillo-González, Ana Cristina; Pelegrín-Hernández, Juan Pablo; Nieto-Cerón, Susana; Madrona, Antonio Piñero; Noguera, José Antonio; López-Moreno, María Fuensanta; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno; Vidal, Cecilio J; Hellín-Meseguer, Diego; Cabezas-Herrera, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that a non-neuronal cholinergic system is expressed aberrantly in airways. A proliferative effect is exerted directly by cholinergic agonists through the activation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. In cancer, particularly those related with smoking, the mechanism through which tumour cells respond to aberrantly activated cholinergic signalling is a key question. Fifty paired pieces of larynx squamous cell carcinoma and adjacent non-cancerous tissue were compared in terms of their acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE). The AChE activity in non-cancerous tissues (0.248 ± 0.030 milliunits per milligram of wet tissue; mU/mg) demonstrates that upper respiratory tissues express sufficient AChE activity for controlling the level of acetylcholine (ACh). In larynx carcinomas, the AChE activity decreased to 0.157 ± 0.024 mU/mg (p=0.009). Larynx cancer patients exhibiting low ACh-degrading enzymatic activity had a significantly shorter overall survival (p=0.031). Differences in the mRNA levels of alternatively spliced AChE isoforms and molecular compositions were noted between glottic and supraglottic cancers. Our results suggest that the low AChE activity observed in larynx squamous cell carcinoma may be useful for predicting the outcome of patients.

  17. EEG SPECTRA, BEHAVIORAL STATES AND MOTOR ACTIVITY IN RATS EXPOSED TO ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITOR CHLORPYRIFOS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OP) has been associated with sleep disorders: insomnia and ?excessive dreaming'. However neuronal mechanisms of these effects have not been analyzed. OP inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity leading to a hyperativity of the brain cholin...

  18. Simultaneous ultrastructural visualization of acetylcholinesterase activity and tritiated norepinephrine uptake in renal nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas, L.; Wang, P.

    1983-02-01

    In this investigation we have combined the methods of ultrastructural demonstration of acetylcholinesterase activity with electron microscopic autoradiography for the demonstration of norepinephrine uptake. The results show electron-dense deposits indicative of acetylcholinesterase activity associated with perivascular axons overlaid by concentrations of silver grains representing exogenous tritiated norepinephrine. Forty-five percent of the intervaricose regions and 19% of the varicosities overlaid by autoradiographic grains showed ''moderate'' amounts of cholinesterase staining. A greater proportion of autoradiographic grains was observed on the varicosities than in the intervaricose regions; however, the amount of acetylcholinesterase activity was greater in the intervaricose regions than in the varicosities. This investigation provides evidence for the presence of periaxonal acetylcholinesterase staining in adrenergic axons in the rat kidney.

  19. Acetylcholinesterase activity in an experimental rat model of Type C hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marta; Méndez-López, Magdalena; López, Laudino; Aller, María A; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L

    2011-05-01

    Patients with liver malfunction often suffer from hepatic encephalopathy, a neurological complication which can affect attention and cognition. Diverse experimental models have been used to study brain alterations that may be responsible for hepatic encephalopathy symptoms. The aim of the study was to determine whether cognitive impairment found in cirrhosis could be due to disturbance of acetylcholinesterase activity. Acetylcholinesterase activity was assessed in the brains of Wistar rats with thioacetamide-induced cirrhosis. The cirrhotic group displayed up-regulation of acetylcholinesterase levels in the entorrhinal cortex, anterodorsal and anteroventral thalamus and accumbens, whereas down-regulation was found in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Our results indicate that the experimental model of hepatic encephalopathy by chronic administration of thioacetamide presents alterations of acetylcholinesterase activity in brain limbic system regions, which play a role in attention and memory.

  20. A microfluidic paper-based device to assess acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunye; Gomez, Frank A

    2017-04-01

    Neurotransmitters play key roles in cell-to-cell communication. These chemical messengers are involved in many functional processes, including growth, reproduction, memory, and behavior. In this communication, we describe a novel microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) to detect acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and inhibitor screening through a colorimetric analysis. The μPAD is easily fabricated via a wax printing process whereby wax is deposited onto the surface of chromatographic paper, and heated to create a hydrophobic barrier. Separate solutions of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and samples containing AChE and acetylthiocholine iodide (ATC) (or cysteine, Cys), respectively, are directly spotted onto the μPAD. DTNB and AChE/ATC (or Cys) flow towards each other where a reaction occurs to form the yellow colored 2-nitro-5-thiobenzoic acid anion (TNB(2-) ). The device is dried, scanned, and analyzed yielding a linear range of average inverse yellow intensities versus substrate concentration. An IC50 value (0.045 nM) with a known inhibitor, neostigmine bromide (NB), is obtained on the device. μPADs are low cost and easy to fabricate and have great potential to quantify neurotransmitter activity.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase Activity and Neurodevelopment in Boys and Girls

    PubMed Central

    Himes, John H.; Jacobs, David R.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphate exposures can affect children’s neurodevelopment, possibly due to neurotoxicity induced by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, and may affect boys more than girls. We tested the hypothesis that lower AChE activity is associated with lower neurobehavioral development among children living in Ecuadorian floricultural communities. METHODS: In 2008, we examined 307 children (age: 4–9 years; 52% male) and quantified AChE activity and neurodevelopment in 5 domains: attention/executive functioning, language, memory/learning, visuospatial processing, and sensorimotor (NEPSY-II test). Associations were adjusted for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and height-for-age, flower worker cohabitation, and hemoglobin concentration. RESULTS: Mean ± standard deviation AChE activity was 3.14 ± 0.49 U/mL (similar for both genders). The range of scores among neurodevelopment subtests was 5.9 to 10.7 U (standard deviation: 2.6–4.9 U). Girls had a greater mean attention/executive functioning domain score than boys. In boys only, there were increased odds ratios of low (<9th percentile) neurodevelopment among those in the lowest tertile versus the highest tertile of AChE activity (odds ratios: total neurodevelopment: 5.14 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.84 to 31.48]; attention/executive functioning domain: 4.55 [95% CI: 1.19 to 17.38], memory/learning domain: 6.03 [95% CI: 1.17 to 31.05]) after adjustment for socioeconomic and demographic factors, height-for-age, and hemoglobin. Within these domains, attention, inhibition and long-term memory subtests were most affected. CONCLUSIONS: Low AChE activity was associated with deficits in neurodevelopment, particularly in attention, inhibition, and memory in boys but not in girls. These critical cognitive skills affect learning and academic performance. Added precautions regarding secondary occupational pesticide exposure would be prudent. PMID:24249815

  2. Synthesis and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of polyhydroxylated sulfated steroids: structure/activity studies.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Victoria; Murray, Ana P; Maier, Marta S

    2013-11-01

    Disulfated and trisulfated steroids have been synthesized from cholesterol and their acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity has been evaluated. In our studies we have found that the activity was not only dependent on the location of the sulfate groups but on their configurations. 2β,3α,6α-trihydroxy-5α-cholestan-6-one trisulfate (18) was the most active steroid with an IC50 value of 15.48 μM comparable to that of 2β,3α-dihydroxy-5α-cholestan-6-one disulfate (1). Both compounds were found to be less active than the reference compound eserine. The butyrylcholinesterase activity of 1 and 18 was one magnitude lower than that against acetylcholinesterase revealing a selective inhibitor profile.

  3. Structure-activity approach in the reactivation of tabun-phosphorylated human acetylcholinesterase with bispyridinium para-aldoximes.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, Zrinka; Calić, Maja; Sinko, Goran; Bosak, Anita

    2007-06-01

    We investigated interactions of bispyridinium para-aldoximes N,N'-(propano)bis(4-hydroxyiminomethyl) pyridinium bromide (TMB-4), N,N'-(ethano)bis(4-hydroxyiminomethyl)pyridinium methanosulphonate (DMB-4), and N,N'-(methano)bis(4-hydroxyiminomethyl)pyridinium chloride (MMB-4) with human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase phosphorylated by tabun. We analysed aldoxime conformations to determine the flexibility of aldoxime as an important feature for binding to the acetylcholinesterase active site. Tabun-inhibited human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase was completely reactivated only by the most flexible bispyridinium aldoxime - TMB-4 with a propylene chain between two rings. Shorter linkers than propylene (methylene or ethylene) as in MMB-4 and DMB-4 did not allow appropriate orientation in the active site, and MMB-4 and DMB-4 were not efficient reactivators of tabun-phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase. Since aldoximes are also reversible inhibitors of native acetylcholinesterase, we determined dissociation constants and their protective index against acetylcholinesterase inactivation by tabun.

  4. Preliminary studies of acetylcholinesterase activity in the rat brain using N-phenylferrocenecarboxamide labelled by the technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Mejri, Najoua; Said, Nadia Malek; Guizani, Sihem; Essouissi, Imen; Saidi, Mouldi

    2013-05-01

    There is currently great interest in developing radiolabeled substrates for acetylcholinesterase that would be useful in the in vivo imaging of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The reduction of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the brain has been measured in dementia disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies using (11)C and (18)F-labeled acetylcholine analogues. Our aim was to develop a new 99mTc-labeled acetylcholine analogue: N-phenylferrocenecarboxamide labelled with technetium-99m (99mTc-TPCC) to study acetylcholinesterase activity. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that the labelled compound was a substrate for acetylcholinesterase. The hydrolytic rate of this substrate was measured and the specificity was evaluated using the inhibitor BW 284 C51. In rat experiments, the 99mTc-TPCC showed desirable properties for studying the acetylcholinesterase in the rat brain: high hydrolytic rate and a moderate specificity of the substrate for acetylcholinesterase.

  5. Synthesis and acetylcholinesterase/butyrylcholinesterase inhibition activity of new tacrine-like analogues.

    PubMed

    Marco, J L; de los Ríos, C; Carreiras, M C; Baños, J E; Badía, A; Vivas, N M

    2001-03-01

    The synthesis and preliminary results for acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition activity of a series of pyrano[2,3-b]quinolines (2, 3) and benzonaphthyridines (5, 6) derivatives are described. These molecules are tacrine-like analogues which have been prepared from readily available polyfunctionalized ethyl [6-amino-5-cyano-4H-pyrans and 6-amino-5-cyanopyridines]-3-carboxylates via Friedlander condensation with selected ketones. These compounds showed moderate acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity, the more potent (2e, 5b) being 6 times less active than tacrine. The butyrylcholinesterase activity of some of these molecules is also discussed.

  6. Buprofezin inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity in B-biotype Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Cottage, Emma L A; Gunning, Robin V

    2006-01-01

    B-biotype Bemisia tabaci is a severe insect pest worldwide in many ornamental, agricultural, and horticultural industries. Control of this insect is hampered by resistance to many acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-inhibiting insecticides, such as organophosphates and carbamates. Consequently, insect growth regulators such as buprofezin, which act by inhibiting chitin synthesis, are being investigated for use against B-biotype B. tabaci in Australia. This study discusses the effects of buprofezin on B. tabaciAChE.

  7. Acetylcholinesterase-inhibitory activities of the extracts from sponges collected in mauritius waters.

    PubMed

    Beedessee, Girish; Ramanjooloo, Avin; Surnam-Boodhun, Rashmee; van Soest, Rob W M; Marie, Daniel E P

    2013-03-01

    Patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) show a characteristic neurochemical deficit of acetylcholine, especially in the basal forebrains. The use of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors to retard the hydrolysis of acetylcholine has been suggested as a promising strategy for AD treatment. In this study, we evaluated the acetylcholinesterase inhibitory (AChEI) activities of 134 extracts obtained from 45 species of marine sponges. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and microplate assays reveal potent acetylcholinsterase inhibitory activities of two AcOEt extracts from the sponges Pericharax heteroraphis and Amphimedon navalis PULITZER-FINALI. We further investigated the inhibitory kinetics of the extracts and found them to display mixed competitive/noncompetitive inhibition and associated their inhibitory activity partly to terpenoids. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from marine organisms have been rarely studied, and this study demonstrated the potential of marine sponges as a source of pharmaceutical leads against neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of lycopodane-type alkaloids from the Icelandic Lycopodium annotinum ssp. alpestre.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, Elsa Steinunn; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate structures and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of lycopodane-type alkaloids isolated from an Icelandic collection of Lycopodium annotinum ssp. alpestre. Ten alkaloids were isolated, including annotinine, annotine, lycodoline, lycoposerramine M, anhydrolycodoline, gnidioidine, lycofoline, lannotinidine D, and acrifoline, as well as a previously unknown N-oxide of annotine. 1H and 13C NMR data of several of the alkaloids were provided for the first time. Solvent-dependent equilibrium constants between ketone and hemiketal form of acrifoline were determined. Conformation of acrifoline was characterized using NOESY spectroscopy and molecular modelling. The isolated alkaloids were evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Ligand docking studies based on mutated 3D structure of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase provided rationale for low inhibitory activity of the isolated alkaloids as compared to huperzine A or B, which are potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors belonging to the lycodine class. Based on the modelling studies the lycopodane-type alkaloids seem to fit well into the active site gorge of the enzyme but the position of their functional groups is not compatible with establishing strong hydrogen bonding interactions with the amino acid residues that line the binding site. The docking studies indicate possibilities of additional functionalization of the lycopodane skeleton to render potentially more active analogues.

  9. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity in Wistar and August rats with low and high motor activity (a cytochemical study).

    PubMed

    Sergutina, A V; Rakhmanova, V I

    2014-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase activity was quantitatively evaluated by cytochemical method in brain structures (layers III and V of the sensorimotor cortex, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus CA3 field) of August and Wistar rats demonstrating high and low motor activity in the open field test. In August rats, acetylcholinesterase activity in the analyzed brain structures prevailed in animals with high motor activity in comparison with rats with low motor activity. In Wistar rats, the differences between the animals demonstrating high and low motor activity were less pronounced, but varied depending on the experimental series of studies. Comparisons of August rats with low motor activity and Wistar rats with high motor activity (maximum difference of motor function in these animals) revealed significant excess of acetylcholinesterase activity in layer III of the sensorimotor cortex in August rats and no differences in other brain structures of the examined animals.

  10. Antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities of extracts from Rapistrum rugosum in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Amel, Omri Hichri; Malek, Besbes Hlila; Hichem, Ben Jannet; Ali, Lamari; Mahjoub, Aouni; Boulbaba, Selmi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antioxidant potential and anti-acetylcholinesterase activity of Rapistrum rugosum extracts. Methods The crude, ethyl acetate, butanol and water extracts prepared from flowers, roots, stems and leaves of Rapistrum rugosum were tested at 1 mg/mL to determine their total polyphenol content, total flavonoid content and total condensed tannin content. Their antioxidant activity was assessed at different concentrations (0.0312, 0.0625, 0.1250, 0.25, 0.50 and 1.00 mg/mL) by using DPPH, ABTS, reducing power and β-carotene bleAChIng inhibition activity. Anti-acetylcholinesterase activity was also determined. Results The extract of leaves and stems had the highest total phenolic content [(110.45±0.03) mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight]. The ethyl acetate extract of flowers had the highest total flavonoid content [(24.62±0.13) mg quercetin equivalent/g dry weight]. The butanolic fraction of flowers had the highest total condensed tannin content [(317.85±0.01) mg catechin equivalent/g dry weight]. The crude extracts of flowers exhibited an interesting antioxidant activity for DPPH assay (93.00±0.01)% at 1 mg/mL. The greatest acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity (IC50=1.60 mg/mL) was exhibited by the crude extracts from the flowers. Conclusions The results demonstrated that Rapistrum rugosum contains active constituents which possess antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities.

  11. Huperzia quadrifariata and Huperzia reflexa alkaloids inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity in vivo in mice brain.

    PubMed

    Konrath, E L; Neves, B M; Passos, C Dos S; Lunardi, P S; Ortega, M G; Cabrera, J L; Gonçalves, C A; Henriques, A T

    2012-11-15

    Huperzine A, a Lycopodium alkaloid produced by Chinese folk herb Huperzia serrata (Lycopodiaceae), has been shown to be a promising agent for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease due to its potent acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, as well its efficacy in the treatment of memory of aged patients. Thus, the effects of two Huperzia species of habitats in Brazil (H. quadrifariata and H. reflexa) with described in vitro AChE inhibition activities were studied and their effects on mice brain AChE inhibition were determined after a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. The alkaloid extracts were administered to mice in various doses (10, 1 and 0.5mg/kg) and acetylcholinesterase activity was measured post mortem in two brain areas using the Ellman's colorimetric method. The AChE activity was found to be significantly reduced in both the cortex and hippocampus, although this activity was less potent than that of reference inhibitor huperzine A (0.5mg/kg). Thus, it appears that H. quadrifariata and H. reflexa alkaloid extracts, shown to inhibit acetylcholinesterase in vitro, also have very potent in vivo effects, suggesting that the Huperzia species may still constitute a promising source of compounds with pharmaceutical interest for Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Alkaloid profiles and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of Fumaria species from Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Vrancheva, Radka Z; Ivanov, Ivan G; Aneva, Ina Y; Dincheva, Ivayla N; Badjakov, Ilian K; Pavlov, Atanas I

    2016-01-01

    GC-MS analysis of alkaloid profiles of five Fumaria species, naturally grown in Bulgaria (F. officinalis, F. thuretii, F. kralikii, F. rostellata and F. schrammii) and analysis of acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of alkaloid extracts were performed. Fourteen isoquinoline alkaloids were identified, with the principle ones being protopine, cryptopine, sinactine, parfumine, fumariline, fumarophycine, and fumaritine. Protopine contents, defined by HPLC analysis varied between 210.6 ± 8.8 μg/g DW (F. schrammii) and 334.5 ± 7.1 μg/g DW. (F. rostellata). While all of the investigated alkaloid extracts significantly inhibited acetylcholinesterase activity, the F. kralikii demonstrated the highest level of inhibition (IC(50) 0.13 ± 0.01 mg extract/mL).

  13. Acetylcholinesterase activity and antioxidant capacity of zebrafish brain is altered by heavy metal exposure.

    PubMed

    Richetti, S K; Rosemberg, D B; Ventura-Lima, J; Monserrat, J M; Bogo, M R; Bonan, C D

    2011-01-01

    Pollution is a world problem with immeasurable consequences. Heavy metal compounds are frequently found as components of anthropogenic pollution. Here we evaluated the effects of the treatment with cadmium acetate, lead acetate, mercury chloride, and zinc chloride in acetylcholinesterase activity and gene expression pattern, as well as the effects of these treatments in antioxidant competence in the brain of an aquatic and well-established organism for toxicological analysis, zebrafish (Danio rerio, Cyprinidae). Mercury chloride and lead acetate promoted a significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase activity whereas they did not alter the gene expression pattern. In addition, the antioxidant competence was decreased after exposure to mercury chloride. The data presented here allowed us to hypothesize a signal transmission impairment, through alterations in cholinergic transmission, and also in the antioxidant competence of zebrafish brain tissue as some of the several effects elicited by these pollutants.

  14. Antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities of extracts and secondary metabolites from Acacia cyanophylla

    PubMed Central

    Ghribia, Lotfi; Ghouilaa, Hatem; Omrib, Amel; Besbesb, Malek; Janneta, Hichem Ben

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antioxidant potential and anti-acetycholinesterase activity of compounds and extracts from Acacia cyanophylla (A. cyanophylla). Methods Three polyphenolic compounds were isolated from ethyl acetate extract of A. cyanophylla flowers. They have been identified as isosalipurposide 1, quercetin 2 and naringenin 3. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR experiments as well as ES-MS. The prepared extracts and the isolated compounds 1-3 were tested for their antioxidant activity using 1′-1′-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) scavenging assays and reducing power. They have been also investigated for inhibitory effect against acetylcholinesterase using the microplate assay. Results In the DPPH test, the EtOAc extract of flowers exhibited the highest antioxidant effect (67.26 µg/mL). Isosalipurposide 1 showed a significant antiradical power against DPPH (81.9 µg/mL). All extracts showed a dose-dependent acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In terms of the IC50 value, the butanolic extract (16.03 µg/mL) was the most potent sample. Isosalipurposide 1 was found to be active against AChE with an IC50 value of 52.04 µg/mL. Conclusions The results demonstrated the important antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activity of pure compounds and extracts from A. cyanophylla. PMID:25183120

  15. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modelling of diversely functionalized heterocyclic derivatives as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase/butyrylcholinesterase and modulators of Ca2+ channels and nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Marco, José L; de los Ríos, Cristóbal; García, Antonio G; Villarroya, Mercedes; Carreiras, M Carmo; Martins, Carla; Eleutério, Ana; Morreale, Antonio; Orozco, M; Luque, F Javier

    2004-05-01

    The synthesis and the biological activity of compounds 5-40 as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), as well as modulators of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and nicotinic receptors, are described. These molecules are tacrine analogues, which have been prepared from polyfunctionalized 6-amino-5-cyano-4H-pyrans, 6-amino-5-cyano-pyridines and 5-amino-2-aryl-3-cyano-1,3-oxazoles via Friedländer reaction with selected cycloalkanones. These compounds are moderate acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors, the BuChE/AChE selectivity of the most active molecules ranges from 10.0 (compound 29) to 76.9 (compound 16). Interestingly, the 'oxazolo-tacrine' derivatives are devoid of any activity. All compounds showed an important inhibitory effect on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Most of them also blocked L-type Ca(2+) channels, and three of them, 64, 19 and 67, the non-L type of Ca(2+) channels. Molecular modelling studies suggest that these compounds might bind at the peripheral binding site of AChE, which opens the possibility to design inhibitors able to bind at both, the catalytic and peripheral binding sites of the enzyme.

  16. Glyphosate Adversely Affects Danio rerio Males: Acetylcholinesterase Modulation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Fernanda Moreira; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Primel, Ednei Gilberto; da Rosa, Carlos Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that glyphosate-based herbicides are toxic to animals. In the present study, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP), and lipid peroxidation (LPO), as well as the activity and expression of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme, were evaluated in Danio rerio males exposed to 5 or 10 mg/L of glyphosate for 24 and 96 h. An increase in ACAP in gills after 24 h was observed in the animals exposed to 5 mg/L of glyphosate. A decrease in LPO was observed in brain tissue of animals exposed to 10 mg/L after 24 h, while an increase was observed in muscle after 96 h. No significant alterations were observed in ROS generation. AChE activity was not altered in muscles or brains of animals exposed to either glyphosate concentration for 24 or 96 h. However, gene expression of this enzyme in the brain was reduced after 24 h and was enhanced in both brain and muscle tissues after 96 h. Thus, contrary to previous findings that had attributed the imbalance in the oxidative state of animals exposed to glyphosate-based herbicides to surfactants and other inert compounds, the present study demonstrated that glyphosate per se promotes this same effect in zebrafish males. Although glyphosate concentrations did not alter AChE activity, this study demonstrated for the first time that this molecule affects ache expression in male zebrafish D. rerio.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain of dystonia musculorum (Dst(dt-J)) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Clément, C; Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2012-01-01

    The dystonia musculorum (Dst(dt-J)) mutant mouse suffers from severe motor coordination deficits, characterized, among various symptoms, by a spastic ataxia and dystonic movements, indicating central defects in motor structures in addition to dystrophy of peripheral sensory tracts and partial degeneration of spinocerebellar tracts. Neurochemical alterations, notably in dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems, were previously observed in basal ganglia and cerebellum. A quantitative histochemical cartography of brain acetylcholinesterase activity in Dst(dt-J) mutants, in comparison with controls, revealed increases in the neostriatum, the habenula-interpeduncular pathway, the cholinergic pedunculopontine nucleus and its target structures, the thalamus, major regions of the basal ganglia, such as substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, globus pallidum, and subthalamic nucleus, as well as in associated extrapyramidal regions, such as red nucleus, brainstem reticular formation, and superior colliculus. These acetylcholinesterase changes may play a role in motor deficits, particularly the dystonic symptomatology observed in the mutation.

  18. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of Ganoderma lucidum grown on germinated brown rice.

    PubMed

    Hasnat, Abul; Pervin, Mehnaz; Lim, Beong Ou

    2013-06-07

    In this study, the acetylcholinesterase inhibition and in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of Ganoderma lucidum grown on germinated brown rice (GLBR) were evaluated. In antioxidant assays in vitro, GLBR was found to have strong metal chelating activity, DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl and superoxide radical scavenging activity. Cell-based antioxidant methods were used, including lipid peroxidation on brain homogenate and AAPH-induced erythrocyte haemolysis. In antioxidant assays in vivo, mice were administered with GLBR and this significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the mice sera, livers and brains. The amount of total phenolic and flavonoid compounds were 43.14 mg GAE/g and 13.36 mg CE/g dry mass, respectively. GLBR also exhibited acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. In addition, HPLC analyses of GLBR extract revealed the presence of different phenolic compounds. These findings demonstrate the remarkable potential of GLBR extract as valuable source of antioxidants which exhibit interesting acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

  19. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  20. Antioedematogenic activity, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antimicrobial properties of Jacaranda oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Pereira, V V; Silva, R R; Dos Santos, M H; Dias, D F; Moreira, M E C; Takahashi, J A

    2016-09-01

    Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham. (Bignoniaceae) is a shrub found in the Brazilian cerrado and used in folk medicine to treat microbial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phytochemical screening and evaluate antioedematogenic, antimicrobial and antiacetylcholinesterase properties of J. oxyphylla crude extracts. All extracts analysed showed presence of terpenoids, which are potentially active chemical substances. A high AChE inhibitory activity for hexane extract from leaves and for the extracts from twigs was found. Ethanol extract from leaves of J. oxyphylla showed activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. This extract was also effective in inhibiting the stages of inflammation evaluated. Biological investigation and phytochemical screening of J. oxyphylla extracts provided additional evidence of its traditional medicinal value.

  1. Effect of isoquinoline alkaloids from two Hippeastrum species on in vitro acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Pagliosa, L B; Monteiro, S C; Silva, K B; de Andrade, J P; Dutilh, J; Bastida, J; Cammarota, M; Zuanazzi, J A S

    2010-07-01

    The treatment of neurological disorders and neurodegenerative diseases is related to the levels of acetylcholine (ACh) through the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Galanthamine, an important alkaloid isolated from the Amaryllidaceae family, is approved for the pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and acts by inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. In the present study, Ellman's method was used to verify the inhibition of AChE activity of some isoquinolines alkaloids such as galanthamine, montanine, hippeastrine and pretazettine. At the concentrations 1mM, 500 microm and 100 microm, galanthamine presented an AChE inhibition higher than 90%. Montanine inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, more than 50% of the enzyme at 1mM concentration. With the concentrations 500 microm and 100 microm, 30-45% of AChE activity inhibition was detected. The alkaloids hippeastrine and pretazettine presented no significant inhibition of the AChE activity. The results demonstrate that montanine significantly inhibits AChE activity at the tested concentrations, suggesting the necessity of further investigations on this alkaloid use in treating neurological disorders.

  2. Flexibility of active-site gorge aromatic residues and non-gorge aromatic residues in acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    The presence of an unusually large number of aromatic residues in the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase has been a topic of great interest. Flexibility of these residues has been suspected to be a key player in controlling ligand traversal in the gorge. This raises the question of whether the over representation of aromatic residues in the gorge implies higher than normal flexibility of those residues. The current study suggests that it does not. Large changes in the hydrophobic cross sectional area due to dihedral oscillations are probably the reason behind their presence in the gorge.

  3. Structure-activity relationship for the reactivators of acetylcholinesterase inhibited by nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Kuca, Kamil; Musilek, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Karasova, Jana; Soukup, Ondrej; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Hrabinova, Martina

    2013-08-01

    Nerve agents such as sarin, VX and tabun are organophosphorus compounds able to inhibit an enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). AChE reactivators and anticholinergics are generally used as antidotes in the case of intoxication with these agents. None from the known AChE reactivators is able to reactivate AChE inhibited by all kinds of nerve agents. In this work, reactivation potency of seventeen structurally different AChE reactivators was tested in vitro and subsequently, relationship between their chemical structure and biological activity was outlined. VX was chosen as appropriate member of the nerve agent family.

  4. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Echium confusum Coincy.

    PubMed

    Benamar, Houari; Tomassini, Lamberto; Venditti, Alessandro; Marouf, Abderrazak; Bennaceur, Malika; Serafini, Mauro; Nicoletti, Marcello

    2017-06-01

    Four pyrrolizidine alkaloids, namely 7-O-angeloyllycopsamine N-oxide 1, echimidine N-oxide 2, echimidine 3 and 7-O-angeloylretronecine 4, were isolated for the first time from the whole plant ethanolic extract of Echium confusum Coincy, through bioassay-guided approach. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic means. All the isolates compounds showed moderate activities in inhibiting AChE, with IC50 0.276-0.769.

  5. Altered binding of thioflavin t to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase after phosphorylation of the active site by chlorpyrifos oxon or dichlorvos

    SciTech Connect

    Sultatos, L.G. Kaushik, R.

    2008-08-01

    The peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, when occupied by a ligand, is known to modulate reaction rates at the active site of this important enzyme. The current report utilized the peripheral anionic site specific fluorogenic probe thioflavin t to determine if the organophosphates chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos bind to the peripheral anionic site of human recombinant acetylcholinesterase, since certain organophosphates display concentration-dependent kinetics when inhibiting this enzyme. Incubation of 3 nM acetylcholinesterase active sites with 50 nM or 2000 nM inhibitor altered both the B{sub max} and K{sub d} for thioflavin t binding to the peripheral anionic site. However, these changes resulted from phosphorylation of Ser203 since increasing either inhibitor from 50 nM to 2000 nM did not alter further thioflavin t binding kinetics. Moreover, the organophosphate-induced decrease in B{sub max} did not represent an actual reduction in binding sites, but instead likely resulted from conformational interactions between the acylation and peripheral anionic sites that led to a decrease in the rigidity of bound thioflavin t. A drop in fluorescence quantum yield, leading to an apparent decrease in B{sub max}, would accompany the decreased rigidity of bound thioflavin t molecules. The organophosphate-induced alterations in K{sub d} represented changes in binding affinity of thioflavin t, with diethylphosphorylation of Ser203 increasing K{sub d}, and dimethylphosphorylation of Ser203 decreasing K{sub d}. These results indicate that chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos do not bind directly to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, but can affect binding to that site through phosphorylation of Ser203.

  6. In vivo and in vitro effects of fructose on rat brain acetylcholinesterase activity: an ontogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Carine A; Biella, Mairis S; Lopes, Abigail; Deroza, Pedro F; Oliveira, Mariana B; Macan, Tamires P; Streck, Emilio L; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Zugno, Alexandra I; Schuck, Patrícia F

    2014-12-01

    Increased fructose concentrations are the biochemical hallmark of fructosemia, a group of inherited disorders on the metabolic pathway of this sugar. The main clinical findings observed in patients affected by fructosemia include neurological abnormalities with developmental delay, whose pathophysiology is still undefined. In the present work we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of fructose on acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in brain structures of developing rats. For the in vitro experiments, fructose was added at increasing concentrations to the incubation medium. It was observed that fructose provoked an inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in cerebral cortex of 30-day-old-rats, even at low concentrations (0.1 mM). For the in vivo experiments, rats were killed 1 h after a single fructose administration (5 µmol/g). Control group received the same volume of saline solution. We found that AchE activity was increased in cerebral cortex of 30- and 60-day-old rats receiving fructose administration. Finally, we observed that AchE activity was unaffected by acute fructose administration in cerebral cortex, striatum or hippocampus of 15- and 90-day-old rats. The present data suggest that a disruption in cholinergic homeostasis may be involved in the pathophysiology of brain damage observed in young patients affected by fructosemia.

  7. Highly-substrate active isoenzyme acetylcholinesterase-II, in rosy eye mutant of Aedes aegypti mosquito.

    PubMed

    Mourya, D T; Gokhale, M D; Barde, P V; Deobagkar, D N

    2001-08-01

    Insecticide bioassays were carried out on larvae and adults of rosy eye mutant and wildtype strains of A. aegypti. Both the strains were equally susceptible to DDT, malathion and deltamethrin. Biochemical assays showed an increase in acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) activity in all the stages of mutant strain with both the substrates i.e. acetylthiocholine iodide and S-butyrylthiocholine iodide. However, there was no difference in the percent inhibition of enzyme activity with propoxur in these two strains. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis performed in native conditions on the homogenates of adults of rosy eye mosquitoes showed that AChE-II allele was highly active with the substrate acetylthiocholine iodide as compared to wildtype strain. Frequency of the highly active AChE-II allele in the mutant strain was about 68%, whereas it was about 5% in the wildtype strain.

  8. Phytochemicals content, antioxidant activity and acetylcholinesterase inhibition properties of indigenous Garcinia parvifolia fruit.

    PubMed

    Ali Hassan, Siti Hawa; Fry, Jeffrey R; Abu Bakar, Mohd Fadzelly

    2013-01-01

    Garcinia parvifolia belongs to the same family as mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana), which is known locally in Sabah as "asam kandis" or cherry mangosteen. The present study was conducted to determine the phytochemicals content (total phenolic, flavonoid, anthocyanin, and carotenoid content) and antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity of the flesh and peel of G. parvifolia. All samples were freeze-dried and extracted using 80% methanol and distilled water. For the 80% methanol extract, the flesh of G. parvifolia displayed higher phenolic and flavonoid contents than the peel, with values of 7.2 ± 0.3 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g and 5.9 ± 0.1 mg rutin equivalent (RU)/g, respectively. Anthocyanins were detected in the peel part of G. parvifolia but absent in the flesh. The peel of G. parvifolia displayed higher total carotenoid content as compared to the flesh part with the values of 17.0 ± 0.3 and 3.0 ± 0.0 mg β-carotene equivalents (BC)/100 g, respectively. The free-radical scavenging, ferric reducing, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition effect of the flesh were higher as compared to the peel in both extracts. These findings suggested that the edible part of G. parvifolia fruit has a potential as a natural source of antioxidant and anti-Alzheimer's agents.

  9. Inhibition effect of graphene oxide on the catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Gu, Yao; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Variations in the enzyme activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the presence of the nano-material, graphene oxide (GO), were investigated with the use of molecular spectroscopy UV-visible and fluorescence methods. From these studies, important kinetic parameters of the enzyme were extracted; these were the maximum reaction rate, Vm , and the Michaelis constant, Km . A comparison of these parameters indicated that GO inhibited the catalytic activity of the AChE because of the presence of the AChE-GO complex. The formation of this complex was confirmed with the use of fluorescence data, which was resolved with the use of the MCR-ALS chemometrics method. Furthermore, it was found that the resonance light-scattering (RLS) intensity of AChE changed in the presence of GO. On this basis, it was demonstrated that the relationship between AChE and GO was linear and such models were used for quantitative analyses of GO.

  10. Effects of Green Tea Extract on Learning, Memory, Behavior and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Young and Old Male Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaur, Tranum; Pathak, C. M.; Pandhi, P.; Khanduja, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of green tea extract administration on age-related cognition in young and old male Wistar rats. Methods: Young and old rats were orally administered 0.5% green tea extract for a period of eight weeks and were evaluated by passive avoidance, elevated maze plus paradigm and changes in acetylcholinesterase activity.…

  11. Effect of ovariectomy and estrogen supplementation on brain acetylcholinesterase activity and passive-avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Amitava; Dikshit, Madhu; Srivastava, Shoba R; Srivastava, Umesh K; Nath, Chandishwar

    2002-09-01

    The effect of ovariectomy and estrogen treatment on the brain acetylcholinesterase activity and cognition in rats was investigated in this study. Ovariectomized and nonovariectomized rats were treated subcutaneously with estradiol dipropionate for 8 d. In the single-trial, passive-avoidance test all the groups showed significant learning and retention of memory as evident by the increase in transfer latency time in trial 2 as compared with trial 1. No-transfer response was significantly increased in the estradiol-dipropionate-treated ovariectomized (80%) and nonovariectomized (60%) group as compared with the ovariectomized (30%) group. Specific activity of acetylcholinesterase was assayed spectrophotometrically in salt-soluble and detergent-soluble fractions of various brain areas: frontal cortex, cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus, thalamus, pons, medulla, and cerebellum. The effect of ovariectomy and estradiol dipropionate was varied in both fractions of these brain areas. Estradiol dipropionate treatment could restore the acetylcholinesterase activity to the control level only in the detergent-soluble fraction of hypothalamus and salt-soluble fraction of hypothalamus, thalamus, and medulla in ovariectomized rats. The results indicate that ovariectomy alters acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain areas but not in a uniform manner and affects only qualitative aspects of cognitive function, which could be improved by estrogen supplementation.

  12. Screening the methanol extracts of some Iranian plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Gholamhoseinian, A.; Moradi, M.N.; Sharifi-far, F.

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the main enzyme for the breakdown of acetylcholine. Nowadays, usage of the inhibitors of this enzyme is one of the most important types of treatment of mild to moderate neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. Herbal medicines can be a new source of inhibitors of this enzyme. In this study we examined around 100 different plants to evaluate their inhibitory properties for AChE enzyme. Plants were scientifically identified and their extracts were prepared by methanol percolation. Acetylcholinesterase activity was measured using a colorimetric method in the presence or absence of the extracts. Eserine was used as a positive control. Methanol extracts of the Levisticum officinale, Bergeris integrima and Rheum ribes showed more than 50% AChE inhibitory activity. The inhibition kinetics were studied in the presence of the most effective extracts. L. officinale and B. integrima inhibited AChE activity in a non-competitive manner, while R. ribes competitively inhibitied the enzyme as revealed by double-reciprocal Linweaver-Burk plot analysis. Under controlled condition, Km and Vmax values of the enzyme were found to be 9.4 mM and 0.238 mM/min, respectively. However, in the presence of L. officinale, B. integrima, and R. ribes extracts, Vmax values were 0.192, 0.074 and 0.238 mM/min, respectively. Due to the competitive inhibition of the enzyme by R. ribes extract, the Km value of 21.2 mM was obtained. The concentration required for 50% enzyme inhibition (IC50 value) was 0.5, 0.9, and 0.95 mg/ml for the L. officinale, B. integrima and R. ribes extracts, respectively. The IC50 of the eserine was determined to be 0.8 mg/ml. PMID:21589805

  13. Structural and kinetic effects of mobile phone microwaves on acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Barteri, Mario; Pala, Alessandro; Rotella, Simona

    2005-03-01

    The present study provides evidence that "in vitro" simple exposure of an aqueous solution of electric eel acetylcholinesterase (EeAChE; EC 3.1.1.7.) to cellular phone emission alters its enzymatic activity. This paper demonstrates, by combining different experimental techniques, that radio frequency (RF) radiations irreversibly affect the structural and biochemical characteristics of an important CNS enzyme. These results were obtained by using a commercial cellular phone to reproduce the reality of the human exposition. This experimental procedure provided surprising effects collected practically without experimental errors because they were obtained comparing native and irradiated sample of the same enzyme solution. Although these results cannot be used to conclude whether exposure to RF during the use of cellular phone can lead to any hazardous health effect, they may be a significant first step towards further verification of these effects on other "ex vivo" or "in vivo" biological systems.

  14. Maternal caffeine intake affects acetylcholinesterase in hippocampus of neonate rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosane Souza; Richetti, Stefânia Konrad; da Silveira, Vanessa Gass; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Lara, Diogo R; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional factors and signalling molecules from intracellular metabolism modulate a complex set of events during brain development. Neurotransmitter and neuromodulator synthesis and their receptor expressions vary according to different stages of brain development. The dynamics of signalling systems is often accompanied by alterations in enzyme expression and activity. Adenosine is a neuromodulator that controls the release of several neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, which is an important neurotransmitter during brain development. Caffeine is a non-specific antagonist of adenosine receptors and can reach the immature brain. We evaluated the effects of rat maternal caffeine intake (1g/L) on acetylcholine degradation and acetylcholinesterase expression from hippocampus of 7-, 14- and 21-day-old neonates in caffeine-treated and control groups. Caffeine was not able to change the age-dependent increase of acetylcholinesterase activity or the age-dependent decrease of acetylcholinesterase expression. However, caffeine promoted an increase of acetylcholinesterase activity (42%) without modifications on the level of acetylcholinesterase mRNA transcripts in 21-day-old rats. Considering the high score of phosphorylatable residues on acetylcholinesterase, this profile can be associated with a possible regulation by specific phosphorylation sites. These results highlight the ability of maternal caffeine intake to interfere on cholinergic neurotransmission during brain development.

  15. Salivary Acetylcholinesterase Activity Is Increased in Parkinson's Disease: A Potential Marker of Parasympathetic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Tatyana; Knudsen, Cindy Soendersoe; Mouridsen, Kim; Nexo, Ebba; Borghammer, Per

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Decreased salivary flow and xerostomia are frequent findings in Parkinson's disease (PD), possibly caused by alterations in the parasympathetic tonus. Here we explore salivary acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as a potential biomarker in PD. Methods. We measured salivary flow, AChE activity, and total protein concentration in 30 PD patients and 49 healthy controls. We also performed exploratory correlation analyses with disease duration, motor symptom severity, autonomic complaints, and other nonmotor symptoms. Results. PD patients displayed significantly decreased salivary flow rate, significantly increased salivary AChE activity, and total protein concentration. Importantly, the AChE activity/total protein ratio was significantly increased in PD patients, suggesting that increased AChE activity cannot be explained solely by upconcentration of saliva. The Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) score displayed significant correlation with total salivary protein (P = 0.002) and near-significant correlation with salivary flow (P = 0.07). Color vision test scores were also significantly correlated with AChE activity (P = 0.04) and total protein levels (P = 0.002). Conclusion. Salivary AChE activity is increased in PD patients compared to healthy controls. Future studies are needed to elucidate whether this parameter reflects the extent of neuronal damage and parasympathetic denervation in the salivary glands of PD patients. PMID:25767737

  16. Effect of carbaryl (carbamate insecticide) on acetylcholinesterase activity of two strains of Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera).

    PubMed

    Toumi, Hela; Bejaoui, Mustapha; Touaylia, Samir; Burga Perez, Karen F; Ferard, Jean François

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of carbaryl (carbamate insecticide) on the acetylcholinesterase activity in two strains (same clone A) of the crustacean cladoceran Daphnia magna. Four carbaryl concentrations (0.4, 0.9, 1.8 and 3.7 µg L(-1)) were compared against control AChE activity. Our results showed that after 48 h of carbaryl exposure, all treatments induced a significant decrease of AChE activities whatever the two considered strains. However, different responses were registered in terms of lowest observed effect concentrations (LOEC: 0.4 µg L(-1) for strain 1 and 0.9 µg L(-1) for strains 2) revealing differences in sensitivity among the two tested strains of D. magna. These results suggest that after carbaryl exposure, the AChE activity responses can be also used as a biomarker of susceptibility. Moreover, our results show that strain1 is less sensitive than strain 2 in terms of IC50-48 h of AChE activity. Comparing the EC50-48 h of standard ecotoxicity test and IC50-48 h of AChE inhibition, there is the same order of sensitivity with both strains.

  17. Chemical composition, aroma evaluation, and inhibitory activity towards acetylcholinesterase of essential oils from Gynura bicolor DC.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Nakahashi, Hiroshi; Usami, Atsushi; Matsuda, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    The compositions of the essential oils obtained from leaves and stems of Gynura bicolor DC. were analyzed by GC-MS. One hundred eight components of these oils were identified. (E)-β-caryophyllene (31.42 %), α-pinene (17.11 %), and bicyclogermacrene (8.09 %) were found to be the main components of the leaf oil, while α-pinene (61.42 %), β-pinene (14.39 %), and myrcene (5.10 %) were the major constituents of the stem oil. We found 73 previously unidentified components in these oils from G. bicolor. The oils were also subjected to odor evaluation. Eleven and 12 aroma-active compounds were detected in the leaf and stem oils, respectively. The abilities of these oils to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were determined. The sesquiterpenoids in the oils were found to inhibit AChE activity more strongly than the monoterpenoids in the oils did. It was suggested that the three main components in each essential oil act synergistically against AChE activity. These results show that the essential oils obtained from G. bicolor are a good dietary source of AChE activity inhibition.

  18. Influence of water temperature on acetylcholinesterase activity in the pacific tree frog (Hyla regilla)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Catherine S.; Schwarzbach, Steven E.; Henderson, John D.; Wilson, Barry W.; Tjeerdema, Ronald S.

    2005-01-01

    This investigation evaluated whether acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in Pacific tree frogs (Hyla regilla) from different geographical locations was influenced by different temperatures during early aquatic life stages, independent of pesticide exposure. Tadpoles were collected from both a California coastal pond and a Sierra Nevada mountain range pond, USA. Groups of frogs from each location were raised in temperatures representative of either the Sierra Nevada (8°C) or the coastal (19°C) location. Metamorphs from both locations raised as tadpoles at 19°C had AChE activities of 42.3 and 38.7 nm/min/mg protein, while those raised as tadpoles at 8°C had activities of 26.9 and 28.2 nm/min/mg protein. A two-way analysis of variance revealed temperature to be the significant factor in determining AChE activity (F = 22.3, p < 0.001), although origin was not important (F = 0.09, p = 0.75). Interpretations regarding the influence of pesticides upon AChE activity in Pacific tree frogs must consider the influence of environmental temperature to enable cross-population comparisons.

  19. Synaptosomal acetylcholinesterase activity variation pattern in the presence of electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Afrasiabi, Ali; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Abbasi, Shayan; Dadras, Ali; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Seidkhani, Hossein; Modaresi, Seyed Mohamad Sadegh; Masoudian, Neda; Amani, Amir; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2014-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the enzyme that controls the acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations in cholinergic synaptic clefts by hydrolyzing ACh to choline and acetate. Cholinergic synapses are involved in important functions such as learning, memory and cognition. In this study, we investigated the effects of a wide range of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) on synaptic ACh concentrations through AChE enzyme activity assay. Synaptosome suspensions were prepared as a neural terminus from cerebral cortex of sheep brain. Prepared synaptosomes were exposed to ELF-EMFs with frequency ranging from 50 Hz to 230 Hz for duration between 15 and 120 min and flux intensity between 0.1 mT and 1.7 mT. Consequently, AChE activity was measured by Ellman method. Raw data were analyzed by neural network based software, Inform 4.02, to predict AChE activity pattern through nine 3D curves. These curves showed that AChE activity decreases when exposed to ELF-EMFs of 1.2 mT to 1.7 mT intensity and 50 Hz to 90 Hz frequency. Thus, it is proposed that exposure to fields of in this range of frequency-intensity would be effective in clinical treatments of cholinergic disorders to increase synaptic ACh concentration. However, more in vivo experiments are needed to develop this suggested treatment.

  20. A computational insight into acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of a new lichen depsidone.

    PubMed

    Ece, Abdulilah; Pejin, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are yet the best drugs currently available for the management of Alzheimer's disease. The recent phytochemical investigation has led to the isolation of a new depsidone 1 with moderate AChE activity (1 μg). This work was focused on its electronic properties analysed using commercially available programs. Both the active depsidone molecule 1 and galanthamine showed to have higher HOMO energies than the inactive depsidones 2-4, isolated from the same lichen species. However, the amino depsidone derivative 7, whose structure was proposed using computational approaches, is expected to be more active AChE inhibitor than the depsidone 1, due to the improved HOMO energy value. In addition, the molecular docking study indicated that the compound 7 has ability to make the well-known interactions of potent AChE inhibitors with the enzyme active site. The data presented herein support the design of novel AChE inhibitors based on the depsidone scaffold.

  1. Calcium-activated butyrylcholinesterase in human skin protects acetylcholinesterase against suicide inhibition by neurotoxic organophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; University of Bradford ). E-mail: K.Schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, Nicholas C.J.; Elwary, Souna M.; Parkin, Susan M.; Wood, John M.

    2007-04-20

    The human epidermis holds an autocrine acetylcholine production and degradation including functioning membrane integrated and cytosolic butyrylcholinesterase (BuchE). Here we show that BuchE activities increase 9-fold in the presence of calcium (0.5 x 10{sup -3}M) via a specific EF-hand calcium binding site, whereas acetylcholinesterase (AchE) is not affected. {sup 45}Calcium labelling and computer simulation confirmed the presence of one EF-hand binding site per subunit which is disrupted by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation. Moreover, we confirmed the faster hydrolysis by calcium-activated BuchE using the neurotoxic organophosphate O-ethyl-O-(4-nitrophenyl)-phenylphosphonothioate (EPN). Considering the large size of the human skin with 1.8 m{sup 2} surface area with its calcium gradient in the 10{sup -3}M range, our results implicate calcium-activated BuchE as a major protective mechanism against suicide inhibition of AchE by organophosphates in this non-neuronal tissue.

  2. Effect of pesticide exposure on acetylcholinesterase activity in subsistence farmers from Campeche, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rendón von Osten, Jaime; Epomex, Centro; Tinoco-Ojanguren, Rolando; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Guilhermino, Lucia

    2004-08-01

    The authors surveyed agricultural production methods and pesticide use among subsistence farmers (campesinos) in 4 rural communities of Campeche, Mexico. Self-reports of symptoms of poisoning resulting from occupational pesticide exposure were elicited by questionnaire (N = 121), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity during insecticide use was evaluated from blood samples (N = 127). In individuals from 2 of the 4 communities, AChE activity was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the mean of activity determined for individuals in a reference group. Results of this study show that erythrocyte AChE inhibition provides a good biomarker of exposure to organophosphate pesticides in field studies with human populations. Carbamates, particularly carbofuran, seem to be more associated with exuberant and diversified symptomatology of pesticide exposure than organophosphates. Studies in field communities where both carbamates and organophosphates are suspected to exist should include blood AChE determinations, symptomatology surveys, and socioeconomic questionnaires. The authors recommend that the Mexican National Health Ministry authorities specify additional provisions regarding the use of protective equipment and the adoption of other safety practices during field work, increase information campaigns about the risks of pesticide use and the value of safety practices, and increase programs of medical monitoring and assistance for rural communities dealing with pesticides.

  3. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the erythrocytes of newborn infants with hyperbilirubinemia and asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Mydlil, V; Tomasová, H; Cápová, E; Cerná, M

    1976-01-01

    The authors measured erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) activity in 51 physiologic newborn infants, 35 pregnant women and 101 infants with hyperbilirubinemia caused by hemolytic diseases in the ABO and Rh systems, or of other origin (6 children). In total, 374 examinations of erythrocyte ACHE were performed. The normal values of physiologic infants during the first hours of life were 0.162 +/- 0.03, at the age of 3 days 0.104 +/- 0.04. The values in pregnant women were 0.206 +/- 0.07. The ACHE activity was considerably decreased in newborn infants affected by erythroblastosis-ABO, and its mean value, in the case of exsanguinotransfusion indicated by the Polácek scheme, amounted to 0.060 +/- 0.051. It raised after exsanguinotransfusion and was equal to the value of red cells transfused. In newborn infants affected by erythroblastosis-Rh, the value decreased in the cases complicated with asphyxia. Low values of ACHE are sometimes found in certain cases of IRDS or of septicemia. The determination of erythrocyte ACHE activity enables assessing the state of red blood cells.

  4. Alkaloids from Peumus boldus and their acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Hošt'álková, Anna; Opletal, Lubomír; Kuneš, Jiří; Novák, Zdeněk; Hrabinová, Martina; Chlebek, Jakub; Čegan, Lukáš; Cahlíková, Lucie

    2015-04-01

    Eleven isoquinoline alkaloids (1-11) were isolated from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. by standard chromatographic methods. The chemical structures were elucidated by MS, and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis, and by comparison with literature data. Compounds isolated in sufficient amount were evaluated for their acetylcholinesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition activity using Ellman's method. In the prolyl oligopeptidase assay, Z-Gly-Pro-p-nitroanilide was used as substrate. Promising butyrylcholinesterase inhibition activities were demonstrated by two benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, reticuline (8) and N-methylcoclaurine (9), with IC50 values of 33.6 ± 3.0 µM and 15.0 ± 1.4 µM, respectively. Important prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition activities were shown by N-methyllaurotetanine (6) and sinoacutine (4) with IC50 values of 135.4 ± 23.2 µM and 143.1 ± 25.4 µM, respectively. Other tested compounds were considered inactive.

  5. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of Thai traditional nootropic remedy and its herbal ingredients.

    PubMed

    Tappayuthpijarn, Pimolvan; Itharat, Arunporn; Makchuchit, Sunita

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is increasing every year in accordance with the increasing of elderly population and could pose significant health problems in the future. The use of medicinal plants as an alternative prevention or even for a possible treatment of the AD is, therefore, becoming an interesting research issue. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are well-known drugs commonly used in the treatment of AD. The aim of the present study was to screen for AChE inhibitory activity of the Thai traditional nootropic recipe and its herbal ingredients. The results showed that ethanolic extracts of four out of twenty-five herbs i.e. Stephania pierrei Diels. Kaempfera parviflora Wall. ex Baker, Stephania venosa (Blume) Spreng, Piper nigrum L at 0.1 mg/mL showed % AChE inhibition of 89, 64, 59, 50; the IC50 were 6, 21, 29, 30 microg/mL respectively. The other herbs as well as combination of the whole recipe had no synergistic inhibitory effect on AChE activity. However some plants revealed antioxidant activity. More research should have be performed on this local wisdom remedy to verify the uses in scientific term.

  6. Effect of glyphosate-based herbicide on acetylcholinesterase activity in tadpoles, Hoplobatrachus rugulosus.

    PubMed

    Ruamthum, W; Visetson, S; Milne, J R; Bullangpoti, V

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on activity of the neuron enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AchE), in the tadpole stage (stage 35-39) of the East Asian Bullfrog, Hoplobatrachus rugulosus. There were 4 herbicide concentration treatments consisting of glyphosate-based herbicide added at 21, 24, 27 and 30 microl to 1L de-chlorinated water in glass containers (10x15x20 cm). There were 4 replicates per treatment, each replicate using 20 tadpoles. The toxicity results were compared with tadpoles in distilled water as a control treatment. After 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours exposure to glyphosate-based herbicide concentrations, LC50 values of 25.21, 24.66, 24.16 and 23.63 microl/L, respectively, were recorded. AChE activities decreased significantly and markedly with herbicide concentration. Such inhibition of AChE activity by this glyphosate-based herbicide indicates the potential of such herbicides to disrupt ecological communities in water near where the herbicides are applied.

  7. Novel polyacetylene derivatives and their inhibitory activities on acetylcholinesterase obtained from Panax ginseng roots.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Iida, Daiki; Ueno, Yoshihiro; Samukawa, Keiichi; Ishizaka, Toshihiko; Kotake, Takeshi; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    In our research program to identify cholinesterase and β-secretase inhibitors, we investigated Ginseng (root of Panax ginseng), a crude drug described as a multifunctional drug in the ancient Chinese herbal book Shennong Ben Cao Jing. Results from hexane and methanol extracts showed moderate inhibitory activities. This suggests that ginseng roots may be effective for the prevention of and therapy for dementia. We then focused on hexane extracts of raw ginseng root and dried ginseng root since the determination of hexane extract constituents has not been studied extensively. Activity-guided fractionation and purification led to the isolation of 4 polyacetylene compounds; homopanaxynol, homopanaxydol, (9Z)-heptadeca-1, 9-diene-4,6-diyn-3-one, and (8E)-octadeca-1,8-diene-4,6-diyn-3,10-diol. The chemical structures of these compounds, including stereochemistry, were determined. This is the first study to identify the structure of homopanaxynol and homopanaxydol. Moreover, the modes of action of some compounds were characterized as competitive inhibitors. This study showed, for the first time, that polyacetylene compounds possess acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities.

  8. Circannual rhythms of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the freshwater fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Helman, Renata J; Ferreyroa, Gisele V; dos Santos Afonso, Maria; Salibián, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomarkers as a tool to assess responses of organisms exposed to pollutants in toxicity bioassays, as well as in aquatic environmental risk assessment protocols, requires the understanding of the natural fluctuation of the particular biomarker. The aim of this study was to characterize the intrinsic variations of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in tissues of a native freshwater teleost fish to be used as biomarker in toxicity tests, taking into account both seasonal influence and fish size. Specific AChE activity was measured by the method of Ellman et al. (1961) in homogenates of fish anterior section finding a seasonal variability. The highest activity was observed in summer, decreasing significantly below 40% in winter. The annual AChE activity cycle in the anterior section was fitted to a sinusoidal function with a period of 11.2 months. Moreover, an inverse relationship between enzymatic activity and the animal size was established. The results showed that both the fish length and seasonal variability affect AChE activity. AChE activity in fish posterior section showed a similar trend to that in the anterior section, while seasonal variations of the activity in midsection were observed but differences were not statistically significant. In addition, no relationship between AChE and total tissue protein was established in the anterior and posterior sections suggesting that the circannual rhythms observed are AChE-specific responses. Results highlight the importance of considering both the fish size and season variations to reach valid conclusions when AChE activity is employed as neurotoxicity biomarker.

  9. Gastrointestinal acetylcholinesterase activity following endotracheal microinstillation inhalation exposure to sarin in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Soma; Song, Jian; Rezk, Peter; Sabnekar, Praveena; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Sciuto, Alfred M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2010-09-06

    The goal of this study was to assess acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition at different regions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract following inhalation exposure to nerve agent sarin. Seven major regions of the GI tract were removed from saline control animals (n=3) and 677.4 mg/m(3) sarin-exposed animals at 4h (n=4) and 24h (n=4) post-exposure. AChE activity was determined in blood and homogenized tissue supernatant by specific Ellman's assay using Iso-OMPA, a BChE inhibitor, and expressed as activity/optical density of hemoglobin for blood and activity/mg protein for tissues. Our data showed that the AChE activity was significantly decreased for groups both 4h and 24h post-sarin exposure. Among the seven chosen regions of the guinea pig GI tract, duodenum showed the highest AChE activity in control animals. The AChE activity was significantly decreased in the stomach (p=0.03), duodenum (p=0.029), jejunum (p=0.006), and ileum (p=0.006) 4h following sarin exposure. At 24h post-sarin exposure the AChE activity of duodenum (p=0.029) and ileum (p=0.006) was significantly inhibited. Esophagus showed no inhibition following sarin exposure at both 4h and 24h groups. These results suggest that the AChE activity is different in different regions of the GI tract and highest levels of AChE inhibition following sarin exposure were seen in regions exhibiting higher overall AChE activity and cholinergic function.

  10. The effect of aspartame metabolites on human erythrocyte membrane acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Tsakiris, Stylianos; Giannoulia-Karantana, Aglaia; Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H

    2006-01-01

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) with neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in human erythrocyte membranes after incubation with the sum of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (met) and aspartic acid (aspt), or with each one separately. Erythrocyte membranes were obtained from 12 healthy individuals and were incubated with ASP hydrolysis products for 1 h at 37 degrees C. AChE was measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of membranes with ASP metabolites corresponding with 34 mg/kg, 150 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg of ASP consumption resulted in an enzyme activity reduction by -33%, -41%, and -57%, respectively. Met concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.60 mM, and 0.80 mM decreased the enzyme activity by -20%, -32% or -40%, respectively. Aspt concentrations 2.80 mM, 7.60 mM or 10.0 mM inhibited membrane AChE activity by -20%, -35%, and -47%, respectively. Phe concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.35 mM or 0.50mM reduced the enzyme activity by -11%, -33%, and -35%, respectively. Aspt or Phe concentrations 0.82 mM or 0.07 mM, respectively, did not alter the membrane AChE activity. It is concluded that low concentrations of ASP metabolites had no effect on the membrane enzyme activity, whereas high or toxic concentrations partially or remarkably decreased the membrane AChE activity, respectively. Additionally, neurological symptoms, including learning and memory processes, may be related to the high or toxic concentrations of the sweetener metabolites.

  11. acetylcholinesterase inhibitory potential and insecticidal activity of an endophytic Alternaria sp. from Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bahaderjeet; Thakur, Abhinay; Kaur, Sanehdeep; Chadha, B S; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2012-11-01

    Keeping in view the vast potential of endophytic fungi to produce bioactive molecules, this study aimed at isolating and screening endophytes for the production of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Fifty-four endophytic fungi were isolated from Ricinus communis and screened for their AChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's colorimetric assay method. Six isolates were found to possess AChE inhibitory activity with maximum inhibition of 78 % being evinced by culture Cas1 which was identified to be Alternaria sp. on the basis of molecular as well as microscopic methods. Optimization of inhibitor production was carried out using one factor at a time approach. Maximum production of inhibitor was obtained on potato dextrose broth after 10 days incubation. The IC(50) of the chloroform extract was observed to be 40 μg/ml. The extract was purified on silica gel and eluted stepwise with a gradient of chloroform/methanol. The insecticidal potential of the extract was evaluated by feeding the larvae of Spodoptera litura on diet containing varying concentrations of the extract. It was observed that with increase in the concentration of the extract, mortality of the larvae increased. The culture has the potential of being exploited in medicine as well as a biocontrol agent.

  12. Effects of Chlorophenoxy Herbicides and Their Main Transformation Products on DNA Damage and Acetylcholinesterase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Benfeito, Sofia; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Andrade, Paula B.; Sottomayor, M. J.; Borges, Fernanda; Garrido, E. Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pesticide transformation products (TPs) are increasingly being detected among different environmental compartments, including groundwater and surface water. However, there is no sufficient experimental data on their toxicological potential to assess the risk associated with TPs, even if their occurrence is known. In this study, the interaction of chlorophenoxy herbicides (MCPA, mecoprop, 2,4-D and dichlorprop) and their main transformation products with calf thymus DNA by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy has been assessed. Additionally, the toxicity of the chlorophenoxy herbicides and TPs was also assessed evaluating the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. On the basis of the results found, it seems that AChE is not the main target of chlorophenoxy herbicides and their TPs. However, the results found showed that the transformation products displayed a higher inhibitory activity when compared with the parent herbicides. The results obtained in the DNA interaction studies showed, in general, a slight effect on the stability of the double helix. However, the data found for 4-chloro-2-methyl-6-nitrophenol suggest that this transformation product can interact with DNA through a noncovalent mode. PMID:24795892

  13. Galangin, a flavonol derived from Rhizoma Alpiniae Officinarum, inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ava J Y; Xie, Heidi Q; Choi, Roy C Y; Zheng, Ken Y Z; Bi, Cathy W C; Xu, Sherry L; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2010-09-06

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several AChE inhibitors, e.g. rivastigmine, galantamine and huperzine are originating from plants, suggesting that herbs could potentially serve as sources for novel AChE inhibitors. Here, we searched potential AChE inhibitors from flavonoids, a group of naturally occurring compounds in plants or traditional Chinese medicines (TCM). Twenty-one flavonoids, covered different subclasses, were tested for their potential function in inhibiting AChE activity from the brain in vitro. Among all the tested flavonoids, galangin, a flavonol isolated from Rhizoma Alpiniae Officinarum, the rhizomes of Alpiniae officinarum (Hance.) showed an inhibitory effect on AChE activity with the highest inhibition by over 55% and an IC(50) of 120 microM and an enzyme-flavonoid inhibition constant (K(i)) of 74 microM. The results suggest that flavonoids could be potential candidates for further development of new drugs against AD.

  14. Maternal caffeine exposure alters neuromotor development and hippocampus acetylcholinesterase activity in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Claudia; Souza, Andressa; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; De Oliveira, Carla; Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bonan, Carla D; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci L S

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal caffeine intake on the neuromotor development of rat offspring and on acetylcholine degradation and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression in the hippocampus of 14-day-old infant rats. Rat dams were treated with caffeine (0.3g/L) throughout gestation and lactation until the pups were 14 days old. The pups were divided into three groups: (1) control, (2) caffeine, and (3) washout caffeine. The washout group received a caffeine solution until the seventh postnatal day (P7). Righting reflex (RR) and negative geotaxis (NG) were assessed to evaluate postural parameters as an index of neuromotor reflexes. An open-field (OF) test was conducted to assess locomotor and exploratory activities as well as anxiety-like behaviors. Caffeine treatment increased both RR and NG latency times. In the OF test, the caffeine group had fewer outer crossings and reduced locomotion compared to control, while the washout group showed increased inner crossings in relation to the other groups and fewer rearings only in comparison to the control group. We found decreased AChE activity in the caffeine group compared to the other groups, with no alteration in AChE transcriptional regulation. Chronic maternal exposure to caffeine promotes important alterations in neuromotor development. These results highlight the ability of maternal caffeine intake to interfere with cholinergic neurotransmission during brain development.

  15. [Effect of acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase on the activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh, 1 microM) stimulates activity of the contractile vacuole of proteus. The effect of ACh is not mimicked by its analogs which are not hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE), i. e., carbacholine and 5-methylfurmethide. The effect of ACh is not sensitive to the blocking action of M-cholinolytics, atropine and mytolone, but is suppressed by N-cholinolytic, tubocurarine. The inhibitors of AChE, eserine (0.01 microM) and armine (0.1 microM), suppress the effect of ACh on amoeba contractile vacuole. ACh does not affect activation of contractile vacuole induced by arginine-vasopressin (1 microM), but it blocks such effect of opiate receptors agonist, dynorphin A1-13 (0.01 microM). This effect of ACh is also suppressed by the inhibitors of AChE. These results suggest that, in the above-described effects of ACh, AChE acts not as an antagonist, but rather as a synergist.

  16. Sublethal Effects of Insecticide Exposure on Megacopta cribraria (Fabricius) Nymphs: Key Biological Traits and Acetylcholinesterase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jin; Reisig, Dominic D.; Li, Guoping; Wu, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Megacopta cribraria F. (Hemiptera: Plataspidae), the kudzu bug, is an invasive insect pest of U.S. soybean. At present, insecticide application is the primary and most effective control option for M. cribraria. In this study, the potential effects of sublethal and low-lethal concentrations (LC10 and LC40) of three common insecticides on key biological traits and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the treated nymphal stage of insect were assessed. The results show that the sublethal concentration of imidacloprid significantly reduced adult emergence rate of M. cribraria. A low-lethal concentration of imidacloprid significantly increased nymphal development time, but significantly decreased adult emergence rate and adult longevity. Both sublethal and low-lethal concentrations of acephate caused an increase in nymphal development time and a reduction in adult emergence rate and adult longevity. Fecundity of females was significantly reduced only by exposure to low-lethal concentrations of acephate. Sublethal and low-lethal concentrations of bifenthrin increased nymphal development time, but significantly decreased adult emergence rate. In addition, we found that the AChE activity of M. cribraria was significantly increased only by LC40 imidacloprid, but strongly inhibited by acephate. PMID:27638957

  17. Variations in Acetylcholinesterase Activity within Human Cortical Pyramidal Neurons Across Age and Cognitive Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Janeczek, Monica; Gefen, Tamar; Samimi, Mehrnoosh; Kim, Garam; Weintraub, Sandra; Bigio, Eileen; Rogalski, Emily; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Geula, Changiz

    2017-03-01

    We described an extensive network of cortical pyramidal neurons in the human brain with abundant acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Emergence of these neurons during childhood/adolescence, attainment of highest density in early adulthood, and virtual absence in other species led us to hypothesize involvement of AChE within these neurons in higher cortical functions. The current study quantified the density and staining intensity of these neurons using histochemical procedures. Few faintly stained AChE-positive cortical pyramidal neurons were observed in children/adolescents. These neurons attained their highest density and staining intensity in young adulthood. Compared with the young adult group, brains of cognitively normal elderly displayed no significant change in numerical density but a significant decrease in staining intensity of AChE-positive cortical pyramidal neurons. Brains of elderly above age 80 with unusually preserved memory performance (SuperAgers) showed significantly lower staining intensity and density of these neurons when compared with same-age peers. Conceivably, low levels of AChE activity could enhance the impact of acetylcholine on pyramidal neurons to counterbalance other involutional factors that mediate the decline of memory capacity during average aging. We cannot yet tell if elderly with superior memory capacity have constitutively low neuronal AChE levels or if this feature reflects adaptive neuroplasticity.

  18. Effects of Anabaena spiroides (Cyanobacteria) aqueous extracts on the acetylcholinesterase activity of aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Monserrat, J M; Yunes, J S; Bianchini, A

    2001-06-01

    The effects of aqueous extracts from a cyanobacteria species, Anabaena spiroides, on fish (Odontesthes argentinensis), crab (Callinectes sapidus), and purified eel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were studied. In vitro concentrations of A. spiroides aqueous extract that inhibited 50% of enzyme activity (IC50) were 23.0, 17.2, and 45.0 mg/L of lyophilized cyanobacteria for eel, fish, and crab AChE, respectively. Eel AChE inhibition follows pseudo-first-order kinetics, the same expected for organophosphorus pesticides. Inhibition of purified eel AChE using mixtures of bioxidized malathion and aqueous extract of A. spiroides showed a competitive feature (p < 0.05), suggesting that the toxin(s) could be structurally similar to an organophosphorus pesticide and that toxins present in the aqueous extract inhibit the active site of the enzyme. The inhibition recovery assays using 2-PAM (0.3 mM) showed that (1) bioxidized malathion inhibited 27.0 +/- 1.1% of crab and 36.5 +/- 0.1% of eel AChE activities; (2) with bioxidized malathion + 2-PAM the registered inhibition was 13.2 +/- 2.1% and 3.7 +/- 0.5% in crab and eel AChE, respectively; (3) the aqueous extract from A. spiroides inhibited 17.4 +/- 2.2% and 59.9 +/- 0.5% of crab and eel AChE activity, respectively; and (4) aqueous extract + 2-PAM inhibited 22.3 +/- 2.6 and 61.5 +/- 0.2% of crab and eel AChEs. The absence of enzyme activity recovery after 2-PAM exposure could imply that the enzyme aging process was extremely quick.

  19. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases acetylcholinesterase activity correlating with reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Yamchuen, Panit; Aimjongjun, Sathid; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2014-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their oxidized forms, and oxidative stress are suspected to be a key combination in the onset of AD and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a part in this pathology. The present study aimed to link these parameters using differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in culture. Both mildly and fully oxidized human LDL (mox- and fox-LDL), but not native (non-oxidized) LDL were cytotoxic in dose- and time-dependent patterns and this was accompanied by an increased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidized LDL (10-200 μg/mL) augmented AChE activity after 4 and 24h treatments, respectively while the native LDL was without effect. The increased AChE with oxidized LDLs was accompanied by a proportionate increase in intracellular ROS formation (R=0.904). These findings support the notion that oxidized LDLs are cytotoxic and that their action on AChE may reduce central cholinergic transmission in AD and affirm AChE as a continued rational for anticholinesterase therapy but in conjunction with antioxidant/antihyperlipidemic cotreatments.

  20. Characterization of Lignanamides from Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) Seed and Their Antioxidant and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activities.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoli; Tang, Jiajing; dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Nurisso, Alessandra; Simões-Pires, Claudia Avello; Ji, Mei; Lou, Hongxiang; Fan, Peihong

    2015-12-16

    Hemp seed is known for its content of fatty acids, proteins, and fiber, which contribute to its nutritional value. Here we studied the secondary metabolites of hemp seed aiming at identifying bioactive compounds that could contribute to its health benefits. This investigation led to the isolation of 4 new lignanamides, cannabisin M (2), cannabisin N (5), cannabisin O (8), and 3,3'-demethyl-heliotropamide (10), together with 10 known lignanamides, among which 4 was identified for the first time from hemp seed. Structures were established on the basis of NMR, HR-MS, UV, and IR as well as by comparison with the literature data. Lignanamides 2, 7, and 9-14 showed good antioxidant activity, among which 7, 10, and 13 also inhibited acetylcholinesterase in vitro. The newly identified compounds in this study add to the diversity of hemp seed composition, and the bioassays implied that hemp seed, with lignanamides as nutrients, may be a good source of bioactive and protective compounds.

  1. Blocked Enzymatic Etching of Gold Nanorods: Application to Colorimetric Detection of Acetylcholinesterase Activity and Its Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saa, Laura; Grinyte, Ruta; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Pavlov, Valeri

    2016-05-04

    The anisotropic morphology of gold nanorods (AuNRs) has been shown to lead to nonuniform ligand distribution and preferential etching through their tips. We have recently demonstrated that this effect can be achieved by biocatalytic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP). We report here that modification of AuNRs with thiol-containing organic molecules such as glutathione and thiocholine hinders enzymatic AuNR etching. Higher concentrations of thiol-containing molecules in the reaction mixture gradually decrease the rate of enzymatic etching, which can be monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy through changes in the AuNR longitudinal plasmon band. This effect can be applied to develop novel optical assays for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The biocatalytic hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine by AChE yields thiocholine, which prevents enzymatic AuNR etching in the presence of HRP. Additionally, the same bioassay can be used for the detection of nanomolar concentrations of AChE inhibitors such as paraoxon and galanthamine.

  2. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activity of Pigment Echinochrome A from Sea Urchin Scaphechinus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Pronto, Julius Ryan D.; Sarankhuu, Bolor-Erdene; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (EchA) is a dark-red pigment of the polyhydroxynaphthoquinone class isolated from sea urchin Scaphechinus mirabilis. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are used in the treatment of various neuromuscular disorders, and are considered as strong therapeutic agents for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although EchA is clinically used to treat ophthalmic diseases and limit infarct formation during ischemia/reperfusion injury, anti-AChE effect of EchA is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the anti-AChE effect of EchA in vitro. EchA and its exhausted form which lost anti-oxidant capacity did not show any significant cytotoxicy on the H9c2 and A7r5 cells. EchA inhibited AChE with an irreversible and uncompetitive mode. In addition, EchA showed reactive oxygen species scavenging activity, particularly with nitric oxide. These findings indicate new therapeutic potential for EchA in treating reduced acetylcholine-related diseases including AD and provide an insight into developing new AChE inhibitors. PMID:24918454

  3. Flavonoids, Antioxidant Potential, and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition Activity of the Extracts from the Gametophyte and Archegoniophore of Marchantia polymorpha L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Cao, Jianguo; Wu, Yuhuan; Wang, Quanxi; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-03-17

    Marchantia polymorpha L. is a representative bryophyte used as a traditional Chinese medicinal herb for scald and pneumonia. The phytochemicals in M. polymorpha L. are terpenoids and flavonoids, among which especially the flavonoids show significant human health benefits. Many researches on the gametophyte of M. polymorpha L. have been reported. However, as the reproductive organ of M. polymorpha L., the bioactivity and flavonoids profile of the archegoniophore have not been reported, so in this work the flavonoid profiles, antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibition activities of the extracts from the archegoniophore and gametophyte of M. polymorpha L. were compared by radical scavenging assay methods (DPPH, ABTS, O(2-)), reducing power assay, acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay and LC-MS analysis. The results showed that the total flavonoids content in the archegoniophore was about 10-time higher than that of the gametophyte. Differences between the archegoniophore and gametophyte of M. polymorpha L. were observed by LC-MS analysis. The archegoniophore extracts showed stronger bio-activities than those of the gametophyte. The archegoniophore extract showed a significant acetylcholinesterase inhibition, while the gametophyte extract hardly inhibited it.

  4. Acetylcholinesterase Activity, Cohabitation with Floricultural Workers, and Blood Pressure in Ecuadorian Children

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, David R.; Himes, John H.; Alexander, Bruce H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are commonly used pesticides that can effect hemodynamic changes through increased cholinergic stimulation. Children of agricultural workers are likely to have paraoccupational exposures to pesticides, but the potential physiological impact of such exposures is unclear. Objectives: We investigated whether secondary pesticide exposures were associated with blood pressure and heart rate among children living in agricultural Ecuadorian communities. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 271 children 4–9 years of age [51% cohabited with one or more flower plantation workers (mean duration, 5.2 years)]. Erythrocyte AChE activity was measured using the EQM Test-mate system. Linear regression models were used to estimate associations of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate with AChE activity, living with flower workers, duration of cohabitation with a flower worker, number of flower workers in the child’s home, and number of practices that might increase children’s exposure to pesticides. Results: Mean (± SD) AChE activity was 3.14 ± 0.49 U/mL. A 1-U/mL decrease in AChE activity was associated with a 2.86-mmHg decrease in SBP (95% CI: –5.20, –0.53) and a 2.89-mmHg decrease in DBP (95% CI: –5.00, –0.78), after adjustment for potential confounders. Children living with flower workers had lower SBP (–1.72 mmHg; 95% CI: –3.53, 0.08) than other children, and practices that might increase exposure also were associated with lower SBP. No significant associations were found between exposures and heart rate. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that subclinical secondary exposures to pesticides may affect vascular reactivity in children. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:23359481

  5. Copper acutely impairs behavioral function and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Haverroth, Gabriela M B; Welang, Chariane; Mocelin, Riciéri N; Postay, Daniela; Bertoncello, Kanandra T; Franscescon, Francini; Rosemberg, Denis B; Dal Magro, Jacir; Dalla Corte, Cristiane L

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a heavy metal found at relatively high concentrations in surface waters around the world. Copper is a micronutrient at low concentrations and is essential to several organisms. At higher concentrations copper can become toxic, which reveal the importance of studying the toxic effects of this metal on the aquatic life. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects of copper on the behavior and biochemical parameters of zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish were exposed for 24h at a concentration of 0.006 mg/L Cu. After the exposure period, behavioral profile of animals was recorded through 6 min using two different apparatuses tests: the Novel Tank and the Light-Dark test. After behavioral testing, animals were euthanized with a solution of 250 mg/L of tricaine (MS-222). Brain, muscle, liver and gills were extracted for analysis of parameters related to oxidative stress and accumulation of copper in these tissues. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was determined in brain and muscle. Results showed acute exposure to copper induces significant changes in behavioral profile of zebrafish by changing locomotion and natural tendency to avoid brightly lit area. On the other hand, there were no significant effects on parameters related to oxidative stress. AChE activity decreased significantly in zebrafish muscle, but there were no significant changes in cerebral AChE activity. Copper levels in tissues did not increase significantly compared to the controls. Taken together, these results indicate that a low concentration of copper can acutely affect behavioral profile of adult zebrafish which could be partially related to an inhibition on muscle AChE activity. These results reinforce the need of additional tests to establishment of safe copper concentrations to aquatic organisms and the importance of behavioral parameters in ecotoxicological studies.

  6. Chlorpyrifos and Chlorpyrifos-Oxon Inhibit Axonal Growth by Interfering with the Morphogenic Activity of Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongren; Howard, Angela; Bruun, Donald; Ajua-Alemanj, Mispa; Pickart, Cecile; Lein, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    A primary role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is regulation of cholinergic neurotransmission by hydrolysis of synaptic acetylcholine. In the developing nervous system, however, AChE also functions as a morphogenic factor to promote axonal growth. This raises the question of whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) that are known to selectively bind to and inactivate the enzymatic function of AChE also interfere with its morphogenic function to perturb axonogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to chlorpyrifos (CPF) or its oxon metabolite (CPFO). Both OPs significantly decreased axonal length at concentrations that had no effect on cell viability, protein synthesis or the enzymatic activity of AChE. Comparative analyses of the effects of CPF and CPFO on axonal growth in DRG neurons cultured from AChE nullizygous (AChE−/−) versus wildtype (AChE+/+) mice indicated that while these OPs inhibited axonal growth in AChE+/+ DRG neurons, they had no effect on axonal growth in AChE−/− DRG neurons. However, transfection of AChE−/− DRG neurons with cDNA encoding full-length AChE restored the wildtype response to the axon inhibitory effects of OPs. These data indicate that inhibition of axonal growth by OPs requires AChE, but the mechanism involves inhibition of the morphogenic rather than enzymatic activity of AChE. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for explaining not only the functional deficits observed in children and animals following developmental exposure to OPs, but also the increased vulnerability of the developing nervous system to OPs. PMID:18076960

  7. Chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon inhibit axonal growth by interfering with the morphogenic activity of acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Dongren; Howard, Angela; Bruun, Donald; Ajua-Alemanj, Mispa; Pickart, Cecile; Lein, Pamela J.

    2008-04-01

    A primary role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is regulation of cholinergic neurotransmission by hydrolysis of synaptic acetylcholine. In the developing nervous system, however, AChE also functions as a morphogenic factor to promote axonal growth. This raises the question of whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) that are known to selectively bind to and inactivate the enzymatic function of AChE also interfere with its morphogenic function to perturb axonogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to chlorpyrifos (CPF) or its oxon metabolite (CPFO). Both OPs significantly decreased axonal length at concentrations that had no effect on cell viability, protein synthesis or the enzymatic activity of AChE. Comparative analyses of the effects of CPF and CPFO on axonal growth in DRG neurons cultured from AChE nullizygous (AChE{sup -/-}) versus wild type (AChE{sup +/+}) mice indicated that while these OPs inhibited axonal growth in AChE{sup +/+} DRG neurons, they had no effect on axonal growth in AChE{sup -/-} DRG neurons. However, transfection of AChE{sup -/-} DRG neurons with cDNA encoding full-length AChE restored the wild type response to the axon inhibitory effects of OPs. These data indicate that inhibition of axonal growth by OPs requires AChE, but the mechanism involves inhibition of the morphogenic rather than enzymatic activity of AChE. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for explaining not only the functional deficits observed in children and animals following developmental exposure to OPs, but also the increased vulnerability of the developing nervous system to OPs.

  8. Visible-light-activated photoelectrochemical biosensor for the study of acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by endogenous neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qilin; Chen, Hua; Xu, Lili; Lu, Danqin; Tang, Linlin; Jin, Litong; Xu, Zhiai; Zhang, Wen

    2013-07-15

    In this report, a novel visible-light-activated photoelectrochemical biosensor was fabricated to study the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity induced by two endogenous neurotoxins, 1(R)-methyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline [(R)-Sal] and 1(R),2(N)-dimethyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetra-hydroisoquinoline [(R)-NMSal], which have drawn much attention in the study of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The photoelectrode was prepared by three steps, as follows. At first, nitrogen and fluorine co-doped TiO2 nanotubes (TNs) were obtained by anodic oxidation of a Ti sheet. Secondly, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were deposited onto the TNs through a microwave-assisted heating polyol (MAHP) process. At last, AChE was immobilized on the obtained photoelectrode and the biosensor was marked as AChE/Ag/NFTNs. Due to the nitrogen and fluorine co-doping, the photoelectrochemical biosensors can produce high photocurrent under visible light irradiation. Moreover, the presence of AgNPs greatly increased the photocurrent response of the biosensor. AChE/Ag/NFTNs hybrid system was used to study AChE inhibition induced by (R)-Sal and (R)-NMSal. The result proved that both (R)-Sal and (R)-NMSal exhibited mixed and reversible inhibition against AChE. This strategy is of great significance for the development of novel photoelectrochemical biosensors in the future.

  9. Interpretation of toxicological activity of ionic liquids to acetylcholinesterase inhibition via in silico modelling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-09-01

    For designing environmentally friendly ionic liquids (ILs), their structural effects on the toxicity should be interpreted via modelling based on the quantitative-structure-activity-relationship (QSAR) concept. For the purpose, QSAR models for predicting IL toxicity in acetylcholinesterase activity were developed by using linear free-energy relationship (LFER) descriptors, whose chemical meanings are well defined. These are excess molar refraction (Ec or a), dipolarity/polarizability (Sc or a), H-bonding acidity (Ac or a), H-bonding basicity (Bc or a), McGowan volume (Vc or a), and ionic interactions of cation (J(+)) and anion (J(-)). Since the experimentally determined LFER descriptors are not available, we calculated them based on density functional theory, conductor-like screening model and the open-source software, obprop. The toxicity values of imidazolium- and pyridinium-based ILs could be predicted by a combination of four descriptors (Ac, Bc, Vc and Sa) with an R(2) of 0.828, and (Ec, Ac, Ea and Sa) with an R(2) of 0.879, respectively. In prediction study using the overall dataset containing various IL structures, the six calculated terms (Ec, Sc, Ac, J(+), Ea, and Sa) were selected and correlated with the observed toxicity values in R(2) of 0.748 for the training set, R(2) of 0.711 for the test set and R(2) of 0.655 for external validation set. And this study explains how the selected terms are contributing to the prediction models, and their chemical meanings were understood.

  10. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the pons and medulla oblongata of rats after chronic electroconvulsive shock.

    PubMed

    Camarini, R; Benedito, M A

    1997-10-01

    An imbalance between cholinergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission has been proposed for the etiology of affective disorders. According to this hypothesis, depression would be the result of enhanced cholinergic and reduced noradrenergic neurotransmission. Repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS) is an effective treatment for depression; moreover, in laboratory animals it induces changes in brain noradrenergic neurotransmission similar to those obtained by chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs (down-regulation of beta-adrenergic receptors). The aim of the present study was to determine whether repeated ECS in rats changes acetylcholinesterase (Achase) activity. Achase controls the level of acetylcholine (Ach) in the synaptic cleft and its levels seem to be regulated by the interaction between Ach and its receptor. Thus, a decrease in Achase activity would suggest decreased cholinergic activity. Adult male Wistar rats received one ECS (80 mA, 0.2 s, 60 Hz) daily for 7 days. Control rats were handled in the same way without receiving the shock. Rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last ECS and membrane-bound and soluble Achase activity was assayed in homogenates obtained from the pons and medulla oblongata. A statistically significant decrease in membrane-bound Achase activity (nmol thiocholine formed min-1 mg protein-1) (control 182.6 +/- 14.8, ECS 162.2 +/- 14.2, P < 0.05) and an increase in soluble Achase activity in the medulla oblongata (control 133.6 +/- 4.2, ECS 145.8 +/- 12.3, P < 0.05) were observed. No statistical differences were observed in Achase activity in the pons. Although repeated ECS induced a decrease in membrane-bound Achase activity, the lack of changes in the pons (control Achase activity: total 231.0 +/- 34.5, membrane-bound 298.9 +/- 18.5, soluble 203.9 +/- 30.9), the region where the locus coeruleus, the main noradrenergic nucleus, is located, does not seem to favor the existence of an interaction between cholinergic and noradrenergic

  11. Distribution of Intravenously Administered Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in the Adrenal Gland: 11C-Donepezil PET Study in the Normal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Tadashi; Naka, Sadahiro; Ikeda, Hayato; Horitsugi, Genki; Kanai, Yasukazu; Isohashi, Kayako; Ishibashi, Mana; Kato, Hiroki; Shimosegawa, Eku; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors have been used for patients with Alzheimer's disease. However, its pharmacokinetics in non-target organs other than the brain has not been clarified yet. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the whole-body distribution of intravenously administered 11C-Donepezil (DNP) and the AChE activity in the normal rat, with special focus on the adrenal glands. Methods The distribution of 11C-DNP was investigated by PET/CT in 6 normal male Wistar rats (8 weeks old, body weight  = 220±8.9 g). A 30-min dynamic scan was started simultaneously with an intravenous bolus injection of 11C-DNP (45.0±10.7 MBq). The whole-body distribution of the 11C-DNP PET was evaluated based on the Vt (total distribution volume) by Logan-plot analysis. A fluorometric assay was performed to quantify the AChE activity in homogenized tissue solutions of the major organs. Results The PET analysis using Vt showed that the adrenal glands had the 2nd highest level of 11C-DNP in the body (following the liver) (13.33±1.08 and 19.43±1.29 ml/cm3, respectively), indicating that the distribution of 11C-DNP was the highest in the adrenal glands, except for that in the excretory organs. The AChE activity was the third highest in the adrenal glands (following the small intestine and the stomach) (24.9±1.6, 83.1±3.0, and 38.5±8.1 mU/mg, respectively), indicating high activity of AChE in the adrenal glands. Conclusions We demonstrated the whole-body distribution of 11C-DNP by PET and the AChE activity in the major organs by fluorometric assay in the normal rat. High accumulation of 11C-DNP was observed in the adrenal glands, which suggested the risk of enhanced cholinergic synaptic transmission by the use of AChE inhibitors. PMID:25225806

  12. Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities of Bouvardia ternifolia: potential implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Giovanni; Huerta-Reyes, Maira; González-Cortazar, Manasés; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Silva-García, Raúl; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo

    2015-07-01

    Bouvardia ternifolia has been used medicinally to treat inflammation. In the present study, we investigate the anti-Alzheimer's potential effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of B. ternifolia through evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, quantification of the percentage inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity, protection effect against β-amyloid fibrillar-induce neurotoxicity, and the identification of the main constituents. Our results show that B. ternifolia extract and ethyl acetate fraction induced anti-inflammatory effects by reducing inflammation by >70 %, while antioxidant test revealed significant IC50 values for flavonoid content fraction (30.67 ± 2.09 μg/ml) and ethyl acetate fraction (42.66 ± 0.93 μg/ml). The maximum inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was exhibited by scopoletin content fraction (38.43 ± 3.94 %), while ethyl acetate fraction exerted neuroprotective effect against β-amyloid peptide (83.97 ± 5.03 %). Phytochemical analysis, showed the presence of 3-O-quercetin glucopyranoside (415 mg/g), rutin (229.9 mg/g), ursolic and oleanolic acid (54 and 20.8 mg/g respectively), 3-O-quercetin rhamnopyranoside (12.8 mg/g), chlorogenic acid (9.5 mg/g), and scopoletin (1.38 mg/g). Our findings support the use of B. ternifolia since the extract induced significant neuroprotection against β-amyloid peptide, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase effects that could be attributed to its contents of polyphenols, coumarins, and triterpenes, and encourage further studies for development of this extract as therapeutic agent in treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Possibility of Acetylcholinesterase Overexpression in Alzheimer Disease Patients after Therapy with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kračmarová, Alžběta; Drtinová, Lucie; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme responsible for termination of excitatory transmission at cholinergic synapses by the hydrolyzing of a neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Nowadays, other functions of acetylcholinesterase in the organism are considered, for example its role in regulation of apoptosis. Cholinergic nervous system as well as acetylcholinesterase activity is closely related to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The mostly used therapy of Alzheimer disease is based on enhancing cholinergic function using inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase like rivastigmine, donepezil or galantamine. These drugs can influence not only the acetylcholinesterase activity but also other processes in treated organism. The paper is aimed mainly on possibility of increased expression and protein level of acetylcholinesterase caused by the therapy with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

  14. Quercetin Improves Neurobehavioral Performance Through Restoration of Brain Antioxidant Status and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Manganese-Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Adedara, Isaac A; Ego, Valerie C; Subair, Temitayo I; Oyediran, Oluwasetemi; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the neuroprotective mechanism of quercetin by assessing the biochemical and behavioral characteristics in rats sub-chronically treated with manganese alone at 15 mg/kg body weight or orally co-treated with quercetin at 10 and 20 mg/kg body weight for 45 consecutive days. Locomotor behavior was monitored using video-tracking software during a 10-min trial in a novel environment whereas the brain regions namely the hypothalamus, cerebrum and cerebellum of the rats were processed for biochemical analyses. Results indicated that co-treatment with quercetin significantly (p < 0.05) prevented manganese-induced locomotor and motor deficits specifically the decrease in total distance travelled, total body rotation, maximum speed, absolute turn angle as well as the increase in time of immobility and grooming. The improvement in the neurobehavioral performance of manganese-treated rats following quercetin co-treatment was confirmed by track and occupancy plot analyses. Moreover, quercetin assuaged manganese-induced decrease in antioxidant enzymes activities and the increase in acetylcholinesterase activity, hydrogen peroxide generation and lipid peroxidation levels in the hypothalamus, cerebrum and cerebellum of the rats. Taken together, quercetin mechanisms of ameliorating manganese-induced neurotoxicity is associated with restoration of acetylcholinesterase activity, augmentation of redox status and inhibition of lipid peroxidation in brain of rats.

  15. Structure-activity relationships and binding mode in the human acetylcholinesterase active site of pseudo-irreversible inhibitors related to xanthostigmine.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Stefano; Cavalli, Andrea; Ceccarini, Luisa; Bartolini, Manuela; Belluti, Federica; Bisi, Alessandra; Andrisano, Vincenza; Recanatini, Maurizio; Rampa, Angela

    2009-04-01

    Structure-activity relationship studies on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors were extended to newly synthesized compounds derived from the lead compound xantostigmine (1). The xanthone ring of compound 1 was replaced with several different scaffolds based on the benzopyran skeleton, linked to the tertiary amino nitrogen through an heptyloxy chain. These modifications resulted in 19 new compounds, most of them showing activity in the nanomolar-subnanomolar range. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to both define a new computational protocol for the simulation of pseudo-irreversibile AChE covalent inhibitors, and to acquire a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships of the present series of compounds. The results of this computational work prompted us to to evaluate the ability of compounds 5 and 13 to inhibit acetylcholinesterase-induced Abeta aggregation.

  16. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition, antioxidant activity and toxicity of Peumus boldus water extracts on HeLa and Caco-2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Falé, P L; Amaral, F; Amorim Madeira, P J; Sousa Silva, M; Florêncio, M H; Frazão, F N; Serralheiro, M L M

    2012-08-01

    This work aimed to study the inhibition on acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), the antioxidant activity and the toxicity towards Caco-2 and HeLa cells of aqueous extracts of Peumus Boldus. An IC(50) value of 0.93 mg/mL, for AChE inhibition, and EC(50) of 18.7 μg/mL, for the antioxidant activity, was determined. This activity can be attributed to glycosylated flavonoid derivatives detected, which were the main compounds, although boldine and other aporphine derivatives were also present. No changes in the chemical composition or the biochemical activities were found after gastrointestinal digestion. Toxicity of P. boldus decoction gave an IC(50) value 0.66 mg/mL for HeLa cells, which caused significant changes in the cell proteome profile.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase-Inhibition and Antibacterial Activity of Mondia whitei Adventitious Roots and Ex vitro-Grown Somatic Embryogenic-Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Ponnusamy; Kumari, Aloka; Ncube, Bhekumthetho; Van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Mondia whitei (Hook.f.) Skeels is an important endangered medicinal and commercial plant in South Africa. In vitro propagation systems are required for biomass production and bioactivity analysis to supplement wild resources/stocks. Adventitious roots from somatic embryogenic explants using suspension culture and ex vitro-grown plants produced via somatic embryogenesis were established using different plant growth regulator treatments. The adventitious root biomass and different parts of ex vitro-grown and mother plants were used to investigate the potential for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and antibacterial activities. Adventitious roots derived from 2.5 μM indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) treatments and ex vitro-grown plants derived from meta-topolin riboside and IAA treatments gave the best AChE and antibacterial activities. The in vitro-established M. whitei and ex vitro biomass have comparable ability to function as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and antibacterial agents, and can be used as potent bioresources in traditional medicine. PMID:27752244

  18. Effect of thermal stress and water deprivation on the acetylcholinesterase activity of the pig brain and hypophyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adejumo, D. O.; Egbunike, G. N.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of direct exposure of boars to thermal stress for 1 h daily for 5 days and to acute water deprivation for 24 or 48 h were studied on the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of porcine brain and hypophysial regions. Mean ambient temperatures, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures in the open were significantly higher than inside the pen. Heat stress induced a rise in AChE activities in the pons, cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, mid-brain and medulla oblongata. However, no significant changes were observed in the cerebral cortex, adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis. Water deprivation significantly ( P<0.05) depressed AChE activity to varying extents depending on the duration of water restriction. Thus AChE activity in the amygdala was depressed by water deprivation for 24 h but partially restored at 48 h. The pons and medulla oblongata were comparable to the amygdala in this respect. The adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis were relatively unaffected.

  19. Effects of tricyclic compounds on membrane binding of bivalent cations, activities of acetylcholinesterase and some tissue proteases.

    PubMed

    Molnar, J; Sohar, I; Kovacs, J; Rakonczay, Z; Rausch, H

    1993-01-01

    A tricyclic compound tetrahydroaminoacridine is known to improve the cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease. The possible mechanism of action of acridine and structurally related tricyclic compounds was studied on the bivalent cation content of bacterial membrane, rat brain acetylcholinesterase and some tissue proteases in model experiments. Acridine orange and disubstituted chlorpromazine (CPZ) derivatives lowered Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding and membrane polarization in the simplest biological membrane (E. coli), as revealed by reactor neutron activation analysis. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was inhibited by CPZ, 3,7,8-trihydroxy-CPZ, acridine orange partially saturated desipramine, imipramine, trans-clopenthixol and tetrahydrocannabidiolic at 10(-4) to 10(-5). A metalloproteinase, MMP-7-ase, was inhibited by tetrahydrocannabidiolic acid, 3,7,8-trihydroxy-CPZ, acridine orange but other tissue proteinases, ATN-ase and cathepsin B, were less sensitive to these compounds. (ATN-ase is an acetyltyrosine-p-nitroanilide splitting enzyme, a serine protease). The chelate complex forming ability and electron donor capacity of the compounds may play a role in the biological effects tested. It is assumed that compounds which do not displace bivalent cations in membranes may exert an inhibitory effect on AChE, and that metalloproteinase enzymes may be promising for the treatment of degenerative brain diseases.

  20. Behavioral swimming effects and acetylcholinesterase activity changes in Jenynsia multidentata exposed to chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin individually and in mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bonansea, Rocío Inés; Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto; Amé, María Valeria

    2016-07-01

    The pesticides cypermethrin (CYP) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) were found together in water bodies located in agricultural and urban areas. However, the impact to non-target biota from exposure to mixtures has received little attention. In the current study, we evaluated changes in swimming behavior and cholinesterase enzymes activity in Jenynsia multidentata, to investigate the possible effects of these insecticides individually and in mixtures. Moreover, differences between technical and commercial mixtures of the pesticides were evaluated. Females of J. multidentata were exposed over 96-h to CYP (0.04 and 0.4µgL(-1)), CPF (0.4 and 4µgL(-1)), individually and in a technical and commercial mixtures. Swimming behavior was recorded after 24h and 96h of exposure. Also, we measured cholinesterase enzymes activity in brain and muscle after 96h of exposure. Exposure to CYP increased the exploratory activity of J. multidentata in the upper area of the aquarium. Fish exposed to CPF (4µg L(-1)) showed a decrease in swimming activity and an increase in the time spent at the bottom of the aquarium. Interestingly, fish exposed to the technical and commercial mixture of CYP and CPF displayed a different behavior based on the concentration of exposure. Low concentration of pesticides elicited an increase in J. multidentata swimming activity with preference for the upper area of the aquarium, and high concentrations caused decrease in swimming activity with preference for the bottom area of the aquarium. Based on the response of cholinesterase enzymes, acetylcholinesterase in muscle was more sensitive to exposure to CYP, CPF and their mixtures than in brain. A decrease in swimming behavior correlates significantly with the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in muscle of J. multidentata exposed to high concentrations of pesticides. These results draw attention to the need of more studies on the potential ecotoxicological impact of pesticides and its mixtures at

  1. Combined approach to demonstrate acetylcholinesterase activity changes in the rat brain following tabun intoxication and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Bajgar, Jiri; Hajek, Petr; Kassa, Jiri; Slizova, Dasa; Krs, Otakar; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Fusek, Josef; Capek, Lukas; Voicu, Victor A

    2012-01-01

    Reactivation effects of K203 and currently available oximes (obidoxime, HI-6) in combination with atropine on acetylcholinesterase activities in the brain parts of rats poisoned with tabun were studied. The activity was determined by quantitative histochemical and biochemical methods correlating between them very well. The tabun-induced changes in acetylcholinsterase activity as well as in reactivation potency of reactivators used were different in various parts of the brain. Pontomedullar area seems to be important for observed changes following tabun intoxication and its treatment. From the oximes studied, the reactivation effect of K203 was comparable with obidoxime; HI-6 was ineffective. Combination of bio- and histochemical methods allow fine differentiation among the action of different oximes following tabun poisoning.

  2. Inhibition and Larvicidal Activity of Phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum on Acetylcholinesterase against Mosquito Vectors and Their Binding Mode of Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hematpoor, Arshia; Liew, Sook Yee; Chong, Wei Lim; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus are vectors of dengue fever and West Nile virus diseases. This study was conducted to determine the toxicity, mechanism of action and the binding interaction of three active phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae) toward late 3rd or early 4th larvae of above vectors. A bioassay guided-fractionation on the hexane extract from the roots of Piper sarmentosum led to the isolation and identification of three active phenylpropanoids; asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3. The current study involved evaluation of the toxicity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of these compounds against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were highly potent against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae causing up to 100% mortality at ≤ 15 μg/mL concentration. The ovicidal activity of asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3 were evaluated through egg hatching. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed potent ovicidal activity. Ovicidal activity for both compounds was up to 95% at 25μg/mL. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed strong inhibition on acetylcholinesterase with relative IC50 values of 0.73 to 1.87 μg/mL respectively. These findings coupled with the high AChE inhibition may suggest that asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 are neuron toxic compounds toward Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus. Further computational docking with Autodock Vina elaborates the possible interaction of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 with three possible binding sites of AChE which includes catalytic triads (CAS: S238, E367, H480), the peripheral sites (PAS: E72, W271) and anionic binding site (W83). The binding affinity of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were relatively strong with asaricin 1 showed a higher binding affinity in the anionic pocket. PMID:27152416

  3. Acetylcholinesterase activity in Corbicula fluminea Mull., as a biomarker of organophosphate pesticide pollution in Pinacanauan River, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Kimberly S; Pocsidio, Glorina N

    2010-06-01

    Organophosphates are known to inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. In this study, the AChE activity from the total soft tissues of Corbicula fluminea Mull. was used as a biomarker of organophosphate pollution in Pinacanauan River. Clams were collected from two different sites and at different seasons of the year. A colorimetric assay on the total soft tissues of the clams showed a directly proportional relationship between enzyme activity and condition of the riverine system. In vitro experiments on the total soft tissue, adductor muscles, digestive glands, and gills were conducted to assess the degree of localization of AChE as well as the sensitivity and tolerance of the enzymes in these tissues to varying concentrations of malathion. The degree of enzyme localization from highest to lowest is as follows: adductor muscle > gills > digestive gland whereas sensitivity to OP from greatest to least is: gills > adductor muscles > digestive gland.

  4. Structure-Activity Relations In Enzymes: An Application Of IR-ATR Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fringeli, Urs P.; Ahlstrom, Peter; Vincenz, Claudius; Fringeli, Marianna

    1985-12-01

    Relations between structure and specific activity in immobilized acetylcholinesterase (ACNE) have been studied by means of pH- and Ca++-modulation technique combined with attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy and enzyme activity measurement. Periodic modulation of pH and Ca++-concentration enabled a periodic on-off switching of about 40% of the total enzyme activity. It was found that about 0.5 to 1% of the amino acids were involved in this process. These 15 to 30 amino acids assumed antiparallel pleated sheet structure in the inhibited state and random and/or helical structure in the activated state.

  5. Energetics of Ortho-7 (oxime drug) translocation through the active-site gorge of tabun conjugated acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Vivek; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2012-01-01

    Oxime drugs translocate through the 20 Å active-site gorge of acetylcholinesterase in order to liberate the enzyme from organophosphorus compounds' (such as tabun) conjugation. Here we report bidirectional steered molecular dynamics simulations of oxime drug (Ortho-7) translocation through the gorge of tabun intoxicated enzyme, in which time dependent external forces accelerate the translocation event. The simulations reveal the participation of drug-enzyme hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions and water bridges between them. Employing nonequilibrium theorems that recovers the free energy from irreversible work done, we reconstruct potential of mean force along the translocation pathway such that the desired quantity represents an unperturbed system. The potential locates the binding sites and barriers for the drug to translocate inside the gorge. Configurational entropic contribution of the protein-drug binding entity and the role of solvent translational mobility in the binding energetics is further assessed.

  6. Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of Difluoropyrido[4,3-b]indoles as Potential Agents for Acetylcholinesterase and Antiamnesic Activity.

    PubMed

    Madaiah, Malavalli; Jayanna, Bidarur K; Manu, Arakere S; Prashanth, Maralekere K; Revanasiddappa, Hosakere D; Veeresh, Bantal

    2017-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are currently the most widely prescribed drugs for Alzheimer's disease. The high potential of indole compounds in medicinal chemistry led us to discover a novel series of fluoroindole compounds. The synthesis and pharmacological analysis of the difluoropyrido[4,3-b]indoles 11-34 are described. Compounds 11-34 were tested for AChE inhibition activity using a rat brain homogenate. Compounds 25-29 display a promising in vitro profile with an IC50 value range of 46-51.6 nM and show significant protective effect on scopolamine-induced amnesia. The present data indicate that compounds 25-29 may represent attractive potent molecules for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. [Distribution of acetylcholinesterase activity in the digestive system of the gastropod molluscs Littorina littorea and Achatina fulica].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, O V; Kuznetsova, T V

    2008-01-01

    With the use of the histochemical procedure for the demonstration of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity, the distribution cholinergic regulatory elements was studied in the esophagus, the pharynx, the stomach, the liver (the digestive gland) and the intestine in sea and terrestrial gastropod molluscs that differed in their general organization level, lifestyle, habitat and feeding type. In both molluscs, all the parts of the digestive tract contained the significant amount of intraepithelial AchE-positive cells of the open type, single subepithelial neurons and the nervous fibers localized among the muscle cells of the wall of the organs. The basal processes of the AchE-positive intraepithelial cells were shown to form the intraepithelial nerve plexus and to pass under the epithelium. The peculiarities and common principles in the distribution of the nervous elements detected, their possible function and the regulatory role in the digestion in gastropod molluscs and other animals are discussed.

  8. Salivary gland proteome analysis reveals modulation of anopheline unique proteins in insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistant Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Cornelie, Sylvie; Rossignol, Marie; Seveno, Martial; Demettre, Edith; Mouchet, François; Djègbè, Innocent; Marin, Philippe; Chandre, Fabrice; Corbel, Vincent; Remoué, Franck; Mathieu-Daudé, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance due to a mutation in the acetylcholinesterase (ace) encoding ace-1 gene confers cross-resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in Anopheles gambiae populations from Central and West Africa. This mutation is associated with a strong genetic cost revealed through alterations of some life history traits but little is known about the physiological and behavioural changes in insects bearing the ace-1(R) allele. Comparative analysis of the salivary gland contents between An. gambiae susceptible and ace-1(R) resistant strains was carried out to charaterize factors that could be involved in modifications of blood meal process, trophic behaviour or pathogen interaction in the insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. Differential analysis of the salivary gland protein profiles revealed differences in abundance for several proteins, two of them showing major differences between the two strains. These two proteins identified as saglin and TRIO are salivary gland-1 related proteins, a family unique to anopheline mosquitoes, one of them playing a crucial role in salivary gland invasion by Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites. Differential expression of two other proteins previously identified in the Anopheles sialome was also observed. The differentially regulated proteins are involved in pathogen invasion, blood feeding process, and protection against oxidation, relevant steps in the outcome of malaria infection. Further functional studies and insect behaviour experiments would confirm the impact of the modification of the sialome composition on blood feeding and pathogen transmission abilities of the resistant mosquitoes. The data supports the hypothesis of alterations linked to insecticide resistance in the biology of the primary vector of human malaria in Africa.

  9. Salivary Gland Proteome Analysis Reveals Modulation of Anopheline Unique Proteins in Insensitive Acetylcholinesterase Resistant Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Cornelie, Sylvie; Rossignol, Marie; Seveno, Martial; Demettre, Edith; Mouchet, François; Djègbè, Innocent; Marin, Philippe; Chandre, Fabrice; Corbel, Vincent; Remoué, Franck; Mathieu-Daudé, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance due to a mutation in the acetylcholinesterase (ace) encoding ace-1 gene confers cross-resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in Anopheles gambiae populations from Central and West Africa. This mutation is associated with a strong genetic cost revealed through alterations of some life history traits but little is known about the physiological and behavioural changes in insects bearing the ace-1R allele. Comparative analysis of the salivary gland contents between An. gambiae susceptible and ace-1R resistant strains was carried out to charaterize factors that could be involved in modifications of blood meal process, trophic behaviour or pathogen interaction in the insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. Differential analysis of the salivary gland protein profiles revealed differences in abundance for several proteins, two of them showing major differences between the two strains. These two proteins identified as saglin and TRIO are salivary gland-1 related proteins, a family unique to anopheline mosquitoes, one of them playing a crucial role in salivary gland invasion by Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites. Differential expression of two other proteins previously identified in the Anopheles sialome was also observed. The differentially regulated proteins are involved in pathogen invasion, blood feeding process, and protection against oxidation, relevant steps in the outcome of malaria infection. Further functional studies and insect behaviour experiments would confirm the impact of the modification of the sialome composition on blood feeding and pathogen transmission abilities of the resistant mosquitoes. The data supports the hypothesis of alterations linked to insecticide resistance in the biology of the primary vector of human malaria in Africa. PMID:25102176

  10. Zebrafish locomotor capacity and brain acetylcholinesterase activity is altered by Aphanizomenon flos-aquae DC-1 aphantoxins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, De Lu; Hu, Chun Xiang; Li, Dun Hai; Liu, Yong Ding

    2013-08-15

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (A. flos-aquae) is a source of neurotoxins known as aphantoxins or paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs) that present a major threat to the environment and to human health. Generally, altered neurological function is reflected in behavior. Although the molecular mechanism of action of PSPs is well known, its neurobehavioral effects on adult zebrafish and its relationship with altered neurological functions are poorly understood. Aphantoxins purified from a natural isolate of A. flos-aquae DC-1 were analyzed by HPLC. The major analogs found in the toxins were the gonyautoxins 1 and 5 (GTX1 and GTX5; 34.04% and 21.28%, respectively) and the neosaxitoxin (neoSTX, 12.77%). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were intraperitoneally injected with 5.3 and 7.61 μg STXeq/kg (low and high dose, respectively) of A. flos-aquae DC-1 aphantoxins. The swimming activity was investigated by observation combined with video at 6 timepoints from 1 to 24 h post-exposure. Both aphantoxin doses were associated with delayed touch responses, reduced head-tail locomotory abilities, inflexible turning of head, and a tailward-shifted center of gravity. The normal S-pattern (or undulating) locomotor trajectory was replaced by a mechanical motor pattern of swinging the head after wagging the tail. Finally, these fish principally distributed at the top and/or bottom water of the aquarium, and showed a clear polarized distribution pattern at 12 h post-exposure. Further analysis of neurological function demonstrated that both aphantoxin doses inhibited brain acetylcholinesterase activity. All these changes were dose- and time-dependent. These results demonstrate that aphantoxins can alter locomotor capacity, touch responses and distribution patterns by damaging the cholinergic system of zebrafish, and suggest that zebrafish locomotor behavior and acetylcholinesterase can be used as indicators for investigating aphantoxins and blooms in nature.

  11. Acetylcholinesterase immobilization and characterization, and comparison of the activity of the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme with its free counterpart.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2016-02-02

    A successful prescription is presented for acetylcholinesterase physically adsorbed on to a mesoporous silicon surface, with a promising hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide. The catalytic behaviour of the immobilized enzyme was assessed by spectrophotometric bioassay using neostigmine methyl sulfate as a standard acetycholinesterase inhibitor. The surface modification was studied through field emission SEM, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, cathode luminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, photoluminescence measurement and spectrophotometric bioassay. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme not only yielded greater enzyme stability, but also significantly improved the native photoluminescence at room temperature of the bare porous silicon architecture. The results indicated the promising catalytic behaviour of immobilized enzyme compared with that of its free counterpart, with a greater stability, and that it aided reusability and easy separation from the reaction mixture. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme was found to retain 50% of its activity, promising thermal stability up to 90°C, reusability for up to three cycles, pH stability over a broad pH of 4-9 and a shelf-life of 44 days, with an optimal hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide at variable drug concentrations. On the basis of these findings, it was believed that the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme could be exploited as a reusable biocatalyst and for screening of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from crude plant extracts and synthesized organic compounds. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme could offer a great deal as a viable biocatalyst in bioprocessing for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, and bioremediation to enhance productivity and robustness.

  12. Acetylcholinesterase immobilization and characterization, and comparison of the activity of the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme with its free counterpart

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A successful prescription is presented for acetylcholinesterase physically adsorbed on to a mesoporous silicon surface, with a promising hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide. The catalytic behaviour of the immobilized enzyme was assessed by spectrophotometric bioassay using neostigmine methyl sulfate as a standard acetycholinesterase inhibitor. The surface modification was studied through field emission SEM, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, cathode luminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, photoluminescence measurement and spectrophotometric bioassay. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme not only yielded greater enzyme stability, but also significantly improved the native photoluminescence at room temperature of the bare porous silicon architecture. The results indicated the promising catalytic behaviour of immobilized enzyme compared with that of its free counterpart, with a greater stability, and that it aided reusability and easy separation from the reaction mixture. The porous silicon-immobilized enzyme was found to retain 50% of its activity, promising thermal stability up to 90°C, reusability for up to three cycles, pH stability over a broad pH of 4–9 and a shelf-life of 44 days, with an optimal hydrolytic response towards acetylthiocholine iodide at variable drug concentrations. On the basis of these findings, it was believed that the porous silicon-immobilized enzyme could be exploited as a reusable biocatalyst and for screening of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from crude plant extracts and synthesized organic compounds. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme could offer a great deal as a viable biocatalyst in bioprocessing for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, and bioremediation to enhance productivity and robustness. PMID:26839417

  13. Comparative study of oxidative stress parameters and acetylcholinesterase activity in the liver of Pelophylax esculentus complex frogs.

    PubMed

    Prokić, Marko; Borković-Mitić, Slavica; Krizmanić, Imre; Gavrić, Jelena; Despotović, Svetlana; Gavrilović, Branka; Radovanović, Tijana; Pavlović, Slađan; Saičić, Zorica

    2017-01-01

    Comparative activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR), the phase II biotransformation enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST), the concentrations of total glutathione (GSH), sulfhydryl groups (-SH) and the activity of the neurotoxicity biomarker acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were investigated in the livers of species belonging to the Pelophylax esculentus "complex" (parental species Pelophylax ridibundus, Pelophylax lessonae, and their hybrid Pelophylax kl. esculentus) from the wetland, Obedska bara in Serbia. The condition factor (CF) and hepato somatic index (HSI) were also calculated. All three species were caught at same locality and were exposed to the same environmental conditions. Liver SOD activity was lower in P. ridibundus than in P. kl. esculentus and P. lessonae; higher activities of CAT, GR and GST were observed in P. kl. esculentus frogs as compared to their parental species. The activity of GSH-Px was significantly lower in P. kl. esculentus. The activity of AChE was increased in P. lessonae as compared to P. kl. esculentus and P. ridibundus. Similar concentrations of GSH and -SH groups were observed in all investigated species. P. kl. esculentus had a higher CF, while the HSI was lower when compared to the parental species. Our findings suggest that the parental species (P. ridibundus and P. lessonae) possess more similar antioxidative responses to environmental conditions than the hybrid species P. kl. esculentus. The obtained results improve our understanding of the biology and physiology of these three closely related species.

  14. Acetylcholinesterase activity in grass shrimp and aqueous pesticide levels from South Florida drainage canals.

    PubMed

    Key, P B; Fulton, M H; Harman-Fetcho, J A; McConnell, L L

    2003-10-01

    Freshwater drainage canals in South Florida are utilized to manage water in agricultural, urban, and water conservation areas and, as a result, collect urban and agricultural storm runoff that is discharged into the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. Pesticides in this runoff may be toxic to the biota inhabiting these waters. This study evaluated the effects of contaminants in South Florida canals draining into Biscayne Bay on the estuarine grass shrimp (Palaemonetes intermedius), a representative invertebrate species. Results of surface water analysis for pesticides indicated that eight pesticides out of 52 analyzed were detected. The herbicide metolachlor was found at all nine sites in the five canals sampled at concentrations up to 119 ng/L. Atrazine was detected at seven sites at concentrations up to 29 ng/L. Three organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos, malathion, diazinon) were detected at three sites in two canals (Military and North). Grass shrimp from these three sites showed significantly reduced levels of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme as compared to control shrimp. These two canals are similar in the land use areas drained--urban and suburban and agriculture. The results suggest that monitoring organisms for AChE levels can be a means of detecting exposure to organophosphorus pesticide contamination.

  15. Aqueous Extracts from Tunisian Diplotaxis: Phenol Content, Antioxidant and Anti-Acetylcholinesterase Activities, and Impact of Exposure to Simulated Gastrointestinal Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Bahloul, Nada; Bellili, Sana; Aazza, Smail; Chérif, Ameur; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Antunes, Maria Dulce; Miguel, Maria Graça; Mnif, Wissem

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidants have been considered essential for preventing cell damage by scavenging deleterious free radicals. The consumption of antioxidant-rich plants is associated with a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. This study evaluates the antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibition activities of aqueous extracts obtained from different parts of Diplotaxis simplex and Diplotaxis harra from Tunisia. The study also aimed to investigate the action of simulated gastrointestinal juice on antioxidant activities of both extracts. The total phenolic, flavone and flavonol, and flavanone and dihydroflavonol contents were determined by Folin–Ciocalteau, aluminum chloride and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine colorimetric methods, respectively. The metal ion chelating activity, acetylcholinesterase inhibition capacity, and free radical scavenging potential of the extracts towards ABTS (2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl), hydroxyl, superoxide and nitric oxide were also evaluated. The action of simulated gastro-intestinal fluids on the flavone and flavonol content and total antioxidant activity of the flower extracts was surveyed. Extracts from the seeds and flowers of D. simplex and D. harra displayed the highest amounts of phenols (2691.7 and 2694.5 mg Caffeic Acid Equivalent (CAE)/100 mg; 3433.4 and 2647.2 mg CAE/100 mg, respectively) and flavonols/flavones (2144.4 and 2061.1 mg Rutin Equivalent (RE)/100 g; 1922.6 and 1461.1 mg RE/100 g, respectively). The flower and seed extracts exhibited the highest rates of antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibition activities. A decrease in the flavonoid content and antioxidant activity was observed after extract exposure to simulated saliva. Antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibition activities were noted to depend on plant species and plant parts. In vitro gastrointestinal digestion is useful in assessing the bio-accessibility of compounds with biological activities

  16. Alterations in acetylcholinesterase and electrical activity in the nervous system of cockroach exposed to the neem derivative, azadirachtin.

    PubMed

    Shafeek, A; Jaya Prasanthi, R P; Reddy, G Hariprasad; Chetty, C S; Reddy, G Rajarami

    2004-10-01

    Botanical insecticides are relatively safe and biodegradable, and are readily available sources of bioinsecticides. In recent years, the neem derivative, azadirachtin, has been examined as an alternative to synthetic insecticides because of its broad-spectrum insecticidal action. Because many of the natural products and synthetic compounds used in the control of insect pests are known to exhibit electrophysiological effects, in this paper we focused our studies on the alterations in the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and electrical activity in the nervous system of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana, exposed to azadirachtin. Exposure to azadirachtin produced an excitatory effect on spontaneous electrical activity as well as cercal sensory-mediated giant-fiber responses in the cockroach. Topical exposure to sublethal doses of azadirachtin did not result in any significant alterations in the AChE activity in different regions of the nervous system. We suggest that azadirachtin exerts excitatory action on the electrical activity in the nervous system of cockroach by interfering with the ion channels in the nerve membrane, the probable target of several insecticides.

  17. Effect of a glyphosate-based herbicide in Cyprinus carpio: assessment of acetylcholinesterase activity, hematological responses and serum biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Gholami-Seyedkolaei, Seyed Jalil; Mirvaghefi, Alireza; Farahmand, Hamid; Kosari, Ali Asghar

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the toxicity effects of acute and sublethal of Roundup® as a glyphosate-based herbicide on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and several hematological and biochemical parameters of Cyprinus carpio. The LC₅₀-96 h of Roundup® to C. carpio was found to be 22.19 ppm. Common carp was subjected to Roundup® at 0 (control), 3.5, 7 and 14 ppm for 16 days, and the AChE activity is verified in tissues of gill, muscle, brain and liver. After 5 days, a significant decrease was observed in the AChE activity of muscle, brain and liver tissues. Besides, a time- and dose-dependent increase in mean cell hemoglobin (MCH) and mean cell volume (MCV) was observed. In contrast, a significant decrease was found in the quantities of hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (HCT) and, red (RBC) and white (WBC) blood cell count. Also, the activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in Roundup® treated groups were significantly higher than the controlled group at experimental periods. However, the level of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) had a significant reduction behavior during the sampling days. It seems that the changes in hematological and biochemical parameters as well as AChE activity could be used as efficient biomarkers in order to determine Roundup® toxicity in aquatic environment.

  18. Exercise effects on activities of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, acetylcholinesterase and adenine nucleotides hydrolysis in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ben, Juliana; Soares, Flávia Mahatma Schneider; Cechetti, Fernanda; Vuaden, Fernanda Cenci; Bonan, Carla Denise; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Wyse, Angela Terezinha de Souza

    2009-12-11

    Hormone deficiency following ovariectomy causes activation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that has been related to cognitive deficits in experimental animals. Considering that physical exercise presents neuroprotector effects, we decide to investigate whether exercise training would affect enzyme activation in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, as well as adenosine nucleotide hydrolysis in synaptosomes from cerebral cortex of ovariectomized rats. Female adult Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following groups: sham (submitted to surgery without removal of the ovaries), exercise, ovariectomized (Ovx) and Ovx plus exercise. Thirty days after surgery, animals were submitted to one month of exercise training, three times per week. After, rats were euthanized, blood serum was collected and hippocampus and cerebral cortex were dissected. Data demonstrated that exercise reversed the activation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and AChE activities both in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomy decreased AMP hydrolysis in cerebral cortex and did not alter adenine nucleotides hydrolysis in blood serum. Exercise per se decreased ADP and AMP hydrolysis in cerebral cortex. On the other hand, AMP hydrolysis in blood serum was increased by exercise in ovariectomized adult rats. Present data support that physical exercise might have beneficial effects and constitute a therapeutic alternative to hormone replacement therapy for estrogen deprivation.

  19. A 1-methyl-4-piperidinyl cytectrene carboxylate labeled by the technetium 99m, a radiotracer for rat brain acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Mejri, Najoua; Barhoumi, Chokri; Trabelsi, Moez; Mekni, Abdelkader; Said, Nadia Malek; Saidi, Mouldi

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative neurological disorder that causes progressive and irreversible loss of connections between brain cells and loss of mental functions. Clinical and postmortem studies show that the biochemical changes in brains of AD patients include decrease in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Our aim was to study AChE activity using piperidinyl ester labelled with technetium-99m. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that labelled piperidinyl ester was a substrate for AChE. The hydrolytic rate of this substrate was measured and the specificity was evaluated using the inhibitor BW284c51. The rhenium analogues of the technetium-labelled substrate were used to determine the affinity constant (K(m)) and the maximum reaction velocity (V(max)) because of the high specific activity of technetium. The high hydrolytic rate and high specificity of the substrate for AChE make it suitable as an in vivo radiotracer for studying AChE activity in the brain.

  20. Shift in aggregation, ROS generation, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activities in the cells of an Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-09-01

    Washing soda, chemically identified as anhydrous sodium carbonate, is a popular cleaning agent among the rural and urban populations of India which often contaminates the freshwater ponds and lakes, the natural habitat of sponge Eunapius carteri. Present investigation deals with estimation of cellular aggregation, generation of ROS and activities of antioxidant enzymes, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Prolonged treatment of washing soda inhibited the degree of cellular aggregation. Experimental exposure of 8 and 16mg/l of sodium carbonate for 48h elevated the physiological level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the agranulocytes, semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, whereas, treatment of 192h inhibited the ROS generation in three cellular morphotypes. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were recorded to be inhibited under prolonged exposure of washing soda. Washing soda mediated inhibition of ROS generation and depletion in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were indicative to an undesirable shift in cytotoxic status and antioxidative defense in E. carteri. Inhibition in the activity of lysozyme under the treatment of sodium carbonate was suggestive to a severe impairment of the innate immunological efficiency of E. carteri distributed in the washing soda contaminated habitat. Washing soda mediated inhibition in the activity of acetylcholinesterase indicated its neurotoxicity in E. carteri. Washing soda, a reported environmental contaminant, affected adversely the immunophysiological status of E. carteri with reference to cellular aggregation, oxidative stress, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activity.

  1. A fluorometric assay for acetylcholinesterase activity and inhibitor detection based on DNA-templated copper/silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhua; Li, Wang; Hu, Yufang; Xia, Yalin; Shen, Qinpeng; Nie, Zhou; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-09-15

    A novel label-free, rapid, cost-effective, and highly sensitive fluorometric sensor has been constructed for the detection of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and its inhibitor based on the fluorescence quenching of DNA-templated copper/silver nanoclusters (DNA-Cu/AgNCs). In this assay, AChE catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine (ATCh) to form thiocholine which induces fluorescence quenching of DNA-Cu/AgNCs. The AChE activity could be detected as low as 0.05mU/mL and with a linear range from 0.05 to 2.0mU/mL. This assay offers a very convenient "mix and detect" approach for AChE activity. On the other hand, tacrine and organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) were employed to inhibit the hydrolysis of ATCh, which could eliminate the fluorescence quenching of DNA-Cu/AgNCs. The IC50 of tacrine and methamidophos were estimated to be 16.9nM and 0.075mg/L, respectively. This method was also used to detect spiked OPPs in agricultural products successfully. The present work may expand the use of DNA-Cu/AgNCs to the field of enzyme sensors.

  2. Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf extract improves memory impairment and affects acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activities in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Bogacz, Anna; Gryszczynska, Agnieszka; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Piasecka, Anna; Napieczynska, Hanna; Szulc, Michał; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Cichocka, Joanna; Bobkiewicz-Kozlowska, Teresa; Czerny, Boguslaw; Mrozikiewicz, Przemyslaw M

    2013-12-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf as part of a diet and medication can be a valuable proposal for the prevention and treatment of dementia. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of subchronic (28-fold) administration of a plant extract (RE) (200 mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioral and cognitive responses of rats linked with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activity and their mRNA expression level in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. The passive avoidance test results showed that RE improved long-term memory in scopolamine-induced rats. The extract inhibited the AChE activity and showed a stimulatory effect on BuChE in both parts of rat brain. Moreover, RE produced a lower mRNA BuChE expression in the cortex and simultaneously an increase in the hippocampus. The study suggests that RE led to improved long-term memory in rats, which can be partially explained by its inhibition of AChE activity in rat brain.

  3. Alkaloid metabolite profiles by GC/MS and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities with binding-mode predictions of five Amaryllidaceae plants.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Natalie; Alvarez, Rafael; Osorio, Edison H; Alzate, Fernando; Berkov, Strahil; Osorio, Edison

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymatic inhibition is an important target for the management of Alzheimer disease (AD) and AChE inhibitors are the mainstay drugs for its treatment. In order to discover new sources of potent AChE inhibitors, a combined strategy is presented based on AChE-inhibitory activity and chemical profiles by GC/MS, together with in silico studies. The combined strategy was applied on alkaloid extracts of five Amaryllidaceae species that grow in Colombia. Fifty-seven alkaloids were detected using GC/MS, and 21 of them were identified by comparing their mass-spectral fragmentation patterns with standard reference spectra in commercial and private library databases. The alkaloid extracts of Zephyranthes carinata exhibited a high level of inhibitory activity (IC50 = 5.97 ± 0.24 μg/mL). Molecular modeling, which was performed using the structures of some of the alkaloids present in this extract and the three-dimensional crystal structures of AChE derived from Torpedo californica, disclosed their binding configuration in the active site of this AChE. The results suggested that the alkaloids 3-epimacronine and lycoramine might be of interest for AChE inhibition. Although the galanthamine group is known for its potential utility in treating AD, the tazettine-type alkaloids should be evaluated to find more selective compounds of potential benefit for AD.

  4. Larvicidal and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of apiaceae plant essential oils and their constituents against aedes albopictus and formulation development.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seon-Mi; Jung, Chan-Sik; Kang, Jaesoon; Lee, Hyo-Rim; Kim, Sung-Woong; Hyun, Jinho; Park, Il-Kwon

    2015-11-18

    This study evaluated the larvicidal activity of 12 Apiaceae plant essential oils and their components against the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, and the inhibition of acetylcholine esterase with their components. Of the 12 plant essential oils tested, ajowan (Trachyspermum ammi), caraway seed (Carum carvi), carrot seed (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), dill (Anethum graveolens), and parsley (Petroselinum sativum) resulted in >90% larval mortality when used at 0.1 mg/mL. Of the compounds identified, α-phellandrene, α-terpinene, p-cymene, (-)-limonene, (+)-limonene, γ-terpinene, cuminaldehyde, neral, (S)-+-carvone, trans-anethole, thymol, carvacrol, myristicin, apiol, and carotol resulted in >80% larval mortality when used at 0.1 mg/mL. Two days after treatment, 24.69, 3.64, and 12.43% of the original amounts of the celery, cumin, and parsley oils, respectively, remained in the water. Less than 50% of the original amounts of α-phellandrene, 1,8-cineole, terpinen-4-ol, cuminaldehyde, and trans-antheole were detected in the water at 2 days after treatment. Carvacrol, α-pinene, and β-pinene inhibited the activity of Ae. albopictus acetylcholinesterase with IC50 values of 0.057, 0.062, and 0.190 mg/mL, respectively. A spherical microemulsion of parsley essential oil-loaded poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was prepared, and the larvicidal activity of this formulation was shown to be similar to that of parsley oil.

  5. Selective and sensitive detection of acetylcholinesterase activity using denatured protein-protected gold nanoclusters as a label-free probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongchang; Guo, Yuxin; Xiao, Lehui; Chen, Bo

    2014-01-07

    Based on the fluorescence quenching of novel denatured protein-protected gold nanoclusters, a label-free detection method of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has been developed. Using denatured bovine serum albumin (dBSA), in which 35 cysteine residues can interact polyvalently with Au nanoclusters (AuNCs) as a stabilizing agent, water-soluble and stable fluorescent gold nanoclusters were synthesized. The fluorescence of the AuNCs was quenched by thiocholine that was produced from the AChE hydrolysis of S-acetylthiocholine iodide (ACTI) to detect the AChE activity. The linear range of the method was 0.005-0.15 U mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.02 mU mL(-1). Other enzymes and metal ions, i.e., GPT, γ-GT, GOx, K(+), Ca(2+) and Na(+), showed minimal interference. Using the fluorescence probe, satisfactory results for the detection of the AChE activity in human serum were obtained.

  6. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition reveals endogenous nicotinic modulation of glutamate inputs to CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Albuquerque, Edson X; Pereira, Edna F R

    2013-05-01

    The involvement of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the neurotoxicological effects of soman, a potent acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor and a chemical warfare agent, is not clear. This is partly due to a poor understanding of the role of AChE in brain nAChR-mediated functions. To test the hypothesis that AChE inhibition builds sufficient acetylcholine (ACh) in the brain and facilitates nAChR-dependent glutamate transmission, we used whole-cell patch-clamp technique to record spontaneous glutamate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) from CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons (SRI) in hippocampal slices. First, the frequency, amplitude and kinetics of EPSCs recorded from slices of control guinea pigs were compared to those recorded from slices of guinea pigs after a single injection of the irreversible AChE inhibitor soman (25.2μg/kg, s.c.). Second, EPSCs were recorded from rat hippocampal slices before and after their superfusion with the reversible AChE inhibitor donepezil (100nM). The frequency of EPSCs was significantly higher in slices taken from guinea pigs 24h but not 7 days after the soman injection than in slices from control animals. In 52% of the rat hippocampal slices tested, bath application of donepezil increased the frequency of EPSCs. Further, exposure to donepezil increased both burst-like and large-amplitude EPSCs, and increased the proportion of short (20-100ms) inter-event intervals. Donepezil's effects were suppressed significantly in presence of 10μM mecamylamine or 10nM methyllycaconitine. These results support the concept that AChE inhibition is able to recruit nAChR-dependent glutamate transmission in the hippocampus and such a mechanism can contribute to the acute neurotoxicological actions of soman.

  7. Postnatal growth hormone deficiency in growing rats causes marked decline in the activity of spinal cord acetylcholinesterase but not butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Koohestani, Faezeh; Brown, Chester M; Meisami, Esmail

    2012-11-01

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) deficiency on the developmental changes in the abundance and activity of cholinesterase enzymes were studied in the developing spinal cord (SC) of postnatal rats by measuring the specific activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a marker for cholinergic neurons and their synaptic compartments, and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), a marker for glial cells and neurovascular cells. Specific activities of these two enzymes were measured in SC tissue of 21- and 90 day-old (P21, weaning age; P90, young adulthood) GH deficient spontaneous dwarf (SpDwf) mutant rats which lack anterior pituitary and circulating plasma GH, and were compared with SC tissue of normal age-matched control animals. Assays were carried out for AChE and BuChE activity in the presence of their specific chemical inhibitors, BW284C51 and iso-OMPA, respectively. Results revealed that mean AChE activity was markedly and significantly reduced [28% at P21, 49% at P90, (p<0.01)] in the SC of GH deficient rats compared to age-matched controls. GH deficiency had a higher and more significant effect on AChE activity of the older (P90) rats than the younger ones (P21) ones. In contrast, BuChE activity in SC showed no significant changes in GH deficient rats at either of the two ages studied. Results imply that, in the absence of pituitary GH, the postnatal proliferation of cholinergic synapses in the rat SC, a CNS structure, where AChE activity is abundant, is markedly reduced during both the pre- and postweaning periods; more so in the postweaning than preweaning ages. In contrast, the absence of any effects on BuChE activity implies that GH does not affect the development of non-neuronal elements, e.g., glia, as much as the neuronal and synaptic compartments of the developing rat SC.

  8. Macroeconomic Activity Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook for 2016 (AEO2016). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code

  9. Hypothyroidism Enhanced Ectonucleotidases and Acetylcholinesterase Activities in Rat Synaptosomes can be Prevented by the Naturally Occurring Polyphenol Quercetin.

    PubMed

    Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Santi, Adriana; Schmatz, Roberta; Abdalla, Fátima Husein; Cardoso, Andréia Machado; Martins, Caroline Curry; Dias, Glaecir R Mundstock; Calgaroto, Nicéia Spanholi; Pelinson, Luana Paula; Reichert, Karine Paula; Loro, Vania Lucia; Morsch, Vera Maria Melchiors; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have an influence on the functioning of the central nervous system. Furthermore, the cholinergic and purinergic systems also are extensively involved in brain function. In this context, quercetin is a polyphenol with antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. This study investigated the effects of (MMI)-induced hypothyroidism on the NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase (ADA), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities in synaptosomes of rats and whether the quercetin can prevent it. MMI at a concentration of 20 mg/100 mL was administered for 90 days in the drinking water. The animals were divided into six groups: control/water (CT/W), control/quercetin 10 mg/kg, control/quercetin 25 mg/kg, methimazole/water (MMI/W), methimazole/quercetin 10 mg/kg (MMI/Q10), and methimazole/quercetin 25 mg/kg (MMI/Q25). On the 30th day, hormonal dosing was performed to confirm hypothyroidism, and the animals were subsequently treated with 10 or 25 mg/kg quercetin for 60 days. NTPDase activity was not altered in the MMI/W group. However, treatment with quercetin decreased ATP and ADP hydrolysis in the MMI/Q10 and MMI/Q25 groups. 5'-nucleotidase activity increased in the MMI/W group, but treatments with 10 or 25 mg/kg quercetin decreased 5'-nucleotidase activity. ADA activity decreased in the CT/25 and MMI/Q25 groups. Furthermore, AChE activity was reduced in all groups with hypothyroidism. In vitro tests also demonstrated that quercetin per se decreased NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase, and AChE activities. This study demonstrated changes in the 5'-nucleotidase and AChE activities indicating that purinergic and cholinergic neurotransmission are altered in this condition. In addition, quercetin can alter these parameters and may be a promising natural compound with important neuroprotective actions in hypothyroidism.

  10. [Effect of improving memory and inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity by invigorating-qi and warming-yang recipe].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Y; Yang, Y G; Zheng, B

    1993-11-01

    Invigorating-Qi and Warming-Yang (IQWY) had a good curative effect to some senile diseases such as senile dementia, senile hypomnesia etc. This experiment was designed for probing into the therapeutical mechanism of IQWY recipe. BALB/C pure bred mice were divided into five groups. Group I was taken per os of invigorating Qi (IQ), Group II warming Yang (WY), Group III IQWY drugs, Group IV was dysmnesia model, and Group V blank control group injected with normal saline only. All groups except Group V were injected scopolamine (5mg/kg) intraperitoneally to induce dysmnesia model after medication. IQ drug consisted of Codonopsis pilosula, Astragalus membranaceus, Poria cocos, and Glycyrrhiza uralensis, WY drug of Cynomorium songoricum, Epimedium brevicornum and Cuscuta chinensis, while IQWY recipe consisted of both IQ and WY drugs. The results showed that IQ, WY and IQWY had an evident antagonistic action to Scopolamine induced dysmnesia mice, and could improve their memory. The erroneous times of the animal's reaction in Group I, II and III were less than those in Group IV, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. Acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in the mice could be inhibited by IQ, WY and IQWY also. The activity in Group I, II and III was less than that in Group IV and V, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. The therapeutic mechanism of IQWY was in connection with its effect to M-cholinergic transmitters of central nervous system.

  11. Effects of chlorpyrifos ethyl on acetylcholinesterase activity in climbing perch cultured in rice fields in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam Thanh; Berg, Håkan; Nguyen, Hang Thi Thuy; Nguyen, Cong Van

    2015-07-01

    Climbing perch is commonly harvested in rice fields and associated wetlands in the Mekong Delta. Despite its importance in providing food and income to local households, there is little information how this fish species is affected by the high use of pesticides in rice farming. Organophosphate insecticides, such as chlorpyrifos ethyl, which are highly toxic to aquatic organisms, are commonly used in the Mekong Delta. This study shows that the brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in climbing perch fingerlings cultured in rice fields, was significantly inhibited by a single application of chlorpyrifos ethyl, at doses commonly applied by rice farmers (0.32-0.64 kg/ha). The water concentration of chlorpyrifos ethyl decreased below the detection level within 3 days, but the inhibition of brain AChE activity remained for more than 12 days. In addition, the chlorpyrifos ethyl treatments had a significant impact on the survival and growth rates of climbing perch fingerlings, which were proportional to the exposure levels. The results indicate that the high use of pesticides among rice farmers in the Mekong Delta could have a negative impact on aquatic organisms and fish yields, with implications for the aquatic biodiversity, local people's livelihoods and the aquaculture industry in the Mekong Delta.

  12. A selective molecularly imprinted polymer for immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE): an active enzyme targeted and efficient method.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Gökhan; Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we immobilized acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme onto acetylcholine removed imprinted polymer and acetylcholine containing polymer. First, the polymers were produced with acetylcholine, substrate of AChE, by dispersion polymerization. Then, the enzyme was immobilized onto the polymers by using two different methods: In the first method (method A), acetylcholine was removed from the polymer, and then AChE was immobilized onto this polymer (acetylcholine removed imprinted polymer). In the second method (method B), AChE was immobilized onto acetylcholine containing polymer by affinity. In method A, enzyme-specific species (binding sites) occurred by removing acetylcholine from the polymer. The immobilized AChE reached 240% relative specific activity comparison with free AChE because the active enzyme molecules bounded onto the polymer. Transmission electron microscopy results were taken before and after immobilization of AChE for the assessment of morphological structure of polymer. Also, the experiments, which include optimum temperature (25-65 °C), optimum pH (3-10), thermal stability (4-70 °C), kinetic parameters, operational stability and reusability, were performed to determine the characteristic of the immobilized AChE.

  13. Ultrahigh pressure-assisted enzymatic extraction maximizes the yield of longan pulp polysaccharides and their acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yajuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Ruifen; Huang, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Mingwei

    2017-03-01

    An extraction method employing ultrahigh pressure-assisted enzymatic treatment was developed and optimized by response surface methodology to increase the yield of longan pulp polysaccharides (LP-UE). A maximum polysaccharides yield of 8.55% was obtained under the optimal conditions of 407MPa ultrahigh pressure maintained for 6min with an enzyme to pretreated material ratio of 1:100, an enzymolysis time of 1.7h and a water to pretreated material ratio of 42ml/g. Subsequently, the physicochemical properties and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity of LP-UE were compared to those of longan pulp polysaccharides (LP) extracted by hot water (LP-H), ultrahigh pressure (LP-U) or enzymatic treatment (LP-E). Results demonstrated that the extraction yield, hexuronic acid content and AChE inhibitory activity of LP-UE was the highest among the four LP samples. LP-UE was primarily made up of arabinose, glucose, and galactose and was linked mainly by β-type glycosidic linkage. The FTIR spectrum of LP-UE was very similar to those of LP-H, LP-U, and LP-E. In summary, ultrahigh pressure-assisted enzymatic treatment is a more efficient technique for extracting LP with considerable improvement of both yield and memory enhancement function.

  14. Characterization of acetylcholinesterase from elm left beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola and QSAR of temephos derivatives against its activity.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Mahboobeh; Ghadamyari, Mohammad; Gholivand, Khodayar; Valmoozi, Ali Asghar Ebrahimi; Sajedi, Reza H

    2017-03-01

    Insect acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the principal target for organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CB) insecticides. In this research, an AChE from third instar larvae of elm left beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola was purified by affinity chromatography. The enzyme was purified 75.29-fold with a total yield of 8.51%. As shown on denaturing SDS-PAGE, the molecular mass of purified AChE was 70kDa. The enzyme demonstrated maximum activity at pH7 and 35°C. Furthermore, a series of temephos (Tem) derivatives with the general structure of P(O)XP(O) (1-44) were prepared, synthesized and characterized by (31)P, (13)C, (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectral techniques. The toxicity of 36 new Tem derivatives was screened on the third instar larvae and the compound compound 1,2 cyclohexane-N,N'-bis(N,N'-piperidine phosphoramidate) exhibited the highest insecticidal potential. The method of kinetic analysis is applied in order to obtain the maximum velocity (Vmax), the Michaelis constant (Km) and the parameters characterizing the inhibition type for inhibitors with >75% mortality in preliminary bioassay. The inhibition mechanism was mixed and inhibitory constant (Ki) was calculated as 4.70μM(-1)min(-1) for this compound. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) equations of these compounds indicated that the electron orbital energy has major effect on insecticidal properties.

  15. Chlorpyrifos pollution: its effect on brain acetylcholinesterase activity in rat and treatment of polluted soil by indigenous Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shelly; Singh, Partap Bir; Chadha, Pooja; Saini, Harvinder Singh

    2017-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the levels of chlorpyrifos (CPF) pollution in agricultural soil of Punjab, India, its detrimental effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in rat brain and bioremediation of soils polluted with CPF using indigenous and adapted bacterial lab isolate. The analysis revealed that soil samples of Bathinda and Amritsar regions are highly contaminated with chlorpyrifos showing 19 to 175 mg/kg concentrations of CPF. The non-targeted animals may get poisoned with CPF by its indirect dermal absorption, inhalation of toxic fumes and regular consumption of soiled food grains. The study indicated that even the lowermost concentrations of CPF, 19 and 76 mg/kg of soil found in the Amritsar and Bathinda regions respectively can significantly inhibit the AChE activity in rat brain within 24 h of its treatment. This represents the antagonistic effect of CPF on AChE which is a prime neurotransmitter present in all living beings including humans. In light of this, an attempt was made to remediate the polluted soil, a major reservoir of CPF, using Pseudomonas sp. (ChlD), an indigenous bacterial isolate. The culture efficiently degraded 10 to 100 mg/kg chlorpyrifos supplemented in the soil and utilized it as sole source of carbon and energy for its growth. Thus, this study provides a detailed insight regarding the level of CPF pollution in Punjab, its detrimental effects on mammals and bio-based solution to remediate the sites polluted with CPF.

  16. Intracerebroventricular D-galactose administration impairs memory and alters activity and expression of acetylcholinesterase in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, André Felipe; Biasibetti, Helena; Zanotto, Bruna Stela; Sanches, Eduardo Farias; Pierozan, Paula; Schmitz, Felipe; Parisi, Mariana Migliorini; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Wyse, Angela T S

    2016-05-01

    Tissue accumulation of galactose is a hallmark in classical galactosemia. Cognitive deficit is a symptom of this disease which is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of galactose on memory (inhibitory avoidance and novel object recognition tasks) of adult rats. We also investigated the effects of galactose on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, immunocontent and gene expression in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Wistar rats received a single injection of galactose (4mM) or saline (control). For behavioral parameters, galactose was injected 1h or 24h previously to the testing. For biochemical assessment, animals were decapitated 1h, 3h or 24h after galactose or saline injection; hippocampus and cerebral cortex were dissected. Results showed that galactose impairs the memory formation process in aversive memory (inhibitory avoidance task) and recognition memory (novel object recognition task) in rats. The activity of AChE was increased, whereas the gene expression of this enzyme was decreased in hippocampus, but not in cerebral cortex. These findings suggest that these changes in AChE may, at least in part, to lead to memory impairment caused by galactose. Taken together, our results can help understand the etiopathology of classical galactosemia.

  17. The Nature of Activated Non-classical Hydrogen Bonds: A Case Study on Acetylcholinesterase-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Berg, Lotta; Mishra, Brijesh Kumar; Andersson, C David; Ekström, Fredrik; Linusson, Anna

    2016-02-18

    Molecular recognition events in biological systems are driven by non-covalent interactions between interacting species. Here, we have studied hydrogen bonds of the CH⋅⋅⋅Y type involving electron-deficient CH donors using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) calculations applied to acetylcholinesterase-ligand complexes. The strengths of CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions activated by a proximal cation were considerably strong; comparable to or greater than those of classical hydrogen bonds. Significant differences in the energetic components compared to classical hydrogen bonds and non-activated CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions were observed. Comparison between DFT and molecular mechanics calculations showed that common force fields could not reproduce the interaction energy values of the studied hydrogen bonds. The presented results highlight the importance of considering CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions when analysing protein-ligand complexes, call for a review of current force fields, and opens up possibilities for the development of improved design tools for drug discovery.

  18. Effect of high fat diets on the NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and acetylcholinesterase activities in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kaizer, Rosilene Rodrigues; Spanevello, Rosélia Maria; Costa, Eduarda; Morsch, Vera Maria; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2017-03-01

    High fat diets are associated with the promotion of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). This study aim investigate the high fat diets role to promotion of AD using as biochemistry parameter of status of central nervous system through the NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities in brain of young rats. The intake of high fat diets promotes an inhibition of purinergic and cholinergic functions, mainly in the long-term exposure to saturated and saturated/unsaturated diets. The AChE activity was decreased to supernatant and synaptosomes tissues preparations obtained from cerebral cortex in average of 20%, to both groups exposed to saturated and saturated/unsaturated diets, when compared to the control group. Very similar results were found in hippocampus and cerebellum brain areas. At same time, the adenine nucleotides hydrolysis in synaptosomes of cerebral cortex were decreased to ATP, ADP and AMP after the long-term exposure to high fat diets, as saturated and saturated/unsaturated. The inhibition of ATP hydrolysis was of 26% and 39% to saturated and saturated/unsaturated diets, respectively. ADP hydrolysis was decreased in 20% to saturated diet, and AMP hydrolysis was decreased in 25% and 33% to saturated and saturated/unsaturated diets, respectively, all in comparison to the control. Thus, we can suggest that the effects of high diets on the purinergic and cholinergic nervous system may contribute to accelerate the progressive memory loss, to decline in language and other cognitive disruptions, such as AD patients presents.

  19. Local salt substitutes “Obu-otoyo” activate acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase and induce lipid peroxidation in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has shown that ingestion of heavy metals can lead to neurodegenerative diseases. This study aimed to investigate the neurotoxic potential of salt substitutes (Obu-Otoyo); salt A (made by burning palm kernel shaft then soaked in water overnight and the extract from the resulting residue is used as the salt substitute) and salt B (an unrefined salt mined from a local site at Ilobu town, Osun-State, Nigeria) by assessing their effect on some key enzymes linked with neurodegenerative disease [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities] as well as on malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the rat brain. Salt substitutes were fed to normal rats as dietary inclusion at doses of 0.5 and 1.0% for 30 days. Thereafter, the effect of the salt substitutes on AChE and BChE activities as well as on MDA level in the rat brain was determined. The results revealed that the salt substitutes caused a significant (p<0.05) increase in both AChE and BChE activity and also induced lipid peroxidation in the brain of rats in vivo as well as under in vitro condition in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of the salt substitutes on AChE and BChE activities could be attributed to the presence of some toxic heavy metals. Therefore, the ability of the salt substitutes to induce lipid peroxidation and activate AChE and BChE activities could provide some possible mechanism for their neurotoxic effect. PMID:27486373

  20. Local salt substitutes "Obu-otoyo" activate acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase and induce lipid peroxidation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele J; Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O

    2015-09-01

    Evidence has shown that ingestion of heavy metals can lead to neurodegenerative diseases. This study aimed to investigate the neurotoxic potential of salt substitutes (Obu-Otoyo); salt A (made by burning palm kernel shaft then soaked in water overnight and the extract from the resulting residue is used as the salt substitute) and salt B (an unrefined salt mined from a local site at Ilobu town, Osun-State, Nigeria) by assessing their effect on some key enzymes linked with neurodegenerative disease [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities] as well as on malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the rat brain. Salt substitutes were fed to normal rats as dietary inclusion at doses of 0.5 and 1.0% for 30 days. Thereafter, the effect of the salt substitutes on AChE and BChE activities as well as on MDA level in the rat brain was determined. The results revealed that the salt substitutes caused a significant (p<0.05) increase in both AChE and BChE activity and also induced lipid peroxidation in the brain of rats in vivo as well as under in vitro condition in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of the salt substitutes on AChE and BChE activities could be attributed to the presence of some toxic heavy metals. Therefore, the ability of the salt substitutes to induce lipid peroxidation and activate AChE and BChE activities could provide some possible mechanism for their neurotoxic effect.

  1. In vitro anti-acetylcholinesterase activity of an aqueous extract of Unicaria tomentosa and in silico study of its active constituents

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Suman; Shivani; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Depletion of acetylcholine in the central nervous system (CNS) is responsible for memory loss and cognition deficit. Enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is responsible for destruction of acetylcholine (Ach) in the brain. Many herbal plant extracts have been investigated for their potential use in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by inhibiting AChE and upregulating the levels of Ach. The current study investigated the anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of an aqueous extract of Unicaria tomentosa bark which has not been reported so far in the literature. The in vitro study of an aqueous extract of U. tomentosa showed maximum inhibition of 76.2±0.002 % at 0.4mg/ml of final concentration with an IC50 = 0.112 mg/ml. The mechanism of inhibition was elucidated by kinetic study which showed mixed type of inhibition, this might be due to the presence of various phytoconstituents such as oxindole alkaloids present in an aqueous extract. Based on molecular structure of phytoconstituents obtained from U. tomentosa known from the relevant literature, in-silico molecular docking study was performed against AChE protein to validate the results. PMID:28149044

  2. In vitro anti-acetylcholinesterase activity of an aqueous extract of Unicaria tomentosa and in silico study of its active constituents.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Suman; Shivani; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Depletion of acetylcholine in the central nervous system (CNS) is responsible for memory loss and cognition deficit. Enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is responsible for destruction of acetylcholine (Ach) in the brain. Many herbal plant extracts have been investigated for their potential use in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by inhibiting AChE and upregulating the levels of Ach. The current study investigated the anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of an aqueous extract of Unicaria tomentosa bark which has not been reported so far in the literature. The in vitro study of an aqueous extract of U. tomentosa showed maximum inhibition of 76.2±0.002 % at 0.4mg/ml of final concentration with an IC50 = 0.112 mg/ml. The mechanism of inhibition was elucidated by kinetic study which showed mixed type of inhibition, this might be due to the presence of various phytoconstituents such as oxindole alkaloids present in an aqueous extract. Based on molecular structure of phytoconstituents obtained from U. tomentosa known from the relevant literature, in-silico molecular docking study was performed against AChE protein to validate the results.

  3. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  4. Neuroprotective effects of quercetin on memory and anxiogenic-like behavior in diabetic rats: Role of ectonucleotidases and acetylcholinesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Roberto M; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Olabiyi, Ayodeji A; Schmatz, Roberta; Gutierres, Jessié M; Stefanello, Naiara; Zanini, Daniela; Rosa, Michelle M; Andrade, Cinthia M; Rubin, Maribel A; Schetinger, Maria Rosa; Morsch, Vera Maria; Danesi, Cristiane C; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the protective effect of quercetin (Querc) on memory, anxiety-like behavior and impairment of ectonucleotidases and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities in brain of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetes). The type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of 70mg/kg of streptozotocin (STZ), diluted in 0.1M sodium-citrate buffer (pH 4.5). Querc was dissolved in 25% ethanol and administered by gavage at the doses of 5, 25 and 50mg/kg once a day during 40days. The animals were distributed in eight groups of ten animals as follows: vehicle, Querc 5mg/kg, Querc 25mg/kg, Querc 50mg/kg, diabetes, diabetes plus Querc 5mg/kg, diabetes plus Querc 25mg/kg and diabetes plus Querc 50mg/kg. Querc was able to prevent the impairment of memory and the anxiogenic-like behavior induced by STZ-diabetes. In addition, Querc prevents the decrease in the NTPDase and increase in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in SN from cerebral cortex of STZ-diabetes. STZ-diabetes increased the AChE activity in SN from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Querc 50mg/kg was more effective to prevent the increase in AChE activity in the brain of STZ-diabetes. Querc also prevented an increase in the malondialdehyde levels in all the brain structures. In conclusion, the present findings showed that Querc could prevent the impairment of the enzymes that regulate the purinergic and cholinergic extracellular signaling and improve the memory and anxiety-like behavior induced by STZ-diabetes.

  5. Digestibility and Bioavailability of the Active Components of Erica australis L. Aqueous Extracts and Their Therapeutic Potential as Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Pilar; Falé, Pedro L.; Martins, Alice; Rauter, Amélia P.

    2015-01-01

    Erica australis L. (Ericaceae) is used in traditional medicine to treat many free-radical related ailments. In the present work, the stability and biological activity of the plant aqueous extracts submitted to an in vitro digestive process were investigated. Chemical stability was monitored by HPLC-DAD and LC-MS/MS, while the bioactivities were evaluated through the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and DPPH radical scavenging activity. Both extracts, whose main components were flavonol glycosides, inhibited AChE, showing IC50 values of 257.9 ± 6.2 µg/mL and 296.8 ± 8.8 µg/mL for the decoction and for the infusion, respectively. Significant radical scavenging activities were also revealed by both extracts, as denoted by the IC50 values for the decoction, 6.7 ± 0.1 µg/mL, and for the infusion, 10.5 ± 0.3 µg/mL. After submission to gastric and pancreatic juices, no remarkable alterations in the composition or in the bioactivities were observed, suggesting that the extracts may pass through the gastrointestinal tract, keeping their composition and therefore their biological properties. Moreover, the bioavailability of the components of both extracts, as studied in a Caco-2 cell model, showed that compounds can permeate the membrane, which is a condition to exert their biological activities. Our results add further support to the potential of E. australis for its antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. PMID:26347794

  6. Brain regional acetylcholinesterase activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rats after repeated administration of cholinesterase inhibitors and its withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Haruo . E-mail: hk1664@iwate-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Tadahiko; Sakamoto, Maki; Hashimoto, Wataru; Kashiwada, Keiko; Sato, Itaru; Akahori, Fumiaki; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2007-03-15

    Activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and specific binding of [{sup 3}H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), [{sup 3}H]pirenzepine (PZP) and [{sup 3}H]AF-DX 384 to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) preparations in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex of rats were determined 1, 6 and 11 days after the last treatment with an organophosphate DDVP, a carbamate propoxur or a muscarinic agonist oxotremorine as a reference for 7 and 14 days. AChE activity was markedly decreased in the three regions 1 day after the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days with a gradual recovery 6 to 11 days, and much less decreased 1, 6 and 11 days after the treatment with propoxur for 7 days but not for 14 days in the hippocampus and cortex. The binding of [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 in the three regions was generally decreased by the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days. Such down-regulations were generally restored 6 or 11 days after the treatment for 7 but not for 14 days. The down-regulation or up-regulation as measured by [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 was observed 1, 6 or 11 days after treatment with propoxur for 7 days and/or 14 days. Repeated treatment with oxotremorine produced similar effects except AChE activity to DDVP. These results suggest that repeated inhibition of AChE activity may usually cause down-regulation of mAChRs with some exception in the hippocampus when a reversible antiChE propoxur is injected.

  7. In Vitro and In Vivo Metabolism and Inhibitory Activities of Vasicine, a Potent Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shi, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Yadi; Cheng, Xuemei; Liu, Qing; Han, Han; Yang, Baohua; He, Chunyong; Wang, Yongli; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Zhengtao; Wang, Changhong

    2015-01-01

    Vasicine (VAS), a potential natural cholinesterase inhibitor, exhibited promising anticholinesterase activity in preclinical models and has been in development for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. This study systematically investigated the in vitro and in vivo metabolism of VAS in rat using ultra performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 72 metabolites were found based on a detailed analysis of their 1H- NMR and 13C NMR data. Six key metabolites were isolated from rat urine and elucidated as vasicinone, vasicinol, vasicinolone, 1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo [2,1-b] quinazolin-3-yl hydrogen sulfate, 9-oxo-1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo [2,1-b] quinazolin-3-yl hydrogen sulfate, and 1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo [2,1-b] quinazolin-3-β-D-glucuronide. The metabolic pathway of VAS in vivo and in vitro mainly involved monohydroxylation, dihydroxylation, trihydroxylation, oxidation, desaturation, sulfation, and glucuronidation. The main metabolic soft spots in the chemical structure of VAS were the 3-hydroxyl group and the C-9 site. All 72 metabolites were found in the urine sample, and 15, 25, 45, 18, and 11 metabolites were identified from rat feces, plasma, bile, rat liver microsomes, and rat primary hepatocyte incubations, respectively. Results indicated that renal clearance was the major excretion pathway of VAS. The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities of VAS and its main metabolites were also evaluated. The results indicated that although most metabolites maintained potential inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE, but weaker than that of VAS. VAS undergoes metabolic inactivation process in vivo in respect to cholinesterase inhibitory activity. PMID:25849329

  8. Effects of chemical and thermal stress on acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain of the bank vole, Myodes glareolus.

    PubMed

    Świergosz-Kowalewska, Renata; Molenda, Patrycja; Halota, Anna

    2014-08-01

    One of the most important issues in ecotoxicology is better understanding the effects of interactions between chemical pollutants and physical environmental factors on animals. To fill this knowledge gap, changes in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brain samples of bank voles Myodes (Clethrionomys) glareolus due to temperature effects, and two chemical stressors were studied in a full factorial laboratory experiment (27 treatments). The experiment was divided into three phases: acclimatisation (3 days), intoxication (42 days) and elimination (21 days). During the intoxication phase, animals were orally exposed to different concentrations of either nickel (0, 300 or 800 mg Ni/kg food), chlorpyrifos (CPF) (0, 50 or 350 mg CPF/kg food) or a mixture of both chemicals. During the acclimatisation and elimination phases, the bank voles were given uncontaminated food. The experiment was conducted at three different temperatures (10, 20 or 30 °C), and a 12 h:12 h light:dark regime. The animals were sacrificed at 0, 5, 10, 20, 42, 49 and 63 days after the beginning of the intoxication, and brain samples were obtained for chemical analysis. The nickel accumulation in the brain depended on the level of nickel exposure and on interactions between the temperature and other factors. Nickel exhibited no effect on AChE activity. In contrast, AChE was drastically inhibited by chlorpyrifos and low temperature, but interactions between all factors significantly influenced the enzyme activity during the elimination phase of the experiment. High mortality was observed in the groups exposed to high concentrations of nickel and chlorpyrifos.

  9. Effects of intralipid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester on neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, and acetylcholinesterase activity in acute chlorpyriphos intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Umit; Osun, Arif; Basarslan, Kagan; Senol, Serkan; Kaplan, Ibrahim; Alp, Harun

    2014-01-01

    Chlorpyriphos is one of the most widely used organophosphate (OP) insecticide in agriculture with potential toxicity. Current post-exposure treatments consist of anti-cholinergic drugs and oxime compounds. We studied the effects of intralipid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on chlorpyriphos toxicity to compose an alternative or supportive treatment for OP poisoning. Methods: Forty-nine rats were randomly divided into seven groups. Chlorpyriphos was administered for toxicity. Intralipid (IL) and CAPE administered immediately after chlorpyriphos. Serum acetylcholinesterase (AChE) level, total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant response (TAR), and histologic examination of cerebellum and brain tissue with Hematoxylin-Eosin and immunohistochemical dyes were examined. Results: Serum enzym levels showed that chlorpyriphos and CAPE inhibited AChE while IL alone had no effect, chlorpyriphos and CAPE intensifies the inhibition effect. Significant difference at AChE levels between the chlorpyriphos+IL and chlorpyriphos+CAPE verified that IL has a protective effect on AChE inhibition. TAR levels were significantly increased in all groups except chlorpyriphos group, TOS levels revealed that CAPE and IL decrease the amount of oxidative stress. Histologic examination revealed that neuronal degeneration was slightly decreased at chlorpyriphos+IL group, but CAPE had a significant effect on protection of neuronal degeneration. Conclusion: The results of this study gave us three key points. 1) AChE activity is important for diagnosis of OP intoxication but it has no value for determining the neuro-degeneration. 2) CAPE inhibits AChE activity and may increase the muscarinic-nicotinic hyperactivation. Therefore it should not be used for treatment of OP intoxication. 3) IL decreases the severity of neurodegeneration and symptoms of OP intoxication and it can be used as a supportive agent. PMID:24955152

  10. Galactose alters markers of oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase activity in the cerebrum of rats: protective role of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Delwing-de Lima, Daniela; Fröhlich, Monique; Dalmedico, Leticia; Aurélio, Juliana Gruenwaldt Maia; Delwing-Dal Magro, Débora; Pereira, Eduardo Manoel; Wyse, Angela T S

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated the in vitro effects of galactose at 0.1, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mM on thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), total sulfhydryl content, protein carbonyl content, on the activities of the antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus of rats. We also investigated the influence of the antioxidants (each at 1 mM), α-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and glutathione, on the effects elicited by galactose on the parameters tested. Results showed that galactose, at a concentration of 3.0 mM, enhanced TBA-RS levels in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rats. In the cerebral cortex, galactose at concentrations of 5.0 and 10.0 mM increased TBA-RS and protein carbonyl content, and at 10.0 mM increased CAT activity and decreased AChE activity. In the cerebellum, galactose at concentrations of 5.0 and 10.0 mM increased TBA-RS, SOD and GSH-Px activities. In the hippocampus, galactose at concentrations of 5.0 and 10.0 mM increased TBA-RS and CAT activity and at 10.0 mM decreased GSH-Px. Data showed that at the pathologically high concentration (greater than 5.0 mM), galactose induces lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, alters antioxidant defenses in the cerebrum, and also alters cholinesterase activity. Trolox, ascorbic acid and glutathione addition prevented the majority of alterations in oxidative stress parameters and the decrease in AChE activity that were caused by galactose. Our findings lend support to a potential therapeutic strategy for this condition, which may include the use of appropriate antioxidants for ameliorating the damage caused by galactose.

  11. Differences between male and female rhesus monkey erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and plasma cholinesterase activity before and after exposure to sarin

    SciTech Connect

    Woodard, C.L.; Calamaio, C.A.; Kaminskis, A.; Anderson, D.R.; Harris, L.W.

    1993-05-13

    The female rhesus monkey has a menstrual cycle like the human. Additionally, several differences in enzyme levels between males and females and in the female during the menstrual cycle are present. Therefore we quantitated plasma cholinesterase (ChE/BuChE) and erythrocyte (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity before and after exposure to sarin (GB)(1 5 ug/kg, iv; a 0.75 LD50), in male and female rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys. Twenty-eight-day preexposure baseline plasma ChE and RBC AChE values for six male and six female rhesus monkeys were compared for intra-animal, within sex and between sex differences. After these baseline values were obtained, the organophosphorus (OP) compound/Isopropyl methylphosphono-fluoridate (GB) was administered to atropinized monkeys to determine if there was a significant in vivo difference between the sexes in their response to this intoxication in regard to the rate of BuChE /AChE inhibition, pyridine-2-aldoxime methyl chloride (2-PAM) reactivation of the phosphonylated BuChE and the rate of aging of the phosphonylated:BuChE/AChE. In the pre-exposure portion of the protocol; the intra-animal and intra-group BuChE/AChE variations were found to be minimal; but there were significant differences between the male and female monkeys in both plasma BuChE and RBC AChE levels; although probably clinically insignificant in respect to an OP intoxication. No significant cyclic fluctuations were seen during the 28-day study in either sex.

  12. Ortho-7 bound to the active-site gorge of free and OP-conjugated acetylcholinesterase: cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arup Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the immense importance of cation-π interactions prevailing in bispyridinium drug acetylcholinesterase (AChE) complexes, a precise description of cation-π interactions at molecular level has remained elusive. Here, we consider a bispyridinium drug, namely, ortho-7 in three different structures of AChE, with and without complexation with organophosphorus (OP) compounds for detailed investigation using all atom molecular dynamics simulation. By quantum mechanical calculations, Y72, W86, Y124, W286, Y337, and Y341 aromatic residues of the enzyme are investigated for possible cation-π interactions with ortho-7. The cation-π interactions in each of the protein-drug complexes are studied using distance, angle, a suitable functional form of them, and electrostatic criteria. The variation of cation-π functional is remarkably consistent with that of the Columbic variation. It is clearly observed that cation-π interactions for some of the residues in the catalytic active site (CAS) and peripheral anionic site (PAS) of the enzyme are either enhanced or reduced based on the nature of OP conjugation (i.e., nerve gas, tabun or pesticide, fenamiphos) when compared with the OP-free enzyme. The strength of cation-π interaction is strongly dependent on the type OP conjugation. The effect of conjugation at CAS is also seen to influence the cation-π interaction at the PAS region. The variation of cation-π interactions on the type of conjugating OP compounds might be suggestive of a reason as to why wide spectrum drug against any OP poisoning is yet to arrive in the market.

  13. Flavanone Glycosides as Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Computational and Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Remya, C.; Dileep, K. V.; Tintu, I.; Variyar, E. J.; Sadasivan, C.

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter called acetylcholine and is crucially involved in the regulation of neurotransmission. One of the observable facts in the neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease is the decrease in the level of acetylcholine. Available drugs that are used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease are primarily acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with multiple activities. They maintain the level of acetylcholine in the brain by inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase function. Hence acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can be used as lead compounds for the development of drugs against AD. In the present study, the binding potential of four flavanone glycosides such as naringin, hesperidin, poncirin and sakuranin against acetylcholinesterase was analysed by using the method of molecular modeling and docking. The activity of the top scored compound, naringin was further investigated by enzyme inhibition studies and its inhibitory concentration (IC50) towards acetylcholinesterase was also determined. PMID:25593395

  14. Assessment of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activities in blood plasma of agriculture workers

    PubMed Central

    Dhananjayan, V.; Ravichandran, B.; Anitha, N.; Rajmohan, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cholinesterase determination indicates whether the person has been under pesticide exposure is not. It is recommended that the worker′s cholinesterase level should be assessed for workers at a pesticide applied region. Hence, cholinesterase activities in blood samples of agricultural workers exposed to vegetables and grape cultivation with age matched, unexposed workers, who never had any exposure to pesticides, were estimated. Methods: The detailed occupational history and lifestyle characters were obtained by questionnaire. Cholinesterase activity was determined by the method of Ellman as modified by Chambers and Chambers. Results: AChE was ranging from 1.65 to 3.54μmoles/min/ml in exposed subjects where as it was ranged from 2.22 to 3.51μmoles/min/ml in control subjects. BChE activity was ranging from 0.16 to 5.2μmoles/min/ml among exposed subjects, where as it was ranged from 2.19 to 5.06μmoles/min/ml in control subjects. The results showed statistically significant reduction in enzyme activities (AChE 14%; BChE 56%) among exposed subjects. Conclusion: It was concluded that the reduction in cholinesterase activity may lead to varieties of effects. Hence it is compulsory to use protective gadgets during pesticide spray. Further a continuous biomonitoring study is recommended to assess pesticide exposure. PMID:23776322

  15. Is fast fiber innervation responsible for increased acetylcholinesterase activity in reinnervating soleus muscles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted as to whether the predominantly slow SOL, which is low in AChE activity, is initially reinnervated by axons that originally innervated fast muscle fibers with high AChE activity, such as those of the EDL. Local denervation of the SOL in the guinea pig was performed because this muscle is composed solely of slow (type I) fibers; thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of homologous muscle fast fiber innervation. The overshoot in this preparation was qualitatively similar to that seen with distal denervation in the guinea pig and local and distal denervation in the rat. Thus, initial fast fiber innvervation is not responsible for the patterns of change in AChE activity seen with reinnervation in the SOL. It is concluded that the neural control of AChe is different in these two muscles and may reflect specific differences in the characteristics of AChE regulation in fast and slow muscle.

  16. Combined effects of chlorpyriphos, copper and temperature on acetylcholinesterase activity and toxicokinetics of the chemicals in the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Agnieszka J; Choczyński, Maciej; Laskowski, Ryszard; Walczak, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    In polluted environments organisms are commonly exposed to a combination of chemicals with different modes of action, and their effects can be additionally modified by natural abiotic conditions. One possible mechanism for interactions in mixtures is via toxicokinetics, as chemicals may alter the uptake, distribution, biotransformation and/or elimination of each other, and all these processes can be affected by temperature. In this study, the effect of temperature (T) on the toxicokinetics of copper (Cu) and chlorpyriphos (CHP), applied either singly or in binary mixtures, was studied in the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The experiments were conducted at 10 or 20 °C and the earthworms were exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of Cu and/or CHP for 16 d, followed by a depuration period of 4 d in uncontaminated soil. The earthworms were sampled for body Cu and/or CHP concentrations and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity measurements. The CHP degradation rate in the soil was substantially higher at 20 °C and in soil treated with Cu. The significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of AChE activity in the earthworms exposed to CHP was found. The effect of Cu was significant only at p < 0.1. No synergistic effect of the parallel CHP and Cu exposure was found. Four days after transferring the earthworms to uncontaminated soil, the AChE activity recovered to the level observed in control animals. The temperature effect on the toxicokinetic parameters was more pronounced for CHP than for Cu. In the case of CHP, the assimilation rate constant (kA) was significantly higher at 20 °C than at 10 °C, both in CHP-only and CHP + Cu treatments. A similar trend was found for the elimination rate constant (kE), but the difference was statistically significant only for non-Cu treatments. In the case of Cu, the general trend of higher kA and kE at 20 °C and in the absence of CHP was observed.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase activity in intact and homogenized skeletal muscle of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Miledi, R; Molenaar, P C; Polak, R L

    1984-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh) was determined in intact frog sartorius muscles or their homogenates. The Vmax was 29 nmol min-1 in intact muscles and 46 nmol min-1 per muscle in homogenates, and the Km was 6 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The muscle was divided into small segments, which were homogenized; the junctional cholinesterase (ChE) accounted for 60% of total enzyme activity. At low substrate concentrations the rate of hydrolysis was up to 30 times higher in homogenates than in intact muscles. This difference was greatly reduced at very high substrate concentrations. It appears that most of the ChE in intact muscle is 'occluded' to external ACh, mainly because the ChE at the edges of the synaptic cleft prevents the ACh from reaching the enzyme situated further inwards, which consequently does not contribute to its hydrolysis; homogenization makes all synaptic ChE accessible to added ACh. Incubation of sartorius muscles with collagenase caused an 80% decrease in ChE activity (determined in homogenates) of end-plate-containing parts which became similar to that in end-plate-free parts on which collagenase had little effect. Histochemistry showed that the tendon-muscle junction contained folds which were stained intensively for ChE. Diethyldimethylpyrophosphonate , neostigmine, eserine, and di-isopropyl fluorophosphonate inhibited ChE activity in this order of potency. The I50 values (i.e. the concentrations of the drugs which caused a 50% inhibition) were about 5 times higher in intact than in homogenized tissue. Neostigmine, 0.15 and 0.4 microM, increased the time constant of miniature end-plate currents 1.3- and 1.8-fold, and slowed down ChE activity of muscle homogenates by 1.4 and 2.1 times, respectively, without significantly affecting ACh hydrolysis by intact muscles. This indicates that synaptic ChE is not present in large excess. It is concluded that ChE activity measured in homogenates presents a better picture of in situ ChE activity than

  18. Neurotoxic responses in brain tissues of rainbow trout exposed to imidacloprid pesticide: Assessment of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine activity, oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Topal, Ahmet; Alak, Gonca; Ozkaraca, Mustafa; Yeltekin, Aslı Cilingir; Comaklı, Selim; Acıl, Gurdal; Kokturk, Mine; Atamanalp, Muhammed

    2017-05-01

    The extensive use of imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, causes undesirable toxicity in non-targeted organisms including fish in aquatic environments. We investigated neurotoxic responses by observing 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) activity, oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in rainbow trout brain tissue after 21 days of imidacloprid exposure at levels of (5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, 20 mg/L). The obtained results indicated that 8-OHdG activity did not change in fish exposed to 5 mg/L of imidacloprid, but 10 mg/L and 20 mg/L of imidacloprid significantly increased 8-OHdG activity compared to the control (p < 0.05). An immunopositiv reaction to 8-OHdG was detected in brain tissues. The brain tissues indicated a significant increase in antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) compared to the control and there was a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (p < 0.05). High concentrations of imidacloprid caused a significant decrease in AChE enzyme activity (p < 0.05). These results suggested that imidacloprid can be neurotoxic to fish by promoting AChE inhibition, an increase in 8-OHdG activity and changes in oxidative stress parameters. Therefore, these data may reflect one of the molecular pathways that play a role in imidacloprid toxicity.

  19. The Toxic Effect of Manganese on the Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Rat Brains

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi Babadi, Vahid; Sadeghi, Leila; Shirani, Kobra; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Rezaei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a naturally occurring element and an essential nutrient for humans and animals. However, exposure to high levels of Mn may cause neurotoxic effects. Accumulation of manganese damages central nervous system and causes Parkinson's disease-like syndrome called manganism. Mn neurotoxicity has been suggested to involve an imbalance between the DAergic and cholinergic systems. The pathological mechanisms associated with Mn neurotoxicity are poorly understood, but several reports have established it is mediated by changing of AChE activity that resulted in oxidative stress. Therefore we focused the effect of Mn in AChE activity in the rat's brain by MnCl2 injection intraperitoneally and analyzed their brains after time intervals. This study used different acute doses in short time course and different chronic doses at different exposing time to investigate which of them (exposing dose or time) is more important in Mn toxic effect. Results showed toxic effect of Mn is highly dose dependent and AChE activity in presence of chronic dose in 8 weeks reaches acute dose in only 2 days. PMID:25246936

  20. Neurotoxic effects of nickel chloride in the rainbow trout brain: Assessment of c-Fos activity, antioxidant responses, acetylcholinesterase activity, and histopathological changes.

    PubMed

    Topal, Ahmet; Atamanalp, Muhammed; Oruç, Ertan; Halıcı, Mesut Bünyami; Şişecioğlu, Melda; Erol, Hüseyin Serkan; Gergit, Arzu; Yılmaz, Bahar

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the biochemical, immunohistochemical, and histopathological effects of nickel chloride (Ni) in the rainbow trout brain. Fish were exposed to Ni concentrations (1 mg/L and 2 mg/L) for 21 days. At the end of the experimental period, brain tissues were taken from all fish for c-Fos activity and histopathological examination and determination of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) enzyme activities, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and glutathione (GSH) levels. Our results showed that Ni treatment caused a significant increase in the brain SOD activity and in LPO and GSH levels (p < 0.05), but it significantly decreased AChE and CAT enzyme activities (p < 0.05). Strong induction in c-Fos was observed in some cerebral and cerebellar regions of fish exposed to Ni concentrations when compared with the control group. However, c-Fos activity was decreased in necrotic Purkinje cells. Brain tissues were characterized by demyelination and necrotic changes. These results suggested that Ni treatment causes oxidative stress, changes in c-Fos activity, and histopathological damage in the fish brain.

  1. Effects of immature cashew nut-shell liquid (Anacardium occidentale) against oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    De Lima, S G; Feitosa, C M; Citó, A M G L; Moita Neto, J M; Lopes, J A D; Leite, A S; Brito, M C; Dantas, S M M; Cavalcante, A A C Melo

    2008-09-09

    The cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale) represents one of the major cheapest sources of non-isoprenoid phenolic lipids, which have a variety of biological properties: they can act as molluscicides, insecticides, fungicides, have anti-termite properties, have medicinal applications, and demonstrate antioxidant activity in vitro. Immature cashew nut-shell liquid (iCNSL) is a unique natural source of unsaturated long-chain phenols. Their use has stimulated much research in order to prepare drug analogues for application in several fields. The objective of the present study was to determine whether iCNSL has antioxidant properties when used in strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to measure the inhibitory activity of acetylcholinesterase. The constituents were identified using thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. The iCNSL contains anacardic acid, cardanol, cardol, and 2-methyl cardol. Immature cashew nut oil contains triacylglycerols, fatty acids, alkyl-substituted phenols, and cholesterol. The main constituents of the free fatty acids are palmitic (C(16:0)) and oleic acid (C(18:1)). iCNSL has excellent protective activities in strains of S. cerevisiae against oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide and inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity. iCNSL may have an important role in protecting DNA against damage induced by reactive oxygen species, as well as hydrogen peroxide, generated by intra- and extracellular mechanisms.

  2. Beyond Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Novel Cholinergic Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamkwalala, Asante R; Newhouse, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    The major components of the cholinergic receptor system of the human brain include projections from the basal forebrain nuclei, and utilize the two types of receptors that they synapse on, nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. With the widespread cortical and subcortical projections of the basal forebrain, activity of these two receptor systems provide modulation of neurotransmitter activity underlying normal cognitive processes, such as attention, episodic memory, and working memory. Alzheimer's disease (AD) targets and damages cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain, and as these projections are lost, cognitive performance progressively declines. Currently, the most widely prescribed treatment for AD is acetylcholinesterase inhibitor medications, which work by partially blocking the degradation of acetylcholine in the synapse and enabling more of the neurotransmitter to reach and activate cholinergic receptors. However since these medications have limited effectiveness, alternate treatments that focus on augmenting the activity of the receptors themselves, independent of acetylcholinesterase inhibition, are being explored. This review will discuss: 1) the role of the cholinergic system in modulating cognition, 2) novel cholinergic treatment strategies for AD-related cognitive decline, in particular treatments intended to increase cholinergic system activity by selectively targeting muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors to improve cognitive performance, 3) risks, and additional considerations for cholinergic cognitive treatments for AD.

  3. Repetitive obidoxime treatment induced increase of red blood cell acetylcholinesterase activity even in a late phase of a severe methamidophos poisoning: A case report.

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Eyer, Florian; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; John, Harald

    2016-02-26

    Accidental self-poisoning or deliberate use in suicidal intent of organophosphorus pesticides (OPP), which are widely used in agriculture, represent a health problem worldwide. Symptoms of poisoning are characterized by acute cholinergic crisis caused by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. A 75-year-old male patient ingested 20ml of an OPP solution containing 10% methamidophos in suicidal intent. In the course of poisoning typical clinical symptoms of cholinergic crisis (miosis, bradycardia, hypotension, hypersalivation and impairment of neurologic status) were evident. Butyryl (plasma) cholinesterase (BChE) and red blood cell acetylcholinesterase (RBC-AChE) revealed decreased activities, thus specific treatment with the enzyme reactivator obidoxime was started. Inhibitory activity of the patient's plasma indicated significant amounts of persisting methamidophos in the circulation and was still found on day 4 after ingestion. Due to missing spontaneous breathing on day 6, obidoxime was administered again. Afterwards a significant increase of RBC-AChE activity was found. The patient was extubated on day 10 and a restitution ad integrum was achieved. In conclusion, obidoxime is a potent reactivator of OPP-inhibited AChE. A repetitive and prolonged administration of obidoxime should be considered in cases of severe methamidophos poisoning and should be tailored with an advanced analytical biomonitoring.

  4. Positive allosteric modulators of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors affect neither the function of other ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels and acetylcholinesterase, nor β-amyloid content.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Ravazzini, Federica; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Feuerbach, Dominik; Boffi, Juan C; Draczkowski, Piotr; Montag, Dirk; Brown, Brandon M; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Puia, Giulia

    2016-07-01

    The activity of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), including 3-furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide (PAM-2), 3-furan-2-yl-N-o-tolylacrylamide (PAM-3), and 3-furan-2-yl-N-phenylacrylamide (PAM-4), was tested on a variety of ligand- [i.e., human (h) α7, rat (r) α9α10, hα3-containing AChRs, mouse (m) 5-HT3AR, and several glutamate receptors (GluRs)] and voltage-gated (i.e., sodium and potassium) ion channels, as well as on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and β-amyloid (Aβ) content. The functional results indicate that PAM-2 inhibits hα3-containing AChRs (IC50=26±6μM) with higher potency than that for NR1aNR2B and NR1aNR2A, two NMDA-sensitive GluRs. PAM-2 affects neither the activity of m5-HT3ARs, GluR5/KA2 (a kainate-sensitive GluR), nor AChE, and PAM-4 does not affect agonist-activated rα9α10 AChRs. Relevant clinical concentrations of PAM-2-4 do not inhibit Nav1.2 and Kv3.1 ion channels. These PAMs slightly enhance the activity of GluR1 and GluR2, two AMPA-sensitive GluRs. PAM-2 does not change the levels of Aβ42 in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model (i.e., 5XFAD). The molecular docking and dynamics results using the hα7 model suggest that the active sites for PAM-2 include the intrasubunit (i.e., PNU-120596 locus) and intersubunit sites. These results support our previous study showing that these PAMs are selective for the α7 AChR, and clarify that the procognitive/promnesic/antidepressant activity of PAM-2 is not mediated by other targets.

  5. A modification of thiocholine-ferricyanide method of Karnovsky and Roots for localization of acetylcholinesterase activity without interference by Koelle's copper thiocholine iodide precipitate.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, S; Larabi, Y

    1983-01-01

    In the original Karnovsky and Roots' method for the localization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), thiocholine reduces the ferricyanide and cupric ions of this medium competitively, giving simultaneously cupric (Koelle's precipitate) as histochemical products. We modified the method in order to promote the true Karnovsky's reaction, and to slow down the secondary Koelle's reaction by increasing the concentration of the ferricyanide ion from 0.5 mM to 5.0 mM and by decreasing the concentration of the cupric ion from 3.0 mM to 2.5 mM. The cupric ion, complexed with 5 mM sodium citrate in the original method, was further stabilized by the use of 0.1 M citrate buffer in order to prevent the interaction of cupric ion with increased ferricyanide. In order to suppress completely the residual Koelle's precipitate, we used acetylthiocholine chloride as a substrate, instead of acetylthiocholine iodide. The chloride salt of cuprous thiocholine is soluble, contrary to the iodide salt. In addition, the pH of the medium was lowered from 6.0 to 5.0 to avoid artefactual nuclear staining, appearing at a pH beyond 5.5. In this modified medium, Karnovsky's cupric ferrocyanide becomes the sole precipitate at the enzymatic site and this provides fine localization of acetylcholinesterase activity.

  6. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of dual inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and serotonin transporter as potential agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Toda, Narihiro; Tago, Keiko; Marumoto, Shinji; Takami, Kazuko; Ori, Mayuko; Yamada, Naho; Koyama, Kazuo; Naruto, Shunji; Abe, Kazumi; Yamazaki, Reina; Hara, Takao; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Abe, Yasuyuki; Kaneko, Tsugio; Kogen, Hiroshi

    2003-05-01

    We have designed and synthesized a dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and serotonin transporter (SERT) as a novel class of treatment drugs for Alzheimer's disease on the basis of a hypothetical model of the AChE active site. Dual inhibitions of AChE and SERT would bring about greater therapeutic effects than AChE inhibition alone and avoid adverse peripheral effects caused by excessive AChE inhibition. Compound (S)-6j exhibited potent inhibitory activities against AChE (IC(50)=101 nM) and SERT (IC(50)=42 nM). Furthermore, (S)-6j showed inhibitory activities of both AChE and SERT in mice brain following oral administration.

  7. Aphicidal Activity of Illicium verum Fruit Extracts and Their Effects on the Acetylcholinesterase and Glutathione S-transferases Activities in Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ben-Guo; Wang, Sa; Dou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Su; Li, Mao-Ye; Hua, Ri-Mao; Li, Shi-Guang; Lin, Hua-Feng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the aphicidal activity and underlying mechanism of Illicium verum Hook. f. that is used as both food and medicine. The contact toxicity of the extracts from I. verum fruit with methyl alcohol (MA), ethyl acetate (EA), and petroleum ether (PE) against Myzus persicae (Sulzer), and the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) of M. persicae after contact treatment were tested. The results showed that MA, EA, and PE extracts of 1.000 mg/l caused, respectively, M. persicae mortalities of 68.93%, 89.95% and 74.46%, and the LC50 of MA, EA, and PE extracts were 0.31, 0.14 and 0.27 mg/l at 72 h after treatment, respectively; the activities of AChE and GSTs in M. persicae were obviously inhibited by the three extracts, as compared with the control, with strong dose and time-dependent effects, the inhibition rates on the whole reached more than 50.00% at the concentration of 1.000 mg/l at 72 h after treatment. The inhibition of the extracts on AChE and GSTs activities (EA extract > PE extract > MA extract) were correlated with theirs contact toxic effects, so it is inferred that the decline of the metabolic enzymes activities may be one of important reasons of M. persicae death. The study results suggested that I. verum extracts have potential as a eco-friendly biopesticide in integrated pest management against M. persicae. PMID:26826651

  8. Zephycandidine A, the First Naturally Occurring Imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridine Alkaloid from Zephyranthes candida, Exhibits Significant Anti-tumor and Anti-acetylcholinesterase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Guanqun; Qu, Xiaolan; Liu, Junjun; Tong, Qingyi; Zhou, Junfei; Sun, Bin; Yao, Guangmin

    2016-09-01

    Zephycandidine A (1), the first naturally occurring imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridine alkaloid, was isolated from Zephyranthes candida (Amaryllidaceae). The structure of 1 was elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and NMR calculation, and a plausible biogenetic pathway for zephycandidine A (1) was proposed. Zephycandidine A (1) exhibited significant cytotoxicity against five cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 1.98 to 7.03 μM with selectivity indices as high as 10 when compared to the normal Beas-2B cell. Further studies suggested that zephycandidine A (1) induces apoptosis in leukemia cells by the activation of caspase-3, upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2, and degradation of PARP expression. In addition, zephycandidine A (1) showed acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity, and the docking studies of zephycandidine A (1) and galanthamine (2) with AChE revealed that interactions with W286 and Y337 are necessary.

  9. Zephycandidine A, the First Naturally Occurring Imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridine Alkaloid from Zephyranthes candida, Exhibits Significant Anti-tumor and Anti-acetylcholinesterase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Guanqun; Qu, Xiaolan; Liu, Junjun; Tong, Qingyi; Zhou, Junfei; Sun, Bin; Yao, Guangmin

    2016-01-01

    Zephycandidine A (1), the first naturally occurring imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridine alkaloid, was isolated from Zephyranthes candida (Amaryllidaceae). The structure of 1 was elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and NMR calculation, and a plausible biogenetic pathway for zephycandidine A (1) was proposed. Zephycandidine A (1) exhibited significant cytotoxicity against five cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 1.98 to 7.03 μM with selectivity indices as high as 10 when compared to the normal Beas-2B cell. Further studies suggested that zephycandidine A (1) induces apoptosis in leukemia cells by the activation of caspase-3, upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2, and degradation of PARP expression. In addition, zephycandidine A (1) showed acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity, and the docking studies of zephycandidine A (1) and galanthamine (2) with AChE revealed that interactions with W286 and Y337 are necessary. PMID:27658482

  10. Use and disuse and the control of acetylcholinesterase activity in fast and slow twitch muscle of rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dettbarn, W. D.; Groswald, D.; Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    The role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in neuromuscular transmission is relatively well established, little is known, however, of the mechanisms that regulate its synthesis and control its specific distribution in fast and slow muscle. Innervation plays an important role in the regulation of AChE and elimination of the influence of the nerve by surgical denervation results in a loss of AChE. The influences of the nerve and how they are mediated was investigated. It is suggested that muscle usage and other factors such as materials carried by axonal transport may participate in the regulation of this enzyme. The mechanisms that regulate AChE and its molecular forms in two functionally different forms are studied.

  11. Molecular Probe Analysis of Mammalian Brain Acetylcholinesterase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-27

    Project and Degrees Awarded During this Reporting Period: Judith K. Marquis, Principal Investigator Thomas Biagioni , Senior Research Technician Robert...binding sites in nerve membrane vesicles. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 80C: 203-205 (1985). 5. Volpe, L.S., T.M. Biagioni & J.K. Marquis: In vitro modulation of...Saxena, Vol. 6(1988Y.8 11. Marquis, J.K. & T.M. Biagioni : Selective inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in human plasma

  12. C- and O-glycosyl flavonoids in Sanguinello and Tarocco blood orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) juice: Identification and influence on antioxidant properties and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Davide; Gattuso, Giuseppe; Laganà, Giuseppina; Leuzzi, Ugo; Bellocco, Ersilia

    2016-04-01

    Sanguinello and Tarocco are the blood orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) cultivars most diffused worldwide. Reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled with MS-MS analysis showed that these two varieties have a similar chromatographic pattern, characterised by the presence of C- and O-glycosyl flavonoids. Of the two, Sanguinello was found to be far richer in flavonoids than Tarocco. In the juices, twelve individual components were identified for the first time, namely, four C-glycosyl flavones (lucenin-2, vicenin-2, stellarin-2, lucenin-2 4'-methyl ether and scoparin), three flavonol derivatives (quercetin-3-O-(2-rhamnosyl)-rutinoside, quercetin-3-O-hexoside, quercetin 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-glycoside), an O-triglycosyl flavanone (narirutin 4'-O-glucoside) and a flavone O-glycosides (chrysoeriol 7-O-neoesperidoside). Moreover, the influence of the identified C- and O-glycosyl flavonoids on the antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase activity of these juices has been evaluated.

  13. Immunocytochemical demonstration of axonal and perikaryal acetylcholinesterase in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mesulam, M M; Geula, C; Cosgrove, R; Mash, D; Brimijoin, S

    1991-01-25

    The adult human neocortex contains a dense net of axons and perikarya which yield an acetylcholinesterase-rich enzymatic reaction pattern in histochemical experiments. We employed a monoclonal antibody to human acetylcholinesterase and a method for the concurrent visualization of histochemical and immunohistochemical reaction-products to explore the relationship between immunological and enzymatic markers of acetylcholinesterase. We observed that the cortical axons and perikarya with a histochemically determined acetylcholinesterase-rich enzymatic activity also contain acetylcholinesterase-like immunoreactivity. This was especially informative for the intracortical acetylcholinesterase-rich perikarya of layers III and V since these neurons require prolonged incubations for histochemical detection and since they are not conspicuous in other animal species. The availability of a reliable immunohistochemical method makes it possible to investigate the distribution of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme molecule independent of its enzymatic activity.

  14. Concentration-Dependent Interactions of the Organophosphates Chlorpyrifos Oxon and Methyl Paraoxon with Human Recombinant Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, R.; Rosenfeld, Clint A.; Sultatos, L.G.

    2007-01-01

    For many decades it has been thought that oxygen analogs (oxons) of organophosphorus insecticides phosphylate the catalytic site of acetylcholinesterase by a mechanism that follows simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. More recently, the interactions of at least some oxons have been shown to be far more complex, and likely involve binding of oxons to a second site on acetylcholinesterase that modulates the inhibitory capacity of other oxon molecules at the catalytic site. The current study has investigated the interactions of chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon with human recombinant acetylcholinesterase. Both chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon were found to have ki’s that change as a function of oxon concentration. Furthermore, 10 nM chlorpyrifos oxon resulted in a transient increase in acetylthiocholine hydrolysis, followed by inhibition. Moreover, in the presence of 100 nM chlorpyrifos oxon, acetylthiocholine was found to influence both the Kd (binding affinity) and k2 (phosphorylation constant) of this oxon. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the interactions of chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon with acetylcholinesterase cannot be described by simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, but instead support the hypothesis that these oxons bind to a secondary site on acetylcholinesterase, leading to activation/inhibition of the catalytic site, depending on the nature of the substrate and inhibitor. Additionally, these data raise questions regarding the adequacy of estimating risk of low levels of insecticide exposure from direct extrapolation of insecticide dose-response curves since the capacity of individual oxon molecules at low oxon levels could be greater than individual oxon molecules in vivo associated with the dose response curve. PMID:17467020

  15. Concentration-dependent interactions of the organophosphates chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon with human recombinant acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushik, R.; Rosenfeld, Clint A.; Sultatos, L.G. . E-mail: sultatle@umdnj.edu

    2007-06-01

    For many decades it has been thought that oxygen analogs (oxons) of organophosphorus insecticides phosphorylate the catalytic site of acetylcholinesterase by a mechanism that follows simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. More recently, the interactions of at least some oxons have been shown to be far more complex and likely involve binding of oxons to a second site on acetylcholinesterase that modulates the inhibitory capacity of other oxon molecules at the catalytic site. The current study has investigated the interactions of chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon with human recombinant acetylcholinesterase. Both chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon were found to have k {sub i}'s that change as a function of oxon concentration. Furthermore, 10 nM chlorpyrifos oxon resulted in a transient increase in acetylthiocholine hydrolysis, followed by inhibition. Moreover, in the presence of 100 nM chlorpyrifos oxon, acetylthiocholine was found to influence both the K {sub d} (binding affinity) and k {sub 2} (phosphorylation constant) of this oxon. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the interactions of chlorpyrifos oxon and methyl paraoxon with acetylcholinesterase cannot be described by simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics but instead support the hypothesis that these oxons bind to a secondary site on acetylcholinesterase, leading to activation/inhibition of the catalytic site, depending on the nature of the substrate and inhibitor. Additionally, these data raise questions regarding the adequacy of estimating risk of low levels of insecticide exposure from direct extrapolation of insecticide dose-response curves since the capacity of individual oxon molecules at low oxon levels could be greater than individual oxon molecules in vivo associated with the dose-response curve.

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Sodium Arsenite and Acacia Honey on Acetylcholinesterase in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Odunola, Oyeronke A.; Gbadegesin, Michael A.; Sallau, Abdullahi B.; Ndidi, Uche S.; Ibrahim, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of sodium arsenite and Acacia honey on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and electrolytes in the brain and serum of Wistar rats. Male Wistar albino rats in four groups of five rats each were treated with distilled water, sodium arsenite (5 mg/kg body weight), Acacia honey (20% v/v), and sodium arsenite and Acacia honey, daily for one week. The sodium arsenite and Acacia honey significantly (P < 0.05) decreased AChE activity in the brain with the combined treatment being more potent. Furthermore, sodium arsenite and Acacia honey significantly (P < 0.05) decreased AChE activity in the serum. Strong correlation was observed between the sodium and calcium ion levels with acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain and serum. The gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis of Acacia honey revealed the presence of a number of bioactive compounds such as phenolics, sugar derivatives, and fatty acids. These findings suggest that sodium arsenite and/or Acacia honey modulates acetylcholinesterase activities which may be explored in the management of Alzheimer's diseases but this might be counteracted by the hepatotoxicity induced by arsenics. PMID:25821630

  17. Submillimeter Confocal Imaging Active Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Cwik, Thomas; Rowell, Mark; Hacker, John

    2009-01-01

    The term submillimeter confocal imaging active module (SCIAM) denotes a proposed airborne coherent imaging radar system that would be suitable for use in reconnaissance, surveillance, and navigation. The development of the SCIAM would include utilization and extension of recent achievements in monolithic microwave integrated circuits capable of operating at frequencies up to and beyond a nominal radio frequency of 340 GHz. Because the SCIAM would be primarily down-looking (in contradistinction to primarily side-looking), it could be useful for imaging shorter objects located between taller ones (for example, objects on streets between buildings). The SCIAM would utilize a confocal geometry to obtain high cross-track resolution, and would be amenable to synthetic-aperture processing of its output to obtain high along-track resolution. The SCIAM (see figure) would include multiple (two in the initial version) antenna apertures, separated from each other by a cross-track baseline of suitable length (e.g., 1.6 m). These apertures would both transmit the illuminating radar pulses and receive the returns. A common reference oscillator would generate a signal at a controllable frequency of (340 GHz + (Delta)f)/N, where (Delta)f is an instantaneous swept frequency difference and N is an integer. The output of this oscillator would be fed to a frequency- multiplier-and-power-amplifier module to obtain a signal, at 340 GHz + (Delta)f, that would serve as both the carrier signal for generating the transmitted pulses and a local-oscillator (LO) signal for a receiver associated with each antenna aperture. Because duplexers in the form of circulators or transmit/receive (T/R) switches would be lossy and extremely difficult to implement, the antenna apertures would be designed according to a spatial-diplexing scheme, in which signals would be coupled in and out via separate, adjacent transmitting and receiving feed horns. This scheme would cause the transmitted and received beams

  18. Identical kinetics of human erythrocyte and muscle acetylcholinesterase with respect to carbamate pre-treatment, residual activity upon soman challenge and spontaneous reactivation after withdrawal of the inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Herkert, Nadja M; Eckert, Saskia; Eyer, Peter; Bumm, Rudolf; Weber, Georg; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2008-04-18

    The efficacy of oxime treatment in soman poisoning is limited due to rapid aging of inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pre-treatment with carbamates was shown to improve antidotal treatment substantially. Recently, by using a dynamically working in vitro model with real-time determination of membrane-bound AChE activity, we were able to demonstrate that pre-inhibition of human erythrocyte AChE with pyridostigmine or physostigmine resulted in a markedly higher residual AChE activity after inhibition by soman or paraoxon than in the absence of reversible inhibitors. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effect of carbamate pre-treatment and soman challenge with human erythrocyte and muscle homogenate AChE. Both enzyme sources were immobilized on particle filters which were perfused with acetylthiocholine, Ellman's reagent and phosphate buffer. AChE activity was continuously analyzed in a flow-through detector. Pre-inhibition of AChE with pyridostigmine or physostigmine resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in carbamylation, residual activity after soman inhibition and fraction of decarbamylation AChE after discontinuation of the inhibitors without differences between human erythrocyte and muscle AChE. This data support the view that human erythrocyte AChE is an adequate surrogate marker for synaptic AChE in OP poisoning.

  19. Active combustion flow modulation valve

    DOEpatents

    Hensel, John Peter; Black, Nathaniel; Thorton, Jimmy Dean; Vipperman, Jeffrey Stuart; Lambeth, David N; Clark, William W

    2013-09-24

    A flow modulation valve has a slidably translating hollow armature with at least one energizable coil wound around and fixably attached to the hollow armature. The energizable coil or coils are influenced by at least one permanent magnet surrounding the hollow armature and supported by an outer casing. Lorentz forces on the energizable coils which are translated to the hollow armature, increase or decrease the flow area to provide flow throttling action. The extent of hollow armature translation depends on the value of current supplied and the direction of translation depends on the direction of current flow. The compact nature of the flow modulation valve combined with the high forces afforded by the actuator design provide a flow modulation valve which is highly responsive to high-rate input control signals.

  20. Highly Sensitive and Selective Immuno-capture/Electrochemical Assay of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Red Blood Cells: A Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-09

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold nanocomposites (MWCNTs-Au) modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentration of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to its concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in-vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposures to OPs.

  1. Pharmacological characterization of RS-1259, an orally active dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and serotonin transporter, in rodents: possible treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yasuyuki; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Hara, Takao; Abe, Kazumi; Yamazaki, Reina; Kumagae, Yoshihiro; Naruto, Shunji; Koyama, Kazuo; Marumoto, Shinji; Tago, Keiko; Toda, Narihiro; Takami, Kazuko; Yamada, Naho; Ori, Mayuko; Kogen, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Tsugio

    2003-09-01

    A dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and serotonin transporter (SERT), RS-1259 (4-[1S)-methylamino-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)]propylphenyl N,N-dimethylcarbamate (fumaric acid)(1/2)salt), was newly synthesized. RS-1259 simultaneously inhibited AChE and SERT in the brain following an oral administration in mice and rats. Actual simultaneous elevation of extracellular levels of 5-HT and ACh in the rat hippocampus was confirmed by microdialysis. The compound was as effective as SERT inhibitors such as fluoxetine and fluvoxamine in a 5-hydroxytryptophan-enhancing test in mice. Spatial memory deficits in the two-platform task of a water maze in aged rats were ameliorated by RS-1259 as well as donepezil. Both RS-1259 and donepezil increased the awake episodes in the daytime electroencephalogram of rats. Although RS-1259 was weaker than donepezil in enhancing central cholinergic transmission, as observed by ACh elevation in the hippocampus and memory enhancement in aged rats, the efficacy of RS-1259 on the consciousness level, which reflects the whole activity in the brain, was almost the same as that of donepezil. These results suggest that both cholinergic and serotonergic systems are involved in maintaining brain arousal and that a dual inhibitor of AChE and SERT may be useful for the treatment of cognitive disorders associated with reduced brain activity such as in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Kinetic analysis of interactions of different sarin and tabun analogues with human acetylcholinesterase and oximes: is there a structure-activity relationship?

    PubMed

    Aurbek, Nadine; Herkert, Nadja M; Koller, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2010-09-06

    The repeated misuse of highly toxic organophosphorus compound (OP) based chemical warfare agents in military conflicts and terrorist attacks poses a continuous threat to the military and civilian sector. The toxic symptomatology of OP poisoning is mainly caused by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, E.C. 3.1.1.7) resulting in generalized cholinergic crisis due to accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) in synaptic clefts. Beside atropine as competitive antagonist of ACh at muscarinic ACh receptors oximes as reactivators of OP-inhibited AChE are a mainstay of standard antidotal treatment. However, human AChE inhibited by certain OP is rather resistant to oxime-induced reactivation. The development of more effective oxime-based reactivators may fill the gaps. To get more insight into a potential structure-activity relationship between human AChE, OPs and oximes in vitro studies were conducted to investigate interactions of different tabun and sarin analogues with human AChE and the oximes obidoxime and HI 6 by determination of various kinetic constants. Rate constants for the inhibition of human AChE by OPs, spontaneous dealkylation and reactivation as well as reactivation by obidoxime and HI 6 of OP-inhibited human AChE were determined. The recorded kinetic data did not allow a general statement concerning a structure-activity relationship between human AChE, OP and oximes.

  3. RNAi of ace1 and ace2 in Blattella germanica reveals their differential contribution to acetylcholinesterase activity and sensitivity to insecticides.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, L; Piulachs, M D; Bellés, X; Castañera, P; Ortego, F; Díaz-Ruíz, J R; Hernández-Crespo, P; Tenllado, F

    2009-12-01

    Cyclorrhapha insect genomes contain a single acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene while other insects contain at least two ace genes (ace1 and ace2). In this study we tested the hypothesis that the two ace paralogous from Blattella germanica have different contributions to AChE activity, using RNA interference (RNAi) to knockdown each one individually. Paralogous-specific depletion of Bgace transcripts was evident in ganglia of injected cockroaches, although the effects at the protein level were less pronounced. Using spectrophotometric and zymogram measurements, we obtained evidence that BgAChE1 represents 65-75% of the total AChE activity in nerve tissue demonstrating that ace1 encodes a predominant AChE. A significant increase in sensitivity of Bgace1-interfered cockroaches was observed after 48 h of exposure to chlorpyrifos. In contrast, Bgace2 knockdown had a negligible effect on mortality to this organophosphate. These results point out a key role, qualitative and/or quantitative, of AChE1 as target of organophosphate insecticides in this species. Silencing the expression of Bgace1 but not Bgace2 also produced an increased mortality in insects when synergized with lambda-cyhalothrin, a situation which resembles the synergistic effects observed between organophosphates and pyrethroids. Gene silencing of ace genes by RNAi offers an exciting approach for examining a possible functional differentiation in ace paralogous.

  4. Effects of harmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, on spatial learning and memory of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and scopolamine-induced memory impairment mice.

    PubMed

    He, Dandan; Wu, Hui; Wei, Yue; Liu, Wei; Huang, Fei; Shi, Hailian; Zhang, Beibei; Wu, Xiaojun; Wang, Changhong

    2015-12-05

    Harmine, a β-carboline alkaloid present in Peganum harmala with a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, has been shown to exert strong inhibition against acetylcholinesterase in vitro. However, whether it can rescue the impaired cognition has not been elucidated yet. In current study, we examined its effects on scopolamine-induced memory impairment mice and APP/PS1 transgenic mice, one of the models for Alzheimer's disease, using Morris Water Maze test. In addition, whether harmine could penetrate blood brain barrier, interact with and inhibit acetylcholinesterase, and activate downstream signaling network was also investigated. Our results showed that harmine (20mg/kg) administered by oral gavage for 2 weeks could effectively enhance the spatial cognition of C57BL/6 mice impaired by intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine (1mg/kg). Meanwhile, long-term consumption of harmine (20mg/kg) for 10 weeks also slightly benefited the impaired memory of APP/PS1 mice. Furthermore, harmine could pass through blood brain barrier, penetrate into the brain parenchyma shortly after oral administration, and modulate the expression of Egr-1, c-Jun and c-Fos. Molecular docking assay disclosed that harmine molecule could directly dock into the catalytic active site of acetylcholinesterase, which was partially confirmed by its in vivo inhibitory activity on acetylcholinesterase. Taken together, all these results suggested that harmine could ameliorate impaired memory by enhancement of cholinergic neurotransmission via inhibiting the activity of acetylcholinesterase, which may contribute to its clinical use in the therapy of neurological diseases characterized with acetylcholinesterase deficiency.

  5. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of aloe-emodin derivatives as new acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Da-Hua; Huang, Wei; Li, Chao; Wang, Ling-Ting; Wang, Shi-Fan

    2013-03-01

    A series of aloe-emodin derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Most of the new prepared compounds showed remarkable acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities. Among them, the compound 1-((4,5-dihydroxy-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracen-2-yl) methyl) pyridin-1-ium chloride (C3) which has a pyridinium substituent possessed the best inhibitory activity of acetylcholinesterase (IC(50)=0.09 μM). The docking study performed with AUTODOCK demonstrated that C3 could interact with the catalytic active site (CAS) and the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of acetylcholinesterase.

  6. Paper-based fluorescent sensor for rapid naked-eye detection of acetylcholinesterase activity and organophosphorus pesticides with high sensitivity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiafu; Li, Haiyin; Hou, Ting; Li, Feng

    2016-12-15

    Various strategies have been proposed for the sensing of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). However, the practical application of most methods is restricted by their intrinsic drawbacks such as complexity, long analysis time, and high cost. Thus, it is highly desirable to develop simple, fast and sensitive approaches for AChE activity and OPs detection. Herein, we reported a simple paper-based fluorescent sensor (PFS) based on the aggregation induced emission (AIE) effect of tetraphenylethylene (TPE) and the addition reaction capability of maleimide, which has been used as a powerful tool for rapid naked-eye detection of AChE activity and OPs. The introduction of TPE provides the probe with unique fluorescence property in solid state and is of great importance for improving the sensitivity of PFS. The hydrolysis product of acetylthiocholine catalyzed by AChE induced the maleimide ring destruction and activated the fluorescence performance of TPE. Given that AChE activity can be specifically inhibited by OPs, the as-proposed PFS can also be utilized for sensitive detection of OPs. Meanwhile, the variation of fluorescence signal can be readily detected by naked eyes, and low detection limits of 2.5mUmL(-1) and 0.5ngmL(-1) for AChE activity and OPs are obtained, respectively. Moreover, it has been successfully applied for AChE activity and OPs detection in diluted human serum samples, showing its great potential to be applied in real samples. Thus, this strategy possesses considerable advantages of simplicity, rapid detection, portability, cost efficiency and visualization.

  7. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in the central nervous system of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by mercury, cadmium, and lead

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, M.; Fingerman, M.

    1995-11-01

    The toxicological, physiological and biochemical responses of aquatic crustaceans to heavy metals have been reported by several investigators. Levels of glucose, lactic acid, sodium, potassium, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in the blood of the crab Scylla serrata increased, while glycogen levels in hepatopancreas and muscle decreased after a four-week exposure to mercuric chloride. In fiddler crab, Uca pugilator, enzyme activity was observed to decrease in the hepatopancreas but increased in abdominal muscle after 48 hr cadmium exposure. In the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, exposed for 96 hr to cadmium, glutahione (GSH) level and GSH S-transferase activity deceased in the midgut. In crayfish Astacus astacus exposed to sublethal concentrations of lead and cadmium, oxidative enzyme (succine dehydrogenase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase) activities in gills and hepatopancrease decreased. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition by organophosphates and organocarbamates in various crustaceans has bee reported. In vivo cadmium exposure caused increases in esterase activities, but mercury exposure decreases these activities in the hepatopancreas of the shrimp Callianassa tyrrhena. The freshwater crab, Barytelphusa guerini, exposed to 0.6 ppm cadmium showed reduced oxygen consumption throughout the experiment whereas AChE activity increased after 4 days but decreased after 15 days. The authors wanted to determine the effects of cadmium, lead and mercury on AChE activity in central nervous tissue of Procambarus clarkii. This enzyme has the potential for serving both as a biochemical indicator of toxic stress and a sensitive parameter for testing water for the presence of toxicants. These three biologically silent metals have, according to Schweinsberg and Karsa great toxicological significance to humans because their use is widespread. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Effect of paraoxonase 1 192 Q/R polymorphism on paraoxonase and acetylcholinesterase enzyme activities in a Turkish population exposed to organophosphate.

    PubMed

    Sunay, Seda Zengin; Kayaaltı, Zeliha; Bayrak, Tülin; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2015-12-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds are the most commonly used pesticide groups and they are commercially used in the market for local and industrial purposes. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) enzyme plays an important role in biotransformation of OP compounds, which shows toxic effects via inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The aim of this study was to determine the effects of PON1 gene polymorphism and its effects on PON and AChE enzyme activities in individuals who were exposed to organophosphorus insecticides due to occupational reasons, and to profile the probability of susceptibility to organophosphorus compounds. For this purpose, 54 individuals who were exposed to OPs and 54 healthy unrelated controls were studied. First, PON1 and AChE enzyme activities were measured. Second, PON1 192 Q/R polymorphism was determined by standard polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. When the PON1 192 Q/R polymorphism was compared with PON1 enzyme activities, statistically significant association was found in both OP-exposed and control groups (p < 0.05). PON1 192 R(+) (QR + RR genotypes) genotype carriers had higher PON1 activities than 192 R(-) (QQ) genotype carriers. On the other hand, results were statistically analyzed in terms of AChE enzyme activities and there were statistically significant differences only in the OP-exposed group (p < 0.05). The mean AChE concentration in the OP-exposed group was determined as 33.79 ± 6.84 U/g haemoglobin (Hb) for PON1 192 R(+) carriers and 30.37 ± 7.62 U/g Hb for PON1 192 R(+) carriers. As a conclusion, PON1 and AChE activities were increasing according to the genotypes found in individuals having been exposed to OPs at a chronic level; 192 R(+) > 192 R(-), respectively.

  9. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    What is Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM)? The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) is an expandable habitat technology demonstration on ISS; increase human-rated inflatable structure Technology Readiness Level (TRL) to level 9. NASA managed ISS payload project in partnership with Bigelow Aerospace. Launched to ISS on Space X 8 (April 8th, 2016). Fully expanded on May 28th, 2016. Jeff Williams/Exp. 48 Commander first entered BEAM on June 5th, 2016.

  10. Fumigant toxicity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of 4 Asteraceae plant essential oils and their constituents against Japanese termite (Reticulitermes speratus Kolbe).

    PubMed

    Seo, Seon-Mi; Kim, Junheon; Kang, Jaesoon; Koh, Sang-Hyun; Ahn, Young-Joon; Kang, Kyu-Suk; Park, Il-Kwon

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the fumigant toxicity of 4 Asteraceae plant essential oils and their constituents against the Japanese termite Reticulitermes speratus Kolbe. Fumigant toxicity varied with plant essential oils or constituents, exposure time, and concentration. Among the tested essential oils, those from Chamaemelum nobile exhibited the strongest fumigant toxicity, followed by those from Santolina chamaecyparissus, Ormenis multicaulis, and Eriocephalus punctulatus at 2 days after treatment. In all, 15, 24, 19, and 9 compounds were identified in the essential oils from C. nobile, E. punctulatus, O. multicaulis, and S. chamaecyparissus, respectively, by using gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, or open-column chromatography. The identified compounds were tested individually for their fumigant toxicity against Japanese termites. Among the test compounds, trans-pinocarveol, caryophyllene oxide, sabinene hydrate, and santolina alcohol showed strong fumigant toxicity against Japanese termites. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition activity of the identified compounds from C. nobile, E. punctulatus, O. multicaulis, and S. chamaecyparissus essential oils were tested to determine the mode of their action. The IC50 values of (+)-α-pinene, (-)-limonene, (-)-α-pinene, β-pinene, and β-phellandrene against Japanese termite AChE were 0.03, 0.13, 0.41, 0.42, and 0.67mg/mL, respectively. Further studies are warranted to determine the potential of these essential oils and their constituents as fumigants for termite control.

  11. Performance Based Education. Technology Activity Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L., Ed.

    These Technology Activity Modules are designed to serve as an implementation resource for technology education teachers as they integrate technology education with Missouri's Academic Performance Standards and provide a source of activities and activity ideas that can be used to integrate and reinforce learning across the curriculum. The modules…

  12. Phytoestrogens genistein and daidzin enhance the acetylcholinesterase activity of the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 by binding to the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Hiroko; Talorete, Terence P N; Kimura, Momoko; Maekawa, Takaaki; Inamori, Yuhei; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Seki, Humitake

    2002-11-01

    Some compounds derived from plants have been known to possess estrogenic properties and can thus alter the physiology of higher organisms. Genistein and daidzin are examples of these phytoestrogens, which have recently been the subject of extensive research. In this study, genistein and daidzin were found to enhance the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the rat neuronal cell line PC12 at concentrations as low as 0.08 muM by binding to the estrogen receptor (ER). Results have shown that this enhancement was effectively blocked by the known estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen, indicating the involvement of the ER in AChE induction. That genistein and daidzin are estrogenic were confirmed in a cell proliferation assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF7. This proliferation was also blocked by tamoxifen, again indicating the involvement of the ER. On the other hand, incubating the PC12 cells in increasing concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol (E2) did not lead to enhanced AChE activity, even in the presence of genistein or daidzin. This suggests that mere binding of an estrogenic compound to the ER does not necessarily lead to enhanced AChE activity. Moreover, the effect of the phytoestrogens on AChE activity cannot be expressed in the presence of E2 since they either could not compete with the natural ligand in binding to the ER or that E2 down-regulates its own receptor. This study clearly suggests that genistein and daidzin enhance AChE activityin PC12 cells by binding to the ER; however, the actual mechanism of enhancement is not known.

  13. Development of a dynamic model for real-time determination of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase activity upon perfusion with inhibitors and reactivators.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Saskia; Eyer, Peter; Mückter, Harald; Worek, Franz

    2006-07-28

    Quantitative predictions of the course of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, following interference of inhibitors and reactivators, are usually obscured by the time-dependent changes of all reaction partners. To mimic these dynamics we developed an in vitro model. Immobilized human erythrocyte ghosts in a bioreactor were continuously perfused while AChE activity was monitored by a modified Ellman method. The perfusion system consisted of two HPLC pumps with integrated quaternary low-pressure gradient formers that were programmed by a computer using commercial HPLC software. The combined eluates passed a particle filter (Millex-GS, 0.22 microm) containing a thin layer of erythrocytes that was immersed in a temperature-controlled water bath. The effluent passed a flow cell in a UV-vis detector, the signal of which was digitized, written to disc and calculated with curve fitting programs. AChE activity decreased by 3.4% within 2.5 h. The day-to-day variation of the freshly prepared bioreactor using the same enzyme source was +/-3.3%. Residual activity of 0.2% marked the limit of quantification. Following perfusion with paraoxon, pseudo first-order rate constants of inhibition were established that did not differ from results obtained in conventional assays. The same holds true for reactivation with obidoxime. The set-up presented allows freely programmable time-dependent changes of up to eight solvents to mimic pharmacokinetic profiles without accumulation of products. Due to some hysteresis in the system, reaction half-lives should be >3 min and concentration changes in critical compounds should exceed half-lives of 5 min. Otherwise, the system offers much flexibility and operates with high precision.

  14. Curcumin improves episodic memory in cadmium induced memory impairment through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and adenosine deaminase activities in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Okonkwo, Princess Kamsy; Faboya, Opeyemi Ayodeji; Onikanni, Sunday Amos; Fadaka, Adewale; Olayide, Israel; Akinyemi, Elizabeth Olufisayo; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin, the main polyphenolic component of turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizomes has been reported to exert cognitive enhancing potential with limited scientific basis. Hence, this study sought to evaluate the effect of curcumin on cerebral cortex acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in cadmium (Cd)-induced memory impairment in rats. Animals were divided into six groups (n = 6): saline/vehicle, saline/curcumin 12.5 mg/kg, saline/curcumin 25 mg/kg, Cd/vehicle, Cd/curcumin 12.5 mg/kg, and Cd/curcumin 25 mg/kg. Rats received Cd (2.5 mg/kg) and curcumin (12.5 and 25 mg/kg, respectively) by gavage for 7 days. The results of this study revealed that cerebral cortex AChE and ADA activities were increased in Cd-poisoned rats, and curcumin co-treatment reversed these activities to the control levels. Furthermore, Cd intoxication increased the level of lipid peroxidation in cerebral cortex with a concomitant decreased in functional sulfuhydryl (-SH) group and nitric oxide (NO), a potent neurotransmitter and neuromodulatory agent. However, the co-treatment with curcumin at 12.5 and 25 mg/kg, respectively increased the non-enzymatic antioxidant status and NO in cerebral cortex with a decreased in malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Therefore, inhibition of AChE and ADA activities as well as increased antioxidant status by curcumin in Cd-induced memory dysfunction could suggest some possible mechanism of action for their cognitive enhancing properties.

  15. Irreversible thermal denaturation of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, D. I.; Shnyrov, V. L.; Villar, E.; Silman, I.; Weiner, L.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal denaturation of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase, a disulfide-linked homodimer with 537 amino acids in each subunit, was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. It displays a single calorimetric peak that is completely irreversible, the shape and temperature maximum depending on the scan rate. Thus, thermal denaturation of acetylcholinesterase is an irreversible process, under kinetic control, which is described well by the two-state kinetic scheme N-->D, with activation energy 131 +/- 8 kcal/mol. Analysis of the kinetics of denaturation in the thermal transition temperature range, by monitoring loss of enzymic activity, yields activation energy of 121 +/- 20 kcal/mol, similar to the value obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Thermally denatured acetylcholinesterase displays spectroscopic characteristics typical of a molten globule state, similar to those of partially unfolded enzyme obtained by modification with thiol-specific reagents. Evidence is presented that the partially unfolded states produced by the two different treatments are thermodynamically favored relative to the native state. PMID:8563632

  16. Effect of pharmaceuticals exposure on acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity and on the expression of AchE gene in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus koreanus.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Park, Heum Gi; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2013-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals are widely used in human and veterinary medicine. However, they are emerging as a significant contaminant in aquatic environments through wastewater. Due to the persistent and accumulated properties of pharmaceuticals via the food web, their potential harmful effects on aquatic animals are a great concern. In this study, we investigated the effects of six pharmaceuticals: acetaminophen, ATP; atenolol, ATN; carbamazepine, CBZ; oxytetracycline, OTC; sulfamethoxazole, SMX; and trimethoprim, TMP on acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7) activity and its transcript expression with chlorpyrifos (as a positive control) in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus koreanus. ATP, CBZ, and TMP exposure also remarkably inhibited Bk-AChE activity at 100 μg/L (24 h) and 1000 μg/L (12 h and 24 h). ATP, CBZ, and TMP exposure showed a significant decrease in the Bk-AChE mRNA level in a concentration-dependent manner. However, in the case of OTC and SMX, a slight decrease in Bk-AChE mRNA expression was found but only at the highest concentration. The time-course experiments showed that ATP positively induced Bk-AChE mRNA 12 h after exposure at both 100 and 1000 μg/L, while the Bk-AChE mRNA expression was significantly downregulated over 6 to 24 h after exposure to 1000 μg/L of CBZ, OTC, SMX, and TMP. Our findings suggest that Bk-AChE would be a useful biomarker for risk assessment of pharmaceutical compounds as an early signal of their toxicity in aquatic environments. Particularly, ATP, CBZ, and TMP may have a toxic cholinergic effect on rotifer B. koreanus by inhibiting AChE activity.

  17. Application of a dynamic in vitro model with real-time determination of acetylcholinesterase activity for the investigation of tabun analogues and oximes.

    PubMed

    Worek, Franz; Herkert, Nadja M; Koller, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2015-12-25

    Tabun-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is rather resistant towards reactivation by oximes in vitro while in vivo experiments showed some protection of animals poisoned by this chemical warfare nerve agent after treatment with an oxime and atropine. In addition, AChE inhibited by close tabun analogues, N,N-diethyltabun and N,N-di-n-propyltabun was completely resistant towards reactivation by oximes. In order to get more insight into potential mechanisms of this oxime resistance experiments with these toxic agents and the oximes obidoxime, 2-PAM, MMB-4 and HI-6 were performed utilizing a dynamic model with real-time determination of AChE activity. This experimental setup allowed the investigation of reactivation with minimized side reactions. The determined reactivation constants with tabun-inhibited human AChE were in good agreement with previously reported constants determined with a static model. N,N-diethyl- and N,N-di-n-propyltabun-inhibited human AChE could not be reactivated by oximes which indicates that the inadequate oxime effect was not due to re-inhibition by phosphonyloximes. Additional experiments with tabun-inhibited human and Rhesus monkey AChE revealed that no reactivation occurred with HI-6. These data give further support to the assumption that an interaction of tabun with residues in the active site gorge of AChE prevents effective reactivation by oximes, a mechanism which may also be the reason for the total oxime resistance of N,N-diethyl- and N,N-di-n-propyltabun-inhibited human AChE.

  18. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity in shiner perch (Cymatogaster aggregata) and juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) after application of carbaryl to control burrowing shrimp within Willapa Bay, Washington.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Alexandra T; King, Kerensa A; Grue, Christian E; Grassley, James M; Ekblad, Cathy J

    2013-11-01

    Carbaryl has been applied in Willapa Bay, Washington, for five decades to control burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) on commercial oyster (Crassostrea gigas) beds. Concerns about effects on nontarget species, including fishes, have led to restrictions in use despite a lack of data on in situ exposure. We measured brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in adult Shiner perch (Cymatogaster aggregata) and juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) after operational applications. We hypothesized that exposure in Shiner perch would be greater than in juvenile Chinook salmon because of their greater site fidelity and benthic foraging. However, Shiner perch exhibited no statistically significant AChE inhibition. Enzyme activity was statistically decreased (≤14 %) in juvenile Chinook salmon after a second spray event; however, inhibition was less than that associated with overt effects and was similar to controls by 48 h after the spray. Diet analyses confirmed that Shiner perch were primarily feeding on benthic invertebrates and that juvenile Chinook salmon were feeding primarily within the water column. Composition of Shiner perch diets and amount of food consumed varied little among channels and time periods; however, Shiner perch on beds consumed more food 6 h after application than those at other time points and locations. There were no consistent differences in the diets of juvenile Chinook salmon within channels among time periods. Results suggest (1) that carbaryl applications pose little hazard to fish in the bay having habitat and dietary preferences similar to those of Shiner perch and juvenile Chinook salmon and (2) that quantification of direct exposure in the field is essential to adequately assess risk.

  19. In vitro biological assessment of berberis vulgaris and its active constituent, berberine: antioxidants, anti-acetylcholinesterase, anti-diabetic and anticancer effects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Berberis vulgaris is a well known plant with traditional herbal medical history. The aims of this study was to bioscreen and compare the in vitro biological activity (antioxidant, cholinergic, antidaibetic and the anticancer) of barberry crude extract and berberine active compound. Methods The effect of B. vulgaris extract and berberine chloride on cellular thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) formation, diphenyle–α-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) oxidation, cellular nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging capability, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and α-gulcosidase activities were spectrophotometrically determined. On the other hand, the effect of extract and berberine as anticancer was estimated on three different cell lines which were MCF-7, HepG-2, and Caco-2 cells by using neutral red uptake assay which compared with control normal cells (PBMC). Results Our results showed that barberry crude extract contains 0.6 mg berberine/mg crude extract. Barberry extract showed potent antioxidative capacity through decreasing TBARS, NO and the oxidation of DPPH that associated with GPx and SOD hyperactivation. Inhibitory effect of berberis crude extract on α-glucosidase was more potent than that of berberine chloride, while both had the same AChE inhibitory effect. Besides, different concentrations of both berberine chloride and barberry ethanolic extract showed to have no growth inhibitory effect on normal blood cells (PBMC). Otherwise, both berberine chloride and barberry ethanolic extract showed to have inhibitory effect on the growth of breast, liver and colon cancer cell lines (MCF7, HepG2 and CACO-2, respectively) at different incubation times starting from 24 hrs up to 72 hrs and the inhibitory effect increased with time in a dose dependant manner. Conclusion This work demonstrates the potential of the barberry crude extract and its active alkaloid, berberine, on suppressing lipid peroxidation

  20. Oxidative stress and damage to erythrocytes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--changes in ATPase and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Bożena; Sicińska, Paulina; Pająk, Aneta; Koceva-Chyla, Aneta; Pietras, Tadeusz; Pszczółkowska, Anna; Górski, Paweł; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2015-12-01

    The study indicates, for the first time, the changes in both ATPase and AChE activities in the membrane of red blood cells of patients diagnosed with COPD. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common and severe lung disorders. We examined the impact of COPD on redox balance and properties of the membrane of red blood cells. The study involved 30 patients with COPD and 18 healthy subjects. An increase in lipid peroxidation products and a decrease in the content of -SH groups in the membrane of red blood cells in patients with COPD were observed. Moreover, an increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase and a decrease in superoxide dismutase, but not in catalase activity, were found as well. Significant changes in activities of erythrocyte membrane enzymes in COPD patients were also evident demonstrated by a considerably lowered ATPase activity and elevated AChE activity. Changes in the structure and function of red blood cells observed in COPD patients, together with changes in the activity of the key membrane enzymes (ATPases and AChE), can result from the imbalance of redox status of these cells due to extensive oxidative stress induced by COPD disease.

  1. A novel isopimarane diterpenoid with acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity from Nepeta sorgerae, an endemic species to the Nemrut Mountain.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Anil; Cağlar, Pinar; Dirmenci, Tuncay; Gören, Nezhun; Topçu, Gülaçti

    2012-06-01

    From the dichloromethane extract of Nepeta sorgerae, the isolation and structure elucidation are now reported of a new isopimarane diterpenoid, named sorgerolone, and two known triterpenoids, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid. Antioxidant activity of the extracts and the isolated terpenoids was determined by the DPPH free radical scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition (beta-carotene bleaching) methods. Anticholinesterase activity of the extracts and isolates was investigated by Ellman's method against AChE and BChE enzymes. Although the antioxidant activity results were low, the AChE enzyme inhibition of the extracts and terpenoids was very promising.

  2. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, beta-amyloid aggregation, and NMDA receptors in Alzheimer's disease: a promising direction for the multi-target-directed ligands gold rush.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Michela; Simoni, Elena; Bartolini, Manuela; Cavalli, Andrea; Ceccarini, Luisa; Pascu, Nicoleta; McClymont, David W; Tarozzi, Andrea; Bolognesi, Maria L; Minarini, Anna; Tumiatti, Vincenzo; Andrisano, Vincenza; Mellor, Ian R; Melchiorre, Carlo

    2008-08-14

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial syndrome with several target proteins contributing to its etiology. To confront AD, an innovative strategy is to design single chemical entities able to simultaneously modulate more than one target. Here, we present compounds that inhibit acetylcholinesterase and NMDA receptor activity. Furthermore, these compounds inhibit AChE-induced Abeta aggregation and display antioxidant properties, emerging as lead candidates for treating AD.

  3. Impacts of oxidative stress on acetylcholinesterase transcription, and activity in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) following Chlorpyrifos exposure.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Rubio-Escalante, Fernando J; Noreña-Barroso, Elsa; Escalante-Herrera, Karla S; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides cause irreversible inhibition of AChE which leads to neuronal overstimulation and death. Thus, dogma indicates that the target of OP pesticides is AChE, but many authors postulate that these compounds also disturb cellular redox processes, and change the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, it has also been reported that oxidative stress plays also a role in the regulation and activity of AChE. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of the antioxidant, vitamin C (VC), the oxidant, t-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) and the organophosphate Chlorpyrifos (CPF), on AChE gene transcription and activity in zebrafish embryos after 72h exposure. In addition, oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring antioxidant enzymes activities and transcription, and quantification of total glutathione. Apical effects on the development of zebrafish embryos were also measured. With the exception of AChE inhibition and enhanced gene expression, limited effects of CPF on oxidative stress and apical endpoints were found at this developmental stage. Addition of VC had little effect on oxidative stress or AChE, but increased pericardial area and heartbeat rate through an unknown mechanism. TBOOH diminished AChE gene expression and activity, and caused oxidative stress when administered alone. However, in combination with CPF, only reductions in AChE activity were observed with no significant changes in oxidative stress suggesting the adverse apical endpoints in the embryos may have been due to AChE inhibition by CPF rather than oxidative stress. These results give additional evidence to support the role of prooxidants in AChE activity and expression.

  4. Status of Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The current status of the JEM activities are presented in graphic form. The JEM spacecraft configuration is presented. The JEM configuration consist of the Pressurized Module, the Exposed Facility, the Experiment Logistics Module which consist of a pressurized section and an exposed section; and the Remote Manipulator System. The master schedule of the space station is given. Also the development tests of the structure and mechanism, the electrical power system, the data management system, the thermal control system, the environment control system, the experiment support system, and the remote manipulator system are listed.

  5. Reduced Acetylcholine Receptor Density, Morphological Remodeling, and Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Can Sustain Muscle Function in Acetylcholinesterase Knockout Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    superior catalytic activity for mouse chow and water ad libitum and were 53 + 4 ACh hydrolysis, AChE is the dominant enzyme, days old at the time of...were analyzed using a two-tailed gain, 1593; scan time , 16 s). Endplates in the same Student’s t- test , whereas comparisons between three focal plane...amplitudes and prolonged knockout mice , this enzyme appears to exert a prom- rise and relaxation times similar to those observed in inent role in

  6. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity recovery following acute methyl parathion intoxication in two feral rodent species: comparison to laboratory rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.K.; Silvey, N.J.; Bailey, E.M. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    Widespread use of organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) has produced both acute and chronic intoxication among nontarget organisms. Most such studies have included fish and birds as opposed to mammals. However, numerous OP toxicity studies have been conducted on laboratory rodents creating a temptation to apply this data to feral rodents. Chronic OP exposure has been reported to produce cholinergic adaptation which in turn lowers mortality rates following a subsequent acute anticholinesterase exposure. The relevance that these laboratory rodent studies have on feral rodents is subject to debate. Field studies involving OP exposure among nontarget feral mammals have produced contradictory results. Increased mortality as a result of repeated OP application has been reported. This observation may be of considerable importance to nontarget feral rodent populations due to the repetitive nature of OP application protocols. The ability of feral rodents to recover brain AChE activity (BAA) between OP application intervals undoubtedly promotes their survival. This study investigated and compared BAA recovery following acute oral methyl parathion intoxication among 2 feral rodent species and among 2 common laboratory rodent species.

  7. Novel assay utilizing fluorochrome-tagged physostigmine (Ph-F) to in situ detect active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) induced during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuan; Lee, Brian; Johnson, Gary; Naleway, John; Guzikowski, Anthony; Dai, Wei; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2005-01-01

    It was recently reported that acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is expressed in cells undergoing apoptosis and that its presence is essential for assembly of the apoptosome and subsequent caspase-9 activation. To obtain a marker of active AChE that could assay this enzyme in live intact cells and be applicable to fluorescence microscopy and cytometry, the fluorescein-tagged physostigmine (Ph-F), high affinity ligand (inhibitor) reactive with the active center of AChE, was constructed and tested for its ability to in situ label AChE and measure its induction during apoptosis. Ph-F inhibited cholinesterase activity in vitro (IC50 = 10(-6) and 5 x 10(-6) M for equine butyrylcholinesterase and human erythrocyte AChE, respectively) and was a selective marker of cells and structures that were AChE-positive. Thus, exposure of mouse bone marrow cells to Ph-F resulted in the exclusive labeling of megakaryocytes, and of the diaphragm muscle, preferential labeling of the nerve-muscle junctions (end-plates). During apoptosis of carcinoma HeLa cells and leukemic HL-60 or Jurkat cells triggered either by the DNA topoisomerase 1 inhibitor topotecan (TPT) or by oxidative stress (H2O2), the cells become reactive with Ph-F. Their Ph-F derived fluorescence was measured by flow and laser scanning cytometry. The appearance of Ph-F binding sites during apoptosis was preceded by the loss of mitochondrial potential, was concurrent with the presence of activated caspases, and was followed by loss of membrane integrity. At a very early stage of apoptosis, when nucleolar segregation was apparent, the Ph-F binding sites were distinctly localized within the nucleolus and at later stages of apoptosis in the cytoplasm. During apoptosis triggered by TPT, Ph-F binding was preferentially induced in S-phase cells. Our data on megakaryocytes and end-plates indicate that Ph-F reacts with active sites of AChE, and can be used to reveal the presence of this enzyme in live cells and possibly to study its

  8. Exploring the Effect of Phyllanthus emblica L. on Cognitive Performance, Brain Antioxidant Markers and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Rats: Promising Natural Gift for the Mitigation of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Sahab; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Hossain, Md. Sarwar; Akter, Farjana; Iqbal, Mohammed Ashraful; Asaduzzaman, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are incurable and debilitating conditions that result in the progressive degeneration of nerve cells, which affect the cognitive activity. Currently, as a result of multiple studies linking Alzheimer's disease (AD) to oxidative damage, the uses of natural antioxidant to prevent, delay, or enhance the pathological changes underlying the progression of AD has received considerable attention. Therefore, this study was aimed at examining the effect of ethanolic extracts of Phyllanthus emblica (EEPE) ripe (EEPEr) and EEPE unripe (EEPEu) fruits on cognitive functions, brain antioxidant enzymes, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in rat. The effects of EEPEr and EEPEu fruits (i.e., 100 and 200 mg/kg b.w.) were examined in Swiss albino male rats for 12 days and its effect on cognitive functions, brain antioxidant enzymes, and AChE activity determined. Learning and memory enhancing activity of EEPE fruit was examined by using passive avoidance test and rewarded alternation test. Antioxidant potentiality was evaluated by measuring the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase, and the contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in entire brain tissue homogenates. AChE activity was determined using colorimetric method. Administration of the highest dose (i.e., 200 mg/kg b.w.) of EEPEr fruit significantly (p < 0.01) and both lowest and highest doses (i.e., 100 and 200 mg/kg b.w.) of EEPEu fruit markedly (p < 0.05, p < 0.001) increased step-through latency in rats on 6th, 11th, and 12th day with respect to the control group. For aforementioned doses, the percentage of memory retention (MR) was considerably (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) increased in rats on 10th, 11th, and 12th days with respect to the control group. The extract, particularly highest dose (i.e., 200 mg/kg b.w.) of EEPEr

  9. Exploring the Effect of Phyllanthus emblica L. on Cognitive Performance, Brain Antioxidant Markers and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Rats: Promising Natural Gift for the Mitigation of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Sahab; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Hossain, Md Sarwar; Akter, Farjana; Iqbal, Mohammed Ashraful; Asaduzzaman, Md

    2016-10-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are incurable and debilitating conditions that result in the progressive degeneration of nerve cells, which affect the cognitive activity. Currently, as a result of multiple studies linking Alzheimer's disease (AD) to oxidative damage, the uses of natural antioxidant to prevent, delay, or enhance the pathological changes underlying the progression of AD has received considerable attention. Therefore, this study was aimed at examining the effect of ethanolic extracts of Phyllanthus emblica (EEPE) ripe (EEPEr) and EEPE unripe (EEPEu) fruits on cognitive functions, brain antioxidant enzymes, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in rat. The effects of EEPEr and EEPEu fruits (i.e., 100 and 200 mg/kg b.w.) were examined in Swiss albino male rats for 12 days and its effect on cognitive functions, brain antioxidant enzymes, and AChE activity determined. Learning and memory enhancing activity of EEPE fruit was examined by using passive avoidance test and rewarded alternation test. Antioxidant potentiality was evaluated by measuring the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase, and the contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in entire brain tissue homogenates. AChE activity was determined using colorimetric method. Administration of the highest dose (i.e., 200 mg/kg b.w.) of EEPEr fruit significantly (p < 0.01) and both lowest and highest doses (i.e., 100 and 200 mg/kg b.w.) of EEPEu fruit markedly (p < 0.05, p < 0.001) increased step-through latency in rats on 6th, 11th, and 12th day with respect to the control group. For aforementioned doses, the percentage of memory retention (MR) was considerably (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) increased in rats on 10th, 11th, and 12th days with respect to the control group. The extract, particularly highest dose (i.e., 200 mg/kg b.w.) of EEPEr

  10. An acetylcholinesterase-inspired biomimetic toxicity sensor.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, Evan K; Londoño, Nicolas J; Duirk, Stephen E; Monty, Chelsea N; Masel, Richard I

    2013-05-01

    This work demonstrates the ability of an acetylcholinesterase-inspired biomimetic sensor to accurately predict the toxicity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. In surface waters used for municipal drinking water supplies, numerous pesticides and other anthropogenic chemicals have been found that inhibit AChE; however, there is currently no portable toxicity assay capable of determining the potential neurotoxicity of water samples and complex mixtures. Biological assays have been developed to determine the toxicity of unknown samples, but the short shelf-life of cells and other biological materials often make them undesirable for use in portable assays. Chemical methods and structure-activity-relationships, on the other hand, require prior knowledge on the compounds of interest that is often unavailable when analyzing environmental samples. In the toxicity assay presented here, the acetylcholinesterase enzyme has been replaced with 1-phenyl-1,2,3-butanetrione 2-oxime (PBO) a biomimetic compound that is structurally similar to the AChE active site. Using a biomimetic compound in place of the native enzyme allows for a longer shelf-life while maintaining the selective and kinetic ability of the enzyme itself. Previous work has shown the success of oxime-based sensors in the selective detection of AChE inhibitors and this work highlights the ability of an AChE-inspired biomimetic sensor to accurately predict the toxicity (LD50 and LC50) for a range of AChE inhibitors. The biomimetic assay shows strong linear correlations to LD50 (oral, rat) and LC50 (fish) values. Using a test set of eight AChE inhibitors, the biomimetic assay accurately predicted the LC50 value for 75% of the inhibitors within one order of magnitude.

  11. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by Tea Tree oil.

    PubMed

    Mills, Clive; Cleary, Brian J; Gilmer, John F; Walsh, John J

    2004-03-01

    Pediculosis is a widespread condition reported in schoolchildren. Treatment most commonly involves the physical removal of nits using fine-toothcombs and the chemical treatment of adult lice and eggs with topical preparations. The active constituents of these preparations frequently exert their effects through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7). Increasing resistance to many preparations has led to the search for more effective treatments. Tea Tree oil, otherwise known as Melaleuca oil, has been added to several preparations as an alternative treatment of head lice infestations. In this study two major constituents of Tea Tree oil, 1,8-cineole and terpinen-4-ol, were shown to inhibit acetylcholinesterase at IC50 values (inhibitor concentrations required to give 50% inhibition) of 0.04 and 10.30 mM, respectively. Four samples of Tea Tree oil tested (Tisserand, Body Treats, Main Camp and Irish Health Culture Association Pure Undiluted) showed anticholinesterase activity at IC50 values of 0.05, 0.10, 0.08 and 0.11 microL mL(-1), respectively. The results supported the hypothesis that the insecticidal activity of Tea Tree oil was attributable, in part, to the anticholinesterase activity of Tea Tree oil.

  12. Laboratory and Simulated Field Bioassays to Evaluate Larvicidal Activity of Pinus densiflora Hydrodistillate, Its Constituents and Structurally Related Compounds against Aedes albopictus, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens pallens in Relation to Their Inhibitory Effects on Acetylcholinesterase Activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Chan; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2013-05-30

    The toxicity of Pinus densiflora (red pine) hydrodistillate, its 19 constituents and 28 structurally related compounds against early third-instar larvae of Aedes albopictus (Ae. albopictus), Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti) and Culex pipiens palles (Cx. p. pallens) was examined using direct-contact bioassays. The efficacy of active compounds was further evaluated in semi-field bioassays using field-collected larval Cx. p. pallens. Results were compared with those of two synthetic larvicides, temephos and fenthion. In laboratory bioassays, Pinus densiflora hydrodistillate was found to have 24 h LC50 values of 20.33, 21.01 and 22.36 mg/L against larval Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti and Cx. p. pallens respectively. Among the identified compounds, thymol, δ-3-carene and (+)-limonene exhibited the highest toxicity against all three mosquito species. These active compounds were found to be nearly equally effective in field trials as well. In vitro bioassays were conducted to examine the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity of 10 selected compounds. Results showed that there is a noticeable correlation between larvicidal activity and AChE inhibitory activity. In light of global efforts to find alternatives for currently used insecticides against disease vector mosquitoes, Pinus densiflora hydrodistillate and its constituents merit further research as potential mosquito larvicides.

  13. Processing abstract language modulates motor system activity.

    PubMed

    Glenberg, Arthur M; Sato, Marc; Cattaneo, Luigi; Riggio, Lucia; Palumbo, Daniele; Buccino, Giovanni

    2008-06-01

    Embodiment theory proposes that neural systems for perception and action are also engaged during language comprehension. Previous neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have only been able to demonstrate modulation of action systems during comprehension of concrete language. We provide neurophysiological evidence for modulation of motor system activity during the comprehension of both concrete and abstract language. In Experiment 1, when the described direction of object transfer or information transfer (e.g., away from the reader to another) matched the literal direction of a hand movement used to make a response, speed of responding was faster than when the two directions mismatched (an action-sentence compatibility effect). In Experiment 2, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to study changes in the corticospinal motor pathways to hand muscles while reading the same sentences. Relative to sentences that do not describe transfer, there is greater modulation of activity in the hand muscles when reading sentences describing transfer of both concrete objects and abstract information. These findings are discussed in relation to the human mirror neuron system.

  14. Inhibitors of Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Meet Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system. PMID:24893223

  15. Novel multipotent tacrine-dihydropyridine hybrids with improved acetylcholinesterase inhibitory and neuroprotective activities as potential drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Marco-Contelles, José; León, Rafael; de Los Ríos, Cristóbal; Guglietta, Antonio; Terencio, José; López, Manuela G; García, Antonio G; Villarroya, Mercedes

    2006-12-28

    In this work we describe the synthesis and biological evaluation of the tacrine-1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) hybrids (3-11). These multipotent molecules are the result of the juxtaposition of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) such as tacrine (1) and a 1,4-DHP such as nimodipine (2). Compounds 3-11 are very selective and potent AChEIs and show an excellent neuroprotective profile and a moderate Ca2+ channel blockade effect. Consequently, these molecules are new potential drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Syntheses of coumarin-tacrine hybrids as dual-site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and their activity against butylcholinesterase, Aβ aggregation, and β-secretase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Peng, Da-Yong; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2014-09-01

    Exploring small-molecule acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors to slow the breakdown of acetylcholine (Ach) represents the mainstream direction for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy. As the first acetylcholinesterase inhibitor approved for the clinical treatment of AD, tacrine has been widely used as a pharmacophore to design hybrid compounds in order to combine its potent AChE inhibition with other multi-target profiles. In present study, a series of novel tacrine-coumarin hybrids were designed, synthesized and evaluated as potent dual-site AChE inhibitors. Moreover, compound 1g was identified as the most potent candidate with about 2-fold higher potency (Ki=16.7nM) against human AChE and about 2-fold lower potency (Ki=16.1nM) against BChE than tacrine (Ki=35.7nM for AChE, Ki=8.7nM for BChE), respectively. In addition, some of the tacrine-coumarin hybrids showed simultaneous inhibitory effects against both Aβ aggregation and β-secretase. We therefore conclude that tacrine-coumarin hybrid is an interesting multifunctional lead for the AD drug discovery.

  17. Genetic factors potentially reducing fitness cost of organophosphate-insensitive acetylcholinesterase(s) in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acaricidal activity of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acaricides is believed to result from inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Previous studies in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus demonstrated the presence of three presumptive AChE genes (BmAChEs). Biochemical characterization of re...

  18. Modulation of ceramide synthase activity via dimerization.

    PubMed

    Laviad, Elad L; Kelly, Samuel; Merrill, Alfred H; Futerman, Anthony H

    2012-06-15

    Ceramide, the backbone of all sphingolipids, is synthesized by a family of ceramide synthases (CerS) that each use acyl-CoAs of defined chain length for N-acylation of the sphingoid long chain base. CerS mRNA expression and enzymatic activity do not always correlate with the sphingolipid acyl chain composition of a particular tissue, suggesting post-translational mechanism(s) of regulation of CerS activity. We now demonstrate that CerS activity can be modulated by dimer formation. Under suitable conditions, high M(r) CerS complexes can be detected by Western blotting, and various CerS co-immunoprecipitate. CerS5 activity is inhibited in a dominant-negative fashion by co-expression with catalytically inactive CerS5, and CerS2 activity is enhanced by co-expression with a catalytically active form of CerS5 or CerS6. In a constitutive heterodimer comprising CerS5 and CerS2, the activity of CerS2 depends on the catalytic activity of CerS5. Finally, CerS dimers are formed upon rapid stimulation of ceramide synthesis by curcumin. Together, these data demonstrate that ceramide synthesis can be regulated by the formation of CerS dimers and suggest a novel way to generate the acyl chain composition of ceramide (and downstream sphingolipids), which may depend on the interaction of CerS with each other.

  19. Effect of local acetylcholinesterase inhibition on sweat rate in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, M.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    ACh is the neurotransmitter responsible for increasing sweat rate (SR) in humans. Because ACh is rapidly hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE), it is possible that AChE contributes to the modulation of SR. Thus the primary purpose of this project was to identify whether AChE around human sweat glands is capable of modulating SR during local application of various concentrations of ACh in vivo, as well as during a heat stress. In seven subjects, two microdialysis probes were placed in the intradermal space of the forearm. One probe was perfused with the AChE inhibitor neostigmine (10 microM); the adjacent membrane was perfused with the vehicle (Ringer solution). SR over both membranes was monitored via capacitance hygrometry during microdialysis administration of various concentrations of ACh (1 x 10(-7)-2 M) and during whole body heating. SR was significantly greater at the neostigmine-treated site than at the control site during administration of lower concentrations of ACh (1 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-3) M, P < 0.05), but not during administration of higher concentrations of ACh (1 x 10(-2)-2 M, P > 0.05). Moreover, the core temperature threshold for the onset of sweating at the neostigmine-treated site was significantly reduced relative to that at the control site. However, no differences in SR were observed between sites after 35 min of whole body heating. These results suggest that AChE is capable of modulating SR when ACh concentrations are low to moderate (i.e., when sudomotor activity is low) but is less effective in governing SR after SR has increased substantially.

  20. Effects of Sequential Applications of Bassa 50EC (Fenobucarb) and Vitashield 40EC (Chlorpyrifos ethyl) on Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Climbing Perch (Anabas testudineus) Cultured in Rice Fields in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Berg, Håkan; Laureus, Jenny; Cong, Nguyen Van; Tedengren, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This study assesses the effects of sequential applications of the insecticides Bassa 50EC (fenobucarb-F) and Vitashield 40EC (chlorpyrifos ethyl-CPF), sprayed at concentrations used by rice farmers in the Mekong Delta, on the brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in climbing perch fingerlings. After spraying the pesticides on the rice fields, the water concentrations of both insecticides decreased below the detection levels within 3 days. The sequential applications caused significant inhibition on the brain AChE activity in the exposed fish. The inhibition by F was quicker, but less prolonged, than for CPF. The inhibition levels caused by the sequential applications were lower than those caused by only CPF and by a mixture of CPF and F. The results indicate that sequential applications of pesticides could have a negative impact on aquatic organisms and fish yields, with implication for the aquatic biodiversity, local people's livelihood and the aquaculture industry in the Mekong Delta.

  1. Scaffolds are 'active' regulators of signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Anita; Varga, János; Reményi, Attila

    2010-11-01

    Signaling cascades, in addition to proteins with obvious signaling-relevant activities (e.g. protein kinases or receptors), also employ dedicated 'inactive' proteins whose functions appear to be the organization of the former components into higher order complexes through protein-protein interactions. The core function of signaling adaptors, anchors and scaffolds is the recruitment of proteins into one macromolecular complex. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the recruiter and the recruited molecules mutually influence each other in a scaffolded complex. This yields fundamentally novel properties for the signaling complex as a whole. Because these are not merely additive to the properties of the individual components, scaffolded signaling complexes may behave as functionally distinct modules.

  2. Modulating reproductive activity in stallions: a review.

    PubMed

    Stout, T A E

    2005-10-01

    Situations in which suppression or stimulation of reproductive activity in stallions has been attempted, or is desired, include resolution of the equine arteritis virus 'shedding' state, induction of testicular descent in inguinal cryptorchids, and the improvement of sperm production capacity and/or semen quality in sub-fertile stallions. However, the most common reason for wanting to modulate reproductive activity in a stallion is to alter the expression of sexual behaviour. In the case of intact stallions used for competitive or recreational purposes, the overt expression of sexual or aggressive behaviour can be distracting for both animal and owner and, in some cases, dangerous to all concerned. By the same token, a breeding stallion that displays little interest in mounting a mare/phantom, or is slow to achieve erection and/or ejaculation, can be extremely frustrating. This paper reviews the major pharmacological agents reported to usefully modify reproductive activity in stallions, and outlines their pros and cons when compared to training, management or surgical alternatives.

  3. Revision of the DELFIC Particle Activity Module

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, David A; Jodoin, Vincent J

    2010-09-01

    The Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) was originally released in 1968 as a tool for modeling fallout patterns and for predicting exposure rates. Despite the continual advancement of knowledge of fission yields, decay behavior of fission products, and biological dosimetry, the decay data and logic of DELFIC have remained mostly unchanged since inception. Additionally, previous code revisions caused a loss of conservation of radioactive nuclides. In this report, a new revision of the decay database and the Particle Activity Module is introduced and explained. The database upgrades discussed are replacement of the fission yields with ENDF/B-VII data as formatted in the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code, revised decay constants, revised exposure rate multipliers, revised decay modes and branching ratios, and revised boiling point data. Included decay logic upgrades represent a correction of a flaw in the treatment of the fission yields, extension of the logic to include more complex decay modes, conservation of nuclides (including stable nuclides) at all times, and conversion of key variables to double precision for nuclide conservation. Finally, recommended future work is discussed with an emphasis on completion of the overall radiation physics upgrade, particularly for dosimetry, induced activity, decay of the actinides, and fractionation.

  4. Modulation of nicotinic receptor activity in the central nervous system: a novel approach to the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, E X; Santos, M D; Alkondon, M; Pereira, E F; Maelicke, A

    2001-08-01

    Impaired cholinergic function in the central nervous system is an early feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Currently, cholinergic deficit is usually corrected by increasing the amount of acetylcholine in the synapse by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). One of the most consistent cholinergic deficits in AD is the reduced expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in the brain. Since these receptors are essential for learning and memory, restoring nicotinic cholinergic function is a promising approach to treating AD. Allosteric modulation of nAChR is a novel approach, which circumvents development of tolerance through long-term use of conventional nicotinic agonists. Allosteric modulators interact with receptor-binding sites distinct from those capable of recognizing the natural agonist. Positive allosteric modulation of nAChR activity has no effect on conductance of single channels; instead, by facilitating channel opening, it potentiates responses evoked by the interaction of the natural agonist with presynaptic and postsynaptic nAChR. Allosteric modulation of nAChR activity could therefore potentially produce a significant benefit in AD. One such allosteric modulator is galantamine. In addition to increasing nAChR activity, galantamine also inhibits AChE. This novel, dual mechanism of action distinguishes galantamine from many other AChE inhibitors. Galantamine has been shown to improve cognitive and daily function for at least 6 months in placebo-controlled trials, and to maintain these functions at baseline levels for at least 12 months in a 6-month open-label extension study. Galantamine has positive effects on nAChR expression, which are likely to contribute to its sustained efficacy in the treatment of AD patients.

  5. New Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Mona; Adem, Abdu; Sabbagh, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) remains a highly viable target for the symptomatic improvement in Alzheimer's disease (AD) because cholinergic deficit is a consistent and early finding in AD. The treatment approach of inhibiting peripheral AchE for myasthenia gravis had effectively proven that AchE inhibition was a reachable therapeutic target. Subsequently tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine were developed and approved for the symptomatic treatment of AD. Since then, multiple cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) continue to be developed. These include newer ChEIs, naturally derived ChEIs, hybrids, and synthetic analogues. In this paper, we summarize the different types of ChEIs in development and their respective mechanisms of actions. This pharmacological approach continues to be active with many promising compounds. PMID:22216416

  6. Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) - ISS Inflatable Module Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Rajib; Munday, Steve; Valle, Gerard D.

    2014-01-01

    INNOVATION: BEAM is a pathway project demonstrating the design, fabrication, test, certification, integration, operation, on-orbit performance, and disposal of the first ever man-rated space inflatable structure. The groundwork laid through the BEAM project will support developing and launching a larger inflatable space structure with even greater mass per volume (M/V) advantages need for longer space missions. OVERVIEW: Inflatable structures have been shown to have much lower mass per volume ratios (M/V) when compared with conventional space structures. BEAM is an expandable structure, launched in a packed state, and then expanded once on orbit. It is a temporary experimental module to be used for gathering structural, thermal, and radiation data while on orbit. BEAM will be launched on Space X-8, be extracted from the dragon trunk, and will attach to ISS at Node 3- Aft. BEAM performance will be monitored over a two-year period and then BEAM will be jettison using the SSRMS.

  7. Dual Binding Site and Selective Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Derived from Integrated Pharmacophore Models and Sequential Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shikhar; Mohan, C. Gopi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have employed in silico methodology combining double pharmacophore based screening, molecular docking, and ADME/T filtering to identify dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors that can preferentially inhibit acetylcholinesterase and simultaneously inhibit the butyrylcholinesterase also but in the lesser extent than acetylcholinesterase. 3D-pharmacophore models of AChE and BuChE enzyme inhibitors have been developed from xanthostigmine derivatives through HypoGen and validated using test set, Fischer's randomization technique. The best acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors pharmacophore hypotheses Hypo1_A and Hypo1_B, with high correlation coefficient of 0.96 and 0.94, respectively, were used as 3D query for screening the Zinc database. The screened hits were then subjected to the ADME/T and molecular docking study to prioritise the compounds. Finally, 18 compounds were identified as potential leads against AChE enzyme, showing good predicted activities and promising ADME/T properties. PMID:25050335

  8. Space station group activities habitability module study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David

    1986-01-01

    This study explores and analyzes architectural design approaches for the interior of the Space Station Habitability Module (originally defined as Habitability Module 1 in Space Station Reference Configuration Decription, JSC-19989, August 1984). In the Research Phase, architectural program and habitability design guidelines are specified. In the Schematic Design Phase, a range of alternative concepts is described and illustrated with drawings, scale-model photographs and design analysis evaluations. Recommendations are presented on the internal architectural, configuration of the Space Station Habitability Module for such functions as the wardroom, galley, exercise facility, library and station control work station. The models show full design configurations for on-orbit performance.

  9. The Effect of Parathion on Red Blood Cell Acetylcholinesterase in the Wistar Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bunya, Naofumi; Sawamoto, Keigo; Benoit, Hanif

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticide poisoning is a significant problem worldwide. Research into new antidotes for these acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, and even optimal doses for current therapies, is hindered by a lack of standardized animal models. In this study, we sought to characterize the effects of the OP pesticide parathion on acetylcholinesterase in a Wistar rat model that included comprehensive medical care. Methods. Male Wistar rats were intubated and mechanically ventilated and then poisoned with between 20 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg of intravenous parathion. Upon developing signs of poisoning, the rats were treated with standard critical care, including atropine, pralidoxime chloride, and midazolam, for up to 48 hours. Acetylcholinesterase activity was determined serially for up to 8 days after poisoning. Results. At all doses of parathion, maximal depression of acetylcholinesterase occurred at 3 hours after poisoning. Acetylcholinesterase recovered to nearly 50% of baseline activity by day 4 in the 20 mg/kg cohort and by day 5 in the 40 and 60 mg/kg cohorts. At day 8, most rats' acetylcholinesterase had recovered to roughly 70% of baseline. These data should be useful in developing rodent models of acute OP pesticide poisoning. PMID:27418928

  10. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity.

  11. PICALM modulates autophagy activity and tau accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Kevin; Fleming, Angeleen; Imarisio, Sara; Lopez Ramirez, Ana; Mercer, Jacob L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Bento, Carla F.; Puri, Claudia; Zavodszky, Eszter; Siddiqi, Farah; Lavau, Catherine P.; Betton, Maureen; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several loci associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including proteins involved in endocytic trafficking such as PICALM/CALM (phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein). It is unclear how these loci may contribute to AD pathology. Here we show that CALM modulates autophagy and alters clearance of tau, a protein which is a known autophagy substrate and which is causatively linked to AD, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, altered CALM expression exacerbates tau-mediated toxicity in zebrafish transgenic models. CALM influences autophagy by regulating the endocytosis of SNAREs, such as VAMP2, VAMP3 and VAMP8, which have diverse effects on different stages of the autophagy pathway, from autophagosome formation to autophagosome degradation. This study suggests that the AD genetic risk factor CALM modulates autophagy, and this may affect disease in a number of ways including modulation of tau turnover. PMID:25241929

  12. Synthesis and acetylcholinesterase/butyrylcholinesterase inhibition activity of 4-amino-2, 3-diaryl-5, 6, 7, 8-tetrahydrofuro(and thieno)[2, 3-b]-quinolines, and 4-amino-5, 6, 7, 8, 9-pentahydro-2, 3-diphenylcyclohepta[e]furo(and thieno)-[2, 3-b]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Marco, José L; De Los Ríos, Cristóbal; Carreiras, María C; Baños, Josep E; Badia, Albert; Vivas, Nuria M

    2002-07-01

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibition activities of a series of 4-amino-2, 3-diaryl-5, 6, 7, 8-tetrahydrofuro[2, 3-b]quinolines (10-12)/4-amino-5, 6, 7, 8-tetrahydro-2, 3-diphenylthieno[2, 3-b]quinoline (14) and 4-amino-5, 6, 7, 8, 9-pentahydro-2, 3-diphenylcyclohepta[e]furo[2, 3-b]pyridine (13)/4-amino-5, 6, 7, 8, 9-pentahydro-2, 3-phenylcyclohepta[e]thieno[2, 3-b]pyridine (15) are described. These compounds are tacrine (THA) analogues which have been prepared either from readily available 2-amino-3-cyano-4, 5-diarylfurans (16-18) or from 2-amino-3-cyano-4, 5-diphenylthiophene (19), via Friedländer condensation with cyclohexanone or cycloheptanone. These compounds are competitive inhibitors for acetylcholinesterase, the more potent being compound (13) which is three-fold less active than tacrine. The butyrylcholinesterase inhibition activity is significant only in compounds 10 and133, which are ten-fold less active than tacrine. It is found that the products 11 and 12 strongly inhibit acetylcholinesterase, and show excellent selectivity regarding butyrylcholinesterase.

  13. Musical hallucinations treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan F; Lauw, René; Sommer, Iris E C

    2015-01-01

    Musical hallucinations are relatively rare auditory percepts which, due to their intrusive nature and the accompanying fear of impending mental decline, tend to cause significant distress and impairment. Although their etiology and pathophysiology appear to be heterogeneous and no evidence-based treatment methods are available, case reports indicate that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may yield positive results in patients with comorbid hearing loss. We present two female patients (aged 76 and 78 years) both of whom suffered from hearing impairment and practically incessant musical hallucinations. Both patients were successfully treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Based on these two case descriptions and an overview of studies describing the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in similar patients, we discuss possible mechanisms and propose further research on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for musical hallucinations experienced in concordance with hearing loss.

  14. Musical Hallucinations Treated with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan F.; Lauw, René; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Musical hallucinations are relatively rare auditory percepts which, due to their intrusive nature and the accompanying fear of impending mental decline, tend to cause significant distress and impairment. Although their etiology and pathophysiology appear to be heterogeneous and no evidence-based treatment methods are available, case reports indicate that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may yield positive results in patients with comorbid hearing loss. We present two female patients (aged 76 and 78 years) both of whom suffered from hearing impairment and practically incessant musical hallucinations. Both patients were successfully treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Based on these two case descriptions and an overview of studies describing the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in similar patients, we discuss possible mechanisms and propose further research on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for musical hallucinations experienced in concordance with hearing loss. PMID:25904872

  15. Probing the active sites of butyrylcholinesterase and cholesterol esterase with isomalathion: conserved stereoselective inactivation of serine hydrolases structurally related to acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Doorn, J A; Talley, T T; Thompson, C M; Richardson, R J

    2001-07-01

    Previous work has shown that acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a member of the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily, is stereoselectively inhibited by the four stereoisomers of isomalathion. Recent kinetic and mass spectral data demonstrated that a difference in mechanism of inactivation exists for AChE treated with (1R)- versus (1S,3S)-stereoisomers. This study sought to determine whether other alpha/beta-hydrolases are stereoselectively inhibited by isomalathion and if the difference in mechanism of AChE inactivation between (1R)- and (1S,3S)-isomers is conserved for other alpha/beta-hydrolases. Bimolecular rate constants of inhibition (k(i)) were measured for human and equine butyrylcholinesterase (HBChE and EBChE, respectively) and bovine cholesterol esterase (BCholE) with all four isomers. Isomalathion isomers inhibited these enzymes with the following order of potency: (1R,3R) > (1R,3S) > (1S,3R) > or = (1S,3S). Ratios of k(i) values for the most potent to the least potent isomer were 10.5 (HBChE), 11.9 (EBChE), and 68.6 (BCholE). Rate constants of reactivation (k(3)) were measured for enzyme inhibited by isomalathion isomers. HBChE, EBChE, and BCholE inactivated by the (1R)-isomers readily reactivated. However, enzymes modified by (1S)-isomalathions were refractory toward reactivation, and k(3) values were not significantly different from zero for HBChE and BCholE treated with the (1S,3S)-isomer. Computer-based docking experiments were performed for BCholE with (1R,3R)- and (1S,3S)-enantiomers. Calculated structures predicted a difference in primary leaving group: diethyl thiosuccinate for (1R,3R)-isomalathion and thiomethyl for the (1S,3S)-isomer. The data demonstrate that the alpha/beta-hydrolases used in this study are stereoselectively inhibited by isomalathion. Furthermore, the results suggest that the mechanistic shift demonstrated to occur for inhibition of AChE by (1R)- versus (1S,3S)-isomers is conserved for butyrylcholinesterase and cholesterol esterase.

  16. Advanced Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.117.4.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This is the third level of a three module series and considers design and operation…

  17. Infant Smiling during Social Interaction: Arousal Modulation or Activation Indicator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewy, Richard

    In a study of infant smiling, 20 mother-infant dyads were videotaped in normal face-to-face interaction when the infants were 9 and 14 weeks of age. Videotapes were used to determine which of two classes of smiling behavior models, either arousal modulation or activation indicator, was most supported by empirical data. Arousal modulation models…

  18. Intermediate Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.116.3.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This is the second level of a three module series and considers aeration devices,…

  19. Basic Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.115.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts, and transparency masters. This is the first of a three module series and considers definition of terms, design…

  20. Amphiphile dependency of the monomeric and dimeric forms of acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Ott, P; Brodbeck, U

    1984-08-08

    Human erythrocyte membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase was converted to a monomeric species by treatment of ghosts with 2-mercaptoethanol and iodoacetic acid. After solubilization with Triton X-100, the reduced and alkylated enzyme was partially purified by affinity chromatography and separated from residual dimeric enzyme by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in a zonal rotor. Monomeric and dimeric acetylcholinesterase showed full enzymatic activity in presence of Triton X-100 whereas in the absence of detergent, activity was decreased to approx. 20% and 15%, respectively. Preformed egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles fully sustained activity of the monomeric species whereas the dimer was only 80% active. The results suggest that a dimeric structure is not required for manifestation of amphiphile dependency of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes. Furthermore, monomeric enzyme appears to be more easily inserted into phospholipid bilayers than the dimeric species.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and Gulf War illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Beatrice Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests excess illness in Persian Gulf War veterans (GWV) can be explained in part by exposure of GWV to organophosphate and carbamate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEis), including pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides, and nerve agents. Evidence germane to the relation of AChEis to illness in GWV was assessed. Many epidemiological studies reported a link between AChEi exposure and chronic symptoms in GWV. The link is buttressed by a dose–response relation of PB pill number to chronic symptoms in GWV and by a relation between avidity of AChEi clearance and illness, based on genotypes, concentrations, and activity levels of enzymes that detoxify AChEis. Triangulating evidence derives from studies linking occupational exposure to AChEis to chronic health symptoms that mirror those of ill GWV. Illness is again linked to lower activity of AChEi detoxifying enzymes and genotypes conferring less-avid AChEi detoxification. AChEi exposure satisfies Hill's presumptive criteria for causality, suggesting this exposure may be causally linked to excess health problems in GWV. PMID:18332428

  2. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors by ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON) are considered factors underlying age-related sensitivity differences. We used an in vitro system to measure detoxification of AChE-inhibiting pesticides mediated via these esterases. Recombinant human AChE was used as a bioassay of inhibitor concentration following incubation with detoxifying tissue: liver plus Ca+2 (to stimulate PONs, measuring activity of both esterases) or EGTA (to inhibit PONs, thereby measuring CaE activity). Inhibitory concentrations of aldicarb, chlorpyrifos oxon, malaoxon, methamidophos, oxamyl, paraoxon, and methyl paraoxon were incubated with liver from adult male rat or one of 20 commercially provided human (11-83 years of age) liver samples. Detoxification was the difference in inhibition produced by the pesticide alone or in combination with liver plus Ca+2 or EGTA. Generally, rat liver produced more detoxification than did the human samples. There were large detoxification differences, which were not correlated with age or sex, across human samples for some pesticides (especially malaoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon) but not for others (e.g., aldicarb, methamidophos). Chlorpyrifos oxon was detoxified only in the presence of Ca+2 in both rat and human livers. Detoxification of pa

  3. Active mode locking of lasers by piezoelectrically induced diffraction modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausz, F.; Turi, L.; Kuti, Cs.; Schmidt, A. J.

    1990-04-01

    A new amplitude-modulation mode-locking technique is presented. Acoustic waves are generated directly on the faces of a resonant photoelastic medium. The created standing waves cause a highly efficient diffraction modulation of light. The modulation depth of standing-wave mode lockers is related to material and drive parameters and a figure of merit is introduced. With a lithium niobate crystal modulation depths over 10 are achieved at 1.054 μm and 1 W of radio frequency power. Using this device for the active mode locking of a continuous-wave Nd:glass laser pulses as short as 3.8 ps are produced at a repetition rate of 66 MHz. Limitations of amplitude-modulation mode locking by standing acoustic waves are discussed.

  4. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Modulates Thalamic Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weidong; Russo, Gary S.; Hashimoto, Takao; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective tool for the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. The mechanism by which STN DBS elicits its beneficial effect, however, remains unclear. We previously reported STN stimulation increased the rate and produced a more regular and periodic pattern of neuronal activity in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi). Here we extend our observations to neurons in the pallidal (ventralis lateralis pars oralis (VLo) and ventralis anterior (VA)) and cerebellar (ventralis lateralis posterior pars oralis (VPLo)) receiving areas of the motor thalamus during STN DBS. Stimulation parameters that produced improvement in rigidity and bradykinesia resulted in changes in the pattern and power of oscillatory activity of neuronal activity that were similar in both regions of the motor thalamus. Neurons in both VA/VLo and VPLo tended to become more periodic and regular with a shift in oscillatory activity from low to high frequencies. Burst activity was reduced in VA/VLo, but was not significantly changed in VPLo. There was also a significant shift in the population of VA/VLo neurons that were inhibited during STN DBS, while VPLo neurons tended to be activated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that STN DBS increases output from the nucleus and produces a change in the pattern and periodicity of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia thalamic network, and that these changes include cerebellar pathways likely via activation of adjacent cerebello-thalamic fiber bundles. PMID:19005057

  5. Evidence for non-acetylcholinesterase mechanisms in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibition is a well-established mode of action for adverse effects of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides, and the use of this endpoint in regulatory considerations has been assumed to be protective of downstream cholinergic effects. It has been questioned whether neurodevelopmental outcomes are also a consequence of this enzyme inhibition, or whether there are alternative non-cholinesterase mechanisms by which these chemicals alter key events in nervous system development. There is a growing body of literature in laboratory animals indicating that gestational and/or postnatal exposure may cause persistent behavioral effects into adulthood, as well as emerging epidemiological reports of neurodevelopmental outcomes in children. Common experimental findings are alterations in motor activity, cognitive function, and affective and social behaviors in rats or mice, as well as disrupted neuromotor and cognitive development in children. However, the data do not provide evidence for a characteristic pattern of effects. This may suggest nonspecific alterations in neurobehavioral function, but it may also be the result of considerable differences in exposure parameters, experimental designs, test methods and equipment, populations and animal models, and a host of other variables. A number of pesticides have been implicated, but the database for chlorpyrifos is the largest and thus those studies influence any evaluations of trend. Specific attri

  6. Insect Repellents: Modulators of Mosquito Odorant Receptor Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    molecular pathways through allosteric regulation of various proteins including proteases [39,40], the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) [41], the a7 nicotinic...41. Price MR, Baillie GL, Thomas A, Stevenson LA, Easson M, et al. (2005) Allosteric modulation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor . Mol Pharmacol 68...Insect Repellents: Modulators of Mosquito Odorant Receptor Activity Jonathan D. Bohbot, Joseph C. Dickens* Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior

  7. Astrocytic GABA transporter activity modulates excitatory neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Boddum, Kim; Jensen, Thomas P.; Magloire, Vincent; Kristiansen, Uffe; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are ideally placed to detect and respond to network activity. They express ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, and can release gliotransmitters. Astrocytes also express transporters that regulate the extracellular concentration of neurotransmitters. Here we report a previously unrecognized role for the astrocytic GABA transporter, GAT-3. GAT-3 activity results in a rise in astrocytic Na+ concentrations and a consequent increase in astrocytic Ca2+ through Na+/Ca2+ exchange. This leads to the release of ATP/adenosine by astrocytes, which then diffusely inhibits neuronal glutamate release via activation of presynaptic adenosine receptors. Through this mechanism, increases in astrocytic GAT-3 activity due to GABA released from interneurons contribute to 'diffuse' heterosynaptic depression. This provides a mechanism for homeostatic regulation of excitatory transmission in the hippocampus. PMID:27886179

  8. Modulation of motoneuron activity by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Serotonin is a major neuromodulator in the central nervous system involved in most physiological functions including appetite regulation, sexual arousal, sleep regulation and motor control. The activity of neurons from the raphe spinal tract, which release serotonin on motoneurons, is positively correlated with motor behaviour. During moderate physical activity, serotonin is released from synaptic terminals onto the dendrites and cell bodies of motoneurons. Serotonin increases the excitability of motoneurons and thereby facilitate muscle contraction by acting on several parallel intracellular pathways. By activating 5-HT1A receptors, serotonin inhibits TWIK-related acid-sensitive potassium channels and small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. In parallel, serotonin binds to 5-HT2 receptors, which promotes the low-threshold L-type Ca(2+) channels. During intense physical activity, more serotonin is released. The reuptake systems saturate and serotonin spills over to reach extrasynaptic 5-HT1A receptors located on the axon initial segment of motoneurons. This in turn induces the inhibition of the Na(+) channels responsible for the initiation of action potentials. Fewer nerve impulses are generated and muscle contraction becomes weaker. By decreasing the gain of motoneurons, serotonin triggers central fatigue.

  9. Mechanobiocatalysis: Modulating Enzymatic Activity with Mechanical Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    displayed by enzymes and other materials. It was demonstrated that the application of forces to enzymes properly outfitted with polymers resulted in...intrinsic activities displayed by enzymes and other materials. It was demonstrated that the application of forces to enzymes properly outfitted with polymers ...of eYFP-containing polymer composites via the application of mechanical force, as well as showing that the photophysical properties displayed by

  10. Anti-Acetylcholinesterase Alkaloids from Annona glabra Leaf.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shoei-Sheng; Wu, Dong-Yi; Tsai, Sheng-Fa; Chen, Chien-Kuang

    2015-06-01

    Bioassay guided fractionation and separation of the EtOH extract of Annona glabra leaf against acetylcholinesterse led to the characterization of 15 alkaloids. Among them, (-)-actinodaphnine (2) and (-)-(6aS,7R)-7-hydroxyactinodaphnine (9) are new aporphines, although (+)-2 and (±)-2 have been found in several plants. Their structures were established by spectroscopic analysis. (-)-Anolobine (5) and (-)-roemeroline (8) showed moderate inhibitory activity against eel acetylcholinesterase with IC50 values of 22.4 and 26.3 μM, respectively.

  11. Computer Image Analysis of Histochemically-Labeled Acetylcholinesterase.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-30

    image analysis on conjunction with histochemical techniques to describe the distribution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in nervous and muscular tissue in rats treated with organophosphates (OPs). The objective of the first year of work on this remaining 2 years. We began by adopting a version of the AChE staining method as modified by Hanker, which consistent with the optical properties of our video system. We wrote computer programs for provide a numeric quantity which represents the degree of staining in a tissue section. The staining was calibrated by

  12. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Modulates Trichomonas vaginalis Activity.

    PubMed

    Korosh, Travis; Jordan, Kelsey D; Wu, Ja-Shin; Yarlett, Nigel; Upmacis, Rita K

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted parasite and, while it is often asymptomatic in males, the parasite is associated with disease in both sexes. Metronidazole is an effective treatment for trichomoniasis, but resistant strains have evolved and, thus, it has become necessary to investigate other possible therapies. In this study, we examined the effects of native and oxidized forms of the sodium salts of eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and arachidonic acids on T. vaginalis activity. Eicosapentaenoic acid was the most toxic with 190 and 380 μM causing approximately 90% cell death in Casu2 and ATCC 50142 strains, respectively. In contrast, oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid was the least toxic, requiring > 3 mM to inhibit activity, while low levels (10 μM) were associated with increased parasite density. Mass spectrometric analysis of oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid revealed C20 products containing one to six additional oxygen atoms and various degrees of bond saturation. These results indicate that eicosapentaenoic acid has different effects on T. vaginalis survival, depending on whether it is present in the native or oxidized form. A better understanding of lipid metabolism in T. vaginalis may facilitate the design of synthetic fatty acids that are effective for the treatment of metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis.

  13. Network-dependent modulation of brain activity during sleep.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Kan, Shigeyuki; Koike, Takahiko; Misaki, Masaya; Konishi, Seiki; Miyauchi, Satoru; Miyahsita, Yasushi; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    Brain activity dynamically changes even during sleep. A line of neuroimaging studies has reported changes in functional connectivity and regional activity across different sleep stages such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, it remains unclear whether and how the large-scale network activity of human brains changes within a given sleep stage. Here, we investigated modulation of network activity within sleep stages by applying the pairwise maximum entropy model to brain activity obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging from sleeping healthy subjects. We found that the brain activity of individual brain regions and functional interactions between pairs of regions significantly increased in the default-mode network during SWS and decreased during REM sleep. In contrast, the network activity of the fronto-parietal and sensory-motor networks showed the opposite pattern. Furthermore, in the three networks, the amount of the activity changes throughout REM sleep was negatively correlated with that throughout SWS. The present findings suggest that the brain activity is dynamically modulated even in a sleep stage and that the pattern of modulation depends on the type of the large-scale brain networks.

  14. Immobilization of Acetylcholinesterase on Screen-Printed Electrodes. Application to the Determination of Arsenic(III)

    PubMed Central

    Sanllorente-Méndez, Silvia; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, M. Julia

    2010-01-01

    Enzymatic amperometric procedures for measuring arsenic, based on the inhibitive action of this metal on acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity, have been developed. Screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) were used with acetylcholinesterase covalently bonded directly to its surface. The amperometric response of acetylcholinesterase was affected by the presence of arsenic ions, which caused a decrease in the current intensity. The experimental optimum working conditions of pH, substrate concentration and potential applied, were established. Under these conditions, repeatability and reproducibility of biosensors were determined, reaching values below 4% in terms of relative standard deviation. The detection limit obtained for arsenic was 1.1 × 10−8 M for Ach/SPCE biosensor. Analysis of the possible effect of the presence of foreign ions in the solution was performed. The method was applied to determine levels of arsenic in spiked tap water samples. PMID:22294918

  15. Muscle metaboreceptor modulation of cutaneous active vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Stephens, D. P.; Johnson, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia has been shown to reduce cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) by inhibiting the cutaneous active vasodilator system. METHODS: To identify whether this response was initiated by muscle metaboreceptors, in seven subjects two 3-min bouts of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia were performed, followed by 2 min of postexercise ischemia (PEI). An index of forearm skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) was measured on the contralateral arm at an unblocked site and at a site at which adrenergic vasoconstrictor function was blocked via bretylium iontophoresis to reveal active cutaneous vasodilator function unambiguously. Sweat rate was measured via capacitance hygrometry, CVC was indexed from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure and was expressed as a percentage of maximal CVC at that site. In normothermia, neither isometric exercise nor PEI affected CVC (P > 0.05). RESULTS: The first bout of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia reduced CVC at control sites and this reduction persisted through PEI (pre-exercise: 59.8 +/- 5.4, exercise: 49.8 +/- 4.9, PEI: 49.7 +/- 5.3% of maximum; both P < 0.05), whereas there were no significant changes in CVC at the bretylium treated sites. The succeeding bout of isometric exercise in hyperthermia significantly reduced CVC at both untreated (pre-exercise: 59.0 +/- 4.8, exercise: 47.3 +/- 4.0, PEI: 50.1 +/- 4.1% of maximum; both P < 0.05) and bretylium treated sites (pre-exercise: 61.4 +/- 7.3, exercise: 50.6 +/- 5.1, PEI: 53.9 +/- 6.0% of maximum, both P < 0.05). At both sites, CVC during PEI was lower than during the pre-exercise period (P < 0.05). Sweat rate rose significantly during both bouts of isometric exercise and remained elevated during PEI. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the reduction in CVC during isometric exercise in hyperthermia, including the inhibition of the active vasodilator system, is primarily mediated by muscle

  16. Modulation of macrophage activation by prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Carnuccio, R.; D'Acquisto, F.; Rosa, M. Di

    1996-01-01

    The effect of prostaglandtn E2, iloprost and cAMP on both nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α release in J774 macrophages has been studied. Both prostaglandin E2 and iloprost inhibited, in a concentration-dependent fashion, the lipopolysaccharide-induced generation of nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-α. The inhibitory effect of these prostanoids seems to be mediated by an increase of the second messenger cAMP since it was mimicked by dibutyryl cAMP and potentiated by the selective type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor RO-20-1724. Our results suggest that the inhibition of nitric oxide release by prostaglandin E2 and iloprost in lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 macrophages may be secondary to the inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-α generation, which in turn is likely to be mediated by cAMP. PMID:18475691

  17. Age-related learning and memory deficits in rats: role of altered brain neurotransmitters, acetylcholinesterase activity and changes in antioxidant defense system.

    PubMed

    Haider, Saida; Saleem, Sadia; Perveen, Tahira; Tabassum, Saiqa; Batool, Zehra; Sadir, Sadia; Liaquat, Laraib; Madiha, Syeda

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative stress from generation of increased reactive oxygen species or free radicals of oxygen has been reported to play an important role in the aging. To investigate the relationship between the oxidative stress and memory decline during aging, we have determined the level of lipid peroxidation, activities of antioxidant enzymes, and activity of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) in brain and plasma as well as biogenic amine levels in brain from Albino-Wistar rats at age of 4 and 24 months. The results showed that the level of lipid peroxidation in the brain and plasma was significantly higher in older than that in the young rats. The activities of antioxidant enzymes displayed an age-dependent decline in both brain and plasma. Glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities were found to be significantly decreased in brain and plasma of aged rats. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was also significantly decreased in plasma of aged rats; however, a decreased tendency (non-significant) of SOD in brain was also observed. AChE activity in brain and plasma was significantly decreased in aged rats. Learning and memory of rats in the present study was assessed by Morris Water Maze (MWM) and Elevated plus Maze (EPM) test. Short-term memory and long-term memory was impaired significantly in older rats, which was evident by a significant increase in the latency time in MWM and increase in transfer latency in EPM. Moreover, a marked decrease in biogenic amines (NA, DA, and 5-HT) was also found in the brain of aged rats. In conclusion, our data suggest that increased oxidative stress, decline of antioxidant enzyme activities, altered AChE activity, and decreased biogenic amines level in the brain of aged rats may potentially be involved in diminished memory function.

  18. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens.

  19. Staufen Negatively Modulates MicroRNA Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhiji; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Morrissey, David; Ambros, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various posttranscriptional gene regulatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer, and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3′ untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs or other small RNA populations between wild-type and stau-1 mutants, with the exception of certain endogenous siRNAs in the WAGO pathway. The modulation of microRNA activity by STAU-1 does not seem to be associated with the previously reported enhanced exogenous RNAi (Eri) phenotype of stau-1 mutants, since eri-1 exhibits the opposite effect on microRNA activity. Altogether, our results suggest that STAU-1 negatively modulates microRNA activity downstream of microRNA biogenesis, possibly by competing with microRNAs for binding on the 3′ untranslated region of target mRNAs. PMID:26921297

  20. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  1. The recovery of acetylcholinesterase activity and the progression of neuropathological and pathophysiological alterations in the rat basolateral amygdala after soman-induced status epilepticus: relation to anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Prager, Eric M.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Almeida-Suhett, Camila P.; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Apland, James P.; Rossetti, Franco; Olsen, Cara H.; Braga, Maria F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents are powerful neurotoxins that irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. One of the consequences of AChE inhibition is the generation of seizures and status epilepticus (SE), which cause brain damage, resulting in long-term neurological and behavioral deficits. Increased anxiety is the most common behavioral abnormality after nerve agent exposure. This is not surprising considering that the amygdala, and the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) in particular, plays a central role in anxiety, and this structure suffers severe damage by nerve agent-induced seizures. In the present study, we exposed male rats to lethal doses of the nerve agent soman, and determined the time course of recovery of AChE activity, along with the progression of neuropathological and pathophysiological alterations in the BLA, during a 30-day period after exposure. Measurements were taken at 24 hours, 7 days, 14 days, and 30 days after exposure, and at 14 and 30 days, anxiety-like behavior was also evaluated. We found that more than 90% of AChE is inhibited at the onset of SE, and AChE inhibition remains at this level 24 hours later, in the BLA, as well as in the hippocampus, piriform cortex, and prelimbic cortex, which we analyzed for comparison. AChE activity recovered by day 7 in the BLA and day 14 in the other three regions. Significant neuronal loss and neurodegeneration were present in the BLA at 24 hours and throughout the 30-day period. There was no significant loss of GABAergic interneurons in the BLA at 24 hours post-exposure. However, by day 7, the number of GABAergic interneurons in the BLA was reduced, and at 14 and 30 days after soman, the ratio of GABAergic interneurons to the total number of neurons was lower compared to controls. Anxiety-like behavior in the open-field and the acoustic startle response tests was increased at 14 and 30 days post-exposure. Accompanying pathophysiological alterations in the BLA – studied in

  2. Anthranilate-Activating Modules from Fungal Nonribosomal Peptide Assembly Lines†

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Brian D.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    Fungal natural products containing benzodiazepinone- and quinazolinone-fused ring systems can be assembled by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) using the conformationally restricted β-amino acid anthranilate as one of the key building blocks. We validated that the first module of the acetylaszonalenin synthetase of Neosartorya fischeri NRRL 181 activates anthranilate to anthranilyl-AMP. With this as starting point, we then used bioinformatic predictions about fungal adenylation domain selectivities to identify and confirm an anthranilate-activating module in the fumiquinazoline A producer Aspergillus fumigatus Af293 as well as a second anthranilate-activating NRPS in N. fischeri. This establishes an anthranilate adenylation domain code for fungal NRPS and should facilitate detection and cloning of gene clusters for benzodiazepine- and quinazoline-containing polycyclic alkaloids with a wide range of biological activities. PMID:20225828

  3. [Modulators of the regulatory protein activity acting at microdoses].

    PubMed

    Iamskova, V P; Krasnov, M S; Skripnikova, V S; Moliavka, A A; Il'ina, A P; Margasiuk, D V; Borisenko, A V; Berezin, B B; Iamskov, I A

    2009-01-01

    New, previously not studied bioregulators active in the ultra low doses corresponding of 10(-8) - 10(-17) mg/ml have been isolated from vitreoretinal tissue of eye. It has been shown that these bioregulators comprise some regulatory peptides-modulators represented by proteins with molecular weights 15-70 KDa one of which is bovine serum albumin. Correlation between the nanosize of bioregulators and their ability to show activity in ultra low doses is established.

  4. Alcohol Usage and Abrupt Cessation Modulate Diurnal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Norrell, Stacy; Reyes-Vasquez, Cruz; Burau, Keith; Dafny, Nachum

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol has many effects throughout the body. The effect on circadian rhythms and the correlation of these effects to withdrawal effects of alcohol present interesting findings. By measuring 3 planes of activity of female Sprague-Dawley rats during alcohol usage and continuing study through the first two days following withdrawal of alcohol allow for the observation of a drastic modulation of the circadian pattern of activity. PMID:20615456

  5. Effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza root extract on brain acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activities, their mRNA levels and memory evaluation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Piasecka, Anna; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Bogacz, Anna; Szulc, Michal; Kaminska, Ewa; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Gryszczynska, Agnieszka; Kachlicki, Piotr; Buchwald, Waldemar; Klejewski, Andrzej; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka

    2017-05-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza (Lamiaceae), one of the most important and popular plants of traditional medicine of Asia, is used for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases and in central nervous system disturbances. The main aim of this study was to assess the influence of subchronic (28-fold) administration of Salvia miltiorrhiza root extract (SE, 200mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioural activity and memory of rats and to evaluate the activities of cholinesterases (AChE and BuChE) and gene expression levels of AChE and BuChE as well as of beta-secretase (BACE1) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex in vivo. Huperzine A (HU, 0.5mg/kg b.w., p.o.) served as a positive control substance, whereas scopolamine (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) injection was used as a well-known model of memory impairment. The results showed that subchronic administration of SE led to an improvement of long-term memory of rats. Strong inhibition of AChE and BuChE mRNA transcription in the frontal cortex of rats treated with SE or HU was observed. The BACE1 transcript level was significantly decreased. AChE activity was statistically significantly inhibited in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus by SE (47% and 55%, respectively). Similar effects were observed in the case of HU. In summary, activity of SE provides evidence that the plant can be a source of drugs used in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  6. Acetylcholinesterase of Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae): Baculovirus expression, biochemical properties and organophosphate insensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the baculovirus expression and biochemical characterization of recombinant acetylcholinesterase from Haematobia irritans (L) (rHiAChE) and the effect of the previously described G262A mutation on enzyme activity and sensitivity to selected organophosphates. The rHiAChE was confirm...

  7. Module Design, Materials, and Packaging Research Team: Activities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J.; Glick, S.; Jorgensen, G.; Kempe, M.; Kennedy, C.; Pern, J.; Terwilliger, K

    2005-01-01

    Our team activities are directed at improving PV module reliability by incorporating new, more effective, and less expensive packaging materials and techniques. New and existing materials or designs are evaluated before and during accelerated environmental exposure for the following properties: (1) Adhesion and cohesion: peel strength and lap shear. (2) Electrical conductivity: surface, bulk, interface and transients. (3) Water vapor transmission: solubility and diffusivity. (4) Accelerated weathering: ultraviolet, temperature, and damp heat tests. (5) Module and cell failure diagnostics: infrared imaging, individual cell shunt characterization, coring. (6) Fabrication improvements: SiOxNy barrier coatings and enhanced wet adhesion. (7) Numerical modeling: Moisture ingress/egress, module and cell performance, and cell-to-frame leakage current. (8) Rheological properties of polymer encapsulant and sheeting materials. Specific examples will be described.

  8. Module Packaging Research and Reliability: Activities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; delCueto, J.; Glick, S.; Jorgensen, G.; Kempe, M.; Pern, J.; Terwilliger, K.

    2005-11-01

    Our team activities are directed at improving PV module reliability by incorporating new, more effective, and less expensive packaging materials and techniques. New and existing materials or designs are evaluated before and during accelerated environmental exposure for the following properties: (1) Adhesion and cohesion: peel strength and lap shear. (2) Electrical conductivity: surface, bulk, interface and transients. (3) Water vapor transmission: solubility and diffusivity. (4) Accelerated weathering: ultraviolet, temperature, and damp heat tests. (5) Module and cell failure diagnostics: infrared imaging, individual cell shunt characterization, coring. (6) Fabrication improvements: SiOxNy barrier coatings and enhanced wet adhesion. (7) Numerical modeling: Moisture ingress/egress, module and cell performance, and cell-to-frame leakage current. (8) Rheological properties of polymer encapsulant and sheeting materials. Specific examples are described.

  9. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) is a comprehensive, mid?term energy forecasting and policy analysis tool used by EIA. WEPS projects energy supply, demand, and prices by country or region, given assumptions about the state of various economies, international energy markets, and energy policies. The Global Activity Module (GLAM) provides projections of economic driver variables for use by the supply, demand, and conversion modules of WEPS . GLAM’s baseline economic projection contains the economic assumptions used in WEPS to help determine energy demand and supply. GLAM can also provide WEPS with alternative economic assumptions representing a range of uncertainty about economic growth. The resulting economic impacts of such assumptions are inputs to the remaining supply and demand modules of WEPS .

  10. Use of a novel radiometric method to assess the inhibitory effect of donepezil on acetylcholinesterase activity in minimally diluted tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Okamura, Toshimitsu; Arai, Takuya; Obata, Takayuki; Fukushi, Kiyoshi; Irie, Toshiaki; Shiraishi, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cholinesterase inhibitors have been widely used for the treatment of patients with dementia. Monitoring of the cholinesterase activity in the blood is used as an indicator of the effect of the cholinesterase inhibitors in the brain. The selective measurement of cholinesterase with low tissue dilution is preferred for accurate monitoring; however, the methods have not been established. Here, we investigated the effect of tissue dilution on the action of cholinesterase inhibitors using a novel radiometric method with selective substrates, N-[14C]methylpiperidin-4-yl acetate ([14C]MP4A) and (R)-N-[14C]methylpiperidin-3-yl butyrate ([14C]MP3B_R), for AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) respectively. Experimental approach: We investigated the kinetics of hydrolysis of [14C]-MP4A and [14C]-MP3B_R by cholinesterases, and evaluated the selectivity of [14C]MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R for human AChE and BChE, respectively, compared with traditional substrates. Then, IC50 values of cholinesterase inhibitors in minimally diluted and highly diluted tissues were measured with [14C]MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R. Key results: AChE and BChE activities were selectively measured as the first-order hydrolysis rates of [14C]-MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R respectively. The AChE selectivity of [14C]MP4A was an order of magnitude higher than traditional substrates used for the AChE assay. The IC50 values of specific AChE and BChE inhibitors, donepezil and ethopropazine, in 1.2-fold diluted human whole blood were much higher than those in 120-fold diluted blood. In addition, the IC50 values of donepezil in monkey brain were dramatically decreased as the tissue was diluted. Conclusions and implications: This method would effectively monitor the activity of cholinesterase inhibitors used for therapeutics, pesticides and chemical warfare agents. PMID:20401964

  11. Magnetic modulation of solar luminosity by photospheric activity

    SciTech Connect

    Foukal, P.; Lean, J.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of slow changes in solar irradiance S is studied using measurements obtained with radiometers on the SMM and Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The general downtrend in the radiometer readings is examined by removing the influence of sunspot blocking and comparing the residual irradiance variations with changes in facular and network radiation as indicated by the He I 10830 and CaK indices. The time-integrated sunspot and facular contributions to irradiance variation and its implications for active region energetics are considered. The magnetic activity modulation of S over solar cycle 21 from daily data on sunspot blocking and the He I index are simulated, and this simulated irradiance variation is compared to radiometry since 1978. Other recent evidence for an irradiance modulation by magnetic activity is discussed. 38 references.

  12. Idefix insulator activity can be modulated by nearby regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Brasset, E; Bantignies, F; Court, F; Cheresiz, S; Conte, C; Vaury, C

    2007-01-01

    Insulators play important roles in controlling gene activity and maintaining regulatory independence between neighbouring genes. In this article, we show that the enhancer-blocking activity of the insulator present within the LTR retrotransposon Idefix can be abolished if two copies of the region containing the insulator--specifically, the long terminal repeat (LTR)--are fused to the retrotransposon's 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). The presence of this combination of two [LTR-5' UTR] modules is a prerequisite for the loss of enhancer-blocking activity. We further show that the 5' UTR causes flanking genomic sequences to be displaced to the nuclear periphery, which is not observed when two insulators are present by themselves. This study thus provides a functional link between insulators and independent genomic modules, which may cooperate to allow the specific regulation of defined genomic loci via nuclear repositioning. It further illustrates the complexity of genomic regulation within a chromatic environment with multiple functional elements.

  13. Magnetic modulation of solar luminosity by photospheric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P.; Lean, J.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of slow changes in solar irradiance S is studied using measurements obtained with radiometers on the SMM and Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The general downtrend in the radiometer readings is examined by removing the influence of sunspot blocking and comparing the residual irradiance variations with changes in facular and network radiation as indicated by the He I 10830 and CaK indices. The time-integrated sunspot and facular contributions to irradiance variation and its implications for active region energetics are considered. The magnetic activity modulation of S over solar cycle 21 from daily data on sunspot blocking and the He I index are simulated, and this simulated irradiance variation is compared to radiometry since 1978. Other recent evidence for an irradiance modulation by magnetic activity is discussed.

  14. Pd(II) complexes of acetylcholinesterase reactivator obidoxime

    PubMed Central

    Stoykova, Silviya; Atanasov, Vasil; Pantcheva, Ivayla; Antonov, Liudmil

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the acetylcholinesterase reactivator obidoxime (H2L2+) to bind palladium(II) cations was evaluated spectrophotometrically at different reaction conditions (pH, reaction time, metal-to-ligand molar ratio). The results showed that immediately after mixing the reagents, pH 7.4, complex species of composition [PdHL]3+ existed predominantly with a value of conditional stability constant lgβ‘=6.52. The reaction was completed within 24 hours affording the formation of species [Pd2L]4+ with significantly increased stability (lgβ‘=9.34). The spectral data suggest that obidoxime coordinates metal(II) ions through the oximate functional groups. The in vitro reactivation assay of paraoxon-inhibited rat brain acetylcholinesterase revealed that the new complex species were much less active than the non-coordinated obidoxime. The lack of reactivation ability could be explained by the considerable stability of complexes in solution as well as by the deprotonation of oxime groups essential for recovery of the enzymatic activity. PMID:26109891

  15. Water modulation of stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme activity and desquamation.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, A; Harding, C; Moore, A; Coan, P

    2001-09-01

    Exposure to a dry environment leads to depletion of water from the peripheral stratum corneum layers in a process dependent on the relative humidity (RH) and the intrinsic properties of the tissue. We hypothesized that by modulating the water content of the stratum corneum in the surface layers, RH effects the rate of desquamation by modulating the activity of the desquamatory enzymes, and specifically stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme (SCCE). Using a novel air interface in vitro desquamatory model, we demonstrated RH-dependent corneocyte release with desquamatory rates decreasing below 80% RH. Application of 10% glycerol or a glycerol-containing moisturizing lotion further increased desquamation, even in humid conditions, demonstrating that water was the rate-limiting factor in the final stages of desquamation. Furthermore, even in humid conditions desquamation was sub-maximal. In situ stratum corneum SCCE activity showed a dependence on RH: activity was significantly higher at 100% than at 44% RH. Further increases in SCCE activity were induced by applying a 10% glycerol solution. Since SCCE, a water-requiring enzyme, must function in the water-depleted outer stratum corneum, we sought to determine whether this enzyme has a tolerance to lowered water activity. Using concentrated sucrose solutions to lower water activity, we analysed the activity of recombinant SCCE and compared it to that of trypsin and chymotrypsin. SCCE activity demonstrated a tolerance to water restriction, and this may be an adaptation to maintain enzyme activity even within the water-depleted stratum corneum intercellular space. Overall these findings support the concept that in the upper stratum corneum, RH modulates desquamation by its effect upon SCCE activity, and possibly other desquamatory hydrolases. In addition, SCCE may be adapted to function in the water-restricted stratum corneum intercellular space.

  16. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) by chlorpyrifos at sublethal concentrations: Methodological aspects

    SciTech Connect

    van der Wel, H.; Welling, W.

    1989-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase activity is a potential biochemical indicator of toxic stress in fish and a sensitive parameter for testing water for the presence of organophosphates. A number of methodological aspects regarding the determination of the in vivo effect of chlorpyrifos on acetylcholinesterase in guppies have been investigated. It was found that with acetylthiocholine as a substrate, the contribution of pseudocholinesterase to the total cholinesterase activity can be neglected. Protection of acetylcholinesterase of guppies exposed to chlorpyrifos from additional, artifactual in vitro enzyme inhibition during homogenization is necessary. Very low concentrations of acetone in the exposure medium, resulting from dilution of the stock solution of chlorpyrifos in acetone, can result in large decreases in the oxygen content of this medium. This may affect the uptake rate of the toxic compound and, thereby, cholinesterase inhibition. Very low, sublethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos result in high inhibition levels of acetylcholinesterase (80-90%) in guppies within 2 weeks of continuous exposure. Recovery of the enzyme activity occurs after the exposed animals are kept in clean medium for 4 days, but the rate of recovery is considerably lower than the rate of inhibition.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE)--amyloid-beta-peptide complexes in Alzheimer's disease. the Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Urra, Soledad; Colombres, Marcela

    2004-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by selective neuronal cell death, which is probably caused by amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) oligomers and fibrils. We have found that acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a senile plaque component, increases amyloid fibril assembly with the formation of highly toxic complexes (Abeta-AChE). The neurotoxic effect induced by Abeta-AChE complexes was higher than that induced by the Abeta peptide alone as shown both in vitro (hippocampal neurons) and in vivo (rats injected with Abeta peptide in the dorsal hippocampus). Interestingly, treatment with Abeta-AChE complexes decreases the cytoplasmic beta-catenin level, a key component of Wnt signaling. Conversely, the activation of this signaling pathway by Wnt-3a promotes neuronal survival and rescues changes in Wnt components (activation or subcellular localization). Moreover Frzb-1, a Wnt antagonist reverses the Wnt-3a neuroprotection effect against Abeta neurotoxicity. Compounds that mimic the Wnt signaling or modulate the cross-talking with this pathway could be used as neuroprotective agents for therapeutic strategies in AD patients.

  18. Peroxisome Proliferators-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Modulators and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min-Chul; Lee, Kyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Yoon, Do-Young

    2008-01-01

    Overweight and obesity lead to an increased risk for metabolic disorders such as impaired glucose regulation/insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Several molecular drug targets with potential to prevent or treat metabolic disorders have been revealed. Interestingly, the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has many beneficial clinical effects. PPAR directly modulates gene expression by binding to a specific ligand. All PPAR subtypes (α, γ, and σ) are involved in glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and energy balance. PPAR agonists play an important role in therapeutic aspects of metabolic disorders. However, undesired effects of the existing PPAR agonists have been reported. A great deal of recent research has focused on the discovery of new PPAR modulators with more beneficial effects and more safety without producing undesired side effects. Herein, we briefly review the roles of PPAR in metabolic disorders, the effects of PPAR modulators in metabolic disorders, and the technologies with which to discover new PPAR modulators. PMID:18566691

  19. Cardiac afferent activity modulates the expression of racial stereotypes

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Ruben T.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.; Critchley, Hugo D.; Tsakiris, Manos

    2017-01-01

    Negative racial stereotypes tend to associate Black people with threat. This often leads to the misidentification of harmless objects as weapons held by a Black individual. Yet, little is known about how bodily states impact the expression of racial stereotyping. By tapping into the phasic activation of arterial baroreceptors, known to be associated with changes in the neural processing of fearful stimuli, we show activation of race-threat stereotypes synchronized with the cardiovascular cycle. Across two established tasks, stimuli depicting Black or White individuals were presented to coincide with either the cardiac systole or diastole. Results show increased race-driven misidentification of weapons during systole, when baroreceptor afferent firing is maximal, relative to diastole. Importantly, a third study examining the positive Black-athletic stereotypical association fails to demonstrate similar modulations by cardiac cycle. We identify a body–brain interaction wherein interoceptive cues can modulate threat appraisal and racially biased behaviour in context-dependent ways. PMID:28094772

  20. Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress Modulation with Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Debevec, Tadej; Millet, Grégoire P.; Pialoux, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, defined as an imbalance between prooxidants and antioxidants, resulting in molecular damage and disruption of redox signaling, is associated with numerous pathophysiological processes and known to exacerbate chronic diseases. Prolonged systemic hypoxia, induced either by exposure to terrestrial altitude or a reduction in ambient O2 availability is known to elicit oxidative stress and thereby alter redox balance in healthy humans. The redox balance modulation is also highly dependent on the level of physical activity. For example, both high-intensity exercise and inactivity, representing the two ends of the physical activity spectrum, are known to promote oxidative stress. Numerous to-date studies indicate that hypoxia and exercise can exert additive influence upon redox balance alterations. However, recent evidence suggests that moderate physical activity can attenuate altitude/hypoxia-induced oxidative stress during long-term hypoxic exposure. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on hypoxia-related oxidative stress modulation by different activity levels during prolonged hypoxic exposures and examine the potential mechanisms underlying the observed redox balance changes. The paper also explores the applicability of moderate activity as a strategy for attenuating hypoxia-related oxidative stress. Moreover, the potential of such moderate intensity activities used to counteract inactivity-related oxidative stress, often encountered in pathological, elderly and obese populations is also discussed. Finally, future research directions for investigating interactive effects of altitude/hypoxia and exercise on oxidative stress are proposed. PMID:28243207

  1. An evaluation of the inhibition of human butyrylcholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase by the organophosphate chlorpyrifos oxon

    SciTech Connect

    Shenouda, Josephine; Green, Paula; Sultatos, Lester

    2009-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) and butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8) are enzymes that belong to the superfamily of alpha/beta-hydrolase fold proteins. While they share many characteristics, they also possess many important differences. For example, whereas they have about 54% amino acid sequence identity, the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase is considerably smaller than that of butyrylcholinesterase. Moreover, both have been shown to display simple and complex kinetic mechanisms, depending on the particular substrate examined, the substrate concentration, and incubation conditions. In the current study, incubation of butyrylthiocholine in a concentration range of 0.005-3.0 mM, with 317 pM human butyrylcholinesterase in vitro, resulted in rates of production of thiocholine that were accurately described by simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a K{sub m} of 0.10 mM. Similarly, the inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase in vitro by the organophosphate chlorpyrifos oxon was described by simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a k{sub i} of 3048 nM{sup -1} h{sup -1}, and a K{sub D} of 2.02 nM. In contrast to inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase, inhibition of human acetylcholinesterase by chlorpyrifos oxon in vitro followed concentration-dependent inhibition kinetics, with the k{sub i} increasing as the inhibitor concentration decreased. Chlorpyrifos oxon concentrations of 10 and 0.3 nM gave k{sub i}s of 1.2 and 19.3 nM{sup -1} h{sup -1}, respectively. Although the mechanism of concentration-dependent inhibition kinetics is not known, the much smaller, more restrictive active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase almost certainly plays a role. Similarly, the much larger active site gorge of butyrylcholinesterase likely contributes to its much greater reactivity towards chlorpyrifos oxon, compared to acetylcholinesterase.

  2. Microarray and network-based identification of functional modules and pathways of active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhong-Rui; Yin, Juan; Sun, Wen; Lin, Dian-Jie

    2017-02-08

    Diagnose of active tuberculosis (TB) is challenging and treatment response is also difficult to efficiently monitor. The aim of this study was to use an integrated analysis of microarray and network-based method to the samples from publically available datasets to obtain a diagnostic module set and pathways in active TB. Towards this goal, background protein-protein interactions (PPI) network was generated based on global PPI information and gene expression data, following by identification of differential expression network (DEN) from the background PPI network. Then, ego genes were extracted according to the degree features in DEN. Next, module collection was conducted by ego gene expansion based on EgoNet algorithm. After that, differential expression of modules between active TB and controls was evaluated using random permutation test. Finally, biological significance of differential modules was detected by pathways enrichment analysis based on Reactome database, and Fisher's exact test was implemented to extract differential pathways for active TB. Totally, 47 ego genes and 47 candidate modules were identified from the DEN. By setting the cutoff-criteria of gene size >5 and classification accuracy ≥0.9, 7 ego modules (Module 4, Module 7, Module 9, Module 19, Module 25, Module 38 and Module 43) were extracted, and all of them had the statistical significance between active TB and controls. Then, Fisher's exact test was conducted to capture differential pathways for active TB. Interestingly, genes in Module 4, Module 25, Module 38, and Module 43 were enriched in the same pathway, formation of a pool of free 40S subunits. Significant pathway for Module 7 and Module 9 was eukaryotic translation termination, and for Module 19 was nonsense mediated decay enhanced by the exon junction complex (EJC). Accordingly, differential modules and pathways might be potential biomarkers for treating active TB, and provide valuable clues for better understanding of molecular

  3. Functional modules, structural topology, and optimal activity in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Hernández, Magdalena; Mora, Yolanda; Encarnación, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Modular organization in biological networks has been suggested as a natural mechanism by which a cell coordinates its metabolic strategies for evolving and responding to environmental perturbations. To understand how this occurs, there is a need for developing computational schemes that contribute to integration of genomic-scale information and assist investigators in formulating biological hypotheses in a quantitative and systematic fashion. In this work, we combined metabolome data and constraint-based modeling to elucidate the relationships among structural modules, functional organization, and the optimal metabolic phenotype of Rhizobium etli, a bacterium that fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris. To experimentally characterize the metabolic phenotype of this microorganism, we obtained the metabolic profile of 220 metabolites at two physiological stages: under free-living conditions, and during nitrogen fixation with P. vulgaris. By integrating these data into a constraint-based model, we built a refined computational platform with the capability to survey the metabolic activity underlying nitrogen fixation in R. etli. Topological analysis of the metabolic reconstruction led us to identify modular structures with functional activities. Consistent with modular activity in metabolism, we found that most of the metabolites experimentally detected in each module simultaneously increased their relative abundances during nitrogen fixation. In this work, we explore the relationships among topology, biological function, and optimal activity in the metabolism of R. etli through an integrative analysis based on modeling and metabolome data. Our findings suggest that the metabolic activity during nitrogen fixation is supported by interacting structural modules that correlate with three functional classifications: nucleic acids, peptides, and lipids. More fundamentally, we supply evidence that such modular organization during functional nitrogen fixation is

  4. Local modulation of steroid action: rapid control of enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Thierry D.; Cornil, Charlotte A.; Patte-Mensah, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Mensah-Nyagan, A. Guy; Balthazart, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens can induce rapid, short-lived physiological and behavioral responses, in addition to their slow, but long-term, effects at the transcriptional level. To be functionally relevant, these effects should be associated with rapid modulations of estrogens concentrations. 17β-estradiol is synthesized by the enzyme aromatase, using testosterone as a substrate, but can also be degraded into catechol-estrogens via hydroxylation by the same enzyme, leading to an increase or decrease in estrogens concentration, respectively. The first evidence that aromatase activity (AA) can be rapidly modulated came from experiments performed in Japanese quail hypothalamus homogenates. This rapid modulation is triggered by calcium-dependent phosphorylations and was confirmed in other tissues and species. The mechanisms controlling the phosphorylation status, the targeted amino acid residues and the reversibility seem to vary depending of the tissues and is discussed in this review. We currently do not know whether the phosphorylation of the same amino acid affects both aromatase and/or hydroxylase activities or whether these residues are different. These processes provide a new general mechanism by which local estrogen concentration can be rapidly altered in the brain and other tissues. PMID:25852459

  5. JAK tyrosine kinases promote hierarchical activation of Rho and Rap modules of integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Montresor, Alessio; Bolomini-Vittori, Matteo; Toffali, Lara; Rossi, Barbara; Constantin, Gabriela; Laudanna, Carlo

    2013-12-23

    Lymphocyte recruitment is regulated by signaling modules based on the activity of Rho and Rap small guanosine triphosphatases that control integrin activation by chemokines. We show that Janus kinase (JAK) protein tyrosine kinases control chemokine-induced LFA-1- and VLA-4-mediated adhesion as well as human T lymphocyte homing to secondary lymphoid organs. JAK2 and JAK3 isoforms, but not JAK1, mediate CXCL12-induced LFA-1 triggering to a high affinity state. Signal transduction analysis showed that chemokine-induced activation of the Rho module of LFA-1 affinity triggering is dependent on JAK activity, with VAV1 mediating Rho activation by JAKs in a Gαi-independent manner. Furthermore, activation of Rap1A by chemokines is also dependent on JAK2 and JAK3 activity. Importantly, activation of Rap1A by JAKs is mediated by RhoA and PLD1, thus establishing Rap1A as a downstream effector of the Rho module. Thus, JAK tyrosine kinases control integrin activation and dependent lymphocyte trafficking by bridging chemokine receptors to the concurrent and hierarchical activation of the Rho and Rap modules of integrin activation.

  6. Functional modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by cereblon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Jo, Sooyeon; Kim, Hyunyoung; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in cereblon (CRBN), a substrate binding component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, cause a form of mental retardation in humans. However, the cellular proteins that interact with CRBN remain largely unknown. Here, we report that CRBN directly interacts with the α1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK α1) and inhibits the activation of AMPK activation. The ectopic expression of CRBN reduces phosphorylation of AMPK α1 and, thus, inhibits the enzyme in a nutrient-independent manner. Moreover, AMPK α1 can be potently activated by suppressing endogenous CRBN using CRBN-specific small hairpin RNAs. Thus, CRBN may act as a negative modulator of the AMPK signaling pathway in vivo.

  7. Dietary modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Marion-Letellier, R; Déchelotte, P; Iacucci, M; Ghosh, S

    2009-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is a nuclear receptor that regulates intestinal inflammation. PPAR gamma is highly expressed in the colon and can be activated by various dietary ligands. A number of fatty acids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids or eicosanoids are considered as endogenous PPAR gamma activators. Nevertheless, other nutrients such as glutamine, spicy food or flavonoids are also able to activate PPAR gamma. As PPAR gamma plays a key role in bacterial induced inflammation, anti-inflammatory properties of probiotics may be mediated through PPAR gamma. The aims of the present review are to discuss of the potential roles of dietary compounds in modulating intestinal inflammation through PPAR gamma.

  8. Effect of Calea serrata Less. n-hexane extract on acetylcholinesterase of larvae ticks and brain Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Vera Lucia Sardá; Vanzella, Cláudia; Moysés, Felipe dos Santos; Santos, Jaqueline Campiol Dos; Martins, João Ricardo Souza; von Poser, Gilsane Lino; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2012-10-26

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme that hydrolyses acetylcholine (ACh) at cholinergic synapses, is a target for pesticides and its inhibition by organophosphates leads to paralysis and death of arthropods. It has been demonstrated that the n-hexane extract of Calea serrata had acaricidal activity against larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The aim of the present study was to understand the mechanism of the acaricidal action of C. serrata n-hexane extract are specifically to investigate the in vitro anticholinesterase activity on larvae of R. microplus and in brain structures of male Wistar rats. The n-hexane extract significantly inhibited in vitro acetylcholinesterase activity in R. microplus larvae and rat brain structures. The results confirm that inhibition of acetylcholinesterase is a possible mechanism of action of hexane extract at C. serrata.

  9. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Ho, Lena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Bruneau, B. G.

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also required to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.

  10. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    DOE PAGES

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; ...

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also requiredmore » to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.« less

  11. Decorin binds myostatin and modulates its activity to muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Takayuki; Kishioka, Yasuhiro; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Akihito; Hennebry, Alex; Berry, Carole J.; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi; Nishimura, Takanori . E-mail: nishi@anim.agr.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-02-10

    Myostatin, a member of TGF-{beta} superfamily of growth factors, acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. The mechanism whereby myostatin controls the proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells is mostly clarified. However, the regulation of myostatin activity to myogenic cells after its secretion in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is still unknown. Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan, binds TGF-{beta} and regulates its activity in the ECM. Thus, we hypothesized that decorin could also bind to myostatin and participate in modulation of its activity to myogenic cells. In order to test the hypothesis, we investigated the interaction between myostatin and decorin by surface plasmon assay. Decorin interacted with mature myostatin in the presence of concentrations of Zn{sup 2+} greater than 10 {mu}M, but not in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. Kinetic analysis with a 1:1 binding model resulted in dissociation constants (K {sub D}) of 2.02 x 10{sup -8} M and 9.36 x 10{sup -9} M for decorin and the core protein of decorin, respectively. Removal of the glycosaminoglycan chain by chondroitinase ABC digestion did not affect binding, suggesting that decorin could bind to myostatin with its core protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated that immobilized decorin could rescue the inhibitory effect of myostatin on myoblast proliferation in vitro. These results suggest that decorin could trap myostatin and modulate its activity to myogenic cells in the ECM.

  12. Temperature rise and microplastics interact with the toxicity of the antibiotic cefalexin to juveniles of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps): Post-exposure predatory behaviour, acetylcholinesterase activity and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Fonte, Elsa; Ferreira, Pedro; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the toxicity of cefalexin to Pomatoschistus microps juveniles in relation to the presence of microplastics in the water and temperature rise. After acclimatization, groups of wild juveniles were exposed for 96h to artificial salt water (control), microplastics alone (0.184mg/l), cefalexin alone (1.3-10mg/l) and in mixture with microplastics (cefalexin: 1.3-10mg/l; microplastics: 0.184mg/l) at 20 and 25°C. Effect criteria were mortality, post-exposure predatory performance (PEPP), acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and lipid peroxidation levels (LPO). At 20°C, concentrations of cefalexin alone≥5mg/l significantly reduced PEPP (up to 56%; 96h-EC50=8.4mg/l), indicating toxicity of the antibiotic to juveniles after short-term exposure to water concentrations in the low ppm range. At 20°C, fish exposed to microplastics alone did not have significant differences in any of the parameters tested relative to the control group but tended to have an inhibition of the PEPP (23%) and AChE (21%); at 25°C, microplastics alone caused mortality (33%) and PEPP inhibition (28%). Thus, microplastics are toxic to P. microps juveniles. At 20°C, under simultaneous exposure to cefalexin and microplastics, the PEPP was significantly reduced (at cefalexin concentrations≥1.25mg/l). Moreover, at 25°C, the toxicity curves of cefalexin (PEPP based), alone and in mixture with microplastics, were significantly different (p<0.05; 96h-EC50 of 3.8 and 5.2mg/l, respectively), and the integrated data analysis indicated significant interactions between the two substances for all biomarkers. Thus, the presence of microplastics in the water influenced the toxicity of cefalexin. The rise of water temperature (from 20°C to 25°C), increased the microplastics-induced mortality (from 8 to 33%), and the inhibitory effects of cefalexin on the PEPP (up to 70%). Significant differences (p<0.05) between the toxicity curves of cefalexin alone at distinct

  13. Zinc modulates PPARgamma signaling and activation of porcine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Meerarani, Purushothaman; Reiterer, Gudrun; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2003-10-01

    Dietary zinc has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and is a critical component of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gene expression and regulation. To assess the protective mechanisms of PPARgamma in endothelial cell dysfunction and the role of zinc in the modulation of PPARgamma signaling, cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were exposed to the membrane-permeable zinc chelator N,N,N'N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylene diamine (TPEN), thiazolidinedione (TZD; PPARgamma agonist) or bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; PPARgamma antagonist). Subsequently, endothelial cells were activated by treatment with linoleic acid (90 micro mol/L) for 6 h. Zinc chelation by TPEN increased the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and activator protein (AP)-1, decreased PPARgamma expression and activation as well as up-regulated interleukin (IL)-6 expression and production. These effects were fully reversed by zinc supplementation. In addition, exposure to TZD down-regulated linoleic acid-induced DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1, whereas BADGE further induced activation of these oxidative stress-sensitive transcription factors. Most importantly, the TZD-mediated down-regulation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 and reduced inflammatory response were impaired during zinc chelation. These data suggest that zinc plays a critical role in PPARgamma signaling in linoleic acid-induced endothelial cell activation and indicate that PPARgamma signaling is impaired during zinc deficiency.

  14. Tribotronic Tuning Diode for Active Analog Signal Modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Yang, Zhi Wei; Pang, Yaokun; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-01-24

    Realizing active interaction with external environment/stimuli is a great challenge for current electronics. In this paper, a tribotronic tuning diode (TTD) is proposed by coupling a variable capacitance diode and a triboelectric nanogenerator in free-standing sliding mode. When the friction layer is sliding on the device surface for electrification, a reverse bias voltage is created and applied to the diode for tuning the junction capacitance. When the sliding distance increases from 0 to 25 mm, the capacitance of the TTD decreases from about 39 to 8 pF. The proposed TTD has been integrated into analog circuits and exhibited excellent performances in frequency modulation, phase shift, and filtering by sliding a finger. This work has demonstrated tunable diode and active analog signal modulation by tribotronics, which has great potential to replace ordinary variable capacitance diodes in various practical applications such as signal processing, electronic tuning circuits, precise tuning circuits, active sensor networks, electronic communications, remote controls, flexible electronics, etc.

  15. Modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; Matthys, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    L-Arginine is converted to the highly reactive and unstable nitric oxide (NO) and L-citrulline by an enzyme named nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NO decomposes into other nitrogen oxides such as nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO2-), and in the presence of superoxide anion to the potent oxidizing agent peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Activated rodent macrophages are capable of expressing an inducible form of this enzyme (iNOS) in response to appropriate stimuli, i.e., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ). Other cytokines can modulate the induction of NO biosynthesis in macrophages. NO is a major effector molecule of the anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity of rodent macrophages against certain micro-organisms and tumour cells, respectively. The NO synthesizing pathway has been demonstrated in human monocytes and other cells, but its role in host defence seems to be accessory. A delicate functional balance between microbial stimuli, host-derived cytokines and hormones in the microenvironment regulates iNOS expression. This review will focus mainly on the known and proposed mechanisms of the regulation of iNOS induction, and on agents that can modulate NO release once the active enzyme has been expressed in the macrophage. PMID:18475620

  16. Modulation of hyaluronan synthase activity in cellular membrane fractions.

    PubMed

    Vigetti, Davide; Genasetti, Anna; Karousou, Evgenia; Viola, Manuela; Clerici, Moira; Bartolini, Barbara; Moretto, Paola; De Luca, Giancarlo; Hascall, Vincent C; Passi, Alberto

    2009-10-30

    Hyaluronan (HA), the only non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan, is involved in morphogenesis, wound healing, inflammation, angiogenesis, and cancer. In mammals, HA is synthesized by three homologous HA synthases, HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3, that polymerize the HA chain using UDP-glucuronic acid and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine as precursors. Since the amount of HA is critical in several pathophysiological conditions, we developed a non-radioactive assay for measuring the activity of HA synthases (HASs) in eukaryotic cells and addressed the question of HAS activity during intracellular protein trafficking. We prepared three cellular fractions: plasma membrane, cytosol (containing membrane proteins mainly from the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi), and nuclei. After incubation with UDP-sugar precursors, newly synthesized HA was quantified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of fluorophore-labeled saccharides and high performance liquid chromatography. This new method measured HAS activity not only in the plasma membrane fraction but also in the cytosolic membranes. This new technique was used to evaluate the effects of 4-methylumbeliferone, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, interleukin 1beta, platelet-derived growth factor BB, and tunicamycin on HAS activities. We found that HAS activity can be modulated by post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation and N-glycosylation. Interestingly, we detected a significant increase in HAS activity in the cytosolic membrane fraction after tunicamycin treatment. Since this compound is known to induce HA cable structures, this result links HAS activity alteration with the capability of the cell to promote HA cable formation.

  17. Physical activity behavior predicts endogenous pain modulation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Kelly M; Ohlman, Thomas; Naugle, Keith E; Riley, Zachary A; Keith, NiCole R

    2017-03-01

    Older adults compared with younger adults are characterized by greater endogenous pain facilitation and a reduced capacity to endogenously inhibit pain, potentially placing them at a greater risk for chronic pain. Previous research suggests that higher levels of self-reported physical activity are associated with more effective pain inhibition and less pain facilitation on quantitative sensory tests in healthy adults. However, no studies have directly tested the relationship between physical activity behavior and pain modulatory function in older adults. This study examined whether objective measures of physical activity behavior cross-sectionally predicted pain inhibitory function on the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) test and pain facilitation on the temporal summation (TS) test in healthy older adults. Fifty-one older adults wore an accelerometer on the hip for 7 days and completed the CPM and TS tests. Measures of sedentary time, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were obtained from the accelerometer. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to determine the relationship of TS and CPM with levels of physical activity, while controlling for demographic, psychological, and test variables. The results indicated that sedentary time and LPA significantly predicted pain inhibitory function on the CPM test, with less sedentary time and greater LPA per day associated with greater pain inhibitory capacity. Additionally, MVPA predicted pain facilitation on the TS test, with greater MVPA associated with less TS of pain. These results suggest that different types of physical activity behavior may differentially impact pain inhibitory and facilitatory processes in older adults.

  18. Simulations of the equatorial thermosphere anomaly: Geomagnetic activity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jiuhou; Wang, Wenbin; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Luan, Xiaoli; Dou, Xiankang; Burns, Alan G.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2014-08-01

    The modulation of geomagnetic activity on the equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) in thermospheric temperature under the high solar activity condition is investigated using the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model simulations. The model simulations during the geomagnetically disturbed interval, when the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (Bz) oscillates between southward and northward directions, are analyzed and also compared with those under the quiet time condition. Our results show that ionospheric electron densities increase greatly in the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crest region and decrease around the magnetic equator during the storm time, resulting from the enhanced eastward electric fields. The impact of both the direct heat deposition at high latitudes and the modulation of the storm time enhanced EIA crests on the ETA are subsequently studied. The increased plasma densities over the EIA crest region enhance the field-aligned ion drag that accelerates the poleward meridional winds and consequently their associated adiabatic cooling effect. This process alone produces a deeper temperature trough over the magnetic equator as a result of the enhanced divergence of meridional winds. Moreover, the enhanced plasma-neutral collisional heating at higher latitudes associated with the ionospheric positive storm effect causes a weak increase of the ETA crests. On the other hand, strong changes of the neutral temperature are mainly confined to higher latitudes. Nevertheless, the changes of the ETA purely due to the increased plasma density are overwhelmed by those associated with the storm time heat deposition, which is the major cause of an overall elevated temperature in both the ETA crests and trough during the geomagnetically active period. Associated with the enhanced neutral temperature at high latitudes due to the heat deposition, the ETA crest-trough differences become larger under the minor

  19. EarthScope Content Module for IRIS Active Earth Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuillan, P. J.; Welti, R.; Johnson, J. A.; Shiffman, C. R.; Olds, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Active Earth Monitor (AEM) is an interactive computer-based display for university lobbies, museums, visitor centers, schools and libraries. AEM runs in a standard Internet web browser in full screen mode. The display consists of a customizable set of content pages about plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis. Low-cost and simple-to-implement, the Active Earth Monitor provides a way to engage audiences with earth science information without spending resources on a large exhibit. The EarthScope Active Earth Monitor content set highlights the connections between the landscape and the research and monitoring being conducted by EarthScope in partnership with regional monitoring networks. Modules consist of chapters that focus on What is EarthScope?, EarthScope Observatories, and EarthScope Research Results. Content topics are easily explored using a web page button type navigation interface via a touch screen or mouse. A formative evaluation of general public users informed the interface design. Chapters in the modules start with a general overview and proceed to detailed specifics. Each chapter utilizes at least one set of live or near real-time research data (often more than one). This exposes the general public to active ongoing research that is engaging, relevant to the individual user, and explained in easy to understand terms. All live content is updated each time a user accesses the individual page displaying the live data. Leading questions are presented allowing the user to examine the content before accessing the answer via pop-up box. Diagrams and charts of research data have explanatory keys that allow users to self explore all content. Content pages can be created and inserted in the Active Earth Monitor by utilizing the simple HTML/CSS coding.;

  20. In Vitro Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition by Type A Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R.; Quinn, L. Y.

    1967-01-01

    Type A botulinum toxin was studied for its ability to inhibit the action of acetyl-cholinesterase. The chromogenic substrate, indophenyl acetate, was used for assay of enzyme activity. Inhibition of enzyme function was detected through use of both 6.6 × 10−6 mg (20 ld50) and 6.6 × 10−10 mg (2 × 10−3ld50) of type A botulinal toxin. Control assays were performed by use of both homologous antitoxin and heterologous antitoxins (types B and E). Enzyme inhibition was effectively prevented by use of homologous antitoxin only. The inhibition noted was specific and reproducible for given substrate, enzyme, and toxin concentrations. PMID:4860916

  1. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory effect of lignans isolated from Schizandra chinensis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Manh; Na, MinKyun; Min, Byung Sun; Ngoc, Tran Minh; Lee, IkSoo; Zhang, XinFeng; Bae, KiHwan

    2007-06-01

    The hexane extract of the fruit of Schizandra chinensis (Schisandraceae) was found to show significant inhibition of the activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE). In further studies, fourteen lignans were isolated, and evaluated for their inhibitory effect on AChE. The compounds having both aromatic methylenedioxy and hydroxyl groups on their cyclooctadiene ring, such as gomisin C (6), gomisin G (7), gomisin D (8), schisandrol B (11) and gomisin A (13), entirely inhibited AChE in dose dependent manners, with IC50 values of 6.71 +/- 0.53, 6.55 +/- 0.31, 7.84 +/- 0.62, 12.57 +/- 1.07 and 13.28 +/- 1.68 microM, respectively. These results indicate that the lignans could potentially be a potent class of AChE inhibitors.

  2. Carrageenans solubilize asymmetric acetylcholinesterase from nicotinic cholinergic synapses.

    PubMed

    von Bernhardi, R; Ayal, H; Inestrosa, N C

    1990-01-01

    1. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in both vertebrate and invertebrates organisms. 2. The asymmetric synaptic AChE is attached to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the neuromuscular junction through heparin sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs). 3. It has been shown previously that heparin-like glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) can solubilize this enzyme from the cholinergic synapses. 4. The present paper describes the solubilization of asymmetric AChE by different marine macroalgal polysaccharides, called carrageenans. 5. Important differences were found among all the carrageenans tested; they released 15-50% of the total AChE activity normally solubilized by heparin. 6. Carrageenans extracted from tetrasporic stages of Iridaea ciliata and I. membranacea were always better extracting agents than those from the cystocarpic stages of these algae, suggesting that lambda-like carrageenans are involved. 7. This hypothesis was confirmed by extracting AChE with purified carrageenans.

  3. Acetylcholinesterase biosensor for carbaryl detection based on interdigitated array microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhili; Guo, Yemin; Sun, Xia; Cao, Yaoyao; Wang, Xiangyou

    2014-10-01

    In this study, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor with superior accuracy and sensitivity was successfully developed based on interdigitated array microelectrodes (IAMs). IAMs have a series of parallel microband electrodes with alternating microbands connected together. Chitosan was used as the enzyme immobilization material, and AChE was used as the model enzyme for carbaryl detection to fabricate AChE biosensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used in conjunction with the fabricated biosensor to detect pesticide residues. Based on the inhibition of pesticides on the AChE activity, using carbaryl as model compounds, the biosensor exhibited a wide range, low detection limit, and high stability. Moreover, the biosensor can also be used as a new promising tool for pesticide residue analysis.

  4. Endogenous Epoxygenases Are Modulators of Monocyte/Macrophage Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Mary C.; Holness, Mark J.; Swales, Karen E.; Warner, Timothy D.; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Gilroy, Derek W.; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid is metabolized through three major metabolic pathways, the cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and CYP450 enzyme systems. Unlike cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenases, the role of CYP450 epoxygenases in monocyte/macrophage-mediated responses is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings When transfected in vitro, CYP2J2 is an efficient activator of anti-inflammatory pathways through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α. Human monocytes and macrophages contain PPARα and here we show they express the epoxygenases CYP2J2 and CYP2C8. Inhibition of constitutive monocyte epoxygenases using the epoxygenase inhibitor SKF525A induces cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and activity, and the release of TNFα, and can be reversed by either add back of the endogenous epoxygenase products and PPARα ligand 11,12- epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) or the addition of the selective synthetic PPARα ligand GW7647. In alternatively activated (IL-4-treated) monocytes, in contrast to classically activated cells, epoxygenase inhibition decreased TNFα release. Epoxygenases can be pro-inflammatory via superoxide anion production. The suppression of TNFα by SKF525A in the presence of IL-4 was associated with a reduction in superoxide anion generation and reproduced by the superoxide dismutase MnCl2. Similar to these acute activation studies, in monocyte derived macrophages, epoxygenase inhibition elevates M1 macrophage TNFα mRNA and further decreases M2 macrophage TNFα. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, epoxygenase activity represents an important endogenous pathway which limits monocyte activation. Moreover endogenous epoxygenases are immuno-modulators regulating monocyte/macrophage activation depending on the underlying activation state. PMID:22028915

  5. Modulation of human motoneuron activity by a mental arithmetic task.

    PubMed

    Bensoussan, Laurent; Duclos, Yann; Rossi-Durand, Christiane

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the performance of a mental task affects motoneuron activity. To this end, the tonic discharge pattern of wrist extensor motor units was analyzed in healthy subjects while they were required to maintain a steady wrist extension force and to concurrently perform a mental arithmetic (MA) task. A shortening of the mean inter-spike interval (ISI) and a decrease in ISI variability occurred when MA task was superimposed to the motor task. Aloud and silent MA affected equally the rate and variability of motoneuron discharge. Increases in surface EMG activity and force level were consistent with the modulation of the motor unit discharge rate. Trial-by-trial analysis of the characteristics of motor unit firing revealed that performing MA increases activation of wrist extensor SMU. It is suggested that increase in muscle spindle afferent activity, resulting from fusimotor drive activation by MA, may have contributed to the increase in synaptic inputs to motoneurons during the mental task performance, likely together with enhancement in the descending drive. The finding that a mental task affects motoneuron activity could have consequences in assessment of motor disabilities and in rehabilitation in motor pathologies.

  6. Scene interpretation module for an active vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remagnino, P.; Matas, J.; Illingworth, John; Kittler, Josef

    1993-08-01

    In this paper an implementation of a high level symbolic scene interpreter for an active vision system is considered. The scene interpretation module uses low level image processing and feature extraction results to achieve object recognition and to build up a 3D environment map. The module is structured to exploit spatio-temporal context provided by existing partial world interpretations and has spatial reasoning to direct gaze control and thereby achieve efficient and robust processing using spatial focus of attention. The system builds and maintains an awareness of an environment which is far larger than a single camera view. Experiments on image sequences have shown that the system can: establish its position and orientation in a partially known environment, track simple moving objects such as cups and boxes, temporally integrate recognition results to establish or forget object presence, and utilize spatial focus of attention to achieve efficient and robust object recognition. The system has been extensively tested using images from a single steerable camera viewing a simple table top scene containing box and cylinder-like objects. Work is currently progressing to further develop its competences and interface it with the Surrey active stereo vision head, GETAFIX.

  7. The Mechanical Environment Modulates Intracellular Calcium Oscillation Activities of Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Godbout, Charles; Follonier Castella, Lysianne; Smith, Eric A.; Talele, Nilesh; Chow, Melissa L.; Garonna, Adriano; Hinz, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblast contraction is fundamental in the excessive tissue remodeling that is characteristic of fibrotic tissue contractures. Tissue remodeling during development of fibrosis leads to gradually increasing stiffness of the extracellular matrix. We propose that this increased stiffness positively feeds back on the contractile activities of myofibroblasts. We have previously shown that cycles of contraction directly correlate with periodic intracellular calcium oscillations in cultured myofibroblasts. We analyze cytosolic calcium dynamics using fluorescent calcium indicators to evaluate the possible impact of mechanical stress on myofibroblast contractile activity. To modulate extracellular mechanics, we seeded primary rat subcutaneous myofibroblasts on silicone substrates and into collagen gels of different elastic modulus. We modulated cell stress by cell growth on differently adhesive culture substrates, by restricting cell spreading area on micro-printed adhesive islands, and depolymerizing actin with Cytochalasin D. In general, calcium oscillation frequencies in myofibroblasts increased with increasing mechanical challenge. These results provide new insight on how changing mechanical conditions for myofibroblasts are encoded in calcium oscillations and possibly explain how reparative cells adapt their contractile behavior to the stresses occurring in normal and pathological tissue repair. PMID:23691248

  8. Experimental and computational studies on the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by curcumin and some of its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tello-Franco, Veronica; Lozada-García, Maria Concepcion; Soriano-García, Manuel

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated several biological activities of curcumin with therapeutic potential against Alzheimer's disease, among them the inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Aiming at identifying the chemical features relevant for this activity, the inhibition of curcumin and a set of 7 derivatives against AChE of E. electricus was measured. These derivatives presented lower activity than curcumin, allowing for the identification of possible unfavorable enzyme-inhibitor interactions. Our computational approach was to dock the molecules to the active site of AChE, followed by an analysis of hydrogen bonds and close contacts to relevant aromatic amino acid residues. To account for inhibitory activity, we sought to define the common structural features between known acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and the tested derivatives. A pharmacophore model was generated, which consisted of two hydrophobic, one aromatic and one hydrogen bond acceptor features. We conclude that the presence of two aromatic rings and the distance between them, allows curcumin and its derivatives to favorably interact with both the quaternary and peripheral sites of AChE. Hydrogen bonds can be formed with the quaternary and acyl sites, which should further stabilize the complex. The acylation of the hydroxyl groups and the reduction of the conjugated double bonds lowered the inhibitory activity, pointing to the modification of the keto-enol moiety as the best alternative for the design of more potent curcumin derivatives as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

  9. Dopamine Modulates the Activity of Sensory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Cecilia; Trapani, Josef G.; Pacentine, Itallia; Maeda, Reo; Sheets, Lavinia; Mo, Weike

    2015-01-01

    The senses of hearing and balance are subject to modulation by efferent signaling, including the release of dopamine (DA). How DA influences the activity of the auditory and vestibular systems and its site of action are not well understood. Here we show that dopaminergic efferent fibers innervate the acousticolateralis epithelium of the zebrafish during development but do not directly form synapses with hair cells. However, a member of the D1-like receptor family, D1b, tightly localizes to ribbon synapses in inner ear and lateral-line hair cells. To assess modulation of hair-cell activity, we reversibly activated or inhibited D1-like receptors (D1Rs) in lateral-line hair cells. In extracellular recordings from hair cells, we observed that D1R agonist SKF-38393 increased microphonic potentials, whereas D1R antagonist SCH-23390 decreased microphonic potentials. Using ratiometric calcium imaging, we found that increased D1R activity resulted in larger calcium transients in hair cells. The increase of intracellular calcium requires Cav1.3a channels, as a Cav1 calcium channel antagonist, isradipine, blocked the increase in calcium transients elicited by the agonist SKF-38393. Collectively, our results suggest that DA is released in a paracrine fashion and acts at ribbon synapses, likely enhancing the activity of presynaptic Cav1.3a channels and thereby increasing neurotransmission. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neurotransmitter dopamine acts in a paracrine fashion (diffusion over a short distance) in several tissues and bodily organs, influencing and regulating their activity. The cellular target and mechanism of the action of dopamine in mechanosensory organs, such as the inner ear and lateral-line organ, is not clearly understood. Here we demonstrate that dopamine receptors are present in sensory hair cells at synaptic sites that are required for signaling to the brain. When nearby neurons release dopamine, activation of the dopamine receptors increases the activity of

  10. Guide RNA functional modules direct Cas9 activity and orthogonality.

    PubMed

    Briner, Alexandra E; Donohoue, Paul D; Gomaa, Ahmed A; Selle, Kurt; Slorach, Euan M; Nye, Christopher H; Haurwitz, Rachel E; Beisel, Chase L; May, Andrew P; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2014-10-23

    The RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease specifically targets and cleaves DNA in a sequence-dependent manner and has been widely used for programmable genome editing. Cas9 activity is dependent on interactions with guide RNAs, and evolutionarily divergent Cas9 nucleases have been shown to work orthogonally. However, the molecular basis of selective Cas9:guide-RNA interactions is poorly understood. Here, we identify and characterize six conserved modules within native crRNA:tracrRNA duplexes and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that direct Cas9 endonuclease activity. We show the bulge and nexus are necessary for DNA cleavage and demonstrate that the nexus and hairpins are instrumental in defining orthogonality between systems. In contrast, the crRNA:tracrRNA complementary region can be modified or partially removed. Collectively, our results establish guide RNA features that drive DNA targeting by Cas9 and open new design and engineering avenues for CRISPR technologies.

  11. The hypothalamic NPVF circuit modulates ventral raphe activity during nociception

    PubMed Central

    Madelaine, Romain; Lovett-Barron, Matthew; Halluin, Caroline; Andalman, Aaron S.; Liang, Jin; Skariah, Gemini M.; Leung, Louis C.; Burns, Vanessa M.; Mourrain, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    RFamide neuropeptide VF (NPVF) is expressed by neurons in the hypothalamus and has been implicated in nociception, but the circuit mechanisms remain unexplored. Here, we studied the structural and functional connections from NPVF neurons to downstream targets in the context of nociception, using novel transgenic lines, optogenetics, and calcium imaging in behaving larval zebrafish. We found a specific projection from NPVF neurons to serotonergic neurons in the ventral raphe nucleus (vRN). We showed NPVF neurons and vRN are suppressed and excited by noxious stimuli, respectively. We combined optogenetics with calcium imaging and pharmacology to demonstrate that stimulation of NPVF cells suppresses neuronal activity in vRN. During noxious stimuli, serotonergic neurons activation was due to a suppression of an inhibitory NPVF-ventral raphe peptidergic projection. This study reveals a novel NPVF-vRN functional circuit modulated by noxious stimuli in vertebrates. PMID:28139691

  12. Task complexity modulates pilot electroencephalographic activity during real flights.

    PubMed

    Di Stasi, Leandro L; Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Suárez, Juan; McCamy, Michael B; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Roca-Dorda, Joaquín; Catena, Andrés

    2015-07-01

    Most research connecting task performance and neural activity to date has been conducted in laboratory conditions. Thus, field studies remain scarce, especially in extreme conditions such as during real flights. Here, we investigated the effects of flight procedures of varied complexity on the in-flight EEG activity of military helicopter pilots. Flight procedural complexity modulated the EEG power spectrum: highly demanding procedures (i.e., takeoff and landing) were associated with higher EEG power in the higher frequency bands, whereas less demanding procedures (i.e., flight exercises) were associated with lower EEG power over the same frequency bands. These results suggest that EEG recordings may help to evaluate an operator's cognitive performance in challenging real-life scenarios, and thus could aid in the prevention of catastrophic events.

  13. Space station group activities habitability module study: A synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David; Glassman, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Space station habitability was studied by investigating crew activity routines, proximities, ergonomic envelopes, and group volumes. Ten alternative schematic interior designs were proposed. Preliminary conclusions include: (1) in-service interior modifications may be necessary and should be planned for; (2) design complexity will be increased if the module cluster is reduced from five to three; (3) the increased crew circulation attendant upon enhancement of space station activity may produce human traffic bottlenecks and should be planned for; (4) a single- or two-person quiet area may be desirable to provide crew members with needed solitude during waking hours; and (5) the decision to choose a two-shift or three-shift daily cycle will have a significant impact on the design configuration and operational efficiency of the human habitat.

  14. Design and synthesis of dual inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and serotonin transporter targeting potential agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kogen, Hiroshi; Toda, Narihiro; Tago, Keiko; Marumoto, Shinji; Takami, Kazuko; Ori, Mayuko; Yamada, Naho; Koyama, Kazuo; Naruto, Shunji; Abe, Kazumi; Yamazaki, Reina; Hara, Takao; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Abe, Yasuyuki; Kaneko, Tsugio

    2002-10-03

    Highly efficient acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and serotonin transporter (SERT) dual inhibitors, (S)-4 and (R)-13 were designed and synthesized on the basis of the hypothetical model of AChE active site. Both compounds showed potent inhibitory activities against AChE and SERT. [structure: see text

  15. Prior probability modulates anticipatory activity in category-specific areas.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Sabrina; Lepsien, Jöran; Kotz, Sonja A; Bar, Moshe

    2016-02-01

    Bayesian models are currently a dominant framework for describing human information processing. However, it is not clear yet how major tenets of this framework can be translated to brain processes. In this study, we addressed the neural underpinning of prior probability and its effect on anticipatory activity in category-specific areas. Before fMRI scanning, participants were trained in two behavioral sessions to learn the prior probability and correct order of visual events within a sequence. The events of each sequence included two different presentations of a geometric shape and one picture of either a house or a face, which appeared with either a high or a low likelihood. Each sequence was preceded by a cue that gave participants probabilistic information about which items to expect next. This allowed examining cue-related anticipatory modulation of activity as a function of prior probability in category-specific areas (fusiform face area and parahippocampal place area). Our findings show that activity in the fusiform face area was higher when faces had a higher prior probability. The finding of a difference between levels of expectations is consistent with graded, probabilistically modulated activity, but the data do not rule out the alternative explanation of a categorical neural response. Importantly, these differences were only visible during anticipation, and vanished at the time of stimulus presentation, calling for a functional distinction when considering the effects of prior probability. Finally, there were no anticipatory effects for houses in the parahippocampal place area, suggesting sensitivity to stimulus material when looking at effects of prediction.

  16. Dietary fat modulates serum paraoxonase 1 activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kudchodkar, B J; Lacko, A G; Dory, L; Fungwe, T V

    2000-10-01

    We examined the effects of dietary fats with specific fatty acid compositions, on serum paraoxonase (PON1) activity in rats. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into four dietary groups. One group received the control diet [AIN 93M with soybean oil (5 g/100 g diet)], whereas the remaining three groups received the modified control diet supplemented with (15 g/100 g diet) triolein, tripalmitin or fish oil, respectively. After 20 d, blood was obtained after overnight food deprivation and PON1 activity was determined. Serum lipids and lipid components of lipoproteins were also determined. Serum PON1 activity [micromol/(L.min)] was significantly (P: < 0.05) higher in triolein (98 +/- 6) and lower in fish oil (41 +/- 4), compared with tripalmitin-fed rats (63 +/- 11). Serum PON1 activity in tripalmitin-fed rats was comparable to that of controls (67 +/- 9). Serum PON1 activity correlated significantly with serum lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity (r = 0.77, P: < 0.001) and was transported in blood principally in association with the denser subfraction of HDL, very high density lipoprotein (VHDL; d > 1.15 kg/L). Serum PON1 activity correlated strongly with serum lipids as well as lipids of VLDL, HDL and its subfractions. Multiple linear regression analysis, however, showed a significant relationship of serum PON1 activity, principally with the phospholipids of VHDL (r = 0.47, P: < 0.002). These data suggest that the modulation of serum PON1 activity by dietary fat may be mediated via the effect of the specific fatty acids on the synthesis and secretion of VHDL, the subfraction of HDL that transports the majority of PON1 in the blood.

  17. Preclinical and first-in-human evaluation of PRX-105, a PEGylated, plant-derived, recombinant human acetylcholinesterase-R

    SciTech Connect

    Atsmon, Jacob; Brill-Almon, Einat; Nadri-Shay, Carmit; Chertkoff, Raul; Alon, Sari; Shaikevich, Dimitri; Volokhov, Inna; Haim, Kirsten Y.; Bartfeld, Daniel; Shulman, Avidor; Ruderfer, Ilya; Ben-Moshe, Tehila; Shilovitzky, Orit; Soreq, Hermona; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2015-09-15

    PRX-105 is a plant-derived recombinant version of the human ‘read-through’ acetylcholinesterase splice variant (AChE-R). Its active site structure is similar to that of the synaptic variant, and it displays the same affinity towards organophosphorus (OP) compounds. As such, PRX-105 may serve as a bio-scavenger for OP pesticides and chemical warfare agents. To assess its potential use in prophylaxis and treatment of OP poisoning we conducted several preliminary tests, reported in this paper. Intravenous (IV) PRX-105 was administered to mice either before or after exposure to an OP toxin. All mice who received an IV dose of 50 nmol/kg PRX-105, 2 min before being exposed to 1.33 × LD{sub 50} and 1.5 × LD{sub 50} of toxin and 10 min after exposure to 1.5 × LD{sub 50} survived. The pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles of PRX-105 were evaluated in mice and mini-pigs. Following single and multiple IV doses (50 to 200 mg/kg) no deaths occurred and no significant laboratory and histopathological changes were observed. The overall elimination half-life (t{sub ½}) in mice was 994 (± 173) min. Additionally, a first-in-human study, to assess the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the compound, was conducted in healthy volunteers. The t{sub ½} in humans was substantially longer than in mice (average 26.7 h). Despite the small number of animals and human subjects who were assessed, the fact that PRX-105 exerts a protective and therapeutic effect following exposure to lethal doses of OP, its favorable safety profile and its relatively long half-life, renders it a promising candidate for treatment and prophylaxis against OP poisoning and warrants further investigation. - Highlights: • PRX-105 is a PEGylated plant-derived recombinant human acetylcholinesterase-R. • PRX-105 is a promising bio-scavenger for organophosphorous toxins at lethal doses. • PRX-105 was shown to protect animals both prophylactically and post-poisoning. • First-in-human study

  18. Longitudinal and geomagnetic activity modulation of the equatorial thermosphere anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jiuhou; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Forbes, Jeffrey M.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we examine the detailed similarities and differences between the equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) from 20 March to 6 April 2002, when both the ETA and the EIA are distinct in the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) observations. The characteristics of the ETA and the EIA are obtained from the CHAMP accelerometer, in situ electron density measurements, and total electron content (TEC) above the CHAMP satellite. Our results show that the trough locations of the ETA and the EIA in latitude show a good agreement, and both correspond well with the dip magnetic equator, while the ETA crests are usually located poleward of the EIA. Meanwhile, the latitudinal locations of the ETA crests exhibit strong hemispheric asymmetry and large variability during our study interval. The longitudinal variations between the EIA and the ETA show significant differences. The EIA crests from the CHAMP observations show strong wave 4 structures, but the primary component in the ETA is wave 1. Moreover, the ETA densities show strong variations in response to geomagnetic activity, whereas CHAMP in situ electron densities and TEC at the EIA do not reflect such large day-to-day variability. Therefore, a simple EIA-ETA relationship cannot explain the dependence of the longitudinal and geomagnetic activity modulation of the ETA and the EIA. The meridional ion drag, which is significantly modulated by enhanced equatorward winds during elevated geomagnetic activity, is probably responsible for some of the observed features in the ETA, although no unambiguous explanation for ETA formation yet exists.

  19. In vitro inhibition of acetylcholinesterase from four marine species by organophosphates and carbamates

    SciTech Connect

    Galgani, F.; Bocquene, G. )

    1990-08-01

    The literature on the biological, physical, and pharmaceutical chemistry of cholinesterase is considerable and includes data on activators and inhibitors. Most of the work on specific anticholinesterasic agents has been concerned with carbamates and organophosphates. Because of the sensitivity of acetylcholinesterase to carbamates and organophosphates, the enzyme has been used as a biochemical indicator of pollution by these agents. However, the chemical reactivity of such chemicals has not been correlated with their effect on Ache and it is impossible to accurately predict biological effects based only on structure. The objectives of this study were to investigate the sensitivity of various marine animals to both organo-phosphates and carbamates. The study was conducted by assessing the in vitro effect of five organophosphates and three carbamates on acetylcholinesterase activity from the muscle of the shrimp Palaemon serratus, the fishes Scomber and Pleuronectes platessa, and from the whole mussels Mytilus edulis. All these species could be used for the monitoring of effect of pollutants.

  20. Focused ultrasound modulates region-specific brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung-Schik; Bystritsky, Alexander; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Fischer, Krisztina; Min, Byoung-Kyong; McDannold, Nathan J.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated the in vivo feasibility of using focused ultrasound (FUS) to transiently modulate (through either stimulation or suppression) the function of regional brain tissue in rabbits. FUS was delivered in a train of pulses at low acoustic energy, far below the cavitation threshold, to the animal's somatomotor and visual areas, as guided by anatomical and functional information from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The temporary alterations in the brain function affected by the sonication were characterized by both electrophysiological recordings and functional brain mapping achieved through the use of functional MRI (fMRI). The modulatory effects were bimodal, whereby the brain activity could either be stimulated or selectively suppressed. Histological analysis of the excised brain tissue after the sonication demonstrated that the FUS did not elicit any tissue damages. Unlike transcranial magnetic stimulation, FUS can be applied to deep structures in the brain with greater spatial precision. Transient modulation of brain function using image-guided and anatomically-targeted FUS would enable the investigation of functional connectivity between brain regions and will eventually lead to a better understanding of localized brain functions. It is anticipated that the use of this technology will have an impact on brain research and may offer novel therapeutic interventions in various neurological conditions and psychiatric disorders. PMID:21354315

  1. Prepulse inhibition modulation by contextual conditioning of dopaminergic activity.

    PubMed

    Mena, Auxiliadora; De la Casa, Luis G

    2013-09-01

    When a neutral stimulus is repeatedly paired with a drug, an association is established between them that can induce two different responses: either an opponent response that counteracts the effect of the drug, or a response that is similar to that induced by the drug. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of the associations that can be established between the contextual cues and the administration of dopamine agonists or antagonists. Our hypothesis suggests that repeated administration of drugs that modulate dopaminergic activity in the presence of a specific context leads to the establishment of an association that subsequently results in a conditioned response to the context that is similar to that induced by the drug. To test this hypothesis, we conducted two experiments that revealed that contextual cues acquired the property to modulate pre-pulse inhibition by prior pairings of such context with the dopamine antagonist haloperidol (Experiment 1), and with the dopamine agonist d-amphetamine (Experiment 2). The implications of these results are discussed both at a theoretical level, and attending to the possibilities that could involve the use of context cues for the therapeutic administration of dopaminergic drugs.

  2. AMPK Phosphorylation Modulates Pain by Activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Bullón, Pedro; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; Carrión, Angel M.; Marín-Aguilar, Fabiola; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Román-Malo, Lourdes; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesus; Culic, Ognjen; Ryffel, Bernhard; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Battino, Maurizio; Sánchez-Alcazar, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Impairment in adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation are associated with several metabolic and inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the role of AMPK/NLRP3 inflammasome axis in the molecular mechanism underlying pain perception. Results: Impairment in AMPK activation induced by compound C or sunitinib, two AMPK inhibitors, provoked hyperalgesia in mice (p<0.001) associated with marked NLRP3 inflammasome protein activation and increased serum levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (24.56±0.82 pg/ml) and IL-18 (23.83±1.882 pg/ml) compared with vehicle groups (IL-1β: 8.15±0.44; IL-18: 4.92±0.4). This effect was rescued by increasing AMPK phosphorylation via metformin treatment (p<0.001), caloric restriction diet (p<0.001), or NLRP3 inflammasome genetic inactivation using NLRP3 knockout (nlrp3−/−) mice (p<0.001). Deficient AMPK activation and overactivation of NLRP3 inflammasome axis were also observed in blood cells from patients with fibromyalgia (FM), a prevalent human chronic pain disease. In addition, metformin treatment (200 mg/daily), which increased AMPK activation, restored all biochemical alterations examined by us in blood cells and significantly improved clinical symptoms, such as, pain, fatigue, depression, disturbed sleep, and tender points, in patients with FM. Innovation and Conclusions: These data suggest that AMPK/NLRP3 inflammasome axis participates in chronic pain and that NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition by AMPK modulation may be a novel therapeutic target to fight against chronic pain and inflammatory diseases as FM. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 157–170. PMID:26132721

  3. Bacteria activate sensory neurons that modulate pain and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M.; Heesters, Balthasar A.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Von Hehn, Christian A.; Zhao, Fan; Tran, Johnathan; Wainger, Brian; Strominger, Amanda; Muralidharan, Sriya; Horswill, Alexander R.; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck; Hwang, Sun Wook; Carroll, Michael C.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Nociceptor sensory neurons are specialized to detect potentially damaging stimuli, protecting the organism by initiating the sensation of pain and eliciting defensive behaviors. Bacterial infections produce pain by unknown molecular mechanisms, although they are presumed secondary to immune activation. Here we demonstrate that bacteria directly activate nociceptors, and that the immune response mediated through TLR2, MyD88, T cells, B cells, and neutrophils/monocytes is not necessary for Staphylococcus aureus induced pain in mice. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia parallels live bacterial load rather than tissue swelling or immune activation. Bacteria induce calcium flux and action potentials in nociceptor neurons, in part via bacterial N-formylated peptides and the pore-forming toxin alpha-hemolysin through distinct mechanisms. Specific ablation of Nav1.8-lineage neurons, which include nociceptors, abrogated pain during bacterial infection, but concurrently increased local immune infiltration and lymphadenopathy of the draining lymph node. Thus, bacterial pathogens produce pain by directly activating sensory neurons that modulate inflammation, an unsuspected role for the nervous system in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23965627

  4. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  5. Coco is a dual activity modulator of TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Haremaki, Tomomi; Warmflash, Aryeh; Sorre, Benoit; Brivanlou, Ali H.

    2015-01-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is a crucial regulator of developmental processes and disease. The activity of TGFβ ligands is modulated by various families of soluble inhibitors that interfere with the interactions between ligands and receptors. In an unbiased, genome-wide RNAi screen to identify genes involved in ligand-dependent signaling, we unexpectedly identified the BMP/Activin/Nodal inhibitor Coco as an enhancer of TGFβ1 signaling. Coco synergizes with TGFβ1 in both cell culture and Xenopus explants. Molecularly, Coco binds to TGFβ1 and enhances TGFβ1 binding to its receptor Alk5. Thus, Coco acts as both an inhibitor and an enhancer of signaling depending on the ligand it binds. This finding raises the need for a global reconsideration of the molecular mechanisms regulating TGFβ signaling. PMID:26116664

  6. Coco is a dual activity modulator of TGFβ signaling.

    PubMed

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Haremaki, Tomomi; Warmflash, Aryeh; Sorre, Benoit; Brivanlou, Ali H

    2015-08-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is a crucial regulator of developmental processes and disease. The activity of TGFβ ligands is modulated by various families of soluble inhibitors that interfere with the interactions between ligands and receptors. In an unbiased, genome-wide RNAi screen to identify genes involved in ligand-dependent signaling, we unexpectedly identified the BMP/Activin/Nodal inhibitor Coco as an enhancer of TGFβ1 signaling. Coco synergizes with TGFβ1 in both cell culture and Xenopus explants. Molecularly, Coco binds to TGFβ1 and enhances TGFβ1 binding to its receptor Alk5. Thus, Coco acts as both an inhibitor and an enhancer of signaling depending on the ligand it binds. This finding raises the need for a global reconsideration of the molecular mechanisms regulating TGFβ signaling.

  7. Specific modulation of protein activity by using a bioorthogonal reaction.

    PubMed

    Warner, John B; Muthusamy, Anand K; Petersson, E James

    2014-11-24

    Unnatural amino acids with bioorthogonal reactive groups have the potential to provide a rapid and specific mechanism for covalently inhibiting a protein of interest. Here, we use mutagenesis to insert an unnatural amino acid containing an azide group (Z) into the target protein at positions such that a "click" reaction with an alkyne modulator (X) will alter the function of the protein. This bioorthogonally reactive pair can engender specificity of X for the Z-containing protein, even if the target is otherwise identical to another protein, allowing for rapid target validation in living cells. We demonstrate our method using inhibition of the Escherichia coli enzyme aminoacyl transferase by both active-site occlusion and allosteric mechanisms. We have termed this a "clickable magic bullet" strategy, and it should be generally applicable to studying the effects of protein inhibition, within the limits of unnatural amino acid mutagenesis.

  8. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, Module 4: Electricity and Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-05-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research. The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is supported by an Instructor's Website that: (1) describes the history and philosophy of the Workshop Physics Project; (2) provides advice on how to integrate the Guide into a variety of educational settings; (3) provides information on computer tools (hardware and software) and apparatus; and (4) includes suggested homework assignments for each unit. Log on to the Workshop Physics Project website at http://physics.dickinson.edu/ Workshop Physics is a component of the Physics Suite--a collection of materials created by a group of educational reformers known as the Activity Based Physics Group. The Physics Suite contains a broad array of curricular materials that are based on physics education research, including:

      Understanding Physics, by Cummings, Laws, Redish and Cooney (an introductory textbook based on the best-selling text by Halliday/Resnick/Walker) RealTime Physics Laboratory Modules Physics by Inquiry (intended for use in a workshop setting) Interactive Lecture Demonstration Tutorials in Introductory Physics Activity Based Tutorials (designed primarily for use in recitations)

    • Auditory Cortex Basal Activity Modulates Cochlear Responses in Chinchillas

      PubMed Central

      León, Alex; Elgueda, Diego; Silva, María A.; Hamamé, Carlos M.; Delano, Paul H.

      2012-01-01

      Background The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory nerve fibers. The functional role of the cortico-olivocochlear efferent system remains debated. We hypothesized that auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear and auditory-nerve afferent responses through the efferent system. Methodology/Principal Findings Cochlear microphonics (CM), auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP) and auditory cortex evoked potentials (ACEP) were recorded in twenty anesthetized chinchillas, before, during and after auditory cortex deactivation by two methods: lidocaine microinjections or cortical cooling with cryoloops. Auditory cortex deactivation induced a transient reduction in ACEP amplitudes in fifteen animals (deactivation experiments) and a permanent reduction in five chinchillas (lesion experiments). We found significant changes in the amplitude of CM in both types of experiments, being the most common effect a CM decrease found in fifteen animals. Concomitantly to CM amplitude changes, we found CAP increases in seven chinchillas and CAP reductions in thirteen animals. Although ACEP amplitudes were completely recovered after ninety minutes in deactivation experiments, only partial recovery was observed in the magnitudes of cochlear responses. Conclusions/Significance These results show that blocking ongoing auditory cortex activity modulates CM and CAP responses, demonstrating that cortico-olivocochlear circuits regulate auditory nerve and cochlear responses through a basal efferent tone. The diversity of the obtained effects

    • MCT SWIR modules for passive and active imaging applications

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Breiter, R.; Benecke, M.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Weber, A.; Wendler, J.; Sieck, A.

      2016-05-01

      Based on AIM's state-of-the-art MCT IR technology, detector modules for the SWIR spectral range have been developed, fabricated and characterized. While LPE grown MCT FPAs with extended 2.5μm cut-off have been fabricated and integrated also MBE grown MCT on GaAs is considered for future production. Two imaging applications have been in focus operating either in passive mode by making use of e.g. the night glow, or in active mode by laser illumination for gated viewing. Dedicated readout integrated circuits (ROIC), realized in 0.18μm Si-CMOS technology providing the required functionality for passive imaging and gated imaging, have been designed and implemented. For both designs a 640x512 15μm pitch format was chosen. The FPAs are integrated in compact dewar cooler configurations using AIM's split linear coolers. A command and control electronics (CCE) provides supply voltages, biasing, clocks, control and video digitization for easy system interfacing. For imaging under low-light conditions a low-noise 640x512 15μm pitch ROIC with CTIA input stages and correlated double sampling was designed. The ROIC provides rolling shutter and snapshot integration. To reduce size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) a 640x512 format detector in a 10μm pitch is under development. The module makes use of the extended SWIR spectral cut-off up to 2.5μm. To be used for active gated-viewing operation SWIR MCT avalanche photodiodes have been implemented and characterized on FPA level in a 640x512 15μm pitch format. The specific ROIC provides also the necessary functions for range gate control and triggering by the laser illumination. First lab and field tests of a gated viewing demonstrator have been carried out. The paper will present the development status and performance results of AIM's MCT based SWIR Modules for imaging applications.

    • Hypoxia induced cognitive impairment modulating activity of Cyperus rotundus.

      PubMed

      Kandikattu, Hemanth Kumar; Deep, Satya Narayan; Razack, Sakina; Amruta, Narayanappa; Prasad, Dipti; Khanum, Farhath

      2017-03-27

      Hypobaric hypoxia leads to decrease in cellular oxygen content which subsequently damages the hippocampus with an increase in brain oxidative stress and impairs the memory of the individual. In the present study, we have evaluated the cognitive impairment modulating activity of total oligomeric flavonoids fraction of Cyperus rotundus (TOF) in Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were trained for memory activity for a period of 7days followed by 7days exposure to 25,000ft. altitude and the spatial reference memory was evaluated. Behavioral analysis of the rats by Morris water maze experiment showed that TOF supplementation enhanced the spatial reference memory activity of the rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. The decrease in antioxidant status of the animals exposed to hypoxia was restored with TOF supplementation. The increase in ROS, lipid peroxidation products and protein carbonyls of the hippocampus was significantly decreased in animals with TOF administration. The histological assessment of the pyramidal cells of the hippocampus of hypoxia-exposed animals showed nuclear damage and TOF supplementation prevented nuclear damage. TOF administration suppressed hypoxia-induced increase in serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. GABA and Ach levels were decreased by hypoxia which was prevented by TOF supplementation. The increase in GFAP, HIF-1α and VEGF expression in CA3 region of the hippocampus in hypoxia-exposed rats was decreased in TOF administered rats. Taken together, TOF extract ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration in hippocampus through its anti-stress effects.

    • Modulation of aromatase activity by diet polyphenolic compounds.

      PubMed

      Monteiro, Rosário; Azevedo, Isabel; Calhau, Conceição

      2006-05-17

      Estrogens are involved in physiological actions related to reproduction, body fat distribution, and maintenance of bone mass and are also related to the pathogenesis of estrogen-dependent cancers. The aim of this work was to study the effect of polyphenols on estrogen synthesis. The effect of polyphenols and polyphenolic-rich beverages on aromatase activity was tested in JAR cells (a choriocarcinoma cell line) through the tritiated water release assay. Some of the tested polyphenols inhibited estrogen production, chrysin being the most potent. Additionally, we observed that red wine, alcohol-free red wine, green tea, and black tea (200 microL/mL) significantly decreased aromatase activity. No effect on aromatase expression, as assessed by western blotting and RT-PCR, has been detected after 24 h of treatment with any of the flavonoids under study. In conclusion, polyphenols are able to modulate aromatase activity and, consequently, estrogen synthesis. The knowledge of such interference may help to clarify some of the biological properties attributed to polyphenols and may be useful in prevention/treatment of estrogen-dependent disorders.

    • Influence of acetylcholinesterase immobilization on the photoluminescence properties of mesoporous silicon surface

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Saleem, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Lee, Ki Hwan

      2014-07-01

      Acetylcholinesterase immobilized p-type porous silicon surface was prepared by covalent attachment. The immobilization procedure was based on support surface chemical oxidation, silanization, surface activation with cyanuric chloride and finally covalent attachment of free enzyme on the cyanuric chloride activated porous silicon surface. Different pore diameter of porous silicon samples were prepared by electrochemical etching in HF based electrolyte solution and appropriate sample was selected suitable for enzyme immobilization with maximum trapping ability. The surface modification was studied through field emission scanning electron microscope, EDS, FT-IR analysis, and photoluminescence measurement by utilizing the fluctuation in the photoluminescence of virgin and enzyme immobilized porous silicon surface. Porous silicon showed strong photoluminescence with maximum emission at 643 nm and immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on porous silicon surface cause considerable increment on the photoluminescence of porous silicon material while acetylcholinesterase free counterpart did not exhibit any fluorescence in the range of 635-670 nm. The activities of the free and immobilized enzymes were evaluated by spectrophotometric method by using neostigmine methylsulfate as standard enzyme inhibitor. The immobilized enzyme exhibited considerable response toward neostigmine methylsulfate in a dose dependent manner comparable with that of its free counterpart alongside enhanced stability, easy separation from the reaction media and significant saving of enzyme. It was believed that immobilized enzyme can be exploited in organic and biomolecule synthesis possessing technical and economical prestige over free enzyme and prominence of easy separation from the reaction mixture.

    • Astrocytic Orosomucoid-2 Modulates Microglial Activation and Neuroinflammation.

      PubMed

      Jo, Myungjin; Kim, Jong-Heon; Song, Gyun Jee; Seo, Minchul; Hwang, Eun Mi; Suk, Kyoungho

      2017-03-15

      Orosomucoid (ORM) is an acute-phase protein that belongs to the immunocalin subfamily, a group of small-molecule-binding proteins with immunomodulatory functions. Little is known about the role of ORM proteins in the CNS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the brain expression of ORM and its role in neuroinflammation. Expression of Orm2, but not Orm1 or Orm3, was highly induced in the mouse brain after systemic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Plasma levels of ORM2 were also significantly higher in patients with cognitive impairment than in normal subjects. RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that astrocytes are the major cellular sources of ORM2 in the inflamed mouse brain. Recombinant ORM2 protein treatment decreased microglial production of proinflammatory mediators and reduced microglia-mediated neurotoxicity in vitro LPS-induced microglial activation, proinflammatory cytokines in hippocampus, and neuroinflammation-associated cognitive deficits also decreased as a result of intracerebroventricular injection of recombinant ORM2 protein in vivo Moreover, lentiviral shRNA-mediated Orm2 knockdown enhanced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and microglial activation in the hippocampus. Mechanistically, ORM2 inhibited C-C chemokine ligand 4 (CCL4)-induced microglial migration and activation by blocking the interaction of CCL4 with C-C chemokine receptor type 5. Together, the results from our cultured glial cells, mouse neuroinflammation model, and patient studies suggest that ORM2 is a novel mediator of astrocyte-microglial interaction. We also report that ORM2 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by modulating microglial activation and migration during brain inflammation. ORM2 can be exploited therapeutically for the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural cell interactions are important for brain physiology and pathology. Particularly, the interaction between non

    • Some enzymatic properties of brain Acetylcholinesterase from bluegill and channel catfish

      USGS Publications Warehouse

      Hogan, James W.; Knowles, Charles O.

      1968-01-01

      Using a manometric technique an acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7, acetylcholine acetyl-hydrolase) was demonstrated in brain tissue from the bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque, and the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Walbaum). The activities were 19 and 37 μmoles acetylcholine hydrolyzed/milligram protein per hour for the bluegill and channel catfish enzymes, respectively. The optimum substrate concentration for the hydrolysis of acetylcholine was 10 mMfor the enzymes from both species. Generally, the catfish acetylcholinesterase was somewhat more susceptible than the bluegill to the inhibitors tested; however, the bluegill enzyme was more susceptible to inhibition by malathion and malaoxon.

    • Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 5. Enrichment Activities for the Gifted/Talented.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Mallis, Jackie; Gilman, Sharlene

      The document presents Module 5, enrichment activities for the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small group interaction,…

    • Molecular Dynamics of Mouse Acetylcholinesterase Complexed with Huperzine A

      SciTech Connect

      Tara, Sylvia; Helms, Volkhard H.; Straatsma, TP; Mccammon, J Andrew A.

      1999-03-16

      Two molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a modeled complex of mouse acetylcholinesterase liganded with huperzine A (HupA). Analysis of these simulations shows that HupA shifts in the active site toward Tyr 337 and Phe 338, and that several residues in the active site area reach out to make hydrogen bonds with the inhibitor. Rapid fluctuations of the gorge width are observed, ranging from widths that allow substrate access to the active site, to pinched structures that do not allow access of molecules as small as water. Additional openings or channels to the active site are found. One opening is formed in the side wall of the active site gorge by residues Val 73, Asp 74, Thr 83, Glu 84, and Asn 87. Another opening is formed at the base of the gorge by residues Trp 86, Val 132, Glu 202, Gly 448, and Ile 451. Both of these openings have been observed separately in the Torpedo californica form of the enzyme. These channels could allow transport of waters and ions to and from the bulk solution.

    • Cannabinoids modulate spontaneous synaptic activity in retinal ganglion cells.

      PubMed

      Middleton, T P; Protti, D A

      2011-09-01

      The endocannabinoid (ECB) system has been found throughout the central nervous system and modulates cell excitability in various forms of short-term plasticity. ECBs and their receptors have also been localized to all retinal cells, and cannabinoid receptor activation has been shown to alter voltage-dependent conductances in several different retinal cell types, suggesting a possible role for cannabinoids in retinal processing. Their effects on synaptic transmission in the mammalian retina, however, have not been previously investigated. Here, we show that exogenous cannabinoids alter spontaneous synaptic transmission onto retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in whole-mount retinas, we measured spontaneous postsynaptic currents (SPSCs) in RGCs in adult and young (P14-P21) mice. We found that the addition of an exogenous cannabinoid agonist, WIN55212-2 (5 μM), caused a significant reversible reduction in the frequency of SPSCs. This change, however, did not alter the kinetics of the SPSCs, indicating a presynaptic locus of action. Using blockers to isolate inhibitory or excitatory currents, we found that cannabinoids significantly reduced the release probability of both GABA and glutamate, respectively. While the addition of cannabinoids reduced the frequency of both GABAergic and glutamatergic SPSCs in both young and adult mice, we found that the largest effect was on GABA-mediated currents in young mice. These results suggest that the ECB system may potentially be involved in the modulation of signal transmission in the retina. Furthermore, they suggest that it might play a role in the developmental maturation of synaptic circuits, and that exogenous cannabinoids are likely able to disrupt retinal processing and consequently alter vision.

    • Micro-Stirling Active Cooling Module (MS/ACM) for DoD Electronics Systems

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2012-03-01

      Micro- Stirling Active Cooling Module (MS/ACM) for DoD Electronics Systems Douglas S. Beck Beck Engineering , Inc. 1490 Lumsden Road, Port Orchard...refrigerator. We are developing for DARPA a cm-scale Micro- Stirling Active Cooling Module (MS/ACM) micro- refrigerator to benefit the DoD systems. Under...a DARPA contract, we are designing, building, and demonstrating a breadboard MS/ACM. Keywords: Stirling ; cooler; active cooling module; micro

    • Hydrophobic Moiety of Cationic Lipids Strongly Modulates Their Transfection Activity

      SciTech Connect

      Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris; Wang, Li; MacDonald, Robert C.

      2010-01-18

      Synthetic cationic lipids are widely used components of nonviral gene carriers, and the factors regulating their transfection efficiency are the subject of considerable interest. In view of the important role that electrostatic interactions with the polyanionic nucleic acids play in formation of lipoplexes, a common empirical approach to improving transfection has been the synthesis and testing of amphiphiles with new versions of positively charged polar groups, while much less attention has been given to the role of the hydrophobic lipid moieties. On the basis of data for {approx}20 cationic phosphatidylcholine (PC) derivatives, here we demonstrate that hydrocarbon chain variations of these lipids modulate by over 2 orders of magnitude their transfection efficiency. The observed molecular structure-activity relationship manifests in well-expressed dependences of activity on two important molecular characteristics, chain unsaturation and total number of carbon atoms in the lipid chains, which is representative of the lipid hydrophobic volume and hydrophilic-lipophilic ratio. Transfection increases with decrease of chain length and increase of chain unsaturation. Maximum transfection was found for cationic PCs with monounsaturated 14:1 chains. It is of particular importance that the high-transfection lipids strongly promote cubic phase formation in zwitterionic membrane phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). These remarkable correlations point to an alternative, chain-dependent process in transfection, not related to the electrostatic cationic-anionic lipid interactions.

  1. A human phospholipid phosphatase activated by a transmembrane control module.

    PubMed

    Halaszovich, Christian R; Leitner, Michael G; Mavrantoni, Angeliki; Le, Audrey; Frezza, Ludivine; Feuer, Anja; Schreiber, Daniela N; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A; Oliver, Dominik

    2012-11-01

    In voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs), a transmembrane voltage sensor domain (VSD) controls an intracellular phosphoinositide phosphatase domain, thereby enabling immediate initiation of intracellular signals by membrane depolarization. The existence of such a mechanism in mammals has remained elusive, despite the presence of VSP-homologous proteins in mammalian cells, in particular in sperm precursor cells. Here we demonstrate activation of a human VSP (hVSP1/TPIP) by an intramolecular switch. By engineering a chimeric hVSP1 with enhanced plasma membrane targeting containing the VSD of a prototypic invertebrate VSP, we show that hVSP1 is a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase whose predominant substrate is PI(4,5)P(2). In the chimera, enzymatic activity is controlled by membrane potential via hVSP1's endogenous phosphoinositide binding motif. These findings suggest that the endogenous VSD of hVSP1 is a control module that initiates signaling through the phosphatase domain and indicate a role for VSP-mediated phosphoinositide signaling in mammals.

  2. Active Desiccant Dehumidification Module Integration with Rooftop Packaged HVAC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J

    2002-04-17

    This report summarizes a research and development program that produced a stand-alone active desiccant module (ADM) that can be easily integrated with new or existing packaged cooling equipment. The program also produced a fully integrated hybrid system, combining the active desiccant section with a conventional direct expansion air-conditioning unit, that resulted in a compact, low-cost, energy-efficient end product. Based upon the results of this investigation, both systems were determined to be highly viable products for commercialization. Major challenges--including wheel development, compact packaging, regeneration burner development, control optimization, and low-cost design--were all successfully addressed by the final prototypes produced and tested as part of this program. Extensive laboratory testing was completed in the SEMCO laboratory for each of the two ADM system approaches. This testing confirmed the performance of the ADM systems to be attractive compared with that of alternate approaches currently used to precondition outdoor air, where a return air path is not readily available for passive desiccant recovery or where first cost is the primary design criterion. Photographs, schematics, and performance maps are provided for the ADM systems that were developed; and many of the control advantages are discussed. Based upon the positive results of this research and development program, field tests are under way for fully instrumented pilot installations of ADM systems in both a hotel/motel and a restaurant.

  3. Modulation of Group I Ribozyme Activity by Cationic Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ito, Tatsunobu; Tanaka, Takahiro; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cationic porphyrins on the catalytic activities of four group I ribozymes were investigated. A cationic porphyrin possessing four pyridinium moieties (pPyP) inhibited two group IC3 ribozymes (Syn Rz and Azo Rz) and a group IC1 ribozyme (Tet Rz). In the case of a group IA2 ribozyme (Td Rz), however, pPyP served not only as an inhibitor but also as an activator, and the effects of pPyP were dependent on its concentration. To analyze the structural and electronic factors determining the effects of pPyP on group I ribozymes, three cationic porphyrins (pPyNCP, pPyF4P, and TMPyP) were also examined. As interactions between small organic molecules and nucleic acids are attractive and important issues in biochemistry and biotechnology, this study contributes to the development of porphyrin-based molecules that can modulate functions of structured RNA molecules. PMID:25811638

  4. Materials and Process Activities for NASA's Composite Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polis, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to design, build, and test a full-scale Composite Crew Module (CCM). The overall goal of the CCM project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project s baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. The materials and process activities were prioritized based on a rapid prototype approach. This approach focused developmental activities on design details with greater risk and uncertainty, such as out-of-autoclave joining, over some of the more traditional lamina and laminate building block levels. While process development and associated building block testing were performed, several anomalies were still observed at the full-scale level due to interactions between process robustness and manufacturing scale-up. This paper describes the process anomalies that were encountered during the CCM development and the subsequent root cause investigations that led to the final design solutions. These investigations highlight the importance of full-scale developmental work early in the schedule of a complex composite design/build project.

  5. The active zone T-bar--a plasticity module?

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Carolin; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2010-09-01

    The synaptic active zone, the site where Ca(2+)-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles takes place, is commonly associated with protein-rich, electron-dense cytomatrices. The molecular composition and functional role of active zones, especially in the context of vesicular exo- and endocytosis, are under intense investigation. Per se, Drosophila synapses, which display so-called T-bars as electron-dense specializations, should be a highly suitable model system, as they allow for a combination of efficient genetics with ultrastructural and electrophysiological analyses. However, it needed a biochemical approach of the Buchner laboratory to "molecularly" access the T-bar by identification of the CAST/ERC-family member Bruchpilot as the first T-bar-residing protein. Genetic elimination of Bruchpilot revealed that the protein is essential for T-bar formation, calcium channel clustering, and hence proper vesicle fusion and patterned synaptic plasticity. Recently, Bruchpilot was shown to directly shape the T-bar, likely by adopting an elongated conformation. Moreover, first mechanisms that control the availability of Bruchpilot for T-bar assembly were described. This review seeks to summarize the information on T-bar structure, as well as on functional aspects, formulating the hypothesis that T-bars are genuine "plasticity modules."

  6. Characterization of lipid-protein interactions in acetylcholinesterase lipoprotein extracted from bovine erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beauregard, G; Roufogalis, B D

    1979-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase was released from bovine erythrocytes in hypo-osmotic sodium phosphate buffer. Initially, about 30% of the enzyme was released in a soluble lipoprotein form, and further incubation resulted in the progressive release of the enzyme in a particulate form. Solubilization of the acetylcholinesterase in the particulate fraction with Lubrol WX (2 mg/ml) resulted in the loss of all lipids except a non-exchangeable fraction identified as cardiolipin. Addition of a mixture of erythrocyte phospholipids to the soluble forms and to the Lubrol WX-solubilized enzyme resulted in the formation of particulate forms of the enzyme with increased partial specific volume and Stokes radius, and a break in the Arrhenius plot of the enzyme activity around 20 degrees C. The break in the Arrhenius plot was abolished by treatment of a soluble enzyme preparation with 1.8 M salt (NaCl) in phosphate buffer, conditions that allowed the extraction of cardiolipin from the enzyme by chloroform/methanol. Failure of the high-salt treatment to decrease the Stokes radius made it unlikely that the bound cardiolipin formed a boundary layer or annulus around the protein. It is suggested that cardiolipin is bound to the core of the dimeric protein structure, thereby controlling the acetylcholinesterase activity. PMID:475749

  7. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  8. Recent developments in the synthesis of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Marco, José L; Carreiras, M Carmo

    2003-09-01

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibitory activities of a series of pyrano[2,3-b]quinolines (2, 3), [1,8]naphthyridines (5, 6), 4-amino-2,3-diaryl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofuro[2,3-b]quinolines (11-13)/ 4-amino-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-2,3-diphenyl-5H-cyclohepta[e]furo[2,3-b]pyridine (14), 4-amino-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2,3-diphenylthieno[2,3-b]quinoline (15)/ 4-amino-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-2,3-diphenyl-5H-cyclohepta[e]thieno[2,3-b]pyridine (16) are described. These compounds are tacrine analogues that have been prepared from readily available polyfunctionalized ethyl [6-amino-5-cyano-4H-pyran]-3-carboxylates (9, 10), ethyl [6-amino-5-cyanopyridine]-3-carboxylates (7, 8), 2-amino-3-cyano-4,5-diarylfurans (17-19) and 2-amino-3-cyano-4,5-diphenylthiophene (20) via Friedländer condensation with selected ketones. These compounds are competitive and, in a few cases, non-competitive inhibitors for AChE, the most potent being compound (14), though three-fold less active than tacrine. The BuChE inhibitory activity is only significant in compounds 11 and 14, ten-fold less active than tacrine. Furthermore, the products 12 and 13 are selective and moderate AChE inhibitors.

  9. Active space debris removal by a hybrid propulsion module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, L. T.; Bernelli, F.; Maggi, F.; Tadini, P.; Pardini, C.; Anselmo, L.; Grassi, M.; Pavarin, D.; Francesconi, A.; Branz, F.; Chiesa, S.; Viola, N.; Bonnal, C.; Trushlyakov, V.; Belokonov, I.

    2013-10-01

    During the last 40 years, the mass of the artificial objects in orbit increased quite steadily at the rate of about 145 metric tons annually, leading to a total tally of approximately 7000 metric tons. Now, most of the cross-sectional area and mass (97% in LEO) is concentrated in about 4600 intact objects, i.e. abandoned spacecraft and rocket bodies, plus a further 1000 operational spacecraft. Simulations and parametric analyses have shown that the most efficient and effective way to prevent the outbreak of a long-term exponential growth of the catalogued debris population would be to remove enough cross-sectional area and mass from densely populated orbits. In practice, according to the most recent NASA results, the active yearly removal of approximately 0.1% of the abandoned intact objects would be sufficient to stabilize the catalogued debris in low Earth orbit, together with the worldwide adoption of mitigation measures. The candidate targets for removal would have typical masses between 500 and 1000 kg, in the case of spacecraft, and of more than 1000 kg, in the case of rocket upper stages. Current data suggest that optimal active debris removal missions should be carried out in a few critical altitude-inclination bands. This paper deals with the feasibility study of a mission in which the debris is removed by using a hybrid propulsion module as propulsion unit. Specifically, the engine is transferred from a servicing platform to the debris target by a robotic arm so to perform a controlled disposal. Hybrid rocket technology for de-orbiting applications is considered a valuable option due to high specific impulse, intrinsic safety, thrust throttle ability, low environmental impact and reduced operating costs. Typically, in hybrid rockets a gaseous or liquid oxidizer is injected into the combustion chamber along the axial direction to burn a solid fuel. However, the use of tangential injection on a solid grain Pancake Geometry allows for more compact design of

  10. Rare earth activated yttrium aluminate phosphors with modulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Muresan, L E; Popovici, E J; Perhaita, I; Indrea, E; Oro, J; Casan Pastor, N

    2016-06-01

    Yttrium aluminate (Y3 A5 O12 ) was doped with different rare earth ions (i.e. Gd(3+) , Ce(3+) , Eu(3+) and/or Tb(3+) ) in order to obtain phosphors (YAG:RE) with general formula,Y3-x-a Gdx REa Al5 O12 (x = 0; 1.485; 2.97 and a = 0.03). The synthesis of the phosphor samples was done using the simultaneous addition of reagents technique. This study reveals new aspects regarding the influence of different activator ions on the morpho-structural and luminescent characteristics of garnet type phosphor. All YAG:RE phosphors are well crystallized powders containing a cubic-Y3 Al5 O12 phase as major component along with monoclinic-Y4 Al2 O9 and orthorhombic-YAlO3 phases as the impurity. The crystallites dimensions of YAG:RE phosphors vary between 38 nm and 88 nm, while the unit cell slowly increase as the ionic radius of the activator increases. Under UV excitation, YAG:Ce exhibits yellow emission due to electron transition in Ce(3+) from the 5d level to the ground state levels ((2) F5/2 , (2) F7/2 ). The emission intensity of Ce(3+) is enhanced in the presence of the Tb(3+) ions and is decreased in the presence of Eu(3+) ions due to some radiative or non-radiative processes that take place between activator ions. By varying the rare earth ions, the emission colour can be modulated from green to white and red. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Morphinans and isoquinolines: acetylcholinesterase inhibition, pharmacophore modeling, and interaction with opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Daniela; Spetea, Mariana; Music, Melisa; Rief, Silvia; Fink, Monika; Kirchmair, Johannes; Schütz, Johannes; Wolber, Gerhard; Langer, Thierry; Stuppner, Hermann; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Rollinger, Judith M

    2010-07-15

    Following indications from pharmacophore-based virtual screening of natural product databases, morphinan and isoquinoline compounds were tested in vitro for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. After the first screen, active and inactive compounds were used to build a ligand-based pharmacophore model in order to prioritize compounds for biological testing. Among the virtual hits tested, the enrichment of actives was significantly higher than in a random selection of test compounds. The most active compounds were biochemically tested for their activity on mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors.

  12. Promoting Active Learning with Cases and Instructional Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Larry G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Proposes the use of cases and instructional modules to teach invention, engineering design, and technology management. Discusses the case method in graduate business education, cases and modules in engineering education, using cases in class, and the development and distribution of cases. Presents examples of using cases about total quality…

  13. Behavioral State Modulates the Activity of Brainstem Sensorimotor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Kimberly L.

    2011-01-01

    Sensorimotor processing must be modulated according to the animal's behavioral state. A previous study demonstrated that motion responses were strongly state dependent in birds. Vestibular eye and head responses were significantly larger and more compensatory during simulated flight, and a flight-specific vestibular tail response was also characterized. In the current study, we investigated the neural substrates for these state-dependent vestibular behaviors by recording extracellularly from neurons in the vestibular nuclear complex and comparing their spontaneous activity and sensory responses during default and simulated flight states. We show that motion-sensitive neurons in the lateral vestibular nucleus are state dependent. Some neurons increased their spontaneous firing rates during flight, though their increased excitability was not reflected in higher sensory gains. However, other neurons exhibited state-dependent gating of sensory inputs, responding to rotational stimuli only during flight. These results demonstrate that vestibular processing in the brainstem is state dependent and lay the foundation for future studies to investigate the synaptic mechanisms responsible for these modifications. PMID:22090497

  14. Cytoskeletal Modulation of Lipid Interactions Regulates Lck Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Chichili, Gurunadh R.; Cail, Robert C.; Rodgers, William

    2012-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton promotes clustering of proteins associated with cholesterol-dependent rafts, but its effect on lipid interactions that form and maintain rafts is not understood. We addressed this question by determining the effect of disrupting the cytoskeleton on co-clustering of dihexadecyl-(C16)-anchored DiO and DiI, which co-enrich in ordered lipid environments such as rafts. Co-clustering was assayed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in labeled T cells, where rafts function in the phosphoregulation of the Src family kinase Lck. Our results show that probe co-clustering was sensitive to depolymerization of actin filaments with latrunculin B (Lat B), inhibition of myosin II with blebbistatin, and treatment with neomycin to sequester phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Cytoskeletal effects on lipid interactions were not restricted to order-preferring label because co-clustering of C16-anchored DiO with didodecyl (C12)-anchored DiI, which favors disordered lipids, was also reduced by Lat B and blebbistatin. Furthermore, conditions that disrupted probe co-clustering resulted in activation of Lck. These data show that the cytoskeleton globally modulates lipid interactions in the plasma membrane, and this property maintains rafts that function in Lck regulation. PMID:22613726

  15. Acetylcholinesterase as a Biomarker in Environmental and Occupational Medicine: New Insights and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Caricato, Roberto; Calisi, Antonio; Giordano, Maria Elena; Schettino, Trifone

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a key enzyme in the nervous system. It terminates nerve impulses by catalysing the hydrolysis of neurotransmitter acetylcholine. As a specific molecular target of organophosphate and carbamate pesticides, acetylcholinesterase activity and its inhibition has been early recognized to be a human biological marker of pesticide poisoning. Measurement of AChE inhibition has been increasingly used in the last two decades as a biomarker of effect on nervous system following exposure to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides in occupational and environmental medicine. The success of this biomarker arises from the fact that it meets a number of characteristics necessary for the successful application of a biological response as biomarker in human biomonitoring: the response is easy to measure, it shows a dose-dependent behavior to pollutant exposure, it is sensitive, and it exhibits a link to health adverse effects. The aim of this work is to review and discuss the recent findings about acetylcholinesterase, including its sensitivity to other pollutants and the expression of different splice variants. These insights open new perspective for the future use of this biomarker in environmental and occupational human health monitoring. PMID:23936791

  16. Synthesis and in vitro acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory potential of hydrazide based Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Fazal; Ullah, Hayat; Taha, Muhammad; Wadood, Abdul; Javed, Muhammad Tariq; Rehman, Wajid; Nawaz, Mohsan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ali, Muhammad; Sajid, Muhammad; Ali, Farman; Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Khan, Khalid Mohammed

    2016-10-01

    To discover multifunctional agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, a series of hydrazide based Schiff bases were designed and synthesized based on multitarget-directed strategy. We have synthesized twenty-eight analogs of hydrazide based Schiff bases, characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and evaluated in vitro for acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition. All compounds showed varied degree of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition when compared with standard Eserine. Among the series, compounds 10, 3 and 24 having IC50 values 4.12±0.01, 8.12±0.01 and 8.41±0.06μM respectively showed potent acetylcholinesterase inhibition when compared with Eserine (IC50=0.85±0.0001μM). Three compounds 13, 24 and 3 having IC50 values 6.51±0.01, 9.22±0.07 and 37.82±0.14μM respectively showed potent butyrylcholinesterase inhibition by comparing with eserine (IC50=0.04±0.0001μM). The remaining compounds also exhibited moderate to weak inhibitory potential. Structure activity relationship has been established. Through molecular docking studies the binding interaction was confirmed.

  17. Acetylcholinesterase as a biomarker in environmental and occupational medicine: new insights and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lionetto, Maria Giulia; Caricato, Roberto; Calisi, Antonio; Giordano, Maria Elena; Schettino, Trifone

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a key enzyme in the nervous system. It terminates nerve impulses by catalysing the hydrolysis of neurotransmitter acetylcholine. As a specific molecular target of organophosphate and carbamate pesticides, acetylcholinesterase activity and its inhibition has been early recognized to be a human biological marker of pesticide poisoning. Measurement of AChE inhibition has been increasingly used in the last two decades as a biomarker of effect on nervous system following exposure to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides in occupational and environmental medicine. The success of this biomarker arises from the fact that it meets a number of characteristics necessary for the successful application of a biological response as biomarker in human biomonitoring: the response is easy to measure, it shows a dose-dependent behavior to pollutant exposure, it is sensitive, and it exhibits a link to health adverse effects. The aim of this work is to review and discuss the recent findings about acetylcholinesterase, including its sensitivity to other pollutants and the expression of different splice variants. These insights open new perspective for the future use of this biomarker in environmental and occupational human health monitoring.

  18. Flavonoids induce the expression of acetylcholinesterase in cultured osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miranda L; Bi, Cathy W C; Kong, Ava Y Y; Dong, Tina T X; Wong, Yung H; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-11-25

    Flavonoids, a group of natural compounds mainly derived from plants, are known to possess osteogenic effects in bone cells. Here, we aimed to test if flavonoid could induce a cholinergic enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), as well as bone differentiation. In cultured rat osteoblasts, twenty flavonoids, deriving from Chinese herbs and having known induction of alkaline phosphatase (ALP(1)) expression, were tested for its induction activity on AChE expression. Eleven flavonoids showed the induction, and five of them had robust activation of AChE expression, including baicalin, calycosin, genistin, hyperin and pratensein: the induction of AChE included the levels of mRNA, protein and enzymatic activity. Moreover, the flavonoid-induced AChE expression in cultured osteoblast was in proline-rich membrane anchor (PRiMA)-linked tetrameric globular form (G4) only. In parallel, the expression of PRiMA was also induced by the application of flavonoids. The flavonoid-induced AChE in the cultures was not affected by estrogen receptor blocker, ICI 182,780. Taken together, the induction of PRiMA-linked AChE in osteoblast should be independent to classical estrogen signaling pathway.

  19. Perspectives for the structure-based design of acetylcholinesterase reactivators.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Rodrigo; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Zuluaga, Andres F

    2016-07-01

    Rational design of active molecules through structure-based methods has been gaining adepts during the last decades due to the wider availability of protein structures, most of them conjugated with relevant ligands. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a molecular target with a considerable amount of data related to its sequence and 3-dimensional structure. In addition, there are structural insights about the mechanism of action of the natural substrate and drugs used in Alzheimer's disease, organophosphorus compounds, among others. We looked for AChE structural data useful for in silico design of potential interacting molecules. In particular, we focused on information regarding the design of ligands aimed to reactivate AChE catalytic activity. The structures of 178 AChE were annotated and categorized on different subsets according to the nature of the ligand, source organisms and experimental details. We compared sequence homology among the active site from Torpedo californica, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens with the latter two species having the closest relationship (88.9% identity). In addition, the mechanism of organophosphorus binding and the design of effective reactivators are reviewed. A curated data collection obtained with information from several sources was included for researchers working on the field. Finally, a molecular dynamics simulation with human AChE indicated that the catalytic pocket volume stabilizes around 600 Å(3), providing additional clues for drug design.

  20. Glucocorticoid-independent modulation of GR activity: Implications for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hapgood, Janet P.; Avenant, Chanel; Moliki, Johnson M.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological doses of glucocorticoids (GCs), acting via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to repress inflammation and immune function, remain the most effective therapy in the treatment of inflammatory and immune diseases. Since many patients on GC therapy exhibit GC-resistance and severe side-effects, much research is focussed on developing more selective GCs and combination therapies, with greater anti-inflammatory potency. GCs mediate their classical genomic transcriptional effects by binding to the cytoplasmic GR, followed by nuclear translocation and modulation of transcription of target genes by direct DNA-binding of the GR or its tethering to other transcription factors. Recent evidence suggests, however, that the responses mediated by the GR are much more complex and involve multiple parallel mechanisms integrating simultaneous signals from other receptors, both in the absence and presence of GCs, to shift the sensitivity of a target cell to GCs. The level of cellular stress, immune activation status, or the cell cycle phase may be crucial for determining GC sensitivity and GC responsiveness as well as subcellular localization of the GR and GR levels. Central to the development of new drugs that target GR signalling alone or as add-on therapies, is an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms of GC-independent GR desensitization, priming and activation of the unliganded GR, as well as synergy and cross-talk with other signalling pathways. This review will discuss the information currently available on these topics and their relevance to immunotherapy, as well as identify unanswered questions and future areas of research. PMID:27288728

  1. Allergy Enhances Neurogenesis and Modulates Microglial Activation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Barbara; Mrowetz, Heike; Thalhamer, Josef; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Weiss, Richard; Aigner, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Allergies and their characteristic TH2-polarized inflammatory reactions affect a substantial part of the population. Since there is increasing evidence that the immune system modulates plasticity and function of the central nervous system (CNS), we investigated the effects of allergic lung inflammation on the hippocampus—a region of cellular plasticity in the adult brain. The focus of the present study was on microglia, the resident immune cells of the CNS, and on hippocampal neurogenesis, i.e., the generation of new neurons. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized with a clinically relevant allergen derived from timothy grass pollen (Phl p 5). As expected, allergic sensitization induced high serum levels of allergen-specific immunoglobulins (IgG1 and IgE) and of TH2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13). Surprisingly, fewer Iba1+ microglia were found in the granular layer (GL) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and also the number of Iba1+MHCII+ cells was lower, indicating a reduced microglial surveillance and activation in the hippocampus of allergic mice. Neurogenesis was analyzed by labeling of proliferating cells with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and determining their fate 4 weeks later, and by quantitative analysis of young immature neurons, i.e., cells expressing doublecortin (DCX). The number of DCX+ cells was clearly increased in the allergy animals. Moreover, there were more BrdU+ cells present in the hippocampus of allergic mice, and these newly born cells had differentiated into neurons as indicated by a higher number of BrdU+NeuN+ cells. In summary, allergy led to a reduced microglia presence and activity and to an elevated level of neurogenesis in the hippocampus. This effect was apparently specific to the hippocampus, as we did not observe these alterations in the subventricular zone (SVZ)/olfactory bulb (OB) system, also a region of high cellular plasticity and adult neurogenesis. PMID:27445696

  2. Glucocorticoid-independent modulation of GR activity: Implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hapgood, Janet P; Avenant, Chanel; Moliki, Johnson M

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacological doses of glucocorticoids (GCs), acting via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to repress inflammation and immune function, remain the most effective therapy in the treatment of inflammatory and immune diseases. Since many patients on GC therapy exhibit GC resistance and severe side-effects, much research is focused on developing more selective GCs and combination therapies, with greater anti-inflammatory potency. GCs mediate their classical genomic transcriptional effects by binding to the cytoplasmic GR, followed by nuclear translocation and modulation of transcription of target genes by direct DNA binding of the GR or its tethering to other transcription factors. Recent evidence suggests, however, that the responses mediated by the GR are much more complex and involve multiple parallel mechanisms integrating simultaneous signals from other receptors, both in the absence and presence of GCs, to shift the sensitivity of a target cell to GCs. The level of cellular stress, immune activation status, or the cell cycle phase may be crucial for determining GC sensitivity and GC responsiveness as well as subcellular localization of the GR and GR levels. Central to the development of new drugs that target GR signaling alone or as add-on therapies, is an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms of GC-independent GR desensitization, priming and activation of the unliganded GR, as well as synergy and cross-talk with other signaling pathways. This review will discuss the information currently available on these topics and their relevance to immunotherapy, as well as identify unanswered questions and future areas of research.

  3. Behavioral activation system modulation on brain activation during appetitive and aversive stimulus processing

    PubMed Central

    Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sanjuán-Tomás, Ana; Belloch, Vicente; Parcet, Maria-Antònia; Ávila, César

    2010-01-01

    The reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposed the behavioral activation system (BAS) as a neurobehavioral system that is dependent on dopamine-irrigated structures and that mediates the individual differences in sensitivity and reactivity to appetitive stimuli associated with BAS-related personality traits. Theoretical developments propose that high BAS sensitivity is associated with both enhanced appetitive stimuli processing and the diminished processing of aversive stimuli. The objective of this study was to analyze how individual differences in BAS functioning were associated with brain activation during erotic and aversive picture processing while subjects were involved in a simple goal-directed task. Forty-five male participants took part in this study. The task activation results confirm the activation of the reward and punishment brain-related structures while viewing erotic and aversive pictures, respectively. The SR scores show a positive correlation with activation of the left lateral prefrontal cortex, the mesial prefrontal cortex and the right occipital cortex while viewing erotic pictures, and a negative correlation with the right lateral prefrontal cortex and the left occipital cortex while viewing aversive pictures. In summary, the SR scores modulate the activity of the cortical areas in the prefrontal and the occipital cortices that are proposed to modulate the BAS and the BIS-FFFS. PMID:20147458

  4. Can Salivary Acetylcholinesterase be a Diagnostic Biomarker for Alzheimer?

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Moghadam, Nahid Beladi; Ehsani, Marjan; Mortazavi, Hamed; Sabour, Siamak

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The loss of brain cholinergic activity is a key phenomenon in the biochemistry of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Due to the specific biosynthesis of Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) of cholinergic neurons, the enzyme has been proposed as a potential biochemical marker of cholinergic activity. AChE is expressed not only in the Central Nervous System (CNS), Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) and muscles, but also on the surface of blood cells and saliva. Aim This study aimed to measure salivary AChE activity in AD and to determine the feasibility of creating a simple laboratory test for diagnosing such patients. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the recorded data were obtained from 15 Alzheimer’s patients on memantine therapy and 15 healthy subjects. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were collected from the participants and salivary levels of AChE activity were determined by using the Ellman colorimetric method. The Mann Whitney U test was used to compare the average (median) of AChE activity between AD and controls. In order to adjust for possible confounding factors, partial correlation coefficient and multivariate linear regressions were used. Results Although the average of AChE activity in the saliva of people with AD was lower compared to the control group, we found no statistically significant differences using Mann Whitney U test (138 in control group vs. 175 in Alzheimer’s patients, p value=0.25). Additionally, no significant differences were observed in the activity of this enzyme in both sexes or with increased age or duration of the disease. After adjusting for age and gender, there was no association between AChE activity and AD (regression coefficient β=0.08; p value= 0.67). conclusion Saliva AChE activity was not significantly associated with AD. This study might help in introduce a new diagnostic aid for AD or monitor patients with AD. PMID:28274046

  5. Unified active and reactive power modulation of HVDC transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, C. E.; Pohl, R. V.

    1981-11-01

    The power modulation of a high voltage direct current (HVDC) system for stabilization of an ac/dc network was investigated. It was found that simultaneous modulation of both dc current and voltage was more effective than just current modulation by itself, since the dc voltage modulation could be used to minimize the reactive power changes resulting from a change of the dc current. This helps stabilize the ac busbar voltages at the converters, which reduces undesirable load flow changes to voltage dependent ac loads, thus improving the effectiveness of the dc power modulation. This unified modulation control concept was evaluated by means of digital computer studies as well as a special purpose HVDC simulator. Several combined ac/dc power transmission systems were synthesized for testing of different modulation controller concepts. An optimum controller design incorporating a linear quadratic control algorithm with full state feedback was first studied. This provided a basis for comparison of suboptimal controller designs utilizing reduced state feedback and a Kalman filter state reconstruction technique.

  6. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and acetylcholinesterase: biomarkers for the joint effects of cadmium, zinc and methyl parathion contamination in water.

    PubMed

    Ling, XuePing; Zhang, YiHeng; Lu, YingHua; Huang, HeQing

    2011-10-01

    Heavy metals are known to reduce the activities of antioxidant enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase, catalase), while organophosphorous insecticides are known to inhibit the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. In this study, the activities of these three enzymes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) tissues were assessed to evaluate the consequences heavy metal and organophosphate contamination in aquatic systems. When the fish were contacted with water containing a single pollutant, superoxide dismutase activity was affected by the presence of Cd but not by methyl parathion or Zn. However, catalase and acetylcholinesterase activities were sensitive to all three pollutants. The combined treatment showed that the three enzymes could be chosen as biomarkers of joint pollution by both metals and organophosphate. Toxicity tests showed an antagonism interaction between methyl parathion and Cd or Zn, and the change of enzyme activities at 96 hours was in accordance with that.

  7. Crystal Structure of Snake Venom Acetylcholinesterase in Complex with Inhibitory Antibody Fragment Fab410 Bound at the Peripheral Site

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Yves; Renault, Ludovic; Marchot, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    The acetylcholinesterase found in the venom of Bungarus fasciatus (BfAChE) is produced as a soluble, non-amphiphilic monomer with a canonical catalytic domain but a distinct C terminus compared with the other vertebrate enzymes. Moreover, the peripheral anionic site of BfAChE, a surface site located at the active site gorge entrance, bears two substitutions altering sensitivity to cationic inhibitors. Antibody Elec410, generated against Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase (EeAChE), inhibits EeAChE and BfAChE by binding to their peripheral sites. However, both complexes retain significant residual catalytic activity, suggesting incomplete gorge occlusion by bound antibody and/or high frequency back door opening. To explore a novel acetylcholinesterase species, ascertain the molecular bases of inhibition by Elec410, and document the determinants and mechanisms for back door opening, we solved a 2.7-Å resolution crystal structure of natural BfAChE in complex with antibody fragment Fab410. Crystalline BfAChE forms the canonical dimer found in all acetylcholinesterase structures. Equally represented open and closed states of a back door channel, associated with alternate positions of a tyrosine phenol ring at the active site base, coexist in each subunit. At the BfAChE molecular surface, Fab410 is seated on the long Ω-loop between two N-glycan chains and partially occludes the gorge entrance, a position that fully reflects the available mutagenesis and biochemical data. Experimentally based flexible molecular docking supports a similar Fab410 binding mode onto the EeAChE antigen. These data document the molecular and dynamic peculiarities of BfAChE with high frequency back door opening, and the mode of action of Elec410 as one of the largest peptidic inhibitors targeting the acetylcholinesterase peripheral site. PMID:25411244

  8. Are soluble and membrane-bound rat brain acetylcholinesterase different

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, C.; el Mourabit, M.; Stutz, C.; Mark, J.; Waksman, A. )

    1990-11-01

    Salt-soluble and detergent-soluble acetylcholinesterases (AChE) from adult rat brain were purified to homogeneity and studied with the aim to establish the differences existing between these two forms. It was found that the enzymatic activities of the purified salt-soluble AChE as well as the detergent-soluble AChE were dependent on the Triton X-100 concentration. Moreover, the interaction of salt-soluble AChE with liposomes suggests amphiphilic behaviour of this enzyme. Serum cholinesterase (ChE) did not bind to liposomes but its activity was also detergent-dependent. Detergent-soluble AChE remained in solution below critical micellar concentrations of Triton X-100. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified, Biobeads-treated and iodinated detergent-soluble 11 S AChE showed, under non reducing conditions, bands of 69 kD, 130 kD and greater than 250 kD corresponding, respectively, to monomers, dimers and probably tetramers of the same polypeptide chain. Under reducing conditions, only a 69 kD band was detected. It is proposed that an amphiphilic environment stabilizes the salt-soluble forms of AChE in the brain in vivo and that detergent-soluble Biobeads-treated 11 S AChE possess hydrophobic domain(s) different from the 20 kD peptide already described.

  9. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition within the lycorine series of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; van Staden, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    The plant family Amaryllidaceae occupies a privileged status within the botanical hierarchy due to its horticultural and ornamental appeal, as well as its widespread usage in the traditional medicinal practices of indigenous peoples across the globe. Of greater significance are the unique, structurally-diverse alkaloid constituents produced by members of the family, which has spawned several biologically significant molecules. In this regard, the Alzheimer's drug galanthamine has gained much prominence due to its selective and reversible inhibitory interaction with the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), of significance in the progression of neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The lycorine series of compounds within the family have recently emerged as novel inhibitors of AChE, in some instances with higher levels of activity compared with the commercial drug galanthamine, making them attractive targets for natural product and synthetically-driven structure-activity relationship studies. This brief survey traces the emergence of lycorine compounds over the past decade as promising leads in the therapeutic approach towards AD and their possible future advancement onto the clinical stage.

  10. Activity of catalytic silver nanoparticles modulated by capping agent hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Janani, Seralathan; Stevenson, Priscilla; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a facile in situ method is reported for the preparation of catalytic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using N-acyl tyramine (NATA) with variable hydrophobic acyl length. Scanning electron microscopic analysis shows that NATA exists initially as larger aggregates in alkaline aqueous solution. The addition of AgNO3 dissociates these larger aggregate and subsequently promotes the formation of self-assembled NATA and AgNPs. Characterization of AgNPs using UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope revealed that the hydrophobic acyl chain length of NATA does not influence the particle size, shape and morphology. All NATA-AgNPs yielded relatively identical values in full width at half-maximum (FWHM) analysis, indicating that the AgNPs prepared with NATA are relatively polydispersed at all tested acyl chain lengths. These nanoparticles are able to efficiently catalyze the reduction of 4-nitro phenol to 4-amino phenol, 2-nitro aniline to 1,2-diamino benzene, 2,4,6-trinitro phenol to 2,4,6-triamino phenol by NaBH4 in an aqueous environment. The reduction reaction rate is determined to be pseudo-first order and the apparent rate constant is linearly dependent on the hydrophobic acyl chain length of the NATA. All reaction kinetics presented an induction period, which is dependent on the N-acyl chain length, indicating that the hydrophobic effects play a critical role in bringing the substrate to the metal nanoparticle surface to induce the catalytic reaction. In this study, however, the five catalytic systems have similar size and polydispersity, differing only in terms of capping agent hydrophobicity, and shows different catalytic activity with respect to the alkyl chain length of the capping agent. As discussed, the ability to modulate the metal nanoparticles catalytic property, by modifying the capping agent hydrophobicity represents a promising future for developing an efficient nanocatalyst without altering the size

  11. A point mutation in the acetylcholinesterase-1 gene is associated with chlorpyrifos resistance in the plant bug Apolygus lucorum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuwen; Zuo, Kairan; Kang, Zhaokui; Yang, Yihua; Oakeshott, John G; Wu, Yidong

    2015-10-01

    Control of Chinese Apolygus lucorum relies heavily on organophosphate insecticides. Here we describe resistance to the organophosphate chlorpyrifos in an A. lucorum strain, BZ-R, which was developed from a field-collected strain (BZ) by selection with chlorpyrifos in the laboratory. BZ-R showed 21-58 fold resistance to chlorpyrifos compared with the laboratory reference strain LSF and another susceptible strain, BZ-S, derived from BZ. BZ-R also showed several fold resistance to two other organophosphates and a carbamate. No synergism of chlorpyrifos by metabolic enzyme inhibitors nor any increase in detoxifying enzyme activities were observed in BZ-R. No sequence differences in acetylcholinesterase-2 were found to be associated with the resistance but the frequency of an alanine to serine substitution at position 216 of acetylcholinesterase-1 was 100% in BZ-R, ∼21-23% in SLF and BZ, and 0% in BZ-S. A single generation treatment of chlorpyrifos on the BZ strain also increased its frequency of the serine substitution to 64%. Recombinantly expressed acetylcholinesterase-1 carrying the serine substitution was about five fold less sensitive to inhibition by chlorpyrifos oxon than the wild-type enzyme. Quantitative real-time PCR found no differences in ace1 or ace2 expression levels among the strains tested. Thus the chlorpyrifos resistance is strongly associated with the serine substituted acetylcholinesterase-1. An equivalent substitution has been found to confer resistance to many organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in four other insect species.

  12. Blackout!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Electricity and Solar Activity Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  13. Blackout!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Electricity and Solar Activity Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  14. Toxin-Antitoxin Modules Are Pliable Switches Activated by Multiple Protease Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Muthuramalingam, Meenakumari; White, John C.; Bourne, Christina R.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are bacterial regulatory switches that facilitate conflicting outcomes for cells by promoting a pro-survival phenotypic adaptation and/or by directly mediating cell death, all through the toxin activity upon degradation of antitoxin. Intensive study has revealed specific details of TA module functions, but significant gaps remain about the molecular details of activation via antitoxin degradation used by different bacteria and in different environments. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the interaction of antitoxins with cellular proteases Lon and ClpP to mediate TA module activation. An understanding of these processes can answer long-standing questions regarding stochastic versus specific activation of TA modules and provide insight into the potential for manipulation of TA modules to alter bacterial growth. PMID:27409636

  15. Modulation of Leishmania major aquaglyceroporin activity by a mitogen-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Goutam; Sharma, Mansi; Kruse, Martin; Sander-Juelch, Claudia; Munro, Laura Anne; Wang, Yong; Vilg, Jenny Veide; Tamás, Markus J; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Wiese, Martin; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Summary Leishmania major aquaglyceroporin (LmjAQP1) adventitiously facilitates the uptake of antimonite [Sb(III)], an active form of Pentostam® or Glucantime®, which are the first line of defense against all forms of leishmaniasis. The present paper shows that LmjAQP1 activity is modulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase, LmjMPK2. Leishmania parasites co-expressing LmjAQP1 and LmjMPK2 show increased Sb(III) uptake and increased Sb(III) sensitivity. When subjected to a hypo-osmotic stress, these cells show faster volume recovery than cells expressing LmjAQP1 alone. LmjAQP1 is phosphorylated in vivo at Thr197 and this phosphorylation requires LmjMPK2 activity. Lys42 of LmjMPK2 is critical for its kinase activity. Cells expressing altered T197A LmjAQP1 or K42A LmjMPK2 showed decreased Sb(III) influx and a slower volume recovery than cells expressing wild type proteins. Phosphorylation of LmjAQP1 led to a decrease in its turnover rate affecting LmjAQP1 activity. Although LmjAQP1 is localized to the flagellum of promastigotes, upon phosphorylation, it is relocalized to the entire surface of the parasite. L. mexicana promastigotes with an MPK2 deletion showed reduced Sb(III) uptake and slower volume recovery than wild type cells. This is the first report where a parasite aquaglyceroporin activity is post-translationally modulated by a MAP kinase. PMID:22779703

  16. A novel role for synaptic acetylcholinesterase as an apoptotic deoxyribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Du, Aiying; Xie, Jing; Guo, Kaijie; Yang, Lei; Wan, Yihan; OuYang, Qi; Zhang, Xuejin; Niu, Xin; Lu, Lu; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    In addition to terminating neurotransmission by hydrolyzing acetylcholine, synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChES) has been found to have a pro-apoptotic role. However, the underlying mechanism has rarely been investigated. Here, we report a nuclear translocation-dependent role for AChES as an apoptotic deoxyribonuclease (DNase). AChES polypeptide binds to and cleaves naked DNA at physiological pH in a Ca2+–Mg2+-dependent manner. It also cleaves chromosomal DNA both in pre-fixed and in apoptotic cells. In the presence of a pan-caspase inhibitor, the cleavage still occurred after nuclear translocation of AChES, implying that AChES-DNase acts in a CAD- and EndoG-independent manner. AChE gene knockout impairs apoptotic DNA cleavage; this impairment is rescued by overexpression of the wild-type but not (aa 32–138)-deleted AChES. Furthermore, in comparison with the nuclear-localized wild-type AChES, (aa 32–138)-deleted AChES loses the capacity to initiate apoptosis. These observations confirm that AChES mediates apoptosis via its DNase activity. PMID:27462404

  17. Mutations in Acetylcholinesterase2 (ace2) increase the insensitivity of acetylcholinesterase to fosthiazate in the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Kun; Wu, Qin-Song; Peng, Huan; Kong, Ling-An; Liu, Shi-Ming; Yin, Hua-Qun; Cui, Ru-Qiang; Zhan, Li-Ping; Cui, Jiang-Kuan; Peng, De-Liang

    2016-11-29

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita causes severe damage to continuously cropping vegetables. The control of this nematode relies heavily on organophosphate nematicides in China. Here, we described resistance to the organophosphate nematicide fosthiazate in a greenhouse-collected resistant population (RP) and a laboratory susceptible population (SP) of M. incognita. Fosthiazate was 2.74-fold less toxic to nematodes from RP than that from SP. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the acetylcholinesterase2 (ace2) transcription level in the RP was significantly higher than that in the SP. Eighteen nonsynonymous amino acid differences in ace2 were observed between the cDNA fragments of the RP and SP. The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) protein activity in the RP was significantly reduced compared with that in the SP. After knocking down the ace2 gene, the ace2 transcription level was significantly decreased, but no negative impact on the infection of juveniles was observed. The 50% lethal concentration of the RNAi RP population decreased 40%, but the inhibition rate of fosthiazate against AChE activity was significantly increased in RP population. Thus, the increased fosthiazate insensitivity in the M. incognita resistant population was strongly associated with mutations in ace2. These results provide valuable insights into the resistance mechanism of root-knot nematode to organophosphate nematicides.

  18. Mutations in Acetylcholinesterase2 (ace2) increase the insensitivity of acetylcholinesterase to fosthiazate in the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Kun; Wu, Qin-Song; Peng, Huan; Kong, Ling-An; Liu, Shi-Ming; Yin, Hua-Qun; Cui, Ru-Qiang; Zhan, Li-Ping; Cui, Jiang-Kuan; Peng, De-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita causes severe damage to continuously cropping vegetables. The control of this nematode relies heavily on organophosphate nematicides in China. Here, we described resistance to the organophosphate nematicide fosthiazate in a greenhouse-collected resistant population (RP) and a laboratory susceptible population (SP) of M. incognita. Fosthiazate was 2.74-fold less toxic to nematodes from RP than that from SP. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the acetylcholinesterase2 (ace2) transcription level in the RP was significantly higher than that in the SP. Eighteen nonsynonymous amino acid differences in ace2 were observed between the cDNA fragments of the RP and SP. The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) protein activity in the RP was significantly reduced compared with that in the SP. After knocking down the ace2 gene, the ace2 transcription level was significantly decreased, but no negative impact on the infection of juveniles was observed. The 50% lethal concentration of the RNAi RP population decreased 40%, but the inhibition rate of fosthiazate against AChE activity was significantly increased in RP population. Thus, the increased fosthiazate insensitivity in the M. incognita resistant population was strongly associated with mutations in ace2. These results provide valuable insights into the resistance mechanism of root-knot nematode to organophosphate nematicides. PMID:27897265

  19. Active cancellation of residual amplitude modulation in a frequency-modulation based Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinan; Wang, Yicheng; Pratt, Jon R.

    2016-03-01

    Residual amplitude modulation (RAM) is one of the most common noise sources known to degrade the sensitivity of frequency modulation spectroscopy. RAM can arise as a result of the temperature dependent birefringence of the modulator crystal, which causes the orientation of the crystal's optical axis to shift with respect to the polarization of the incident light with temperature. In the fiber-based optical interferometer used on the National Institute of Standards and Technology calculable capacitor, RAM degrades the measured laser frequency stability and correlates with the environmental temperature fluctuations. We have demonstrated a simple approach that cancels out excessive RAM due to polarization mismatch between the light and the optical axis of the crystal. The approach allows us to measure the frequency noise of a heterodyne beat between two lasers individually locked to different resonant modes of a cavity with an accuracy better than 0.5 ppm, which meets the requirement to further determine the longitudinal mode number of the cavity length. Also, this approach has substantially mitigated the temperature dependency of the measurements of the cavity length and consequently the capacitance.

  20. Studying modulation on simultaneously activated SSVEP neural networks by a cognitive task.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenghua

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP), it has been used in many fields. Numerous studies suggest that there exist three SSVEP neural networks in different frequency bands. An obvious phenomenon has been observed, that the amplitude and phase of SSVEP can be modulated by a cognitive task. Previous works have studied this modulation on separately activated SSVEP neural networks by a cognitive task. If two or more SSVEP neural networks are activated simultaneously in the process of a cognitive task, is the modulation on different SSVEP neural networks the same? In this study, two different SSVEP neural networks were activated simultaneously by two different frequency flickers, with a working memory task irrelevant to the flickers being conducted at the same time. The modulated SSVEP waves were compared with each other and to those only under one flicker in previous studies. The comparison results show that the cognitive task can modulate different SSVEP neural networks with a similar style.

  1. Energy-Storage Modules for Active Solar Heating and Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    34 page report describes a melting salt hydrate that stores 12 times as much heat as rocks and other heavy materials. Energy is stored mostly as latent heat; that is, heat that can be stored and recovered without any significant change in temperature. Report also describes development, evaluation and testing of permanently sealed modules containing salt hydrate mixture.

  2. Smart active multiwave sensing with zero background amplitude modulated probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.J.; Young, R.A.; Jelsma, L.

    1994-07-01

    Recently, a new approach to multi-wavelength remote sensing has been proposed based on the generation and detection of spectral ``pickets`` synthesized from the frequency filtered bandwidth of a modelocked laser. Using linear array liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) technology for spectral filtering permits real time grey scale control of individual picket amplitudes and phases, making it possible to independently modulate picket characteristics in the kHz to MHz regime. Due to the versatility of this approach, a whole suite of spectroscopies based on detection techniques that are similar to conventional sideband spectroscopies can be implemented. These techniques not only inherit the S/N advantages of their conventional counterparts, they can also be easily extended to simultaneous multi-wavelength operation using frequency multiplex techniques and configured for real time adaptive data acquisition. We report the laboratory demonstration and theoretical development of a new class of zero background AM modulated spectroscopic probes for differential absorption measurements. Preliminary detection sensitivities on the order of 10{sup {minus}6} can be inferred from our measurements. Application of this technique to realistic remote sensing scenarios, advantages over other modulation and direct detection approaches, as well as the present limitations and theoretical limits to detection sensitivity will be discussed.

  3. The influence of active cell design on a monolithic organic photovoltaic module: fabrication and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hong-Kun; Sim, Jun Hyoung; Jeong, Seonju; Woo, Sung-Ho; Shin, Jang-Kyoo; Han, Yoon Soo

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the influence of an active cell design on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a monolithic organic photovoltaic (OPV) module was investigated using experimental methods and circuit simulation. For circuit simulation using computer simulation-based study, the organic PV cell was described by a circuit-based two-diode model and the modules were simulated under several conditions including shading effect, diode model parameters, series resistance and shunt resistance, etc. A unit organic PV cell as a reference device and four types of monolithic organic PV modules with different active cell length were fabricated together on the same glass substrate. The characteristics of the fabricated unit OPV cell were measured and the electrical parameters were extracted to use them for the simulation of four types of monolithic organic PV modules. To analyze the influence of OPV cell design on the PCE of monolithic organic PV modules, the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curves and the PCEs of the four type monolithic OPV modules with different active cell length were obtained and compared with the simulated results. The simulated I-V curves were matched well with the measured I-V curves for the four types of monolithic organic PV modules with different active cell length. The highest PCE of the monolithic OPV module was 2.86 % with the active cell length of 11.6 mm. We expect that this work is meaningful to enhance the performance of a monolithic OPV module to a certain extent and it offers a method to design a high-efficiency large-area monolithic OPV module.

  4. Russian Activities in Space Photovoltaic Power Modules with Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, Vyacheslav M.; Rumyantsev, Valeri D.

    2004-01-01

    Space concentrator modules with point-and line-focus Fresnel lenses and with reflective parabolic troughs have been developed recently at Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute. PV receivers for these modules are based: on the single junction LPE and MOCVD AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells characterized by AM0 efficiencies of 23.5 - 24% at 20 - 50 suns and 24 - 24.75 at 50 - 200 suns; on the mechanically stacked tandem AlGaAs/GaAs-GaSb cells with efficiency of 27 - 28 at 20 - 100 suns. MOCVD AlGaAs/GaAs cells with internal Bragg reflector have shown a higher radiation resistance as compared to a traditional structure. Monolithic two-terminal tandems AlGaAs (top)-GaAs (bottom) for space application and GaSb (top) - InGaAsSb (bottom) for TRV application are under development as well.

  5. Thermal denaturation of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase: Is aggregation a driving force in protein unfolding?

    PubMed Central

    Shin, I.; Wachtel, E.; Roth, E.; Bon, C.; Silman, I.; Weiner, L.

    2002-01-01

    A monomeric form of acetylcholinesterase from the venom of Bungarus fasciatus is converted to a partially unfolded molten globule species by thermal inactivation, and subsequently aggregates rapidly. To separate the kinetics of unfolding from those of aggregation, single molecules of the monomeric enzyme were encapsulated in reverse micelles of Brij 30 in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, or in large unilamellar vesicles of egg lecithin/cholesterol at various protein/micelle (vesicle) ratios. The first-order rate constant for thermal inactivation at 45°C, of single molecules entrapped within the reverse micelles (0.031 min−1), was higher than in aqueous solution (0.007 min−1) or in the presence of normal micelles (0.020 min−1). This clearly shows that aggregation does not provide the driving force for thermal inactivation of BfAChE. Within the large unilamellar vesicles, at average protein/vesicle ratios of 1:1 and 10:1, the first-order rate constants for thermal inactivation of the encapsulated monomeric acetylcholinesterase, at 53°C, were 0.317 and 0.342 min−1, respectively. A crosslinking technique, utilizing the photosensitive probe, hypericin, showed that thermal denaturation produces a distribution of species ranging from dimers through to large aggregates. Consequently, at a protein/vesicle ratio of 10:1, aggregation can occur upon thermal denaturation. Thus, these experiments also demonstrate that aggregation does not drive the thermal unfolding of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase. Our experimental approach also permitted monitoring of recovery of enzymic activity after thermal denaturation in the absence of a competing aggregation process. Whereas no detectable recovery of enzymic activity could be observed in aqueous solution, up to 23% activity could be obtained for enzyme sequestered in the reverse micelles. PMID:12142456

  6. Biological Activity of sym-Triazines with Acetylcholine-like Substitutions as Multitarget Modulators of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The bioactivities of two novel compounds (TAE-1 and TAE-2) that contain a sym-triazine scaffold with acetylcholine-like substitutions are examined as promising candidate agents against Alzheimer’s disease. Inhibition of amyloid-β fibril formation in the presence of Aβ1–42, evaluated by Thioflavin T fluorescence, demonstrated comparable or improved activity to a previously reported pentapeptide-based fibrillogenesis inhibitor, iAβ5p. Destabilization of Aβ1–42 assemblies by TAE-1 and TAE-2 was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy imaging. sym-Triazine inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was observed in cytosol extracted from differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells and also using human erythrocyte AChE. The sym-triazine derivatives were well tolerated by these cells and promoted beneficial effects on human neurons, upregulating expression of synaptophysin, a synaptic marker protein, and MAP2, a neuronal differentiation marker. PMID:23472585

  7. Modulated spectral activity (MSA) - Implications for planetary radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, James R.; Alexander, Joseph K.; Staelin, David H.

    The properties of the Jovian and Saturnian MSA, modulation patterns within the normally diffuse nonthermal radio emission that are characterized by distinctive banded structures of enhanced intensity fluctuations in frequency over time scales of minutes to tens of minutes, are discussed. Although Jovian and Saturnian MSA are both normally observed in the 0.2-1.3-MHz frequency range, similar pattern have been noted in Jovian decametric emission above 30 MHz. The MSA properties are used to constrain the possible source mechanism.

  8. Modulated spectral activity (MSA) - Implications for planetary radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James R.; Alexander, Joseph K.; Staelin, David H.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of the Jovian and Saturnian MSA, modulation patterns within the normally diffuse nonthermal radio emission that are characterized by distinctive banded structures of enhanced intensity fluctuations in frequency over time scales of minutes to tens of minutes, are discussed. Although Jovian and Saturnian MSA are both normally observed in the 0.2-1.3-MHz frequency range, similar pattern have been noted in Jovian decametric emission above 30 MHz. The MSA properties are used to constrain the possible source mechanism.

  9. Identification of Post-Transcriptional Modulators of Breast Cancer Transcription Factor Activity Using MINDy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Thomas M.; Castro, Mauro A. A.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified transcription factors (TFs) that are key drivers of breast cancer risk. To better understand the pathways or sub-networks in which these TFs mediate their function we sought to identify upstream modulators of their activity. We applied the MINDy (Modulator Inference by Network Dynamics) algorithm to four TFs (ESR1, FOXA1, GATA3 and SPDEF) that are key drivers of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer risk, as well as cancer progression. Our computational analysis identified over 500 potential modulators. We assayed 189 of these and identified 55 genes with functional characteristics that were consistent with a role as TF modulators. In the future, the identified modulators may be tested as potential therapeutic targets, able to alter the activity of TFs that are critical in the development of breast cancer. PMID:27997592

  10. Design, synthesis, and characterization of novel, nonquaternary reactivators of GF-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    McHardy, Stanton F; Bohmann, Jonathan A; Corbett, Michael R; Campos, Bismarck; Tidwell, Michael W; Thompson, Paul Marty; Bemben, Chris J; Menchaca, Tony A; Reeves, Tony E; Cantrell, William R; Bauta, William E; Lopez, Ambrosio; Maxwell, Donald M; Brecht, Karen M; Sweeney, Richard E; McDonough, John

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this research was to identify structurally novel, non-quaternarypyridinium reactivators of GF (cyclosarin)-inhibited hAChE that possess the capacity to mediate in vitro reactivation of GF-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE). New compounds were designed, synthesized and assessed in GF-inhibited hAChE assays. Structure activity relationships for AChE binding and reactivation of GF-inhibited hAChE were developed. Lead compounds from two different chemical series, represented by compounds 17 and 38, displayed proficient in vitro reactivation of GF-inhibited hAChE, while also possessing low inhibition of native enzyme.

  11. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of benzophenone derivatives as novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Belluti, Federica; Piazzi, Lorna; Bisi, Alessandra; Gobbi, Silvia; Bartolini, Manuela; Cavalli, Andrea; Valenti, Piero; Rampa, Angela

    2009-03-01

    Starting from a structure-based drug design, new acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were designed and synthesized as analogues of donepezil. The compounds were composed by an aromatic function and a tertiary amino moiety connected by a suitable spacer. In particular, the benzophenone nucleus and the N,N-benzylmethylamine function were selected. The easily accessible three-step synthesis of these compounds resulted to be significantly less difficult and expensive than that of donepezil. Several compounds possess anti-cholinesterase activity in the order of micro and sub-micromolar. Particularly, compounds 1 and 10 were the most potent inhibitors of the series.

  12. Finite Element Learning Modules as Active Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ashland O.; Jensen, Daniel; Rencis, Joseph; Wood, Kristin; Wood, John; White, Christina; Raaberg, Kristen Kaufman; Coffman, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of active learning is to solicit participation by students beyond the passive mode of traditional classroom lectures. Reading, writing, participating in discussions, hands-on activities, engaging in active problem solving, and collaborative learning can all be involved. The skills acquired during active learning tend to go above and…

  13. Modulation error in active-aperture phased-array radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, M. L.; Howard, R. L.; Mitchell, M. A.

    Range sidelobe (RSL) suppression is presently treated in the context of active arrays that are defined by a phased-array antenna, which is driven by either distributed solid-state element-level modules or tube-driven subarray-level transmitters and receivers. An account is given of the basic methodology for achievement of low-RSL performance in active arrays, using modulation-error compensation. Attention is given to the performance limits imposed by modulation-error decorrelation and noise-limited error characterization.

  14. Novel acetylcholinesterase target site for malaria mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2006-12-20

    Current anticholinesterase pesticides were developed during World War II and are toxic to mammals because they target a catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) in insects and in mammals. A sequence analysis of AChEs from 73 species and a three-dimensional model of a malaria-carrying mosquito (Anopheles gambiae) AChE (AgAChE) reported here show that C286 and R339 of AgAChE are conserved at the opening of the active site of AChEs in 17 invertebrate and four insect species, respectively. Both residues are absent in the active site of AChEs of human, monkey, dog, cat, cattle, rabbit, rat, and mouse. The 17 invertebrates include house mosquito, Japanese encephalitis mosquito, African malaria mosquito, German cockroach, Florida lancelet, rice leaf beetle, African bollworm, beet armyworm, codling moth, diamondback moth, domestic silkworm, honey bee, oat or wheat aphid, the greenbug, melon or cotton aphid, green peach aphid, and English grain aphid. The four insects are house mosquito, Japanese encephalitis mosquito, African malaria mosquito, and German cockroach. The discovery of the two invertebrate-specific residues enables the development of effective and safer pesticides that target the residues present only in mosquito AChEs rather than the ubiquitous serine residue, thus potentially offering an effective control of mosquito-borne malaria. Anti-AgAChE pesticides can be designed to interact with R339 and subsequently covalently bond to C286. Such pesticides would be toxic to mosquitoes but not to mammals.

  15. Freeze-frame inhibitor captures acetylcholinesterase in a unique conformation

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Yves; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Radić, Zoran; Sharpless, K. Barry; Taylor, Palmer; Marchot, Pascale

    2004-01-01

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between unactivated azides and acetylenes proceeds exceedingly slowly at room temperature. However, considerable rate acceleration is observed when this reaction occurs inside the active center gorge of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) between certain azide and acetylene reactants, attached via methylene chains to specific inhibitor moieties selective for the active center and peripheral site of the enzyme. AChE catalyzes the formation of its own inhibitor in a highly selective fashion: only a single syn1-triazole regioisomer with defined substitution positions and linker distances is generated from a series of reagent combinations. Inhibition measurements revealed this syn1-triazole isomer to be the highest affinity reversible organic inhibitor of AChE with association rate constants near the diffusion limit. The corresponding anti1 isomer, not formed by the enzyme, proved to be a respectable but weaker inhibitor. The crystal structures of the syn1- and anti1-mouse AChE complexes at 2.45- to 2.65-Å resolution reveal not only substantial binding contributions from the triazole moieties, but also that binding of the syn1 isomer induces large and unprecedented enzyme conformational changes not observed in the anti1 complex nor predicted from structures of the apoenzyme and complexes with the precursor reactants. Hence, the freeze-frame reaction offers both a strategically original approach for drug discovery and a means for kinetically controlled capture, as a high-affinity complex between the enzyme and its self-created inhibitor, of a highly reactive minor abundance conformer of a fluctuating protein template. PMID:14757816

  16. Freeze-frame inhibitor captures acetylcholinesterase in a unique conformation.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Yves; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Radić, Zoran; Sharpless, K Barry; Taylor, Palmer; Marchot, Pascale

    2004-02-10

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between unactivated azides and acetylenes proceeds exceedingly slowly at room temperature. However, considerable rate acceleration is observed when this reaction occurs inside the active center gorge of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) between certain azide and acetylene reactants, attached via methylene chains to specific inhibitor moieties selective for the active center and peripheral site of the enzyme. AChE catalyzes the formation of its own inhibitor in a highly selective fashion: only a single syn1-triazole regioisomer with defined substitution positions and linker distances is generated from a series of reagent combinations. Inhibition measurements revealed this syn1-triazole isomer to be the highest affinity reversible organic inhibitor of AChE with association rate constants near the diffusion limit. The corresponding anti1 isomer, not formed by the enzyme, proved to be a respectable but weaker inhibitor. The crystal structures of the syn1- and anti1-mouse AChE complexes at 2.45- to 2.65-A resolution reveal not only substantial binding contributions from the triazole moieties, but also that binding of the syn1 isomer induces large and unprecedented enzyme conformational changes not observed in the anti1 complex nor predicted from structures of the apoenzyme and complexes with the precursor reactants. Hence, the freeze-frame reaction offers both a strategically original approach for drug discovery and a means for kinetically controlled capture, as a high-affinity complex between the enzyme and its self-created inhibitor, of a highly reactive minor abundance conformer of a fluctuating protein template.

  17. A grit separation module for inorganic matter removal from activated sludge: investigation on characteristics of split sludge from the module.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Peng; Guo, Jin-Song; Wang, Jing; Yan, Peng; Ji, Fang-Ying; Fang, Fang; Dong, Yang

    2016-12-01

    A grit separation module was developed to prevent the accumulation of inorganic solids in activated sludge systems, and it achieved effective separation of organic matter and inorganic solids. To provide technical and theoretical support for further comprehensive utilization of split sludge (underflow and overflow sludge from the separation module), the characteristics of split sludge were investigated. The settling and dewatering properties of the underflow sludge were excellent, and it had high inorganic matter content, whereas the overflow sludge had higher organic matter content. The most abundant inorganic constituent was SiO2 (59.34%), and SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 together accounted for 79.53% of the inorganic matter in the underflow sludge. The mass ratio of Fe2O3, CaO, and MgO to SiO2 and Al2O3 was 0.245 in the inorganic component of the underflow sludge. The underflow sludge had the beneficial characteristics of simple treatment and disposal, and it was suitable for use as a base raw material for ceramsite production. The overflow sludge with higher organic matter content was constantly returned from the separation module to the wastewater treatment system, gradually improving the volatile suspended solid/total suspended solid ratio of the activated sludge in the wastewater treatment system.

  18. β-amyloid decreases detectable endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human erythrocytes: a role for membrane acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Francesco; Carelli-Alinovi, Cristiana; Sampaolese, Beatrice; Giardina, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    Until few years ago, many studies of Alzheimer's disease investigated the effects of this syndrome in the central nervous system. Only recently, the detection of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) in the blood has evidenced the necessity to extend studies on extraneuronal cells, particularly on erythrocytes. Aβ is also present in brain capillaries, where it interacts with the erythrocytes, inducing several metabolic and functional alterations. Recently, functionally active endothelial type nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was discovered in human erythrocytes. The goal of the present study was to evidence the effect of Aβ on erythrocyte eNOS. We found that Aβ following to 24-h exposure causes a decrease in the immune staining of erythrocyte eNOS. Concurrently, Aβ alters erythrocyte cell morphology, decreases nitrites and nitrates levels, and affects membrane acetylcholinesterase activity. Propidium, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, was able to reverse the effects elicited by Aβ. These events could contribute to the vascular alterations associated with Alzheimer's disease disease.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of pretreatment with quercetin as assessed by acetylcholinesterase assay and behavioral testing in poloxamer-407 induced hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Braun, Josiane B S; Ruchel, Jader B; Adefegha, Stephen A; Coelho, Ana Paula V; Trelles, Kelly B; Signor, Cristiane; Rubin, Maribel A; Oliveira, Juliana S; Dornelles, Guilherme L; de Andrade, Cinthia M; Castilhos, Lívia G; Leal, Daniela B R

    2017-04-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a group of disorders characterized by excessive lipids in the bloodstream. It is associated with the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and recognized as the most important factor underlying the occurrence of atherosclerosis. This study was conducted to investigate whether pretreatment with quercetin can protect against possible memory impairment and deterioration of the cholinergic system in hyperlipidemic rats. Animals were divided into ten groups (n=7): saline/control, saline/quercetin 5mg/kg, saline/quercetin 25mg/kg, saline/quercetin 50mg/kg, saline/simvastatin (0.04mg/kg), hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidemia/quercetin 5mg/kg, hyperlipidemia/quercetin 25mg/kg, hyperlipidemia/quercetin 50mg/kg and hyperlipidemia/simvastatin. The animals were pretreated with quercetin by oral gavage for a period of 30days and hyperlipidemia was subsequently induced by intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of 500mg/kg of poloxamer-407. Simvastatin was administered after the induction of hyperlipidemia. The results demonstrated that hyperlipidemic rats had memory impairment compared with the saline control group (P<0.001). However, pretreatment with quercetin and simvastatin treatment attenuated the damage caused by hyperlipidemia compared with the hyperlipidemic group (P<0.05). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the cerebral hippocampus was significantly (P<0.001) reduced in the hyperlipidemic group compared with the control saline group. Pretreatment with quercetin and simvastatin treatment in the hyperlipidemic groups significantly (P<0.05) increased AChE activity compared with the hyperlipidemic group. Our results thus suggest that quercetin may prevent memory impairment, alter lipid metabolism, and modulate AChE activity in an experimental model of hyperlipidemia.

  20. Magnesium Modulates Doxorubicin Activity through Drug Lysosomal Sequestration and Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Valentina; Luongo, Francesca; Arduini, Daniela; Wolf, Federica I

    2016-03-21

    Magnesium is directly involved in the control of cell growth and survival, but its role in cancer biology and therapy is multifaceted; in particular, it is highly controversial whether magnesium levels can affect therapy outcomes. Here we investigated whether magnesium availability can modulate cellular responses to the widely used chemotherapeutic doxorubicin. We used an in vitro model consisting of mammary epithelial HC11 cells and found that high magnesium availability was correlated with diminished sensitivity both in cells chronically adapted to high magnesium concentrations and in acutely magnesium-supplemented cells. This decrease in sensitivity resulted from reduced intracellular doxorubicin accumulation in the face of a similar drug uptake rate. We observed that high-magnesium conditions caused a decrease in intracellular drug retention by altering drug lysosomal sequestration and trafficking. In our model, magnesium supplementation correspondingly modulated expression of the TRPM7 channel, which is known to control cytoskeletal organization and dynamics and may be involved in the proposed mechanism. Our findings suggest that magnesium supplementation in hypomagnesemic cancer patients may hinder response to therapy.

  1. An optimized extraction technique for acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from the Camellia japonica seed cake by using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Kim, Cho Rong; Lim, Ho-Jeong; Nam, Sang Hae; Joo, Ok Soo; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    The response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the extraction conditions for the acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitory activity and extraction yield from Camellia japonica seed cake. Predicted values for AchE inhibition and extraction yield were 19.41 and 13.35%, respectively, which are in good agreement with the experimental values from validation, suggesting that RSM may provide a useful tool to optimization processes.

  2. Introducing Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: Probing the Substrate Selectivity of Acetylcholinesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelin, Marcus; Larsson, Rikard; Vongvilai, Pornrapee; Ramstrom, Olof

    2010-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, college students are introduced to dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) and apply it to determine the substrate selectivity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Initially, the students construct a chemical library of dynamically interchanging thioesters and thiols. Then, AChE is added and allowed to select and hydrolyze…

  3. Acetylcholinesterases of Blood-feeding Flies and Ticks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the biochemical target of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate pesticides for invertebrates, vertebrate nerve agents, and AChE inhibitors used to reduce effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are widely used to control blood-feeding arthropods, ...

  4. Complexity of acetylcholinesterases in biting flies and ticks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors function as pesticides for invertebrates, vertebrate nerve agents, and medicine to reduce cognitive effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Organophosphate (OP) pesticides have been widely used to control biting flies and ticks, however, OP-resistance has compromised c...

  5. Pre-stimulus BOLD-network activation modulates EEG spectral activity during working memory retention.

    PubMed

    Kottlow, Mara; Schlaepfer, Anthony; Baenninger, Anja; Michels, Lars; Brandeis, Daniel; Koenig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) processes depend on our momentary mental state and therefore exhibit considerable fluctuations. Here, we investigate the interplay of task-preparatory and task-related brain activity as represented by pre-stimulus BOLD-fluctuations and spectral EEG from the retention periods of a visual WM task. Visual WM is used to maintain sensory information in the brain enabling the performance of cognitive operations and is associated with mental health. We tested 22 subjects simultaneously with EEG and fMRI while performing a visuo-verbal Sternberg task with two different loads, allowing for the temporal separation of preparation, encoding, retention and retrieval periods. Four temporally coherent networks (TCNs)-the default mode network (DMN), the dorsal attention, the right and the left WM network-were extracted from the continuous BOLD data by means of a group ICA. Subsequently, the modulatory effect of these networks' pre-stimulus activation upon retention-related EEG activity in the theta, alpha, and beta frequencies was analyzed. The obtained results are informative in the context of state-dependent information processing. We were able to replicate two well-known load-dependent effects: the frontal-midline theta increase during the task and the decrease of pre-stimulus DMN activity. As our main finding, these two measures seem to depend on each other as the significant negative correlations at frontal-midline channels suggested. Thus, suppressed pre-stimulus DMN levels facilitated later task related frontal midline theta increases. In general, based on previous findings that neuronal coupling in different frequency bands may underlie distinct functions in WM retention, our results suggest that processes reflected by spectral oscillations during retention seem not only to be "online" synchronized with activity in different attention-related networks but are also modulated by activity in these networks during preparation intervals.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ induces myogenesis by modulating myostatin activity.

    PubMed

    Bonala, Sabeera; Lokireddy, Sudarsanareddy; Arigela, Harikumar; Teng, Serena; Wahli, Walter; Sharma, Mridula; McFarlane, Craig; Kambadur, Ravi

    2012-04-13

    Classically, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) function was thought to be restricted to enhancing adipocyte differentiation and development of adipose-like cells from other lineages. However, recent studies have revealed a critical role for PPARβ/δ during skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. Although PPARβ/δ has been implicated in regulating myogenesis, little is presently known about the role and, for that matter, the mechanism(s) of action of PPARβ/δ in regulating postnatal myogenesis. Here we report for the first time, using a PPARβ/δ-specific ligand (L165041) and the PPARβ/δ-null mouse model, that PPARβ/δ enhances postnatal myogenesis through increasing both myoblast proliferation and differentiation. In addition, we have identified Gasp-1 (growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein-1) as a novel downstream target of PPARβ/δ in skeletal muscle. In agreement, reduced Gasp-1 expression was detected in PPARβ/δ-null mice muscle tissue. We further report that a functional PPAR-responsive element within the 1.5-kb proximal Gasp-1 promoter region is critical for PPARβ/δ regulation of Gasp-1. Gasp-1 has been reported to bind to and inhibit the activity of myostatin; consistent with this, we found that enhanced secretion of Gasp-1, increased Gasp-1 myostatin interaction and significantly reduced myostatin activity upon L165041-mediated activation of PPARβ/δ. Moreover, we analyzed the ability of hGASP-1 to regulate myogenesis independently of PPARβ/δ activation. The results revealed that hGASP-1 protein treatment enhances myoblast proliferation and differentiation, whereas silencing of hGASP-1 results in defective myogenesis. Taken together these data revealed that PPARβ/δ is a positive regulator of skeletal muscle myogenesis, which functions through negatively modulating myostatin activity via a mechanism involving Gasp-1.

  7. A 45-kDa acetylcholinesterase protoxin of Aeromonas hydrophila: purification and immunogenicity in fish.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M J; Rodríguez, L A; Fernández-Briera, A; Nieto, T P

    2002-05-21

    A rabbit antiserum to the 15-kDa acetylcholinesterase toxin neutralised the lethal effect of the 15-kDa toxin of Aeromonas hydrophila when injected into trout. However, immunisation of fish with the 15-kDa toxoid failed to induce an antibody response, and a higher molecular mass form of this toxin was purified from the extracellular products with the aim of inducing an immune response in fish. The optimal conditions for production of extracellular products by A. hydrophila strain B32 were studied to increase the concentration of this protoxin. The extracellular products were fractionated by molecular exclusion chromatography to yield a purified protoxin with an estimated molecular mass of 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE and which gave a positive reaction in Western blotting with the rabbit anti-15-kDa toxin serum. Since the 45-kDa protoxin showed lower specific acetylcholinesterase activity than the active 15-kDa toxin, the behaviour of the active site was studied using specific inhibitors. This 45-kDa protoxin was 13.3-fold less toxic than the 15-kDa toxin and induced antibody production in fish.

  8. Is acetylcholinesterase a biomarker of susceptibility in Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera) after deltamethrin exposure?

    PubMed

    Toumi, Héla; Boumaiza, Moncef; Millet, Maurice; Radetski, Claudemir Marcos; Felten, Vincent; Férard, Jean François

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we explored the possibility of using the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as a biomarker after deltamethrin (pyrethroid insecticide) exposure with three strains of the cladoceran Daphnia magna. Four calculated time-weighted deltamethrin concentrations (20.1, 40.3, 80.6 and 161.3 ng L(-1)) were compared against control acetylcholinesterase activity. Our results showed that after 48 h of deltamethrin exposure, all treatments induced a significant decrease of AChE activities whatever the three considered strains. However, diverse responses were registered in terms of lowest observed effect concentrations (LOEC: 80.6 ng L(-1) for strain 1 and 20.1 ng L(-1) for strains 2 and 3) revealing differences in sensitivity among the three tested strains of D. magna. Our results suggest that after deltamethrin exposure, the AChE activity responses can be also used as a biomarker of susceptibility (i.e., variation of strain specific response). Moreover, our results show that strain 1 is the less sensitive in terms of IC50-48 h of AChE, whereas it became the most sensitive when considering the EC50-48 h estimated in the standard ecotoxicity test.

  9. Virtual Screening of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Using the Lipinski's Rule of Five and ZINC Databank

    PubMed Central

    Nogara, Pablo Andrei; Saraiva, Rogério de Aquino; Caeran Bueno, Diones; Lissner, Lílian Juliana; Lenz Dalla Corte, Cristiane; Braga, Marcos M.; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and neurodegenerative pathology that can affect people over 65 years of age. It causes several complications, such as behavioral changes, language deficits, depression, and memory impairments. One of the methods used to treat AD is the increase of acetylcholine (ACh) in the brain by using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs). In this study, we used the ZINC databank and the Lipinski's rule of five to perform a virtual screening and a molecular docking (using Auto Dock Vina 1.1.1) aiming to select possible compounds that have quaternary ammonium atom able to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The molecules were obtained by screening and further in vitro assays were performed to analyze the most potent inhibitors through the IC50 value and also to describe the interaction models between inhibitors and enzyme by molecular docking. The results showed that compound D inhibited AChE activity from different vertebrate sources and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) from Equus ferus (EfBChE), with IC50 ranging from 1.69 ± 0.46 to 5.64 ± 2.47 µM. Compound D interacted with the peripheral anionic subsite in both enzymes, blocking substrate entrance to the active site. In contrast, compound C had higher specificity as inhibitor of EfBChE. In conclusion, the screening was effective in finding inhibitors of AChE and BuChE from different organisms. PMID:25685814

  10. Positive cooperative regulation of double binding sites for human acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-10-25

    Acetylcholinesterase is a potent enzyme that regulates neurotransmission by rapidly hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in synapses of the nervous system. As drug target of anti-AD, it has catalytic and peripheral anionic sites. However, the regulation relation between these two sites is unclear. Therefore, we constructed dynamics fluctuation network based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the regulation mechanism. The results suggest that the correlation network in double-site system (hAChE/TZ5) is distinctly different from that in the free state and single-site systems (hAChE/huprine and hAChE/1YL). The community network analysis indicates that the information freely transfers from the peripheral anionic site to the catalytic active site in hAChE/TZ5. Furthermore, the binding free energy between the inhibitor and hAChE for hAChE/TZ5 is significantly lower than of either hAChE/huprine or hAChE/1YL. Thus, a hypothesis of 'positive cooperative regulation' is proposed for the regulation of double binding sites and further confirmed by the weakening and mutation community analyses. Finally, one possible cooperative regulation pathway of W86-TZ5-W286 was identified based on the shortest path algorithm and was confirmed by the network perturbation analysis. Interestingly, the regulation pathway for single-site systems is significantly different from that of dual-site system. The process targeting on the shortest pathway can better regulate the hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and significantly inhibit the aggregation of Aβ amyloid.

  11. Shuttle extravehicular activity signal processor pulse amplitude modulation decommutator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, D. E.; Conrad, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    To provide data with long-term stability and accuracy, the pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) decommutator was synchronized to the PAM-return to zero wavetrain, and each channel was sampled with a common sample and hold circuit and digitized sequentially. The digital value of each channel was then scaled by the digital value of the calibration channels. The corrected digital value of each channel was stored for one complete frame and then transferred to the multiplexer-demultiplexer at a high rate in one block of serial digital data. A test model was built to demonstrate this design approach taken for the PAM decom and performance data was provided. The accuracies obtained with various signal to noise ratios are shown.

  12. Modulating the Anticancer Activity of Ruthenium(II)-Arene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Catherine M; Păunescu, Emilia; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; Griffioen, Arjan W; Scopelliti, Rosario; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-04-23

    Following the identification of [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate)], a ruthenium(II)-arene complex with a perfluoroalkyl-modified ligand that displays remarkable in vitro cancer cell selectivity, a series of structurally related compounds were designed. In the new derivatives, the p-cymene ring and/or the chloride ligands are substituted by other ligands to modulate the steric bulk or aquation kinetics. The new compounds were evaluated in both in vitro (cytotoxicity and migration assays) and in vivo (chicken chorioallantoic membrane) models and were found to exhibit potent antivascular effects.

  13. Role of modulation on the effect of microwaves on ornithine decarboxylase activity in L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Penafiel, L M; Litovitz, T; Krause, D; Desta, A; Mullins, J M

    1997-01-01

    The effect of 835 MHz microwaves on the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in L929 murine cell was investigated at an SAR of approximately 2.5 W/kg. The results depended upon the type of modulation employed. AM frequencies of 16 Hz and 60 Hz produced a transient increase in ODC activity that reached a peak at 8 h of exposure and returned to control levels after 24 h of exposure. In this case, ODC was increased by a maximum of 90% relative to control levels. A 40% increase in ODC activity was also observed after 8 h of exposure with a typical signal from a TDMA digital cellular telephone operating in the middle of its transmission frequency range (approximately 840 MHz). This signal was burst modulated at 50 Hz, with approximately 30% duty cycle. By contrast, 8 h exposure with 835 MHz microwaves amplitude modulated with speech produced no significant change in ODC activity. Further investigations, with 8 h of exposure to AM microwaves, as a function of modulation frequency, revealed that the response is frequency dependent, decreasing sharply at 6 Hz an 600 Hz. Exposure with 835 MHz microwaves, frequency modulated with a 60 Hz sinusoid, yielded no significant enhancement in ODC activity for exposure times ranging between 2 and 24 h. Similarly, exposure with a typical signal from an AMPS analog cellular telephone, which uses a form of frequency modulation, produced no significant enhancement in ODC activity. Exposure with 835 MHz continuous wave microwaves produced no effects for exposure times between 2 and 24 h, except for a small but statistically significant enhancement in ODC activity after 6 h of exposure. Comparison of these results suggests that effects are much more robust when the modulation causes low-frequency periodic changes in the amplitude of the microwave carrier.

  14. A Mechanism-based 3D-QSAR Approach for Classification and Prediction of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Potency of Organophosphate and Carbamate Analogs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate esters can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by binding covalently to a serine residue in the enzyme active site, and their inhibitory potency depends largely on affinity for the enzyme and the reactivity of the ester. Despite this understandi...

  15. Learning new gait patterns: Exploratory muscle activity during motor learning is not predicted by motor modules.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Rajiv; Krishnan, Chandramouli; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Rymer, William Z

    2016-03-21

    The motor module hypothesis in motor control proposes that the nervous system can simplify the problem of controlling a large number of muscles in human movement by grouping muscles into a smaller number of modules. Here, we tested one prediction of the modular organization hypothesis by examining whether there is preferential exploration along these motor modules during the learning of a new gait pattern. Healthy college-aged participants learned a new gait pattern which required increased hip and knee flexion during the swing phase while walking in a lower-extremity robot (Lokomat). The new gait pattern was displayed as a foot trajectory in the sagittal plane and participants attempted to match their foot trajectory to this template. We recorded EMG from 8 lower-extremity muscles and we extracted motor modules during both baseline walking and target-tracking using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Results showed increased trajectory variability in the first block of learning, indicating that participants were engaged in exploratory behavior. Critically, when we examined the muscle activity during this exploratory phase, we found that the composition of motor modules changed significantly within the first few strides of attempting the new gait pattern. The lack of persistence of the motor modules under even short time scales suggests that motor modules extracted during locomotion may be more indicative of correlated muscle activity induced by the task constraints of walking, rather than reflecting a modular control strategy.

  16. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition by Biofumigant (Coumaran) from Leaves of Lantana camara in Stored Grain and Household Insect Pests

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendra, Anjanappa; Bakthavatsalam, Nandagopal

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies proved that the biofumigants could be an alternative to chemical fumigants against stored grain insect pests. For this reason, it is necessary to understand the mode of action of biofumigants. In the present study the prospectus of utilising Lantana camara as a potent fumigant insecticide is being discussed. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by Coumaran, an active ingredient extracted from the plant L. camara, was studied. The biofumigant was used as an enzyme inhibitor and acetylthiocholine iodide as a substrate along with Ellman's reagent to carry out the reactions. The in vivo inhibition was observed in both dose dependent and time dependent in case of housefly, and the nervous tissue (ganglion) and the whole insect homogenate of stored grain insect exposed to Coumaran. The possible mode of action of Coumaran as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor is discussed. PMID:25025036

  17. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition by biofumigant (Coumaran) from leaves of Lantana camara in stored grain and household insect pests.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Raghavendra, Anjanappa; Bakthavatsalam, Nandagopal

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies proved that the biofumigants could be an alternative to chemical fumigants against stored grain insect pests. For this reason, it is necessary to understand the mode of action of biofumigants. In the present study the prospectus of utilising Lantana camara as a potent fumigant insecticide is being discussed. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by Coumaran, an active ingredient extracted from the plant L. camara, was studied. The biofumigant was used as an enzyme inhibitor and acetylthiocholine iodide as a substrate along with Ellman's reagent to carry out the reactions. The in vivo inhibition was observed in both dose dependent and time dependent in case of housefly, and the nervous tissue (ganglion) and the whole insect homogenate of stored grain insect exposed to Coumaran. The possible mode of action of Coumaran as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor is discussed.

  18. Preclinical and first-in-human evaluation of PRX-105, a PEGylated, plant-derived, recombinant human acetylcholinesterase-R.

    PubMed

    Atsmon, Jacob; Brill-Almon, Einat; Nadri-Shay, Carmit; Chertkoff, Raul; Alon, Sari; Shaikevich, Dimitri; Volokhov, Inna; Haim, Kirsten Y; Bartfeld, Daniel; Shulman, Avidor; Ruderfer, Ilya; Ben-Moshe, Tehila; Shilovitzky, Orit; Soreq, Hermona; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2015-09-15

    PRX-105 is a plant-derived recombinant version of the human 'read-through' acetylcholinesterase splice variant (AChE-R). Its active site structure is similar to that of the synaptic variant, and it displays the same affinity towards organophosphorus (OP) compounds. As such, PRX-105 may serve as a bio-scavenger for OP pesticides and chemical warfare agents. To assess its potential use in prophylaxis and treatment of OP poisoning we conducted several preliminary tests, reported in this paper. Intravenous (IV) PRX-105 was administered to mice either before or after exposure to an OP toxin. All mice who received an IV dose of 50nmol/kg PRX-105, 2min before being exposed to 1.33×LD50 and 1.5×LD50 of toxin and 10min after exposure to 1.5×LD50 survived. The pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles of PRX-105 were evaluated in mice and mini-pigs. Following single and multiple IV doses (50 to 200mg/kg) no deaths occurred and no significant laboratory and histopathological changes were observed. The overall elimination half-life (t½) in mice was 994 (±173) min. Additionally, a first-in-human study, to assess the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the compound, was conducted in healthy volunteers. The t½ in humans was substantially longer than in mice (average 26.7h). Despite the small number of animals and human subjects who were assessed, the fact that PRX-105 exerts a protective and therapeutic effect following exposure to lethal doses of OP, its favorable safety profile and its relatively long half-life, renders it a promising candidate for treatment and prophylaxis against OP poisoning and warrants further investigation.

  19. View of activity in Mission Control Center during Lunar Module liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A partial view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center during the liftoff of the Apollo 15 Lunar Module 'Falcon' ascent stage from the lunar surface. An RCA color television camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle made it possible for people on Earth to watch the Lunar Module (LM) launch from the Moon. Seated in the right foreground is Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, a spacecraft communicator. Note liftoff on the television monitor in the center background.

  20. Review of studies on modulating enzyme activity by low intensity electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, Elena; Cosic, Irena

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a compilation of our findings on non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at the molecular level. The outcomes of our studies revealed that that enzymes' activity can be modulated by external electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of selected frequencies. Here, we discuss the possibility of modulating protein activity using visible and infrared light based on the concepts of protein activation outlined in the resonant recognition model (RRM), and by low intensity microwaves. The theoretical basis behind the RRM model expounds a potential interaction mechanism between electromagnetic radiation and proteins as well as protein-protein interactions. Possibility of modulating protein activity by external EMR is experimentally validated by irradiation of the L-lactate Dehydrogenase enzyme.

  1. Reward sensitivity modulates brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, ACC and striatum during task switching.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan C; Costumero, Víctor; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Current perspectives on cognitive control acknowledge that individual differences in motivational dispositions may modulate cognitive processes in the absence of reward contingencies. This work aimed to study the relationship between individual differences in Behavioral Activation System (BAS) sensitivity and the neural underpinnings involved in processing a switching cue in a task-switching paradigm. BAS sensitivity was hypothesized to modulate brain activity in frontal regions, ACC and the striatum. Twenty-eight healthy participants underwent fMRI while performing a switching task, which elicited activity in fronto-striatal regions during the processing of the switch cue. BAS sensitivity was negatively associated with activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the ventral striatum. Combined with previous results, our data indicate that BAS sensitivity modulates the neurocognitive processes involved in task switching in a complex manner depending on task demands. Therefore, individual differences in motivational dispositions may influence cognitive processing in the absence of reward contingencies.

  2. Reward Sensitivity Modulates Brain Activity in the Prefrontal Cortex, ACC and Striatum during Task Switching

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Ávila, César; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan C.; Costumero, Víctor; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Current perspectives on cognitive control acknowledge that individual differences in motivational dispositions may modulate cognitive processes in the absence of reward contingencies. This work aimed to study the relationship between individual differences in Behavioral Activation System (BAS) sensitivity and the neural underpinnings involved in processing a switching cue in a task-switching paradigm. BAS sensitivity was hypothesized to modulate brain activity in frontal regions, ACC and the striatum. Twenty-eight healthy participants underwent fMRI while performing a switching task, which elicited activity in fronto-striatal regions during the processing of the switch cue. BAS sensitivity was negatively associated with activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the ventral striatum. Combined with previous results, our data indicate that BAS sensitivity modulates the neurocognitive processes involved in task switching in a complex manner depending on task demands. Therefore, individual differences in motivational dispositions may influence cognitive processing in the absence of reward contingencies. PMID:25875640

  3. UHF wearable battery free sensor module for activity and falling detection.

    PubMed

    Nam Trung Dang; Thang Viet Tran; Wan-Young Chung

    2016-08-01

    Falling is one of the most serious medical and social problems in aging population. Therefore taking care of the elderly by detecting activity and falling for preventing and mitigating the injuries caused by falls needs to be concerned. This study proposes a wearable, wireless, battery free ultra-high frequency (UHF) smart sensor tag module for falling and activity detection. The proposed tag is powered by UHF RF wave from reader and read by a standard UHF Electronic Product Code (EPC) Class-1 Generation-2 reader. The battery free sensor module could improve the wearability of the wireless device. The combination of accelerometer signal and received signal strength indication (RSSI) from a reader in the passive smart sensor tag detect the activity and falling of the elderly very successfully. The fabricated smart sensor tag module has an operating range of up to 2.5m and conducting in real-time activity and falling detection.

  4. Focal Adhesion Kinase Modulates Cell Adhesion Strengthening via Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Kristin E.; Dumbauld, David W.; Burns, Kellie L.; Hanks, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an essential nonreceptor tyrosine kinase regulating cell migration, adhesive signaling, and mechanosensing. Using FAK-null cells expressing FAK under an inducible promoter, we demonstrate that FAK regulates the time-dependent generation of adhesive forces. During the early stages of adhesion, FAK expression in FAK-null cells enhances integrin activation to promote integrin binding and, hence, the adhesion strengthening rate. Importantly, FAK expression regulated integrin activation, and talin was required for the FAK-dependent effects. A role for FAK in integrin activation was confirmed in human fibroblasts with knocked-down FAK expression. The FAK autophosphorylation Y397 site was required for the enhancements in adhesion strengthening and integrin-binding responses. This work demonstrates a novel role for FAK in integrin activation and the time-dependent generation of cell–ECM forces. PMID:19297531

  5. Modulation of macrophage activation and programming in immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangwei; Yang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    Macrophages are central mediators of the immune, contributing both to the initiation and the resolution of inflammation. The concept of macrophage activation and program has stimulated interest in its definition, and functional significance in homeostasis and diseases. It has been known that macrophages could be differently activated and programmed into different functional subtypes in response to different types of antigen stumuli or different kinds of cytokines present in the microenvironment and could thus profoundly influence immune responses, but little is known about the state and exact regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program from cell or molecular signaling level in immunity. In this review, we summarize the recent finding regarding the regulatory mechanism of macrophage activation and program toward M1 and M2, especially on M2 macrophages.

  6. Synthesis and SAR study of modulators inhibiting tRXRα-dependent AKT activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Liqun; Chen, Jiebo; Zheng, Jian-Feng; Gao, Weiwei; Zeng, Zhiping; Zhou, Hu; Zhang, Xiao-kun; Huang, Pei-Qiang; Su, Ying

    2013-01-01

    RXRα represents an intriguing and unique target for pharmacologic interventions. We recently showed that Sulindac and a designed analog could bind to RXRα and modulate its biological activity, including inhibition of the interaction of an N-terminally truncated RXRα (tRXRα) with the p85α regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K). Here we report the synthesis, testing and SAR of a series of novel analogs of Sulindac as potential modulators for inhibiting tRXRα-dependent AKT activation. A new compound 30 was identified to have improved biological activity. PMID:23434637

  7. Fuzzy Behavior Modulation with Threshold Activation for Autonomous Vehicle Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunstel, Edward

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes fuzzy logic techniques used in a hierarchical behavior-based architecture for robot navigation. An architectural feature for threshold activation of fuzzy-behaviors is emphasized, which is potentially useful for tuning navigation performance in real world applications. The target application is autonomous local navigation of a small planetary rover. Threshold activation of low-level navigation behaviors is the primary focus. A preliminary assessment of its impact on local navigation performance is provided based on computer simulations.

  8. Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase activity by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S

    2004-11-01

    The levels of the cGMP in smooth muscle of the gut reflect continued synthesis by soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) and breakdown by phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). Soluble GC is a haem-containing, heterodimeric protein consisting alpha- and beta-subunits: each subunit has N-terminal regulatory domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The haem moiety acts as an intracellular receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and determines the ability of NO to activate the enzyme and generate cGMP. In the present study the mechanism by which protein kinases regulate soluble GC in gastric smooth muscle was examined. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) acting as a NO donor stimulated soluble GC activity and increased cGMP levels. SNP induced soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation was abolished by the selective cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors, Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. In contrast, SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP levels were significantly enhanced by Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. Phosphorylation and inhibition of soluble GC were PKG specific, as selective activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, Sp-5, 6-DCl-cBiMPS had no effect on SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation and activity. The ability of PKG to stimulate soluble GC phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro by back phosphorylation technique. Addition of purified phosphatase 1 inhibited soluble GC phosphorylation in vitro, and inhibition was reversed by a high concentration (10 microM) of okadaic acid. In gastric smooth muscle cells, inhibition of phosphatase activity by okadaic acid increased soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. The increase in soluble GC phosphorylation inhibited SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP formation. The results implied the feedback inhibition of soluble GC activity by PKG-dependent phosphorylation impeded further formation of cGMP.

  9. Thermal Analysis of ISS Service Module Active TCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altov, Vladimir V.; Zaletaev, Sergey V.; Belyavskiy, Evgeniy P.

    2000-01-01

    ISS Service Module mission must begin in July 2000. The verification of design thermal requirements is mostly due to thermal analysis. The thermal analysis is enough difficult problem because of large number of ISS configurations that had to be investigated and various orbital environments. Besides the ISS structure has articulating parts such as solar arrays and radiators. The presence of articulating parts greatly increases computation times and requires accurate approach to organization of calculations. The varying geometry needs us to calculate the view factors several times during the orbit, while in static geometry case we need do it only once. In this paper we consider the thermal mathematical model of SM that includes the TCS and construction thermal models and discuss the results of calculations for ISS configurations 1R and 9Al. The analysis is based on solving the nodal heat balance equations for ISS structure by Kutta-Merson method and analytical solutions of heat transfer equations for TCS units. The computations were performed using thermal software TERM [1,2] that will be briefly described.

  10. Role of GABAA inhibition in modulation of pyramidal tract neuron activity during postural corrections

    PubMed Central

    Tamarova, Zinaida A; Sirota, Mikhail G; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Deliagina, Tatiana G; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated that the activity of pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) of the motor cortex is modulated in relation to postural corrections evoked by periodical tilts of the animal. The modulation included an increase in activity in one phase of the tilt cycle and a decrease in the other phase. It is known that the motor cortex contains a large population of inhibitory GABAergic neurons. How do these neurons participate in periodic modulation of PTNs? The goal of this study was to investigate the role of GABAA inhibitory neurons of the motor cortex in the modulation of postural-related PTN activity. Using extracellular electrodes with attached micropipettes, we recorded the activity of PTNs in cats maintaining balance on a tilting platform both before and after iontophoretic application of the GABAA receptor antagonists gabazine or bicuculline. The tilt-related activity of 93% of PTNs was affected by GABAA receptor antagonists. In 88% of cells, peak activity increased by 75 ± 50% (mean ± SD). In contrast, the trough activity changed by a much smaller value and almost as many neurons showed a decrease as showed an increase. In 73% of the neurons, the phase position of the peak activity did not change or changed by no more than 0.1 of a cycle. We conclude that the GABAergic system of the motor cortex reduces the posture-related responses of PTNs but has little role in determining their response timing. PMID:17425574

  11. Modulating endotoxin activity by combinatorial bioengineering of meningococcal lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Zariri, Afshin; Pupo, Elder; van Riet, Elly; van Putten, Jos P. M.; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis contains a very potent hexa-acylated LPS that is too toxic for therapeutic applications. We used systematic molecular bioengineering of meningococcal LPS through deletion of biosynthetic enzymes in combination with induction of LPS modifying enzymes to yield a variety of novel LPS mutants with changes in both lipid A acylation and phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry was used for detailed compositional determination of the LPS molecular species, and stimulation of immune cells was done to correlate this with endotoxic activity. Removal of phosphethanolamine in lipid A by deletion of lptA slightly reduces activity of hexa-acylated LPS, but this reduction is even more evident in penta-acylated LPS. Surprisingly, expression of PagL deacylase in a penta-acylated lpxL1 mutant increased LPS activity, contradicting the general rule that tetra-acylated LPS is less active than penta-acylated LPS. Further modification included expression of lpxP, an enzyme known to add a secondary 9-hexadecenoic acid to the 2’ acyl chain. The LpxP enzyme is temperature-sensitive, enabling control over the ratio of expressed modified hexa- and penta-acylated LPS by simply changing the growth temperature. These LPS derivatives display a broad range of TLR4 activity and differential cytokine induction, which can be exploited for use as vaccine adjuvant or other TLR4-based therapeutics. PMID:27841285

  12. RGS6, a Modulator of Parasympathetic Activation in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianqi; Huang, Jie; Maity, Biswanath; Gao, Zhan; Lorca, Ramón A.; Gudmundsson, Hjalti; Li, Jingdong; Stewart, Adele; Swaminathan, Paari Dominic; Ibeawuchi, Stella-Rita; Shepherd, Andrew; Chen, Ching-Kang; Kutschke, William; Mohler, Peter J.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; Anderson, Mark E.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Parasympathetic regulation of heart rate is mediated by acetylcholine binding to G protein-coupled muscarinic M2 receptors, which activate heterotrimeric Gi/o proteins to promote GIRK channel activation. RGS proteins, which function to inactivate G proteins, are indispensable for normal parasympathetic control of the heart. However it is unclear which of the more than twenty known RGS proteins function to negatively regulate and thereby ensure normal parasympathetic control of the heart. Objective To examine the specific contribution of RGS6 as an essential regulator of parasympathetic signaling in heart. Methods and Results We developed RGS6 knockout mice to determine the functional impact of loss of RGS6 on parasympathetic regulation of cardiac automaticity. RGS6 exhibited a uniquely robust expression in the heart, particularly in sinoatrial (SAN) and atrioventricular (AVN) nodal regions. Loss of RGS6 provoked dramatically exaggerated bradycardia in response to carbachol in mice and isolated perfused hearts and significantly enhanced the effect of carbachol on inhibition of spontaneous action potential firing in SAN cells. Consistent with a role of RGS6 in G protein inactivation, RGS6-deficient atrial myocytes exhibited a significant reduction in the time course of IKAch activation and deactivation, as well as the extent of IKAch desensitization. Conclusions RGS6 is a previously unrecognized, but essential regulator of parasympathetic activation in heart, functioning to prevent parasympathetic override and severe bradycardia. These effects likely result from actions of RGS6 as a negative regulator of G protein activation of GIRK channels. PMID:20864673

  13. Phosphatidylserine is a critical modulator for Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bill X.; Akbar, Mohammed; Kevala, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Akt activation relies on the binding of Akt to phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) in the membrane. Here, we demonstrate that Akt activation requires not only PIP3 but also membrane phosphatidylserine (PS). The extent of insulin-like growth factor–induced Akt activation and downstream signaling as well as cell survival under serum starvation conditions positively correlates with plasma membrane PS levels in living cells. PS promotes Akt-PIP3 binding, participates in PIP3-induced Akt interdomain conformational changes for T308 phosphorylation, and causes an open conformation that allows for S473 phosphorylation by mTORC2. PS interacts with specific residues in the pleckstrin homology (PH) and regulatory (RD) domains of Akt. Disruption of PS–Akt interaction by mutation impairs Akt signaling and increases susceptibility to cell death. These data identify a critical function of PS for Akt activation and cell survival, particularly in conditions with limited PIP3 availability. The novel molecular interaction mechanism for Akt activation suggests potential new targets for controlling Akt-dependent cell survival and proliferation. PMID:21402788

  14. Valsalva maneuver: Insights into baroreflex modulation of human sympathetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael L.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Beightol, Larry A.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    Valsalva's maneuver, voluntary forced expiration against a closed glottis, is a well-characterized research tool, used to assess the integrity of human autonomic cardiovascular control. Valsalva straining provokes a stereotyped succession of alternating positive and negative arterial pressure and heart rate changes mediated in part by arterial baroreceptors. Arterial pressure changes result primarily from fluctuating levels of venous return to the heart and changes of sympathetic nerve activity. Muscle sympathetic activity was measured directly in nine volunteers to explore quantitatively the relation between arterial pressure and human sympathetic outflow during pressure transients provoked by controlled graded Valsalva maneuvers. Our results underscore several properties of sympathetic regulation during Valsalva straining. First, muscle sympathetic nerve activity changes as a mirror image of changes in arterial pressure. Second, the magnitude of sympathetic augmentation during Valsalva straining predicts phase 4 arterial pressure elevations. Third, post-Valsalva sympathetic inhibition persists beyond the return of arterial and right atrial pressures to baseline levels which reflects an alteration of the normal relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic activity. Therefore, Valsalva straining may have some utility for investigating changes of reflex control of sympathetic activity after space flight; however, measurement of beat-to-beat arterial pressure is essential for this use. The utility of this technique in microgravity can not be determined from these data. Further investigations are necessary to determine whether these relations are affected by the expansion of intrathoracic blood volume associated with microgravity.

  15. Phospholipase Cε Modulates Rap1 Activity and the Endothelial Barrier

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Glading, Angela J.

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, PLCε, is a unique signaling protein with known roles in regulating cardiac myocyte growth, astrocyte inflammatory signaling, and tumor formation. PLCε is also expressed in endothelial cells, however its role in endothelial regulation is not fully established. We show that endothelial cells of multiple origins, including human pulmonary artery (HPAEC), human umbilical vein (HUVEC), and immortalized brain microvascular (hCMEC/D3) endothelial cells, express PLCε. Knockdown of PLCε in arterial endothelial monolayers decreased the effectiveness of the endothelial barrier. Concomitantly, RhoA activity and stress fiber formation were increased. PLCε-deficient arterial endothelial cells also exhibited decreased Rap1-GTP levels, which could be restored by activation of the Rap1 GEF, Epac, to rescue the increase in monolayer leak. Reintroduction of PLCε rescued monolayer leak with both the CDC25 GEF domain and the lipase domain of PLCε required to fully activate Rap1 and to rescue endothelial barrier function. Finally, we demonstrate that the barrier promoting effects PLCε are dependent on Rap1 signaling through the Rap1 effector, KRIT1, which we have previously shown is vital for maintaining endothelial barrier stability. Thus we have described a novel role for PLCε PIP2 hydrolytic and Rap GEF activities in arterial endothelial cells, where PLCε-dependent activation of Rap1/KRIT1 signaling promotes endothelial barrier stability. PMID:27612188

  16. Phospholipase Cε Modulates Rap1 Activity and the Endothelial Barrier.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Peter V; Smrcka, Alan V; Glading, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, PLCε, is a unique signaling protein with known roles in regulating cardiac myocyte growth, astrocyte inflammatory signaling, and tumor formation. PLCε is also expressed in endothelial cells, however its role in endothelial regulation is not fully established. We show that endothelial cells of multiple origins, including human pulmonary artery (HPAEC), human umbilical vein (HUVEC), and immortalized brain microvascular (hCMEC/D3) endothelial cells, express PLCε. Knockdown of PLCε in arterial endothelial monolayers decreased the effectiveness of the endothelial barrier. Concomitantly, RhoA activity and stress fiber formation were increased. PLCε-deficient arterial endothelial cells also exhibited decreased Rap1-GTP levels, which could be restored by activation of the Rap1 GEF, Epac, to rescue the increase in monolayer leak. Reintroduction of PLCε rescued monolayer leak with both the CDC25 GEF domain and the lipase domain of PLCε required to fully activate Rap1 and to rescue endothelial barrier function. Finally, we demonstrate that the barrier promoting effects PLCε are dependent on Rap1 signaling through the Rap1 effector, KRIT1, which we have previously shown is vital for maintaining endothelial barrier stability. Thus we have described a novel role for PLCε PIP2 hydrolytic and Rap GEF activities in arterial endothelial cells, where PLCε-dependent activation of Rap1/KRIT1 signaling promotes endothelial barrier stability.

  17. Solar irradiance modulation by active regions from 1969 through 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schatten, K.H.; Miller, N.; Sofia, S.; Oster, L.

    1982-01-01

    The solar irradiance variations resulting from sunspot deficits and facular excesses in emission have been calculated from 1969 through 1980. Agreement appears to exist between our calculations and the major features seen with the Nimbus 7 cavity pyrheliometer and with both the major and minor features detected by The Solar Maximum Mission ACRIM experiment. The 12-year irradiance variations we calculate suggest a larger variance with increased solar activity, and little change in the average irradiance with solar activity. The largest excursions over these 12 years show a 0.4% variation. Removal of the activity influences upon solar irradiance during the numerous rocket experiments observing the solar ''constant'' may allow a better value for this quantity to be determined.

  18. How Orthography Modulates Morphological Priming: Subliminal Kanji Activation in Japanese

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yoko; Ikemoto, Yu; Jacob, Gunnar; Clahsen, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigates to what extent masked morphological priming is modulated by language-particular properties, specifically by its writing system. We present results from two masked priming experiments investigating the processing of complex Japanese words written in less common (moraic) scripts. In Experiment 1, participants performed lexical decisions on target verbs; these were preceded by primes which were either (i) a past-tense form of the same verb, (ii) a stem-related form with the epenthetic vowel -i, (iii) a semantically-related form, and (iv) a phonologically-related form. Significant priming effects were obtained for prime types (i), (ii), and (iii), but not for (iv). This pattern of results differs from previous findings on languages with alphabetic scripts, which found reliable masked priming effects for morphologically related prime/target pairs of type (i), but not for non-affixal and semantically-related primes of types (ii), and (iii). In Experiment 2, we measured priming effects for prime/target pairs which are neither morphologically, semantically, phonologically nor - as presented in their moraic scripts—orthographically related, but which—in their commonly written form—share the same kanji, which are logograms adopted from Chinese. The results showed a significant priming effect, with faster lexical-decision times for kanji-related prime/target pairs relative to unrelated ones. We conclude that affix-stripping is insufficient to account for masked morphological priming effects across languages, but that language-particular properties (in the case of Japanese, the writing system) affect the processing of (morphologically) complex words. PMID:27065895

  19. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  20. Role of modulation on the effect of microwaves on ornithine decarboxylase activity in L929 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Penafiel, L.M.; Litovitz, T.; Krause, D.; Desta, A.; Mullins, J.M.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of 835 MHz microwaves on the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in L929 murine cells was investigated at an SAR of {approximately}2.5 W/kg. The results depended upon the type of modulation employed. AM frequencies of 16 Hz and 60 Hz produced a transient increase in ODC activity that reached a peak at 8 h of exposure and returned to control levels after 24 h of exposure. In this case, ODC was increased by a maximum of 90% relative to control levels. A 40% increase in ODC activity was also observed after 8 h of exposure with a typical signal from a TDMA digital cellular telephone operating in the middle of its transmission frequency range. This signal was burst modulated at 50 Hz, with approximately 30% duty cycle. By contrast, 8 h exposure with 835 MHz microwaves amplitude modulated with speech produced no significant change in ODC activity. Further investigations, with 8 h of exposure to AM microwaves, as a function of modulation frequency, revealed that the response is frequency dependent, decreasing sharply at 6 Hz and 600 Hz. Exposure with 835 MHz microwaves, frequency modulated with a 60 Hz sinusoid, yielded no significant enhancement in ODC activity for exposure times ranging between 2 and 24 h. Similarly, exposure with a typical signal from an AMPS analog cellular telephone, which uses a form of frequency modulation, produced no significant enhancement in ODC activity. Exposure with 835 MHz continuous wave microwaves produced no effects for exposure times between 2 and 24 h, except for a small but statistically significant enhancement in ODC activity after 6 h of exposure.

  1. CD39 modulates endothelial cell activation and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Goepfert, C.; Imai, M.; Brouard, S.; Csizmadia, E.; Kaczmarek, E.; Robson, S. C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD39 is the dominant vascular nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) that exerts major effects on platelet reactivity by the regulated hydrolysis of extracellular adenine nucleotides. The effects of NTPDases on endothelial cell (EC) activation and apoptosis remain unexplored. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Recombinant replication-deficient adenoviruses were constructed with human CD39 cDNA (rAdCD39) or the bacterial beta-galactosidase (rAdbetagal). RESULTS: Intact human umbilical vein EC cultures infected with rAdCD39 had substantial and stable increases in NTPDase biochemical activity (14.50 +/- 3.50 Pi nmole/well/min), when contrasted with noninfected cells (0.95 +/- 0.002) and rAdbetagal infected cells (1.01 +/- 0.02; p<0.005). Increased NTPDase activity efficiently inhibited immediate type 2Y purinergic receptor (P2Y)-mediated EC activation responses viz. von Willebrand factor secretion in response to extracellular ATP. In addition, CD39 up-regulation blocked ATP-induced translocation of the transcription nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB to the cell nucleus, and abrogated transcription of mRNA encoding E-selectin, and consequent protein synthesis. CD39 also decreased the extent of apoptosis triggered by putative type-2X purinergic (P2X7) receptors in response to high concentrations of extracellular ATP in vitro. CONCLUSION: These properties of CD39 indicate primary vascular protective effects with potential therapeutic applications. PMID:10997340

  2. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Equipped with Estrogen Receptor Modulation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gryder, Berkley E.; Rood, Michael K.; Johnson, Kenyetta A.; Patil, Vishal; Raftery, Eric D.; Yao, Li-Pan D.; Rice, Marcie; Azizi, Bahareh; Doyle, Donald F.; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    We described a set of novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) equipped with either an antagonist or an agonist of the estrogen receptor (ER) to confer selective activity against breast cancers. These bifunctional compounds potently inhibit HDAC at nanomolar concentrations, and either agonize or antagonize ERα and ERβ. The ER antagonist activities of tamoxifen-HDACi conjugates (Tam-HDACi) are nearly identical to those of tamoxifen. Conversely, ethynyl-estradiol HDACi conjugates (EED-HDACi) have attenuated ER agonist activities relative to the parent ethynyl-estradiol. In silico docking analysis provides structural basis for the trends of ER agonism/antagonism and ER subtype selectivity. Excitingly, lead Tam-HDACi conjugates show anticancer activity that is selectively more potent against MCF-7 (ERα positive breast) compared to MDA-MB-231 (triple negative breast cancer), DU145 (prostate cancer) or Vero (non-cancerous cell line). This dual-targeting approach illustrates the utility of designing small molecules with an emphasis on cell-type selectivity, not merely improved potency, working towards a higher therapeutic index at the earliest stages of drug development. PMID:23786452

  3. Reversible modulation of SIRT1 activity in a mouse strain

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Knowles, Katherine V.; He, Xiaohong; Jardine, Karen; Coulombe, Josée; Dewar-Darch, Danielle; Caron, Annabelle Z.

    2017-01-01

    The SIRT1 protein deacetylase is reported to have a remarkably wide spectrum of biological functions affecting such varied processes as aging, cancer, metabolism, neurodegeneration and immunity. However, the SIRT1 literature is also full of contradictions. To help establish the role(s) of SIRT1 in these and other biological processes, we set out to create a mouse in which the SIRT1 activity could be toggled between on and off states by fusing the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain (ER) to the C terminus of the SIRT1 protein. We found that the catalytic activity of the SIRT1-ER fusion protein increased 4–5 fold in cells treated with its ligand, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4OHT). The 4OHT-induced activation of SIRT1-ER was due in large part to a 2 to 4-fold increase in abundance of the SIRT1-ER protein in cells in culture and in tissues in vivo. This increase is reversible and is a consequence of 4OHT-induced stabilization of the SIRT1-ER protein. Since changes in SIRT1 level or activity of 2–4 fold are frequently reported to be sufficient to affect its biological functions, this mouse should be helpful in establishing the causal relationships between SIRT1 and the diseases and processes it affects. PMID:28273169

  4. Reversible modulation of SIRT1 activity in a mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Clark-Knowles, Katherine V; He, Xiaohong; Jardine, Karen; Coulombe, Josée; Dewar-Darch, Danielle; Caron, Annabelle Z; Gray, Douglas A; McBurney, Michael W

    2017-01-01

    The SIRT1 protein deacetylase is reported to have a remarkably wide spectrum of biological functions affecting such varied processes as aging, cancer, metabolism, neurodegeneration and immunity. However, the SIRT1 literature is also full of contradictions. To help establish the role(s) of SIRT1 in these and other biological processes, we set out to create a mouse in which the SIRT1 activity could be toggled between on and off states by fusing the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain (ER) to the C terminus of the SIRT1 protein. We found that the catalytic activity of the SIRT1-ER fusion protein increased 4-5 fold in cells treated with its ligand, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4OHT). The 4OHT-induced activation of SIRT1-ER was due in large part to a 2 to 4-fold increase in abundance of the SIRT1-ER protein in cells in culture and in tissues in vivo. This increase is reversible and is a consequence of 4OHT-induced stabilization of the SIRT1-ER protein. Since changes in SIRT1 level or activity of 2-4 fold are frequently reported to be sufficient to affect its biological functions, this mouse should be helpful in establishing the causal relationships between SIRT1 and the diseases and processes it affects.

  5. Modulation of autophagic activity by extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Xu, Teng; Su, Hang; Ganapathy, Suthakar; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2011-11-01

    Reprogramming energy metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, a common feature of human cancer, is associated with a relative acidic tumor microenvironment which can sometimes be further accentuated by hypoxia operating within most solid tumors. We found that alteration of extracellular pH induces marked and rapid changes of autophagic activity. Interestingly, acidic and basic conditions induced completely opposite effect on autophagy, with its activity suppressed at lower pH whereas stimulated at higher pH. Gene knockdown experiments indicated that pH induced-autophagy requires Beclin 1, Vps34 and Atg5, key components of the autophagy pathway. Of note, an acidic condition not only inhibits the basal but also blocks the starvation-induced autophagy activity. Significantly, examination of different areas of tumor mass revealed a lower autophagic activity within the inner region than the outer region. These findings have important implications on the connections between autophagy and cancer as well as a wide range of other physiological and pathological processes.

  6. Modulation of ventral striatal activity by cognitive effort.

    PubMed

    Dobryakova, Ekaterina; Jessup, Ryan K; Tricomi, Elizabeth

    2017-02-15

    Effort discounting theory suggests that the value of a reward should be lower if it was effortful to obtain, whereas contrast theory suggests that the contrast between the costly effort and the reward makes the reward seem more valuable. To test these alternative hypotheses, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as participants engaged in feedback-based learning that required low or high cognitive effort to obtain positive feedback, while the objective amount of information provided by feedback remained constant. In the low effort condition, a single image was presented with four response options. In the high effort condition, two images were presented, each with two response options, and correct feedback was presented only when participants responded correctly to both of the images. Accuracy was significantly lower for the high effort condition, and all participants reported that the high effort condition was more difficult. A region of the ventral striatum selected for sensitivity to feedback value also showed increased activation to feedback presentation associated with the high effort condition relative to the low effort condition, when controlling for activation from corresponding control conditions where feedback was random. These results suggest that increased cognitive effort produces corresponding increases in positive feedback-related ventral striatum activity, in line with the predictions made by contrast theory. The accomplishment of obtaining a hard-earned intrinsic reward, such as positive feedback, may be particularly likely to promote reward-related brain activity.

  7. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  8. A Circuit for Motor Cortical Modulation of Auditory Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M.; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity. PMID:24005287

  9. A circuit for motor cortical modulation of auditory cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anders; Schneider, David M; Takatoh, Jun; Sakurai, Katsuyasu; Wang, Fan; Mooney, Richard

    2013-09-04

    Normal hearing depends on the ability to distinguish self-generated sounds from other sounds, and this ability is thought to involve neural circuits that convey copies of motor command signals to various levels of the auditory system. Although such interactions at the cortical level are believed to facilitate auditory comprehension during movements and drive auditory hallucinations in pathological states, the synaptic organization and function of circuitry linking the motor and auditory cortices remain unclear. Here we describe experiments in the mouse that characterize circuitry well suited to transmit motor-related signals to the auditory cortex. Using retrograde viral tracing, we established that neurons in superficial and deep layers of the medial agranular motor cortex (M2) project directly to the auditory cortex and that the axons of some of these deep-layer cells also target brainstem motor regions. Using in vitro whole-cell physiology, optogenetics, and pharmacology, we determined that M2 axons make excitatory synapses in the auditory cortex but exert a primarily suppressive effect on auditory cortical neuron activity mediated in part by feedforward inhibition involving parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Using in vivo intracellular physiology, optogenetics, and sound playback, we also found that directly activating M2 axon terminals in the auditory cortex suppresses spontaneous and stimulus-evoked synaptic activity in auditory cortical neurons and that this effect depends on the relative timing of motor cortical activity and auditory stimulation. These experiments delineate the structural and functional properties of a corticocortical circuit that could enable movement-related suppression of auditory cortical activity.

  10. ModuleBlast: identifying activated sub-networks within and across species.

    PubMed

    Zinman, Guy E; Naiman, Shoshana; O'Dee, Dawn M; Kumar, Nishant; Nau, Gerard J; Cohen, Haim Y; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2015-02-18

    Identifying conserved and divergent response patterns in gene networks is becoming increasingly important. A common approach is integrating expression information with gene association networks in order to find groups of connected genes that are activated or repressed. In many cases, researchers are also interested in comparisons across species (or conditions). Finding an active sub-network is a hard problem and applying it across species requires further considerations (e.g. orthology information, expression data and networks from different sources). To address these challenges we devised ModuleBlast, which uses both expression and network topology to search for highly relevant sub-networks. We have applied ModuleBlast to expression and interaction data from mouse, macaque and human to study immune response and aging. The immune response analysis identified several relevant modules, consistent with recent findings on apoptosis and NFκB activation following infection. Temporal analysis of these data revealed cascades of modules that are dynamically activated within and across species. We have experimentally validated some of the novel hypotheses resulting from the analysis of the ModuleBlast results leading to new insights into the mechanisms used by a key mammalian aging protein.

  11. Language modulates brain activity underlying representation of kinship terms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyan; Ge, Yue; Tang, Honghong; Luo, Yue-Jia; Mai, Xiaoqin; Liu, Chao

    2015-12-21

    Kinship terms have been found to be highly diverse across languages. Here we investigated the brain representation of kinship terms in two distinct populations, native Chinese and Caucasian English speakers, with a five-element kinship identification (FEKI) task. The neuroimaging results showed a common extensive frontal and parietal lobe brain activation pattern for different kinship levels for both Chinese and Caucasian English speakers. Furthermore, Chinese speakers had longer reaction times and elicited more fronto-parietal brain networks activation compared to English speakers in level three (e.g., uncle and nephew) and four (e.g., cousin), including an association between the middle frontal gyrus and superior parietal lobe, which might be associated with higher working memory, attention control, and social distance representation load in Chinese kinship system processing. These results contribute to our understanding of the representation of kinship terms in the two languages.

  12. Crystallinity Modulation of Layered Carbon Nitride for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhai; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As an emerging metal‐free semiconductor, covalently bonded carbon nitride (CN) has attracted much attention in photocatalysis. However, drawbacks such as a high recombination rate of excited electrons and holes hinder its potential applications. Tailoring the crystallinity of semiconductors is an important way to suppress unwanted charge recombination, but has rarely been applied to CN so far. Herein, a simple method to synthesize CN of high crystallinity by protonation of specific intermediate species during conventional polymerization is reported. Interestingly, the as‐obtained CN exhibited improved photocatalytic activities of up to seven times those of the conventional bulk CN. This approach, with only a slight change to the conventional method, provides a facile way to effectively regulate the crystallinity of bulk CN to improve its photocatalytic activities and sheds light on large‐scale industrial applications of CN with high efficiency for sustainable energy. PMID:27436164

  13. Allatotropin Modulates Myostimulatory and Cardioacceleratory Activities in Rhodnius prolixus (Stal).

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos-Sambucaro, María José; Lorenzo-Figueiras, Alicia Nieves; Riccillo, Fernando Luis; Diambra, Luis Anibal; Noriega, Fernando Gabriel; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Haematophagous insects can ingest large quantities of blood in a single meal and eliminate high volumes of urine in the next few hours. This rise in diuresis is possible because the excretory activity of the Malpighian tubules is facilitated by an increase in haemolymph circulation as a result of intensification of aorta contractions combined with an increase of the anterior midgut peristaltic waves. It has been previously described that haemolymph circulation during post-prandial diuresis is stimulated by the synergistic activity of allatotropin (AT) and serotonin in the kissing bug Triatoma infestans; resulting in an increase in aorta contractions. In the same species, AT stimulates anterior midgut and rectum muscle contractions to mix urine and feces and facilitate the voiding of the rectum. Furthermore, levels of AT in midgut and Malpighian tubules increased in the afternoon when insects are getting ready for nocturnal feeding. In the present study we describe the synergistic effect of AT and serotonin increasing the frequency of contractions of the aorta in Rhodnius prolixus. The basal frequency of contractions of the aorta in the afternoon is higher that the observed during the morning, suggesting the existence of a daily rhythmic activity. The AT receptor is expressed in the rectum, midgut and dorsal vessel, three critical organs involved in post-prandial diuresis. All together these findings provide evidence that AT plays a role as a myoregulatory and cardioacceleratory peptide in R. prolixus. PMID:25897783

  14. Dopamine Transporter Activity Is Modulated by α-Synuclein.

    PubMed

    Butler, Brittany; Saha, Kaustuv; Rana, Tanu; Becker, Jonas P; Sambo, Danielle; Davari, Paran; Goodwin, J Shawn; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2015-12-04

    The duration and strength of the dopaminergic signal are regulated by the dopamine transporter (DAT). Drug addiction and neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases have all been associated with altered DAT activity. The membrane localization and the activity of DAT are regulated by a number of intracellular proteins. α-Synuclein, a protein partner of DAT, is implicated in neurodegenerative disease and drug addiction. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the interaction between DAT and α-synuclein, the cellular location of this interaction, and the functional consequences of this interaction on the basal, amphetamine-induced DAT-mediated dopamine efflux, and membrane microdomain distribution of the transporter. Here, we found that the majority of DAT·α-synuclein protein complexes are found at the plasma membrane of dopaminergic neurons or mammalian cells and that the amphetamine-mediated increase in DAT activity enhances the association of these proteins at the plasma membrane. Further examination of the interaction of DAT and α-synuclein revealed a transient interaction between these two proteins at the plasma membrane. Additionally, we found DAT-induced membrane depolarization enhances plasma membrane localization of α-synuclein, which in turn increases dopamine efflux and enhances DAT localization in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains.

  15. Uterine glutathione reductase activity: modulation by estrogens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, M; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Pedrón, N N; Hicks, J J

    1999-10-29

    The aim of this study was to determine whether glutathione reductase activity in uterine tissue is regulated by sex hormones. In spayed rats uterine glutathione reductase was significantly increased by exogenous estrogen (P< 0.01), progesterone (P< 0.01) or estrogen plus progesterone (P<0.01). When enzyme activity is expressed per mg protein, daily administration of estrogen or progesterone induces a progressive increase of this enzyme between 24 to 48 h or 24 to 72 h of treatment, respectively. Whereas the combination of both steroids causes an earlier and higher increase in glutathione reductase activity at 24 h of treatment. Estradiol singly or in combination with progesterone induced the highest protein concentration in the uterus. Whereas uterine DNA concentration is only significantly affected by estradiol. Our results suggest that uterine glutathione reductase is regulated by estradiol and progesterone and may be involved in maintaining levels of reduced glutathione in the uterus. This compound may be required for control of the redox state of thiol groups and in detoxification reactions involving H2O2 and electrophylic substances. The antioxidant action of estrogens is partially due to the stimulation of glutathione reductase.

  16. Modulation of divalent cation-activated chloride ion currents.

    PubMed

    Scott, R H; McGuirk, S M; Dolphin, A C

    1988-07-01

    1. Voltage-sensitive calcium channel currents carried by Ca2+ (ICa) or Ba2+ (IBa) were followed by tail currents carried by Cl- ions in approximately 45% of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones. 2. Extracellular application of (-)-baclofen (100 microM) inhibited IBa and ICl(Ba). Bay K 8644 (5 microM) potentiated both currents. 3. Intracellular GTP-gamma-S increased the proportion of neurones in which ICl(Ba) was recorded. In addition, the activation by GTP-gamma-S of a pertussis toxin-sensitive GTP binding (G)-protein resulted in a steady increase in the Cl- tail current with time, despite a concurrent reduction in IBa. 4. Extracellular application of 10mM caffeine selectively reduced ICl(Ba) without significant change in IBa. When Ca2+ was the charge carrier, caffeine had little effect on ICl(Ca), and increased the inactivation of ICa. 5. We conclude that, in addition to being regulated by divalent cation entry through Ca2+ channels, the Cl- current is also regulated by G-protein activation. The mechanism of activation of ICl(Ba) may involve Ca2+ release from intracellular stores.

  17. Corticothalamic Activation Modulates Thalamic Firing Through Glutamate "Metabotropic" Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, David A.; von Krosigk, Marcus

    1992-04-01

    The mammalian thalamus forms an obligatory relay for nearly all sensory information that reaches the cerebral cortex. The transmission of sensory information by the thalamus varies in a state-dependent manner, such that during slow wave sleep or drowsiness thalamic responsiveness is markedly reduced, whereas during the waking, attentive state transmission is enhanced. Although activation of brainstem inputs to thalamic neurons has long been assumed to underlie this gating of sensory transfer through the thalamus, numerically the largest input to thalamic relay neurons derives from layer VI cells of the cerebral cortex. Here we report that activation of corticothalamic fibers causes a prolonged excitatory postsynaptic potential in guinea pig dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons resulting from the reduction of a potassium conductance, consistent with the activation of glutamatergic "metabotropic" receptors. This slow depolarization can switch firing of thalamic neurons from the burst firing mode, which is prevalent during slow wave sleep, to the single spike mode, which is prevalent during waking, thereby facilitating transmission of sensory information through the thalamus. This prolonged enhancement of thalamic transfer may allow the cerebral cortex to gate or control selective fields of sensory inputs in a manner that facilitates arousal, attention, and cognition.

  18. Serotonin transporter genotype modulates amygdala activity during mood regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Hengyi; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Breland, Jessica; Sankoorikal, Geena Mary V.; Brodkin, Edward S.; Farah, Martha J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated the short allele of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in depression vulnerability, particularly in the context of stress. Several neuroimaging studies have shown that 5-HTTLPR genotype predicts amygdala reactivity to negatively valenced stimuli, suggesting a mechanism whereby the short allele confers depression risk. The current study investigated whether 5-HTTLPR genotype similarly affects neural activity during an induced sad mood and during recovery from sad mood. Participants were 15 homozygous short (S) and 15 homozygous long (L) individuals. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging during four scanning blocks: baseline, sad mood, mood recovery and following return to baseline. Comparing mood recovery to baseline, both whole brain analyses and template-based region-of-interest analyses revealed greater amygdala activity for the S vs the L-group. There were no significant amygdala differences found during the induced sad mood. These results demonstrate the effect of the S allele on amygdala activity during intentional mood regulation and suggest that amygdala hyperactivity during recovery from a sad mood may be one mechanism by which the S allele confers depression risk. PMID:19858108

  19. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of optogenetic modulation of neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Gu, L.; Ghosh, N.; Mohanty, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    Here, we introduce a computational procedure to examine whether optogenetically activated neuronal firing recordings could be characterized as multifractal series. Optogenetics is emerging as a valuable experimental tool and a promising approach for studying a variety of neurological disorders in animal models. The spiking patterns from cortical region of the brain of optogenetically-stimulated transgenic mice were analyzed using a sophisticated fluctuation analysis method known as multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA). We observed that the optogenetically-stimulated neural firings are consistent with a multifractal process. Further, we used MFDFA to monitor the effect of chemically induced pain (formalin injection) and optogenetic treatment used to relieve the pain. In this case, dramatic changes in parameters characterizing a multifractal series were observed. Both the generalized Hurst exponent and width of singularity spectrum effectively differentiates the neural activities during control and pain induction phases. The quantitative nature of the analysis equips us with better measures to quantify pain. Further, it provided a measure for effectiveness of the optogenetic stimulation in inhibiting pain. MFDFA-analysis of spiking data from other deep regions of the brain also turned out to be multifractal in nature, with subtle differences in the parameters during pain-induction by formalin injection and inhibition by optogenetic stimulation. Characterization of neuronal firing patterns using MFDFA will lead to better understanding of neuronal response to optogenetic activation and overall circuitry involved in the process.

  20. Modulation of bone remodeling via mechanically activated ion channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Randall L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the maintenance of bone mass is the physical forces imposed upon the skeleton. Removal of these forces, such as in a weightless environment, results in a rapid loss of bone, whereas application of exogenous mechanical strain has been shown to increase bone formation. Numerous flight and ground-based experiments indicate that the osteoblast is the key bone cell influenced by mechanical stimulation. Aside from early transient fluctuations in response to unloading, osteoclast number and activity seem unaffected by removal of strain. However, bone formation is drastically reduced in weightlessness and osteoblasts respond to mechanical strain with an increase in the activity of a number of second messenger pathways resulting in increased anabolic activity. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the osteoblast converts physical stimuli into a biochemical message, a process we have termed biochemical coupling, remains elusive. Prior to the application of this grant, we had characterized a mechanosensitive, cation nonselective channel (SA-cat) in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells that we proposed is the initial signalling mechanism for mechanotransduction. During the execution of this grant, we have made considerable progress to further characterize this channel as well as to determine its role in the osteoblastic response to mechanical strain. To achieve these goals, we combined electrophysiologic techniques with cellular and molecular biology methods to examine the role of these channels in the normal function of the osteoblast in vitro.

  1. Detection and characterisation of delamination in PV modules by active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A.; Sastry, O. S.; Gupta, R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a fast and efficient method for the detection and characterisation of delamination in photovoltaic (PV) modules by using active infrared thermography approach. A discrete part of PV module was irradiated by step heating and its thermal image sequence was used to detect and analyse delamination. Different types of heating source for thermal excitation for this application have been studied. An electro-thermal model was developed to simulate the active thermography approach for the characterisation of delamination in PV module by equivalent resistance-capacitance (RC) network using a circuit simulator. This simulation approach was used to estimate the extent of delamination in the module and to determine the optimum parameters for the characterisation of delamination. Different applications based on front and backsides of heating the module were also proposed in this paper. The proposed method has the potential to be employed for the quality check of PV modules during inline production as well as for the predictive maintenance of outdoor PV plants.

  2. Structural evidence that human acetylcholinesterase inhibited by tabun ages through O-dealkylation.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Eugénie; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Dupeux, Florine; Trovaslet, Marie; Masson, Patrick; Nachon, Florian

    2010-05-27

    Tabun is a warfare agent that inhibits human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) by rapid phosphylation of the catalytic serine. A time-dependent reaction occurs on the tabun adduct, leading to an "aged" enzyme, resistant to oxime reactivators. The aging reaction may proceed via either dealkylation or deamidation, depending on the stereochemistry of the phosphoramidyl adduct. We solved the X-ray structure of aged tabun-hAChE complexed with fasciculin II, and we show that aging proceeds through O-dealkylation, in agreement with the aging mechanism that we determined for tabun-inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase and mouse acetylcholinesterase. Noteworthy, aging and binding of fasciculin II lead to an improved thermostability, resulting from additional stabilizing interactions between the two subdomains that face each other across the active site gorge. This first structure of hAChE inhibited by a nerve agent provides structural insight into the inhibition and aging mechanisms and a structural template for the design of molecules capable of reactivating aged hAChE.

  3. Anatomy of acetylcholinesterase catalysis: reaction dynamics analogy for human erythrocyte and electric eel enzymes.

    PubMed

    Acheson, S A; Quinn, D M

    1990-09-03

    The anatomy of catalysis (i.e., reaction dynamics, thermodynamics and transition state structures) is compared herein for acetylcholinesterases from human erythrocytes and Electrophorus electricus. The two enzymes have similar relative activities for the substrate o-nitrochloroacetanilide and o-nitrophenyl acetate. In addition, with each substrate K values and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects for kES and kE are similar for the two enzymes. Solvent isotope effects in mixed isotopic buffers indicate that the acylation stages of o-nitrochloroacetanilide turnover by the two enzymes are rate-limited by virtual transition states that are weighted averages of contributions from transition states of serial chemical and physical steps. Similar experiments show that the transition states for Vmax of o-nitrophenyl acetate turnover by the two enzymes are stabilized by simple general acid-base (i.e., one-proton) catalysis. These comparisons demonstrate that acetylcholinesterases from diverse sources display functional analogy in that reaction dynamics and transition state structures are closely similar.

  4. Novel and Viable Acetylcholinesterase Target Site for Developing Effective and Environmentally Safe Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yuan-Ping; Brimijoin, Stephen; Ragsdale, David W; Zhu, Kun Yan; Suranyi, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Insect pests are responsible for human suffering and financial losses worldwide. New and environmentally safe insecticides are urgently needed to cope with these serious problems. Resistance to current insecticides has resulted in a resurgence of insect pests, and growing concerns about insecticide toxicity to humans discourage the use of insecticides for pest control. The small market for insecticides has hampered insecticide development; however, advances in genomics and structural genomics offer new opportunities to develop insecticides that are less dependent on the insecticide market. This review summarizes the literature data that support the hypothesis that an insect-specific cysteine residue located at the opening of the acetylcholinesterase active site is a promising target site for developing new insecticides with reduced off-target toxicity and low propensity for insect resistance. These data are used to discuss the differences between targeting the insect-specific cysteine residue and targeting the ubiquitous catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterase from the perspective of reducing off-target toxicity and insect resistance. Also discussed is the prospect of developing cysteine-targeting anticholinesterases as effective and environmentally safe insecticides for control of disease vectors, crop damage, and residential insect pests within the financial confines of the present insecticide market. PMID:22280344

  5. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity modulates prolactin expression in the pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Tyler B.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary tumors account for 15% of intracranial neoplasms, however the extent to which environmental toxicants contribute to the proliferation and hormone expression of pituitary cells is unknown. Aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) interacting protein (AIP) loss of function mutations cause somatotroph and lactotroph adenomas in humans. AIP sequesters AhR and inhibits its transcriptional function. Because of the link between AIP and pituitary tumors, we hypothesize that exposure to dioxins, potent exogenous ligands for AhR that are persistent in the environment, may predispose to pituitary dysfunction through activation of AhR. In the present study, we examined the effect of AhR activation on proliferation and endogenous pituitary hormone expression in the GH3 rat somato-lactotrope tumor cell line and the effect of loss of AhR action in knockout mice. GH3 cells respond to nM doses of the reversible AhR agonist β-naphthoflavone with a robust induction of Cyp1a1. Although mRNA levels of the anti-proliferative signaling cytokine TGFbeta1 are suppressed upon β-naphthoflavone treatment, we did not observe an alteration in cell proliferation. AhR activation with β-naphthoflavone suppresses Ahr expression and impairs expression of prolactin (PRL), but not growth hormone (GH) mRNA in GH3 cells. In mice, loss of Ahr similarly leads to a reduction in Prl mRNA at P3, while Gh is unaffected. Additionally, there is a significant reduction pituitary hormones Lhb and Fshb in the absence of Ahr. Overall, these results demonstrate that AhR is important for pituitary hormone expression and suggests environmental dioxins can exert endocrine disrupting effects at the pituitary. PMID:22975028

  6. Sigma-1 receptors modulate functional activity of rat splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Whitlock, B B; Pultz, J A; Wolfe, S A

    1995-06-01

    Neuroleptics, opiates, and cocaine are commonly prescribed for or abused by humans. Although primarily used for their actions at other receptors in brain, these compounds also act at sigma receptors. We have previously identified sigma-1 receptors on human peripheral blood leukocytes and rat spleen, and in the present study we demonstrate a correlation between the pharmacology of these receptors and the ability of drugs to suppress concanavalin A-induced splenocyte proliferation. These results support the hypothesis that sigma-1 receptors regulate functional activities of immune cells, and suggest that sigma agonists may cause changes in immune competence in vivo.

  7. SUMO modification modulates the transrepression activity of PLZF

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, T.-T.; Chang, C.-C.; Shih, H.-M. . E-mail: hmshih@ibms.sinica.edu.tw

    2007-06-29

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification has recently been shown to associate with transcriptional regulation and nuclear body formation. Here, we show that transcription factor PLZF can be SUMO modified at lysine residue 242, 387 and 396. Converting these three SUMO acceptor Lys to Arg 3KR does not significantly affect PLZF nuclear body formation, which is distinct from the scenario of PML sumoylation in PML nuclear body formation. Furthermore, PLZF-3KR markedly reduced the transcriptional repression activity, correlating with a loss of PLZF-mediated growth suppression. These results reveal an important role of SUMO modification in PLZF-mediated transcriptional repression.

  8. Control of Foxp3 stability through modulation of TET activity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xiaojing; Trifari, Sara; Äijö, Tarmo; Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Pastor, William A.; Zepeda-Martínez, Jorge A.; Lio, Chan-Wang J.; Li, Xiang; Huang, Yun; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and other oxidized methylcytosines, intermediates in DNA demethylation. In this study, we examine the role of TET proteins in regulating Foxp3, a transcription factor essential for the development and function of regulatory T cells (T reg cells), a distinct lineage of CD4+ T cells that prevent autoimmunity and maintain immune homeostasis. We show that during T reg cell development in the thymus, TET proteins mediate the loss of 5mC in T reg cell–specific hypomethylated regions, including CNS1 and CNS2, intronic cis-regulatory elements in the Foxp3 locus. Similar to CNS2-deficient T reg cells, the stability of Foxp3 expression is markedly compromised in T reg cells from Tet2/Tet3 double-deficient mice. Vitamin C potentiates TET activity and acts through Tet2/Tet3 to increase the stability of Foxp3 expression in TGF-β–induced T reg cells. Our data suggest that targeting TET enzymes with small molecule activators such as vitamin C might increase induced T reg cell efficacy. PMID:26903244

  9. Human epidermal plasminogen activator. Characterization, localization, and modulation.

    PubMed

    Morioka, S; Jensen, P J; Lazarus, G S

    1985-12-01

    Using biochemical and immunocytochemical approaches, we have investigated the plasminogen activator (PA) of primary human epidermal cell cultures. A rabbit antibody raised against human urinary PA (urokinase) inhibited greater than or equal to 96% of the PA activity in the keratinocyte cultures. Immunoblot and double immunodiffusion analyses of keratinocyte PA with anti-urokinase antibody confirmed that epidermal PA was of the urokinase type. Immunocytochemical investigation of human keratinocyte cultures with anti-urokinase antibody revealed two characteristic staining patterns for PA. First, cells at the advancing edge of subconfluent colonies were cytoplasmically stained in a granular pattern. Similar staining was observed at the migrating edges of confluent epidermal cell cultures that had been wounded by cutting with a blade. This induction of PA staining was independent of cell division. Secondly, differentiated epidermal cells located on the surface of colonies were stained either at the plasma membrane or homogeneously throughout the cell. The highly differentiated, spontaneously shed cells were usually very heavily stained by anti-urokinase antibody. These immunocytochemical experiments suggest that PA expression is highly regulated in human epidermal cells. Specifically, PA expression appears to be related to cellular differentiation and to cell movement in expanding or wounded keratinocyte colonies.

  10. REGgamma modulates p53 activity by regulating its cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Yu, Guowu; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhao, Dengpan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jiang; Li, Lei; Zeng, Yu; Dang, Yongyan; Wang, Chuangui; Gao, Guang; Long, Weiwen; Lonard, David M; Qiao, Shanlou; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Zhang, Bianhong; Luo, Honglin; Li, Xiaotao

    2010-12-01

    The proteasome activator REGγ mediates a shortcut for the destruction of intact mammalian proteins. The biological roles of REGγ and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we provide evidence that REGγ regulates cellular distribution of p53 by facilitating its multiple monoubiquitylation and subsequent nuclear export and degradation. We also show that inhibition of p53 tetramerization by REGγ might further enhance cytoplasmic relocation of p53 and reduce active p53 in the nucleus. Furthermore, multiple monoubiquitylation of p53 enhances its physical interaction with HDM2 and probably facilitates subsequent polyubiquitylation of p53, suggesting that monoubiquitylation can act as a signal for p53 degradation. Depletion of REGγ sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptosis, validating its crucial role in the control of apoptosis, probably through regulation of p53 function. Using a mouse xenograft model, we show that REGγ knockdown results in a significant reduction of tumor growth, suggesting an important role for REGγ in tumor development. Our study therefore demonstrates that REGγ-mediated inactivation of p53 is one of the mechanisms involved in cancer progression.

  11. Acetylcholinesterases of blood-feeding flies and ticks.

    PubMed

    Temeyer, Kevin B; Tuckow, Alexander P; Brake, Danett K; Li, Andrew Y; Pérez de León, Adalberto A

    2013-03-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the biochemical target of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate pesticides for invertebrates, vertebrate nerve agents, and AChE inhibitors used to reduce effects of Alzheimer's disease. Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are widely used to control blood-feeding arthropods, including biting flies and ticks. However, resistance to OPs in pests affecting animal and human health has compromised control efficacy. OP resistance often results from mutations producing an OP-insensitive AChE. Our studies have demonstrated production of OP-insensitive AChEs in biting flies and ticks. Complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences encoding AChEs were obtained for the horn fly, stable fly, sand fly, and the southern cattle tick. The availability of cDNA sequences enables the identification of mutations, expression and characterization of recombinant proteins, gene silencing for functional studies, as well as in vitro screening of novel inhibitors. The southern cattle tick expresses at least three different genes encoding AChE in their synganglion, i.e. brain. Gene amplification for each of the three known cattle tick AChE genes and expression of multiple alleles for each gene may reduce fitness cost associated with OP-resistance. AChE hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, but may have additional roles in physiology and development. The three cattle tick AChEs possess significantly different biochemical properties, and are expressed in neural and non-neural tissues, which suggest separation of structure and function. The remarkable complexity of AChEs in ticks suggested by combining genomic data from Ixodes scapularis with our genetic and biochemical data from Rhipicephalus microplus is suggestive of previously unknown gene duplication and diversification. Comparative studies between invertebrate and vertebrate AChEs could enhance our understanding of structure-activity relationships. Research with ticks as a model system offers the opportunity to

  12. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition and Information Processing in the Auditory Cortex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-30

    9,24,29,30), or for causing auditory hallucinations (2,23,31,32). Thus, compounds which alter cho- linergic transmission, in particular anticholinesterases...the upper auditory system. Thus, attending to and understanding verbal messages in humans, irrespective of the particular voice which speaks them, may...00, AD ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND INFORMATION PROCESSING IN THE AUDITORY CORTEX ANNUAL SUMMARY REPORT DTIC ELECTENORMAN M

  13. The Geography of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liverman, Diana; Solem, Michael

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module examines the geography of human activities that produce the major…

  14. Subunit Interfaces Contribute Differently to Activation and Allosteric Modulation of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Short, Caitlin A.; Cao, Angela T.; Wingfield, Molly A.; Doers, Matthew E.; Jobe, Emily M.; Wang, Nan; Levandoski, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed in the nervous system and are implicated in many normal and pathological processes. The structural determinants of allostery in nAChRs are not well understood. One class of nAChR allosteric modulators, including the small molecule morantel (Mor), acts from a site that is structurally homologous to the canonical agonist site but exists in the β(+)/α(–) subunit interface. We hypothesized that all nAChR subunits move with respect to each other during channel activation and allosteric modulation. We therefore studied five pairs of residues predicted to span the interfaces of α3β2 receptors, one at the agonist interface and four at the modulator interface. Substituting cysteines in these positions, we used disulfide trapping to perturb receptor function. The pair α3Y168-β2D190, involving the C loop region of the β2 subunit, mediates modulation and agonist activation, because evoked currents were reduced up to 50% following oxidation (H2O2) treatment. The pair α3S125-β2Q39, below the canonical site, is also involved in channel activation, in accord with previous studies of the muscle-type receptor; however, the pair is differentially sensitive to ACh activation and Mor modulation (currents decreased 60% and 80%, respectively). The pairs α3Q37-β2A127 and α3E173-β2R46, both in the non-canonical interface, showed increased currents following oxidation, suggesting that subunit movements are not symmetrical. Together, our results from disulfide trapping and further mutation analysis indicate that subunit interface movement is important for allosteric modulation of nAChRs, but that the two types of interfaces contribute unequally to receptor activation. PMID:25486620

  15. Acetylcholinesterase-Based Electrochemical Multiphase Microreactor for Detection of Organophosphorous Compounds (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    glutaraldehyde. The system was tested with malathion , an organophosphorus pesticide. The detection limit of the sensor in the parts-per-trillion range and...Electric eel acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) and the organophosphate, malathion , were purchased from Aldrich. Electric eel acetylcholinesterase is less...expensive than human acetylcholinesterase and allows us to use a non-toxic organophosphate. Malathion , commonly used as a pesticide, is not

  16. Primary Investigation for the Mechanism of Biatractylolide from Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma as an Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yong-Chao; Ning, Ning; Zhu, Li; Li, Dan-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Biatractylolide was isolated from ethyl acetate extract of dried Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma root by multistep chromatographic processing. Structure of biatractylolide was confirmed by 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. The IC50 on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was 6.5458 μg/mL when the control IC50 value of huperzine A was 0.0192