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Sample records for modulates myocardial metabolism

  1. Compound danshen dripping pills modulate the perturbed energy metabolism in a rat model of acute myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiahua; Yong, Yonghong; Aa, Jiye; Cao, Bei; Sun, Runbin; Yu, Xiaoyi; Huang, Jingqiu; Yang, Na; Yan, Lulu; Li, Xinxin; Cao, Jing; Aa, Nan; Yang, Zhijian; Kong, Xiangqing; Wang, Liansheng; Zhu, Xuanxuan; Ma, Xiaohui; Guo, Zhixin; Zhou, Shuiping; Sun, He; Wang, Guangji

    2016-12-01

    The continuous administration of compound danshen dripping pills (CDDP) showed good efficacy in relieving myocardial ischemia clinically. To probe the underlying mechanism, metabolic features were evaluated in a rat model of acute myocardial ischemia induced by isoproterenol (ISO) and administrated with CDDP using a metabolomics platform. Our data revealed that the ISO-induced animal model showed obvious myocardial injury, decreased energy production, and a marked change in metabolomic patterns in plasma and heart tissue. CDDP pretreatment increased energy production, ameliorated biochemical indices, modulated the changes and metabolomic pattern induced by ISO, especially in heart tissue. For the first time, we found that ISO induced myocardial ischemia was accomplished with a reduced fatty acids metabolism and an elevated glycolysis for energy supply upon the ischemic stress; while CDDP pretreatment prevented the tendency induced by ISO and enhanced a metabolic shift towards fatty acids metabolism that conventionally dominates energy supply to cardiac muscle cells. These data suggested that the underlying mechanism of CDDP involved regulating the dominant energy production mode and enhancing a metabolic shift toward fatty acids metabolism in ischemic heart. It was further indicated that CDDP had the potential to prevent myocardial ischemia in clinic.

  2. Compound danshen dripping pills modulate the perturbed energy metabolism in a rat model of acute myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiahua; Yong, Yonghong; Aa, Jiye; Cao, Bei; Sun, Runbin; Yu, Xiaoyi; Huang, Jingqiu; Yang, Na; Yan, Lulu; Li, Xinxin; Cao, Jing; Aa, Nan; Yang, Zhijian; Kong, Xiangqing; Wang, Liansheng; Zhu, Xuanxuan; Ma, Xiaohui; Guo, Zhixin; Zhou, Shuiping; Sun, He; Wang, Guangji

    2016-01-01

    The continuous administration of compound danshen dripping pills (CDDP) showed good efficacy in relieving myocardial ischemia clinically. To probe the underlying mechanism, metabolic features were evaluated in a rat model of acute myocardial ischemia induced by isoproterenol (ISO) and administrated with CDDP using a metabolomics platform. Our data revealed that the ISO-induced animal model showed obvious myocardial injury, decreased energy production, and a marked change in metabolomic patterns in plasma and heart tissue. CDDP pretreatment increased energy production, ameliorated biochemical indices, modulated the changes and metabolomic pattern induced by ISO, especially in heart tissue. For the first time, we found that ISO induced myocardial ischemia was accomplished with a reduced fatty acids metabolism and an elevated glycolysis for energy supply upon the ischemic stress; while CDDP pretreatment prevented the tendency induced by ISO and enhanced a metabolic shift towards fatty acids metabolism that conventionally dominates energy supply to cardiac muscle cells. These data suggested that the underlying mechanism of CDDP involved regulating the dominant energy production mode and enhancing a metabolic shift toward fatty acids metabolism in ischemic heart. It was further indicated that CDDP had the potential to prevent myocardial ischemia in clinic. PMID:27905409

  3. Diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heart is challenged by a plethora of extracellular stimuli over the course of a normal day, each of which distinctly influences myocardial contractile function. It is therefore not surprising that myocardial metabolism also oscillates in a time-of-day dependent manner. What is becoming increasin...

  4. Cardioselective Dominant-negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor (Δ337T) Modulates Myocardial Metabolism and Contractile Dfficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Olson, Aaron; Ge, Ming; Ning, Xue-Han; Buroker, Norman E.; Chung, Youngran; Jue, Thomas; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-06-03

    Dominant- negative thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) show elevated expression relative to ligand-binding TRs during cardiac hypertrophy. We tested the hypothesis that overexpression of a dominant-negative TR alters cardiac metabolism and contractile efficiency (CE). We used mice expressing the cardioselective dominant-negative TRβ1 mutation Δ337T. Isolated working Δ337T hearts and nontransgenic control (Con) hearts were perfused with 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate (ACAC), lactate, and glucose at physiological concentrations for 30 min. 13C NMR spectroscopy and isotopomer analyses were used to determine substrate flux and fractional contributions (Fc) of acetyl-CoA to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Δ337T hearts exhibited rate depression but higher developed pressure and CE, defined as work per oxygen consumption (MV˙ O2). Unlabeled substrate Fc from endogenous sources was higher in Δ337T, but ACAC Fc was lower. Fluxes through CAC, lactate, ACAC, and FFA were reduced in Δ337T. CE and Fc differences were reversed by pacing Δ337T to Con rates, accompanied by an increase in FFA Fc. Δ337T hearts lacked the ability to increase MV˙ O2. Decreases in protein expression for glucose transporter-4 and hexokinase-2 and increases in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 and -4 suggest that these hearts are unable to increase carbohydrate oxidation in response to stress. These data show that Δ337T alters the metabolic phenotype in murine heart by reducing substrate flux for multiple pathways. Some of these changes are heart rate dependent, indicating that the substrate shift may represent an accommodation to altered contractile protein kinetics, which can be disrupted by pacing stress.

  5. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  6. Mangiferin modulation of metabolism and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fomenko, Ekaterina Vladimirovna; Chi, Yuling

    2016-09-10

    The recent emergence of a worldwide epidemic of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes, demands effective strategy to develop nutraceuticals or pharmaceuticals to halt this trend. Natural products have long been and continue to be an attractive source of nutritional and pharmacological therapeutics. One such natural product is mangiferin (MGF), the predominant constituent of extracts of the mango plant Mangifera indica L. Reports on biological and pharmacological effects of MGF increased exponentially in recent years. MGF has documented antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies indicate that it modulates multiple biological processes involved in metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. MGF has been shown to improve metabolic abnormalities and disorders in animal models and humans. This review focuses on the recently reported biological and pharmacological effects of MGF on metabolism and metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(5):492-503, 2016.

  7. Relation between the kinetics of thallium-201 in myocardial scintigraphy and myocardial metabolism in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, H; Akioka, K; Takagi, M; Tanaka, A; Takeuchi, K; Yoshikawa, J; Ochi, H

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To investigate the relations between myocardial metabolism and the kinetics of thallium-201 in myocardial scintigraphy.
Methods—46 patients within six weeks after the onset of acute myocardial infarction underwent resting myocardial dual isotope, single acquisition, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using radioiodinated 15-iodophenyl 3-methyl pentadecaenoic acid (BMIPP) and thallium-201, exercise thallium-201 SPECT, and positron emission tomography (PET) using nitrogen-13 ammonia (NH3) and [F18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) under fasting conditions. The left ventricle was divided into nine segments, and the severity of defects was assessed visually.
Results—In the resting SPECT, less BMIPP uptake than thallium-201 uptake was observed in all of 40 segments with reverse redistribution of thallium-201, and in 21 of 88 segments with a fixed defect of thallium-201 (p < 0.0001); and more FDG uptake than NH3 uptake (NH3-FDG mismatch) was observed in 35 of 40 segments with reverse redistribution and in 38 of 88 segments with fixed defect (p < 0.0001). Less BMIPP uptake in the resting SPECT was observed in 49 of 54 segments with slow stress redistribution in exercise SPECT, and in nine of 17 segments with rapid stress redistribution (p < 0.0005); NH3-FDG mismatch was observed in 42 of 54 segments with slow stress redistribution and in five of 17 segments with rapid stress redistribution (p < 0.0005).
Conclusions—Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy provides information about not only myocardial perfusion and viability but also about myocardial metabolism in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

 Keywords: thallium-201 SPECT;  BMIPP SPECT;  FDG PET;  myocardial infarction;  redistribution PMID:9764055

  8. Effects of activation of endocannabinoid system on myocardial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Polak, Agnieszka; Harasim, Ewa; Chabowski, Adrian

    2016-05-21

    Endocannabinoids exert their effect on the regulation of energy homeostasis via activation of specific receptors. They control food intake, secretion of insulin, lipids and glucose metabolism, lipid storage. Long chain fatty acids are the main myocardial energy substrate. However, the heart exerts enormous metabolic flexibility emphasized by its ability to utilzation not only fatty acids, but also glucose, lactate and ketone bodies. Endocannabinoids can directly act on the cardiomyocytes through the CB1 and CB2 receptors present in cardiomyocytes. It appears that direct activation of CB1 receptors promotes increased lipogenesis, pericardial steatosis and bioelectrical dysfunction of the heart. In contrast, stimulation of CB2 receptors exhibits cardioprotective properties, helping to maintain appropriate amount of ATP in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the effects of endocannabinoids at both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, such as liver, pancreas, or adipose tissue, resulting indirectly in plasma availability of energy substrates and affects myocardial metabolism. To date, there is little evidence that describes effects of activation of the endocannabinoid system in the cardiovascular system under physiological conditions. In the present paper the impact of metabolic diseases, i. e. obesity and diabetes, as well as the cardiovascular diseases - hypertension, myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction on the deregulation of the endocannabinoid system and its effect on the metabolism are described.

  9. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  10. Altered phosphate metabolism in myocardial infarction: P-31 MR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bottomley, P.A.; Herfkens, R.J.; Smith, L.S.; Bashore, T.M.

    1987-12-01

    The high-energy myocardial phosphate metabolism of four patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction after coronary angioplasty and drug therapy was evaluated with cardiac-gated phosphorus magnetic resonance (MR) depth-resolved surface coil spectroscopy (DRESS) 5-9 days after the onset of symptoms. Significant reductions (about threefold) in the phosphocreatine (PCr) to inorganic phosphate (Pi) ratio and elevations in the Pi to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio were observed in endocardially or transmurally derived MR spectra when compared with values from epicardially displaced spectra and values from seven healthy volunteers (P less than .05). High-energy phosphate metabolites and Pi ratios did not vary significantly during the cardiac cycle in healthy volunteers. However, contamination of Pi resonances by phosphomonoester components, including blood 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, precluded accurate spectral quantification of Pi and pH. The results indicate that localized P-31 MR spectroscopy may be used to directly assess cellular energy reserve in clinical myocardial infarction and to evaluate metabolic response to interventions.

  11. Adaptation of myocardial substrate metabolism to a ketogenic nutrient environment.

    PubMed

    Wentz, Anna E; d'Avignon, D André; Weber, Mary L; Cotter, David G; Doherty, Jason M; Kerns, Robnet; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Reddy, Naveen; Sambandam, Nandakumar; Crawford, Peter A

    2010-08-06

    Heart muscle is metabolically versatile, converting energy stored in fatty acids, glucose, lactate, amino acids, and ketone bodies. Here, we use mouse models in ketotic nutritional states (24 h of fasting and a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet) to demonstrate that heart muscle engages a metabolic response that limits ketone body utilization. Pathway reconstruction from microarray data sets, gene expression analysis, protein immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical analysis of myocardial tissue from nutritionally modified mouse models reveal that ketotic states promote transcriptional suppression of the key ketolytic enzyme, succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT; encoded by Oxct1), as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha-dependent induction of the key ketogenic enzyme HMGCS2. Consistent with reduction of SCOT, NMR profiling demonstrates that maintenance on a ketogenic diet causes a 25% reduction of myocardial (13)C enrichment of glutamate when (13)C-labeled ketone bodies are delivered in vivo or ex vivo, indicating reduced procession of ketones through oxidative metabolism. Accordingly, unmetabolized substrate concentrations are higher within the hearts of ketogenic diet-fed mice challenged with ketones compared with those of chow-fed controls. Furthermore, reduced ketone body oxidation correlates with failure of ketone bodies to inhibit fatty acid oxidation. These results indicate that ketotic nutrient environments engage mechanisms that curtail ketolytic capacity, controlling the utilization of ketone bodies in ketotic states.

  12. Myocardial Reloading After Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K.; Rosiers, Christine Des; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart, providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. ECMO also induces stress which can adversely affect the ability to reload or wean the heart from the circuit. Metabolic impairments induced by altered loading and/or stress conditions may impact weaning. However, cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading with ECMO modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Methods and Results Sixteen immature piglets (7.8 to 15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8‐hour ECMO (UNLOAD) and postwean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused into the coronary artery [2‐13C]‐pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]‐L‐leucine as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. Upon RELOAD, each functional parameter, which were decreased substantially by ECMO, recovered to near‐baseline level with the exclusion of minimum dP/dt. Accordingly, myocardial oxygen consumption was also increased, indicating that overall mitochondrial metabolism was reestablished. At the metabolic level, when compared to UNLOAD, RELOAD altered the contribution of various substrates/pathways to tissue pyruvate formation, favoring exogenous pyruvate versus glycolysis, and acetyl‐CoA formation, shifting away from pyruvate decarboxylation to endogenous substrate, presumably fatty acids. Furthermore, there was also a significant increase of tissue concentrations for all CAC intermediates (≈80%), suggesting enhanced anaplerosis, and of fractional protein synthesis rates (>70%). Conclusions RELOAD alters both cytosolic and mitochondrial energy substrate metabolism, while favoring leucine incorporation into protein synthesis rather than oxidation in the CAC. Improved understanding of factors governing these metabolic perturbations may

  13. Myocardial Reloading after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-08-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. Mortality after ECMO remains high.Cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown and may impact recovery. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Fourteen immature piglets (7.8-15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8 hour-ECMO (UNLOAD) and post-wean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused [2-13C]-pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]-L-leucine, as a tracer of amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis into the coronary artery. RELOAD showed marked elevations in myocardial oxygen consumption above baseline and UNLOAD. Pyruvate uptake was markedly increased though RELOAD decreased pyruvate contribution to oxidative CAC metabolism.RELOAD also increased absolute concentrations of all CAC intermediates, while maintaining or increasing 13C-molar percent enrichment. RELOAD also significantly increased cardiac fractional protein synthesis rates by >70% over UNLOAD. Conclusions: RELOAD produced high energy metabolic requirement and rebound protein synthesis. Relative pyruvate decarboxylation decreased with RELOAD while promoting anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and amino acid incorporation into protein rather than to the CAC for oxidation. These perturbations may serve as therapeutic targets to improve contractile function after ECMO.

  14. Noninvasive measurement of regional myocardial glucose metabolism by positron emission computed tomography. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1980-06-01

    While the results of regional myocardial glucose metabolism measurements using positron emission computed tomography (/sup 13/N-ammonia) are promising, their utility and value remains to be determined in man. If this technique can be applied to patients with acute myocardial ischemia or infarction it may permit delineation of regional myocardial segments with altered, yet still active metabolism. Further, it may become possible to evaluate the effects of interventions designed to salvage reversibly injured myocardium by this technique.

  15. Atorvastatin Improves Ventricular Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction by Interfering with Collagen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Karla; Pereira do Carmo, Helison Rafael; Galluce Torina, Anali; Diógenes de Carvalho, Daniela; Carvalho Sposito, Andrei; de Souza Vilarinho, Karlos Alexandre; da Mota Silveira-Filho, Lindemberg; Martins de Oliveira, Pedro Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Therapeutic strategies that modulate ventricular remodeling can be useful after acute myocardial infarction (MI). In particular, statins may exert effects on molecular pathways involved in collagen metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine whether treatment with atorvastatin for 4 weeks would lead to changes in collagen metabolism and ventricular remodeling in a rat model of MI. Methods Male Wistar rats were used in this study. MI was induced in rats by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Animals were randomized into three groups, according to treatment: sham surgery without LAD ligation (sham group, n = 14), LAD ligation followed by 10mg atorvastatin/kg/day for 4 weeks (atorvastatin group, n = 24), or LAD ligation followed by saline solution for 4 weeks (control group, n = 27). After 4 weeks, hemodynamic characteristics were obtained by a pressure-volume catheter. Hearts were removed, and the left ventricles were subjected to histologic analysis of the extents of fibrosis and collagen deposition, as well as the myocyte cross-sectional area. Expression levels of mediators involved in collagen metabolism and inflammation were also assessed. Results End-diastolic volume, fibrotic content, and myocyte cross-sectional area were significantly reduced in the atorvastatin compared to the control group. Atorvastatin modulated expression levels of proteins related to collagen metabolism, including MMP1, TIMP1, COL I, PCPE, and SPARC, in remote infarct regions. Atorvastatin had anti-inflammatory effects, as indicated by lower expression levels of TLR4, IL-1, and NF-kB p50. Conclusion Treatment with atorvastatin for 4 weeks was able to attenuate ventricular dysfunction, fibrosis, and left ventricular hypertrophy after MI in rats, perhaps in part through effects on collagen metabolism and inflammation. Atorvastatin may be useful for limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial ischemic events. PMID:27880844

  16. The effect of nifedipine on myocardial perfusion and metabolism in systemic sclerosis. A positron emission tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Duboc, D.; Kahan, A.; Maziere, B.; Loc'h, C.; Crouzel, C.; Menkes, C.J.; Amor, B.; Strauch, G.; Guerin, F.; Syrota, A. )

    1991-02-01

    We assessed the effect of nifedipine on myocardial perfusion and metabolism in 9 patients with systemic sclerosis, using positron emission tomography with a perfusion tracer (potassium-38) and a metabolic tracer (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)). Nifedipine, 20 mg 3 times daily for 1 week, induced a significant increase in 38K myocardial uptake, a significant decrease in 18FDG myocardial uptake, and a significant increase in the myocardial 38K: 18FDG ratio. These results indicate that the increase in myocardial perfusion is associated with modifications in myocardial energy metabolism, which probably result from a beneficial anti-ischemic effect of nifedipine in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  17. Myocardial Function and Lipid Metabolism in the Chronic Alcoholic Animal

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Timothy J.; Khan, Mohammad I.; Ettinger, Philip O.; Haider, Bunyad; Lyons, Michael M.; Oldewurtel, Henry A.; Weber, Marilyn

    1974-01-01

    In view of the variables that obscure the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy, a study was undertaken in mongrel dogs fed ethanol as 36% of calories for up to 22 mo. Both the experimental and control groups maintained body weight, hematocrit, plasma vitamin, and protein levels. Left ventricular function was evaluated in the intact anesthetized dog using indicator dilution for end-diastolic and stroke volume determinations. During increased afterload with angiotensin, the ethanol group exhibited a larger rise of end-diastolic pressure (P<0.01), whereas end-diastolic and stroke volume responses were significantly less than in controls. Preload increments with saline elicited a significantly higher end-diastolic pressure rise in the ethanol group (P<0.01). No hypertrophy, inflammation, or fibrosis was present and it was postulated that the enhanced diastolic stiffness was related to accumulation of Alcian Blue-positive material in the ventricular interstitium. To evaluate myocardial lipid metabolism, [1-14C]oleic acid was infused systemically. Plasma specific activity and myocardial lipid uptake were similar in both groups. There was a significantly increased incorporation of label into triglyceride, associated with a reduced 14CO2 production, considered the basis for a twofold increment of triglyceride content. In addition, diminished incorporation of [14C]oleic acid into phospholipid was observed accompanied by morphologic abnormalities of cardiac cell membranes. Potassium loss and sodium gain, like the lipid alteration, was more prominent in the subendocardium. Thus, chronic ethanol ingestion in this animal model is associated with abnormalities of ventricular function without evident malnutrition, analogous to the preclinical malfunction described in the human alcoholic. Images PMID:4368946

  18. Myocardial imaging and metabolic studies with (17-/sup 123/I)iodoheptadecanoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Freundlieb, C.; Hoeck, A.; Vyska, K.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Machulla, H.J.; Stoecklin, G.

    1980-11-01

    After intravenous administration of the stearic acid analogue (17-/sup 123/I)iodoheptadecanoic acid (I-123 HA), myocardial metabolism was studied in ten normal individuals, eight patients with coronary artery disease and three patients with congestive heart failure. High-quality images were obtained in sequential scintigraphy of I-123 metabolically bound in myocardial tissue. Infarcted zones as well as ischemic regions are indicated by reduced tracer uptake. Iodine-123 in the blood pool and interstitial space consists mainly of radioiodide that is liberated by fatty-acid metabolism and was corrected for. Using the proposed correction not only are the images improved but the uptake and elimination of the I-123 in the myocardial cells can be followed. The average disappearance half-time of I-123 HA from the myocardium of normal persons was 24 +- 4.7 min. In patients with coronary artery disease significant differences between myocardial regions were observed.

  19. Myocardial Energy Substrate Metabolism in Heart Failure : from Pathways to Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Arata; Milner, Kenneth; Gupta, Abhishek; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in therapy, heart failure remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity and is a growing healthcare burden worldwide. Alterations in myocardial energy substrate metabolism are a hallmark of heart failure, and are associated with an energy deficit in the failing heart. Previous studies have shown that a metabolic shift from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism to glycolysis, as well as an uncoupling between glycolysis and glucose oxidation, plays a crucial role in the development of cardiac inefficiency and functional impairment in heart failure. Therefore, optimizing energy substrate utilization, particularly by increasing mitochondrial glucose oxidation, can be a potentially promising approach to decrease the severity of heart failure by improving mechanical cardiac efficiency. One approach to stimulating myocardial glucose oxidation is to inhibit fatty acid oxidation. This review will overview the physiological regulation of both myocardial fatty acid and glucose oxidation in the heart, and will discuss what alterations in myocardial energy substrate metabolism occur in the failing heart. Furthermore, lysine acetylation has been recently identified as a novel post-translational pathway by which mitochondrial enzymes involved in all aspects of cardiac energy metabolism can be regulated. Thus, we will also discuss the effect of acetylation of metabolic enzymes on myocardial energy substrate preference in the settings of heart failure. Finally, we will focus on pharmacological interventions that target enzymes involved in fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation, transcriptional regulation of fatty acid oxidation, and glucose oxidation to treat heart failure.

  20. [The influence of halogenated anesthetic agents on the hemodynamics and myocardial metabolism in ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A V; Nesterova, Iu V; Brand, Ia B

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of anesthesia with equipotential concentrations of halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane plus 33% O2 on central hemodynamics, coronary flow, and myocardial metabolism in 60 patients undergoing myocardial revascularization surgery. The study found that halothane and isoflurane with 33% O2 caused dose-dependent and well-controlled arterial hypotension and decreased left ventricular (LV) stroke work index, myocardial consumption of O2 MCO2), total peripheral vascular resistance, and coronary vascular resistance (CVR), which increased coronary volume flow. Monoanesthesia with enflurane lowered myocardial contractility and did not change LV work; MCO2 decreased, while coronary sinus flow increased due to a decrease in CVR. Thus, the comparison of hemodynamic and myocardial effects of the three potent inhaled anesthetics--halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane - demonstrated their positive effects on myocardial oxygen balance in a form of dosed and controlled decrease in its work in cardiological patients with preserved LV contractility. The imported anesthetics enflurane and isoflurane do not have any significant advantage over the Russian-made halothane in this category of patients. At the same time, halothane vs. enflurane has a more noticeable "unloading" effect on afterload and does not cause convulsive episodes and periods of cerebral activity depression; in contrast to isoflurane, halothane dose not cause metabolic disturbances in a compromised myocardium; halothane is used in lower inhaled concentrations to achieve the same degree of myocardial work decrease without a substantial decrease in cardiac efficiency. These facts suggest that halothane has a practical advantage over the other anesthetics.

  1. Alteration in metabolic signature and lipid metabolism in patients with angina pectoris and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Yeon; Lee, Sang-Hak; Shin, Min-Jeong; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolites are indispensable regulators of physiological and pathological processes, including atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the complex changes in lipid metabolites and metabolism that occur in patients with these conditions are incompletely understood. We performed lipid profiling to identify alterations in lipid metabolism in patients with angina and myocardial infarction (MI). Global lipid profiling was applied to serum samples from patients with CAD (angina and MI) and age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy subjects using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis. A multivariate analysis showed a clear separation between the patients with CAD and normal controls. Lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (lysoPE) species containing unsaturated fatty acids and free fatty acids were associated with an increased risk of CAD, whereas species of lysoPC and lyso-alkyl PC containing saturated fatty acids were associated with a decreased risk. Additionally, PC species containing palmitic acid, diacylglycerol, sphingomyelin, and ceramide were associated with an increased risk of MI, whereas PE-plasmalogen and phosphatidylinositol species were associated with a decreased risk. In MI patients, we found strong positive correlation between lipid metabolites related to the sphingolipid pathway, sphingomyelin, and ceramide and acute inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein). The results of this study demonstrate altered signatures in lipid metabolism in patients with angina or MI. Lipidomic profiling could provide the information to identity the specific lipid metabolites under the presence of disturbed metabolic pathways in patients with CAD.

  2. Positron emission tomography detects tissue metabolic activity in myocardial segments with persistent thallium perfusion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunken, R.; Schwaiger, M.; Grover-McKay, M.; Phelps, M.E.; Tillisch, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1987-09-01

    Positron emission tomography with /sup 13/N-ammonia and /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose was used to assess myocardial perfusion and glucose utilization in 51 myocardial segments with a stress thallium defect in 12 patients. Myocardial infarction was defined by a concordant reduction in segmental perfusion and glucose utilization, and myocardial ischemia was identified by preservation of glucose utilization in segments with rest hypoperfusion. Of the 51 segments studied, 36 had a fixed thallium defect, 11 had a partially reversible defect and 4 had a completely reversible defect. Only 15 (42%) of the 36 segments with a fixed defect and 4 (36%) of the 11 segments with a partially reversible defect exhibited myocardial infarction on study with positron tomography. In contrast, residual myocardial glucose utilization was identified in the majority of segments with a fixed (58%) or a partially reversible (64%) thallium defect. All of the segments with a completely reversible defect appeared normal on positron tomography. Apparent improvement in the thallium defect on delayed images did not distinguish segments with ischemia from infarction. Thus, positron emission tomography reveals evidence of persistent tissue metabolism in the majority of segments with a fixed or partially resolving stress thallium defect, implying that markers of perfusion alone may underestimate the extent of viable tissue in hypoperfused myocardial segments.

  3. Diabetes, perioperative ischaemia and volatile anaesthetics: consequences of derangements in myocardial substrate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Volatile anaesthetics exert protective effects on the heart against perioperative ischaemic injury. However, there is growing evidence that these cardioprotective properties are reduced in case of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A strong predictor of postoperative cardiac function is myocardial substrate metabolism. In the type 2 diabetic heart, substrate metabolism is shifted from glucose utilisation to fatty acid oxidation, resulting in metabolic inflexibility and cardiac dysfunction. The ischaemic heart also loses its metabolic flexibility and can switch to glucose or fatty acid oxidation as its preferential state, which may deteriorate cardiac function even further in case of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent experimental studies suggest that the cardioprotective properties of volatile anaesthetics partly rely on changing myocardial substrate metabolism. Interventions that target at restoration of metabolic derangements, like lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, may therefore be an interesting candidate to reduce perioperative complications. This review will focus on the current knowledge regarding myocardial substrate metabolism during volatile anaesthesia in the obese and type 2 diabetic heart during perioperative ischaemia. PMID:23452502

  4. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and contractile function; influence of workload and oleate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple extra-cardiac stimuli, such as workload and circulating nutrients (e.g., fatty acids), known to influence myocardial metabolism and contractile function exhibit marked circadian rhythms. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the rat heart exhibits circadian rhythms in its ...

  5. Impaired contractile recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Janice V; Lu, Li; Ye, Shuyu; Bergman, Bryan C; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Sarraf, Mohammad; Reusch, Jane E B; Greyson, Clifford R; Schwartz, Gregory G

    2013-03-15

    Clinical metabolic syndrome conveys a poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, not fully accounted for by the extent of coronary atherosclerosis. To explain this observation, we determined whether postischemic myocardial contractile and metabolic function are impaired in a porcine dietary model of metabolic syndrome without atherosclerosis. Micropigs (n = 28) were assigned to a control diet (low fat, no added sugars) or an intervention diet (high saturated fat and simple sugars, no added cholesterol) for 7 mo. The intervention diet produced obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, but not atherosclerosis. Under open-chest, anesthetized conditions, pigs underwent 45 min of low-flow myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. In both diet groups, contractile function was similar at baseline and declined similarly during ischemia. However, after 120 min of reperfusion, regional work recovered to 21 ± 12% of baseline in metabolic syndrome pigs compared with 61 ± 13% in control pigs (P = 0.01). Ischemia-reperfusion caused a progressive decline in mechanical/metabolic efficiency (regional work/O2 consumption) in metabolic syndrome hearts, but not in control hearts. Metabolic syndrome hearts demonstrated altered fatty acyl composition of cardiolipin and increased Akt phosphorylation in both ischemic and nonischemic regions, suggesting tonic activation. Metabolic syndrome hearts used more fatty acid than control hearts (P = 0.03). When fatty acid availability was restricted by prior insulin exposure, differences between groups in postischemic contractile recovery and mechanical/metabolic efficiency were eliminated. In conclusion, pigs with characteristics of metabolic syndrome demonstrate impaired contractile and metabolic recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia. Contributory mechanisms may include remodeling of cardiolipin, abnormal activation of Akt, and excessive utilization of fatty acid substrates.

  6. Impaired contractile recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Janice V.; Lu, Li; Ye, Shuyu; Bergman, Bryan C.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Sarraf, Mohammad; Reusch, Jane E. B.; Greyson, Clifford R.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical metabolic syndrome conveys a poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, not fully accounted for by the extent of coronary atherosclerosis. To explain this observation, we determined whether postischemic myocardial contractile and metabolic function are impaired in a porcine dietary model of metabolic syndrome without atherosclerosis. Micropigs (n = 28) were assigned to a control diet (low fat, no added sugars) or an intervention diet (high saturated fat and simple sugars, no added cholesterol) for 7 mo. The intervention diet produced obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, but not atherosclerosis. Under open-chest, anesthetized conditions, pigs underwent 45 min of low-flow myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. In both diet groups, contractile function was similar at baseline and declined similarly during ischemia. However, after 120 min of reperfusion, regional work recovered to 21 ± 12% of baseline in metabolic syndrome pigs compared with 61 ± 13% in control pigs (P = 0.01). Ischemia-reperfusion caused a progressive decline in mechanical/metabolic efficiency (regional work/O2 consumption) in metabolic syndrome hearts, but not in control hearts. Metabolic syndrome hearts demonstrated altered fatty acyl composition of cardiolipin and increased Akt phosphorylation in both ischemic and nonischemic regions, suggesting tonic activation. Metabolic syndrome hearts used more fatty acid than control hearts (P = 0.03). When fatty acid availability was restricted by prior insulin exposure, differences between groups in postischemic contractile recovery and mechanical/metabolic efficiency were eliminated. In conclusion, pigs with characteristics of metabolic syndrome demonstrate impaired contractile and metabolic recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia. Contributory mechanisms may include remodeling of cardiolipin, abnormal activation of Akt, and excessive utilization of fatty acid substrates. PMID:23335793

  7. Periostin as a modulator of chronic cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Minicucci, Marcos F.; dos Santos, Priscila P.; Rafacho, Bruna P. M.; Gonçalves, Andréa F.; Ardisson, Lidiane P.; Batista, Diego F.; Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Okoshi, Katashi; Pereira, Elenize J.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: After acute myocardial infarction, during the cardiac repair phase, periostin is released into the infarct and activates signaling pathways that are essential for the reparative process. However, the role of periostin in chronic cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between tissue periostin and cardiac variables in the chronic cardiac remodeling induced by myocardial infarction. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were assigned to 2 groups: a simulated surgery group (SHAM; n = 8) and a myocardial infarction group (myocardial infarction; n = 13). After 3 months, morphological, functional and biochemical analyses were performed. The data are expressed as means±SD or medians (including the lower and upper quartiles). RESULTS: Myocardial infarctions induced increased left ventricular diastolic and systolic areas associated with a decreased fractional area change and a posterior wall shortening velocity. With regard to the extracellular matrix variables, the myocardial infarction group presented with higher values of periostin and types I and III collagen and higher interstitial collagen volume fractions and myocardial hydroxyproline concentrations. In addition, periostin was positively correlated with type III collagen levels (r = 0.673, p = 0.029) and diastolic (r = 0.678, p = 0.036) and systolic (r = 0.795, p = 0.006) left ventricular areas. Considering the relationship between periostin and the cardiac function variables, periostin was inversely correlated with both the fractional area change (r = -0.783, p = 0.008) and the posterior wall shortening velocity (r = -0.767, p = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Periostin might be a modulator of deleterious cardiac remodeling in the chronic phase after myocardial infarction in rats. PMID:24212842

  8. Myocardial citrate metabolism in control subjects and patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, T T; Henningsen, P; Bagger, J P; Thomsen, P E; Eyjolfsson, K

    1980-10-01

    A significant release of citrate across the myocardium was demonstrated in twenty-two patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and in ten control subjects in fasting resting state. In both groups, increasingly negative arterio-coronary sinus (A-Cs) plasma citrate differences correlated positively to arterial plasma free fatty acid (FFA)concentrations and negatively to (A-Cs) differences of plasma glucose. This supports the hypothesis that a citrate inhibition of glycolysis at the site of phosphofructokinase is of regulatory importance for myocardial glucose metabolism, and suggests that FFA supress glucose utilization by the heart in many by this mechanism. The capacity of plasma FFA to increase myocardial citrate release was significantly higher in controls than in patients with CAD, and was found to be positively related to myocardial capacity of oxygen consumption as estimated from the product of heart rate and systolic blood pressure during an exercise tolerance test.

  9. JAK-STAT signaling and myocardial glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Frias, Miguel A; Montessuit, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    JAK-STAT signaling occurs in virtually every tissue of the body, and so does glucose metabolism. In this review, we summarize the regulation of glucose metabolism in the myocardium and ponder whether JAK-STAT signaling participates in this regulation. Despite a paucity of data directly pertaining to cardiac myocytes, we conclude that JAK-STAT signaling may contribute to the development of insulin resistance in the myocardium in response to various hormones and cytokines. PMID:24416656

  10. Myocyte repolarization modulates myocardial function in aging dogs.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Signore, Sergio; Qanud, Khaled; Borghetti, Giulia; Meo, Marianna; Cannata, Antonio; Zhou, Yu; Wybieralska, Ewa; Luciani, Marco; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Zhang, Eric; Matsuda, Alex; Webster, Andrew; Cimini, Maria; Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; D'Alessandro, David A; Wunimenghe, Oriyanhan; Michler, Robert E; Royer, Christopher; Goichberg, Polina; Leri, Annarosa; Barrett, Edward G; Anversa, Piero; Hintze, Thomas H; Rota, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Studies of myocardial aging are complex and the mechanisms involved in the deterioration of ventricular performance and decreased functional reserve of the old heart remain to be properly defined. We have studied a colony of beagle dogs from 3 to 14 yr of age kept under a highly regulated environment to define the effects of aging on the myocardium. Ventricular, myocardial, and myocyte function, together with anatomical and structural properties of the organ and cardiomyocytes, were evaluated. Ventricular hypertrophy was not observed with aging and the structural composition of the myocardium was modestly affected. Alterations in the myocyte compartment were identified in aged dogs, and these factors negatively interfere with the contractile reserve typical of the young heart. The duration of the action potential is prolonged in old cardiomyocytes contributing to the slower electrical recovery of the myocardium. Also, the remodeled repolarization of cardiomyocytes with aging provides inotropic support to the senescent muscle but compromises its contractile reserve, rendering the old heart ineffective under conditions of high hemodynamic demand. The defects in the electrical and mechanical properties of cardiomyocytes with aging suggest that this cell population is an important determinant of the cardiac senescent phenotype. Collectively, the delayed electrical repolarization of aging cardiomyocytes may be viewed as a critical variable of the aging myopathy and its propensity to evolve into ventricular decompensation under stressful conditions.

  11. Myocardial metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrocardiographic significance of reversible thallium-201 abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Dilsizian, V.; O'Gara, P.T.; Udelson, J.E.; Schenke, W.H.; Quyyumi, A.; Fananapazir, L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Exercise-induced abnormalities during thallium-201 scintigraphy that normalize at rest frequently occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, it is not known whether these abnormalities are indicative of myocardial ischemia. Fifty patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy and, during the same week, measurement of myocardial lactate metabolism and hemodynamics during pacing stress. Thirty-seven patients (74%) had one or more {sup 201}Tl abnormalities that completely normalized after 3 hours of rest; 26 had regional myocardial {sup 201}Tl defects, and 26 had apparent left ventricular cavity dilatation with exercise, with 15 having coexistence of these abnormal findings. Of the 37 patients with reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, 27 (73%) had metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia during rapid atrial pacing compared with four of 13 patients (31%) with normal {sup 201}Tl scans (p less than 0.01). Eleven patients had apparent cavity dilatation as their only {sup 201}Tl abnormality; their mean postpacing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly higher than that of the 13 patients with normal {sup 201}Tl studies (33 +/- 5 versus 21 +/- 10 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the angiographic presence of systolic septal or epicardial coronary arterial compression and the presence or distribution of {sup 201}Tl abnormalities. Patients with ischemic ST segment responses to exercise had an 80% prevalence rate of reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities and a 70% prevalence rate of pacing-induced ischemia. However, 69% of patients with nonischemic ST segment responses had reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, and 55% had pacing-induced ischemia. Reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities during exercise stress are markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most likely identify relatively underperfused myocardium.

  12. Flux balance analysis of myocardial mitochondrial metabolic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ruoyu; Liao, Sha; Liu, Bifeng; Liu, Manxi; Zhang, Hongming; Luo, Qingming

    2005-03-01

    A large number of biological information has been available from genome sequencing and bioinformatics. To further understand the qualities of the biological networks (such as metabolic network) in the complex biological system, representations of integrated function in silico have been widely investigated, and various modeling approaches have been designed, most of which are based on detailed kinetic information except flux balance analysis (FBA). FBA, just based on stoichimetrical information of reactions, is a suitable method for the study of metabolic pathways, and it analyzes the behaviors of the network from the viewpoint of the whole system. Herein, this modeling approach has been utilized to reconstruct the mitochondrial metabolic network to integrate and analyze its capability of producing energy. Besides, extreme pathways analysis (EPA) and shadow prices analysis have also been integrated to study the interior characters of the network. Our modeling results have indicated for the first time that the covalent regulative property of pyruvate dehydrogenase is restrained by the feedback of acetyl-CoA. Combined with the biological experiments, these simulations in silico could be pretty useful for the further understanding of functions and characters of the biological network as a complex system.

  13. Myocardial VHL-HIF Signaling Controls an Embryonic Metabolic Switch Essential for Cardiac Maturation.

    PubMed

    Menendez-Montes, Ivan; Escobar, Beatriz; Palacios, Beatriz; Gómez, Manuel Jose; Izquierdo-Garcia, Jose Luis; Flores, Lorena; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesus; Aragones, Julian; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesus; Torres, Miguel; Martin-Puig, Silvia

    2016-12-19

    While gene regulatory networks involved in cardiogenesis have been characterized, the role of bioenergetics remains less studied. Here we show that until midgestation, myocardial metabolism is compartmentalized, with a glycolytic signature restricted to compact myocardium contrasting with increased mitochondrial oxidative activity in the trabeculae. HIF1α regulation mirrors this pattern, with expression predominating in compact myocardium and scarce in trabeculae. By midgestation, the compact myocardium downregulates HIF1α and switches toward oxidative metabolism. Deletion of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Vhl results in HIF1α hyperactivation, blocking the midgestational metabolic shift and impairing cardiac maturation and function. Moreover, the altered glycolytic signature induced by HIF1 trabecular activation precludes regulation of genes essential for establishment of the cardiac conduction system. Our findings reveal VHL-HIF-mediated metabolic compartmentalization in the developing heart and the connection between metabolism and myocardial differentiation. These results highlight the importance of bioenergetics in ventricular myocardium specialization and its potential relevance to congenital heart disease.

  14. [Modifications in myocardial energy metabolism in diabetic patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grynberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    The capacity of cardiac myocyte to regulate ATP production to face any change in energy demand is a major determinant of cardiac function. Because FA is the main heart fuel (although the most expensive one in oxygen, and prompt to induce deleterious effects), this process is based on a balanced fatty acid (FA) metabolism. Several pathological situations are associated with an accumulation of FA or derivatives, or with an excessive b-oxidation. The diabetic cardiomyocyte is characterised by an over consumption of FA. The control of the FA/glucose balance clearly appears as a new strategy for cytoprotection, particularly in diabetes and requires a reduced FA contribution to ATP production. Cardiac myocytes can control FA mitochondrial entry, but display weak ability to control FA uptake, thus the fate of non beta-oxidized FA appear as a new impairment for the cell. Both the trigger and the regulation of cardiac contraction result from membrane activity, and the other major FA function in the myocardium is their role in membrane homeostasis, through the phospholipid synthesis and remodeling pathways. Sudden death, hypercatecholaminemia, diabetes and heart failure have been associated with an altered PUFA content in cardiac membranes. Experimental data suggest that the 2 metabolic pathways involved in membrane homeostasis may represent therapeutic targets for cytoprotection. The drugs that increase cardiac phospholipid turnover (trimetazidine, ranolazine,...) display anti-ischemic non hemodynamic effect. This effect is based on a redirection of FA utilization towards phospholipid synthesis, which decrease their availability for energy production. A nutritional approach gave also promising results. Besides its anti-arrhythmic effect, the dietary docosahexaenoic acid is able to reduce FA energy consumption and hence oxygen demand. The cardiac metabolic pathways involving FA should be considered as a whole, precariously balanced. The diabetic heart being characterised by

  15. Myocardial Oxidative Metabolism and Protein Synthesis during Mechanical Circulatory Support by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, MD, Colleen M.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena; Bouchard, Bertrand; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support essential for survival in infants and children with acute cardiac decompensation. However, ECMO also causes metabolic disturbances, which contribute to total body wasting and protein loss. Cardiac stunning can also occur which prevents ECMO weaning, and contributes to high mortality. The heart may specifically undergo metabolic impairments, which influence functional recovery. We tested the hypothesis that ECMO alters oxidative. We focused on the amino acid leucine, and integration with myocardial protein synthesis. We used a translational immature swine model in which we assessed in heart (i) the fractional contribution of leucine (FcLeucine) and pyruvate (FCpyruvate) to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and (ii) global protein fractional synthesis (FSR) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Immature mixed breed Yorkshire male piglets (n = 22) were divided into four groups based on loading status (8 hours of normal circulation or ECMO) and intracoronary infusion [13C6,15N]-L-leucine (3.7 mM) alone or with [2-13C]-pyruvate (7.4 mM). ECMO decreased pulse pressure and correspondingly lowered myocardial oxygen consumption (~ 40%, n = 5), indicating decreased overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, FcLeucine was maintained and myocardial protein FSR was marginally increased. Pyruvate addition decreased tissue leucine enrichment, FcLeucine, and Fc for endogenous substrates as well as protein FSR. Conclusion: The heart under ECMO shows reduced oxidative metabolism of substrates, including amino acids, while maintaining (i) metabolic flexibility indicated by ability to respond to pyruvate, and (ii) a normal or increased capacity for global protein synthesis, suggesting an improved protein balance.

  16. Assessment of myocardial oxidative metabolic reserve with positron emission tomography and carbon-11 acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Henes, C.G.; Bergmann, S.R.; Walsh, M.N.; Sobel, B.E.; Geltman, E.M. )

    1989-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that positron emission tomography (PET) with ({sup 11}C)acetate allows noninvasive regional quantification of myocardial oxidative metabolism. To assess the metabolic response of normal myocardium to increased work (oxidative metabolic reserve), clearance of myocardial {sup 11}C activity after administration of ({sup 11}C)acetate i.v. was measured with PET in seven normal subjects at rest and during dobutamine infusion. At rest, clearance of {sup 11}C was monoexponential and homogeneous. The rate constant of the first phase of {sup 11}C clearance, k1, averaged 0.054 {plus minus} 0.014 min-1 at a rate-pressure produce (RPP) of 7329 {plus minus} 1445 mmHg X bpm. During dobutamine infusion, RPP increased by an average of 141% to 17,493 {plus minus} 3582 mm Hg Z bpm. Clearance of 11C became biexponential and remained homogeneous. k1 averaged 0.198 {plus minus} 0.043 min-1 with a mean coefficient of variation of 16%.. k1 and RPP correlated closely (r = 0.91; p less than 0.001), and the slope of the k1/RPP relation remained consistent in all subjects (1.48 {plus minus} 0.42). These findings suggest that PET with ({sup 11}C)acetate and dobutamine stress may provide a promising approach for evaluation of regional myocardial oxidative metabolic reserve in patients with cardiac diseases of diverse etiologies and for assessment of the efficacy of interventions designed to enhance the recovery of metabolically comprised myocardium.

  17. Use of the metabolic tracer carbon-11-acetate for evaluation of regional myocardial perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.Y.; Brunken, R.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R. )

    1991-04-01

    The high first-pass myocardial extraction fraction of carbon-11-acetate suggests that its initial uptake depends on blood flow. Accordingly, regional uptake of {sup 11}C-acetate at 4 min was compared to regional perfusion determined with nitrogen-13-ammonia in 119 segments in 15 patients with stable coronary artery disease by two methods. A close correlation was observed between initial relative myocardial concentrations (segmental activity normalized to maximal activity) of both tracers (11C-acetate = 0.88; 13N-ammonia + 0.079; s.e.e. = 0.064, r = 0.94, p less than 0.001). Furthermore, segmental net extractions (E.F), as calculated from the input function and segmental activities, of the two tracers correlated closely by E.FC-11 = 0.55E.FN-13 + 0.080 (s.e.e. = 0.045, r = 0.87, p less than 0.001). These relationships indicate that initial regional myocardial uptake of {sup 11}C-acetate reflects perfusion and that {sup 11}C-acetate permits near simultaneous evaluation of regional oxidative metabolism and of regional myocardial perfusion.

  18. Fractal regional myocardial blood flows pattern according to metabolism, not vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yipintsoi, Tada; Kroll, Keith; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2016-02-01

    Regional myocardial blood flows are markedly heterogeneous. Fractal analysis shows strong near-neighbor correlation. In experiments to distinguish control by vascular anatomy vs. local vasomotion, coronary flows were increased in open-chest dogs by stimulating myocardial metabolism (catecholamines + atropine) with and without adenosine. During control states mean left ventricular (LV) myocardial blood flows (microspheres) were 0.5-1 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) and increased to 2-3 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with catecholamine infusion and to ∼4 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with adenosine (Ado). Flow heterogeneity was similar in all states: relative dispersion (RD = SD/mean) was ∼25%, using LV pieces 0.1-0.2% of total. During catecholamine infusion local flows increased in proportion to the mean flows in 45% of the LV, "tracking" closely (increased proportionately to mean flow), while ∼40% trended toward the mean. Near-neighbor regional flows remained strongly spatially correlated, with fractal dimension D near 1.2 (Hurst coefficient 0.8). The spatial patterns remain similar at varied levels of metabolic stimulation inferring metabolic dominance. In contrast, adenosine vasodilation increased flows eightfold times control while destroying correlation with the control state. The Ado-induced spatial patterns differed from control but were self-consistent, inferring that with full vasodilation the relaxed arterial anatomy dominates the distribution. We conclude that vascular anatomy governs flow distributions during adenosine vasodilation but that metabolic vasoregulation dominates in normal physiological states.

  19. Effect of unsaturated fatty acids on myocardial performance, metabolism and morphology.

    PubMed

    Pinotti, M F; Silva, M D P; Sugizaki, M M; Diniz, Y S; Sant'Ana, L S; Aragon, F F; Padovani, C R; Novelli, E L B; Cicogna, A C

    2006-02-01

    Diets rich in saturated fatty acids are one of the most important causes of atherosclerosis in men, and have been replaced with diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) for the prevention of this disorder. However, the effect of UFA on myocardial performance, metabolism and morphology has not been completely characterized. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the effects of a UFA-rich diet on cardiac muscle function, oxidative stress, and morphology. Sixty-day-old male Wistar rats were fed a control (N = 8) or a UFA-rich diet (N = 8) for 60 days. Myocardial performance was studied in isolated papillary muscle by isometric and isotonic contractions under basal conditions after calcium chloride (5.2 mM) and ss-adrenergic stimulation with 1.0 microM isoproterenol. Fragments of the left ventricle free wall were used to study oxidative stress and were analyzed by light microscopy, and the myocardial ultrastructure was examined in left ventricle papillary muscle. After 60 days the UFA-rich diet did not change myocardial function. However, it caused high lipid hydroperoxide (176 +/- 5 vs 158 +/- 5, P < 0.0005) and low catalase (7 +/- 1 vs 9 +/- 1, P < 0.005) and superoxide-dismutase (18 +/- 2 vs 27 +/- 5, P < 0.005) levels, and discrete morphological changes in UFA-rich diet hearts such as lipid deposits and mitochondrial membrane alterations compared to control rats. These data show that a UFA-rich diet caused myocardial oxidative stress and mild structural alterations, but did not change mechanical function.

  20. CD36 Protein Influences Myocardial Ca2+ Homeostasis and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pietka, Terri A.; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Kuda, Ondrej; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Dequan; Yamada, Kathryn A.; Yang, Kui; Su, Xiong; Gross, Richard W.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Efimov, Igor R.; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcolemmal CD36 facilitates myocardial fatty acid (FA) uptake, which is markedly reduced in CD36-deficient rodents and humans. CD36 also mediates signal transduction events involving a number of cellular pathways. In taste cells and macrophages, CD36 signaling was recently shown to regulate store-responsive Ca2+ flux and activation of Ca2+-dependent phospholipases A2 that cycle polyunsaturated FA into phospholipids. It is unknown whether CD36 deficiency influences myocardial Ca2+ handling and phospholipid metabolism, which could compromise the heart, typically during stresses. Myocardial function was examined in fed or fasted (18–22 h) CD36−/− and WT mice. Echocardiography and telemetry identified conduction anomalies that were associated with the incidence of sudden death in fasted CD36−/− mice. No anomalies or death occurred in WT mice during fasting. Optical imaging of perfused hearts from fasted CD36−/− mice documented prolongation of Ca2+ transients. Consistent with this, knockdown of CD36 in cardiomyocytes delayed clearance of cytosolic Ca2+. Hearts of CD36−/− mice (fed or fasted) had 3-fold higher SERCA2a and 40% lower phospholamban levels. Phospholamban phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) was enhanced after fasting reflecting increased PKA activity and cAMP levels in CD36−/− hearts. Abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in the CD36−/− myocardium associated with increased lysophospholipid content and a higher proportion of 22:6 FA in phospholipids suggests altered phospholipase A2 activity and changes in membrane dynamics. The data support the role of CD36 in coordinating Ca2+ homeostasis and lipid metabolism and the importance of this role during myocardial adaptation to fasting. Potential relevance of the findings to CD36-deficient humans would need to be determined. PMID:23019328

  1. Effects of a N(6)-disubstituted adenosine derivative on myocardial metabolism and ischemic stress following coronary occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kahles, H; Junggeburth, J; Lick, T; Schäfer, W; Kochsiek, K

    1987-10-01

    The effect of N(6)-phenyl-N(6)-allyladenosine (PAA, BM 11.189) on myocardial ischemic stress was evaluated in six open-chest mongrel dogs during repeated coronary occlusions of 3 min. Whereas there was not significant change in hemodynamic parameters before and during coronary occlusions after treatment, PAA reduced significantly epicardial ST-segment elevations (-34%) during ischemia and myocardial release of lactate (-43%), phosphate (-44%), and potassium (-48%) in the early reperfusion period. PAA lowered significantly arterial non esterified fatty acids and converted oxidative myocardial metabolism from lipid to predominantly carbohydrate utilization, reflected by a shift of cardiac respiratory quotient from 0.81 to 1.01. The beneficial effects of PAA on myocardial ischemic injury could be explained by an improved economy of oxidative myocardial energy supply in the jeopardized border zone of the ischemic myocardium.

  2. Deoxyglucose method for the estimation of local myocardial glucose metabolism with positron computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ratib, O.; Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Henze, E.; Selin, C.E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    The deoxyglucose method originally developed for measurements of the local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose has been investigated in terms of its application to studies of the heart with positron computed tomography (PCT) and FDG. Studies were performed in dogs to measure the tissue kinetics of FDG with PCT and by direct arterial-venous sampling. The operational equation developed in our laboratory as an extension of the Sokoloff model was used to analyze the data. The FDG method accurately predicted the true MMRGlc even when the glucose metabolic rate was normal but myocardial blood flow (MBF) was elevated 5 times the control value or when metabolism was reduced to 10% of normal and MBF increased 5 times normal. Improvements in PCT resolution are required to improve the accuracy of the estimates of the rate constants and the MMRGlc.

  3. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Misako; Indo, Hiroko P.; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Iwashita, Yoichiro; Fukushige, Tomoko; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Kanekura, Takuro; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of

  4. Regulation of myocardial ketone body metabolism by the gut microbiota during nutrient deprivation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Peter A; Crowley, Jan R; Sambandam, Nandakumar; Muegge, Brian D; Costello, Elizabeth K; Hamady, Micah; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2009-07-07

    Studies in mice indicate that the gut microbiota promotes energy harvest and storage from components of the diet when these components are plentiful. Here we examine how the microbiota shapes host metabolic and physiologic adaptations to periods of nutrient deprivation. Germ-free (GF) mice and mice who had received a gut microbiota transplant from conventionally raised donors were compared in the fed and fasted states by using functional genomic, biochemical, and physiologic assays. A 24-h fast produces a marked change in gut microbial ecology. Short-chain fatty acids generated from microbial fermentation of available glycans are maintained at higher levels compared with GF controls. During fasting, a microbiota-dependent, Ppar alpha-regulated increase in hepatic ketogenesis occurs, and myocardial metabolism is directed to ketone body utilization. Analyses of heart rate, hydraulic work, and output, mitochondrial morphology, number, and respiration, plus ketone body, fatty acid, and glucose oxidation in isolated perfused working hearts from GF and colonized animals (combined with in vivo assessments of myocardial physiology) revealed that the fasted GF heart is able to sustain its performance by increasing glucose utilization, but heart weight, measured echocardiographically or as wet mass and normalized to tibial length or lean body weight, is significantly reduced in both fasted and fed mice. This myocardial-mass phenotype is completely reversed in GF mice by consumption of a ketogenic diet. Together, these results illustrate benefits provided by the gut microbiota during periods of nutrient deprivation, and emphasize the importance of further exploring the relationship between gut microbes and cardiovascular health.

  5. Evidence for Intramyocardial Disruption of Lipid Metabolism and Increased Myocardial Ketone Utilization in Advanced Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Kenneth C.; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Aziz, Moez; Mesaros, Clementina; Worth, Andrew J.; Wang, Linda L.; Javaheri, Ali; Blair, Ian A.; Margulies, Kenneth; Rame, J. Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The failing human heart is characterized by metabolic abnormalities, but these defects remains incompletely understood. In animal models of HF there is a switch from a predominance of fatty acid utilization to the more oxygen-sparing carbohydrate metabolism. Recent studies have reported decreases in myocardial lipid content, but inclusion of diabetics and nondiabetics obscures the distinction of adapations to metabolic derangements from adaptations to heart failure per se. Methods and Results We performed both unbiased and targeted myocardial lipid surveys using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy in non-diabetic, lean, predominantly non-ischemic advanced HF patients at the time of heart transplantation or LVAD implantation. We identified significantly decreased concentrations of the majority of myocardial lipid intermediates, including long-chain acylcarnitines, the primary subset of energetic lipid substrate for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We report for the first time significantly reduced levels of intermediate and anaplerotic acyl-CoA species incorporated into Krebs cycle, while the myocardial concentration of acetyl-CoA was significantly increased in end-stage heart failure. In contrast, we observed an increased abundance of ketogenic β-hydroxybutyryl CoA, in association with increased myocardial utilization of β-hydroxybutyrate. We observed a significant increase in the expression of the gene encoding succinyl-CoA: 3oxoacid-CoA transferase (SCOT), the rate limiting enzyme for myocardial oxidation of βOHB and acetoacetate. Conclusions These findings indicate increased ketone utilization in the severely failing human heart independent of diabetes, support the role of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel and myocardial ketone oxidation as a key metabolic adaptation in the failing human heart. PMID:26819374

  6. Metformin improves cardiac function in mice with heart failure after myocardial infarction by regulating mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dan; Yang, Fei

    2017-03-14

    To investigate whether metformin can improve the cardiac function through improving the mitochondrial function in model of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Male C57/BL6 mice aged about 8 weeks were selected and the anterior descending branch was ligatured to establish the heart failure model after myocardial infarction. The cardiac function was evaluated via ultrasound after 3 days to determine the modeling was successful, and the mice were randomly divided into two groups. Saline group (Saline) received the intragastric administration of normal saline for 4 weeks, and metformin group (Met) received the intragastric administration of metformin for 4 weeks. At the same time, Shame group (Sham) was set up. Changes in cardiac function in mice were detected at 4 weeks after operation. Hearts were taken from mice after 4 weeks, and cell apoptosis in myocardial tissue was detected using TUNEL method; fresh mitochondria were taken and changes in oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and respiratory control rate (RCR) of mitochondria in each group were detected using bio-energy metabolism tester, and change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of myocardial tissue was detected via JC-1 staining; the expressions and changes in Bcl-2, Bax, Sirt3, PGC-1α and acetylated PGC-1α in myocardial tissue were detected by Western blot. RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA levels in Sirt3 in myocardial tissues. Metformin improved the systolic function of heart failure model rats after myocardial infarction and reduced the apoptosis of myocardial cells after myocardial infarction. Myocardial mitochondrial respiratory function and membrane potential were decreased after myocardial infarction, and metformin treatment significantly improved the mitochondrial respiratory function and mitochondrial membrane potential; Metformin up-regulated the expression of Sirt3 and the activity of PGC-1α in myocardial tissue of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Metformin decreases the

  7. Myocardial contractile and metabolic properties of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by cardiac troponin I gene mutations: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Wang, Longhui; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming

    2012-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is an inherited disease that is caused by sarcomeric protein gene mutations. The mechanism by which these mutant proteins cause disease is uncertain. Experimentally, cardiac troponin I (CTnI) gene mutations mainly alter myocardial performance via increases in the Ca(2+) sensitivity of cardiac contractility. In this study, we used an integrated simulation that links electrophysiology, contractile activity and energy metabolism of the myocardium to investigate alterations in myocardial contractile function and energy metabolism regulation as a result of increased Ca(2+) sensitivity in CTnI mutations. Simulation results reproduced the following typical features of FHC: (1) slower relaxation (diastolic dysfunction) caused by prolonged [Ca(2+)](i) and force transients; (2) higher energy consumption with the increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity; and (3) reduced fatty acid oxidation and enhanced glucose utilization in hypertrophied heart metabolism. Furthermore, the simulation indicated that in conditions of high energy consumption (that is, more than an 18.3% increase in total energy consumption), the myocardial energetic metabolic network switched from a net consumer to a net producer of lactate, resulting in a low coupling of glucose oxidation to glycolysis, which is a common feature of hypertrophied hearts. This study provides a novel systematic myocardial contractile and metabolic analysis to help elucidate the pathogenesis of FHC and suggests that the alterations in resting heart energy supply and demand could contribute to disease progression.

  8. Peroxisome Proliferators-Activated Receptor (PPAR) Modulators and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min-Chul; Lee, Kyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Yoon, Do-Young

    2008-01-01

    Overweight and obesity lead to an increased risk for metabolic disorders such as impaired glucose regulation/insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Several molecular drug targets with potential to prevent or treat metabolic disorders have been revealed. Interestingly, the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has many beneficial clinical effects. PPAR directly modulates gene expression by binding to a specific ligand. All PPAR subtypes (α, γ, and σ) are involved in glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and energy balance. PPAR agonists play an important role in therapeutic aspects of metabolic disorders. However, undesired effects of the existing PPAR agonists have been reported. A great deal of recent research has focused on the discovery of new PPAR modulators with more beneficial effects and more safety without producing undesired side effects. Herein, we briefly review the roles of PPAR in metabolic disorders, the effects of PPAR modulators in metabolic disorders, and the technologies with which to discover new PPAR modulators. PMID:18566691

  9. Changes in myocardial substrate and energy metabolism by S-(4)-hydroxyphenylglycine and an N-(6)-derivative of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Kahles, H; Schäfer, W; Lick, T; Junggeburth, J; Kochsiek, K

    1986-01-01

    In 15 mongrel open chest dogs oxidative myocardial carbohydrate utilization was stimulated by activation of pyruvatedehydrogenase with S-(4)-hydroxyphenylglycine (HPG) or by inhibition of lipolysis with N(6)-allyl-N(6)-cyclohexyladenosine (PAA). HPG and PAA shifted cardiac respiratory quotients (RQ) from 0.83 to 0.89 and 0.99, respectively. Oxygen extraction ratio of lactate was significantly increased by both interventions. Arterial nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentration decreased significantly only by PAA. The oxygen saving potency of both interventions was quantified over a wide hemodynamic range by comparing the directly measured myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) with the myocardial energy requirements calculated from its hemodynamic determinants according to the Bretschneider formula during base conditions and beta-stimulation. Inhibition of peripheral lipolysis with PAA reduced MVO2 by 14%, enzyme activation with HPG by 8%. The results show that the efficiency of the myocardial energy supply can be influenced by manipulation of the oxidative substrate metabolism.

  10. Fenofibrate Therapy Restores Antioxidant Protection and Improves Myocardial Insulin Resistance in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome and Myocardial Ischemia: The Role of Angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Lara, Luz; Sánchez-Aguilar, María; Sánchez-Mendoza, Alicia; Del Valle-Mondragón, Leonardo; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Vázquez-Meza, Héctor; Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2016-12-28

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation promotes oxidative stress which increases the risk of cardiac dysfunction in metabolic syndrome (MetS) and favors local insulin resistance. Fibrates regulate RAS improving MetS, type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We studied the effect of fenofibrate treatment on the myocardic signaling pathway of Angiotensin II (Ang II)/Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) and its relationship with oxidative stress and myocardial insulin resistance in MetS rats under heart ischemia. Control and MetS rats were assigned to the following groups: (a) sham; (b) vehicle-treated myocardial infarction (MI) (MI-V); and (c) fenofibrate-treated myocardial infarction (MI-F). Treatment with fenofibrate significantly reduced triglycerides, non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), insulin levels and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) in MetS animals. MetS and MI increased Ang II concentration and AT1 expression, favored myocardial oxidative stress (high levels of malondialdehyde, overexpression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 4 (NOX4), decreased total antioxidant capacity and diminished expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD)1, SOD2 and catalase) and inhibited expression of the insulin signaling cascade: phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PkB, also known as Akt)/Glut-4/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In conclusion, fenofibrate treatment favors an antioxidant environment as a consequence of a reduction of the Ang II/AT1/NOX4 signaling pathway, reestablishing the cardiac insulin signaling pathway. This might optimize cardiac metabolism and improve the vasodilator function during myocardial ischemia.

  11. Changes in metabolic modules under environmental variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2006-03-01

    During the last few years, network approaches have shown great promise as a tool to both analyze and provide understanding of complex systems as disparate as the world-wide web and cellular metabolism. Much effort has been focused on characterizing topological properties of such systems. However, in order to develop detailed descriptions of complex networks, we need to look beyond their topology and incorporate dynamical aspects. The cellular metabolism, where nodes correspond to metabolites and links indicate chemical reactions, is an excellent model system where theoretical predictions can be compared with experimental results. I will present recent insights into the principles governing the modular utilization of the cellular metabolism [1,2,3]. We find that, while most metabolic reactions have small fluxes, the metabolism's activity is dominated by an interconnected sub-network of reactions with very high fluxes [1]. For the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli and the yeast S. cerevisiae, the metabolism responds to changes in growth conditions by reorganizing the rates of select reactions predominantly within this high-flux backbone. Furthermore, these networks are organized around the metabolic core -- a set of reactions that are always in use [2]. Strikingly, the activity of the metabolic core reactions is highly synchronized, and the core reactions are significantly more essential and evolutionary conserved than the non-core ones. [1] E. Almaas, B. Kovacs, T. Vicsek, Z.N. Oltvai and A.-L. Barabasi. Nature 427, 839 (2004). [2] E. Almaas, Z.N. Oltvai and A.-L. Barabasi. PLoS Comput. Biol. In press (2005). 10.1371/journal.pcbi.0010068.eor [3] P.J. Macdonald, E. Almaas and A.-L. Barabasi. Europhys. Lett. 72, 308 (2005).

  12. Quercetin modulates keratoconus metabolism in vitro

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Tina B; Sarker-Nag, Akhee; Lyon, Desiree’; Asara, John M; Karamichos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Corneal scarring is the result of a disease, infection or injury. The resulting scars cause significant loss of vision or even blindness. To-date, the most successful treatment is corneal transplantation, but it does not come without side effects. One of the corneal dystrophies that are correlated with corneal scarring is keratoconus (KC). The onset of the disease is still unknown; however, altered cellular metabolism has been linked to promoting the fibrotic phenotype and therefore scarring. We have previously shown that human keratoconus cells (HKCs) have altered metabolic activity when compared to normal human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs). In our current study, we present evidence that quercetin, a natural flavonoid, is a strong candidate for regulating metabolic activity of both HCFs and HKCs in vitro and therefore a potential therapeutic to target the altered cellular metabolism characteristic of HKCs. Targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomics was performed on HCFs and HKCs with and without quercetin treatment in order to identify variations in metabolite flux. Overall, our study reveals a novel therapeutic target OF Quercetin on corneal stromal cell metabolism in both healthy and diseased states. Clearly, further studies are necessary in order to dissect the mechanism of action of quercetin. PMID:26173740

  13. Depressive disorder and gastrointestinal dysfunction after myocardial infarct are associated with abnormal tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyan; Wang, Yangang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism, depressive disorder, and gastrointestinal dysfunction in rats after myocardial infarction. Our goal was to elucidate the physiopathologic bases of somatic/psychiatric depression symptoms after myocardial infarction. A myocardial infarction model was established by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Depression-like behavior was evaluated using the sucrose preference test, open field test, and forced swim test. Gastric retention and intestinal transit were detected using the carbon powder labeling method. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in the hippocampus and ileum. High-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection determined the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine, its precursor tryptophan, and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the hippocampus, distal ileum, and peripheral blood. All data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance. Three weeks after arterial occlusion, rats in the model group began to exhibit depression-like symptoms. For example, the rate of sucrose consumption was reduced, the total and central distance traveled in the open field test were reduced, and immobility time was increased, while swimming, struggling and latency to immobility were decreased in the forced swim test. Moreover, the gastric retention rate and gastrointestinal transit rate were increased in the model group. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase was increased in the hippocampus and ileum, whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism was decreased, resulting in lower 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in the hippocampus and higher levels in the ileum. Depressive disorder and gastrointestinal dysfunction after myocardial infarction involve abnormal tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism, which may explain the somatic, cognitive

  14. Cardiomyocyte glucagon receptor signaling modulates outcomes in mice with experimental myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Safina; Ussher, John R.; Baggio, Laurie L.; Kabir, M. Golam; Charron, Maureen J.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Newgard, Christopher B.; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Glucagon is a hormone with metabolic actions that maintains normoglycemia during the fasting state. Strategies enabling either inhibition or activation of glucagon receptor (Gcgr) signaling are being explored for the treatment of diabetes or obesity. However, the cardiovascular consequences of manipulating glucagon action are poorly understood. Methods We assessed infarct size and the following outcomes following left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation; cardiac gene and protein expression, acylcarnitine profiles, and cardiomyocyte survival in normoglycemic non-obese wildtype mice, and in newly generated mice with selective inactivation of the cardiomyocyte Gcgr. Complementary experiments analyzed Gcgr signaling and cell survival in cardiomyocyte cultures and cell lines, in the presence or absence of exogenous glucagon. Results Exogenous glucagon administration directly impaired recovery of ventricular pressure in ischemic mouse hearts ex vivo, and increased mortality from myocardial infarction after LAD coronary artery ligation in mice in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner. In contrast, cardiomyocyte-specific reduction of glucagon action in adult GcgrCM−/− mice significantly improved survival, and reduced hypertrophy and infarct size following myocardial infarction. Metabolic profiling of hearts from GcgrCM−/− mice revealed a marked reduction in long chain acylcarnitines in both aerobic and ischemic hearts, and following high fat feeding, consistent with an essential role for Gcgr signaling in the control of cardiac fatty acid utilization. Conclusions Activation or reduction of cardiac Gcgr signaling in the ischemic heart produces substantial cardiac phenotypes, findings with implications for therapeutic strategies designed to augment or inhibit Gcgr signaling for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:25685700

  15. The role and modulation of autophagy in experimental models of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Scarabelli, Carol; Agrawal, Pratik R.; Saravolatz, Louis; Abuniat, Cadigia; Scarabelli, Gabriele; Stephanou, Anastasis; Loomba, Leena; Narula, Jagat; Scarabelli, Tiziano M.; Knight, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A physiological sequence called autophagy qualitatively determines cellular viability by removing protein aggregates and damaged cytoplasmic constituents, and contributes significantly to the degree of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. This tightly orchestrated catabolic cellular ‘housekeeping’ process provides cells with a new source of energy to adapt to stressful conditions. This process was first described as a pro-survival mechanism, but increasing evidence suggests that it can also lead to the demise of the cell. Autophagy has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple cardiac conditions including myocardial I/R injury. However, a debate persists as to whether autophagy acts as a protective mechanism or contributes to the injurious effects of I/R injury in the heart. This controversy may stem from several factors including the variability in the experimental models and species, and the methodology used to assess autophagy. This review provides updated knowledge on the modulation and role of autophagy in isolated cardiac cells subjected to I/R, and the growing interest towards manipulating autophagy to increase the survival of cardiac myocytes under conditions of stress-most notably being I/R injury. Perturbation of this evolutionarily conserved intracellular cleansing autophagy mechanism, by targeted modulation through, among others, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulators, calcium lowering agents, resveratrol, longevinex, sirtuin activators, the proapoptotic gene Bnip3, IP3 and lysosome inhibitors, may confer resistance to heart cells against I/R induced cell death. Thus, therapeutic manipulation of autophagy in the challenged myocardium may benefit post-infarction cardiac healing and remodeling. PMID:25593583

  16. Natural product derivative BIO promotes recovery after myocardial infarction via unique modulation of the cardiac microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Sook; Jeong, Hye-Yun; Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Woong-Hee; Cho, Haaglim; Um, JungIn; Seo, Youngha; Kang, Wan Seok; Jin, Suk-Won; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Yong-Chul; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2016-08-11

    The cardiac microenvironment includes cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and macrophages, which regulate remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Targeting this microenvironment is a novel therapeutic approach for MI. We found that the natural compound derivative, BIO ((2'Z,3'E)-6-Bromoindirubin-3'-oxime) modulated the cardiac microenvironment to exert a therapeutic effect on MI. Using a series of co-culture studies, BIO induced proliferation in cardiomyocytes and inhibited proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. BIO produced multiple anti-fibrotic effects in cardiac fibroblasts. In macrophages, BIO inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory factors. Significantly, BIO modulated the molecular crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and differentiating macrophages to induce polarization to the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. In the optically transparent zebrafish-based heart failure model, BIO induced cardiomyocyte proliferation and completely recovered survival rate. BIO is a known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor, but these effects could not be recapitulated using the classical inhibitor, lithium chloride; indicating novel therapeutic effects of BIO. We identified the mechanism of BIO as differential modulation of p27 protein expression and potent induction of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. In a rat MI model, BIO reduced fibrosis and improved cardiac performance. Histological analysis revealed modulation of the cardiac microenvironment by BIO, with increased presence of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that BIO produces unique effects in the cardiac microenvironment to promote recovery post-MI.

  17. The relationship between biventricular myocardial performance and metabolic parameters during incremental exercise and recovery in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pieles, Guido E; Gowing, Lucy; Forsey, Jonathan; Ramanujam, Paramanantham; Miller, Felicity; Stuart, A Graham; Williams, Craig A

    2015-12-15

    Background left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) myocardial reserve during exercise in adolescents has not been directly characterized. The aim of this study was to quantify myocardial performance response to exercise by using two-dimensional (2-D) speckle tracking echocardiography and describe the relationship between myocardial reserve, respiratory, and metabolic exercise parameters. A total of 23 healthy boys and girls (mean age 13.2 ± 2.7 yr; stature 159.1 ± 16.4 cm; body mass 49.5 ± 16.6 kg; BSA 1.47 ± 0.33 m(2)) completed an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (25 W · 3 min increments) with simultaneous acquisition of 2-D transthoracic echocardiography at rest, each exercise stage up to 100 W, and in recovery at 2 min and 10 min. Two-dimensional LV (LV Sl) and RV (RV Sl) longitudinal strain and LV circumferential strain (LV Sc) were analyzed to define the relationship between myocardial performance reserve and metabolic exercise parameters. Participants achieved a peak oxygen uptake (V̇o 2peak) of 40.6 ± 8.9 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) and a work rate of 154 ± 42 W. LV Sl and LV Sc and RV Sl increased significantly across work rates (P < 0.05). LV Sl during exercise was significantly correlated to resting strain, V̇o 2peak, oxygen pulse, and work rate (0.530 ≤ r ≤ 0.784, P < 0.05). This study identifies a positive and moderate relationship between LV and RV myocardial performance and metabolic parameters during exercise by using a novel methodology. Relationships detected present novel data directly describing myocardial adaptation at different stages of exercise and recovery that in the future can help directly assess cardiac reserve in patients with cardiac pathology.

  18. Functional modules, structural topology, and optimal activity in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Hernández, Magdalena; Mora, Yolanda; Encarnación, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Modular organization in biological networks has been suggested as a natural mechanism by which a cell coordinates its metabolic strategies for evolving and responding to environmental perturbations. To understand how this occurs, there is a need for developing computational schemes that contribute to integration of genomic-scale information and assist investigators in formulating biological hypotheses in a quantitative and systematic fashion. In this work, we combined metabolome data and constraint-based modeling to elucidate the relationships among structural modules, functional organization, and the optimal metabolic phenotype of Rhizobium etli, a bacterium that fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris. To experimentally characterize the metabolic phenotype of this microorganism, we obtained the metabolic profile of 220 metabolites at two physiological stages: under free-living conditions, and during nitrogen fixation with P. vulgaris. By integrating these data into a constraint-based model, we built a refined computational platform with the capability to survey the metabolic activity underlying nitrogen fixation in R. etli. Topological analysis of the metabolic reconstruction led us to identify modular structures with functional activities. Consistent with modular activity in metabolism, we found that most of the metabolites experimentally detected in each module simultaneously increased their relative abundances during nitrogen fixation. In this work, we explore the relationships among topology, biological function, and optimal activity in the metabolism of R. etli through an integrative analysis based on modeling and metabolome data. Our findings suggest that the metabolic activity during nitrogen fixation is supported by interacting structural modules that correlate with three functional classifications: nucleic acids, peptides, and lipids. More fundamentally, we supply evidence that such modular organization during functional nitrogen fixation is

  19. Potassium Uptake Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gries, Casey M.; Sadykov, Marat R.; Bulock, Logan L.; Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Thomas, Vinai C.; Bose, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As a leading cause of community-associated and nosocomial infections, Staphylococcus aureus requires sophisticated mechanisms that function to maintain cellular homeostasis in response to its exposure to changing environmental conditions. The adaptation to stress and maintenance of homeostasis depend largely on membrane activity, including supporting electrochemical gradients and synthesis of ATP. This is largely achieved through potassium (K+) transport, which plays an essential role in maintaining chemiosmotic homeostasis, affects antimicrobial resistance, and contributes to fitness in vivo. Here, we report that S. aureus Ktr-mediated K+ uptake is necessary for maintaining cytoplasmic pH and the establishment of a proton motive force. Metabolite analyses revealed that K+ deficiency affects both metabolic and energy states of S. aureus by impairing oxidative phosphorylation and directing carbon flux toward substrate-level phosphorylation. Taken together, these results underline the importance of K+ uptake in maintaining essential components of S. aureus metabolism. IMPORTANCE Previous studies describing mechanisms for K+ uptake in S. aureus revealed that the Ktr-mediated K+ transport system was required for normal growth under alkaline conditions but not under neutral or acidic conditions. This work focuses on the effect of K+ uptake on S. aureus metabolism, including intracellular pH and carbon flux, and is the first to utilize a pH-dependent green fluorescent protein (GFP) to measure S. aureus cytoplasmic pH. These studies highlight the role of K+ uptake in supporting proton efflux under alkaline conditions and uncover a critical role for K+ uptake in establishing efficient carbon utilization. PMID:27340697

  20. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle plasticity modulates metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Kurdiova, Timea; Gasperikova, Daniela; Klimes, Iwar

    2008-12-01

    Obesity, accumulation of adipose tissue, develops when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. Adipose tissue is essential for buffering the differences between energy intake and expenditure by accumulating lipids while skeletal muscle is the energy burning machine. Here we adopted the concept that (i) adipose tissue ability to regulate the storage capacity for lipids as well as (ii) dynamic regulation of muscle and adipose tissue secretory and metabolic activity is important for maintaining the metabolic health. This might be at least in part related to tissue plasticity, a phenomenon enabling dynamic modulation of the tissue phenotype in different physiological and pathophysiological situations. Recent advances in our understanding of the complex endocrine function of adipose tissue in regulating lipid metabolism, adipogenesis, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodelling, inflammation and oxidative stress prompted us to review the role of tissue plasticity--dynamic changes in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle metabolic and endocrine phenotype--in determining the difference between metabolic health and disease.

  1. Trenbolone Improves Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Myocardial Tolerance to Ischemia-Reperfusion in Male Rats With Testosterone-Deficient Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donner, Daniel G; Elliott, Grace E; Beck, Belinda R; Bulmer, Andrew C; Lam, Alfred K; Headrick, John P; Du Toit, Eugene F

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity adds another dimension to the pathophysiology of testosterone (TEST) deficiency (TD) and potentially impairs the therapeutic efficacy of classical TEST replacement therapy. We investigated the therapeutic effects of selective androgen receptor modulation with trenbolone (TREN) in a model of TD with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Male Wistar rats (n=50) were fed either a control standard rat chow (CTRL) or a high-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet. After 8 weeks of feeding, rats underwent sham surgery or an orchiectomy (ORX). Alzet miniosmotic pumps containing either vehicle, 2-mg/kg·d TEST or 2-mg/kg·d TREN were implanted in HF/HS+ORX rats. Body composition, fat distribution, lipid profile, and insulin sensitivity were assessed. Infarct size was quantified to assess myocardial damage after in vivo ischaemia reperfusion, before cardiac and prostate histology was performed. The HF/HS+ORX animals had increased sc and visceral adiposity; circulating triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin; and myocardial damage, with low circulating TEST compared with CTRLs. Both TEST and TREN protected HF/HS+ORX animals against sc fat accumulation, hypercholesterolaemia, and myocardial damage. However, only TREN protected against visceral fat accumulation, hypertriglyceridaemia, and hyperinsulinaemia and reduced myocardial damage relative to CTRLs. TEST caused widespread cardiac fibrosis and prostate hyperplasia, which were less pronounced with TREN. We propose that TEST replacement therapy may have contraindications for males with TD and obesity-related MetS. TREN treatment may be more effective in restoring androgen status and reducing cardiovascular risk in males with TD and MetS.

  2. Time-resolved metabolomics reveals metabolic modulation in rice foliage

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shigeru; Arita, Masanori; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nishioka, Takaaki; Tomita, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    Background To elucidate the interaction of dynamics among modules that constitute biological systems, comprehensive datasets obtained from "omics" technologies have been used. In recent plant metabolomics approaches, the reconstruction of metabolic correlation networks has been attempted using statistical techniques. However, the results were unsatisfactory and effective data-mining techniques that apply appropriate comprehensive datasets are needed. Results Using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) and capillary electrophoresis diode-array detection (CE-DAD), we analyzed the dynamic changes in the level of 56 basic metabolites in plant foliage (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) at hourly intervals over a 24-hr period. Unsupervised clustering of comprehensive metabolic profiles using Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM) allowed classification of the biochemical pathways activated by the light and dark cycle. The carbon and nitrogen (C/N) metabolism in both periods was also visualized as a phenotypic linkage map that connects network modules on the basis of traditional metabolic pathways rather than pairwise correlations among metabolites. The regulatory networks of C/N assimilation/dissimilation at each time point were consistent with previous works on plant metabolism. In response to environmental stress, glutathione and spermidine fluctuated synchronously with their regulatory targets. Adenine nucleosides and nicotinamide coenzymes were regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We also demonstrated that SOM analysis was applicable to the estimation of unidentifiable metabolites in metabolome analysis. Hierarchical clustering of a correlation coefficient matrix could help identify the bottleneck enzymes that regulate metabolic networks. Conclusion Our results showed that our SOM analysis with appropriate metabolic time-courses effectively revealed the synchronous dynamics among metabolic modules and elucidated the underlying biochemical

  3. Hierarchical decomposition of metabolic networks using k-modules.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Arne C

    2015-12-01

    The optimal solutions obtained by flux balance analysis (FBA) are typically not unique. Flux modules have recently been shown to be a very useful tool to simplify and decompose the space of FBA-optimal solutions. Since yield-maximization is sometimes not the primary objective encountered in vivo, we are also interested in understanding the space of sub-optimal solutions. Unfortunately, the flux modules are too restrictive and not suited for this task. We present a generalization, called k-module, which compensates the limited applicability of flux modules to the space of sub-optimal solutions. Intuitively, a k-module is a sub-network with low connectivity to the rest of the network. Recursive application of k-modules yields a hierarchical decomposition of the metabolic network, which is also known as branch decomposition in matroid theory. In particular, decompositions computed by existing methods, like the null-space-based approach, introduced by Poolman et al. [(2007) J. Theor. Biol. 249: , 691-705] can be interpreted as branch decompositions. With k-modules we can now compare alternative decompositions of metabolic networks to the classical sub-systems of glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, etc. They can be used to speed up algorithmic problems [theoretically shown for elementary flux modes (EFM) enumeration] and have the potential to present computational solutions in a more intuitive way independently from the classical sub-systems.

  4. Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Modulating Effects of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Fang; Diers, Anne R.; Hogg, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Altered metabolic phenotype has been recognized as a hallmark of tumor cells for many years, but this aspect of the cancer phenotype has come into greater focus in recent years. NOS2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase of iNOS) has been implicated as a component in many aggressive tumor phenotypes, including melanoma, glioblastoma and breast cancer. Nitric oxide has been well established as a modulator of cellular bioenergetics pathways, in many ways similar to the alteration of cellular metabolism observed in aggressive tumors. In this review we attempt to bring these concepts together with the general hypothesis that one function of NOS2 and NO in cancer is to modulate metabolic processes to facilitate increased tumor aggression. There are many mechanisms by which NO can modulate tumor metabolism, including direct inhibition of respiration, alterations in mitochondrial mass, oxidative inhibition of bioenergetic enzymes, and the stimulation of secondary signaling pathways. Here we review metabolic alterations in the context of cancer cells and discuss the role of NO as a potential mediator of these changes. PMID:25464273

  5. A Comparative Metabolomics Approach Reveals Early Biomarkers for Metabolic Response to Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sara E.; Farag, Mohamed A.; Holvoet, Paul; Hanafi, Rasha S.; Gad, Mohamed Z.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of novel biomarkers is critical for early diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Serum metabolite profiling of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), unstable angina (UA) and healthy controls was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS), solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). Multivariate data analysis revealed a metabolic signature that could robustly discriminate STEMI patients from both healthy controls and UA patients. This panel of biomarkers consisted of 19 metabolites identified in the serum of STEMI patients. One of the most intriguing biomarkers among these metabolites is hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an endogenous gasotransmitter with profound effect on the heart. Serum H2S absolute levels were further investigated using a quantitative double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This highly sensitive immunoassay confirmed the elevation of serum H2S in STEMI patients. H2S level discriminated between UA and STEMI groups, providing an initial insight into serum-free H2S bioavailability during ACS. In conclusion, the current study provides a detailed map illustrating the most predominant altered metabolic pathways and the biochemical linkages among the biomarker metabolites identified in STEMI patients. Metabolomics analysis may yield novel predictive biomarkers that will potentially allow for an earlier medical intervention. PMID:27821850

  6. Impairment of energy metabolism in intact residual myocardium of rat hearts with chronic myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, S; Horn, M; Naumann, A; Tian, R; Hu, K; Laser, M; Friedrich, J; Gaudron, P; Schnackerz, K; Ingwall, J S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that energy metabolism is impaired in residual intact myocardium of chronically infarcted rat heart, contributing to contractile dysfunction. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced in rats by coronary artery ligation. Hearts were isolated 8 wk later and buffer-perfused isovolumically. MI hearts showed reduced left ventricular developed pressure, but oxygen consumption was unchanged. High-energy phosphate contents were measured chemically and by 31P-NMR spectroscopy. In residual intact left ventricular tissue, ATP was unchanged after MI, while creatine phosphate was reduced by 31%. Total creatine kinase (CK) activity was reduced by 17%, the fetal CK isoenzymes BB and MB increased, while the "adult" mitochondrial CK isoenzyme activity decreased by 44%. Total creatine content decreased by 35%. Phosphoryl exchange between ATP and creatine phosphate, measured by 31P-NMR magnetization transfer, fell by 50% in MI hearts. Thus, energy reserve is substantially impaired in residual intact myocardium of chronically infarcted rats. Because phosphoryl exchange was still five times higher than ATP synthesis rates calculated from oxygen consumption, phosphoryl transfer via CK may not limit baseline contractile performance 2 mo after MI. In contrast, when MI hearts were subjected to acute stress (hypoxia), mechanical recovery during reoxygenation was impaired, suggesting that reduced energy reserve contributes to increased susceptibility of MI hearts to acute metabolic stress. PMID:7883957

  7. Modulators of Nucleoside Metabolism in the Therapy of Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    Nucleoside receptors are known to be important targets for a variety of brain diseases. However, the therapeutic modulation of their endogenous agonists by inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism represents an alternative therapeutic strategy that has gained increasing attention in recent years. Deficiency in endogenous nucleosides, in particular of adenosine, may causally be linked to a variety of neurological diseases and neuropsychiatric conditions ranging from epilepsy and chronic pain to schizophrenia. Consequently, augmentation of nucleoside function by inhibiting their metabolism appears to be a rational therapeutic strategy with distinct advantages: (i) in contrast to specific receptor modulation, the increase (or decrease) of the amount of a nucleoside will affect several signal transduction pathways simultaneously and therefore have the unique potential to modify complex neurochemical networks; (ii) by acting on the network level, inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism are highly suited to fine-tune, restore, or amplify physiological functions of nucleosides; (iii) therefore inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism have promise for the “soft and smart” therapy of neurological diseases with the added advantage of reduced systemic side effects. This review will first highlight the role of nucleoside function and dysfunction in physiological and pathophysiological situations with a particular emphasis on the anticonvulsant, neuroprotective, and antinociceptive roles of adenosine. The second part of this review will cover pharmacological approaches to use inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism, with a special emphasis on adenosine kinase, the key regulator of endogenous adenosine. Finally, novel gene-based therapeutic strategies to inhibit nucleoside metabolism and focal treatment approaches will be discussed. PMID:21401494

  8. Myocardial ischemic-reperfusion injury in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, Mahmood S; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2008-10-01

    Hearts of NaCl-induced hypertensive-glucose intolerant (HGI) rats develop reduced infarcts after ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) than their hypertensive (H) counterparts. Because high intake of saturated fat is a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease, we tested the hypothesis that chronic (18 weeks) consumption of a high saturated fat diet increases susceptibility to IRI, an effect more marked in the HGI rats than in the H rats. The fat-fed H (HFAT) rat displayed significantly higher body weight and plasma leptin content compared to the H, HGI, or fat-fed HGI (HGIFAT) rats which all showed similar values. In contrast, plasma triglyceride concentration was significantly higher in the HGIFAT rat than in the other three groups. Plasma insulin concentration was similar in the two H groups but higher than that of the two HGI groups. Compared to the H rat, the HGI rat was markedly glucose intolerant, with fat feeding causing comparable worsening of glucose intolerance in each group. The HGIFAT rats displayed a reduction in baseline myocardial contractility and relaxation and a higher end-diastolic pressure compared to the other three groups. Infarct size was significantly lower in the HGI rats than in the H rats. Although fat feeding did not affect infarct size of the H rat, it worsened that of the HGIFAT rat thereby abrogating the differential that existed between the H and HGI rats. In conclusion, excess fat feeding impairs myocardial function of HGI rats and increases their susceptibility to IRI. These findings are of relevance to the metabolic syndrome that manifests as a cluster of insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and systemic hypertension.

  9. [Effect of rehabilitation after myocardial infarction on muscular metabolism. Contribution of phosphorus 31 NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Cottin, Y; Marcer, I; Walker, P; Verges, B; Caillaux, B X; Louis, P; Didier, J P; Casillas, J M; Brunotte, F; Wolf, J E

    1994-06-01

    P 31 NMR spectroscopy is a recent technique which allows a non-invasive and direct analysis of oxidative metabolism and pH changes, an indicator of acidosis due to lactic acid accumulation in the skeletal muscles. The authors investigated oxidative muscular metabolism of the sural triceps in 10 patients after myocardial infarction by performing a study after the acute phase and repeating the study after a programme of physical training. At rest, there were no significant differences. On the other hand, for the same level of maximal effort, the depletion in phosphocreatinine (PCr) and the accumulation of inorganic phosphate (Pi) were significantly lower after physical training: the PCr/PCr + Pi increased from 0.467 +/- 0.179 to 0.538 +/- 0.20 (p < 0.02) and the Pi/PCr ratio decreased from 1.570 +/- 1.440 to 1.181 +/- 1.069 (p < 0.05). The pH at the same level of maximal exercise did not change significantly between the two periods: 6.85 +/- 0.16 vs 6.88 +/- 0.15 (NS). The peak oxygen consumption (VO2) measured during bicycle ergometry increased significantly from 23.4 +/- 10.5 to 28.3 +/- 12.14 ml/min/kg after exercise training (p < 0.01). In addition, a correlation was observed between the improvement of the peripheral parameters (PCr/PCr + Pi) and the increase in VO2 max (r = 0.757, p < 0.01). The authors results confirm the effects of physical training on oxidative metabolisms of the peripheral muscles and its influence on improvement of global performance of coronary patients.

  10. Sirtuin 1 and sirtuin 3: physiological modulators of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Habegger, Kirk M; Chaudhary, Nilika; Finan, Brian; Banks, Alexander S; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Horvath, Tamas L; Sinclair, David A; Pfluger, Paul T; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2012-07-01

    The sirtuins are a family of highly conserved NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases that act as cellular sensors to detect energy availability and modulate metabolic processes. Two sirtuins that are central to the control of metabolic processes are mammalian sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), which are localized to the nucleus and mitochondria, respectively. Both are activated by high NAD(+) levels, a condition caused by low cellular energy status. By deacetylating a variety of proteins that induce catabolic processes while inhibiting anabolic processes, SIRT1 and SIRT3 coordinately increase cellular energy stores and ultimately maintain cellular energy homeostasis. Defects in the pathways controlled by SIRT1 and SIRT3 are known to result in various metabolic disorders. Consequently, activation of sirtuins by genetic or pharmacological means can elicit multiple metabolic benefits that protect mice from diet-induced obesity, type 2 diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  11. SIRTUIN 1 AND SIRTUIN 3: PHYSIOLOGICAL MODULATORS OF METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Habegger, Kirk M.; Chaudhary, Nilika; Finan, Brian; Banks, Alexander S.; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Horvath, Tamas L.; Sinclair, David A.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Tschöop, Matthias H.

    2013-01-01

    The sirtuins are a family of highly conserved NAD+-dependent deacetylases that act as cellular sensors to detect energy availability and modulate metabolic processes. Two sirtuins that are central to the control of metabolic processes are mammalian sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), which are localized to the nucleus and mitochondria, respectively. Both are activated by high NAD+ levels, a condition caused by low cellular energy status. By deacetylating a variety of proteins that induce catabolic processes while inhibiting anabolic processes, SIRT1 and SIRT3 coordinately increase cellular energy stores and ultimately maintain cellular energy homeostasis. Defects in the pathways controlled by SIRT1 and SIRT3 are known to result in various metabolic disorders. Consequently, activation of sirtuins by genetic or pharmacological means can elicit multiple metabolic benefits that protect mice from diet-induced obesity, type 2 diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:22811431

  12. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens.

  13. Qishen granules inhibit myocardial inflammation injury through regulating arachidonic acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun; Wang, Jing; Wang, Qiyan; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Na; Lu, Linghui; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yong; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    Qishen granules (QSG), a traditional Chinese medicine, have been prescribed widely in the treatment of coronary heart diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that QSG had anti-inflammatory and cardio-protective effects in mice with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, the mechanisms by which QSG attenuate inflammation and prevent post-AMI heart failure (HF) are still unclear. In this study, we explored the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of QSG by in vitro and in vivo experiments. A novel inflammatory injury model of H9C2 cells was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage-conditioned media (CM). An animal model of AMI was conducted by ligation of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery in mice. We found that QSG inhibited release of cytokines from LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and protected H9C2 cardiac cells against CM-induced injury. In vivo results showed that QSG administration could improve cardiac functions and alter pathological changes in model of AMI. QSG regulated multiple key molecules, including phospholipases A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COXs) and lipoxygenases (LOXs), in arachidonic acid metabolism pathway. Interestingly, QSG also targeted TNF-α-NF-κB and IL-6-JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathways. Taken together, QSG achieve synergistic effects in mitigating post-AMI HF by regulating multiple targets in inflammatory pathways. This study provides insights into anti-inflammatory therapeutics in managing HF after AMI. PMID:27833128

  14. Metabolic Inflammation-Differential Modulation by Dietary Constituents.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Claire L; Kennedy, Elaine B; Roche, Helen M

    2016-04-27

    Obesity arises from a sustained positive energy balance which triggers a pro-inflammatory response, a key contributor to metabolic diseases such as T2D. Recent studies, focused on the emerging area of metabolic-inflammation, highlight that specific metabolites can modulate the functional nature and inflammatory phenotype of immune cells. In obesity, expanding adipose tissue attracts immune cells, creating an inflammatory environment within this fatty acid storage organ. Resident immune cells undergo both a pro-inflammatory and metabolic switch in their function. Inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, are induced by saturated fatty acids and disrupt insulin signaling. Conversely, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids do not interrupt metabolism and inflammation to the same extent. AMPK links inflammation, metabolism and T2D, with roles to play in all and is influenced negatively by obesity. Lipid spillover results in hepatic lipotoxicity and steatosis. Also in skeletal muscle, excessive FFA can impede insulin's action and promote inflammation. Ectopic fat can also affect pancreatic β-cell function, thereby contributing to insulin resistance. Therapeutics, lifestyle changes, supplements and dietary manipulation are all possible avenues to combat metabolic inflammation and the subsequent insulin resistant state which will be explored in the current review.

  15. Metabolic Inflammation-Differential Modulation by Dietary Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Claire L.; Kennedy, Elaine B.; Roche, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity arises from a sustained positive energy balance which triggers a pro-inflammatory response, a key contributor to metabolic diseases such as T2D. Recent studies, focused on the emerging area of metabolic-inflammation, highlight that specific metabolites can modulate the functional nature and inflammatory phenotype of immune cells. In obesity, expanding adipose tissue attracts immune cells, creating an inflammatory environment within this fatty acid storage organ. Resident immune cells undergo both a pro-inflammatory and metabolic switch in their function. Inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, are induced by saturated fatty acids and disrupt insulin signaling. Conversely, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids do not interrupt metabolism and inflammation to the same extent. AMPK links inflammation, metabolism and T2D, with roles to play in all and is influenced negatively by obesity. Lipid spillover results in hepatic lipotoxicity and steatosis. Also in skeletal muscle, excessive FFA can impede insulin’s action and promote inflammation. Ectopic fat can also affect pancreatic β-cell function, thereby contributing to insulin resistance. Therapeutics, lifestyle changes, supplements and dietary manipulation are all possible avenues to combat metabolic inflammation and the subsequent insulin resistant state which will be explored in the current review. PMID:27128935

  16. Nutritional and metabolic modulation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management.

    PubMed

    Schols, A M W J

    2003-11-01

    In this paper the perspective for nutritional modulation of systemic impairment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is discussed. Progressive weight loss is characterised by disease-specific elevated energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Weight gain per se can be achieved by caloric supplementation while future studies may prove efficacy of amino acid modulation to stimulate protein synthesis and enhance muscle anabolism. Disproportionate muscle wasting resembles the cachexia syndrome as described in other chronic wasting diseases (cancer, chronic heart failure, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)). There is yet no adequate nutritional strategy available to treat cachexia in COPD. Muscle substrate metabolism has hardly been investigated, but the few data available point towards a decreased fat oxidative capacity that may show similarities with the "metabolic syndrome" as described in type II diabetes and obesity and could theoretically benefit from polyunsaturated fatty acid modulation. To adequately target the different therapeutic options, clearly more clinical (intervention) studies are needed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients that are adequately characterised by local and systemic impairment and in which molecular and metabolic markers are linked to functional outcome.

  17. Chemical modulation of glycerolipid signaling and metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Sarah A.; Mathews, Thomas P.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Brown, H. Alex

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago, glycerolipids captured the attention of biochemical researchers as novel cellular signaling entities. We now recognize that these biomolecules occupy signaling nodes critical to a number of physiological and pathological processes. Thus, glycerolipid-metabolizing enzymes present attractive targets for new therapies. A number of fields—ranging from neuroscience and cancer to diabetes and obesity—have elucidated the signaling properties of glycerolipids. The biochemical literature teems with newly emerging small molecule inhibitors capable of manipulating glycerolipid metabolism and signaling. This ever-expanding pool of chemical modulators appears daunting to those interested in exploiting glycerolipid-signaling pathways in their model system of choice. This review distills the current body of literature surrounding glycerolipid metabolism into a more approachable format, facilitating the application of small molecule inhibitors to novel systems. PMID:24440821

  18. Chemical modulation of glycerolipid signaling and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sarah A; Mathews, Thomas P; Ivanova, Pavlina T; Lindsley, Craig W; Brown, H Alex

    2014-08-01

    Thirty years ago, glycerolipids captured the attention of biochemical researchers as novel cellular signaling entities. We now recognize that these biomolecules occupy signaling nodes critical to a number of physiological and pathological processes. Thus, glycerolipid-metabolizing enzymes present attractive targets for new therapies. A number of fields-ranging from neuroscience and cancer to diabetes and obesity-have elucidated the signaling properties of glycerolipids. The biochemical literature teems with newly emerging small molecule inhibitors capable of manipulating glycerolipid metabolism and signaling. This ever-expanding pool of chemical modulators appears daunting to those interested in exploiting glycerolipid-signaling pathways in their model system of choice. This review distills the current body of literature surrounding glycerolipid metabolism into a more approachable format, facilitating the application of small molecule inhibitors to novel systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions.

  19. Attenuation by creatine of myocardial metabolic stress in Brattleboro rats caused by chronic inhibition of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Constantin-Teodosiu, D.; Greenhaff, P. L.; Gardiner, S. M.; Randall, M. D.; March, J. E.; Bennett, T.

    1995-01-01

    1. The present experiment was undertaken to investigate: (a) the effect of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition, mediated by oral supplementation of the NOS inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), on measures of myocardial energy metabolism and function: (b) the effect of oral creatine supplementation on these variables, in the absence and presence of L-NAME. 2. In one series of experiments, 4 weeks oral administration of L-NAME (0.05 mg ml-1 day-1 in the drinking water) to Brattleboro rats caused significant reductions in myocardial ATP, creatine, and total creatine concentrations and an accumulation of tissue lactate when compared with control animals. Administration of creatine (0.63 mg ml-1 day-1 in the drinking water) for 4 weeks elevated myocardial creatine and total creatine concentrations and reduced lactate accumulation, but did not significantly affect ATP or phosphocreatine (PCr). Concurrent treatment with creatine and L-NAME prevented the reduction in creatine and total creatine concentrations, and significantly attenuated the accumulation of lactate and the reduction in ATP seen with L-NAME alone. 3. In a second series of experiments, 4 weeks treatment with L-NAME and creatine plus L-NAME increased mean arterial blood pressure in conscious Brattleboro rats. Hearts isolated from these animals showed decreased coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and total mechanical performance. Treatment with creatine alone had no measurable effect on either mean arterial blood pressure or coronary flow in isolated hearts. However, there was an increase in LVDP, but not in total mechanical performance, because there was a bradycardia. 4. These results indicate that creatine supplementation can attenuate the metabolic stress associated with L-NAME administration and that this effect occurs as a consequence of the action of creatine on myocardial energy metabolism. PMID:8719809

  20. Ventricular Assist Device Implantation Corrects Myocardial Lipotoxicity, Reverses Insulin Resistance and Normalizes Cardiac Metabolism in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Aalap; Drosatos, Konstantinos; Cheema, Faisal H.; Ji, Ruiping; Khawaja, Tuba; Yu, Shuiqing; Kato, Tomoko; Khan, Raffay; Takayama, Hiroo; Knöll, Ralph; Milting, Hendrik; Chung, Christine S.; Jorde, Ulrich; Naka, Yoshifumi; Mancini, Donna M.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background Heart failure is associated with impaired myocardial metabolism with a shift from fatty acids to glucose utilization for ATP generation. We hypothesized that cardiac accumulation of toxic lipid intermediates inhibits insulin signaling in advanced heart failure and that mechanical unloading of the failing myocardium corrects impaired cardiac metabolism. Methods and Results We analyzed myocardium and serum of 61 patients with heart failure (BMI 26.5±5.1 kg/m2, age 51±12 years) obtained during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation and at explantation (mean duration 185±156 days) and from 9 controls. Systemic insulin resistance in heart failure was accompanied by decreased myocardial triglyceride and overall fatty acid content but increased toxic lipid intermediates, diacylglycerol and ceramide. Increased membrane localization of protein kinase C isoforms, inhibitors of insulin signaling, and decreased activity of insulin signaling molecules Akt and FOXO, were detectable in heart failure compared to controls. LVAD implantation improved whole body insulin resistance (HOMA-IR: 4.5±0.6 to 3.2±0.5; p<0.05) and decreased myocardial levels of diacylglycerol and ceramide while triglyceride and fatty acid content remained unchanged. Improved activation of the insulin/PI3kinase/Akt signaling cascade after LVAD implantation was confirmed by increased phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO, which was accompanied by decreased membrane localization of protein kinase C isoforms after LVAD implantation. Conclusions Mechanical unloading after LVAD implantation corrects systemic and local metabolic derangements in advanced heart failure leading to reduced myocardial levels of toxic lipid intermediates and improved cardiac insulin signaling. PMID:22586279

  1. Targeting Amino Acid Metabolism for Molecular Imaging of Inflammation Early After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, James T.; Bankstahl, Jens P.; Wang, Yong; Wollert, Kai C.; Bengel, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute tissue inflammation after myocardial infarction influences healing and remodeling and has been identified as a target for novel therapies. Molecular imaging holds promise for guidance of such therapies. The amino acid 11C-methionine is a clinically approved agent which is thought to accumulate in macrophages, but not in healthy myocytes. We assessed the suitability of positron emission tomography (PET) with 11C-methionine for imaging post-MI inflammation, from cell to mouse to man. Uptake assays demonstrated 7-fold higher 11C-methionine uptake by polarized pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages over anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes (p<0.001). C57Bl/6 mice (n=27) underwent coronary artery ligation or no surgery. Serial 11C-methionine PET was performed 3, 5 and 7d later. MI mice exhibited a perfusion defect in 32-50% of the left ventricle (LV). PET detected increased 11C-methionine accumulation in the infarct territory at 3d (5.9±0.9%ID/g vs 4.7±0.9 in remote myocardium, and 2.6±0.5 in healthy mice; p<0.05 and <0.01 respectively), which declined by d7 post-MI (4.3±0.6 in infarct, 3.4±0.8 in remote; p=0.03 vs 3d, p=0.08 vs healthy). Increased 11C-methionine uptake was associated with macrophage infiltration of damaged myocardium. Treatment with anti-integrin antibodies (anti-CD11a, -CD11b, -CD49d; 100µg) lowered macrophage content by 56% and 11C-methionine uptake by 46% at 3d post-MI. A patient study at 3d after ST-elevation MI and early reperfusion confirmed elevated 11C-methionine uptake in the hypoperfused myocardial region. Targeting of elevated amino acid metabolism in pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages enables PET imaging-derived demarcation of tissue inflammation after MI. 11C-methionine-based molecular imaging may assist in the translation of novel image-guided, inflammation-targeted regenerative therapies. PMID:27570549

  2. AT1 Receptor Modulator Attenuates the Hypercholesterolemia-Induced Impairment of the Myocardial Ischemic Post-Conditioning Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun-Wei; Hon, Yan; Wan, Qi-Lin; He, Rui-Li; Wang, Zhi-Zhong; Zhao, Cui-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Ischemic post-conditioning (PostC) has been demonstrated as a novel strategy to harness nature's protection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Hypercholesterolemia (HC) has been reported to block the effect of PostC on the heart. Angiotensin II type-1 (AT1) modulators have shown benefits in myocardial ischemia. The present study investigates the effect of a novel inhibitor of AT1, azilsartan in PostC of the heart of normocholesterolemic (NC) and HC rats. Materials and Methods HC was induced by the administration of high-fat diet to the animals for eight weeks. Isolated Langendorff's perfused NC and HC rat hearts were exposed to global ischemia for 30 min and reperfusion for 120 min. I/R-injury had been assessed by cardiac hemodynamic parameters, myocardial infarct size, release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha troponin I, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, nitrite in coronary effluent, thiobarbituric acid reactive species, a reduced form of glutathione, superoxide anion, and left ventricle collagen content in normal and HC rat hearts. Results Azilsartan post-treatment and six episodes of PostC (10 sec each) afforded cardioprotection against I/R-injury in normal rat hearts. PostC protection against I/R-injury was abolished in HC rat hearts. Azilsartan prevented the HC-mediated impairment of the beneficial effects of PostC in I/R-induced myocardial injury, which was inhibited by L-N5-(1-Iminoethyl)ornithinehydrochloride, a potent inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Conclusion Azilsartan treatment has attenuated the HC-induced impairment of beneficial effects of PostC in I/R-injury of rat hearts, by specifically modulating eNOS. Azilsartan may be explored further in I/R-myocardial injury, both in NC and HC conditions, with or without PostC. PMID:28382073

  3. Total Flavones of Choerospondias axillaris Attenuate Cardiac Dysfunction and Myocardial Interstitial Fibrosis by Modulating NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bei; Xia, Qiumei; Gao, Zhiyong

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of total flavonoids of Choerospondias axillaris (TFC) on myocardial infarction (MI)-induced cardiac dysfunction, interstitial fibrosis and inflammatory reaction and further to clarify the potential signaling pathway involved. Rats were subjected to MI via coronary artery occlusion. The model establishment was confirmed by the occurrence of ST-segment elevation in electrocardiogram. Then, TFC was administrated at doses of 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg for 28 consecutive days (gavage). Body weight and heart weight were recorded. Hemodynamics, infarct size and myocardial fibrosis were examined. Blood samples were collected to determine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6, 10 (IL-6, IL-10) levels. The expressions of matrix metalloproteinases-2, 9 (MMP-2, 9), phosphor-IKBα (p-IKBα) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were assayed by Western blot. The results indicated that TFC significantly improved cardiac dysfunction, the heart coefficient and myocardial fibrosis in MI rat. TFC also decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, but increased IL-10 content. Moreover, treatment with TFC protected the heart from chronic MI injury by decreasing the expressions of MMP-2, 9, TGF-β1 and p-IKBα. The results suggested that TFC attenuated cardiac dysfunction and myocardial interstitial fibrosis by modulating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway.

  4. Metabolic Energy of Action Potentials Modulated by Spike Frequency Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Li, Hui-Yan; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Spike frequency adaptation (SFA) exists in many types of neurons, which has been demonstrated to improve their abilities to process incoming information by synapses. The major carrier used by a neuron to convey synaptic signals is the sequences of action potentials (APs), which have to consume substantial metabolic energies to initiate and propagate. Here we use conductance-based models to investigate how SFA modulates the AP-related energy of neurons. The SFA is attributed to either calcium-activated K+ (IAHP) or voltage-activated K+ (IM) current. We observe that the activation of IAHP or IM increases the Na+ load used for depolarizing membrane, while produces few effects on the falling phase of AP. Then, the metabolic energy involved in Na+ current significantly increases from one AP to the next, while for K+ current it is less affected. As a consequence, the total energy cost by each AP gets larger as firing rate decays down. It is also shown that the minimum Na+ charge needed for the depolarization of each AP is unaffected during the course of SFA. This indicates that the activation of either adaptation current makes APs become less efficient to use Na+ influx for their depolarization. Further, our simulations demonstrate that the different biophysical properties of IM and IAHP result in distinct modulations of metabolic energy usage for APs. These investigations provide a fundamental link between adaptation currents and neuronal energetics, which could facilitate to interpret how SFA participates in neuronal information processing. PMID:27909394

  5. Streptomyces rhizobacteria modulate the secondary metabolism of Eucalyptus plants.

    PubMed

    Salla, Tamiris Daros; da Silva, Ramos; Astarita, Leandro Vieira; Santarém, Eliane Romanato

    2014-12-01

    The genus Eucalyptus comprises economically important species, such as Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus globulus, used especially as a raw material in many industrial sectors. Species of Eucalyptus are very susceptible to pathogens, mainly fungi, which leads to mortality of plant cuttings in rooting phase. One alternative to promote plant health and development is the potential use of microorganisms that act as agents for biological control, such as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Rhizobacteria Streptomyces spp have been considered as PGPR. This study aimed at selecting strains of Streptomyces with ability to promote plant growth and modulate secondary metabolism of E. grandis and E. globulus in vitro plants. The experiments assessed the development of plants (root number and length), changes in key enzymes in plant defense (polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase) and induction of secondary compounds(total phenolic and quercetinic flavonoid fraction). The isolate Streptomyces PM9 showed highest production of indol-3-acetic acid and the best potential for root induction. Treatment of Eucalyptus roots with Streptomyces PM9 caused alterations in enzymes activities during the period of co-cultivation (1-15 days), as well as in the levels of phenolic compounds and flavonoids. Shoots also showed alteration in the secondary metabolism, suggesting induced systemic response. The ability of Streptomyces sp. PM9 on promoting root growth, through production of IAA, and possible role on modulation of secondary metabolism of Eucalyptus plants characterizes this isolate as PGPR and indicates its potential use as a biological control in forestry.

  6. The Relationship of Myocardial Collagen Metabolism and Reverse Remodeling after Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Ivan; Milasinovic, Goran; Nikcevic, Gabrijela; Kircanski, Bratislav; Jovanovic, Velibor; Raspopovic, Srdjan; Radovanovic, Nikola; Pavlovic, Sinisa U.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background In the majority of patients with a wide QRS complex and heart failure resistant to optimal medical therapy, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) leads to reverse ventricular remodeling and possibly to changes in cardiac collagen synthesis and degradation. We investigated the relationship of biomarkers of myocardial collagen metabolism and volumetric response to CRT. Methods We prospectively studied 46 heart failure patients (mean age 61±9 years, 87% male) who underwent CRT implantation. Plasma concentrations of amino-terminal propeptide type I (PINP), a marker of collagen synthesis, and carboxy-terminal collagen telopeptide (CITP), a marker of collagen degradation, were measured before and 6 months after CRT. Response to CRT was defined as 15% or greater reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume at 6-month follow-up. Results Baseline PINP levels showed a negative correlation with both left ventricular end-diastolic volume (r=-0.51; p=0.032), and end-systolic diameter (r=-0.47; p=0.049). After 6 months of device implantation, 28 patients (61%) responded to CRT. No significant differences in the baseline levels of PINP and CITP between responders and nonresponders were observed (p>0.05 for both). During follow-up, responders demonstrated a significant increase in serum PINP level from 31.37±18.40 to 39.2±19.19 μg/L (p=0.049), whereas in non-responders serum PINP levels did not significantly change (from 28.12±21.55 to 34.47± 18.64 μg/L; p=0.125). There were no significant changes in CITP levels in both responders and non-responders (p>0.05). Conclusions Left ventricular reverse remodeling induced by CRT is associated with an increased collagen synthesis in the first 6 months of CRT implantation.

  7. The hepatic circadian clock modulates xenobiotic metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    DeBruyne, Jason P; Weaver, David R; Dallmann, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The circadian clock generates daily cycles of gene expression that regulate physiological processes. The liver plays an important role in xenobiotic metabolism and also has been shown to possess its own cell-based clock. The liver clock is synchronized by the master clock in the brain, and a portion of rhythmic gene expression can be driven by behavior of the organism as a whole even when the hepatic clock is suppressed. So far, however, there is relatively little evidence indicating whether the liver clock is functionally important in modulating xenobiotic metabolism. Thus, mice lacking circadian clock function in the whole body or specifically in liver were challenged with pentobarbital and acetaminophen, and pentobarbital sleep time (PBST) and acetaminophen toxicity, respectively, was assessed at different times of day in mutant and control mice. The results suggest that the liver clock is essential for rhythmic changes in xenobiotic detoxification. Surprisingly, it seems that the way in which the clock is disrupted determines the rate of xenobiotic metabolism in the liver. CLOCK-deficient mice are remarkably resistant to acetaminophen and exhibit a longer PBST, while PERIOD-deficient mice have a short PBST. These results indicate an essential role of the tissue-intrinsic peripheral circadian oscillator in the liver in regulating xenobiotic metabolism.

  8. Combination of Plant Metabolic Modules Yields Synthetic Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Fatemeh; Heene, Ernst; Maisch, Jan; Nick, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The great potential of pharmacologically active secondary plant metabolites is often limited by low yield and availability of the producing plant. Chemical synthesis of these complex compounds is often too expensive. Plant cell fermentation offers an alternative strategy to overcome these limitations. However, production in batch cell cultures remains often inefficient. One reason might be the fact that different cell types have to interact for metabolite maturation, which is poorly mimicked in suspension cell lines. Using alkaloid metabolism of tobacco, we explore an alternative strategy, where the metabolic interactions of different cell types in a plant tissue are technically mimicked based on different plant-cell based metabolic modules. In this study, we simulate the interaction found between the nicotine secreting cells of the root and the nicotine-converting cells of the senescent leaf, generating the target compound nornicotine in the model cell line tobacco BY-2. When the nicotine demethylase NtomCYP82E4 was overexpressed in tobacco BY-2 cells, nornicotine synthesis was triggered, but only to a minor extent. However, we show here that we can improve the production of nornicotine in this cell line by feeding the precursor, nicotine. Engineering of another cell line overexpressing the key enzyme NtabMPO1 allows to stimulate accumulation and secretion of this precursor. We show that the nornicotine production of NtomCYP82E4 cells can be significantly stimulated by feeding conditioned medium from NtabMPO1 overexpressors without any negative effect on the physiology of the cells. Co-cultivation of NtomCYP82E4 with NtabMPO1 stimulated nornicotine accumulation even further, demonstrating that the physical presence of cells was superior to just feeding the conditioned medium collected from the same cells. These results provide a proof of concept that combination of different metabolic modules can improve the productivity for target compounds in plant cell

  9. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury via energy metabolism regulation mediated by RhoA signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuan-Chen; Pan, Chun-Shui; Yan, Li; Li, Lin; Hu, Bai-He; Chang, Xin; Liu, Yu-Ying; Fan, Jing-Yu; Sun, Kai; -Li, Quan; Han, Jing-Yan

    2017-03-22

    Cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury remains a challenge for clinicians. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1) has been reported to have the ability to attenuate I/R injury, but its effect on energy metabolism during cardiac I/R and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. In this study, we detected the effect of Rb1 on rat myocardial blood flow, myocardial infarct size, cardiac function, velocity of venule red blood cell, myocardial structure and apoptosis, energy metabolism and change in RhoA signaling pathway during cardiac I/R injury. In addition, the binding affinity of RhoA to Rb1 was detected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Results showed that Rb1 treatment at 5 mg/kg/h protected all the cardiac injuries induced by I/R, including damaged myocardial structure, decrease in myocardial blood flow, impaired heart function and microcirculation, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, myocardial infarction and release of myocardial cTnI. Rb1 also inhibited the activation of RhoA signaling pathway and restored the production of ATP during cardiac I/R. Moreover, SPR assay showed that Rb1 was able to bind to RhoA in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that Rb1 may prevent I/R-induced cardiac injury by regulation of RhoA signaling pathway, and may serve as a potential regime to improve percutaneous coronary intervention outcome.

  10. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury via energy metabolism regulation mediated by RhoA signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuan-Chen; Pan, Chun-Shui; Yan, Li; Li, Lin; Hu, Bai-He; Chang, Xin; Liu, Yu-Ying; Fan, Jing-Yu; Sun, Kai; -Li, Quan; Han, Jing-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury remains a challenge for clinicians. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1) has been reported to have the ability to attenuate I/R injury, but its effect on energy metabolism during cardiac I/R and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. In this study, we detected the effect of Rb1 on rat myocardial blood flow, myocardial infarct size, cardiac function, velocity of venule red blood cell, myocardial structure and apoptosis, energy metabolism and change in RhoA signaling pathway during cardiac I/R injury. In addition, the binding affinity of RhoA to Rb1 was detected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Results showed that Rb1 treatment at 5 mg/kg/h protected all the cardiac injuries induced by I/R, including damaged myocardial structure, decrease in myocardial blood flow, impaired heart function and microcirculation, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, myocardial infarction and release of myocardial cTnI. Rb1 also inhibited the activation of RhoA signaling pathway and restored the production of ATP during cardiac I/R. Moreover, SPR assay showed that Rb1 was able to bind to RhoA in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that Rb1 may prevent I/R-induced cardiac injury by regulation of RhoA signaling pathway, and may serve as a potential regime to improve percutaneous coronary intervention outcome. PMID:28327605

  11. Biphasic modulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsin-Ling; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Yeh, Steve T; Zweier, Jay L; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) is the major source of reactive oxygen species during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Ischemic defect and reperfusion-induced injury to ETC are critical in the disease pathogenesis of postischemic heart. The properties of ETC were investigated in an isolated heart model of global I/R. Rat hearts were subjected to ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 1 h. Studies of mitochondrial function indicated a biphasic modulation of electron transfer activity (ETA) and ETC protein expression during I/R. Analysis of ETAs in the isolated mitochondria indicated that complexes I, II, III, and IV activities were diminished after 30 min of ischemia but increased upon restoration of flow. Immunoblotting analysis and ultrastructural analysis with transmission electron microscopy further revealed marked downregulation of ETC in the ischemic heart and then upregulation of ETC upon reperfusion. No significant difference in the mRNA expression level of ETC was detected between ischemic and postischemic hearts. However, reperfusion-induced ETC biosynthesis in myocardium can be inhibited by cycloheximide, indicating the involvement of translational control. Immunoblotting analysis of tissue homogenates revealed a similar profile in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α expression, suggesting its essential role as an upstream regulator in controlling ETC biosynthesis during I/R. Significant impairment caused by ischemic and postischemic injury was observed in the complexes I- III. Analysis of NADH ferricyanide reductase activity indicated that injury of flavoprotein subcomplex accounts for 50% decline of intact complex I activity from ischemic heart. Taken together, our findings provide a new insight into the molecular mechanism of I/R-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  12. Validity of estimates of myocardial oxidative metabolism with carbon-11 acetate and positron emission tomography despite altered patterns of substrate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Myears, D.W.; Bergmann, S.R.

    1989-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that the myocardial turnover rate constant (k) measured noninvasively with positron emission tomography (PET) after intravenous administration of (/sup 11/C)acetate provides a reliable index of myocardial oxidative metabolism (MVO/sub 2/) theoretically independent of the pattern of myocardial substrate use. However, because estimates of metabolism with other metabolic tracers are sensitive to substrate use, we measured k in 12 dogs during baseline conditions and again after infusion of either glucose (n = 8) or Intralipid (n = 4), interventions that raised arterial glucose or fatty acids by more than fivefold with concomitant changes in myocardial substrate use. Following glucose administration k increased, but no difference was detected after compensation for changes in hemodynamics and myocardial work induced by the infusion (0.18 +/- 0.03 min-1) (t1/2 = 3.9 min) at baseline compared with 0.22 +/- 0.06 min-1 (t1/2 = 3.2 min, p = N.S.). k was not affected by Intralipid infusion (k = 0.15 +/- 0.06 min-1 at baseline and 0.14 +/- 0.04 min-1 during infusion), and correlated closely with MVO/sub 2/ measured directly (n = 19 comparisons, r = 0.89). The results indicate that estimates of MVO/sub 2/ using (/sup 11/C)acetate and PET are valid despite changes in the pattern of myocardial substrate utilization.

  13. Quantitative proteomic changes during post myocardial infarction remodeling reveals altered cardiac metabolism and Desmin aggregation in the infarct region.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kaberi; Basak, Trayambak; Varshney, Swati; Sengupta, Shantanu; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2017-01-30

    Myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of cardiac dysfunction, failure and sudden death. Post infarction cardiac remodeling presents a poor prognosis, with 30%-45% of patients developing heart failure, in a period of 5-25years. Oxidative stress has been labelled as the primary causative factor for cardiac damage during infarction, however, the impact it may have during the process of post infarction remodeling has not been well probed. In this study, we have implemented iTRAQ proteomics to catalogue proteins and functional processes, participating both temporally (early and late phases) and spatially (infarct and remote zones), during post myocardial infarction remodeling of the heart as functions of the differential oxidative stress manifest during the remodeling process. Cardiac metabolism was the dominant network to be affected during infarction and the remodeling time points considered in this study. A distinctive expression pattern of cytoskeletal proteins was also observed with increased remodeling time points. Further, it was found that the cytoskeletal protein Desmin, aggregated in the infarct zone during the remodeling process, mediated by the protease Calpain1. Taken together, all of these data in conjunction may lay the foundation to understand the effects of oxidative stress on the remodeling process and elaborate the mechanism behind the compromised cardiac function observed during post myocardial infarction remodeling.

  14. Impact of the Metabolic Syndrome on the Clinical Outcome of Patients with Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Goo; Ahn, Youngkeun; Chae, Shung Chull; Hur, Seung Ho; Hong, Taek Jong; Kim, Young Jo; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Rhew, Jay Young; Chae, In Ho; Cho, Myeong Chan; Bae, Jang Ho; Rha, Seung Woon; Kim, Chong Jin; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yang Soo; Yoon, Junghan; Chung, Wook Sung; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2010-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in patients with acute myocardial infarction and its effect on clinical outcomes. Employing data from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry, a total of 1,990 patients suffered from acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) between November 2005 and December 2006 were categorized according to the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria of MS. Primary study outcomes included major adverse cardiac events (MACE) during one-year follow-up. Patients were grouped based on existence of MS: group I: MS (n=1,182, 777 men, 62.8±12.3 yr); group II: Non-MS (n=808, 675 men, 64.2±13.1 yr). Group I showed lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (P=0.005). There were no differences between two groups in the coronary angiographic findings except for multivessel involvement (P=0.01). The incidence of in-hospital death was higher in group I than in group II (P=0.047), but the rates of composite MACE during one-year clinical follow-up showed no significant differences. Multivariate analysis showed that low LVEF, old age, MS, low high density lipoprotein cholesterol and multivessel involvement were associated with high in-hospital death rate. In conclusion, MS is an important predictor for in-hospital death in patients with STEMI. PMID:20890426

  15. Vitamin A deficiency modulates iron metabolism via ineffective erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcela S B; Siqueira, Egle M A; Trindade, Luciano S; Arruda, Sandra F

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin A modulates inflammatory status, iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Given that these factors modulate the expression of the hormone hepcidin (Hamp), we investigated the effect of vitamin A deficiency on molecular biomarkers of iron metabolism, the inflammatory response and the erythropoietic system. Five groups of male Wistar rats were treated: control (AIN-93G), the vitamin A-deficient (VAD) diet, the iron-deficient (FeD) diet, the vitamin A- and iron-deficient (VAFeD) diet or the diet with 12 mg atRA/kg diet replacing all-trans-retinyl palmitate by all-trans retinoic acid (atRA). Vitamin A deficiency reduced serum iron and transferrin saturation levels, increased spleen iron concentrations, reduced hepatic Hamp and kidney erythropoietin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and up-regulated hepatic and spleen heme oxygenase-1 gene expression while reducing the liver HO-1 specific activity compared with the control. The FeD and VAFeD rats exhibited lower levels of serum iron and transferrin saturation, lower iron concentrations in tissues and lower hepatic Hamp mRNA levels compared with the control. The treatment with atRA resulted in lower serum iron and transferrin concentrations, an increased iron concentration in the liver, a decreased iron concentration in the spleen and in the gut, and decreased hepatic Hamp mRNA levels. In summary, these findings suggest that vitamin A deficiency leads to ineffective erythropoiesis by the down-regulation of renal erythropoietin expression in the kidney, resulting in erythrocyte malformation and the consequent accumulation of the heme group in the spleen. Vitamin A deficiency indirectly modulates systemic iron homeostasis by enhancing erythrophagocytosis of undifferentiated erythrocytes.

  16. Restoration of myocardial bioenergetic metabolism in swine after periods of ischemic ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Skinner, F P; Levitzky, M G; Scott, R F; Fricks, J

    1975-05-01

    Myocardial mitochondrial function and high energy phosphate levels were measured in normal swine, in swine after either 5 or 10 minutes of ischemic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) while on cardiopulmonary bypass, and in swine defibrillated after either 5 or 10 minutes of IVE. The damage to myocardial mitochondria induced by IVF, such as partial uncoupling, decreased oxygen uptake, and loss of cytochrome oxidase activity, was completely reversed almost instantly by coronary artery perfusion and the restoration of sinus rhythm. After either 5 or 10 minutes of IVF followed by coronary artery reperfusion and defibrillation, myocardial creatine phosphate (CP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) return to normal levels very rapidly. However, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels remain significantly lower than control levels. If the bioenergetic mechanisms of swine and human myocardium are similar, it appears that IVF at least for a 10 minute period produces no damage to myocardial mitochondria that is not corrected by perfusion of the coronary arteries and re-establishment of sinus rhythm. Furthermore, sinus rhythm can be re-established and maintained despite signficantly lower levels of myocardial ATP.

  17. Late-onset caloric restriction alters skeletal muscle metabolism by modulating pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Lin, Shang-Ying; Liao, Yi-Hung; Li, Zhen-Jie; Wong, Alice May-Kuen

    2015-06-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) attenuates age-related muscle loss. However, the underlying mechanism responsible for this attenuation is not fully understood. This study evaluated the role of energy metabolism in the CR-induced attenuation of muscle loss. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to evaluate the effect of CR on energy metabolism and determine its relationship with muscle mass, and 2) to determine whether the effects of CR are age dependent. Young and middle-aged rats were randomized into either 40% CR or ad libitum (AL) diet groups for 14 wk. Major energy-producing pathways in muscles, i.e., glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), were examined. We found that the effects of CR were age dependent. CR improved muscle metabolism and normalized muscle mass in middle-aged animals but not young animals. CR decreased glycolysis and increased the cellular dependency for OXPHOS vs. glycolysis in muscles of middle-aged rats, which was associated with the improvement of normalized muscle mass. The metabolic reprogramming induced by CR was related to modulation of pyruvate metabolism and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Compared with animals fed AL, middle-aged animals with CR had lower lactate dehydrogenase A content and greater mitochondrial pyruvate carrier content. Markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, including AMPK activation levels and SIRT1 and COX-IV content, also showed increased levels. In conclusion, 14 wk of CR improved muscle metabolism and preserved muscle mass in middle-aged animals but not in young developing animals. CR-attenuated age-related muscle loss is associated with reprogramming of the metabolic pathway from glycolysis to OXPHOS.

  18. Pioglitazone Attenuates Acute Cocaine Toxicity in Rat Isolated Heart: Potential Protection by Metabolic Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Guy L.; Ripper, Richard; Bern, Sarah; Lin, Bocheng; Edelman, Lucas; DiGregorio, Guido; Piano, Mariann; Feinstein, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The authors test whether cocaine depresses mitochondrial acylcarnitine exchange and if a drug that enhances glucose metabolism could protect against cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction. Methods Oxygen consumption with and without cocaine was compared in rat cardiac mitochondria using either octanoylcarnitine (lipid) or pyruvate (non-lipid) substrates. Isolated hearts from rats with or without pioglitazone-supplemented diet were exposed to cocaine. Results Cocaine 0.5mM inhibited respiration supported by octanoylcarnitine (82 +/− 10.4 and 45.7 +/− 4.24 ngatomO min −1 mg −1 protein +/− SEM, for control and cocaine treatment, respectively; p < 0.02) but not pyruvate-supported respiration (281 +/− 12.5 and 267 +/− 12.7 ngatomO min −1 mg −1 protein +/− SEM; p = 0.45). Cocaine altered contractility, lusitropy, coronary resistance and lactate production in isolated heart. These effects were each blunted in pioglitazone-treated hearts. Pioglitazone diet attenuated the drop in rate-pressure product (p = 0.002), cocaine-induced diastolic dysfunction (p = 0.04) and myocardial vascular resistance (p = 0.05) compared to controls. Lactate production was higher in pretreated hearts (p = 0.008) and in ventricular myocytes cultured with pioglitazone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Cocaine inhibited octanoylcarnitine-supported mitochondrial respiration. Pioglitazone diet significantly attenuated the effects of cocaine on isolated heart. The authors postulate that inhibition of acylcarnitine exchange could contribute to cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction and that metabolic modulation warrants further study a potential treatment for such toxicity. PMID:21487283

  19. Systemic corazonin signalling modulates stress responses and metabolism in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kubrak, Olga I.; Lushchak, Oleh V.; Zandawala, Meet

    2016-01-01

    Stress triggers cellular and systemic reactions in organisms to restore homeostasis. For instance, metabolic stress, experienced during starvation, elicits a hormonal response that reallocates resources to enable food search and readjustment of physiology. Mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its insect orthologue, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), are known for their roles in modulating stress-related behaviour. Here we show that corazonin (Crz), a peptide homologous to AKH/GnRH, also alters stress physiology in Drosophila. The Crz receptor (CrzR) is expressed in salivary glands and adipocytes of the liver-like fat body, and CrzR knockdown targeted simultaneously to both these tissues increases the fly's resistance to starvation, desiccation and oxidative stress, reduces feeding, alters expression of transcripts of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs), and affects gene expression in the fat body. Furthermore, in starved flies, CrzR-knockdown increases circulating and stored carbohydrates. Thus, our findings indicate that elevated systemic Crz signalling during stress coordinates increased food intake and diminished energy stores to regain metabolic homeostasis. Our study suggests that an ancient stress-peptide in Urbilateria evolved to give rise to present-day GnRH, AKH and Crz signalling systems. PMID:27810969

  20. Bacterial microcompartments as metabolic modules for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Esquer, C Raul; Newnham, Sarah E; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are megadalton-sized protein assemblies that enclose segments of metabolic pathways within cells. They increase the catalytic efficiency of the encapsulated enzymes while sequestering volatile or toxic intermediates from the bulk cytosol. The first BMCs discovered were the carboxysomes of cyanobacteria. Carboxysomes compartmentalize the enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) with carbonic anhydrase. They enhance the carboxylase activity of RuBisCO by increasing the local concentration of CO2 in the vicinity of the enzyme's active site. As a metabolic module for carbon fixation, carboxysomes could be transferred to eukaryotic organisms (e.g. plants) to increase photosynthetic efficiency. Within the scope of synthetic biology, carboxysomes and other BMCs hold even greater potential when considered a source of building blocks for the development of nanoreactors or three-dimensional scaffolds to increase the efficiency of either native or heterologously expressed enzymes. The carboxysome serves as an ideal model system for testing approaches to engineering BMCs because their expression in cyanobacteria provides a sensitive screen for form (appearance of polyhedral bodies) and function (ability to grow on air). We recount recent progress in the re-engineering of the carboxysome shell and core to offer a conceptual framework for the development of BMC-based architectures for applications in plant synthetic biology.

  1. Protective Effect of Qiliqiangxin Capsule on Energy Metabolism and Myocardial Mitochondria in Pressure Overload Heart Failure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfang; Wei, Cong; Wang, Hongtao; Tang, Siwen; Jia, Zhenhua; Wang, Lei; Xu, Dengfeng; Wu, Yiling

    2013-01-01

    Qiliqiangxin capsule (QL) was developed under the guidance of TCM theory of collateral disease and had been shown to be effective and safe for the treatment of heart failure. The present study explored the role of and mechanism by which the herbal compounds QL act on energy metabolism, in vivo, in pressure overload heart failure. SD rats received ascending aorta constriction (TAC) to establish a model of myocardial hypertrophy. The animals were treated orally for a period of six weeks. QL significantly inhibited cardiac hypertrophy due to ascending aortic constriction and improved hemodynamics. This effect was linked to the expression levels of the signaling factors in connection with upregulated energy and the regulation of glucose and lipid substrate metabolism and with a decrease in metabolic intermediate products and the protection of mitochondrial function. It is concluded that QL may regulate the glycolipid substrate metabolism by activating AMPK/PGC-1α axis and reduce the accumulation of free fatty acids and lactic acid, to protect cardiac myocytes and mitochondrial function. PMID:24078824

  2. Abnormal myocardial fatty acid metabolism in dilated cardiomyopathy detected by iodine-123 phenylpentadecanoic acid and tomographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ugolini, V.; Hansen, C.L.; Kulkarni, P.V.; Jansen, D.E.; Akers, M.S.; Corbett, J.R.

    1988-11-01

    The radioidinated synthetic fatty acid iodine-123 phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) has proven useful in the identification of regional abnormalities of cardiac metabolism in patients with myocardial ischemia. The present study was performed to test the hypothesis that the myocardial distribution and turnover of fatty acids, assessed noninvasively with IPPA, are altered in patients with cardiomyopathy. Nine normal volunteers and 19 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy of various etiologies underwent cardiac imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after intravenous injection of IPPA. Apical short-axis and basal short-axis sections were reconstructed and quantitatively analyzed for relative IPPA activity distribution and washout. Patients with congestive cardiomyopathy demonstrated significantly greater heterogeneity of IPPA uptake than normal subjects (maximal percent variation of activity 27 +/- 11 vs 18 +/- 4, p less than 0.01). They also demonstrated a more rapid percent washout rate than control subjects (24 +/- 8 vs 17 +/- 6 for the apical short-axis section, p less than 0.05; 26 +/- 7 vs 18 +/- 5 for the basal short-axis section, p less than 0.01). These abnormalities of fatty acid distribution and turnover were independent of the etiology of the cardiomyopathy. The degree of heterogeneity of IPPA uptake was significantly related to the patients' New York Heart Association functional class (r = 0.64, p less than 0.01). Thus, compared with normal myocardium, the myocardium of patients with congestive cardiomyopathy demonstrates a more heterogeneous distribution of fatty acid uptake, which parallels the clinical severity of the disease. Furthermore, patients with congestive cardiomyopathy demonstrate a more rapid myocardial clearance of the labeled fatty acid, as assessed with SPECT imaging.

  3. Differential effects of octanoate and heptanoate on myocardial metabolism during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an infant swine model

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Olson, Aaron K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Odd-numbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant β-oxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26–45 days old) with 8-h ECMO received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA), or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol·kg body wt−1·min−1 as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5/group). The 13-carbon (13C)-labeled substrates ([2-13C]lactate, [5,6,7-13C3]heptanoate, and [U-13C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 min before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the 13C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]-to-[ADP] ratio compared with other groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate and heptanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC compared with control. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in protein synthesis rate. In conclusion, octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate. PMID:26232235

  4. Differential Effects Of Octanoate And Heptanoate On Myocardial Metabolism During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation In An Infant Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-10-01

    Background: Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Oddnumbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant betaoxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Methods: Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26-45 days old) with 8-hour ECMO were received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA) or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol/kg body wt/min as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5 per group). The 13-Carbon (13C)-labeled substrates ([2-13C]lactate, [5,6,7-13C3]heptanoate and [U-13C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 minutes before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the 13C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]/[ADP] ratio compared with other http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpen Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition For Peer Review groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC as well as heptanoate. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in fractional protein synthesis rate. Conclusion: Octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate, while preserving protein synthesis.

  5. Myocardial viability.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Y; Kloner, R A

    1996-01-01

    Left ventricular function is a major predictor of outcome in patients with coronary artery disease. Acute ischemia, postischemic dysfunction (stunning), myocardial hibernation, or a combination of these 3 are among the reversible forms of myocardial dysfunction. In myocardial stunning, dysfunction occurs despite normal myocardial perfusion, and function recovers spontaneously over time. In acute ischemia and hibernation, there is regional hypoperfusion. Function improves only after revascularization. Evidence of myocardial viability usually relies on the demonstration of uptake of various metabolic tracers, such as thallium (thallous chloride TI 201) or fludeoxyglucose F 18, by dysfunctional myocardium or by the demonstration of contractile reserve in a dysfunctional region. This can be shown as an augmentation of function during the infusion of various sympathomimetic agents. The response of ventricular segments to increasing doses of dobutamine may indicate the underlying mechanism of dysfunction. Stunned segments that have normal perfusion show dose-dependent augmentation of function. If perfusion is reduced as in hibernating myocardium, however, a biphasic response usually occurs: function improves at low doses of dobutamine, whereas higher doses may induce ischemia and, hence, dysfunction. But in patients with severely impaired perfusion, even low doses may cause ischemia. Myocardial regions with subendocardial infarction or diffuse scarring may also have augmented contractility during catecholamine infusion due to stimulation of the subepicardial layers. In these cases, augmentation of function after revascularization is not expected. Because the underlying mechanism, prognosis, and therapy may differ among these conditions, it is crucial to differentiate among dysfunctional myocardial segments that are nonviable and have no potential to regain function, hibernating or ischemic segments in which recovery of function occurs only after revascularization, and

  6. Dunnione ameliorates cisplatin ototoxicity through modulation of NAD(+) metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Pandit, Arpana; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Lee, SeungHoon; Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2016-03-01

    Ototoxicity is an important issue in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. Numerous studies have demonstrated that cisplatin-induced ototoxicity is related to oxidative stress and DNA damage. However, the precise mechanism underlying cisplatin-associated ototoxicity is still unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) has emerged as an important regulator of energy metabolism and cellular homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that the levels and activities of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) are suppressed by the reduction of intracellular NAD(+) levels in cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. We provide evidence that the decreases in SIRT1 activity and expression facilitated by increasing poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation and microRNA-34a levels through cisplatin-mediated p53 activation aggravate the associated ototoxicity. Furthermore, we show that the induction of cellular NAD(+) levels using dunnione, which targets intracellular NQO1, prevents the toxic effects of cisplatin through the regulation of PARP-1 and SIRT1 activity. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD(+) levels by pharmacological agents could be a promising therapeutic approach for protection from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  7. Direct regulation of myocardial triglyceride metabolism by the cardiomyocyte circadian clock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintenance of circadian alignment between an organism and its environment is essential to ensure metabolic homeostasis. Synchrony is achieved by cell autonomous circadian clocks. Despite a growing appreciation of the integral relation between clocks and metabolism, little is known regarding the dir...

  8. Positron emission reconstruction tomography for the assessment of regional myocardial metabolism by the administration of substrates labeled with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ter-Pogossian, M. M.; Hoffman, E. J.; Weiss, E. S.; Coleman, R. E.; Phelps, M. E.; Welch, M. J.; Sobel, B. E.

    1975-01-01

    A positron emission transverse tomograph device was developed which provides transaxial sectional images of the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the heart. The images provide a quantitative three-dimensional map of the distribution of activity unencumbered by the superimposition of activity originating from regions overlying and underlying the plane of interest. PETT is used primarily with the cyclotron-produced radionuclides oxygen-15, nitrogen-13 and carbon-11. Because of the participation of these atoms in metabolism, they can be used to label metabolic substrates and intermediary molecules incorporated in myocardial metabolism.

  9. Effects of nicardipine on coronary blood flow, left ventricular inotropic state and myocardial metabolism in patients with angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, M F; Vincent, M F; Cheron, P; van den Berghe, G; Charlier, A A; Pouleur, H

    1985-01-01

    The effects of intravenous nicardipine (2.5 mg) on the left ventricular (LV) inotropic state, LV metabolism, and coronary haemodynamics were analysed in 22 patients with angina pectoris. Measurements were made at fixed heart rate (atrial pacing), under basal state, and during a cold pressor test. After nicardipine, coronary blood flow and oxygen content in the coronary sinus increased significantly. The indices of inotropic state increased slightly, and the rate of isovolumic LV pressure fall improved. Myocardial oxygen consumption was unchanged despite the significant reduction in pressure-rate product, but LV lactate uptake increased, particularly during the cold pressor test. When nicardipine was administered after propranolol, the indices of inotropic state were unaffected. The lack of direct effect of nicardipine on LV inotropic state was further confirmed by intracoronary injection of 0.1 and 0.2 mg in a separate group of 10 patients. It is concluded that the nicardipine-induced coronary dilatation seems to improve perfusion and aerobic metabolism in areas with chronic ischaemia, resulting in reduced lactate production and augmented oxygen consumption.

  10. Effects of nicardipine and nisoldipine on myocardial metabolism, coronary blood flow and oxygen supply in angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, M F; Vincent, M F; Van Hoof, F; Van den Berghe, G; Charlier, A A; Pouleur, H

    1984-12-01

    The effects of the calcium antagonists nicardipine and nisoldipine on left ventricular (LV) metabolism were analyzed in 32 patients with angina pectoris. Measurements were made at a fixed heart rate under the basal state and during a cold pressor test (CPT). After administration of the drugs, coronary blood flow increased significantly and the mean aortic pressure decreased by 10% (p less than 0.01) in the basal state and by 11% (p less than 0.01) during CPT. Despite the reduction in pressure-rate product, myocardial oxygen consumption was unchanged in the basal state (18 +/- 4 vs 19 +/- 4 ml/min, difference not significant) and during CPT (21 +/- 5 vs 21 +/- 5 ml/min, difference not significant); this discrepancy between a reduced pressure-rate product and an unchanged oxygen consumption was also noted when nicardipine was given after propranolol (0.1 mg/kg; 12 patients). Both agents also increased LV lactate uptake, particularly during CPT (+13 mumol/min, p less than 0.05 vs control CPT) and reduced LV glutamine production. In 10 patients in whom 14C-lactate was infused, the chemical LV lactate extraction ratio increased more than the 14C-lactate extraction ratio after administration of the drugs, indicating a reduction in LV lactate production. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that nicardipine and nisoldipine improve perfusion and aerobic metabolism in chronically ischemic areas, resulting in an augmented oxygen consumption and in a reduced lactate production.

  11. Modulators of Hepatic Lipoprotein Metabolism Identified in a Search for Small-Molecule Inducers of Tribbles Pseudokinase 1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nagiec, Marek M.; Skepner, Adam P.; Negri, Joseph; Eichhorn, Michelle; Kuperwasser, Nicolas; Comer, Eamon; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Subramanian, Aravind; Clish, Clary; Musunuru, Kiran; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Foley, Michael; Perez, Jose R.; Palmer, Michelle A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome wide association studies have linked tribbles pseudokinase 1 (TRIB1) to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Based on the observations that increased expression of TRIB1 reduces secretion of VLDL and is associated with lower plasma levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, higher plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and reduced risk for myocardial infarction, we carried out a high throughput phenotypic screen based on quantitative RT-PCR assay to identify compounds that induce TRIB1 expression in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. In a screen of a collection of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS)-derived compounds, we identified a series of benzofuran-based compounds that upregulate TRIB1 expression and phenocopy the effects of TRIB1 cDNA overexpression, as they inhibit triglyceride synthesis and apoB secretion in cells. In addition, the compounds downregulate expression of MTTP and APOC3, key components of the lipoprotein assembly pathway. However, CRISPR-Cas9 induced chromosomal disruption of the TRIB1 locus in HepG2 cells, while confirming its regulatory role in lipoprotein metabolism, demonstrated that the effects of benzofurans persist in TRIB1-null cells indicating that TRIB1 is sufficient but not necessary to transmit the effects of the drug. Remarkably, active benzofurans, as well as natural products capable of TRIB1 upregulation, also modulate hepatic cell cholesterol metabolism by elevating the expression of LDLR transcript and LDL receptor protein, while reducing the levels of PCSK9 transcript and secreted PCSK9 protein and stimulating LDL uptake. The effects of benzofurans are not masked by cholesterol depletion and are independent of the SREBP-2 regulatory circuit, indicating that these compounds represent a novel class of chemically tractable small-molecule modulators that shift cellular lipoprotein metabolism in HepG2 cells from lipogenesis to scavenging. PMID:25811180

  12. Cardiac Per2 Functions as Novel Link between Fatty Acid Metabolism and Myocardial Inflammation during Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Stephanie; Kominsky, Doug; Brodsky, Kelley; Eltzschig, Holger; Walker, Lori; Eckle, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of peripheral circadian rhyme pathways dominantly leads to metabolic disorders. Studies on circadian rhythm proteins in the heart indicated a role for Clock or Per2 in cardiac metabolism. In contrast to Clock−/−, Per2−/− mice have larger infarct sizes with deficient lactate production during myocardial ischemia. To test the hypothesis that cardiac Per2 represents an important regulator of cardiac metabolism during myocardial ischemia, we measured lactate during reperfusion in Per1−/−, Per2−/− or wildtype mice. As lactate measurements in whole blood indicated an exclusive role of Per2 in controlling lactate production during myocardial ischemia, we next performed gene array studies using various ischemia-reperfusion protocols comparing wildtype and Per2−/− mice. Surprisingly, high-throughput gene array analysis revealed dominantly lipid metabolism as the differentially regulated pathway in wildtype mice when compared to Per2−/−. In all ischemia-reperfusion protocols used, the enzyme enoyl-CoA hydratase, which is essential in fatty acid beta-oxidation, was regulated in wildtype animals only. Studies using nuclear magnet resonance imaging (NMRI) confirmed altered fatty acid populations with higher mono-unsaturated fatty acid levels in hearts from Per2−/− mice. Unexpectedly, studies on gene regulation during reperfusion revealed solely pro inflammatory genes as differentially regulated ‘Per2-genes’. Subsequent studies on inflammatory markers showed increasing IL-6 or TNFα levels during reperfusion in Per2−/− mice. In summary, these studies reveal an important role of cardiac Per2 for fatty acid metabolism and inflammation during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, respectively. PMID:23977055

  13. Circadian Clocks as Modulators of Metabolic Comorbidity in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Barandas, Rita; Landgraf, Dominic; McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder are often accompanied by metabolic dysfunction symptoms, including obesity and diabetes. Since the circadian system controls important brain systems that regulate affective, cognitive, and metabolic functions, and neuropsychiatric and metabolic diseases are often correlated with disturbances of circadian rhythms, we hypothesize that dysregulation of circadian clocks plays a central role in metabolic comorbidity in psychiatric disorders. In this review paper, we highlight the role of circadian clocks in glucocorticoid, dopamine, and orexin/melanin-concentrating hormone systems and describe how a dysfunction of these clocks may contribute to the simultaneous development of psychiatric and metabolic symptoms.

  14. Functional, metabolic and ultrastructure evidence for improved myocardial protection during severe ischaemic stress with MBS, a new crystalloid cardioplegic solution.

    PubMed

    Choong, Y S; Gavin, J B

    1996-06-01

    The duration of aortic clamping and the temperature of the arrested heart are two important factors in the overall strategy of myocardial protection with cardioplegic solutions. The isolated working rat heart was used to compare the cardioprotection effects (function, metabolism and ultrastructure) of the new "extracellular" crystalloid solution, MBS (containing glucose, aspartate and lactobionate) and St. Thomas' Hospital No. 2 (STH) during prolonged moderate hypothermic ischaemia (30 degrees C, 2 hours and 4 hours) with multidose reinfusion (2 min every 30 min interval). All MBS treated hearts (n = 9 per group) rapidly resumed spontaneous regular sinus rhythm (0.8 +/- 0.2 min) and had similar high degree of functional recovery (cardiac output: 90.2 +/- 4.5% & 80.9 +/- 3.5%, stroke volume: 89.1 +/- 4.7% & 81.9 +/- 3.4% and aortic pressure: 102.0 +/- 4.0% & 100.0 +/- 7.3% of pre-arrest values for 2 hours and 4 hours groups, respectively) during 30 min post-ischaemic reperfusion. In contrast, hearts protected with STH showed significantly (p<0.01) less recovery of left ventricular function (cardiac output: 64.3 +/- 2.9% & 5.5 +/- 3.9%, respectively) with two of the nine hearts failing to regain any cardiac pump function after 4 hours. MBS increased lactate efflux (glycolysis) and completely abolished the progressive increase in the coronary vascular resistance during 4 hours ischaemic arrest. These improvements were directly related to the significantly (p<0.01) reduced depletion of the myocardial adenosine triphosphate (13.32 +/- 1.65 vs 2.42 +/- 0.09 micromol/g dry wt) and guanosine triphosphate (1.56 +/- 0.08 vs 0.74 +/- 0.04 micromol/g dry wt) during arrest; to their enhanced repletion after reperfusion (ATP: 96% vs 36%, TAN: 90% vs 40% and GTP: 69% vs 48%); and to the absence of ultrastructural injury to cardiac myocytes and the microvasculature. We conclude that the new crystalloid cardioplegic solution MBS provides markedly improved myocardial protection

  15. Total Mechanical Unloading Minimizes Metabolic Demand of Left Ventricle and Dramatically Reduces Infarct Size in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kakino, Takamori; Arimura, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Nishikawa, Takuya; Sakamoto, Kazuo; Ikeda, Masataka; Kishi, Takuya; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) mechanically unloads the left ventricle (LV). Theoretical analysis indicates that partial LVAD support (p-LVAD), where LV remains ejecting, reduces LV preload while increases afterload resulting from the elevation of total cardiac output and mean aortic pressure, and consequently does not markedly decrease myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2). In contrast, total LVAD support (t-LVAD), where LV no longer ejects, markedly decreases LV preload volume and afterload pressure, thereby strikingly reduces MVO2. Since an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand is the fundamental pathophysiology of myocardial infarction (MI), we hypothesized that t-LVAD minimizes MVO2 and reduces infarct size in MI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differential impact of the support level of LVAD on MVO2 and infarct size in a canine model of ischemia-reperfusion. Methods In 5 normal mongrel dogs, we examined the impact of LVAD on MVO2 at 3 support levels: Control (no LVAD support), p-LVAD and t-LVAD. In another 16 dogs, ischemia was induced by occluding major branches of the left anterior descending coronary artery (90 min) followed by reperfusion (300 min). We activated LVAD from the beginning of ischemia until 300 min of reperfusion, and compared the infarct size among 3 different levels of LVAD support. Results t-LVAD markedly reduced MVO2 (% reduction against Control: -56 ± 9%, p<0.01) whereas p-LVAD did less (-21 ± 14%, p<0.05). t-LVAD markedly reduced infarct size compared to p-LVAD (infarct area/area at risk: Control; 41.8 ± 6.4, p-LVAD; 29.1 ± 5.6 and t-LVAD; 5.0 ± 3.1%, p<0.01). Changes in creatine kinase-MB paralleled those in infarct size. Conclusions Total LVAD support that minimizes metabolic demand maximizes the benefit of LVAD in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27124411

  16. Calcium-linked adjustment of myocardial metabolism to changing mechanical demands in the isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Rubányi, G; Kovách, A G

    1980-01-01

    Isolated rat hearts perfused by the modified Langendorff technique were used to study the effects of changes in perfusate calcium concentration (Cap2+) on left ventricular mechanical performance, O2-consumption, NADH-fluorescence and lactate release in the presence of glucose or pyruvate as the sole exogenous substrate. Stepwise elevation of Ca2+ from 0.31 to 7.8 mM resulted in a continuous increase of contractile activity and O2-consumption independent of the substrate present. Redox changes similar to State 3 to 4 transition (NAD+ reduction) were observed when mechanical activity was reduced by perfusing the hearts with 0.65 or 0.31 mM Cap2+, which was also substrate independent. At high Cap2+ (2.6--7.8 mM) increase of contractile activity and O2-consumption was accompanied by Cap2+ dependent NAD+ reduction in the presence of glucose. Inhibition of glycolisis by pyruvate reversed the direction of NADH response (NADH oxidation following Cap2+ elevation). Myocardial lactate relealse was increased by elevation of Cap2+ from 1.3 to 5.2 mM in the presence of glucose, but this effect was significantly inhibited in the pyruvate perfused hearts. It is concluded that NADH signal originates from both the cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH compartment. The direction of NAD+/NADH redox state changes following Cap2+ elevation is grately influenced by the substrate preferentially consumed by the heart. The data suggest that calcium increases the availability of reducing equivalents to the respiratory chain thereby ensuring adequate supply of ATP when myocardial mechanical demands are changing.

  17. Myocardial metabolism of fluorodeoxyglucose compared to cell membrane integrity for the potassium analogue rubidium-82 for assessing infarct size in man by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, K.L.; Yoshida, K.; Hess, M.J.; Haynie, M.; Mullani, N.; Smalling, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Potassium loss from damaged myocardial cells is linearly related to CPK enzyme loss reflecting extent of necrosis. The potassium analog, rubidium-82 (82Rb), is extracted after i.v. injection and retained in viable myocardium but is not trapped or washed out of necrotic regions. To compare myocardial cell metabolism with membrane dysfunction as indicators of necrosis/viability, 43 patients with evolving myocardial infarction and coronary arteriography had positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the potassium analog 82Rb. Percent of heart showing FDG defects and 82Rb washout on sequential images indicating failure to retain the potassium analogue were visually assessed and quantified by automated software. Infarct size based on rubidium kinetics correlated closely with size and location on FDG images (visual r = 0.93, automated r = 0.82), suggesting that loss of cell membrane integrity for trapping the potassium analog 82Rb parallels loss of intracellular glucose metabolism, both comparable quantitative markers of myocardial necrosis/viability.

  18. Increase in cholinergic modulation with pyridostigmine induces anti-inflammatory cell recruitment soon after acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juraci Aparecida; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; França, Cristiane Miranda; Coelho, Otávio; Alves, Gisele; Lacchini, Silvia; Kallás, Esper Georges; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M

    2016-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that an increase in the anti-inflammatory cholinergic pathway, when induced by pyridostigmine (PY), may modulate subtypes of lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, FOXP3+) and macrophages (M1/M2) soon after myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Wistar rats, randomly allocated to receive PY (40 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) in drinking water or to stay without treatment, were followed for 4 days and then were subjected to ligation of the left coronary artery. The groups-denominated as the pyridostigmine-treated infarcted (IP) and infarcted control (I) groups-were submitted to euthanasia 3 days after MI; the heart was removed for immunohistochemistry, and the peripheral blood and spleen were collected for flow cytometry analysis. Noninfarcted and untreated rats were used as controls (C Group). Echocardiographic measurements were registered on the second day after MI, and heart rate variability was measured on the third day after MI. The infarcted groups had similar MI areas, degrees of systolic dysfunction, blood pressures, and heart rates. Compared with the I Group, the IP Group showed a significant higher parasympathetic modulation and a lower sympathetic modulation, which were associated with a small, but significant, increase in diastolic function. The IP Group showed a significant increase in M2 macrophages and FOXP3(+)cells in the infarcted and peri-infarcted areas, a significantly higher frequency of circulating Treg cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)), and a less extreme decrease in conventional T cells (CD25(+)FOXP3(-)) compared with the I Group. Therefore, increasing cholinergic modulation with PY induces greater anti-inflammatory cell recruitment soon after MY in rats.

  19. Myocardial metabolism, perfusion, wall motion and electrical activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The cardiomyopathy of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy originates in the posterobasal left ventricle and extends chiefly to the contiguous lateral wall. Ultrastructural abnormalities in these regions precede connective tissue replacement. We postulated that a metabolic fault coincided with or antedated the subcellular abnormality. Accordingly, regional left ventricular metabolism, perfusion and wall motion were studied using positron computed tomography and metabolic isotopes supplemented by thallium perfusion scans, equilibrium radionuclide angiography and M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography. To complete the assessment, electrocardiograms, vectorcardiograms, 24 hour taped electrocardiograms and chest x-rays were analyzed. Positron computed tomography utilizing F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) provided the first conclusive evidence supporting the hypothesis of a premorphologic regional metabolic fault. Thus, cardiac involvement in duchenne dystrophy emerges as a unique form of heart disease, genetically targeting specific regions of ventricular myocardium for initial metabolic and subcellular changes. Reported ultrastructural abnormalities of the impulse and conduction systems provide, at least in part, a basis for the clinically observed sinus node, intraatrial, internodal, AV nodal and infranodal disorders.

  20. Metabolic mechanisms in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Houman; Frenneaux, Michael P; Opie, Lionel H

    2007-07-24

    Although neurohumoral antagonism has successfully reduced heart failure morbidity and mortality, the residual disability and death rate remains unacceptably high. Though abnormalities of myocardial metabolism are associated with heart failure, recent data suggest that heart failure may itself promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation. A detrimental self-perpetuating cycle (heart failure --> altered metabolism --> heart failure) that promotes the progression of heart failure may thus be postulated. Accordingly, we review the cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of altered metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. It is hypothesized that the ensuing detrimental myocardial energetic perturbations result from neurohumoral activation, increased adverse free fatty acid metabolism, decreased protective glucose metabolism, and in some cases insulin resistance. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine, and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. On the basis of the mechanisms outlined, appropriate therapies to mitigate aberrant metabolism include intense neurohumoral antagonism, limitation of diuretics, correction of hypokalemia, exercise, and diet. We also discuss more novel mechanistic-based therapies to ameliorate metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. For example, metabolic modulators may optimize myocardial substrate utilization to improve cardiac function and exercise performance beyond standard care. The ultimate success of metabolic-based therapy will be manifest by its capacity further to lessen the residual mortality in heart failure.

  1. Myocardial mechanical dysfunction following endotoxemia: role of changes in energy substrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soraya, Hamid; Masoud, Waleed G T; Gandhi, Manoj; Garjani, Alireza; Clanachan, Alexander S

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular depression due to endotoxemia remains a major cause of mortality in intensive care patients. To determine whether drug-induced alterations in cardiac metabolism may be a viable strategy to reduce endotoxemia-mediated cardiac dysfunction, we assessed endotoxemia-induced changes in glucose and fatty acid metabolism under aerobic and post-ischemic conditions. Endotoxemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by lipopolysaccharide (Escherichia coli 0111:B4c, 4 mg/kg, i.p.) 6 h prior to heart removal for ex vivo assessment of left ventricular (LV) work and rates of glucose metabolism (glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis and glucose oxidation) and palmitate oxidation. Under aerobic conditions, endotoxemic hearts had impaired LV function as judged by echocardiography in vivo (% ejection fraction, 66.0 ± 3.2 vs 78.0 ± 2.1, p < 0.05) or by LV work ex vivo (2.14 ± 0.16 vs 3.28 ± 0.16, Joules min(-1) g dry wt(-1), p < 0.05). However, rates of glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation were not altered. Palmitate oxidation was lower in endotoxemic hearts in proportion to the decreased workload, thus metabolic efficiency was unaffected. In hearts reperfused following global ischemia, untreated hearts had impaired recovery of LV work (52.3 ± 9.4 %) whereas endotoxemic hearts had significantly higher recovery (105.6 ± 11.3 %, p < 0.05). During reperfusion, fatty acid oxidation, acetyl CoA production and metabolic efficiency were similar in both groups. As impaired cardiac function appeared unrelated to depression of energy substrate oxidation, it is unlikely that drug-induced acceleration of fatty acid oxidation will improve mechanical function. The beneficial repartitioning of glucose metabolism in reperfused endotoxemic hearts may contribute to the cardioprotected phenotype.

  2. The AT-hook motif-encoding gene METABOLIC NETWORK MODULATOR 1 underlies natural variation in Arabidopsis primary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baohua; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of primary metabolism is a central mechanism by which plants coordinate their various responses to biotic and abiotic challenge. To identify genes responsible for natural variation in primary metabolism, we focused on cloning a locus from Arabidopsis thaliana that influences the level of TCA cycle metabolites in planta. We found that the Met.V.67 locus was controlled by natural variation in METABOLIC NETWORK MODULATOR 1 (MNM1), which encoded an AT-hook motif-containing protein that was unique to the Brassicales lineage. MNM1 had wide ranging effects on plant metabolism and displayed a tissue expression pattern that was suggestive of a function in sink tissues. Natural variation within MNM1 had differential effects during a diurnal time course, and this temporal dependency was supported by analysis of T-DNA insertion and over-expression lines for MNM1. Thus, the cloning of a natural variation locus specifically associated with primary metabolism allowed us to identify MNM1 as a lineage-specific modulator of primary metabolism, suggesting that the regulation of primary metabolism can change during evolution. PMID:25202318

  3. Septal and anterior reverse mismatch of myocardial perfusion and metabolism in patients with coronary artery disease and left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Fang, Wei; Yang, Min-Fu; Tian, Yue-Qin; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Shen, Rui; Sun, Xiao-Xin; Guo, Feng; Wang, Dao-Yu; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2015-05-01

    The effects of left bundle branch block (LBBB) on left ventricular myocardial metabolism have not been well investigated. This study evaluated these effects in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).Sixty-five CAD patients with complete LBBB (mean age, 61.8 ± 9.7 years) and 65 without LBBB (mean age, 59.9 ± 8.4 years) underwent single photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and contrast coronary angiography. The relationship between myocardial perfusion and metabolism and reverse mismatch score, and that between QRS length and reverse mismatch score and wall motion score were evaluated.The incidence of left ventricular septum and anterior wall reverse mismatching between the two groups was significantly different (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). The incidences of normal myocardial perfusion and metabolism in the left ventricular lateral and inferior walls were also significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The incidence of septal reverse mismatching in patients with mild to moderate perfusion was significantly higher among those with LBBB than among those without LBBB (P < 0.001). In CAD patients with LBBB, septal reverse mismatching was significantly more common among those with mild to moderate perfusion than among those with severe perfusion defects (P = 0.002). The correlation between the septal reverse mismatch score and QRS length was significant (P = 0.026).In patients with CAD and LBBB, septal and anterior reverse mismatching of myocardial perfusion and metabolism was frequently present; the septal reverse mismatch score negatively correlated with the QRS interval.

  4. Sodium permeability and myocardial resistance to cell swelling during metabolic blockade.

    PubMed

    Pine, M B; Kahne, D; Jaski, B; Apstein, C S; Thorp, K; Abelmann, W H

    1980-07-01

    The role of cell membrane permeability to sodium in cell volume regulation during inhibition of the sodium-potassium exchange pump with ouabain and during total metabolic blockade was evaluated in sections of guinea pig renal cortex, ventricle, and atrium incubated in Krebs-Henseleit solution. In all tissues, 2 and 3 h of ouabain and metabolic blockade resulted in similar marked losses of potassium and parallel continuous reductions in resting membrane potentials. Only metabolic blockade of renal cortex increased cell water, chloride, and total monovalent cations (potassium plus sodium) significantly. Compared to ouabain, metabolic blockade markedly increased the rate of cellular washout of 24Na+ from renal cortex (t 1/2 reduced by 47%), which was significantly greater than reductions in t 1/2 from ventricle (16%) and atrium (15%). Thus, inhibition of sodium-potassium exchange pump activity was not sufficient to produce cell swelling unless associated with marked increases in cell membrane permeability to sodium, in which case sodium influx exceeded potassium loss and substantial increases in monovalent cations, chloride, and water occurred.

  5. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of transient changes of canine myocardial metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Heineman, F W; Balaban, R S

    1990-01-01

    The time course of the relative myocardial phosphocreatine and adenosine triphosphate contents (PCr/ATP) during step changes in heart rate in vivo was studied in 14 dogs using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine if transient changes in the high energy phosphates occur with changes in cardiac work. Coronary sinus blood flow (CF), oxygen consumption (MVO2), and NMR data were simultaneously measured during brief (approximately 3 min), paced increases in heart rate in these open chest animals. 31P spectra were collected with a time resolution of 15-16 s (PCr signal to noise 22-41:1). Paced tachycardia associated with increased CF and MVO2 had no significant transient or sustained effect on PCr/ATP. Higher heart rates, associated with decreased CF and blood pressure, caused rapid decreases of PCr/ATP that were reversible upon return to control rates. These data indicate that there are no transient changes in 31P metabolites (on a 15-16-s time base) during step changes in cardiac work associated with increased CF. This lack of change demonstrates that ATP hydrolysis and production are closely matched and that the feedback mechanism linking these processes occurs rapidly with no detectable transient change in the phosphate metabolites. In contrast, when the CF response to tachycardia is insufficient PCr is quickly depleted. This latter result suggests that the PCr/ATP ratio may be a sensitive, rapidly responding indicator of coronary supply/demand mismatching in vivo. Images PMID:2312728

  6. Diet-Induced Metabolic Disturbances As Modulators of Brain Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Nguyen, AnhThao; Liu, Dr Ying; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2009-01-01

    A number of metabolic disturbances occur in response to the consumption of a high fat Western diet. Such metabolic disturbances can include the progressive development of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulemia, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Cumulatively, diet-induced disturbance in metabolism are known to promote increased morbidity and negatively impact life expectancy through a variety of mechanisms. While the impact of metabolic disturbances on the hepatic, endocrine, and cardiovascular systems are well established there remains a noticeable void in understanding the basis by which the central nervous system (CNS) becomes altered in response to diet-induced metabolic dysfunction. In particular, it remains to be fully elucidated which established features of diet-induced pathogenesis (observed in non-CNS tissues) are recapitulated in the brain, and identification as to whether the observed changes in the brain are a direct or indirect effect of peripheral metabolic disturbances. This review will focus on each of these key issues and identify some critical experimental questions which remain to be elucidated experimentally, as well as provide an outline of our current understanding for how diet-induced alterations in metabolism may impact the brain during aging and age-related diseases of the nervous system. PMID:18926905

  7. The Tumor Microenvironment Modulates Choline and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Noriko; Wildes, Flonné; Takagi, Tomoyo; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    An increase of cellular phosphocholine (PC) and total choline (tCho)-containing compounds as well as alterations in lipids have been consistently observed in cancer cells and tissue. These metabolic changes are closely related to malignant transformation, invasion, and metastasis. The study of cancer cells in culture plays an important role in understanding mechanisms leading to altered choline (Cho) and lipid metabolism in cancer, as it provides a carefully controlled environment. However, a solid tumor is a complex system with a unique tumor microenvironment frequently containing hypoxic and acidic regions and areas of nutrient deprivation and necrosis. Cancer cell–stromal cell interactions and the extracellular matrix may also alter Cho and lipid metabolism. Human tumor xenograft models in mice are useful to mimic the growth of human cancers and provide insights into the influence of in vivo conditions on metabolism. Here, we have compared metabolites, obtained with high resolution 1H MRS of extracts from human breast and prostate cancer cells in a 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture and from solid tumor xenografts derived from these cells, as well as the protein expression of enzymes that regulate Cho and lipid metabolism. Our data demonstrate significant differences in Cho and lipid metabolism and protein expression patterns between human breast and prostate cancer cells in culture and in tumors derived from these cells. These data highlight the influence of the tumor microenvironment on Cho and lipid metabolism. PMID:28066718

  8. Combined MSC and GLP-1 Therapy Modulates Collagen Remodeling and Apoptosis following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Elizabeth J.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Sherratt, Michael J.; Lewis, Andrew L.; Wallrapp, Christine; Malik, Nadim

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are being tested as treatment strategies for myocardial infarction (MI); however, their mechanisms in the heart are not fully understood. Methods. We examined the effects of MSCs, either native, or engineered to secrete a GLP-1 fusion protein (MSCs ± GLP-1), on human cardiomyocyte apoptosis in vitro. The effect on cardiac remodeling when encapsulated in alginate beads (CellBeads-MSC and CellBeads-MSC + GLP-1) was also evaluated in a pig MI model, whereby pigs were treated with Empty Beads, CellBeads-MSC, or CellBeads-MSC + GLP-1 and sacrificed at one or four weeks following MI. Results. MSC + GLP-1 conditioned media demonstrated antiapoptotic effects on ischaemic human cardiomyocytes in vitro. In vivo, qRT-PCR revealed large changes in the expression of several genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, which were altered following MSC ± GLP treatment. After four weeks, infarcted areas were imaged using atomic force microscopy, demonstrating significant alterations between groups in the structure of collagen fibrils and resulting scar. Conclusions. These data demonstrate that MSCs ± GLP-1 exhibit modulatory effects on healing post-MI, affecting both apoptosis and collagen scar formation. These data support the premise that both MSCs and GLP-1 could be beneficial in MI treatment. PMID:28003833

  9. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao . E-mail: yuhao@pharm.usyd.edu.au

    2006-01-15

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-{alpha} plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-{alpha} activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-{alpha} mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription.

  10. [Quantitative analysis of myocardial glucose metabolism by using dynamic FDG-PET acquisition].

    PubMed

    Sciumbata, Martina; Critello, Salvatore; Galea, Domenico

    2012-11-01

    In today's diagnostic imaging the heart with Pet 18F - FDG finds its highest expression in' identify the extent, severity, and the possibility of recovery of dysfunctional myocardium. Aim of this study was to extract some parameters "unique" as the regional metabolic rate, the speed of fractional irreversible binding of the tracer to the receptor sites in order to obtain a quantization of a possible damage of the tissue under examination. We used a dedicated software, the PMOD, implemented with compartmental models and graphical analysis methods in order to obtain absolute and repeatable results. In our results these parameters can give a qualitative data integration and definition to which, as is known, do not allow the identification of objective criteria to identify a possible ischemic damage and, most important, a possible recovery of dysfunctional myocardium.

  11. Size matters: plasticity in metabolic scaling shows body-size may modulate responses to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Nicholas; Sigwart, Julia D.

    2014-01-01

    Variability in metabolic scaling in animals, the relationship between metabolic rate (R) and body mass (M), has been a source of debate and controversy for decades. R is proportional to Mb, the precise value of b much debated, but historically considered equal in all organisms. Recent metabolic theory, however, predicts b to vary among species with ecology and metabolic level, and may also vary within species under different abiotic conditions. Under climate change, most species will experience increased temperatures, and marine organisms will experience the additional stressor of decreased seawater pH (‘ocean acidification’). Responses to these environmental changes are modulated by myriad species-specific factors. Body-size is a fundamental biological parameter, but its modulating role is relatively unexplored. Here, we show that changes to metabolic scaling reveal asymmetric responses to stressors across body-size ranges; b is systematically decreased under increasing temperature in three grazing molluscs, indicating smaller individuals were more responsive to warming. Larger individuals were, however, more responsive to reduced seawater pH in low temperatures. These alterations to the allometry of metabolism highlight abiotic control of metabolic scaling, and indicate that responses to climate warming and ocean acidification may be modulated by body-size. PMID:25122741

  12. Size matters: plasticity in metabolic scaling shows body-size may modulate responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Carey, Nicholas; Sigwart, Julia D

    2014-08-01

    Variability in metabolic scaling in animals, the relationship between metabolic rate ( R: ) and body mass ( M: ), has been a source of debate and controversy for decades. R: is proportional to MB: , the precise value of B: much debated, but historically considered equal in all organisms. Recent metabolic theory, however, predicts B: to vary among species with ecology and metabolic level, and may also vary within species under different abiotic conditions. Under climate change, most species will experience increased temperatures, and marine organisms will experience the additional stressor of decreased seawater pH ('ocean acidification'). Responses to these environmental changes are modulated by myriad species-specific factors. Body-size is a fundamental biological parameter, but its modulating role is relatively unexplored. Here, we show that changes to metabolic scaling reveal asymmetric responses to stressors across body-size ranges; B: is systematically decreased under increasing temperature in three grazing molluscs, indicating smaller individuals were more responsive to warming. Larger individuals were, however, more responsive to reduced seawater pH in low temperatures. These alterations to the allometry of metabolism highlight abiotic control of metabolic scaling, and indicate that responses to climate warming and ocean acidification may be modulated by body-size.

  13. Modulation of Myocardial Mitochondrial Mechanisms during Severe Polymicrobial Sepsis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Mani; Golden, Honey B.; Mullapudi, Srinivas; Dowhan, William; Dostal, David E.; Sharma, Avadhesh C.

    2011-01-01

    Background We tested the hypothesis that 5-Hydroxydecanoic acid (5HD), a putative mitoKATP channel blocker, will reverse sepsis-induced cardiodynamic and adult rat ventricular myocyte (ARVM) contractile dysfunction, restore mitochondrial membrane permeability alterations and improve survival. Methodology/Principal Findings Male Sprague-Dawley rats (350–400 g) were made septic using 400 mg/kg cecal inoculum, ip. Sham animals received 5% dextrose water, ip. The Voltage Dependent Anion Channels (VDAC1), Bax and cytochrome C levels were determined in isolated single ARVMs obtained from sham and septic rat heart. Mitochondria and cytosolic fractions were isolated from ARVMs treated with norepinephrine (NE, 10 µmoles) in the presence/absence of 5HD (100 µmoles). A continuous infusion of 5HD using an Alzet pump reversed sepsis-induced mortality when administered at the time of induction of sepsis (−40%) and at 6 hr post-sepsis (−20%). Electrocardiography revealed that 5HD reversed sepsis-induced decrease in the average ejection fraction, Simpsons+m Mode (53.5±2.5 in sepsis and 69.2±1.2 at 24 hr in sepsis+5HD vs. 79.9±1.5 basal group) and cardiac output (63.3±1.2 mL/min sepsis and 79.3±3.9 mL/min at 24 hr in sepsis+5HD vs. 85.8±1.5 mL/min basal group). The treatment of ARVMs with 5HD also reversed sepsis-induced depressed contractility in both the vehicle and NE-treated groups. Sepsis produced a significant downregulation of VDAC1, and upregulation of Bax levels, along with mitochondrial membrane potential collapse in ARVMs. Pretreatment of septic ARVMs with 5HD blocked a NE-induced decrease in the VDAC1 and release of cytochrome C. Conclusion The data suggest that Bax activation is an upstream event that may precede the opening of the mitoKATP channels in sepsis. We concluded that mitoKATP channel inhibition via decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced release of cytochrome C provided protection against sepsis-induced ARVM and myocardial

  14. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Taro; Tomita, Jun; Kume, Shoen; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts) induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine), which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  15. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate tha...

  16. Effects of substitution of Cx43 by Cx32 on myocardial energy metabolism, tolerance to ischaemia and preconditioning protection

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sinovas, Antonio; Sánchez, Jose A; González-Loyola, Alejandra; Barba, Ignasi; Morente, Miriam; Aguilar, Rio; Agulló, Esperanza; Miró-Casas, Elisatet; Esquerda, Neus; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; García-Dorado, David

    2010-01-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) plays an important role in cardioprotective signalling by mechanisms at least in part independent of gap junctional communication. To investigate whether this role is related to specific properties of this connexin isoform, we used a knock-in mouse model in which the coding region of Cx43 is replaced by that of Cx32. Homozygous Cx43KI32 mice showed reduced cell-to-cell Lucifer Yellow transfer (P < 0.01), but QRS duration and left ventricular fractional shortening (echocardiography) were similar to those in wild-type animals. NMR spectroscopy detected reduced ATP and increased lactate content in myocardium from homozygous Cx43KI32 animals (P < 0.05). Despite this, isolated homozygous Cx43KI32 hearts showed smaller infarcts after ischaemia–reperfusion (40 min/60 min) as compared to hearts from heterozygous and wild-type animals (13 and 31% reduction, respectively, P < 0.05). Cardiac myocytes isolated from Cx43KI32 mouse hearts also showed a reduced rate of cell death after simulated ischaemia–reperfusion. In a separate series of experiments, both ischaemic (4 cycles of 3.5 min of ischaemia and 5 min of reperfusion) and pharmacological (50 μmol l−1 diazoxide, 10 min) preconditioning reduced infarct size in hearts from wild-type mice (by 24.84 and 26.63%, respectively, P < 0.05), but only ischaemic preconditioning was effective in hearts from heterozygous animals and both preconditioning strategies failed to protect Cx43KI32 homozygous hearts. These results demonstrate that Cx43 has an important and previously unknown modulatory effect in myocardial energy metabolism and tolerance to ischaemia, and plays a critical role in preconditioning protection, by mechanisms that are specific for this connexin isoform. PMID:20156849

  17. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A.

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  18. Myocardial metabolism of free fatty acids. Studies with 14C-labeled substrates in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Wisneski, J A; Gertz, E W; Neese, R A; Mayr, M

    1987-01-01

    Free fatty acids are considered to be the major energy source for the myocardium. To investigate the metabolic fate of this substrate in humans, 24 subjects underwent coronary sinus and arterial catheterization. 13 subjects were healthy volunteers and 11 subjects had symptoms of ischemic heart disease. [1-14C]oleate or [1-14C]palmitate bound to albumin was infused at a constant rate of 25 microCi/h. Oxidation was determined by measuring the 14CO2 production. The data demonstrated that a high percentage (84 +/- 17%) of the palmitate and oleate extracted by the myocardium underwent rapid oxidation. A highly significant correlation was present between the arterial level and the amount oxidized (r = 0.82, P less than 0.001 for palmitate; r = 0.77, P less than 0.001 for oleate). The isotope extraction ratio was greater than the chemical extraction ratio. This difference of 6 +/- 2 nmol/ml of blood in the young normal subjects was significantly less than the 12 +/- 4 nmol/ml observed in the ischemic heart disease patients (P less than 0.001). PMID:3805273

  19. Standardized Chinese Formula Xin-Ke-Shu inhibits the myocardium Ca2+ overloading and metabolic alternations in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue-Tao; Zhou, Chao; Jia, Hong-Mei; Chang, Xing; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Xin-Ke-Shu (XKS) is a traditional Chinese patent medicine used for treatment of coronary heart diseases in China. However, its mechanism of action is still unclear. In this paper, the mediation of XKS on the isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) rat were evaluated based on a tissue-targeted metabonomics in vitro/vivo. The result indicated that twelve metabolic pathways were involved in the therapeutic effect of XKS in vivo, where seven pathways were associated with the Ca2+ overloading mechanism. In agreement with regulation on metabolic variations, XKS markedly reversed the over-expressions of three involved proteins including phospholipase A2 IIA (PLA2 IIA), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) and Pro-Caspase-3. The metabolic regulations of XKS on H9c2 cell also partially confirmed its metabolic effect. These metabolic characteristics in vitro/vivo and western blotting analysis suggested that XKS protected from MI metabolic perturbation major via inhibition of Ca2+ overloading mechanism. Furthermore, 11 active ingredients of XKS exerted steady affinity with the three proteins through the molecular docking study. Our findings indicate that the metabonomics in vitro/vivo combined with western blotting analysis offers the opportunity to gain insight into the comprehensive efficacy of TCMs on the whole metabolic network. PMID:27457884

  20. Myocardial Gene Transfer: Routes and Devices for Regulation of Transgene Expression by Modulation of Cellular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heart diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality in Western society. Gene therapy approaches are becoming promising therapeutic modalities to improve underlying molecular processes affecting failing cardiomyocytes. Numerous cardiac clinical gene therapy trials have yet to demonstrate strong positive results and advantages over current pharmacotherapy. The success of gene therapy depends largely on the creation of a reliable and efficient delivery method. The establishment of such a system is determined by its ability to overcome the existing biological barriers, including cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking as well as modulation of cellular permeability. In this article, we describe a variety of physical and mechanical methods, based on the transient disruption of the cell membrane, which are applied in nonviral gene transfer. In addition, we focus on the use of different physiological techniques and devices and pharmacological agents to enhance endothelial permeability. Development of these methods will undoubtedly help solve major problems facing gene therapy. PMID:23427834

  1. The WWOX Gene Modulates HDL and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Iatan, Iulia; Choi, Hong Y.; Ruel, Isabelle; Linga Reddy, M.V. Prasad; Kil, Hyunsuk; Lee, Jaeho; Abu Odeh, Mohammad; Salah, Zaidoun; Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Nikkola, Elina; Civelek, Mete; Awan, Zuhier; Croce, Carlo M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Pajukanta, Päivi; Aldaz, C. Marcelo; Genest, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) constitutes a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. Recent studies from our group reported a genetic association between the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene and HDL-C levels. Here, through next-generation resequencing, in vivo functional studies and gene microarray analyses, we investigated the role of WWOX in HDL and lipid metabolism. Methods and Results Using next-generation resequencing of the WWOX region, we first identified 8 variants significantly associated and perfectly segregating with the low-HDL trait in two multi-generational French Canadian dyslipidemic families. To understand in vivo functions of WWOX, we used liver-specific Wwoxhep−/− and total Wwox−/− mice models, where we found decreased ApoA-I and ABCA1 levels in hepatic tissues. Analyses of lipoprotein profiles in Wwox−/−, but not Wwox hep−/− littermates, also showed marked reductions in serum HDL-C concentrations, concordant with the low-HDL findings observed in families. We next obtained evidence of a gender-specific effect in female Wwoxhep−/− mice, where an increase in plasma triglycerides and altered lipid metabolic pathways by microarray analyses were observed. We further identified a significant reduction in ApoA-I and LPL, and upregulation in Fas, Angptl4 and Lipg, suggesting that the effects of Wwox involve multiple pathways, including cholesterol homeostasis, ApoA-I/ABCA1 pathway, and fatty acid biosynthesis/triglyceride metabolism. Conclusions Our data indicate that WWOX disruption alters HDL and lipoprotein metabolism through several mechanisms and may account for the low-HDL phenotype observed in families expressing the WWOX variants. These findings thus describe a novel gene involved in cellular lipid homeostasis, which effects may impact atherosclerotic disease development. PMID:24871327

  2. A worm of one's own: how helminths modulate host adipose tissue function and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Guigas, Bruno; Molofsky, Ari B

    2015-09-01

    Parasitic helminths have coexisted with human beings throughout time. Success in eradicating helminths has limited helminth-induced morbidity and mortality but is also correlated with increasing rates of 'western' diseases, including metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Recent studies in mice describe how type 2 immune cells, traditionally associated with helminth infection, maintain adipose tissue homeostasis and promote adipose tissue beiging, protecting against obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Here, we review these studies and discuss how helminths and helminth-derived molecules may modulate these physiologic pathways to improve metabolic functions in specific tissues, such as adipose and liver, as well as at the whole-organism level.

  3. Transcriptional Changes Associated with Long-Term Left Ventricle Volume Overload in Rats: Impact on Enzymes Related to Myocardial Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, Elise; Drolet, Marie-Claude; Walsh-Wilkinson, Elisabeth; Dhahri, Wahiba; Lachance, Dominic; Gascon, Suzanne; Sarrhini, Otman; Rousseau, Jacques A.; Lecomte, Roger; Couet, Jacques; Arsenault, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Patients with left ventricle (LV) volume overload (VO) remain in a compensated state for many years although severe dilation is present. The myocardial capacity to fulfill its energetic demand may delay decompensation. We performed a gene expression profile, a model of chronic VO in rat LV with severe aortic valve regurgitation (AR) for 9 months, and focused on the study of genes associated with myocardial energetics. Methods. LV gene expression profile was performed in rats after 9 months of AR and compared to sham-operated controls. LV glucose and fatty acid (FA) uptake was also evaluated in vivo by positron emission tomography in 8-week AR rats treated or not with fenofibrate, an activator of FA oxidation (FAO). Results. Many LV genes associated with mitochondrial function and metabolism were downregulated in AR rats. FA β-oxidation capacity was significantly impaired as early as two weeks after AR. Treatment with fenofibrate, a PPARα agonist, normalized both FA and glucose uptake while reducing LV dilation caused by AR. Conclusion. Myocardial energy substrate preference is affected early in the evolution of LV-VO cardiomyopathy. Maintaining a relatively normal FA utilization in the myocardium could translate into less glucose uptake and possibly lesser LV remodeling. PMID:26583150

  4. Pathology of acute ischemic myocardium. Special references to (I) evaluation of morphological methods for detection of early myocardial infarcts, and (II) lipid metabolism in infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, I

    1977-09-01

    Morphological changes of early myocardial infarction within 24 hours after the onset of the acute attack were described together with a review of the literatures. For the practical purpose in detecting very early infarcts, enzymatic histochemistry is the most reliable method. Other methods previously reported such as wavy pattern of the muscle fibers and fuchsinophilia are still controvertial. Lipid metabolism in the infarcted myocardium of dogs was studied both morphologically and biochemically. Up to 3 hours, after the coronary ligation, the tissue lipids accumulated in the necrotic areas with a rise of triglyceride, but later than 6 hours the lipids decreased and were lost from the necrotic tissue, while the surrounding living cells were accumulated with neutral lipids. Serum free fatty acids were elevated in the coronary sinus blood in 6 hours after the ligation. Linolic acids were contained in high proportion in both coronary venous blood after 6 hours, and normal myocardial phospholipid. These results may lead to another possible factor in addition to catecholamine activity to elevate serum FFA in acute myocardial infarction that fatty acids may be released partly from tissue phospholipid and once ever accumulated triglyceride.

  5. AMBIENT: Active Modules for Bipartite Networks - using high-throughput transcriptomic data to dissect metabolic response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the continued proliferation of high-throughput biological experiments, there is a pressing need for tools to integrate the data produced in ways that produce biologically meaningful conclusions. Many microarray studies have analysed transcriptomic data from a pathway perspective, for instance by testing for KEGG pathway enrichment in sets of upregulated genes. However, the increasing availability of species-specific metabolic models provides the opportunity to analyse these data in a more objective, system-wide manner. Results Here we introduce ambient (Active Modules for Bipartite Networks), a simulated annealing approach to the discovery of metabolic subnetworks (modules) that are significantly affected by a given genetic or environmental change. The metabolic modules returned by ambient are connected parts of the bipartite network that change coherently between conditions, providing a more detailed view of metabolic changes than standard approaches based on pathway enrichment. Conclusions ambient is an effective and flexible tool for the analysis of high-throughput data in a metabolic context. The same approach can be applied to any system in which reactions (or metabolites) can be assigned a score based on some biological observation, without the limitation of predefined pathways. A Python implementation of ambient is available at http://www.theosysbio.bio.ic.ac.uk/ambient. PMID:23531303

  6. Can Cholesterol Metabolism Modulation Affect Brain Function and Behavior?

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Veronica; Servadio, Michela; Trezza, Viviana; Pallottini, Valentina

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol is an important component for cell physiology. It regulates the fluidity of cell membranes and determines the physical and biochemical properties of proteins. In the central nervous system, cholesterol controls synapse formation and function and supports the saltatory conduction of action potential. In recent years, the role of cholesterol in the brain has caught the attention of several research groups since a breakdown of cholesterol metabolism has been associated with different neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, and interestingly also with psychiatric conditions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the connection between cholesterol dysregulation and various neurologic and psychiatric disorders based on clinical and preclinical studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 281-286, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pharmacological Modulators of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae Woo; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the principal organelle responsible for correct protein folding, a step in protein synthesis that is critical for the functional conformation of proteins. ER stress is a primary feature of secretory cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases, such as certain neurodegenerative and cardiometabolic disorders. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a defense mechanism to attenuate ER stress and maintain the homeostasis of the organism. Two major degradation systems, including the proteasome and autophagy, are involved in this defense system. If ER stress overwhelms the capacity of the cell’s defense mechanisms, apoptotic death may result. This review is focused on the various pharmacological modulators that can protect cells from damage induced by ER stress. The possible mechanisms for cytoprotection are also discussed. PMID:26840310

  8. Insulin Stimulates S100B Secretion and These Proteins Antagonistically Modulate Brain Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; de Souza, Daniela F; Biasibetti, Regina; Bobermin, Larissa D; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Brain metabolism is highly dependent on glucose, which is derived from the blood circulation and metabolized by the astrocytes and other neural cells via several pathways. Glucose uptake in the brain does not involve insulin-dependent glucose transporters; however, this hormone affects the glucose influx to the brain. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of S100B (an astrocyte-derived protein) have been associated with alterations in glucose metabolism; however, there is no evidence whether insulin modulates glucose metabolism and S100B secretion. Herein, we investigated the effect of S100B on glucose metabolism, measuring D-(3)H-glucose incorporation in two preparations, C6 glioma cells and acute hippocampal slices, and we also investigated the effect of insulin on S100B secretion. Our results showed that: (a) S100B at physiological levels decreases glucose uptake, through the multiligand receptor RAGE and mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling, and (b) insulin stimulated S100B secretion via PI3K signaling. Our findings indicate the existence of insulin-S100B modulation of glucose utilization in the brain tissue, and may improve our understanding of glucose metabolism in several conditions such as ketosis, streptozotocin-induced dementia and pharmacological exposure to antipsychotics, situations that lead to changes in insulin signaling and extracellular levels of S100B.

  9. PRMT5 modulates the metabolic response to fasting signals.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Wei; Niessen, Sherry; Goebel, Naomi; Yates, John R; Guccione, Ernesto; Montminy, Marc

    2013-05-28

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating glucagon maintain glucose balance by promoting hepatic gluconeogenesis. Triggering of the cAMP pathway stimulates gluconeogenic gene expression through the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein and via the dephosphorylation of the latent cytoplasmic CREB regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC2). CREB and CRTC2 activities are increased in insulin resistance, in which they promote hyperglycemia because of constitutive induction of the gluconeogenic program. The extent to which CREB and CRTC2 are coordinately up-regulated in response to glucagon, however, remains unclear. Here we show that, following its activation, CRTC2 enhances CREB phosphorylation through an association with the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). In turn, PRMT5 was found to stimulate CREB phosphorylation via increases in histone H3 Arg2 methylation that enhanced chromatin accessibility at gluconeogenic promoters. Because depletion of PRMT5 lowers hepatic glucose production and gluconeogenic gene expression, these results demonstrate how a chromatin-modifying enzyme regulates a metabolic program through epigenetic changes that impact the phosphorylation of a transcription factor in response to hormonal stimuli.

  10. Modulation of collagen metabolism by the nucleolar protein fibrillarin.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, F; Garnotel, R; Georges, N; Gillery, P

    2001-11-15

    Metabolic functions of fibroblasts are tightly regulated by the extracellular environment. When cultivated in tridimensional collagen lattices, fibroblasts exhibit a lowered activity of protein synthesis, especially concerning extracellular matrix proteins. We have previously shown that extracellular collagen impaired the processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in nucleoli by generating changes in the expression of nucleolar proteins and a premature degradation of neosynthesized rRNA. In this study, we have investigated whether inhibiting the synthesis of fibrillarin, a major nucleolar protein with decreased expression in collagen lattices, could mimic the effects of extracellular matrix. Monolayer-cultured fibroblasts were transfected with anti-fibrillarin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, which significantly decreased fibrillarin content. Downregulation of fibrillarin expression inhibited procollagen secretion into the extracellular medium, without altering total collagen production. No changes of pro1(I)collagen mRNA expression or proline hydroxylation were found. A concomitant intracellular retention of collagen and its chaperone protein HSP47 was found, but no effect on the production of other extracellular matrix macromolecules or remodelling enzymes was observed. These data show that collagen processing depends on unknown mechanisms, involving proteins primarily located in the nucleolar compartment with other demonstrated functions, and suggest specific links between nucleolar machinery and extracellular matrix.

  11. Light modulates metabolic pathways and other novel physiological traits in the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Müller, Gabriela L; Tuttobene, Marisel; Altilio, Matías; Martinez Amezaga, Maitena; Nguyen, Meaghan; Pamela Cribb, P; Cybulski, Larisa E; Ramírez, María Soledad; Altabe, Silvia; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2017-03-13

    Light sensing in chemotrophic bacteria has been relatively recently ascertained. In the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, light modulates motility, biofilm formation and virulence through the BLUF photoreceptor BlsA. In addition, light can induce reduction in susceptibility to certain antibiotics such as minocycline and tigecycline in a photoreceptor-independent manner. In this work we identified new traits whose expression are modulated by light in this pathogen, which comprise not only important determinants related to pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance, but also metabolic pathways, which represents a novel concept for chemotrophic bacteria. Indeed, the phenylacetic acid catabolic pathway as well as trehalose biosynthesis were modulated by light, responses that completely depend on BlsA. We further show that tolerance to some antibiotics as well as modulation of antioxidant enzyme levels are also influenced by light, likely contributing to bacterial persistence in adverse environments. Also, we present evidence indicating that surfactant production is modulated by light. Finally, the expression of whole pathways and gene clusters such as genes involved in lipid metabolism and genes encoding components of the type VI secretion system, as well as efflux pumps related to antibiotic resistance, were differentially induced by light. Overall, our results indicate that light modulates global features of A. baumannii lifestyle.Importance The discovery that non-phototrophic bacteria respond to light constituted a novel concept in microbiology. In this context, we demonstrated that light could modulate aspects related to bacterial virulence, persistence and resistance to antibiotics in the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii In this work, we present the novel finding that light directly regulates metabolism in this chemotrophic bacterium. Insights into the mechanism show the involvement of the photoreceptor BlsA. In addition, tolerance to antibiotics and

  12. Protective role of 5-azacytidine on myocardial infarction is associated with modulation of macrophage phenotype and inhibition of fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Sook; Kang, Wan Seok; Kwon, Jin Sook; Hong, Moon Hwa; Jeong, Hye-yun; Jeong, Hae Chang; Jeong, Myung Ho; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether a shift in macrophage phenotype could be therapeutic for myocardial infarction (MI). The mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was stimulated with peptidoglycan (PGN), with or without 5-azacytidine (5AZ) treatment. MI was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in rats, and the rats were divided into two groups; a saline-injection group and a 5AZ-injection group (2.5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal injection). LV function was evaluated and immunohistochemical analyses were performed 2 weeks after MI. Cardiac fibrosis was induced by angiotensin II (AngII) infusion with or without 5AZ (5 mg/kg/day) in mice. Nitric oxide was produced by PGN, which was reduced by 77.87% after 5AZ treatment. Both induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and iNOS promoter activity by PGN were inhibited by 5AZ. Ejection fraction (59.00 ± 8.03% versus 42.52 ± 2.58%), contractility (LV dP/dt-max, 8299.76 ± 411.56 mmHg versus 6610.36 ± 282.37 mmHg) and relaxation indices (LV dP/dt-min, −4661.37 ± 210.73 mmHg versus −4219.50 ± 162.98 mmHg) were improved after 5AZ administration. Cardiac fibrosis in the MI+5AZ was 8.14 ± 1.00%, compared with 14.93 ± 2.98% in the MI group (P < 0.05). Arginase-1(+)CD68(+) macrophages with anti-inflammatory phenotype were predominant in the infarct border zone of the MI+5AZ group, in comparison with the MI group. AngII-induced cardiac fibrosis was also attenuated after 5AZ administration. In cardiac fibroblasts, pro-fibrotic mediators and cell proliferation were increased by AngII, and these increases were attenuated after 5AZ treatment. 5AZ exerts its cardiac protective role through modulation of macrophages and cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:24571348

  13. Ecology Drives the Distribution of Specialized Tyrosine Metabolism Modules in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Greene, George H.; McGary, Kriston L.; Rokas, Antonis; Slot, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene clusters encoding accessory or environmentally specialized metabolic pathways likely play a significant role in the evolution of fungal genomes. Two such gene clusters encoding enzymes associated with the tyrosine metabolism pathway (KEGG #00350) have been identified in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. The l-tyrosine degradation (TD) gene cluster encodes a functional module that facilitates breakdown of the phenolic amino acid, l-tyrosine through a homogentisate intermediate, but is also involved in the production of pyomelanin, a fungal pathogenicity factor. The gentisate catabolism (GC) gene cluster encodes a functional module likely involved in phenolic compound degradation, which may enable metabolism of biphenolic stilbenes in multiple lineages. Our investigation of the evolution of the TD and GC gene clusters in 214 fungal genomes revealed spotty distributions partially shaped by gene cluster loss and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Specifically, a TD gene cluster shows evidence of HGT between the extremophilic, melanized fungi Exophiala dermatitidis and Baudoinia compniacensis, and a GC gene cluster shows evidence of HGT between Sordariomycete and Dothideomycete grass pathogens. These results suggest that the distribution of specialized tyrosine metabolism modules is influenced by both the ecology and phylogeny of fungal species. PMID:24391152

  14. Nitroso-Redox Balance and Modulation of Basal Myocardial Function: An Update from the Italian Society of Cardiovascular Research (SIRC).

    PubMed

    Tocchetti, Carlo G; Molinaro, Marilisa; Angelone, Tommaso; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Madonna, Rosalinda; Mangiacapra, Fabio; Moccia, Francesco; Penna, Claudia; Sartiani, Laura; Quaini, Federico; Pagliaro, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are produced endogenously by cardiomyocytes and are fundamental signaling molecules that regulate cellular function. Production of ROS and RNS is finely tuned to maintain proper myocardial function, but is altered in many pathophysiological conditions, therefore contributing to worsening myocardial dysfunction and ultimately heart failure. Indeed, an excess of ROS and RNS is central in many pathways leading to cardiac hypertrophy and failure, and the correct regulation of the nitroso-redox balance is fundamental for the function of the main components of the EC-coupling machinery. Broad antioxidant therapies have been proposed to improve myocardial function, but these therapies blunt even physiological ROS and RNS signaling, bringing limited, if any, beneficial effect. On the other hand, more targeted interventions on specific sources or pathways may produce promising results.

  15. Light quality modulates metabolic synchronization over the diel phases of crassulacean acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M.; Taybi, Tahar; Frans, Mario; Godts, Christof; De Proft, Maurice P.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal compartmentation of carboxylation processes is a defining feature of crassulacean acid metabolism and involves circadian control of key metabolic and transport steps that regulate the supply and demand for carbon over a 24h cycle. Recent insights on the molecular workings of the circadian clock and its connection with environmental inputs raise new questions on the importance of light quality and, by analogy, certain photoreceptors for synchronizing the metabolic components of CAM. The present work tested the hypothesis that optimal coupling of stomatal conductance, net CO2 uptake, and the reciprocal turnover of carbohydrates and organic acids over the diel CAM cycle requires both blue and red light input signals. Contrasting monochromatic wavelengths of blue, green, and red light (i.e. 475, 530, 630nm) with low fluence rates (10 μmol m–2 s–1) were administered for 16 hours each diel cycle for a total treatment time of 48 hours to the obligate CAM bromeliad, Aechmea ‘Maya’. Of the light treatments imposed, low-fluence blue light was a key determinant in regulating stomatal responses, organic acid mobilization from the vacuole, and daytime decarboxylation. However, the reciprocal relationship between starch and organic acid turnover that is typical for CAM was uncoupled under low-fluence blue light. Under low-fluence red or green light, the diel turnover of storage carbohydrates was orchestrated in line with the requirements of CAM, but a consistent delay in acid consumption at dawn compared with plants under white or low-fluence blue light was noted. Consistent with the acknowledged influences of both red and blue light as input signals for the circadian clock, the data stress the importance of both red and blue-light signalling pathways for synchronizing the metabolic and physiological components of CAM over the day/night cycle. PMID:24803500

  16. Red wine polyphenols modulate fecal microbiota and reduce markers of the metabolic syndrome in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Sánchez-Alcoholado, Lidia; Pérez-Martínez, Pablo; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina; Cardona, Fernando; Tinahones, Francisco; Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the possible prebiotic effect of a moderate intake of red wine polyphenols on the modulation of the gut microbiota composition and the improvement in the risk factors for the metabolic syndrome in obese patients. Ten metabolic syndrome patients and ten healthy subjects were included in a randomized, crossover, controlled intervention study. After a washout period, the subjects consumed red wine and de-alcoholized red wine over a 30 day period for each. The dominant bacterial composition did not differ significantly between the study groups after the two red wine intake periods. In the metabolic syndrome patients, red wine polyphenols significantly increased the number of fecal bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus (intestinal barrier protectors) and butyrate-producing bacteria (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Roseburia) at the expense of less desirable groups of bacteria such as LPS producers (Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae). The changes in gut microbiota in these patients could be responsible for the improvement in the metabolic syndrome markers. Modulation of the gut microbiota by using red wine could be an effective strategy for managing metabolic diseases associated with obesity.

  17. Experimental study on trace chemical contaminant generation rates of human metabolism in spacecraft crew module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihua, Guo; Xinxing, He; Guoxin, Xu; Xin, Qi

    2012-12-01

    Trace chemical contaminants generated by human metabolism is a major source of contamination in spacecraft crew module. In this research, types and generation rates of pollutants from human metabolism were determined in the Chinese diets. Expired air, skin gas, and sweat of 20 subjects were analyzed at different exercise states in a simulated module. The exercise states were designed according to the basic activities in the orbit of astronauts. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of contaminants generated by human metabolic were performed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, gas chromatography and UV spectrophotometer. Sixteen chemical compounds from metabolic sources were found. With the increase in physical load, the concentrations of chemical compounds from human skin and expired air correspondingly increased. The species and the offgassing rates of pollutants from human metabolism are different among the Chinese, Americans and the Russians due to differences in ethnicity and dietary customs. This research provides data to aid in the design, development and operation of China's long duration space mission.

  18. Sequential changes of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function in myocardial infarction induced by isoproterenol in rats: a long-term and integrative study.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R; López-Barrera, F; Yañez, L; Vidrio, S; Suárez, J; Cota-Garza, M D; Aranda-Fraustro, A; Cruz, D

    1997-12-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is the second cause of mortality in most countries, therefore, it is important to know the evolution and sequence of the physiological and biochemical changes involved in this pathology. This study attempts to integrate these changes and to correlate them in a long-term model (96 h) of isoproterenol-induced myocardial cell damage in the rat. We achieved an infarct-like damage in the apex region of the left ventricle, occurring 12-24 h after isoproterenol administration. The lesion was defined by histological criteria, continuous telemetric ECG recordings, and the increase in serum marker enzymes, specific for myocardial damage. A distinction is made among preinfarction, infarction, and postinfarction. Three minutes after drug administration, there was a 60% increase in heart rate and a lowering of blood pressure, resulting possibly in a functional ischemia. Ultrastructural changes and mitochondrial swelling were evident from the first hour of treatment, but functional alterations in isolated mitochondria, such as decreases in oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient, ATP synthesis, and membrane potential, were noticed only 6 h after drug administration and lasted until 72 h later. Mitochondrial proteins decreased after 3 h of treatment, reaching almost a 50% diminution, which was maintained during the whole study. An energy imbalance, reflected by a decrease in energy charge and in the creatine phosphate/creatine ratio, was observed after 30 min of treatment; however, ATP and total adenine nucleotides diminished clearly only after 3 h of treatment. All these alterations reached a maximum at the onset of infarction and were accompanied by damage to the myocardial function, drastically decreasing left ventricular pressure and shortening the atrioventricular interval. During postinfarction, a partial recovery of energy charge, creatine phosphate/creatine ratio, membrane potential, and myocardial function occurred, but not of mitochondrial

  19. Sulfur and adenine metabolisms are linked, and both modulate sulfite resistance in wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Agustín; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Del Olmo, Marcellí

    2006-08-09

    Sulfite treatment is the most common way to prevent grape must spoilage in winemaking because the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is particularly resistant to this chemical. In this paper we report that sulfite resistance depends on sulfur and adenine metabolism. The amount of adenine and methionine in a chemically defined growth medium modulates sulfite resistance of wine yeasts. Mutations in the adenine biosynthetic pathway or the presence of adenine in a synthetic minimal culture medium increase sulfite resistance. The presence of methionine has the opposite effect, inducing a higher sensitivity to SO(2). The concentration of methionine, adenine, and sulfite in a synthetic grape must influences the progress of fermentation and at the transcriptional level the expression of genes involved in sulfur (MET16), adenine (ADE4), and acetaldehyde (ALD6) metabolism. Sulfite alters the pattern of expression of all these genes. This fact indicates that the response to this stress is complex and involves several metabolic pathways.

  20. Wine lees modulate lipid metabolism and induce fatty acid remodelling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Caro, M; Sansone, A; Amezaga, J; Navarro, V; Ferreri, C; Tueros, I

    2017-03-21

    This study investigates the ability of a polyphenolic extract obtained from a wine lees by-product to modulate zebrafish lipid metabolism. Lees from a Spanish winery were collected and the polyphenolic extract was chemically characterised in terms of antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content and the individual main phenolic compounds. The effects of the extract on lipid metabolism were evaluated using a zebrafish animal model. Lees are rich in polyphenols (42.33 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry matter) with high antioxidant capacity (56.04 mg Trolox equivalent per g dry matter), rutin and quercetin being their main identified polyphenols. The biological effects of lees extract included (i) a reduction in zebrafish embryos' fat reserve (40%), (ii) changes in the expression of lipid metabolism key genes, (iii) remodelling of the fatty acid content in phospholipid and triglyceride fractions of zebrafish embryos and (iv) reduction in the trans fatty acid content. On the whole, wine lees polyphenolic extract was effective at modulating zebrafish lipid metabolism evidencing remodelling effects and antioxidant properties that can be further developed for food innovation.

  1. Adipose tissue branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism modulates circulating BCAA levels.

    PubMed

    Herman, Mark A; She, Pengxiang; Peroni, Odile D; Lynch, Christopher J; Kahn, Barbara B

    2010-04-09

    Whereas the role of adipose tissue in glucose and lipid homeostasis is widely recognized, its role in systemic protein and amino acid metabolism is less well-appreciated. In vitro and ex vivo experiments suggest that adipose tissue can metabolize substantial amounts of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs). However, the role of adipose tissue in regulating BCAA metabolism in vivo is controversial. Interest in the contribution of adipose tissue to BCAA metabolism has been renewed with recent observations demonstrating down-regulation of BCAA oxidation enzymes in adipose tissue in obese and insulin-resistant humans. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we observe alterations in adipose-tissue BCAA enzyme expression caused by adipose-selective genetic alterations in the GLUT4 glucose-transporter expression. We show that the rate of adipose tissue BCAA oxidation per mg of tissue from normal mice is higher than in skeletal muscle. In mice overexpressing GLUT4 specifically in adipose tissue, we observe coordinate down-regulation of BCAA metabolizing enzymes selectively in adipose tissue. This decreases BCAA oxidation rates in adipose tissue, but not in muscle, in association with increased circulating BCAA levels. To confirm the capacity of adipose tissue to modulate circulating BCAA levels in vivo, we demonstrate that transplantation of normal adipose tissue into mice that are globally defective in peripheral BCAA metabolism reduces circulating BCAA levels by 30% (fasting)-50% (fed state). These results demonstrate for the first time the capacity of adipose tissue to catabolize circulating BCAAs in vivo and that coordinate regulation of adipose-tissue BCAA enzymes may modulate circulating BCAA levels.

  2. Modules of co-regulated metabolites in turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizome suggest the existence of biosynthetic modules in plant specialized metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhengzhi; Ma, Xiaoqiang; Gang, David R

    2009-01-01

    Turmeric is an excellent example of a plant that produces large numbers of metabolites from diverse metabolic pathways or networks. It is hypothesized that these metabolic pathways or networks contain biosynthetic modules, which lead to the formation of metabolite modules-groups of metabolites whose production is co-regulated and biosynthetically linked. To test whether such co-regulated metabolite modules do exist in this plant, metabolic profiling analysis was performed on turmeric rhizome samples that were collected from 16 different growth and development treatments, which had significant impacts on the levels of 249 volatile and non-volatile metabolites that were detected. Importantly, one of the many co-regulated metabolite modules that were indeed readily detected in this analysis contained the three major curcuminoids, whereas many other structurally related diarylheptanoids belonged to separate metabolite modules, as did groups of terpenoids. The existence of these co-regulated metabolite modules supported the hypothesis that the 3-methoxyl groups on the aromatic rings of the curcuminoids are formed before the formation of the heptanoid backbone during the biosynthesis of curcumin and also suggested the involvement of multiple polyketide synthases with different substrate selectivities in the formation of the array of diarylheptanoids detected in turmeric. Similar conclusions about terpenoid biosynthesis could also be made. Thus, discovery and analysis of metabolite modules can be a powerful predictive tool in efforts to understand metabolism in plants.

  3. Alterations in myocardial metabolism and function at rest in stable angina pectoris: relations with the amount of exercise-induced thallium-201 perfusion defect

    SciTech Connect

    De Kock, M.; Melin, J.A.; Pouleur, H.; Rousseau, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    The relation between the amount of exercise-induced ischemia and alterations in left ventricular (LV) function and metabolism at rest was studied in 18 coronary patients with stable angina pectoris. An ischemic defect area score was computed from quantitative exercise thallium-201 (Tl-201) scintigraphy; this estimation of the amount of ischemic myocardium was used to classify the patients in group I (n = 8; score less than 15%, mean 6.7 +/- 2.5%) and II (n = 10; score greater than 15%; mean 27.2 +/- 8.9%). Hemodynamics and metabolism were studied in basal state. No patient had anginal pain during the study, and the extent of angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD) was comparable in the two groups. Heart rate, aortic pressure, coronary blood flow, and myocardial oxygen uptake were also similar in both groups. However, ejection fraction was reduced in group II (51 +/- 13 vs 63 +/- 5%; p less than 0.01) and LV relaxation was impaired as shown by the increase in time-constant of isovolumic pressure fall (55 +/- 16 vs 44 +/- 6 ms in group I; p less than 0.05); the LV end-diastolic pressure was also increased in group II (19 +/- 8 vs 10 +/- 4 mmHg in group l; p less than 0.05). Furthermore, in group II, myocardial lactate uptake was reduced (4 +/- 19 vs 30 +/- 29 mumole/min in group I; p less than 0.01) and the productions of alanine and glutamine were augmented (-7.5 +/- 4.4 vs -4.6 +/- 1.6 mumole/min in group I; p less than 0.05).

  4. BAP1 inhibits the ER stress gene regulatory network and modulates metabolic stress response.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fangyan; Lee, Hyemin; Zhang, Yilei; Zhuang, Li; Yao, Hui; Xi, Yuanxin; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; You, M James; Li, Wei; Su, Xiaoping; Gan, Boyi

    2017-03-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is classically linked to metabolic homeostasis via the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), which is instructed by multiple transcriptional regulatory cascades. BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a tumor suppressor with de-ubiquitinating enzyme activity and has been implicated in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Here we show that BAP1 inhibits cell death induced by unresolved metabolic stress. This prosurvival role of BAP1 depends on its de-ubiquitinating activity and correlates with its ability to dampen the metabolic stress-induced UPR transcriptional network. BAP1 inhibits glucose deprivation-induced reactive oxygen species and ATP depletion, two cellular events contributing to the ER stress-induced cell death. In line with this, Bap1 KO mice are more sensitive to tunicamycin-induced renal damage. Mechanically, we show that BAP1 represses metabolic stress-induced UPR and cell death through activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and reveal that BAP1 binds to ATF3 and CHOP promoters and inhibits their transcription. Taken together, our results establish a previously unappreciated role of BAP1 in modulating the cellular adaptability to metabolic stress and uncover a pivotal function of BAP1 in the regulation of the ER stress gene-regulatory network. Our study may also provide new conceptual framework for further understanding BAP1 function in cancer.

  5. BAP1 inhibits the ER stress gene regulatory network and modulates metabolic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fangyan; Lee, Hyemin; Zhang, Yilei; Zhuang, Li; Yao, Hui; Xi, Yuanxin; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; You, M. James; Li, Wei; Su, Xiaoping; Gan, Boyi

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is classically linked to metabolic homeostasis via the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), which is instructed by multiple transcriptional regulatory cascades. BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a tumor suppressor with de-ubiquitinating enzyme activity and has been implicated in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Here we show that BAP1 inhibits cell death induced by unresolved metabolic stress. This prosurvival role of BAP1 depends on its de-ubiquitinating activity and correlates with its ability to dampen the metabolic stress-induced UPR transcriptional network. BAP1 inhibits glucose deprivation-induced reactive oxygen species and ATP depletion, two cellular events contributing to the ER stress-induced cell death. In line with this, Bap1 KO mice are more sensitive to tunicamycin-induced renal damage. Mechanically, we show that BAP1 represses metabolic stress-induced UPR and cell death through activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and reveal that BAP1 binds to ATF3 and CHOP promoters and inhibits their transcription. Taken together, our results establish a previously unappreciated role of BAP1 in modulating the cellular adaptability to metabolic stress and uncover a pivotal function of BAP1 in the regulation of the ER stress gene-regulatory network. Our study may also provide new conceptual framework for further understanding BAP1 function in cancer. PMID:28275095

  6. Repurposing Resveratrol and Fluconazole To Modulate Human Cytochrome P450-Mediated Arachidonic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbeni, Ahmed A; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2016-04-04

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to several biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Repurposing clinically-approved drugs could provide safe and readily available means to control EETs and HETEs levels in humans. Our aim was to determine how to significantly and selectively modulate P450-AA metabolism in humans by clinically-approved drugs. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine the formation of 15 AA metabolites by human recombinant P450 enzymes, as well as human liver and kidney microsomes. CYP2C19 showed the highest EET-forming activity, while CYP1B1 and CYP2C8 showed the highest midchain HETE-forming activities. CYP1A1 and CYP4 showed the highest subterminal- and 20-HETE-forming activity, respectively. Resveratrol and fluconazole produced the most selective and significant modulation of hepatic P450-AA metabolism, comparable to investigational agents. Monte Carlo simulations showed that 90% of human population would experience a decrease by 6-22%, 16-39%, and 16-35% in 16-, 18-, and 20-HETE formation, respectively, after 2.5 g daily of resveratrol, and by 22-31% and 14-23% in 8,9- and 14,15-EET formation after 50 mg of fluconazole. In conclusion, clinically-approved drugs can provide selective and effective means to modulate P450-AA metabolism, comparable to investigational drugs. Resveratrol and fluconazole are good candidates to be repurposed as new P450-based treatments.

  7. Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pols, Thijs W.H.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Vos, Mariska; Levels, Johannes H.M.; Quax, Paul H.A.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Pannekoek, Hans; Groen, Albert K.; Vries, Carlie J.M. de

    2008-02-22

    NR4A nuclear receptors are induced in the liver upon fasting and regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we studied the role of nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) in hepatic lipid metabolism. We generated mice expressing hepatic Nur77 using adenoviral vectors, and demonstrate that these mice exhibit a modulation of the plasma lipid profile and a reduction in hepatic triglyceride. Expression analysis of >25 key genes involved in lipid metabolism revealed that Nur77 inhibits SREBP1c expression. This results in decreased SREBP1c activity as is illustrated by reduced expression of its target genes stearoyl-coA desaturase-1, mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, fatty acid synthase and the LDL receptor, and provides a mechanism for the physiological changes observed in response to Nur77. Expression of LXR target genes Abcg5 and Abcg8 is reduced by Nur77, and may suggest involvement of LXR in the inhibitory action of Nur77 on SREBP1c expression. Taken together, our study demonstrates that Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity.

  8. Modulation of the arginase pathway in the context of microbial pathogenesis: a metabolic enzyme moonlighting as an immune modulator.

    PubMed

    Das, Priyanka; Lahiri, Amit; Lahiri, Ayan; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2010-06-17

    Arginine is a crucial amino acid that serves to modulate the cellular immune response during infection. Arginine is also a common substrate for both inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and arginase. The generation of nitric oxide from arginine is responsible for efficient immune response and cytotoxicity of host cells to kill the invading pathogens. On the other hand, the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea via the arginase pathway can support the growth of bacterial and parasitic pathogens. The competition between iNOS and arginase for arginine can thus contribute to the outcome of several parasitic and bacterial infections. There are two isoforms of vertebrate arginase, both of which catalyze the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, but they differ with regard to tissue distribution and subcellular localization. In the case of infection with Mycobacterium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Helicobacter, Schistosoma, and Salmonella spp., arginase isoforms have been shown to modulate the pathology of infection by various means. Despite the existence of a considerable body of evidence about mammalian arginine metabolism and its role in immunology, the critical choice to divert the host arginine pool by pathogenic organisms as a survival strategy is still a mystery in infection biology.

  9. Human Placenta-Derived Multipotent Cells (hPDMCs) Modulate Cardiac Injury: From Bench to Small and Large Animal Myocardial Ischemia Studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hung; Peng, Kai-Yen; Chiu, Yu-Wei; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Wang, Yao-Horng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Huang, Shih-Yun; Lin, Yi-Shuan; de Vries, Antoine A F; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Lee, Nan-Ting; Yen, B Linju; Yen, Men-Luh

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death globally, and stem cell therapy remains one of the most promising strategies for regeneration or repair of the damaged heart. We report that human placenta-derived multipotent cells (hPDMCs) can modulate cardiac injury in small and large animal models of myocardial ischemia (MI) and elucidate the mechanisms involved. We found that hPDMCs can undergo in vitro cardiomyogenic differentiation when cocultured with mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes. Moreover, hPDMCs exert strong proangiogenic responses in vitro toward human endothelial cells mediated by secretion of hepatocyte growth factor, growth-regulated oncogene-α, and interleukin-8. To test the in vivo relevance of these results, small and large animal models of acute MI were induced in mice and minipigs, respectively, by permanent left anterior descending (LAD) artery ligation, followed by hPDMC or culture medium-only implantation with follow-up for up to 8 weeks. Transplantation of hPDMCs into mouse heart post-acute MI induction improved left ventricular function, with significantly enhanced vascularity in the cell-treated group. Furthermore, in minipigs post-acute MI induction, hPDMC transplantation significantly improved myocardial contractility compared to the control group (p = 0.016) at 8 weeks postinjury. In addition, tissue analysis confirmed that hPDMC transplantation induced increased vascularity, cardiomyogenic differentiation, and antiapoptotic effects. Our findings offer evidence that hPDMCs can modulate cardiac injury in both small and large animal models, possibly through proangiogenesis, cardiomyogenesis, and suppression of cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Our study offers mechanistic insights and preclinical evidence on using hPDMCs as a therapeutic strategy to treat severe cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Garner, Ron E; McKallip, Robert J; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min) using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day) was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02%) vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05). These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy. PMID:26648693

  11. Carbon monoxide and mitochondria—modulation of cell metabolism, redox response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Ana S.; Figueiredo-Pereira, Cláudia; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenously produced gasotransmitter, which is associated with cytoprotection and cellular homeostasis in several distinct cell types and tissues. CO mainly targets mitochondria because: (i) mitochondrial heme-proteins are the main potential candidates for CO to bind, (ii) many CO's biological actions are dependent on mitochondrial ROS signaling and (iii) heme is generated in the mitochondrial compartment. Mitochondria are the key cell energy factory, producing ATP through oxidative phosphorylation and regulating cell metabolism. These organelles are also implicated in many cell signaling pathways and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Finally, mitochondria contain several factors activating programmed cell death pathways, which are released from the mitochondrial inter-membrane space upon mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Therefore, disclosing CO mode of action at mitochondria opens avenues for deeper understanding CO's biological properties. Herein, it is discussed how CO affects the three main aspects of mitochondrial modulation of cell function: metabolism, redox response and cell death. PMID:25709582

  12. Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis: Modulator of Host Metabolism and Appetite.

    PubMed

    van de Wouw, Marcel; Schellekens, Harriët; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2017-03-29

    The gut harbors an enormous diversity of microbes that are essential for the maintenance of homeostasis in health and disease. A growing body of evidence supports the role of this microbiota in influencing host appetite and food intake. Individual species within the gut microbiota are under selective pressure arising from nutrients available and other bacterial species present. Each bacterial species within the gut aims to increase its own fitness, habitat, and survival via specific fermentation of dietary nutrients and secretion of metabolites, many of which can influence host appetite and eating behavior by directly affecting nutrient sensing and appetite and satiety-regulating systems. These include microbiota-produced neuroactives and short-chain fatty acids. In addition, the gut microbiota is able to manipulate intestinal barrier function, interact with bile acid metabolism, modulate the immune system, and influence host antigen production, thus indirectly affecting eating behavior. A growing body of evidence indicates that there is a crucial role for the microbiota in regulating different aspects of eating-related behavior, as well as behavioral comorbidities of eating and metabolic disorders. The importance of intestinal microbiota composition has now been shown in obesity, anorexia nervosa, and forms of severe acute malnutrition. Understanding the mechanisms in which the gut microbiota can influence host appetite and metabolism will provide a better understanding of conditions wherein appetite is dysregulated, such as obesity and other metabolic or eating disorders, leading to novel biotherapeutic strategies.

  13. Insulin Is a Key Modulator of Fetoplacental Endothelium Metabolic Disturbances in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sobrevia, Luis; Salsoso, Rocío; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Barros, Eric; Toledo, Lilian; Silva, Luis; Pizarro, Carolina; Subiabre, Mario; Villalobos, Roberto; Araos, Joaquín; Toledo, Fernando; González, Marcelo; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Farías, Marcelo; Chiarello, Delia I.; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a disease of the mother that associates with altered fetoplacental vascular function. GDM-associated maternal hyperglycaemia result in fetal hyperglycaemia, a condition that leads to fetal hyperinsulinemia and altered L-arginine transport and synthesis of nitric oxide, i.e., endothelial dysfunction. These alterations in the fetoplacental endothelial function are present in women with GDM that were under diet or insulin therapy. Since these women and their newborn show normal glycaemia at term, other factors or conditions could be altered and/or not resolved by restoring normal level of circulating D-glucose. GDM associates with metabolic disturbances, such as abnormal handling of the locally released vasodilator adenosine, and biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol lipoproteins, or metabolic diseases resulting in endoplasmic reticulum stress and altered angiogenesis. Insulin acts as a potent modulator of all these phenomena under normal conditions as reported in primary cultures of cells obtained from the human placenta; however, GDM and the role of insulin regarding these alterations in this disease are poorly understood. This review focuses on the potential link between insulin and endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypercholesterolemia, and angiogenesis in GDM in the human fetoplacental vasculature. Based in reports in primary culture placental endothelium we propose that insulin is a factor restoring endothelial function in GDM by reversing ERS, hypercholesterolaemia and angiogenesis to a physiological state involving insulin activation of insulin receptor isoforms and adenosine receptors and metabolism in the human placenta from GDM pregnancies. PMID:27065887

  14. Murine Gut Microbiota Is Defined by Host Genetics and Modulates Variation of Metabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Williams, Evan G.; Brewer, Simon; Andreux, Pénélope A.; Bastiaansen, John W. M.; Wang, Xusheng; Kachman, Stephen D.; Auwerx, Johan; Williams, Robert W.; Benson, Andrew K.; Peterson, Daniel A.; Ciobanu, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract harbors a complex and diverse microbiota that has an important role in host metabolism. Microbial diversity is influenced by a combination of environmental and host genetic factors and is associated with several polygenic diseases. In this study we combined next-generation sequencing, genetic mapping, and a set of physiological traits of the BXD mouse population to explore genetic factors that explain differences in gut microbiota and its impact on metabolic traits. Molecular profiling of the gut microbiota revealed important quantitative differences in microbial composition among BXD strains. These differences in gut microbial composition are influenced by host-genetics, which is complex and involves many loci. Linkage analysis defined Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) restricted to a particular taxon, branch or that influenced the variation of taxa across phyla. Gene expression within the gastrointestinal tract and sequence analysis of the parental genomes in the QTL regions uncovered candidate genes with potential to alter gut immunological profiles and impact the balance between gut microbial communities. A QTL region on Chr 4 that overlaps several interferon genes modulates the population of Bacteroides, and potentially Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes–the predominant BXD gut phyla. Irak4, a signaling molecule in the Toll-like receptor pathways is a candidate for the QTL on Chr15 that modulates Rikenellaceae, whereas Tgfb3, a cytokine modulating the barrier function of the intestine and tolerance to commensal bacteria, overlaps a QTL on Chr 12 that influence Prevotellaceae. Relationships between gut microflora, morphological and metabolic traits were uncovered, some potentially a result of common genetic sources of variation. PMID:22723961

  15. Clofazimine modulates the expression of lipid metabolism proteins in Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Degang, Yang; Akama, Takeshi; Hara, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Ishido, Yuko; Gidoh, Masaichi; Makino, Masahiko; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) lives and replicates within macrophages in a foamy, lipid-laden phagosome. The lipids provide essential nutrition for the mycobacteria, and M. leprae infection modulates expression of important host proteins related to lipid metabolism. Thus, M. leprae infection increases the expression of adipophilin/adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) and decreases hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), facilitating the accumulation and maintenance of lipid-rich environments suitable for the intracellular survival of M. leprae. HSL levels are not detectable in skin smear specimens taken from leprosy patients, but re-appear shortly after multidrug therapy (MDT). This study examined the effect of MDT components on host lipid metabolism in vitro, and the outcome of rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine treatment on ADRP and HSL expression in THP-1 cells. Clofazimine attenuated the mRNA and protein levels of ADRP in M. leprae-infected cells, while those of HSL were increased. Rifampicin and dapsone did not show any significant effects on ADRP and HSL expression levels. A transient increase of interferon (IFN)-β and IFN-γ mRNA was also observed in cells infected with M. leprae and treated with clofazimine. Lipid droplets accumulated by M. leprae-infection were significantly decreased 48 h after clofazimine treatment. Such effects were not evident in cells without M. leprae infection. In clinical samples, ADRP expression was decreased and HSL expression was increased after treatment. These results suggest that clofazimine modulates lipid metabolism in M. leprae-infected macrophages by modulating the expression of ADRP and HSL. It also induces IFN production in M. leprae-infected cells. The resultant decrease in lipid accumulation, increase in lipolysis, and activation of innate immunity may be some of the key actions of clofazimine.

  16. Effect of SO/sub 2/ on light modulation of plant metabolism. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    This progress report briefly notes conclusions of work done on SO/sub 2/ effect on light modulation of plant metabolism. Conclusions include: effect of light activation on kinetic parameters of fructosebisphosphatase - for this enzyme K/sub m/ decreases and V/sub max/ increases as a result of light activation; and the effect of sulfite and arsenite on light activation in 2 Pisum cultivars - the differences in sensitivity to SO/sub 2/ is directly reflected in differences in a thylakoid bound factor (LEM) to SO/sub 2/.

  17. Modulation of phosphoinositide metabolism in aortic smooth muscle cells by allylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.R.; Murphy, S.K.; Ramos, K. )

    1990-08-01

    Aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) modulate from a contractile to a proliferative phenotype upon subchronic exposure to allylamine. The present studies were designed to determine if this phenotypic modulation is associated with alterations in the metabolism of membrane phosphoinositides. 32P incorporation into phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), and phosphatidic acid (PA) was lower by 31, 35, and 22%, respectively, in SMC from allylamine-treated animals relative to controls. In contrast, incorporation of (3H)myoinositol into inositol phosphates did not differ in allylamine cells relative to control cells. Exposure to dibutyryl (db) cAMP (0.2 mM) and theophylline (0.1 mM) reduced 32P incorporation into PIP and PIP2 in SMC from both experimental groups. Under these conditions, a decrease in (3H)myoinositol incorporation into inositol 1-phosphate was only observed in allylamine cells. The effects of db cAMP and theophylline in allylamine and control SMC correlated with a marked decrease in cellular proliferation. These results suggest that alterations in phosphoinositide synthesis and/or degradation contribute to the enhanced proliferation of SMC induced by allylamine. To further examine this concept, the effects of agents which modulate protein kinase C (PKC) activity were evaluated. Sphingosine (125-500 ng/ml), a PKC inhibitor, decreased SMC proliferation in allylamine, but not control cells. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (1-100 ng/ml), a PKC agonist, stimulated proliferation in control cells, but inhibited proliferation in cells from allylamine-treated animals. We conclude that allylamine-induced phenotypic modulation of SMC is associated with alterations in phosphoinositide metabolism.

  18. Myocardial imaging and metabolic studies with (/sup 17 -123/I)iodoheptadecanoic acid in patients with idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeck, A.; Freundlieb, C.; Vyska, K.; Loesse, B.; Erbel, R.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    In twenty patients with primary congestive cardiomyopathy (COCM) the patterns of accumulation and washout of the fatty acid analogue (/sup 17 -123/I)iodoheptadecanoic acid (I-123 HA) were studied. In contrast to patients with ischemic heart disease, where reduced I-123 HA accumulation was correlated with stenosis of the main coronary arteries, thus usually involving larger wall segments, the patients with COCM concentrated I-123 HA heterogeneously in small spotty segments throughout the entire left-ventricular myocardium. The regional washout half-times varied between 15.1 and 116.2 min. It seems that in patients with severe COCM the elimination half-times are more prolonged than in early stages of the disease. There was no correlation between the regional uptake and the elimination half-times. Sequential myocardial imaging with I-123 HA appears useful for noninvasively diagnosis of COCM.

  19. Pharmacokinetic characterization of amrubicin cardiac safety in an ex vivo human myocardial strip model. II. Amrubicin shows metabolic advantages over doxorubicin and epirubicin.

    PubMed

    Salvatorelli, Emanuela; Menna, Pierantonio; Gonzalez Paz, Odalys; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Aukerman, Sharon L; Chello, Massimo; Covino, Elvio; Sung, Victoria; Minotti, Giorgio

    2012-05-01

    Anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity correlates with cardiac anthracycline accumulation and bioactivation to secondary alcohol metabolites or reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion (O₂·⁻) and hydrogen peroxide H₂O₂). We reported that in an ex vivo human myocardial strip model, 3 or 10 μM amrubicin [(7S,9S)-9-acetyl-9-amino-7-[(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentopyranosyl)oxy]-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6,11-dihydroxy-5,12-napthacenedione hydrochloride] accumulated to a lower level compared with equimolar doxorubicin or epirubicin (J Pharmacol Exp Ther 341:464-473, 2012). We have characterized how amrubicin converted to ROS or secondary alcohol metabolite in comparison with doxorubicin (that formed both toxic species) or epirubicin (that lacked ROS formation and showed an impaired conversion to alcohol metabolite). Amrubicin and doxorubicin partitioned to mitochondria and caused similar elevations of H₂O₂, but the mechanisms of H₂O₂ formation were different. Amrubicin produced H₂O₂ by enzymatic reduction-oxidation of its quinone moiety, whereas doxorubicin acted by inducing mitochondrial uncoupling. Moreover, mitochondrial aconitase assays showed that 3 μM amrubicin caused an O₂·⁻-dependent reversible inactivation, whereas doxorubicin always caused an irreversible inactivation. Low concentrations of amrubicin therefore proved similar to epirubicin in sparing mitochondrial aconitase from irreversible inactivation. The soluble fraction of human myocardial strips converted doxorubicin and epirubicin to secondary alcohol metabolites that irreversibly inactivated cytoplasmic aconitase; in contrast, strips exposed to amrubicin failed to generate its secondary alcohol metabolite, amrubicinol, and only occasionally exhibited an irreversible inactivation of cytoplasmic aconitase. This was caused by competing pathways that favored formation and complete or near-to-complete elimination of 9-deaminoamrubicinol. These results characterize amrubicin

  20. Organochloride pesticides modulated gut microbiota and influenced bile acid metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Shao, Wentao; Zhang, Chunlan; Xu, Cheng; Wang, Qihan; Liu, Hui; Sun, Haidong; Jiang, Zhaoyan; Gu, Aihua

    2017-04-06

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) can persistently accumulate in body and threaten human health. Bile acids and intestinal microbial metabolism have emerged as important signaling molecules in the host. However, knowledge on which intestinal microbiota and bile acids are modified by OCPs remains unclear. In this study, adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p, p'-DDE) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) for 8 weeks. The relative abundance and composition of various bacterial species were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bile acid composition was analyzed by metabolomic analysis using UPLC-MS. The expression of genes involved in hepatic and enteric bile acids metabolism was measured by real-time PCR. Expression of genes in bile acids synthesis and transportation were measured in HepG2 cells incubated with p, p'-DDE and β-HCH. Our findings showed OCPs changed relative abundance and composition of intestinal microbiota, especially in enhanced Lactobacillus with bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity. OCPs affected bile acid composition, enhanced hydrophobicity, decreased expression of genes on bile acid reabsorption in the terminal ileum and compensatory increased expression of genes on synthesis of bile acids in the liver. We demonstrated that chronic exposure of OCPs could impair intestinal microbiota; as a result, hepatic and enteric bile acid profiles and metabolism were influenced. The findings in this study draw our attention to the hazards of chronic OCPs exposure in modulating bile acid metabolism that might cause metabolic disorders and their potential to cause related diseases in human.

  1. Chronic melatonin consumption prevents obesity-related metabolic abnormalities and protects the heart against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury in a prediabetic model of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Nduhirabandi, Frederic; Du Toit, Eugene F; Blackhurst, Dee; Marais, David; Lochner, Amanda

    2011-03-01

    Obesity, a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease, is associated with increased oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status. Melatonin, a potent free radical scavenger and antioxidant, has powerful cardioprotective effects in lean animals but its efficacy in obesity is unknown. We investigated the effects of chronic melatonin administration on the development of the metabolic syndrome as well as ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male Wistar rats received a control diet, a control diet with melatonin, a high-calorie diet, or a high-calorie diet with melatonin (DM). Melatonin (4 mg/kg/day) was administered in the drinking water. After 16 wk, biometric and blood metabolic parameters were measured. Hearts were perfused ex vivo for the evaluation of myocardial function, infarct size (IFS) and biochemical changes [activation of PKB/Akt, ERK, p38 MAPK, AMPK, and glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 expression). The high-calorie diet caused increases in body weight (BW), visceral adiposity, serum insulin and triglycerides (TRIG), with no change in glucose levels. Melatonin treatment reduced the BW gain, visceral adiposity, blood TRIG, serum insulin, homeostatic model assessment index and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the DIO group. Melatonin reduced IFS in DIO and control groups and increased percentage recovery of functional performance of DIO hearts. During reperfusion, hearts from melatonin-treated rats had increased activation of PKB/Akt, ERK42/44 and reduced p38 MAPK activation. Chronic melatonin treatment prevented the metabolic abnormalities induced by DIO and protected the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. These beneficial effects were associated with activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinases pathway.

  2. Tumor suppressor WWOX regulates glucose metabolism via HIF1α modulation

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, M; Aqeilan, R I

    2014-01-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a tumor suppressor that is frequently lost in many cancer types. Wwox-deficient mice develop normally but succumb to a lethal hypoglycemia early in life. Here, we identify WWOX as a tumor suppressor with emerging role in regulation of aerobic glycolysis. WWOX controls glycolytic genes' expression through hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) regulation. Specifically, WWOX, via its first WW domain, physically interacts with HIF1α and modulates its levels and transactivation function. Consistent with this notion, Wwox-deficient cells exhibited increased HIF1α levels and activity and displayed increased glucose uptake. Remarkably, WWOX deficiency is associated with enhanced glycolysis and diminished mitochondrial respiration, conditions resembling the ‘Warburg effect'. Furthermore, Wwox-deficient cells are more tumorigenic and display increased levels of GLUT1 in vivo. Finally, WWOX expression is inversely correlated with GLUT1 levels in breast cancer samples highlighting WWOX as a modulator of cancer metabolism. Our studies uncover an unforeseen role for the tumor-suppressor WWOX in cancer metabolism. PMID:25012504

  3. Tumor suppressor WWOX regulates glucose metabolism via HIF1α modulation.

    PubMed

    Abu-Remaileh, M; Aqeilan, R I

    2014-11-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a tumor suppressor that is frequently lost in many cancer types. Wwox-deficient mice develop normally but succumb to a lethal hypoglycemia early in life. Here, we identify WWOX as a tumor suppressor with emerging role in regulation of aerobic glycolysis. WWOX controls glycolytic genes' expression through hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) regulation. Specifically, WWOX, via its first WW domain, physically interacts with HIF1α and modulates its levels and transactivation function. Consistent with this notion, Wwox-deficient cells exhibited increased HIF1α levels and activity and displayed increased glucose uptake. Remarkably, WWOX deficiency is associated with enhanced glycolysis and diminished mitochondrial respiration, conditions resembling the 'Warburg effect'. Furthermore, Wwox-deficient cells are more tumorigenic and display increased levels of GLUT1 in vivo. Finally, WWOX expression is inversely correlated with GLUT1 levels in breast cancer samples highlighting WWOX as a modulator of cancer metabolism. Our studies uncover an unforeseen role for the tumor-suppressor WWOX in cancer metabolism.

  4. Epistatic interactions between loci of one-carbon metabolism modulate susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Pavani, Addepalli; Digumarti, Raghunadha Rao; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2011-11-01

    In view of growing body of evidence substantiating the role of aberrations in one-carbon metabolism in the pathophysiology of breast cancer and lack of studies on gene-gene interactions, we investigated the role of dietary micronutrients and eight functional polymorphisms of one-carbon metabolism in modulating the breast cancer risk in 244 case-control pairs of Indian women and explored possible gene-gene interactions using Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis (MDR). Dietary micronutrient status was assessed using the validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Genotyping was done for glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) C1561T, reduced folate carrier (RFC)1 G80A, cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase (cSHMT) C1420T, thymidylate synthase (TYMS) 5'-UTR tandem repeat, TYMS 3'-UTR ins6/del6, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR) A2756G, methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase reductase (MTRR) A66G polymorphisms by using the PCR-RFLP/AFLP methods. Low dietary folate intake (P < 0.001), RFC1 G80A (OR: 1.38, 95% CI 1.06-1.81) and MTHFR C677T (OR: 1.74 (1.11-2.73) were independently associated with the breast cancer risk whereas cSHMT C1420T conferred protection (OR: 0.72, 95% CI 0.55-0.94). MDR analysis demonstrated a significant tri-variate interaction among RFC1 80, MTHFR 677 and TYMS 5'-UTR loci (P (trend) < 0.02) with high-risk genotype combination showing inflated risk for breast cancer (OR 4.65, 95% CI 1.77-12.24). To conclude, dietary as well as genetic factors were found to influence susceptibility to breast cancer. Further, the current study highlighted the importance of multi-loci analyses over the single-locus analysis towards establishing the epistatic interactions between loci of one-carbon metabolism modulate susceptibility to the breast cancer.

  5. Mito-DCA: a mitochondria targeted molecular scaffold for efficacious delivery of metabolic modulator dichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rakesh K; Marrache, Sean; Harn, Donald A; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-05-16

    Tumor growth is fueled by the use of glycolysis, which normal cells use only in the scarcity of oxygen. Glycolysis makes tumor cells resistant to normal death processes. Targeting this unique tumor metabolism can provide an alternative strategy to selectively destroy the tumor, leaving normal tissue unharmed. The orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA) is a mitochondrial kinase inhibitor that has the ability to show such characteristics. However, its molecular form shows poor uptake and bioavailability and limited ability to reach its target mitochondria. Here, we describe a targeted molecular scaffold for construction of a multiple DCA loaded compound, Mito-DCA, with three orders of magnitude enhanced potency and cancer cell specificity compared to DCA. Incorporation of a lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cation through a biodegradable linker in Mito-DCA allowed for mitochondria targeting. Mito-DCA did not show any significant metabolic effects toward normal cells but tumor cells with dysfunctional mitochondria were affected by Mito-DCA, which caused a switch from glycolysis to glucose oxidation and subsequent cell death via apoptosis. Effective delivery of DCA to the mitochondria resulted in significant reduction in lactate levels and played important roles in modulating dendritic cell (DC) phenotype evidenced by secretion of interleukin-12 from DCs upon activation with tumor antigens from Mito-DCA treated cancer cells. Targeting mitochondrial metabolic inhibitors to the mitochondria could lead to induction of an efficient antitumor immune response, thus introducing the concept of combining glycolysis inhibition with immune system to destroy tumor.

  6. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism During Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-04-05

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Excitingly, we observed possible sequestration of metabolites recently suggested to have immune modulating roles. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Model-guided analysis suggested that alterations in metabolism prioritized other activities necessary for pathogenesis instead, such as lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  7. Purinergic signaling modulates human visceral adipose inflammatory responses: implications in metabolically unhealthy obesity.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, J; Ferraro, A; Lerner, M; Serrano, J R; Dueck, A; Fainboim, L; Arruvito, L

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is accompanied by chronic inflammation of VAT, which promotes metabolic changes, and purinergic signaling has a key role in a wide range of inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we addressed whether fat inflammation could be differentially modulated by this signaling pathway in the MUO and in individuals who remain MHO. Our results show that the necrotized VAT of both groups released greater levels of ATP compared with lean donors. Interestingly, MUO tissue SVCs showed up-regulation and engagement of the purinergic P2X7R. The extracellular ATP concentration is regulated by an enzymatic process, in which CD39 converts ATP and ADP into AMP, and CD73 converts AMP into adenosine. In VAT, the CD73 ectoenzyme was widely distributed in immune and nonimmune cells, whereas CD39 expression was restricted to immune CD45PAN(+) SVCs. Although the MUO group expressed the highest levels of both ectoenzymes, no difference in ATP hydrolysis capacity was found between the groups. As expected, MUO exhibited the highest NLRP3 inflammasome expression and IL-1β production. MUO SVCs also displayed up-regulation of the A2AR, allowing extracellular adenosine to increase IL-1β local secretion. Additionally, we demonstrate that metabolic parameters and BMI are positively correlated with purinergic components in VAT. These findings indicate that purinergic signaling is a novel mechanism involved in the chronic inflammation of VAT underlying the metabolic changes in obesity. Finally, our study reveals a proinflammatory role for adenosine in sustaining IL-1β production in this tissue.

  8. The phytoestrogen genistein modulates lysosomal metabolism and transcription factor EB (TFEB) activation.

    PubMed

    Moskot, Marta; Montefusco, Sandro; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Mozolewski, Paweł; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Di Bernardo, Diego; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Medina, Diego L; Ballabio, Andrea; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2014-06-13

    Genistein (5,7-dihydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) has been previously proposed as a potential drug for use in substrate reduction therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses, a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by mutations leading to inefficient degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in lysosomes. It was demonstrated that this isoflavone can cross the blood-brain barrier, making it an especially desirable potential drug for the treatment of neurological symptoms present in most lysosomal storage diseases. So far, no comprehensive genomic analyses have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect elicited by genistein. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify the genistein-modulated gene network regulating GAG biosynthesis and degradation, taking into consideration the entire lysosomal metabolism. Our analyses identified over 60 genes with known roles in lysosomal biogenesis and/or function whose expression was enhanced by genistein. Moreover, 19 genes whose products are involved in both GAG synthesis and degradation pathways were found to be remarkably differentially regulated by genistein treatment. We found a regulatory network linking genistein-mediated control of transcription factor EB (TFEB) gene expression, TFEB nuclear translocation, and activation of TFEB-dependent lysosome biogenesis to lysosomal metabolism. Our data indicate that the molecular mechanism of genistein action involves not only impairment of GAG synthesis but more importantly lysosomal enhancement via TFEB. These findings contribute to explaining the beneficial effects of genistein in lysosomal storage diseases as well as envisage new therapeutic approaches to treat these devastating diseases.

  9. Dolomite supplementation improves bone metabolism through modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Nagasawa, Sakae; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Michio

    2005-01-01

    Dolomite, a mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate (CaMg (CO3)2), is used as a food supplement that supplies calcium and magnesium. However, the effect of magnesium supplementation on bone metabolism in patients with osteoporosis is a matter of controversy. We examined the effects of daily supplementation with dolomite on calcium metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Dolomite was administered daily to OVX rats for 9 weeks. The same amount of magnesium chloride as that supplied by the dolomite was given to OVX rats as a positive control. Histological examination revealed that ovariectomy decreased trabecular bone and increased adipose tissues in the femoral metaphysis. Dolomite or magnesium supplementation failed to improve these bone histological features. Calcium content in the femora was decreased in OVX rats. Neither calcium nor magnesium content in the femora in OVX rats was significantly increased by dolomite or magnesium administration. Urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion was significantly increased in OVX rats, and was not affected by the magnesium supplementation. Serum concentrations of magnesium were increased, and those of calcium were decreased, in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. However, there was a tendency toward decreased parathyroid hormone secretion and increased calcitonin secretion in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and osteocalcin levels were significantly increased in the supplemented OVX rats. These results suggest that increased magnesium intake improves calcium metabolism in favor of increasing bone formation, through the modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion.

  10. Building a better infarct: Modulation of collagen cross-linking to increase infarct stiffness and reduce left ventricular dilation post-myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Andrew P; DeLeon-Pennell, Kristine Y; Ma, Yonggang; Halade, Ganesh V; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Iyer, Rugmani Padmanabhan; Flynn, Elizabeth; Cates, Courtney A; Lindsey, Merry L; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) deletion attenuates collagen accumulation and dilation of the left ventricle (LV) post-myocardial infarction (MI); however the biomechanical mechanisms underlying the improved outcome are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms whereby MMP-9 deletion alters collagen network composition and assembly in the LV post-MI to modulate the mechanical properties of myocardial scar tissue. Adult C57BL/6J wild-type (WT; n=88) and MMP-9 null (MMP-9(-/-); n=92) mice of both sexes underwent permanent coronary artery ligation and were compared to day 0 controls (n=42). At day 7 post-MI, WT LVs displayed a 3-fold increase in end-diastolic volume, while MMP-9(-/-) showed only a 2-fold increase (p<0.05). Biaxial mechanical testing revealed that MMP-9(-/-) infarcts were stiffer than WT infarcts, as indicated by a 1.3-fold reduction in predicted in vivo circumferential stretch (p<0.05). Paradoxically, MMP-9(-/-) infarcts had a 1.8-fold reduction in collagen deposition (p<0.05). This apparent contradiction was explained by a 3.1-fold increase in lysyl oxidase (p<0.05) in MMP-9(-/-) infarcts, indicating that MMP-9 deletion increased collagen cross-linking activity. Furthermore, MMP-9 deletion led to a 3.0-fold increase in bone morphogenetic protein-1, the metalloproteinase that cleaves pro-collagen and pro-lysyl oxidase (p<0.05) and reduced fibronectin fragmentation by 49% (p<0.05) to enhance lysyl oxidase activity. We conclude that MMP-9 deletion increases infarct stiffness and prevents LV dilation by reducing collagen degradation and facilitating collagen assembly and cross-linking through preservation of the fibronectin network and activation of lysyl oxidase.

  11. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J.; Gray, Jason D.; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K.; Seifert, Erin L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism’s multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal–medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  12. Effect of Salvianolic Acid b and Paeonol on Blood Lipid Metabolism and Hemorrheology in Myocardial Ischemia Rabbits Induced by Pituitruin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Wang, Siwang; Xie, Yanhua; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Hua; Zhou, Xuanxuan; Liu, Wenbo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of salvianolic acid b and paeonol on coronary disease. The ischemia myocardial animal model is induced by administering pituitrin (20 μg·kg−1) intravenously via the abdominal vein. A combination of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (CSAP) (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) was administrated to experimental rabbits. Biochemical indices were evaluated during six weeks of intervention. We found that the compound of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) can markedly and dose-dependently reduce fibrinogen and malonaldehyde levels, increase the HDL level, improve blood viscosity and plasma viscosity in rabbits. In addition, the medicine can still reduce the ratio of NO/ET and the contents of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrates that compound of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) can improve the blood hemorrheology, decrease oxidative injury and repair the function of blood vessel endothelium, and subsequently prevent the development of Coronary disease. PMID:21152295

  13. IAPP modulates cellular autophagy, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix metabolism in human intervertebral disc cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinghuo; Song, Yu; Liu, Wei; Wang, Kun; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuai; Duan, Zhenfeng; Shao, Zengwu; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic process of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is characterized by imbalance in the extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells have important roles in maintaining the proper structure and tissue homeostasis of disc ECM. These cells need adequate supply of glucose and oxygen. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) exerts its biological effects by regulating glucose metabolism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of IAPP in degenerated IVD tissue, and IAPP modulation of ECM metabolism in human NP cells, especially the crosstalk mechanism between apoptosis and autophagy in these cells. We found that the expression of IAPP and Calcr-RAMP decreased considerably during IDD progression, along with the decrease in the expression of AG, BG, and Col2A1. Induction of IAPP in NP cells by transfection with pLV-IAPP enhanced the synthesis of aggrecan and Col2A1 and attenuated the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1. Upregulation of IAPP also affected the expression of the catabolic markers—matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 3, 9 and 13 and ADAMTS 4 and 5. Downregulation of IAPP by siRNA inhibited the expression of anabolic genes but increased the expression of catabolic genes and inflammatory factors. The expressions of autophagic and apoptotic markers in NP cells transfected with pLV-IAPP were upregulated, including BECLIN1, ATG5, ATG7, LC3 II/I and Bcl-2, while significantly increase in the expression of Bax and Caspase-3 in NP cells transfected with pLV-siIAPP. Mechanistically, PI3K/AKT-mTOR and p38/JNK MAPK signal pathways were involved. We propose that IAPP might play a pivotal role in the development of IDD, by regulating ECM metabolism and controlling the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy in NP, thus potentially offering a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of IDD. PMID:28149534

  14. Comparative studies of high performance swimming in sharks II. Metabolic biochemistry of locomotor and myocardial muscle in endothermic and ectothermic sharks.

    PubMed

    Bernal, D; Smith, D; Lopez, G; Weitz, D; Grimminger, T; Dickson, K; Graham, J B

    2003-08-01

    Metabolic enzyme activities in red (RM) and white (WM) myotomal muscle and in the heart ventricle (HV) were compared in two lamnid sharks (shortfin mako and salmon shark), the common thresher shark and several other actively swimming shark species. The metabolic enzymes measured were citrate synthase (CS), an index of aerobic capacity, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an index of anaerobic capacity. WM creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity, an index of rapid ATP production during burst swimming, was also quantified. Enzyme activities in RM, WM and HV were similar in the two lamnid species. Interspecific comparisons of enzyme activities at a common reference temperature (20 degrees C) show no significant differences in RM CS activity but higher CS activity in the WM and HV of the lamnid sharks compared with the other species. For the other enzymes, activities in lamnids overlapped with those of other shark species. Comparison of the HV spongy and compact myocardial layers in mako, salmon and thresher sharks reveals a significantly greater spongy CS activity in all three species but no differences in LDH activity. Adjustment of enzyme activities to in vivo RM and WM temperatures in the endothermic lamnids elevates CS and LDH in both tissues relative to the ectothermic sharks. Thus, through its enhancement of both RM and WM enzyme activity, endothermy may be an important determinant of energy supply for sustained and burst swimming in the lamnids. Although lamnid WM is differentially warmed as a result of RM endothermy, regional differences in WM CS and LDH activities and thermal sensitivities (Q(10) values) were not found. The general pattern of the endothermic myotomal and ectothermic HV muscle metabolic enzyme activities in the endothermic lamnids relative to other active, ectothermic sharks parallels the general pattern demonstrated for the endothermic tunas relative to their ectothermic sister species. However, the activities of all enzymes measured are lower in

  15. Assessment of myocardial metabolic rate of glucose by means of Bayesian ICA and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods in small animal PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berradja, Khadidja; Boughanmi, Nabil

    2016-09-01

    In dynamic cardiac PET FDG studies the assessment of myocardial metabolic rate of glucose (MMRG) requires the knowledge of the blood input function (IF). IF can be obtained by manual or automatic blood sampling and cross calibrated with PET. These procedures are cumbersome, invasive and generate uncertainties. The IF is contaminated by spillover of radioactivity from the adjacent myocardium and this could cause important error in the estimated MMRG. In this study, we show that the IF can be extracted from the images in a rat heart study with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) by means of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) based on Bayesian theory and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling method (BICA). Images of the heart from rats were acquired with the Sherbrooke small animal PET scanner. A region of interest (ROI) was drawn around the rat image and decomposed into blood and tissue using BICA. The Statistical study showed that there is a significant difference (p < 0.05) between MMRG obtained with IF extracted by BICA with respect to IF extracted from measured images corrupted with spillover.

  16. MAPKAPK-2 modulates p38-MAPK localization and small heat shock protein phosphorylation but does not mediate the injury associated with p38-MAPK activation during myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gorog, Diana A.; Jabr, Rita I; Tanno, Masaya; Sarafraz, Negin; Clark, James E.; Fisher, Simon G.; Cao, Xou Bin; Bellahcene, Mohamed; Dighe, Kushal; Kabir, Alamgir M. N.; Quinlan, Roy A.; Kato, Kanefusa; Gaestel, Matthias; Marber, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    MAPKAPK-2 (MK2) is a protein kinase activated downstream of p38-MAPK which phosphorylates the small heat shock proteins HSP27 and αB crystallin and modulates p38-MAPK cellular distribution. p38-MAPK activation is thought to contribute to myocardial ischemic injury; therefore, we investigated MK2 effects on ischemic injury and p38 cellular localization using MK2-deficient mice (KO). Immunoblotting of extracts from Langendorff-perfused hearts subjected to aerobic perfusion or global ischemia or reperfusion showed that the total and phosphorylated p38 levels were significantly lower in MK2−/− compared to MK2+/+ hearts at baseline, but the ratio of phosphorylated/total p38 was similar. These results were confirmed by cellular fractionation and immunoblotting for both cytosolic and nuclear compartments. Furthermore, HSP27 and αB crsytallin phosphorylation were reduced to baseline in MK2−/− hearts. On semiquantitative immunofluorescence laser confocal microscopy of hearts during aerobic perfusion, the mean total p38 fluorescence was significantly higher in the nuclear compared to extranuclear (cytoplasmic, sarcomeric, and sarcolemmal compartments) in MK2+/+ hearts. However, although the increase in phosphorylated p38 fluorescence intensity in all compartments following ischemia in MK2+/+ hearts was lost in MK2−/− hearts, it was basally elevated in nuclei of MK2−/− hearts and was similar to that seen during ischemia in MK2+/+ hearts. Despite these differences, similar infarct volumes were recorded in wild-type MK2+/+ and MK2−/− hearts, which were decreased by the p38 inhibitor SB203580 (1 μM) in both genotypes. In conclusion, p38 MAPK-induced myocardial ischemic injury is not modulated by MK2. However, the absence of MK2 perturbs the cellular distribution of p38. The preserved nuclear distribution of active p38 MAPK in MK2−/− hearts and the conserved response to SB203580 suggests that activation of p38 MAPK may contribute to injury

  17. Orally Administered Berberine Modulates Hepatic Lipid Metabolism by Altering Microbial Bile Acid Metabolism and the Intestinal FXR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Runbin; Yang, Na; Kong, Bo; Cao, Bei; Feng, Dong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Ge, Chun; Huang, Jingqiu; Shen, Jianliang; Wang, Pei; Feng, Siqi; Fei, Fei; Guo, Jiahua; He, Jun; Aa, Nan; Chen, Qiang; Pan, Yang; Schumacher, Justin D; Yang, Chung S; Guo, Grace L; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that the lipid-lowering effect of berberine (BBR) involves actions on the low-density lipoprotein receptor and the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. However, the implication of these mechanisms is unclear because of the low bioavailability of BBR. Because the main action site of BBR is the gut and intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that the effects of BBR on intestinal FXR signaling pathway might account for its pharmacological effectiveness. Using wild type (WT) and intestine-specific FXR knockout (FXR(int-/-)) mice, we found that BBR prevented the development of high-fat-diet-induced obesity and ameliorated triglyceride accumulation in livers of WT, but not FXR(int-/-) mice. BBR increased conjugated bile acids in serum and their excretion in feces. Furthermore, BBR inhibited bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in gut microbiota, and significantly increased the levels of tauro-conjugated bile acids, especially tauro-cholic acid(TCA), in the intestine. Both BBR and TCA treatment activated the intestinal FXR pathway and reduced the expression of fatty-acid translocase Cd36 in the liver. These results indicate that BBR may exert its lipid-lowering effect primarily in the gut by modulating the turnover of bile acids and subsequently the ileal FXR signaling pathway. In summary, we provide the first evidence to suggest a new mechanism of BBR action in the intestine that involves, sequentially, inhibiting BSH, elevating TCA, and activating FXR, which lead to the suppression of hepatic expression of Cd36 that results in reduced uptake of long-chain fatty acids in the liver.

  18. Gut microbiota-based translational biomarkers to prevent metabolic syndrome via nutritional modulation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuiming; Zhao, Liping

    2014-02-01

    In the face of the global epidemic of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its strong association with the increasing rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, it is critical to detect MetS at an early stage in the clinical setting to implement preventive intervention long before the complications arise. Lipopolysaccharide, the cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria produced from diet-disrupted gut microbiota, has been shown to induce metabolic endotoxemia, chronic low-grade inflammation, and ultimately insulin resistance. Therefore, ameliorating the inflammation and insulin resistance underlying MetS by gut microbiota-targeted, dietary intervention has gained increasing attention. In this review, we propose using dynamic monitoring of a set of translational biomarkers related with the etiological role of gut microbiota, including lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), C-reactive protein (CRP), fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), for early detection and prevention of MetS via nutritional modulation. LBP initiates the recognition and monomerization of lipopolysaccharide and amplifies host immune responses, linking the gut-derived antigen load and inflammation indicated by the plasma levels of CRP. Fasting plasma insulin and HOMA-IR are measured to evaluate insulin sensitivity that is damaged by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The dynamic monitoring of these biomarkers in high-risk populations may provide translational methods for the quantitative and dynamic evaluation of dysbiosis-induced insulin resistance and the effectiveness of dietary treatment for MetS.

  19. Modulation of Central Carbon Metabolism by Acetylation of Isocitrate Lyase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jing; Wang, Yihong; Yu, Heguo; Qian, Xiaoyan; Wang, Honghai; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xuelian

    2017-01-01

    Several enzymes involved in central carbon metabolism such as isocitrate lyase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase are key determinants of pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). In this study, we found that lysine acetylation plays an important role in the modulation of central carbon metabolism in M. tb. Mutant of M. tb defective in sirtuin deacetylase exhibited improved growth in fatty acid-containing media. Global analysis of lysine acetylome of M. tb identified three acetylated lysine residues (K322, K331, and K392) of isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Using a genetically encoding system, we demonstrated that acetylation of K392 increased the enzyme activity of ICL1, whereas acetylation of K322 decreased its activity. Antibodies that specifically recognized acetyllysine at 392 and 322 of ICL1 were used to monitor the levels of ICL1 acetylation in M. tb cultures. The physiological significance of ICL1 acetylation was demonstrated by the observation that M. tb altered the levels of acetylated K392 in response to changes of carbon sources, and that acetylation of K392 affected the abundance of ICL1 protein. Our study has uncovered another regulatory mechanism of ICL1. PMID:28322251

  20. Low level light in combination with metabolic modulators for effective therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tingting; Zhang, Qi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Wu, Mei X.

    2015-03-01

    Vascular damage occurs frequently at the injured brain causing hypoxia and is associated with poor outcomes in the clinics. We found high levels of glycolysis, reduced ATP generation, and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis in neurons under hypoxia. Strikingly, these adverse events were reversed significantly by noninvasive exposure of injured brain to low-level light (LLL). LLL illumination sustained the mitochondrial membrane potential, constrained cytochrome C leakage in hypoxic cells, and protected them from apoptosis, underscoring a unique property of LLL. The effect of LLL was further bolstered by combination with metabolic substrates such as pyruvate or lactate both in vivo and in vitro. The combinational treatment retained memory and learning activities of injured mice to a normal level, whereas those treated with LLL or pyruvate alone, or sham light displayed partial or severe deficiency in these cognitive functions. In accordance with well-protected learning and memory function, the hippocampal region primarily responsible for learning and memory was completely protected by a combination of LLL and pyruvate, in marked contrast to the severe loss of hippocampal tissue due to secondary damage in control mice. These data clearly suggest that energy metabolic modulators can additively or synergistically enhance the therapeutic effect of LLL in energy-producing insufficient tissues like injured brain. Keywords:

  1. Modification of tumour cell metabolism modulates sensitivity to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Chk1 kinase inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation as potentiators of cytotoxic chemotherapy and demonstrate potent activity in combination with anti-metabolite drugs that increase replication stress through the inhibition of nucleotide or deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Inhibiting other metabolic pathways critical for the supply of building blocks necessary to support DNA replication may lead to increased DNA damage and synergy with an inhibitor of Chk1. A screen of small molecule metabolism modulators identified combinatorial activity between a Chk1 inhibitor and chloroquine or the LDHA/LDHB inhibitor GSK 2837808A. Compounds, such as 2-deoxyglucose or 6-aminonicotinamide, that reduced the fraction of cells undergoing active replication rendered tumour cells more resistant to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage. Withdrawal of glucose or glutamine induced G1 and G2/M arrest without increasing DNA damage and reduced Chk1 expression and activation through autophosphorylation. This suggests the expression and activation of Chk1 kinase is associated with cells undergoing active DNA replication. Glutamine starvation rendered tumour cells more resistant to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage and reversal of the glutamine starvation restored the sensitivity of tumour cells to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage. Chk1 inhibitors may be a potentially useful therapeutic treatment for patients whose tumours contain a high fraction of replicating cells. PMID:28106079

  2. Neuronal Control of Metabolism through Nutrient-Dependent Modulation of Tracheal Branching

    PubMed Central

    Linneweber, Gerit A.; Jacobson, Jake; Busch, Karl Emanuel; Hudry, Bruno; Christov, Christo P.; Dormann, Dirk; Yuan, Michaela; Otani, Tomoki; Knust, Elisabeth; de Bono, Mario; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Summary During adaptive angiogenesis, a key process in the etiology and treatment of cancer and obesity, the vasculature changes to meet the metabolic needs of its target tissues. Although the cues governing vascular remodeling are not fully understood, target-derived signals are generally believed to underlie this process. Here, we identify an alternative mechanism by characterizing the previously unrecognized nutrient-dependent plasticity of the Drosophila tracheal system: a network of oxygen-delivering tubules developmentally akin to mammalian blood vessels. We find that this plasticity, particularly prominent in the intestine, drives—rather than responds to—metabolic change. Mechanistically, it is regulated by distinct populations of nutrient- and oxygen-responsive neurons that, through delivery of both local and systemic insulin- and VIP-like neuropeptides, sculpt the growth of specific tracheal subsets. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism by which nutritional cues modulate neuronal activity to give rise to organ-specific, long-lasting changes in vascular architecture. PMID:24439370

  3. Diacylglycerol kinase ϵ deficiency preserves glucose tolerance and modulates lipid metabolism in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Mannerås-Holm, Louise; Schönke, Milena; Brozinick, Joseph T; Vetterli, Laurène; Bui, Hai-Hoang; Sanders, Philip; Nascimento, Emmani B M; Björnholm, Marie; Chibalin, Alexander V; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-02-28

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) catalyze the phosphorylation and conversion of DAG into phosphatidic acid. DGK isozymes have unique primary structures, expression patterns, subcellular localizations, regulatory mechanisms and DAG preferences. DGKε has a hydrophobic segment that promotes its attachment to membranes and shows substrate specificity for DAG with an arachidonoyl acyl chain in the sn-2 position of the substrate. We determined the role of DGKε in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis in relation to diet-induced insulin resistance and obesity using DGKε deficient (KO) and wild-type mice. Lipidomic analysis revealed elevated unsaturated and saturated DAG species in skeletal muscle of DGKε KO mice, which was paradoxically associated with increased glucose tolerance. While skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was unaltered, whole body respiratory exchange ratio was reduced, and abundance of mitochondrial markers was increased, indicating a greater reliance on fat oxidation and intracellular lipid metabolism in DGKε KO mice. Thus, the increased intracellular lipids in skeletal muscle from DGKε KO mice may undergo rapid turnover due to increased mitochondrial function and lipid oxidation, rather than storage, which in turn may preserve insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, DGKε plays a role in glucose and energy homeostasis by modulating lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  4. Low-level light in combination with metabolic modulators for effective therapy of injured brain

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Tingting; Zhang, Qi; Hamblin, Michael R; Wu, Mei X

    2015-01-01

    Vascular damage occurs frequently at the injured brain causing hypoxia and is associated with poor outcomes in the clinics. We found high levels of glycolysis, reduced adenosine triphosphate generation, and increased formation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in neurons under hypoxia. Strikingly, these adverse events were reversed significantly by noninvasive exposure of injured brain to low-level light (LLL). Low-level light illumination sustained the mitochondrial membrane potential, constrained cytochrome c leakage in hypoxic cells, and protected them from apoptosis, underscoring a unique property of LLL. The effect of LLL was further bolstered by combination with metabolic substrates such as pyruvate or lactate both in vivo and in vitro. The combinational treatment retained memory and learning activities of injured mice to a normal level, whereas other treatment displayed partial or severe deficiency in these cognitive functions. In accordance with well-protected learning and memory function, the hippocampal region primarily responsible for learning and memory was completely protected by combination treatment, in marked contrast to the severe loss of hippocampal tissue because of secondary damage in control mice. These data clearly suggest that energy metabolic modulators can additively or synergistically enhance the therapeutic effect of LLL in energy-producing insufficient tissue–like injured brain. PMID:25966949

  5. APL-1, the Alzheimer's Amyloid precursor protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, modulates multiple metabolic pathways throughout development.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Collin Y; Raps, Daniel A; Li, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene or in genes that process APP are correlated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). The biological function of APP remains unclear. APP is a transmembrane protein that can be sequentially cleaved by different secretases to yield multiple fragments, which can potentially act as signaling molecules. Caenorhabditis elegans encodes one APP-related protein, APL-1, which is essential for viability. Here, we show that APL-1 signaling is dependent on the activity of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 and influences metabolic pathways such as developmental progression, body size, and egg-laying rate. Furthermore, apl-1(yn5) mutants, which produce high levels of the extracellular APL-1 fragment, show an incompletely penetrant temperature-sensitive embryonic lethality. In a genetic screen to isolate mutants in which the apl-1(yn5) lethality rate is modified, we identified a suppressor mutation in MOA-1/R155.2, a receptor-protein tyrosine phosphatase, and an enhancer mutation in MOA-2/B0495.6, a protein involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Knockdown of apl-1 in an apl-1(yn5) background caused lethality and molting defects at all larval stages, suggesting that apl-1 is required for each transitional molt. We suggest that signaling of the released APL-1 fragment modulates multiple metabolic states and that APL-1 is required throughout development.

  6. Low Concentrations of Nitric Oxide Modulate Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Metabolism and Antibiotic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Raymond N.; Morgan, Samantha; Brito-Mutunayagam, Sanjita; Skipp, Paul; Feelisch, Martin; Hayes, Stephen M.; Hellier, William; Clarke, Stuart C.; Stoodley, Paul; Burgess, Andrea; Ismail-Koch, Hasnaa; Salib, Rami J.; Webb, Jeremy S.; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the key pathogens responsible for otitis media (OM), the most common infection in children and the largest cause of childhood antibiotic prescription. Novel therapeutic strategies that reduce the overall antibiotic consumption due to OM are required because, although widespread pneumococcal conjugate immunization has controlled invasive pneumococcal disease, overall OM incidence has not decreased. Biofilm formation represents an important phenotype contributing to the antibiotic tolerance and persistence of S. pneumoniae in chronic or recurrent OM. We investigated the treatment of pneumococcal biofilms with nitric oxide (NO), an endogenous signaling molecule and therapeutic agent that has been demonstrated to trigger biofilm dispersal in other bacterial species. We hypothesized that addition of low concentrations of NO to pneumococcal biofilms would improve antibiotic efficacy and that higher concentrations exert direct antibacterial effects. Unlike in many other bacterial species, low concentrations of NO did not result in S. pneumoniae biofilm dispersal. Instead, treatment of both in vitro biofilms and ex vivo adenoid tissue samples (a reservoir for S. pneumoniae biofilms) with low concentrations of NO enhanced pneumococcal killing when combined with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, an antibiotic commonly used to treat chronic OM. Quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) identified 13 proteins that were differentially expressed following low-concentration NO treatment, 85% of which function in metabolism or translation. Treatment with low-concentration NO, therefore, appears to modulate pneumococcal metabolism and may represent a novel therapeutic approach to reduce antibiotic tolerance in pneumococcal biofilms. PMID:26856845

  7. Low Concentrations of Nitric Oxide Modulate Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Metabolism and Antibiotic Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Allan, Raymond N; Morgan, Samantha; Brito-Mutunayagam, Sanjita; Skipp, Paul; Feelisch, Martin; Hayes, Stephen M; Hellier, William; Clarke, Stuart C; Stoodley, Paul; Burgess, Andrea; Ismail-Koch, Hasnaa; Salib, Rami J; Webb, Jeremy S; Faust, Saul N; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniaeis one of the key pathogens responsible for otitis media (OM), the most common infection in children and the largest cause of childhood antibiotic prescription. Novel therapeutic strategies that reduce the overall antibiotic consumption due to OM are required because, although widespread pneumococcal conjugate immunization has controlled invasive pneumococcal disease, overall OM incidence has not decreased. Biofilm formation represents an important phenotype contributing to the antibiotic tolerance and persistence ofS. pneumoniaein chronic or recurrent OM. We investigated the treatment of pneumococcal biofilms with nitric oxide (NO), an endogenous signaling molecule and therapeutic agent that has been demonstrated to trigger biofilm dispersal in other bacterial species. We hypothesized that addition of low concentrations of NO to pneumococcal biofilms would improve antibiotic efficacy and that higher concentrations exert direct antibacterial effects. Unlike in many other bacterial species, low concentrations of NO did not result inS. pneumoniaebiofilm dispersal. Instead, treatment of bothin vitrobiofilms andex vivoadenoid tissue samples (a reservoir forS. pneumoniaebiofilms) with low concentrations of NO enhanced pneumococcal killing when combined with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, an antibiotic commonly used to treat chronic OM. Quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) identified 13 proteins that were differentially expressed following low-concentration NO treatment, 85% of which function in metabolism or translation. Treatment with low-concentration NO, therefore, appears to modulate pneumococcal metabolism and may represent a novel therapeutic approach to reduce antibiotic tolerance in pneumococcal biofilms.

  8. Fasting and Feeding Signals Control the Oscillatory Expression of Angptl8 to Modulate Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Fabin; Wu, Rong; Wang, Pengfei; Wu, Yuting; Azam, Md. Shofiul; Xu, Qian; Chen, Yaqiong; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies a key role of angiopoietin-like protein 8 (Angptl8) in the metabolic transition between fasting and feeding, whereas much less is known about the mechanism of its own expression. Here we show that hepatic Angptl8 is rhythmically expressed, which involving the liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) modulation during feeding and fasting periods, respectively. In addition, Angptl8 mRNA is very unstable, which contributes to the nature of its daily rhythmicity by rapidly responding to fasting/feeding transition. To explore its pathological function in dexamethasone (DEX)-induced fatty liver, we reversed its suppression by glucocorticoids through adenoviral delivery of Angptl8 gene in mouse liver. Surprisingly, hepatic overexpression of Angptl8 dramatically elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels in DEX-treated mice, suggesting a metabolic interaction between Angptl8 and glucocorticoid signaling. Moreover, intracellular hepatic Angptl8 is implicated in the regulation of lipid homeostasis by the experiments with ectopic expression of a nonsecreted Angptl8 mutant (Δ25-Angptl8). Altogether, our data demonstrate the molecular mechanism of the diurnal rhythm of Angptl8 expression regulated by glucocorticoid signaling and LXRα pathway, and provide new evidence to understand the role of Angptl8 in maintaining plasma TG homeostasis. PMID:27845381

  9. Modulation of thiamine metabolism in Zea mays seedlings under conditions of abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Rapala-Kozik, Maria; Kowalska, Ewa; Ostrowska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    The responses of plants to abiotic stress involve the up-regulation of numerous metabolic pathways, including several major routes that engage thiamine diphosphate (TDP)-dependent enzymes. This suggests that the metabolism of thiamine (vitamin B1) and its phosphate esters in plants may be modulated under various stress conditions. In the present study, Zea mays seedlings were used as a model system to analyse for any relation between the plant response to abiotic stress and the properties of thiamine biosynthesis and activation. Conditions of drought, high salt, and oxidative stress were induced by polyethylene glycol, sodium chloride, and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The expected increases in the abscisic acid levels and in the activities of antioxidant enzymes including catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were found under each stress condition. The total thiamine compound content in the maize seedling leaves increased under each stress condition applied, with the strongest effects on these levels observed under the oxidative stress treatment. This increase was also found to be associated with changes in the relative distribution of free thiamine, thiamine monophosphate (TMP), and TDP. Surprisingly, the activity of the thiamine synthesizing enzyme, TMP synthase, responded poorly to abiotic stress, in contrast to the significant enhancement found for the activities of the TDP synthesizing enzyme, thiamine pyrophosphokinase, and a number of the TDP/TMP phosphatases. Finally, a moderate increase in the activity of transketolase, one of the major TDP-dependent enzymes, was detectable under conditions of salt and oxidative stress. These findings suggest a role of thiamine metabolism in the plant response to environmental stress.

  10. Serum complexes of insulin-like growth factor-1 modulate skeletal integrity and carbohydrate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yakar, Shoshana; Rosen, Clifford J.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Sun, Hui; Mejia, Wilson; Kawashima, Yuki; Wu, Yingjie; Emerton, Kelly; Williams, Valerie; Jepsen, Karl; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Majeska, Robert J.; Gavrilova, Oksana; Gutierrez, Mariana; Hwang, David; Pennisi, Patricia; Frystyk, Jan; Boisclair, Yves; Pintar, John; Jasper, Héctor; Domene, Horacio; Cohen, Pinchas; Clemmons, David; LeRoith, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF) -1 is secreted mainly by the liver and circulates bound to IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), either as binary complexes or ternary complexes with IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5 and an acid-labile subunit (ALS). The purpose of this study was to genetically dissect the role of IGF-1 circulatory complexes in somatic growth, skeletal integrity, and metabolism. Phenotypic comparisons of controls and four mouse lines with genetic IGF-1 deficits—liver-specific IGF-1 deficiency (LID), ALS knockout (ALSKO), IGFBP-3 (BP3) knockout, and a triply deficient LID/ALSKO/BP3 line—produced several novel findings. 1) All deficient strains had decreased serum IGF-1 levels, but this neither predicted growth potential or skeletal integrity nor defined growth hormone secretion or metabolic abnormalities. 2) IGF-1 deficiency affected development of both cortical and trabecular bone differently, effects apparently dependent on the presence of different circulating IGF-1 complexes. 3) IGFBP-3 deficiency resulted in increased linear growth. In summary, each IGF-1 complex constituent appears to play a distinct role in determining skeletal phenotype, with different effects on cortical and trabecular bone compartments.—Yakar, S., Rosen, C. J., Bouxsein, M. L., Sun, H., Mejia, W., Kawashima, Y., Wu, Y., Emerton, K., Williams, V., Jepsen, K., Schaffler, M. B., Majeska, R. J., Gavrilova, O., Gutierrez, M., Hwang, D., Pennisi, P., Frystyk, J., Boisclair, Y., Pintar, J., Jasper, H., Domene, H., Cohen, P., Clemmons, D., LeRoith, D. Serum complexes of insulin-like growth factor-1 modulate skeletal integrity and carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:18952711

  11. Siderophore Biosynthesis Governs the Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli by Coordinately Modulating the Differential Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; He, Yan; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections impose substantial health burdens on women worldwide. Urinary tract infections often incur a high risk of recurrence and antibiotic resistance, and uropathogenic E. coli accounts for approximately 80% of clinically acquired cases. The diagnosis of, treatment of, and drug development for urinary tract infections remain substantial challenges due to the complex pathogenesis of this condition. The clinically isolated UPEC 83972 strain was found to produce four siderophores: yersiniabactin, aerobactin, salmochelin, and enterobactin. The biosyntheses of some of these siderophores implies that the virulence of UPEC is mediated via the targeting of primary metabolism. However, the differential modulatory roles of siderophore biosyntheses on the differential metabolomes of UPEC and non-UPEC strains remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we sought to investigate how the differential metabolomes can be used to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC strains and to determine the associated regulatory roles of siderophore biosynthesis. Our results are the first to demonstrate that the identified differential metabolomes strongly differentiated UPEC from non-UPEC strains. Furthermore, we performed metabolome assays of mutants with different patterns of siderophore deletions; the data revealed that the mutations of all four siderophores exerted a stronger modulatory role on the differential metabolomes of the UPEC and non-UPEC strains relative to the mutation of any single siderophore and that this modulatory role primarily involved amino acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation in the carbon fixation pathway, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Surprisingly, the modulatory roles were strongly dependent on the type and number of mutated siderophores. Taken together, these results demonstrated that siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the differential metabolomes and thus may indicate novel targets for virulence-based diagnosis

  12. Metabolic and trophic interactions modulate methane production by Arctic peat microbiota in response to warming

    PubMed Central

    Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Urich, Tim; Frenzel, Peter; Svenning, Mette Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Arctic permafrost soils store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) that could be released into the atmosphere as methane (CH4) in a future warmer climate. How warming affects the complex microbial network decomposing SOC is not understood. We studied CH4 production of Arctic peat soil microbiota in anoxic microcosms over a temperature gradient from 1 to 30 °C, combining metatranscriptomic, metagenomic, and targeted metabolic profiling. The CH4 production rate at 4 °C was 25% of that at 25 °C and increased rapidly with temperature, driven by fast adaptations of microbial community structure, metabolic network of SOC decomposition, and trophic interactions. Below 7 °C, syntrophic propionate oxidation was the rate-limiting step for CH4 production; above this threshold temperature, polysaccharide hydrolysis became rate limiting. This change was associated with a shift within the functional guild for syntrophic propionate oxidation, with Firmicutes being replaced by Bacteroidetes. Correspondingly, there was a shift from the formate- and H2-using Methanobacteriales to Methanomicrobiales and from the acetotrophic Methanosarcinaceae to Methanosaetaceae. Methanogenesis from methylamines, probably stemming from degradation of bacterial cells, became more important with increasing temperature and corresponded with an increased relative abundance of predatory protists of the phylum Cercozoa. We concluded that Arctic peat microbiota responds rapidly to increased temperatures by modulating metabolic and trophic interactions so that CH4 is always highly produced: The microbial community adapts through taxonomic shifts, and cascade effects of substrate availability cause replacement of functional guilds and functional changes within taxa. PMID:25918393

  13. Metabolic and trophic interactions modulate methane production by Arctic peat microbiota in response to warming.

    PubMed

    Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Urich, Tim; Frenzel, Peter; Svenning, Mette Marianne

    2015-05-12

    Arctic permafrost soils store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) that could be released into the atmosphere as methane (CH4) in a future warmer climate. How warming affects the complex microbial network decomposing SOC is not understood. We studied CH4 production of Arctic peat soil microbiota in anoxic microcosms over a temperature gradient from 1 to 30 °C, combining metatranscriptomic, metagenomic, and targeted metabolic profiling. The CH4 production rate at 4 °C was 25% of that at 25 °C and increased rapidly with temperature, driven by fast adaptations of microbial community structure, metabolic network of SOC decomposition, and trophic interactions. Below 7 °C, syntrophic propionate oxidation was the rate-limiting step for CH4 production; above this threshold temperature, polysaccharide hydrolysis became rate limiting. This change was associated with a shift within the functional guild for syntrophic propionate oxidation, with Firmicutes being replaced by Bacteroidetes. Correspondingly, there was a shift from the formate- and H2-using Methanobacteriales to Methanomicrobiales and from the acetotrophic Methanosarcinaceae to Methanosaetaceae. Methanogenesis from methylamines, probably stemming from degradation of bacterial cells, became more important with increasing temperature and corresponded with an increased relative abundance of predatory protists of the phylum Cercozoa. We concluded that Arctic peat microbiota responds rapidly to increased temperatures by modulating metabolic and trophic interactions so that CH4 is always highly produced: The microbial community adapts through taxonomic shifts, and cascade effects of substrate availability cause replacement of functional guilds and functional changes within taxa.

  14. Selective and Efficient Elimination of Vibrio cholerae with a Chemical Modulator that Targets Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Taek; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Eun Jin; Go, Junhyeok; Hwang, Wontae; Kim, Hyoung Rae; Kim, Dong Wook; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of pandemic cholera. Previous studies have shown that the survival of the seventh pandemic El Tor biotype V. cholerae strain N16961 requires production of acetoin in a glucose-rich environment. The production of acetoin, a neutral fermentation end-product, allows V. cholerae to metabolize glucose without a pH drop, which is mediated by the production of organic acid. This finding suggests that inhibition of acetoin fermentation can result in V. cholerae elimination by causing a pH imbalance under glucose-rich conditions. Here, we developed a simple high-throughput screening method and identified an inducer of medium acidification (iMAC). Of 8364 compounds screened, we identified one chemical, 5-(4-chloro-2-nitrobenzoyl)-6-hydroxy-1,3-dimethylpyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione, that successfully killed glucose-metabolizing N16961 by inducing acidic stress. When N16961 was grown with abundant glucose in the presence of iMAC, acetoin production was completely suppressed and concomitant accumulation of lactate and acetate was observed. Using a beta-galactosidase activity assay with a single-copy palsD::lacZ reporter fusion, we show that that iMAC likely inhibits acetoin production at the transcriptional level. Thin-layer chromatography revealed that iMAC causes a significantly reduced accumulation of intracellular (p)ppGpp, a bacterial stringent response alarmone known to positively regulate acetoin production. In vivo bacterial colonization and fluid accumulation were also markedly decreased after iMAC treatment. Finally, we demonstrate iMAC-induced bacterial killing for 22 different V. cholerae strains belonging to diverse serotypes. Together, our results suggest that iMAC, acting as a metabolic modulator, has strong potential as a novel antibacterial agent for treatment against cholera. PMID:27900286

  15. Aging dysregulates D- and E-series resolvins to modulate cardiosplenic and cardiorenal network following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Halade, Ganesh V.; Kain, Vasundhara; Black, Laurence M.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Ingle, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-myocardial infarction (MI), overactive inflammation is the hallmark of aging, however, the mechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that excess influx of omega 6 fatty acids may impair resolution, thus impacting the cardiosplenic and cardiorenal network post-MI. Young and aging mice were fed on standard lab chow (LC) and excess fatty acid (safflower oil; SO)-enriched diet for 2 months and were then subjected to MI surgery. Despite similar infarct areas and left ventricle (LV) dysfunction post-MI, splenic mass spectrometry data revealed higher levels of arachidonic acid (AA) derived pro-inflammatory metabolites in young-SO, but minimal formation of docosanoids, D- and E- series resolvins in SO-fed aged mice. The aged mice receiving excess intake of fatty acids exhibit; 1) decreased lipoxygenases (5-,12-, and 15) in the infarcted LV; 2) lower levels of 14HDHA, RvD1, RvD5, protectin D1, 7(S)maresin1, 8-,11-,18-HEPE and RvE3 with high levels of tetranor-12-HETEs; 3) dual population of macrophages (CD11blow/F480high and CD11bhigh/F480high) with increased pro-inflammatory (CD11b+F4/80+Ly6Chi) phenotype and; 4) increased kidney injury marker NGAL with increased expression of TNF-ɑ and IL-1β indicating MI-induced non-resolving response compared with LC-group. Thus, excess fatty acid intake magnifies the post-MI chemokine signaling and inflames the cardiosplenic and cardiorenal network towards a non-resolving microenvironment in aging. PMID:27777380

  16. GLYCOENGINEERING OF ESTERASE ACTIVITY THROUGH METABOLIC FLUX-BASED MODULATION OF SIALIC ACID.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mohit; Tan, Elaine; Labonte, Jason W; Shah, Shivam; Saeui, Christopher T; Liu, Lingshu; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Bovonratwet, Patawut; Gray, Jeffrey J; Yarema, Kevin

    2017-02-20

    This report describes the metabolic glycoengineering (MGE) of intracellular esterase activity in human colon cancer (LS174T) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In silico analysis of the carboxylesterases CES1 and CES2 suggested that these enzymes are modified with sialylated N-glycans, which are proposed to stabilize the active multimeric forms of these enzymes. This premise was supported by treating cells with butanolylated ManNAc to increase sialylation, which in turn increased esterase activity. By contrast, hexosamine analogs not targeted to sialic acid biosynthesis (e.g., butanoylated GlcNAc or GalNAc) had minimal impact. Measurement of mRNA and protein confirmed that esterase activity was controlled through glycosylation and not through transcription or translation. Azide-modified ManNAc analogs widely used in MGE also enhanced esterase activity and provided a way to enrich targeted "glycoengineered" proteins (such as CES2), thereby providing unambiguous evidence that the compounds were converted to sialosides and installed into the glycan structures of esterases as intended. Overall, this study provides a pioneering example of the modulation of intracellular enzyme activity through MGE, which expands the value of this technology from its current status as a labeling strategy and modulator of cell surface biological events.

  17. Parasitic nematode-induced modulation of body weight and associated metabolic dysfunction in mouse models of obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low grade inflammation characterized by high level of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators implicated in disrupted metabolic homeostasis. Parasitic nematode infection induces a polarized Th2 cytokine response and has been shown to modulate immune-based pathol...

  18. Doxorubicin Induces Inflammatory Modulation and Metabolic Dysregulation in Diabetic Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Supriya, Rashmi; Tam, Bjorn T.; Pei, Xiao M.; Lai, Christopher W.; Chan, Lawrence W.; Yung, Benjamin Y.; Siu, Parco M.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cancer agent doxorubicin (DOX) has been demonstrated to worsen insulin signaling, engender muscle atrophy, trigger pro-inflammation, and induce a shift to anaerobic glycolytic metabolism in skeletal muscle. The myotoxicity of DOX in diabetic skeletal muscle remains largely unclear. This study examined the effects of DOX on insulin signaling, muscle atrophy, pro-/anti-inflammatory microenvironment, and glycolysis metabolic regulation in skeletal muscle of db/db diabetic and db/+ non-diabetic mice. Non-diabetic db/+ mice and diabetic db/db mice were randomly assigned to the following groups: db/+CON, db/+DOX, db/dbCON, and db/dbDOX. Mice in db/+DOX and db/dbDOX groups were intraperitoneally injected with DOX at a dose of 15 mg per kg body weight whereas mice in db/+CON and db/dbCON groups were injected with the same volume of saline instead of DOX. Gastrocnemius was immediately harvested, weighed, washed with cold phosphate buffered saline, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at −80°C for later analysis. The effects of DOX on diabetic muscle were neither seen in insulin signaling markers (Glut4, pIRS1Ser636∕639, and pAktSer473) nor muscle atrophy markers (muscle mass, MuRF1 and MAFbx). However, DOX exposure resulted in enhancement of pro-inflammatory favoring microenvironment (as indicated by TNF-α, HIFα and pNFκBp65) accompanied by diminution of anti-inflammatory favoring microenvironment (as indicated by IL15, PGC1α and pAMPKβ1Ser108). Metabolism of diabetic muscle was shifted to anaerobic glycolysis after DOX exposure as demonstrated by our analyses of PDK4, LDH and pACCSer79. Our results demonstrated that there might be a link between inflammatory modulation and the dysregulation of aerobic glycolytic metabolism in DOX-injured diabetic skeletal muscle. These findings help to understand the pathogenesis of DOX-induced myotoxicity in diabetic muscle. PMID:27512375

  19. The low density lipoprotein receptor modulates the effects of hypogonadism on diet-induced obesity and related metabolic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Caterina; Mpatsoulis, Diogenis; Natsos, Anastasios; Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Zvintzou, Evangelia; Traish, Abdulmaged M.; Voshol, Peter J.; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Kypreos, Kyriakos E.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we investigated how LDL receptor deficiency (Ldlr−/−) modulates the effects of testosterone on obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions. Though sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice fed Western-type diet for 12 weeks became obese and showed disturbed plasma glucose metabolism and plasma cholesterol and TG profiles, castrated mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity and had improved glucose metabolism and reduced plasma TG levels, despite a further deterioration in their plasma cholesterol profile. The effect of hypogonadism on diet-induced weight gain of Ldlr−/− mice was independent of ApoE and Lrp1. Indirect calorimetry analysis indicated that hypogonadism in Ldlr−/− mice was associated with increased metabolic rate. Indeed, mitochondrial cytochrome c and uncoupling protein 1 expression were elevated, primarily in white adipose tissue, confirming increased mitochondrial metabolic activity due to thermogenesis. Testosterone replacement in castrated Ldlr−/− mice for a period of 8 weeks promoted diet-induced obesity, indicating a direct role of testosterone in the observed phenotype. Treatment of sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane for 8 weeks showed that the obesity of castrated Ldlr−/− mice is independent of estrogens. Overall, our data reveal a novel role of Ldlr as functional modulator of metabolic alterations associated with hypogonadism. PMID:24837748

  20. Myocardial Noncompaction Presenting With Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuechun; Li, Xinchun; Lu, Dongfeng; Xiao, Aiyi; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial noncompaction, namly isolated noncompaction of the left ventricular myocardium (NVM), is a rare congenital disease. It can be either seen in the absence of other cardiac anomalies, or associated with other congenital cardiac defects, mostly stenotic lesions of the left ventricular outflow tract. A myocardial bridge (MB) is thought being associated with coronary heart disease, such as coronary spasm, arrhythmia, and so on. The significance of MB in association with other congenital cardiac conditions is unknown. We report a novel case who was presented NVM and MB. A 34-year-old man complained of chest prickling-like pain and dizzy for 1 year. His blood pressure was 110/70 mm Hg. Echocardiograph revealed increased trabeculations below the level of papillary muscle of left ventricle (LV); deep intertrabecular recesses in the endocardial wall of LV particularly in apex free wall; and LV ejection fraction of 57%. A coronary computerized tomography scan showed that part, 38.9 cm, of left descending artery tunnel was surrounding by cardiac muscles rather than resting on top of the myocardium. The therapeutics interventions included lifestyle cares, agents of anti-ischemia and improvement myocardial cell metabolism. The patient was followed up for 2.6 years, and his general condition was stable. This case indicates that NVM can be developed with MB, and the complete diagnosis of NVM and MB should be made by different image studies. PMID:26356695

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid modulates the enterocyte Caco-2 cell expression of microRNAs involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gil-Zamorano, Judit; Martin, Roberto; Daimiel, Lidia; Richardson, Kris; Giordano, Elena; Nicod, Nathalie; García-Carrasco, Belén; Soares, Sara M A; Iglesias-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Lasunción, Miguel A; Sala-Vila, Aleix; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, Jose M; Visioli, Francesco; Dávalos, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Consumption of the long-chain ω-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and greater chemoprevention. However, the mechanisms underlying the biologic effects of DHA remain unknown. It is well known that microRNAs (miRNAs) are versatile regulators of gene expression. Therefore, we aimed to determine if the beneficial effects of DHA may be modulated in part through miRNAs. Loss of dicer 1 ribonuclease type III (DICER) in enterocyte Caco-2 cells supplemented with DHA suggested that several lipid metabolism genes are modulated by miRNAs. Analysis of miRNAs predicted to target these genes revealed several miRNA candidates that are differentially modulated by fatty acids. Among the miRNAs modulated by DHA were miR-192 and miR-30c. Overexpression of either miR-192 or miR-30c in enterocyte and hepatocyte cells suggested an effect on the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism, some of which were confirmed by endogenous inhibition of these miRNAs. Our results show in enterocytes that DHA exerts its biologic effect in part by regulating genes involved in lipid metabolism and cancer. Moreover, this response is mediated through miRNA activity. We validate novel targets of miR-30c and miR-192 related to lipid metabolism and cancer including nuclear receptor corepressor 2, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1, DICER, caveolin 1, ATP-binding cassette subfamily G (white) member 4, retinoic acid receptor β, and others. We also present evidence that in enterocytes DHA modulates the expression of regulatory factor X6 through these miRNAs. Alteration of miRNA levels by dietary components in support of their pharmacologic modulation might be valuable in adjunct therapy for dyslipidemia and other related diseases.

  2. Myocardial Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... typically on the left side of the body (angina pectoris). Other signs and symptoms — which might be experienced ... ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. Podrid PJ. Angina pectoris: Chest pain caused by myocardial ischemia. www.uptodate. ...

  3. New vistas for treatment of obesity and diabetes? Endocannabinoid signalling and metabolism in the modulation of energy balance.

    PubMed

    Lipina, Christopher; Rastedt, Wiebke; Irving, Andrew J; Hundal, Harinder S

    2012-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests that pathological overactivation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is associated with dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes. Indeed, this signalling system acting through cannabinoid receptors has been shown to function both centrally and peripherally to regulate feeding behaviour as well as energy expenditure and metabolism. Consequently, modulation of these receptors can promote significant alterations in body weight and associated metabolic profile. Importantly, blocking cannabinoid receptor type 1 function has been found to prevent obesity and metabolic dysfunction in various murine models and in humans. Here we provide a detailed account of the known physiological role of the ECS in energy balance, and explore how recent studies have delivered novel insights into the potential targeting of this system as a therapeutic means for treating obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  4. Modulation of fructokinase activity of potato (Solanum tuberosum) results in substantial shifts in tuber metabolism.

    PubMed

    Davies, Howard V; Shepherd, Louise V T; Burrell, Michael M; Carrari, Fernando; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Leisse, Andrea; Hancock, Robert D; Taylor, Mark; Viola, Roberto; Ross, Heather; McRae, Diane; Willmitzer, Lothar; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2005-07-01

    Potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L. cvs Desiree and Record) transformed with sense and antisense constructs of a cDNA encoding the potato fructokinase StFK1 exhibited altered transcription of this gene, altered amount of protein and altered enzyme activities. Measurement of the maximal catalytic activity of fructokinase revealed a 2-fold variation in leaf (from 90 to 180% of wild type activity) and either a 10- or 30-fold variation in tuber (from 10 or 30% to 300% in Record and Desiree, respectively) activity. The comparative effect of the antisense construct in leaf and tuber tissue suggests that this isoform is only a minor contributor to the total fructokinase activity in the leaf but the predominant isoform in the tuber. Antisense inhibition of the fructokinase resulted in a reduced tuber yield; however, its overexpression had no impact on this parameter. The modulation of fructokinase activity had few, consistent effects on carbohydrate levels, with the exception of a general increase in glucose content in the antisense lines, suggesting that this enzyme is not important for the control of starch synthesis. However, when metabolic fluxes were estimated, it became apparent that the transgenic lines display a marked shift in metabolism, with the rate of redistribution of radiolabel to sucrose markedly affected by the activity of fructokinase. These data suggest an important role for fructokinase, acting in concert with sucrose synthase, in maintaining a balance between sucrose synthesis and degradation by a mechanism independent of that controlled by the hexose phosphate-mediated activation of sucrose phosphate synthase.

  5. Dietary protein modulates circadian changes in core body temperature and metabolic rate in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Ippei; Nakayama, Mitsuo; Miki, Takanori; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Takeuchi, Yoshiki

    2008-02-01

    We assessed the contribution of dietary protein to circadian changes in core body temperature (Tb) and metabolic rate in freely moving rats. Daily changes in rat intraperitoneal temperature, locomotor activity (LMA), whole-body oxygen consumption (VO2), and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were measured before and during 4 days of consuming a 20% protein diet (20% P), a protein-free diet (0% P), or a pair-fed 20% P diet (20% P-R). Changes in Tb did not significantly differ between the 20% P and 20% P-R groups throughout the study. The Tb in the 0% P group remained elevated during the dark (D) phase throughout the study, but VO2, VCO2, and LMA increased late in the study when compared with the 20% P-R group almost in accordance with elevated Tb. By contrast, during the light (L) phase in the 0% P group, Tb became elevated early in the study and thereafter declined with a tendency to accompany significantly lower VO2 and VCO2 when compared with the 20% P group, but not the 20% P-R group. The respiratory quotient (RQ) in the 0% P group declined throughout the D phase and during the early L phase. By contrast, RQ in the 20% P-R group consistently decreased from the late D phase to the end of the L phase. Our findings suggest that dietary protein contributes to the maintenance of daily oscillations in Tb with modulating metabolic rates during the D phase. However, the underlying mechanisms of Tb control during the L phase remain obscure.

  6. PFKFB3 modulates glycolytic metabolism and alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress in human osteoarthritis cartilage.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jining; Lu, Daigang; Guo, Hua; Miao, Wusheng; Wu, Ge; Zhou, Meifen

    2016-03-01

    Glycolytic disorder has been demonstrated to be a major cause of osteoarthritis (OA) and chondrocyte dysfunction. The present work aimed to investigate the expression and role of the glycolytic regulator 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3) in OA cartilage. It was found that PFKFB3 expression was down-regulated in human OA cartilage tissues and in tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α- or interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated human chondrocytes. The glycolytic metabolism appeared as glucose utilization and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation, and lactate production was stunted in OA cartilage. However, the impaired glycolytic process in OA cartilage was improved by PFKFB3 overexpression, which was confirmed in TNF-α- or IL-1β-treated chondrocytes. Furthermore, the expressions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated genes including PERK, ATF3, IRE1, phosphorylated eIF2α (p-eIF2α) and MMP13 were enhanced in OA cartilage explants, while they were decreased by AdPFKFB3 transfection. PFKFB3 also modulated the expressions of PERK, ATF3, IRE1, p-eIF2α and MMP13 in tunicamycin-exposed chondrocytes. Additionally, PFKFB3 improved the cell viability of OA cartilage explants and chondrocytes through the PI3K/Akt/C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) signalling pathway. The transfection of AdPFKFB3 also significantly reduced caspase 3 activation and promoted aggrecan and type II collagen expressions in OA cartilage explants and chondrocytes. In all, this study characterizes a novel role of PFKFB3 in glycolytic metabolism and ER stress of OA cartilage explants and chondrocytes. The study might provide a potential target for OA prevention or therapy.

  7. Seasonal modulation of free radical metabolism in estivating land snails Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Vasconcelos, Gabriella R; Cardoso, Luciano A; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the regulation of free radical metabolism in Helix aspersa snails during a cycle of 20-day estivation and 24-h arousal in summer in comparison with estivation/arousal in winter-snails. In winter-snails (J. Exp. Biol. 206, 675-685, 2003), we had already observed an increase in the selenium-dependent glutathione-peroxidase (Se-GPX) activity in foot muscle and hepatopancreas and in the contents of hepatopancreas GSH-equivalents (GSH-eq=GSH+2 GSSG) during estivation compared with 24-h aroused snails. Summer-estivation prompted a 3.6-fold increase in Se-GPX activity in hepatopancreas, though not in foot muscle. Total-superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in hepatopancreas decreased (by 30-40%) during summer-estivation; however, no changes occurred in the activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the two organs. GSH-eq levels were increased (by 54%) in foot muscle during estivation, but were unchanged in hepatopancreas. In contrast with winter-snails, oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, carbonyl protein, and the GSSG/GSH-eq ratio) were unaltered during estivation/arousal in summer. These results demonstrate that seasonality modulates not only the absolute activities/levels of antioxidants (enzymes and GSH-eq) in H. aspersa, but also the regulatory process that controls the snail's antioxidant capacity during estivation/arousal. These results suggest that H. aspersa has an "internal clock" controlling the regulation of free radical metabolism in the different seasons.

  8. Inulin and oligofructose modulate lipid metabolism in animals: review of biochemical events and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Delzenne, N M; Daubioul, C; Neyrinck, A; Lasa, M; Taper, H S

    2002-05-01

    Inulin and oligofructose, besides their effect on the gastro-intestinal tract, are also able to exert 'systemic' effect, namely by modifying the hepatic metabolism of lipids in several animal models. Feeding male Wistar rats on a carbohydrate-rich diet containing 10 % inulin or oligofructose significantly lowers serum triacylglycerol (TAG) and phospholipid concentrations. A lower hepatic lipogenesis, through a coordinate reduction of the activity and mRNA of lipogenic enzymes is a key event in the reduction of very low-density lipoprotein-TAG secretion by oligofructose. Oligofructose is also able to counteract triglyceride metabolism disorder occurring through dietary manipulation in animals, and sometimes independently on lipogenesis modulation: oligofructose reduces post-prandial triglyceridemia by 50 % and avoids the increase in serum free cholesterol level occurring in rats fed a Western-type high fat diet. Oligofructose protects rats against liver TAG accumulation (steatosis) induced by fructose, or occurring in obese Zucker fa/fa rats. The protective effect of dietary inulin and oligofructose on steatosis in animals, would be interesting, if confirmed in humans, since steatosis is one of the most frequent liver disorders, occurring together with the plurimetabolic syndrome, in overweight people. The panel of putative mediators of the systemic effects of inulin and oligofructose consists in either modifications in glucose/insulin homeostasis, the end-products of their colonic fermentation (i.e. propionate) reaching the liver by the portal vein, incretins and/or the availability of other nutrients. The identification of the key mediators of the systemic effects of inulin and oligofructose is the key to identify target function(s) (or dysfunction(s)), and finally individuals who would take an advantage of increasing their dietary intake.

  9. CRYAB and HSPB2 deficiency alters cardiac metabolism and paradoxically confers protection against myocardial ischemia in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Ivor J.; Guo, Yiru; Srinivasan, Sathyanarayanan; Boudina, Sihem; Taylor, Ryan P.; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S.; Gottlieb, Roberta; Wawrousek, Eric F.; Abel, E. Dale; Bolli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The abundantly expressed small molecular weight proteins, CRYAB and HSPB2, have been implicated in cardioprotection ex vivo. However, the biological roles of CRYAB/HSPB2 coexpression for either ischemic preconditioning and/or protection in situ remain poorly defined. Wild-type (WT) and age-matched (~5–9 mo) CRYAB/HSPB2 double knockout (DKO) mice were subjected either to 30 min of coronary occlusion and 24 h of reperfusion in situ or preconditioned with a 4-min coronary occlusion/4-min reperfusion × 6, before similar ischemic challenge (ischemic preconditioning). Additionally, WT and DKO mice were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia in isolated hearts ex vivo. All experimental groups were assessed for area at risk and infarct size. Mitochondrial respiration was analyzed in isolated permeabilized cardiac skinned fibers. As a result, DKO mice modestly altered heat shock protein expression. Surprisingly, infarct size in situ was reduced by 35% in hearts of DKO compared with WT mice (38.8 ± 17.9 vs. 59.8 ± 10.6% area at risk, P < 0.05). In DKO mice, ischemic preconditioning was additive to its infarct-sparing phenotype. Similarly, infarct size after ischemia and reperfusion ex vivo was decreased and the production of superoxide and creatine kinase release was decreased in DKO compared with WT mice (P < 0.05). In permeabilized fibers, ADP-stimulated respiration rates were modestly reduced and calcium-dependent ATP synthesis was abrogated in DKO compared with WT mice. In conclusion, contrary to expectation, our findings demonstrate that CRYAB and HSPB2 deficiency induces profound adaptations that are related to 1) a reduction in calcium-dependent metabolism/respiration, including ATP production, and 2) decreased superoxide production during reperfusion. We discuss the implications of these disparate results in the context of phenotypic responses reported for CRYAB/HSPB2-deficient mice to different ischemic challenges. PMID:17873008

  10. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  11. Concerted modulation of alanine and glutamate metabolism in young Medicago truncatula seedlings under hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Limami, Anis M; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Ricoult, Claudie; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Planchet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The modulation of primary nitrogen metabolism by hypoxic stress was studied in young Medicago truncatula seedlings. Hypoxic seedlings were characterized by the up-regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase (mAlaAT), and down-regulation of glutamine synthetase 1b (GS1b), NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase 3 (GDH3), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) gene expression. Hypoxic stress severely inhibited GS activity and stimulated NADH-GOGAT activity. GDH activity was lower in hypoxic seedlings than in the control, however, under either normoxia or hypoxia, the in vivo activity was directed towards glutamate deamination. (15)NH(4) labelling showed for the first time that the adaptive reaction of the plant to hypoxia consisted of a concerted modulation of nitrogen flux through the pathways of both alanine and glutamate synthesis. In hypoxic seedlings, newly synthesized (15)N-alanine increased and accumulated as the major amino acid, asparagine synthesis was inhibited, while (15)N-glutamate was synthesized at a similar rate to that in the control. A discrepancy between the up-regulation of GDH1 expression and the down-regulation of GDH activity by hypoxic stress highlighted for the first time the complex regulation of this enzyme by hypoxia. Higher rates of glycolysis and ethanol fermentation are known to cause the fast depletion of sugar stores and carbon stress. It is proposed that the expression of GDH1 was stimulated by hypoxia-induced carbon stress, while the enzyme protein might be involved during post-hypoxic stress contributing to the regeneration of 2-oxoglutarate via the GDH shunt.

  12. The tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase modulates cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-03-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a tumor suppressor that is frequently altered in cancer. WWOX binds several proteins and thus is postulated to be involved in a variety of cellular processes. Interestingly, Wwox-knockout mice develop normally in utero but succumb to hypoglycemia and other metabolic defects early in life resulting in their death by 3-4 weeks of age. Cumulative evidence has linked WWOX with cellular metabolism including steroid metabolism, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism, bone metabolism and, more recently, glucose metabolism. In this review, we discuss these evolving functions for WWOX and how its deletion affects cellular metabolism and neoplastic progression.

  13. c-di-AMP modulates Listeria monocytogenes central metabolism to regulate growth, antibiotic resistance and osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Aaron T; Garelis, Nicholas E; Peterson, Bret N; Choi, Philip H; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J; Portnoy, Daniel A

    2017-04-01

    Cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a conserved nucleotide second messenger critical for bacterial growth and resistance to cell wall-active antibiotics. In Listeria monocytogenes, the sole diadenylate cyclase, DacA, is essential in rich, but not synthetic media and ΔdacA mutants are highly sensitive to the β-lactam antibiotic cefuroxime. In this study, loss of function mutations in the oligopeptide importer (oppABCDF) and glycine betaine importer (gbuABC) allowed ΔdacA mutants to grow in rich medium. Since oligopeptides were sufficient to inhibit growth of the ΔdacA mutant we hypothesized that oligopeptides act as osmolytes, similar to glycine betaine, to disrupt intracellular osmotic pressure. Supplementation with salt stabilized the ΔdacA mutant in rich medium and restored cefuroxime resistance. Additional suppressor mutations in the acetyl-CoA binding site of pyruvate carboxylase (PycA) rescued cefuroxime resistance and resulted in a 100-fold increase in virulence of the ΔdacA mutant. PycA is inhibited by c-di-AMP and these mutations prompted us to examine the role of TCA cycle enzymes. Inactivation of citrate synthase, but not down-stream enzymes suppressed ΔdacA phenotypes. These data suggested that c-di-AMP modulates central metabolism at the pyruvate node to moderate citrate production and indeed, the ΔdacA mutant accumulated six times the concentration of citrate present in wild-type bacteria.

  14. Modulation of trichloroethylene in vitro metabolism by different drugs in human.

    PubMed

    Cheikh Rouhou, Mouna; Haddad, Sami

    2014-08-01

    Toxicological interactions with drugs have the potential to modulate the toxicity of trichloroethylene (TCE). Our objective is to identify metabolic interactions between TCE and 14 widely used drugs in human suspended hepatocytes and characterize the strongest using microsomal assays. Changes in concentrations of TCE and its metabolites were measured by headspace GC-MS. Results with hepatocytes show that amoxicillin, cimetidine, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid and ranitidine caused no significant interactions. Naproxen and salicylic acid showed to increase both TCE metabolites levels, whereas acetaminophen, carbamazepine and erythromycin rather decreased them. Finally, diclofenac, gliclazide, sulphasalazine and valproic acid had an impact on the levels of only one metabolite. Among the 14 tested drugs, 5 presented the most potent interactions and were selected for confirmation with microsomes, namely naproxen, salicylic acid, acetaminophen, carbamazepine and valproic acid. Characterization in human microsomes confirmed interaction with naproxen by competitively inhibiting trichloroethanol (TCOH) glucuronidation (Ki=2.329 mM). Inhibition of TCOH formation was also confirmed for carbamazepine (partial non-competitive with Ki=70 μM). Interactions with human microsomes were not observed with salicylic acid and acetaminophen, similar to prior results in rat material. For valproic acid, interactions with microsomes were observed in rat but not in human. Inhibition patterns were shown to be similar in human and rat hepatocytes, but some differences in mechanisms were noted in microsomal material between species. Next research efforts will focus on determining the adequacy between in vitro observations and the in vivo situation.

  15. RRM1 modulates mitotane activity in adrenal cancer cells interfering with its metabolization.

    PubMed

    Germano, Antonina; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; De Francia, Silvia; Migliore, Cristina; Berruti, Alfredo; Papotti, Mauro; Terzolo, Massimo

    2015-02-05

    The anti-proliferative activity of mitotane (o,p'DDD) in adrenocortical cancer is mediated by its metabolites o,p'DDE and o,p'DDA. We previously demonstrated a functional link between ribonucleotide reductase M1(RRM1) expression and o,p'DDD activity, but the mechanism is unknown. In this study we assessed the impact of RRM1 on the bioavailability and cytotoxic activity of o,p'DDD, o,p'DDE and o,p'DDA in SW13 and H295R cells. In H295R cells, mitotane and its metabolites showed a similar cytotoxicity and RRM1 expression was not influenced by any drug. In SW13 cells, o,p'DDA only showed a cytotoxic activity and did not modify RRM1 expression, whereas the lack of sensitivity to o,p'DDE was associated to RRM1 gene up-modulation, as already demonstrated for o,p'DDD. RRM1 silencing in SW13 cells increased the intracellular transformation of mitotane into o,p'DDE and o,p'DDA. These data demonstrate that RRM1 gene interferes with mitotane metabolism in adrenocortical cancer cells, as a possible mechanisms of drug resistance.

  16. Transmammary modulation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in liver of mouse pups by mace (Myristica fragrans Houtt.).

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S K; Rao, A R

    1994-05-01

    The present study examines the possible transfer of the active principle(s) of mace (aril of the plant Myristica fragrans) through the transmammary route and its ability to modulate hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in the F1 progeny of mice. An aqueous suspension of mace at the dose levels of 0.025 or 0.1 g/animal/day was administered by oral gavage to dams from day 1 of lactation and continued daily for 14 or 21 days. Dams receiving mace treatment and their F1 pups showed significantly elevated hepatic sulfhydryl content, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase activities and cytochrome b5 content. Hepatic cytochrome P450 content decreased in dams (P < 0.05) receiving the lower mace dose for 21 days and the F1 pups (P < 0.001), but increased in dams receiving the higher dose for both time periods (P < 0.001) and the lower dose for 14 days (P < 0.05). Only the 14-day-old pups of dams receiving either mace dose showed significantly elevated (P < 0.001) levels of hepatic glutathione peroxidase.

  17. Selective retinol production by modulating the composition of retinoids from metabolically engineered E. coli.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hui-Jeong; Ha, Bo-Kyung; Zhou, Jia; Ahn, Jiyoon; Yoon, Sang-Hwal; Kim, Seon-Won

    2015-08-01

    Retinoids can be produced from E. coli when introduced with the β-carotene biosynthesis pathway and the BCMO gene. E. coli has no inherent metabolic pathways related to retinoids, therefore only retinal should be produced from the cleavage of β-carotene by BCMO. However, retinol and retinyl acetate were also produced in significant amounts, by the non-specific activity of inherent promiscuous enzymes or the antibiotic resistance marker of the retinal-producing plasmids. Retinol was produced by the ybbO gene of E. coli which encodes oxidoreductase and retinyl acetate was produced by the chloramphenicol resistance gene, called cat gene which encodes chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, present within the pS-NA plasmid that also contains the mevalonate pathway. The composition of retinoids could be modulated by manipulating the relevant genes. The composition of retinol, a commercially important retinoid, was significantly increased by the overexpression of ybbO gene and the removal of cat gene in the recombinant E. coli, which suggests the possibility of selective retinoid production in the future.

  18. Modulating Composition and Metabolic Activity of the Gut Microbiota in IBD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matijašić, Mario; Meštrović, Tomislav; Perić, Mihaela; Čipčić Paljetak, Hana; Panek, Marina; Vranešić Bender, Darija; Ljubas Kelečić, Dina; Krznarić, Željko; Verbanac, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    The healthy intestine represents a remarkable interface where sterile host tissues come in contact with gut microbiota, in a balanced state of homeostasis. The imbalance of gut homeostasis is associated with the onset of many severe pathological conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic gastrointestinal disorder increasing in incidence and severely influencing affected individuals. Despite the recent development of next generation sequencing and bioinformatics, the current scientific knowledge of specific triggers and diagnostic markers to improve interventional approaches in IBD is still scarce. In this review we present and discuss currently available and emerging therapeutic options in modulating composition and metabolic activity of gut microbiota in patients affected by IBD. Therapeutic approaches at the microbiota level, such as dietary interventions alone or with probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics, administration of antibiotics, performing fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and the use of nematodes, all represent a promising opportunities towards establishing and maintaining of well-being as well as improving underlying IBD symptoms. PMID:27104515

  19. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and metabolic modulators as pharmacological interventions to slow ageing.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Jan; Fong, Sheng; Chen, Ce-Belle; Yoong, Sialee; Pastorin, Giorgia; Schaffer, Sebastian; Cheah, Irwin; Halliwell, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Populations in many nations today are rapidly ageing. This unprecedented demographic change represents one of the main challenges of our time. A defining property of the ageing process is a marked increase in the risk of mortality and morbidity with age. The incidence of cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases increases non-linearly, sometimes exponentially with age. One of the most important tasks in biogerontology is to develop interventions leading to an increase in healthy lifespan (health span), and a better understanding of basic mechanisms underlying the ageing process itself may lead to interventions able to delay or prevent many or even all age-dependent conditions. One of the putative basic mechanisms of ageing is age-dependent mitochondrial deterioration, closely associated with damage mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Given the central role that mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction play not only in ageing but also in apoptosis, cancer, neurodegeneration and other age-related diseases there is great interest in approaches to protect mitochondria from ROS-mediated damage. In this review, we explore strategies of targeting mitochondria to reduce mitochondrial oxidative damage with the aim of preventing or delaying age-dependent decline in mitochondrial function and some of the resulting pathologies. We discuss mitochondria-targeted and -localized antioxidants (e.g.: MitoQ, SkQ, ergothioneine), mitochondrial metabolic modulators (e.g. dichloroacetic acid), and uncouplers (e.g.: uncoupling proteins, dinitrophenol) as well as some alternative future approaches for targeting compounds to the mitochondria, including advances from nanotechnology.

  20. Potentiating the antitumour response of CD8+ T cells by modulating cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Bai, Yibing; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Shuokai; Zheng, Xiaojun; Meng, Xiangbo; Li, Lunyi; Wang, Jing; Xu, Chenguang; Yan, Chengsong; Wang, Lijuan; Chang, Catharine C. Y.; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Zhang, Ti; Zhou, Penghui; Song, Bao-Liang; Liu, Wanli; Sun, Shao-cong; Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Bo-liang; Xu, Chenqi

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have a central role in antitumour immunity, but their activity is suppressed in the tumour microenvironment1–4. Reactivating the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells is of great clinical interest in cancer immunotherapy. Here we report a new mechanism by which the antitumour response of mouse CD8+ T cells can be potentiated by modulating cholesterol metabolism. Inhibiting cholesterol esterification in T cells by genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of ACAT1, a key cholesterol esterification enzyme5, led to potentiated effector function and enhanced proliferation of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells. This is due to the increase in the plasma membrane cholesterol level of CD8+ T cells, which causes enhanced T-cell receptor clustering and signalling as well as more efficient formation of the immunological synapse. ACAT1-deficient CD8+ T cells were better than wild-type CD8+ T cells at controlling melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. We used the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe, which was previously tested in clinical trials for treating atherosclerosis and showed a good human safety profile6,7, to treat melanoma in mice and observed a good antitumour effect. A combined therapy of avasimibe plus an anti-PD-1 antibody showed better efficacy than monotherapies in controlling tumour progression. ACAT1, an established target for atherosclerosis, is therefore also a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26982734

  1. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson ... Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons; 2014:chap ...

  2. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... El metabolismo Metabolism Basics Our bodies get the energy they need from food through metabolism, the chemical ... that convert the fuel from food into the energy needed to do everything from moving to thinking ...

  3. Simultaneous modulation of transport and metabolism of acyclovir prodrugs across rabbit cornea: An approach involving enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Katragadda, Suresh; Talluri, Ravi S; Mitra, Ashim K

    2006-08-31

    The aim of this study is to identify the class of enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV) and to modulate transport and metabolism of amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of acyclovir by enzyme inhibitors across rabbit cornea. l-Valine ester of acyclovir, valacyclovir (VACV) and l-glycine-valine ester of acyclovir, gly-val-acyclovir (GVACV) were used as model compounds. Hydrolysis studies of VACV and GVACV in corneal homogenate were conducted in presence of various enzyme inhibitors. IC(50) values were determined for the enzyme inhibitors. Transport studies were conducted with isolated rabbit corneas at 34 degrees C. Complete inhibition of VACV hydrolysis was observed in the presence of Pefabloc SC (4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl-fluoride) and PCMB (p-chloromercuribenzoic acid). Similar trend was also observed with GVACV in the presence of bestatin. IC(50) values of PCMB and bestatin for VACV and GVACV were found to be 3.81+/-0.94 and 0.34+/-0.08muM respectively. Eserine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate (TEPP) and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) also produced significant inhibition of VACV hydrolysis. Transport of VACV and GVACV across cornea showed decreased metabolic rate and modulation of transport in presence of PCMB and bestain respectively. The principle enzyme classes responsible for the hydrolysis of VACV and GVACV were carboxylesterases and aminopeptidases respectively. Enzyme inhibitors modulated the transport and metabolism of prodrugs simultaneously even though their affinity towards prodrugs was distinct. In conclusion, utility of enzyme inhibitors to modulate transport and metabolism of prodrugs appears to be promising strategy for enhancing drug transport across cornea.

  4. A sturgeon-derived bioactive compound beneficially modulates nuclear receptors controlling metabolic functions in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Francesco; Lorenzetti, Aldo; Catanzaro, Roberto; Zerbinati, Nicola; Jain, Shalini; Solimene, Umberto; Yaduvanshi, Santos K; Yadav, Hariom; Sapienza, Chiara; Srivastava, Nalini; Milazzo, Michele; Italia, Angelo

    2013-06-19

    The aim of the present study was to test the possible effects of a novel sturgeon-derived compound  (LD-1227) on inflammatory markers related to metabolic nuclear receptors in patients with metabolic syndrome. The study population consisted of 76 patients with metabolic syndrome and 30 healthy subjects who were maintained to their current treatments and randomly supplemented: A) LD-1227 (n=38) or B) placebo (n=38) as compared to C) healthy controls (n=30). LD-1227 or placebo (water-soluble starch) were given daily at breakfast and dinner for three months. Levels of hs-CRP, IL-6, TNF-α, leptin and adiponectin/ resistin index were assayed at the entry, 1 month and 3 months afterwards. At the end of the study period, as compared to B group, LD-1227-treated patients showed a significant improvement of all parameters tested, irrespective of the presence of diabetes. In particular, levels of adiponectin and adiponectin/ resistin index significantly increased following LD-1227 administration. Although the metabolic syndrome remains a multifaceted condition requiring a complex approach, LD-1227 could be a potential safe therapeutic tool to be integrated into a wider treatment and preventive medicine schedule strategy.

  5. West African and Amerindian ancestry and risk of myocardial infarction and metabolic syndrome in the Central Valley population of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Bare, Lance; Arellano, Andre; Catanese, Joseph; Campos, Hannia

    2010-06-01

    Genetic ancestry and environmental factors may contribute to the ethnic differences in risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), metabolic syndrome (MS) or its individual components. The population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica offers a unique opportunity to assess the role of genetic ancestry in these chronic diseases because it derived from the admixture of a relatively small number of founders of Southern European, Amerindian, and West African origin. We aimed to determine whether genetic ancestry is associated with risk of myocardial infarction (MI), MS and its individual components in the Central Valley of Costa Rica. We genotyped 39 ancestral informative markers in cases (n = 1,998) with a first non-fatal acute MI and population-based controls (n = 1,998) matched for age, sex, and area of residence, to estimate individual ancestry proportions. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using conditional (MI) and unconditional (MS and its components) logistic regression adjusting for relevant confounders. Mean individual ancestry proportions in cases and controls were 57.5 versus 57.8% for the Southern European, 38.4 versus 38.3% for the Amerindian and 4.1 versus 3.8% for the West African ancestry. Compared with Southern European ancestry, each 10% increase in West African ancestry was associated with a 29% increase in MI, OR (95% CI) = 1.29 (1.07, 1.56), and with a 30% increase on the risk of hypertension, OR (95% CI) = 1.30 (1.00, 1.70). Each 10% increase in Amerindian ancestry was associated with a 14% increase on the risk of MS, OR (95% CI) = 1.14 (1.00, 1.30), and 20% increase on the risk of impaired fasting glucose, OR (95% CI) = 1.20 (1.01, 1.42). These results show that the high variability of admixture proportions in the Central Valley population offers a unique opportunity to uncover the genetic basis of ethnic differences on the risk of disease.

  6. Constitutive expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and related transcription factors in cattle testis and their modulation by illicit steroids.

    PubMed

    Lopparelli, Rosa Maria; Zancanella, Vanessa; Giantin, Mery; Ravarotto, Licia; Cozzi, Giulio; Montesissa, Clara; Dacasto, Mauro

    2010-10-01

    In veterinary species, little information about extrahepatic drug metabolism is actually available. Therefore, the presence of foremost drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and related transcription factors mRNAs was initially investigated in cattle testis; then, their possible modulation following the in vivo exposure to illicit growth promoters (GPs), which represent a major issue in cattle farming, was explored. All target genes were expressed in cattle testis, albeit to a lower extent compared to liver ones; furthermore, illicit protocols containing dexamethasone and 17β-oestradiol significantly up-regulated cytochrome P450 1A1, 2E1, oestrogen receptor-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α mRNA levels. Overall, the constitutive expression of foremost DMEs and related transcription factors was demonstrated for the first time in cattle testis and illicit GPs were shown to affect pre-transcriptionally some of them, with possible consequences upon testicular xenobiotic drug metabolism.

  7. Garlic oil attenuated nitrosodiethylamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating the metabolic activation and detoxification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Li; Zeng, Tao; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) is a potent carcinogen widely existing in the environment. Our previous study has demonstrated that garlic oil (GO) could prevent NDEA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. It has been well documented that the metabolic activation may play important roles in NDEA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, we designed the current study to explore the potential mechanisms by investigating the changes of hepatic phase Ⅰ enzymes (including cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP) 2E1, CYP1A2 and CYP1A1) and phase Ⅱ enzymes (including glutathione S transferases (GSTs) and UDP- Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)) by using enzymatic methods, real-time PCR, and western blotting analysis. We found that NDEA treatment resulted in significant decreases of the activities of CYP2E1, CYP1A2, GST alpha, GST mu, UGTs and increases of the activities of CYP1A1 and GST pi. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of CYP2E1, CYP1A2, GST alpha, GST mu and UGT1A6 in the liver of NDEA-treated rats were significantly decreased compared with those of the control group rats, while the mRNA and protein levels of CYP1A1 and GST pi were dramatically increased. Interestingly, all these adverse effects induced by NDEA were simultaneously and significantly suppressed by GO co-treatment. These data suggest that the protective effects of GO against NDEA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis might be, at least partially, attributed to the modulation of phase I and phase II enzymes.

  8. Potentiation of cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity in mantle cell lymphoma through modulation of ceramide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Kristin; Sander, Birgitta; Bielawski, Jacek; Hannun, Yusuf A; Flygare, Jenny

    2009-07-01

    Ceramide levels are elevated in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells following treatment with cannabinoids. Here, we investigated the pathways of ceramide accumulation in the MCL cell line Rec-1 using the stable endocannabinoid analogue R(+)-methanandamide (R-MA). We further interfered with the conversion of ceramide into sphingolipids that promote cell growth. Treatment with R-MA led to increased levels of ceramide species C16, C18, C24, and C(24:1) and transcriptional induction of ceramide synthases (CerS) 3 and 6. The effects were attenuated using SR141716A, which has high affinity to cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). The CB1-mediated induction of CerS3 and CerS6 mRNA was confirmed using Win-55,212-2. Simultaneous silencing of CerS3 and CerS6 using small interfering RNA abrogated the R-MA-induced accumulation of C16 and C24. Inhibition of either of the enzymes serine palmitoyl transferase, CerS, and dihydroceramide desaturase within the de novo ceramide pathway reversed ceramide accumulation and cell death induced by R-MA treatment. To enhance the cytotoxic effect R-MA, sphingosine kinase-1 and glucosylceramide synthase, enzymes that convert ceramide to the pro-proliferative sphingolipids sphingosine-1-phospate and glucosylceramide, respectively, were inhibited. Suppression of either enzyme using inhibitors or small interfering RNA potentiated the decreased viability, induction of cell death, and ceramide accumulation induced by R-MA treatment. Our findings suggest that R-MA induces cell death in MCL via CB1-mediated up-regulation of the de novo ceramide synthesis pathway. Furthermore, this is the first study were the cytotoxic effect of a cannabinoid is enhanced by modulation of ceramide metabolism.

  9. Garlic Oil Attenuated Nitrosodiethylamine-Induced Hepatocarcinogenesis by Modulating the Metabolic Activation and Detoxification Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cui-Li; Zeng, Tao; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) is a potent carcinogen widely existing in the environment. Our previous study has demonstrated that garlic oil (GO) could prevent NDEA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. It has been well documented that the metabolic activation may play important roles in NDEA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, we designed the current study to explore the potential mechanisms by investigating the changes of hepatic phase Ⅰ enzymes (including cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP) 2E1, CYP1A2 and CYP1A1) and phase Ⅱ enzymes (including glutathione S transferases (GSTs) and UDP- Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)) by using enzymatic methods, real-time PCR, and western blotting analysis. We found that NDEA treatment resulted in significant decreases of the activities of CYP2E1, CYP1A2, GST alpha, GST mu, UGTs and increases of the activities of CYP1A1 and GST pi. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of CYP2E1, CYP1A2, GST alpha, GST mu and UGT1A6 in the liver of NDEA-treated rats were significantly decreased compared with those of the control group rats, while the mRNA and protein levels of CYP1A1 and GST pi were dramatically increased. Interestingly, all these adverse effects induced by NDEA were simultaneously and significantly suppressed by GO co-treatment. These data suggest that the protective effects of GO against NDEA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis might be, at least partially, attributed to the modulation of phase I and phase II enzymes. PMID:23494807

  10. CLOCK genetic variation and metabolic syndrome risk: modulation by monounsaturated fatty acids123

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Shen, Jian; Parnell, Laurence D; Arnett, Donna K; Tsai, Michael Y; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Ordovas, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Disruption of the circadian system may be causal for manifestations of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Objective: The objective was to study the associations of 5 CLOCK polymorphisms with MetS features by analyzing fatty acid (FA) composition from dietary and red blood cell (RBC) membrane sources. Design: Participants (n = 1100) in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) study were included. Dietary intake was estimated with a validated questionnaire. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements and genotypes were determined. Postprandial lipids and the FA composition of RBC membranes were analyzed. Results: CLOCK single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with obesity and individual components of MetS. For single nucleotide polymorphism rs4580704, minor allele carriers had a 46% lower risk of hypertension than did noncarriers. The monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) content of RBC membranes, particularly oleic acid, changed according to CLOCK genetic variants (P < 0.05). We identified significant gene-diet interactions associated with MetS at the CLOCK locus. By dichotomizing MUFA intake, we found different effects across rs4580704 genotypes for glucose (P = 0.020) and insulin resistance (P = 0.026). The protective effect of the minor allele on insulin sensitivity was only present when MUFA intake was >13.2% of energy. We also found different effects across CLOCK 3111T→C genotypes for saturated fatty acid intake (% of energy) (P = 0.017). The deleterious effect of gene variants on waist circumference was only found with high saturated fatty acid intakes (>11.8%). Conclusions: CLOCK polymorphisms interact with FAs to modulate MetS traits. The dietary source and membrane content of MUFAs are implicated in the relations between alterations in the circadian system and MetS. PMID:19846548

  11. The tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase modulates cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad

    2015-01-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a tumor suppressor that is frequently altered in cancer. WWOX binds several proteins and thus is postulated to be involved in a variety of cellular processes. Interestingly, Wwox-knockout mice develop normally in utero but succumb to hypoglycemia and other metabolic defects early in life resulting in their death by 3–4 weeks of age. Cumulative evidence has linked WWOX with cellular metabolism including steroid metabolism, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism, bone metabolism and, more recently, glucose metabolism. In this review, we discuss these evolving functions for WWOX and how its deletion affects cellular metabolism and neoplastic progression. PMID:25491415

  12. 17β Estradiol Modulates Perfusion Pressure and Expression of 5-LOX and CYP450 4A in the Isolated Kidney of Metabolic Syndrome Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Muñoz, A M; Guarner Lans, V; Soria-Castro, E; Diaz-Diaz, E; Torrico-Lavayen, R; Tena-Betancourt, E; Pérez-Torres, I

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and progression of nephropathy depend on sex. We examined a protective effect of estradiol against nephropathy in metabolic syndrome through the modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolism by activating the 5-lipoxygenase and cytochrome p450 4A pathways. 28 female Wistar rats were divided into four groups of seven animals each: control, intact metabolic syndrome, ovariectomized metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome ovariectomized plus estradiol. Blood pressure, body weight, body fat, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA-index, albuminuria, and TNF-α were increased in ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats (p < 0.001). The perfusion pressure in isolated kidneys of ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats in presence of 4 μg of arachidonic acid was increased. The inhibitors of the arachidonic acid metabolism Baicalein, Miconazole, and Indomethacin in these rats decreased the perfusion pressure by 57.62%, 99.83%, and 108.5%, respectively and they decreased creatinine clearance and the arachidonic acid percentage. Phospholipase A2 expression in the kidney of ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats was not modified. 5-lipoxygenase was increased in metabolic syndrome ovariectomized rats while cytochrome p450 4A was decreased. In conclusion, the loss of estradiol increases renal damage while the treatment with estradiol benefits renal function by modulating arachidonic acid metabolism through the 5-lipoxygenase and cytochrome p450 4A pathways.

  13. Cutting Edge: Murine Mast Cells Rapidly Modulate Metabolic Pathways Essential for Distinct Effector Functions.

    PubMed

    Phong, Binh; Avery, Lyndsay; Menk, Ashley V; Delgoffe, Greg M; Kane, Lawrence P

    2017-01-15

    There is growing appreciation that cellular metabolic and bioenergetic pathways do not play merely passive roles in activated leukocytes. Rather, metabolism has important roles in controlling cellular activation, differentiation, survival, and effector function. Much of this work has been performed in T cells; however, there is still very little information regarding mast cell metabolic reprogramming and its effect on cellular function. Mast cells perform important barrier functions and help control type 2 immune responses. In this study we show that murine bone marrow-derived mast cells rapidly alter their metabolism in response to stimulation through the FcεRI. We also demonstrate that specific metabolic pathways appear to be differentially required for the control of mast cell function. Manipulation of metabolic pathways may represent a novel point for the manipulation of mast cell activation.

  14. Estrogen modulation of the ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction via DAPK3/Akt/ERK activation in male rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M. Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2015-09-15

    Evidence suggests that male rats are protected against the hypotensive and myocardial depressant effects of ethanol compared with females. We investigated whether E{sub 2} modifies the myocardial and oxidative effects of ethanol in male rats. Conscious male rats received ethanol (0.5, 1 or 1.5 g/kg i.v.) 30-min after E{sub 2} (1 μg/kg i.v.) or its vehicle (saline), and hearts were collected at the conclusion of hemodynamic measurements for ex vivo molecular studies. Ethanol had no effect in vehicle-treated rats, but it caused dose-related reductions in LV developed pressure (LVDP), end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), rate of rise in LV pressure (dP/dt{sub max}) and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures in E{sub 2}-pretreated rats. These effects were associated with elevated (i) indices of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) malondialdehyde (MDA) protein adducts, and (iii) phosphorylated death-associated protein kinase-3 (DAPK3), Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). Enhanced myocardial anti-oxidant enzymes (heme oxygenase-1, catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2) activities were also demonstrated. In conclusion, E{sub 2} promotes ethanol-evoked myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction in male rats. The present findings highlight the risk of developing myocardial dysfunction in men who consume alcohol while receiving E{sub 2} for specific medical conditions. - Highlights: • Ethanol lowers blood pressure and causes LV dysfunction in E{sub 2}-treated rats. • E{sub 2}/ethanol aggravates cardiac oxidative state via of DAPK3/Akt/ERK activation. • E{sub 2}/ethanol causes a feedback increase in cardiac HO-1, catalase and ALDH2. • Alcohol might increase risk of myocardial dysfunction in men treated with E{sub 2}.

  15. Laser light induced modulations in metabolic activities in human brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2008-03-01

    The role of low visible or near infra-red laser intensity in suppressing metabolic activity of malignant human brain cancer (glioblastoma) cells was investigated through the application of either a continuous wave 633nm HeNe or a pulsed picosecond 1,552nm wavelength laser. Human glioblastomas were exposed in their growth culture medium with serum for several energy doses. For both types of laser exposures the glioblastomas exhibited a maximal decline in the metabolic activity relative to their respective sham control counterparts at 10 J/cm2. The cellular metabolic activities for various treatment doses were measured through the colorimetric MTS metabolic assay after the laser exposure. Interestingly, addition of (the enzyme) catalase in the growth medium prior to the laser exposure was found to diminish the laser induced metabolic suppression for all fluence treatment conditions, thus suggesting a functional role of H IIO II in the metabolic suppression. Taken together, our findings reveal that visible or near infra-red low level light exposures could potentially be a viable tool in reducing the metabolic activity of cancers; evidence at hand implicates a role of light induced H IIO II in bringing about in part, suppression in the metabolic activity. Due to the cellular "biphasic" response to the laser exposure, further research needs to be undertaken to determine exposure parameters which would optimize metabolic and cellular growth suppression in-vivo.

  16. The ATP-binding cassette transporter-2 (ABCA2) regulates esterification of plasma membrane cholesterol by modulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Davis, Warren

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters are a large family (~48 genes divided into seven families A-G) of proteins that utilize the energy of ATP-hydrolysis to pump substrates across lipid bilayers against a concentration gradient. The ABC "A" subfamily is comprised of 13 members and transport sterols, phospholipids and bile acids. ABCA2 is the most abundant ABC transporter in human and rodent brain with highest expression in oligodendrocytes, although it is also expressed in neurons. Several groups have studied a possible connection between ABCA2 and Alzheimer's disease as well as early atherosclerosis. ABCA2 expression levels have been associated with changes in cholesterol and sphingolipid metabolism. In this paper, we hypothesized that ABCA2 expression level may regulate esterification of plasma membrane-derived cholesterol by modulation of sphingolipid metabolism. ABCA2 overexpression in N2a neuroblastoma cells was associated with an altered bilayer distribution of the sphingolipid ceramide that inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity and cholesterol esterification. In contrast, depletion of endogenous ABCA2 in the rat schwannoma cell line D6P2T increased esterification of plasma membrane cholesterol following treatment with exogenous bacterial sphingomyelinase. These findings suggest that control of ABCA2 expression level may be a key locus of regulation for esterification of plasma membrane-derived cholesterol through modulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

  17. Maternal omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients modulate fetal lipid metabolism: A review.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that alterations in the mother's diet or metabolism during pregnancy has long-term adverse effects on the lipid metabolism in the offspring. There is growing interest in the role of specific nutrients especially omega-3 fatty acids in the pathophysiology of lipid disorders. A series of studies carried out in humans and rodents in our department have consistently suggested a link between omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid and micronutrients (vitamin B12 and folic acid) in the one carbon metabolic cycle and its effect on the fatty acid metabolism, hepatic transcription factors and DNA methylation patterns. However the association of maternal intake or metabolism of these nutrients with fetal lipid metabolism is relatively less explored. In this review, we provide insights into the role of maternal omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 and their influence on fetal lipid metabolism through various mechanisms which influence phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase activity, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, adiponectin signaling pathway and epigenetic process like chromatin methylation. This will help understand the possible mechanisms involved in fetal lipid metabolism and may provide important clues for the prevention of lipid disorders in the offspring.

  18. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities.

  19. Supplementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae modulates the metabolic response to lipopolysaccharide challenge in feedlot steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Live yeast has the potential to serve as an alternative to the use of low-dose supplementation of antibiotics in cattle due to the ability to alter ruminant metabolism; which in turn may influence the immune response. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the metabolic response to ...

  20. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and intestines. Several of the hormones of the endocrine system are involved in controlling the rate and direction ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Endocrine System What Can I Do About My High Metabolism? ...

  1. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms. Metabolic diseases and conditions include: Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism is caused ... or through surgery or radiation treatments. Hypothyroidism (pronounced: hi-po-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hypothyroidism is caused ...

  2. Integration of metabolic and gene regulatory networks modulates the C. elegans dietary response.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; MacNeil, Lesley T; Arda, H Efsun; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2013-03-28

    Expression profiles are tailored according to dietary input. However, the networks that control dietary responses remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine forward and reverse genetic screens to delineate a network of 184 genes that affect the C. elegans dietary response to Comamonas DA1877 bacteria. We find that perturbation of a mitochondrial network composed of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and the TCA cycle affects the dietary response. In humans, mutations in the corresponding genes cause inborn diseases of amino acid metabolism, most of which are treated by dietary intervention. We identify several transcription factors (TFs) that mediate the changes in gene expression upon metabolic network perturbations. Altogether, our findings unveil a transcriptional response system that is poised to sense dietary cues and metabolic imbalances, illustrating extensive communication between metabolic networks in the mitochondria and gene regulatory networks in the nucleus.

  3. Extracellular pH Modulates Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Cell Metabolism and Susceptibility to the Mitochondrial Inhibitor Niclosamide

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Joseph E.; Brandenburg, Matthew W.; Ge, Xia; Crowley, Jan R.; Kirmess, Kristopher M.; Som, Avik; D’Avignon, D. Andre; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Achilefu, Samuel; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is a lethal variant of prostate cancer that is associated with castrate-resistant growth, metastasis, and mortality. The tumor environment of neuroendocrine prostate cancer is heterogeneous and characterized by hypoxia, necrosis, and numerous mitoses. Although acidic extracellular pH has been implicated in aggressive cancer features including metastasis and therapeutic resistance, its role in neuroendocrine prostate cancer physiology and metabolism has not yet been explored. We used the well-characterized PNEC cell line as a model to establish the effects of extracellular pH (pH 6.5, 7.4, and 8.5) on neuroendocrine prostate cancer cell metabolism. We discovered that alkalinization of extracellular pH converted cellular metabolism to a nutrient consumption-dependent state that was susceptible to glucose deprivation, glutamine deprivation, and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) mediated inhibition of glycolysis. Conversely, acidic pH shifted cellular metabolism toward an oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent state that was susceptible to OXPHOS inhibition. Based upon this mechanistic knowledge of pH-dependent metabolism, we identified that the FDA-approved anti-helminthic niclosamide depolarized mitochondrial potential and depleted ATP levels in PNEC cells whose effects were enhanced in acidic pH. To further establish relevance of these findings, we tested the effects of extracellular pH on susceptibility to nutrient deprivation and OXPHOS inhibition in a cohort of castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines C4-2B, PC-3, and PC-3M. We discovered similar pH-dependent toxicity profiles among all cell lines with these treatments. These findings underscore a potential importance to acidic extracellular pH in the modulation of cell metabolism in tumors and development of an emerging paradigm that exploits the synergy of environment and therapeutic efficacy in cancer. PMID:27438712

  4. Extracellular pH Modulates Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Cell Metabolism and Susceptibility to the Mitochondrial Inhibitor Niclosamide.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Joseph E; Brandenburg, Matthew W; Ge, Xia; Crowley, Jan R; Kirmess, Kristopher M; Som, Avik; D'Avignon, D Andre; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Achilefu, Samuel; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is a lethal variant of prostate cancer that is associated with castrate-resistant growth, metastasis, and mortality. The tumor environment of neuroendocrine prostate cancer is heterogeneous and characterized by hypoxia, necrosis, and numerous mitoses. Although acidic extracellular pH has been implicated in aggressive cancer features including metastasis and therapeutic resistance, its role in neuroendocrine prostate cancer physiology and metabolism has not yet been explored. We used the well-characterized PNEC cell line as a model to establish the effects of extracellular pH (pH 6.5, 7.4, and 8.5) on neuroendocrine prostate cancer cell metabolism. We discovered that alkalinization of extracellular pH converted cellular metabolism to a nutrient consumption-dependent state that was susceptible to glucose deprivation, glutamine deprivation, and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) mediated inhibition of glycolysis. Conversely, acidic pH shifted cellular metabolism toward an oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent state that was susceptible to OXPHOS inhibition. Based upon this mechanistic knowledge of pH-dependent metabolism, we identified that the FDA-approved anti-helminthic niclosamide depolarized mitochondrial potential and depleted ATP levels in PNEC cells whose effects were enhanced in acidic pH. To further establish relevance of these findings, we tested the effects of extracellular pH on susceptibility to nutrient deprivation and OXPHOS inhibition in a cohort of castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines C4-2B, PC-3, and PC-3M. We discovered similar pH-dependent toxicity profiles among all cell lines with these treatments. These findings underscore a potential importance to acidic extracellular pH in the modulation of cell metabolism in tumors and development of an emerging paradigm that exploits the synergy of environment and therapeutic efficacy in cancer.

  5. Food Components Modulate Obesity and Energy Metabolism via the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid-Sensing Nuclear Receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and hypertension. Many modern people have a tendency to overeat owing to stress and loosening of self-control. Moreover, energy expenditure varies greatly among individuals. Scientific reduction of obesity is important under these circumstances. Furthermore, recent research on molecular levels has clarified the differentiation of adipocytes, the level of subsequent fat accumulation, and the secretion of the biologically active adipokines by adipocytes. Adipose tissues and obesity have become the most important target for the prevention and treatment of many chronic diseases. We have identified various food-derived compounds modulating nuclear receptors, especially peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor(PPAR), in the regulation of energy metabolism and obesity. In this review, we discuss the PPARs that are most important in obesity and energy metabolism.

  6. Beyond anorexia -cachexia. Nutrition and modulation of cancer patients' metabolism: supplementary, complementary or alternative anti-neoplastic therapy?

    PubMed

    Laviano, Alessandro; Seelaender, Marilia; Sanchez-Lara, Karla; Gioulbasanis, Ioannis; Molfino, Alessio; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo

    2011-09-01

    Anorexia and muscle wasting are frequently observed in cancer patients and influence their clinical outcome. The better understanding of the mechanisms underlying behavioral changes and altered metabolism yielded to the development of specialized nutritional support, which enhances utilization of provided calories and proteins by counteracting some of the metabolic derangements occurring during tumor growth. Inflammation appears to be a key factor determining the cancer-associated biochemical abnormalities eventually leading to anorexia and cachexia. Interestingly, inflammation is also involved in carcinogenesis, cancer progression and metastasis by impairing immune surveillance, among other mechanisms. Therefore, nutritional interventions aiming at modulating inflammation to restore nutritional status may also result in improved response to pharmacological anti-cancer therapies. Recent clinical data show that supplementation with nutrients targeting inflammation and immune system increases response rate and survival in cancer patients. This suggests that nutrition therapy should be considered as an important adjuvant strategy in the multidimensional approach to cancer patients.

  7. Increased intestinal permeation and modulation of presystemic metabolism of resveratrol formulated into self-emulsifying drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Mamadou, G; Charrueau, C; Dairou, J; Limas Nzouzi, N; Eto, B; Ponchel, G

    2017-02-17

    Despite various beneficial biological properties, resveratrol lacks therapeutic applications because of poor bioavailability due to variable absorption and extensive metabolism. The present study aims at evaluating the capability of self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) to enhance resveratrol permeation across rat intestine and to modulate its presystemic metabolism. For that purpose, semi-solid (SS) and liquid (L) SEDDS were prepared and dispersed in an aqueous buffer to produce nanoemulsions (NE). The jejunal absorptive transepithelial fluxes (Jms) of resveratrol elicited by these formulations (SS-NE and L-NE) and presystemic metabolization were determined on Ussing chambers. The absorptive fluxes through the intestinal epithelium from the nanoemulsions (Jms=20.5±3.1μgh(-1)cm(-2) SS-NE; 28.9±2.9μgh(-1)cm(-2) L-NE) were significantly increased compared to an ethanolic control solution (Jms=3.4±0.3μgh(-1)cm(-2), p<0.05). No significant variations of conductance were observed after two hours of contact between the formulations and the mucosa. Simultaneously, the presystemic metabolization pattern was modified in the case of the nanoemulsions compared to the control solution. In conclusion, our data suggests that oil-in-water nanoemulsions prepared from SEDDS dispersions of medium-chain lipids could be promising formulations for enhancing oral delivery of resveratrol.

  8. Modulation of GR activity does not affect the in vitro metabolism of cortisol by rainbow trout ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Christie, Heather; Leatherland, John

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the study was to determine whether the metabolic clearance of cortisol from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) ovarian follicles is affected by the level of ovarian steroidogenesis, and whether it involves the activation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Ovarian follicles were incubated in vitro; the adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, was used to stimulate ovarian steroidogenesis, and the modulation of GR activity was brought about using GR agonists (cortisol and dexamethasone) or the GR antagonist, mifepristone (RU486). The follicles were co-incubated with [2, 4, 6, 7 (3)H] cortisol, and the tritium-labelled steroid products were separated by HPLC. In addition, the rates of expression of genes encoding for the two forms of GR (gr1 and gr2) were measured. Cortisone, cortisol sulphate, and cortisone sulphate were the major glucocorticoid products of cortisol metabolism, indicative of the action of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and glucocorticoid sulphotransferase in the follicular cells. There were no effects of RU486 or forskolin on the rates of [(3)H]cortisol metabolism suggesting that cortisol metabolism by ovarian follicles was independent of GR activation, and not influenced by increased activation of gonadal reproductive steroidogenesis.

  9. Transcriptional Profiles of Drought-Related Genes in Modulating Metabolic Processes and Antioxidant Defenses in Lolium multiflorum

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ling; Zhang, Xinquan; Wang, Jianping; Ma, Xiao; Zhou, Meiliang; Huang, LinKai; Nie, Gang; Wang, Pengxi; Yang, Zhongfu; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental stress that limits growth and development of cool-season annual grasses. Drought transcriptional profiles of resistant and susceptible lines were studied to understand the molecular mechanisms of drought tolerance in annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.). A total of 4718 genes exhibited significantly differential expression in two L. multiflorum lines. Additionally, up-regulated genes associated with drought response in the resistant lines were compared with susceptible lines. Gene ontology enrichment and pathway analyses revealed that genes partially encoding drought-responsive proteins as key regulators were significantly involved in carbon metabolism, lipid metabolism, and signal transduction. Comparable gene expression was used to identify the genes that contribute to the high drought tolerance in resistant lines of annual ryegrass. Moreover, we proposed the hypothesis that short-term drought have a beneficial effect on oxidation stress, which may be ascribed to a direct effect on the drought tolerance of annual ryegrass. Evidence suggests that some of the genes encoding antioxidants (HPTs, GGT, AP, 6-PGD, and G6PDH) function as antioxidant in lipid metabolism and signal transduction pathways, which have indispensable and promoting roles in drought resistance. This study provides the first transcriptome data on the induction of drought-related gene expression in annual ryegrass, especially via modulation of metabolic homeostasis, signal transduction, and antioxidant defenses to improve drought tolerance response to short-term drought stress. PMID:27200005

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ 2 Modulates Late-Pregnancy Homeostatic Metabolic Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Yurena; Díez-Hochleitner, Monica; Izquierdo-Lahuerta, Adriana; Corrales, Patricia; Horrillo, Daniel; Velasco, Ismael; Martínez-García, Cristina; Campbell, Mark; Sevillano, Julio; Ricote, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Ramos, Maria Pilar; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy requires adaptation of maternal energy metabolism, including expansion and functional modifications of adipose tissue. Insulin resistance (IR), predominantly during late gestation, is a physiological metabolic adaptation that serves to support the metabolic demands of fetal growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptations are not fully understood and may contribute to gestational diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) controls adipogenesis, glucose and lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. The PPARγ2 isoform is mainly expressed in adipocytes and is thus likely to contribute to adipose tissue adaptation during late pregnancy. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of PPARγ2 to the metabolic adaptations occurring during the late phase of pregnancy in the context of IR. Using a model of late pregnancy in PPARγ2 knockout (KO) mice, we found that deletion of PPARγ2 exacerbated IR in association with lower serum adiponectin levels, increased body weight and enhanced lipid accumulation in the liver. Lack of PPARγ2 provoked changes in the distribution of fat mass and preferentially prevented expansion of the perigonadal depot while at the same time exacerbating inflammation. Pregnant PPARγ2KO mice presented adipose tissue depot-dependent decreased expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Collectively, these data indicate that PPARγ2 is essential in promoting healthy adipose tissue expansion and immune and metabolic functionality during pregnancy, contributing to the physiological adaptations that lead gestation to term. PMID:27782293

  11. Exercise training prevents increased intraocular pressure and sympathetic vascular modulation in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castro, E F S; Mostarda, C T; Rodrigues, B; Moraes-Silva, I C; Feriani, D J; De Angelis, K; Irigoyen, M C

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to study the effects of exercise training (ET) performed by rats on a 10-week high-fructose diet on metabolic, hemodynamic, and autonomic changes, as well as intraocular pressure (IOP). Male Wistar rats receiving fructose overload in drinking water (100 g/L) were concomitantly trained on a treadmill for 10 weeks (FT group) or kept sedentary (F group), and a control group (C) was kept in normal laboratory conditions. The metabolic evaluation comprised the Lee index, glycemia, and insulin tolerance test (KITT). Arterial pressure (AP) was measured directly, and systolic AP variability was performed to determine peripheral autonomic modulation. ET attenuated impaired metabolic parameters, AP, IOP, and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) induced by fructose overload (FT vs F). The increase in peripheral sympathetic modulation in F rats, demonstrated by systolic AP variance and low frequency (LF) band (F: 37±2, 6.6±0.3 vs C: 26±3, 3.6±0.5 mmHg2), was prevented by ET (FT: 29±3, 3.4±0.7 mmHg2). Positive correlations were found between the LF band and right IOP (r=0.57, P=0.01) and left IOP (r=0.64, P=0.003). Negative correlations were noted between KITT values and right IOP (r=-0.55, P=0.01) and left IOP (r=-0.62, P=0.005). ET in rats effectively prevented metabolic abnormalities and AP and IOP increases promoted by a high-fructose diet. In addition, ocular benefits triggered by exercise training were associated with peripheral autonomic improvement.

  12. Myocardial Salvaging Effects of Berberine in Experimental Diabetes Co-Existing with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Manjusha K.; Mohanty, Ipseeta Ray; Maheshwari, Ujwala; Deshmukh, Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the Berberis aristata, has been shown to display a wide array of pharmacological activities (hypoglycaemic and hypolipidemic). Aim The present study was designed to investigate whether these pharmacological properties translate into the cardioprotective effects of Berberine in the setting of diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods Necessary approval from the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee was taken for the study. Experimental diabetes was produced with single dose of Streptozotocin (STZ): 45mg/kg ip and myocardial infarction was induced by administering Isoproterenol (ISP): 85mg/kg, sc to rats on 35th & 36th day. After the confirmation of diabetes on 7th day (>200mg/dl), Berberine (100 mg/kg) was administered orally to experimental rats from day 8 and continued for 30 days thereafter. Various anti-diabetic (Glucose, HbA1c), cardioprotective (CPK-MB), metabolic (lipid profile), safety {liver function (SGPT, kidney function (Creatinine)} and histopathological indices of injury were evaluated in Healthy Control, Diabetic Control and Berberine treated groups. Results Administration of STZ-ISP resulted in a significant decrease in body weight (p<0.001), diabetic changes (increase in blood glucose, HbA1c), cardiac injury (leakage of myocardial CPK-MB), altered lipid profile, SGPT, creatinine levels (p<0.001) in the diabetic control group rats as compared to healthy control. Berberine treatment demonstrated significant antidiabetic as well as myocardial salvaging effects as indicated by restoration of blood glucose, HbA1c and CPK-MB levels (p<0.001) compared to diabetic control group. In addition, Berberine favourably modulated the lipid parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL). Subsequent to ISP challenge, histopathological assessment of heart, pancreas and biochemical indices of injury confirmed the cardioprotective effects of Berberine in setting of diabetes. In addition, Berberine

  13. Deciphering the biological effects of acupuncture treatment modulating multiple metabolism pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Weiping; Meng, Xiangcai; Liu, Li; Xie, Ning; Wang, Xijun

    2016-02-16

    Acupuncture is an alternative therapy that is widely used to treat various diseases. However, detailed biological interpretation of the acupuncture stimulations is limited. We here used metabolomics and proteomics technology, thereby identifying the serum small molecular metabolites into the effect and mechanism pathways of standardized acupuncture treatments at 'Zusanli' acupoint which was the most often used acupoint in previous reports. Comprehensive overview of serum metabolic profiles during acupuncture stimulation was investigated. Thirty-four differential metabolites were identified in serum metabolome and associated with ten metabolism pathways. Importantly, we have found that high impact glycerophospholipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, ether lipid metabolism were acutely perturbed by acupuncture stimulation. As such, these alterations may be useful to clarify the biological mechanism of acupuncture stimulation. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified and such effects of acupuncture stimulation were found to play a role in transport, enzymatic activity, signaling pathway or receptor interaction. Pathway analysis further revealed that most of these proteins were found to play a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple metabolism pathways. It demonstrated that the metabolomics coupled with proteomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in understanding the biological effects of acupuncture stimulation.

  14. Ethidium bromide efflux by Salmonella: modulation by metabolic energy, pH, ions and phenothiazines.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Leonard; Cerca, Pedro; Spengler, Gabriella; Machado, Lisa; Martins, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Fanning, Séamus; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2011-08-01

    The main efflux pump of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, which obtains its energy for the extrusion of noxious agents from the proton-motive force, was studied with the aid of an ethidium bromide (EtBr) semi-automated method under conditions that define the role of metabolic energy, ions and pH in the extrusion of the universal substrate EtBr. The results obtained in this study indicate that in minimal medium containing sodium at pH 5 efflux of EtBr is independent of glucose, whereas at pH 8 metabolic energy is an absolute requirement for the maintenance of efflux. In deionised water at pH 5.5, metabolic energy is required for the maintenance of efflux. The inhibitory effect of the ionophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) on efflux is shown to be minimised by low pH, and at high pH by metabolic energy. Similarly, thioridazine, an inhibitor of metabolic enzymes, inhibits efflux of EtBr only at pH 8 and the degree of inhibition is lessened by the presence of metabolic energy.

  15. Intravaginal probiotics modulated metabolic status and improved milk production and composition of transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Deng, Q; Odhiambo, J F; Farooq, U; Lam, T; Dunn, S M; Ametaj, B N

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate whether intravaginal infusion of probiotics (a lactic acid bacteria cocktail) around parturition would influence metabolic status and increase milk production of transition dairy cows. One hundred pregnant Holstein dairy cows were assigned to 1 of the 3 experimental groups receiving intravaginal infusion of probiotics or carrier (i.e., sterile skim milk) once a week at wk -2, -1, and +1 relative to calving as follows: 2 consecutive probiotics before parturition and 1 carrier dose after parturition (TRT1), 3 consecutive probiotics doses around parturition (TRT2), and 3 consecutive carrier doses around parturition (CTR). The probiotics were a lyophilized culture mixture composed of FUA3089 and FUA3138 and FUA3140 with a cell count of 10 to 10 cfu/dose. Blood was sampled from wk -2 to +3 and milk was sampled on the third day in milk (DIM) and from wk +1 to +5 on a weekly basis. Feed intake and milk production was monitored until wk +8. Results showed that the TRT2 group (366.12 ± 49.77 μmol/L) had a lower ( = 0.01) concentration of NEFA in the serum than the CTR group (550.85 ± 47.16 μmol/L). The concentrations of IgG in the milk were 32.71 ± 3.00 mg/mL in the TRT1 group, 17.47 ± 4.54 mg/mL in the TRT2 group, and 6.73 ± 3.43 mg/mL in the CTR group at 3 DIM ( < 0.01). Meanwhile, both the TRT1 and the TRT2 group had lower haptoglobin in the milk compared with the CTR group at 3 DIM ( < 0.01). The TRT1 group had greater milk protein content than the CTR group (2.99 ± 0.04 vs. 2.82 ± 0.04%; = 0.02), whereas the TRT2 group tended to have greater lactose content compared with the CTR group (4.53 ± 0.03 vs. 4.44 ± 0.03%; = 0.05). The effect of treatment interacted with parity with regards to milk production and feed efficiency. Multiparous cows in the TRT1 and TRT2 groups had greater milk production and feed efficiency than those in the CTR group ( < 0.01 and = 0.02, respectively). Among primiparous cows, those

  16. Gonadal hormone modulation of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced antinociception and metabolism in female versus male rats.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Haas, A E; Wiley, J L; Yu, Z; Clowers, B H

    2017-01-01

    The gonadal hormones testosterone (T) in adult males and estradiol (E2) in adult females have been reported to modulate behavioral effects of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This study determined whether activational effects of T and E2 are sex-specific, and whether hormones modulate production of the active metabolite 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and the inactive metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH). Adult male and female rats were gonadectomized (GDX) and treated with nothing (0), T (10-mm Silastic capsule/100g body weight), or E2 (1-mm Silastic capsule/rat). Three weeks later, saline or the cytochrome P450 inhibitor proadifen (25mg/kg; to block THC metabolism and boost THC's effects) was injected i.p.; 1h later, vehicle or THC (3mg/kg females, 5mg/kg males) was injected i.p., and rats were tested for antinociceptive and motoric effects 15-240min post-injection. T did not consistently alter THC-induced antinociception in males, but decreased it in females (tail withdrawal test). Conversely, T decreased THC-induced catalepsy in males, but had no effect in females. E2 did not alter THC-induced antinociception in females, but enhanced it in males. The discrepant effects of T and E2 on males' and females' behavioral responses to THC suggests that sexual differentiation of THC sensitivity is not simply due to activational effects of hormones, but also occurs via organizational hormone or sex chromosome effects. Analysis of serum showed that proadifen increased THC levels, E2 increased 11-OH-THC in GDX males, and T decreased 11-OH-THC (and to a lesser extent, THC) in GDX females. Thus, hormone modulation of THC's behavioral effects is caused in part by hormone modulation of THC oxidation to its active metabolite. However, the fact that hormone modulation of metabolism did not alter THC sensitivity similarly on all behavioral measures within each sex suggests that other mechanisms also play a role in gonadal hormone modulation of THC sensitivity in adult rats.

  17. Protein- and zinc-deficient diets modulate the murine microbiome and metabolic phenotype12

    PubMed Central

    Bolick, David T; Leng, Joy; Medlock, Greg L; Kolling, Glynis L; Papin, Jason A; Guerrant, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Environmental enteropathy, which is linked to undernutrition and chronic infections, affects the physical and mental growth of children in developing areas worldwide. Key to understanding how these factors combine to shape developmental outcomes is to first understand the effects of nutritional deficiencies on the mammalian system including the effect on the gut microbiota. Objective: We dissected the nutritional components of environmental enteropathy by analyzing the specific metabolic and gut-microbiota changes that occur in weaned-mouse models of zinc or protein deficiency compared with well-nourished controls. Design: With the use of a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy–based metabolic profiling approach with matching 16S microbiota analyses, the metabolic consequences and specific effects on the fecal microbiota of protein and zinc deficiency were probed independently in a murine model. Results: We showed considerable shifts within the intestinal microbiota 14–24 d postweaning in mice that were maintained on a normal diet (including increases in Proteobacteria and striking decreases in Bacterioidetes). Although the zinc-deficient microbiota were comparable to the age-matched, well-nourished profile, the protein-restricted microbiota remained closer in composition to the weaned enterotype with retention of Bacteroidetes. Striking increases in Verrucomicrobia (predominantly Akkermansia muciniphila) were observed in both well-nourished and protein-deficient mice 14 d postweaning. We showed that protein malnutrition impaired growth and had major metabolic consequences (much more than with zinc deficiency) that included altered energy, polyamine, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Consistent with major changes in the gut microbiota, reductions in microbial proteolysis and increases in microbial dietary choline processing were observed. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with metabolic alterations that we previously observed in

  18. Scaling dynamic response and destructive metabolism in an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system modulated by different external periodic interventions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuanzhi; Hu, Wenyong; Zhong, Weirong; Li, Li

    2011-01-14

    On the basis of two universal power-law scaling laws, i.e. the scaling dynamic hysteresis in physics and the allometric scaling metabolism in biosystem, we studied the dynamic response and the evolution of an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system subjected to a periodic external intervention, which is equivalent to the scheme of a radiotherapy or chemotherapy, within the framework of the growth dynamics of tumor. Under the modulation of either an abrupt or a gradual change external intervention, the population density of tumors exhibits a dynamic hysteresis to the intervention. The area of dynamic hysteresis loop characterizes a sort of dissipative-therapeutic relationship of the dynamic responding of treated tumors with the dose consumption of accumulated external intervention per cycle of therapy. Scaling the area of dynamic hysteresis loops against the intensity of an external intervention, we deduced a characteristic quantity which was defined as the theoretical therapeutic effectiveness of treated tumor and related with the destructive metabolism of tumor under treatment. The calculated dose-effectiveness profiles, namely the dose cumulant per cycle of intervention versus the therapeutic effectiveness, could be well scaled into a universal quadratic formula regardless of either an abrupt or a gradual change intervention involved. We present a new concept, i.e., the therapy-effect matrix and the dose cumulant matrix, to expound the new finding observed in the growth and regression dynamics of a modulated anti-tumor system.

  19. Synergistic Effects of Clopidogrel and Fufang Danshen Dripping Pills by Modulation of the Metabolism Target and Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shitang; Ju, Wenzheng; Dai, Guoliang; Zhao, Wenzhu; Cheng, Xiaogui; Fang, Zhuyuan; Tan, Hengshan; Wang, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. The aim was to evaluate the synergistic effects of clopidogrel and FDDP by modulating the metabolism target and the pharmacokinetics. Methods. The inhibition effect of FDDP on the CES1 was first investigated by the molecular simulation method, and the synergistic effects on the pharmacokinetics of CPGS were studied as follows: SD rats were treated with oral clopidogrel alone at a dosage of 30 mg/kg or the combination of clopidogrel and FDDP at dosages of 30 mg/kg and 324 mg/kg, respectively, for 21 days. The concentrations of CPGS in the blood plasma samples were determined and the calculated concentrations were used to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters. Results. 20 compounds in FDDP potentially interacted with CES1 target. The CPGS showed a two-compartment model pharmacokinetic profile. The concentration-time course of CPGS was not changed by FDDP, but FDDP decreased the peak plasma concentration and area under the curve of CPGS. Conclusion. The CES1's activity could be partly inhibited by FDDP through the molecular simulation investigation. The concentration-time course of CPGS was altered slightly by FDDP. The results demonstrated the synergistic effects of clopidogrel and FDDP by modulating both the pharmacokinetics and the target metabolism. PMID:25530790

  20. SIZ1-Dependent Post-Translational Modification by SUMO Modulates Sugar Signaling and Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Castro, Pedro Humberto; Verde, Nuno; Lourenço, Tiago; Magalhães, Alexandre Papadopoulos; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Bejarano, Eduardo Rodríguez; Azevedo, Herlânder

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modification mechanisms function as switches that mediate the balance between optimum growth and the response to environmental stimuli, by regulating the activity of key proteins. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) attachment, or sumoylation, is a post-translational modification that is essential for the plant stress response, also modulating hormonal circuits to co-ordinate developmental processes. The Arabidopsis SUMO E3 ligase SAP and Miz 1 (SIZ1) is the major SUMO conjugation enhancer in response to stress, and is implicated in several aspects of plant development. Here we report that known SUMO targets are over-represented in multiple carbohydrate-related proteins, suggesting a functional link between sumoylation and sugar metabolism and signaling in plants. We subsequently observed that SUMO-conjugated proteins accumulate in response to high doses of sugar in a SIZ1-dependent manner, and that the null siz1 mutant displays increased expression of sucrose and starch catabolic genes and shows reduced starch levels. We demonstrated that SIZ1 controls germination time and post-germination growth via osmotic and sugar-dependent signaling, respectively. Glucose was specifically linked to SUMO-sugar interplay, with high levels inducing root growth inhibition and aberrant root hair morphology in siz1. The use of sugar analogs and sugar marker gene expression analysis allowed us to implicate SIZ1 in a signaling pathway dependent on glucose metabolism, probably involving modulation of SNF1-related kinase 1 (SnRK1) activity.

  1. Nutritional Modulation of Gut Microbiota - The Impact on Metabolic Disease Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Patricia; Bobe, Alexandria; Dolan, Kyle; Leone, Vanessa; Martinez, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The obesity epidemic afflicts over one-third of the United States population. With few therapies available to combat obesity, a greater understanding of the systemic causes of this and other metabolic disorders is needed to develop new, effective treatments. The mammalian intestinal microbiota contributes to metabolic processes in the host. This review summarizes the research demonstrating the interplay of diet, intestinal microbiota, and host metabolism. We detail the effects of diet-induced modifications in microbial activity and resultant impact on: 1) sensory perception of macronutrients and total energy intake, 2) nutrient absorption, transport, and storage, 3) liver and biliary function, 4) immune-mediated signaling related to adipose inflammation, and 5) circadian rhythm. We also discuss therapeutic strategies aimed to modify host-microbe interactions, including pre-, pro-, and post-biotics, as well as fecal microbiota transplantation. Elucidating the role of gut microbes in shaping metabolic homeostasis or dysregulation provides greater insight into disease development and a promising avenue for improved treatment of metabolic dysfunction. PMID:26372091

  2. Mitochondrial mayhem: the mitochondrion as a modulator of iron metabolism and its role in disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Michael Li-Hsuan; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2011-12-15

    The mitochondrion plays vital roles in various aspects of cellular metabolism, ranging from energy transduction and apoptosis to the synthesis of important molecules such as heme. Mitochondria are also centrally involved in iron metabolism, as exemplified by disruptions in mitochondrial proteins that lead to perturbations in whole-cell iron processing. Recent investigations have identified a host of mitochondrial proteins (e.g., mitochondrial ferritin; mitoferrins 1 and 2; ABCBs 6, 7, and 10; and frataxin) that may play roles in the homeostasis of mitochondrial iron. These mitochondrial proteins appear to participate in one or more processes of iron storage, iron uptake, and heme and iron-sulfur cluster synthesis. In this review, we present and critically discuss the evidence suggesting that the mitochondrion may contribute to the regulation of whole-cell iron metabolism. Further, human diseases that arise from a dysregulation of these mitochondrial molecules reveal the ability of the mitochondrion to communicate with cytosolic iron metabolism to coordinate whole-cell iron processing and to fulfill the high demands of this organelle for iron. This review highlights new advances in understanding iron metabolism in terms of novel molecular players and diseases associated with its dysregulation.

  3. Sunlight Modulates Fruit Metabolic Profile and Shapes the Spatial Pattern of Compound Accumulation within the Grape Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Reshef, Noam; Walbaum, Natasha; Agam, Nurit; Fait, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Vineyards are characterized by their large spatial variability of solar irradiance (SI) and temperature, known to effectively modulate grape metabolism. To explore the role of sunlight in shaping fruit composition and cluster uniformity, we studied the spatial pattern of incoming irradiance, fruit temperature and metabolic profile within individual grape clusters under three levels of sunlight exposure. The experiment was conducted in a vineyard of Cabernet Sauvignon cv. located in the Negev Highlands, Israel, where excess SI and midday temperatures are known to degrade grape quality. Filtering SI lowered the surface temperature of exposed fruits and increased the uniformity of irradiance and temperature in the cluster zone. SI affected the overall levels and patterns of accumulation of sugars, organic acids, amino acids and phenylpropanoids, across the grape cluster. Increased exposure to sunlight was associated with lower accumulation levels of malate, aspartate, and maleate but with higher levels of valine, leucine, and serine, in addition to the stress-related proline and GABA. Flavan-3-ols metabolites showed a negative response to SI, whereas flavonols were highly induced. The overall levels of anthocyanins decreased with increased sunlight exposure; however, a hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that the members of this family were grouped into three distinct accumulation patterns, with malvidin anthocyanins and cyanidin-glucoside showing contrasting trends. The flavonol-glucosides, quercetin and kaempferol, exhibited a logarithmic response to SI, leading to improved cluster uniformity under high-light conditions. Comparing the within-cluster variability of metabolite accumulation highlighted the stability of sugars, flavan-3-ols, and cinnamic acid metabolites to SI, in contrast to the plasticity of flavonols. A correlation-based network analysis revealed that extended exposure to SI modified metabolic coordination, increasing the number of negative

  4. Andrographis paniculata Extract and Andrographolide Modulate the Hepatic Drug Metabolism System and Plasma Tolbutamide Concentrations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haw-Wen; Huang, Chin-Shiu; Liu, Pei-Fen; Li, Chien-Chun; Liu, Cheng-Tzu; Chiang, Jia-Rong; Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Lii, Chong-Kuei

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide is the most abundant terpenoid of A. paniculata which is used in the treatment of diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effects of A. paniculata extract (APE) and andrographolide on the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in rat liver and determined whether modulation of these enzymes changed the pharmacokinetics of tolbutamide. Rats were intragastrically dosed with 2 g/kg/day APE or 50 mg/kg/day andrographolide for 5 days before a dose of 20 mg/kg tolbutamide was given. APE and andrographolide reduced the AUC0–12 h of tolbutamide by 37% and 18%, respectively, compared with that in controls. The protein and mRNA levels and enzyme activities of CYP2C6/11, CYP1A1/2, and CYP3A1/2 were increased by APE and andrographolide. To evaluate whether APE or andrographolide affected the hypoglycemic action of tolbutamide, high-fat diet-induced obese mice were used and treated in the same manner as the rats. APE and andrographolide increased CYP2C6/11 expression and decreased plasma tolbutamide levels. In a glucose tolerance test, however, the hypoglycemic effect of tolbutamide was not changed by APE or andrographolide. These results suggest that APE and andrographolide accelerate the metabolism rate of tolbutamide through increased expression and activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes. APE and andrographolide, however, do not impair the hypoglycemic effect of tolbutamide. PMID:23997806

  5. The Class II Trehalose 6-phosphate Synthase Gene PvTPS9 Modulates Trehalose Metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Barraza, Aarón; Contreras-Cubas, Cecilia; Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Reyes, José L.; Juárez-Verdayes, Marco A.; Avonce, Nelson; Quinto, Carmen; Díaz-Camino, Claudia; Sanchez, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Legumes form symbioses with rhizobia, producing nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the plant host. The network of plant signaling pathways affecting carbon metabolism may determine the final number of nodules. The trehalose biosynthetic pathway regulates carbon metabolism and plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development, as well as in plant-microbe interactions. The expression of genes for trehalose synthesis during nodule development suggests that this metabolite may play a role in legume-rhizobia symbiosis. In this work, PvTPS9, which encodes a Class II trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), was silenced by RNA interference in transgenic nodules. The silencing of PvTPS9 in root nodules resulted in a reduction of 85% (± 1%) of its transcript, which correlated with a 30% decrease in trehalose contents of transgenic nodules and in untransformed leaves. Composite transgenic plants with PvTPS9 silenced in the roots showed no changes in nodule number and nitrogen fixation, but a severe reduction in plant biomass and altered transcript profiles of all Class II TPS genes. Our data suggest that PvTPS9 plays a key role in modulating trehalose metabolism in the symbiotic nodule and, therefore, in the whole plant. PMID:27847509

  6. Role of metabolic modulator Bet-CA in altering mitochondrial hyperpolarization to suppress cancer associated angiogenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suchandrima; Ghosh, Monisankar; Dutta, Samir Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors characteristically reflect a metabolic switching from glucose oxidation to glycolysis that plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis and metastasis to facilitate aggressive tumor outcomes. Hyperpolarized mitochondrial membrane potential is a manifestation of malignant cells that compromise the intrinsic pathways of apoptosis and confer a suitable niche to promote the cancer associated hallmark traits. We have previously reported that co-drug Bet-CA selectively targets cancer cells by inducing metabolic catastrophe without a manifest in toxicity. Here we report that the same molecule at a relatively lower concentration deregulates the cardinal phenotypes associated with angiogenesis and metastasis. In mice syngeneic 4T1 breast cancer model, Bet-CA exhibited effective abrogation of angiogenesis and concomitantly obliterated lung metastasis consistent with altered mitochondrial bioenergetics. Furthermore, Bet-CA significantly lowered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels and obviated matrix metalloproteases (MMP-2/9) production directly to the criterion where abrogation of autocrine VEGF/VEGFR2 signalling loop was documented. In vitro studies anticipatedly documented the role of Bet-CA in inhibiting actin remodeling, lamellipodia formation and cell membrane ruffling to constitutively suppress cell motility and invasion. Results comprehensively postulate that Bet-CA, a mitochondria targeting metabolic modulator may serve as an excellent candidate for combating angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:27003027

  7. 27-Hydroxycholesterol contributes to disruptive effects on learning and memory by modulating cholesterol metabolism in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D-D; Yu, H-L; Ma, W-W; Liu, Q-R; Han, J; Wang, H; Xiao, R

    2015-08-06

    Cholesterol metabolism is important for neuronal function in the central nervous system (CNS). The oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC) is a cholesterol metabolite that crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and may be a useful substitutive marker for neurodegenerative diseases. However, the effects of 27-OHC on learning and memory and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. To determine this mechanism, we investigated learning and memory and cholesterol metabolism in rat brain following the injection of various doses of 27-OHC into the caudal vein. We found that 27-OHC increased cholesterol levels and upregulated the expression of liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter protein family member A1 (ABCA1). In addition, 27-OHC decreased the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CR) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in rat brain tissues. These findings suggest that 27-OHC may negatively modulate cognitive effects and cholesterol metabolism in the brain.

  8. Physiological and Pathogenic Roles of Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 in Metabolic Regulations via Multiple Signal Transduction Pathway Modulations

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Yasuka; Yamamotoya, Takeshi; Ueda, Koji; Inoue, Yuki; Mori, Keiichi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Ono, Hiraku; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Prolyl isomerases are divided into three groups, the FKBP family, Cyclophilin and the Parvulin family (Pin1 and Par14). Among these isomerases, Pin1 is a unique prolyl isomerase binding to the motif including pSer/pThr-Pro that is phosphorylated by kinases. Once bound, Pin1 modulates the enzymatic activity, protein stability or subcellular localization of target proteins by changing the cis- and trans-formations of proline. Several studies have examined the roles of Pin1 in the pathogenesis of cancers and Alzheimer’s disease. On the other hand, recent studies have newly demonstrated Pin1 to be involved in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, while Pin1 expression is markedly increased by high-fat diet feeding, Pin1 KO mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and diabetic vascular dysfunction. These phenomena result from the binding of Pin1 to several key factors regulating metabolic functions, which include insulin receptor substrate-1, AMPK, Crtc2 and NF-κB p65. In this review, we focus on recent advances in elucidating the physiological roles of Pin1 as well as the pathogenesis of disorders involving this isomerase, from the viewpoint of the relationships between signal transductions and metabolic functions. PMID:27618008

  9. The Class II Trehalose 6-phosphate Synthase Gene PvTPS9 Modulates Trehalose Metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris Nodules.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Aarón; Contreras-Cubas, Cecilia; Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Reyes, José L; Juárez-Verdayes, Marco A; Avonce, Nelson; Quinto, Carmen; Díaz-Camino, Claudia; Sanchez, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Legumes form symbioses with rhizobia, producing nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the plant host. The network of plant signaling pathways affecting carbon metabolism may determine the final number of nodules. The trehalose biosynthetic pathway regulates carbon metabolism and plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development, as well as in plant-microbe interactions. The expression of genes for trehalose synthesis during nodule development suggests that this metabolite may play a role in legume-rhizobia symbiosis. In this work, PvTPS9, which encodes a Class II trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), was silenced by RNA interference in transgenic nodules. The silencing of PvTPS9 in root nodules resulted in a reduction of 85% (± 1%) of its transcript, which correlated with a 30% decrease in trehalose contents of transgenic nodules and in untransformed leaves. Composite transgenic plants with PvTPS9 silenced in the roots showed no changes in nodule number and nitrogen fixation, but a severe reduction in plant biomass and altered transcript profiles of all Class II TPS genes. Our data suggest that PvTPS9 plays a key role in modulating trehalose metabolism in the symbiotic nodule and, therefore, in the whole plant.

  10. A Flavonoid Compound Promotes Neuronal Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells via PPAR-β Modulating Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yu-qin; Pan, Zong-fu; Chen, Wen-teng; Xu, Min-hua; Zhu, Dan-yan; Yu, Yong-ping; Lou, Yi-jia

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known regarding mitochondrial metabolism in neuronal differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells. By using a small molecule, present research has investigated the pattern of cellular energy metabolism in neural progenitor cells derived from mouse ES cells. Flavonoid compound 4a faithfully facilitated ES cells to differentiate into neurons morphologically and functionally. The expression and localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) were examined in neural progenitor cells. PPAR-β expression showed robust upregulation compared to solvent control. Treatment with PPAR-β agonist L165041 alone or together with compound 4a significantly promoted neuronal differentiation, while antagonist GSK0660 blocked the neurogenesis-promoting effect of compound 4a. Consistently, knockdown of PPAR-β in ES cells abolished compound 4a-induced neuronal differentiation. Interestingly, we found that mitochondrial fusion protein Mfn2 was also abolished by sh-PPAR-β, resulting in abnormal mitochondrial Ca2+ ([Ca2+]M) transients as well as impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics. In conclusion, we demonstrated that by modulating mitochondrial energy metabolism through Mfn2 and mitochondrial Ca2+, PPAR-β took an important role in neuronal differentiation induced by flavonoid compound 4a. PMID:27315062

  11. Contact sensitizers modulate the arachidonic acid metabolism of PMA-differentiated U-937 monocytic cells activated by LPS

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bufalo, Aurelia; Bernad, Jose; Dardenne, Christophe; Verda, Denis; Meunier, Jean Roch; Rousset, Francoise; Martinozzi-Teissier, Silvia; Pipy, Bernard

    2011-10-01

    For the effective induction of a hapten-specific T cell immune response toward contact sensitizers, in addition to covalent-modification of skin proteins, the redox and inflammatory statuses of activated dendritic cells are crucial. The aim of this study was to better understand how sensitizers modulate an inflammatory response through cytokines production and COX metabolism cascade. To address this purpose, we used the human monocytic-like U-937 cell line differentiated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and investigated the effect of 6 contact sensitizers (DNCB, PPD, hydroquinone, propyl gallate, cinnamaldehyde and eugenol) and 3 non sensitizers (lactic acid, glycerol and tween 20) on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha}) and on the arachidonic acid metabolic profile after bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Our results showed that among the tested molecules, all sensitizers specifically prevent the production of PMA/LPS-induced COX-2 metabolites (PGE{sub 2,} TxB{sub 2} and PGD{sub 2}), eugenol and cinnamaldehyde inhibiting also the production of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha}. We further demonstrated that there is no unique PGE{sub 2} inhibition mechanism: while the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from membrane phospholipids does not appear do be a target of modulation, COX-2 expression and/or COX-2 enzymatic activity are the major steps of prostaglandin synthesis that are inhibited by sensitizers. Altogether these results add a new insight into the multiple biochemical effects described for sensitizers. - Highlights: > We investigated how contact sensitizers modulate an inflammatory response. > We used macrophage-differentiated cell line, U-937 treated with PMA/LPS. > Sensitizers specifically inhibit the production of COX metabolites (PGE2, TxB2). > Several mechanisms of inhibition: COX-2 expression/enzymatic activity, isomerases. > New insight in the biochemical properties of sensitizers.

  12. Glutamate transport decreases mitochondrial pH and modulates oxidative metabolism in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Azarias, Guillaume; Perreten, Hélène; Lengacher, Sylvain; Poburko, Damon; Demaurex, Nicolas; Magistretti, Pierre J; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2011-03-09

    During synaptic activity, the clearance of neuronally released glutamate leads to an intracellular sodium concentration increase in astrocytes that is associated with significant metabolic cost. The proximity of mitochondria at glutamate uptake sites in astrocytes raises the question of the ability of mitochondria to respond to these energy demands. We used dynamic fluorescence imaging to investigate the impact of glutamatergic transmission on mitochondria in intact astrocytes. Neuronal release of glutamate induced an intracellular acidification in astrocytes, via glutamate transporters, that spread over the mitochondrial matrix. The glutamate-induced mitochondrial matrix acidification exceeded cytosolic acidification and abrogated cytosol-to-mitochondrial matrix pH gradient. By decoupling glutamate uptake from cellular acidification, we found that glutamate induced a pH-mediated decrease in mitochondrial metabolism that surpasses the Ca(2+)-mediated stimulatory effects. These findings suggest a model in which excitatory neurotransmission dynamically regulates astrocyte energy metabolism by limiting the contribution of mitochondria to the metabolic response, thereby increasing the local oxygen availability and preventing excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

  13. CLOCK genetic variation and metabolic syndrome risk: modulation by monounsaturated fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Disruption of the circadian system may be causal for manifestations of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Objective: To study the associations of five CLOCK polymorphisms with MetS features considering fatty acid (FA) composition, from dietary and red-blood-cells (RBC) membrane sources. Design: ...

  14. Host Genotype and Gut Microbiome Modulate Insulin Secretion and Diet-Induced Metabolic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kreznar, Julia H; Keller, Mark P; Traeger, Lindsay L; Rabaglia, Mary E; Schueler, Kathryn L; Stapleton, Donald S; Zhao, Wen; Vivas, Eugenio I; Yandell, Brian S; Broman, Aimee Teo; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Attie, Alan D; Rey, Federico E

    2017-02-14

    Genetic variation drives phenotypic diversity and influences the predisposition to metabolic disease. Here, we characterize the metabolic phenotypes of eight genetically distinct inbred mouse strains in response to a high-fat/high-sucrose diet. We found significant variation in diabetes-related phenotypes and gut microbiota composition among the different mouse strains in response to the dietary challenge and identified taxa associated with these traits. Follow-up microbiota transplant experiments showed that altering the composition of the gut microbiota modifies strain-specific susceptibility to diet-induced metabolic disease. Animals harboring microbial communities with enhanced capacity for processing dietary sugars and for generating hydrophobic bile acids showed increased susceptibility to metabolic disease. Notably, differences in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion between different mouse strains were partially recapitulated via gut microbiota transfer. Our results suggest that the gut microbiome contributes to the genetic and phenotypic diversity observed among mouse strains and provide a link between the gut microbiome and insulin secretion.

  15. Modulation of sphingolipid metabolism with calorie restriction enhances insulin action in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Obanda, Diana N.; Yu, Yongmei; Wang, Zhong Q; Cefalu, William T.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effect of calorie restriction (CR) on skeletal muscle sphingolipid metabolism and its contribution to improved insulin action in rats after a 6 month feeding study. Twenty nine (29) male Fischer-344 rats were randomized to an ad libitum (AL) diet or 30% CR. Dietary intake, body weight, and insulin sensitivity were monitored. After 6 months, skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) was obtained for insulin signaling and lipid profiling. Calorie restriction significantly decreased insulin and glucose levels and also altered the expression and activity of proteins involved in sphingolipid formation and metabolism. The quantities of ceramides significantly increased in CR animals (p<0.05; n=14–15), while ceramide metabolism products (i.e glycosphingolipids: hexosylceramides and lactosylceramides) significantly decreased (p<0.05; n=14–15). Ceramide phosphates, sphingomyelins, sphingosine and sphingosine phosphate were not significantly different between AL and CR groups (p=ns; n=14–15). Lactosylceramide quantities correlated significantly with surrogate markers of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (r=0.7, p<0.005). Products of ceramide metabolism (glycosphingolipids), known to interfere with insulin signaling at elevated levels were significantly reduced in the skeletal muscle of CR animals. The increase in insulin sensitivity is associated with glycosphingolipid levels. PMID:25771159

  16. The gut microbiota modulates host energy and lipid metabolism in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Velagapudi, Vidya R.; Hezaveh, Rahil; Reigstad, Christopher S.; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Yetukuri, Laxman; Islam, Sama; Felin, Jenny; Perkins, Rosie; Borén, Jan; Orešič, Matej; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    The gut microbiota has recently been identified as an environmental factor that may promote metabolic diseases. To investigate the effect of gut microbiota on host energy and lipid metabolism, we compared the serum metabolome and the lipidomes of serum, adipose tissue, and liver of conventionally raised (CONV-R) and germ-free mice. The serum metabolome of CONV-R mice was characterized by increased levels of energy metabolites, e.g., pyruvic acid, citric acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid, while levels of cholesterol and fatty acids were reduced. We also showed that the microbiota modified a number of lipid species in the serum, adipose tissue, and liver, with its greatest effect on triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine species. Triglyceride levels were lower in serum but higher in adipose tissue and liver of CONV-R mice, consistent with increased lipid clearance. Our findings show that the gut microbiota affects both host energy and lipid metabolism and highlights its role in the development of metabolic diseases. PMID:20040631

  17. The role of metabolism in modulating CO2 fluxes in boreal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, Matthew J.; Giorgio, Paul A.

    2016-10-01

    Lake CO2 emissions are increasingly recognized as an important component of the global CO2 cycle, yet the origin of these emissions is not clear, as specific contributions from metabolism and in-lake cycling, versus external inputs, are not well defined. To assess the coupling of lake metabolism with CO2 concentrations and fluxes, we estimated steady state ratios of gross primary production to respiration (GPP:R) and rates of net ecosystem production (NEP = GPP-R) from surface water O2 dynamics (concentration and stable isotopes) in 187 boreal lakes spanning long environmental gradients. Our findings suggest that internal metabolism plays a dominant role in regulating CO2 fluxes in most lakes, but this pattern only emerges when examined at a resolution that accounts for the vastly differing relationships between lake metabolism and CO2 fluxes. Fluxes of CO2 exceeded those from NEP in over half the lakes, but unexpectedly, these effects were most common and typically largest in a subset ( 30% of total) of net autotrophic lakes that nevertheless emitted CO2. Equally surprising, we found no environmental characteristics that distinguished this category from the more common net heterotrophic, CO2 outgassing lakes. Excess CO2 fluxes relative to NEP were best predicted by catchment structure and hydrologic properties, and we infer from a combination of methods that both catchment inputs and internal anaerobic processes may have contributed this excess CO2. Together, our findings show that the link between lake metabolism and CO2 fluxes is often strong but can vary widely across the boreal biome, having important implications for catchment-wide C budgets.

  18. Targeting hexokinase II to mitochondria to modulate energy metabolism and reduce ischaemia-reperfusion injury in heart

    PubMed Central

    Nederlof, Rianne; Eerbeek, Otto; Hollmann, Markus W; Southworth, Richard; Zuurbier, Coert J

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrially bound hexokinase II (mtHKII) has long been known to confer cancer cells with their resilience against cell death. More recently, mtHKII has emerged as a powerful protector against cardiac cell death. mtHKII protects against ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in skeletal muscle and heart, attenuates cardiac hypertrophy and remodelling, and is one of the major end-effectors through which ischaemic preconditioning protects against myocardial IR injury. Mechanisms of mtHKII cardioprotection against reperfusion injury entail the maintenance of regulated outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) permeability during ischaemia and reperfusion resulting in stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential, the prevention of OMM breakage and cytochrome C release, and reduced reactive oxygen species production. Increasing mtHK may also have important metabolic consequences, such as improvement of glucose-induced insulin release, prevention of acidosis through enhanced coupling of glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. Deficiencies in expression and distorted cellular signalling of HKII may contribute to the altered sensitivity of diabetes to cardiac ischaemic diseases. The interaction of HKII with the mitochondrion constitutes a powerful endogenous molecular mechanism to protect against cell death in almost all cell types examined (neurons, tumours, kidney, lung, skeletal muscle, heart). The challenge now is to harness mtHKII in the treatment of infarction, stroke, elective surgery and transplantation. Remote ischaemic preconditioning, metformin administration and miR-155/miR-144 manipulations are potential means of doing just that. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24032601

  19. Skeletal muscle carnitine loading increases energy expenditure, modulates fuel metabolism gene networks and prevents body fat accumulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Francis B; Wall, Benjamin T; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; Shannon, Chris E; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Macdonald, Ian A; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Twelve weeks of daily l-carnitine and carbohydrate feeding in humans increases skeletal muscle total carnitine content, and prevents body mass accrual associated with carbohydrate feeding alone. Here we determined the influence of l-carnitine and carbohydrate feeding on energy metabolism, body fat mass and muscle expression of fuel metabolism genes. Twelve males exercised at 50% maximal oxygen consumption for 30 min once before and once after 12 weeks of twice daily feeding of 80 g carbohydrate (Control, n= 6) or 1.36 g l-carnitine + 80 g carbohydrate (Carnitine, n= 6). Maximal carnitine palmitolytransferase 1 (CPT1) activity remained similar in both groups over 12 weeks. However, whereas muscle total carnitine, long-chain acyl-CoA and whole-body energy expenditure did not change over 12 weeks in Control, they increased in Carnitine by 20%, 200% and 6%, respectively (P < 0.05). Moreover, body mass and whole-body fat mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) increased over 12 weeks in Control by 1.9 and 1.8 kg, respectively (P < 0.05), but did not change in Carnitine. Seventy-three of 187 genes relating to fuel metabolism were upregulated in Carnitine vs. Control after 12 weeks, with ‘insulin signalling’, ‘peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signalling’ and ‘fatty acid metabolism’ as the three most enriched pathways in gene functional analysis. In conclusion, increasing muscle total carnitine in healthy humans can modulate muscle metabolism, energy expenditure and body composition over a prolonged period, which is entirely consistent with a carnitine-mediated increase in muscle long-chain acyl-group translocation via CPT1. Implications to health warrant further investigation, particularly in obese individuals who have a reduced reliance on muscle fat oxidation during low-intensity exercise. PMID:23818692

  20. Myocardial Bridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  1. miR-34a Modulates Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy by Direct Inhibition of ATG9A Expression and Autophagic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Ye, Jing; Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; You, Xiangyu; Liu, Benrong; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by thickening myocardium and decreasing in heart chamber volume in response to mechanical or pathological stress, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. This study investigated altered miRNA expression and autophagic activity in pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. A rat model of myocardial hypertrophy was used and confirmed by heart morphology, induction of cardiomyocyte autophagy, altered expression of autophagy-related ATG9A, LC3 II/I and p62 proteins, and decrease in miR-34a expression. The in vitro data showed that in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes induced by Ang II, miR-34a expression was downregulated, whereas ATG9A expression was up-regulated. Moreover, miR-34a was able to bind to ATG9A 3′-UTR, but not to the mutated 3′-UTR and inhibited ATG9A protein expression and autophagic activity. The latter was evaluated by autophagy-related LC3 II/I and p62 levels, TEM, and flow cytometry in rat cardiomyocytes. In addition, ATG9A expression induced either by treatment of rat cardiomyocytes with Ang II or ATG9A cDNA transfection upregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in both morphology and expression of hypertrophy-related genes (i.e., ANP and β-MHC), whereas knockdown of ATG9A expression downregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. However, miR-34a antagonized Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy, whereas inhibition of miR-34a expression aggravated Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy (such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy-related ANP and β-MHC expression and cardiomyocyte morphology). This study indicates that miR-34a plays a role in regulation of Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibition of ATG9A expression and autophagic activity. PMID:24728149

  2. Acute myocardial infarction in a young woman on isotretinoin treatment.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Natalia; Antuña, Paula; Dominguez, Lourdes; Rivero, Fernando; Bastante, Teresa; Alfonso, Fernando

    2015-02-15

    The use of isotretinoin has been associated with mild changes in the metabolic profile of adolescents. In very rare cases, a possible association with myocardial infarction, stroke and thromboembolic events has been reported. In this report we describe the potential association of isotretinoin with the occurrence of an acute myocardial infarction in a very young girl. OCT provided unique visualization of the culprit lesion.

  3. Modulation of Mononuclear Phagocyte Inflammatory Response by Liposome-Encapsulated Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Inhibitor Ameliorates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Li; Dong, Yan; Ge, Lan; Lu, Rui-Yi; Sun, Hai-Ying; Guo, Zao-Zeng; Yang, Guo-Hong; Jiang, Tie-Min; Li, Yu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence shows that anti-inflammatory strategies targeting inflammatory monocyte subset could reduce excessive inflammation and improve cardiovascular outcomes. Functional expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) have been demonstrated in monocytes and macrophages. We hypothesized that mononuclear phagocyte VGSCs are a target for monocyte/macrophage phenotypic switch, and liposome mediated inhibition of mononuclear phagocyte VGSC may attenuate myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and improve post-infarction left ventricular remodeling. Methodology/Principal Findings Thin film dispersion method was used to prepare phenytoin (PHT, a non-selective VGSC inhibitor) entrapped liposomes. Pharmacokinetic study revealed that the distribution and elimination half-life of PHT entrapped liposomes were shorter than those of free PHT, indicating a rapid uptake by mononuclear phagocytes after intravenous injection. In rat peritoneal macrophages, several VGSC α subunits (NaV1.1, NaV1.3, NaV1.4, NaV1.5, NaV1.6, NaV1.7, NaVX, Scn1b, Scn3b and Scn4b) and β subunits were expressed at mRNA level, and PHT could suppress lipopolysaccharide induced M1 polarization (decreased TNF-α and CCL5 expression) and facilitate interleukin-4 induced M2 polarization (increased Arg1 and TGF-β1 expression). In vivo study using rat model of myocardial I/R injury, demonstrated that PHT entrapped liposome could partially suppress I/R injury induced CD43+ inflammatory monocyte expansion, along with decreased infarct size and left ventricular fibrosis. Transthoracic echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic analysis revealed that PHT entrapped liposome treatment could attenuate left ventricular structural and functional remodeling, as shown by increased ejection fraction, reduced end-systolic and end-diastolic volume, as well as an amelioration of left ventricular systolic (+dP/dtmax) and diastolic (-dP/dtmin) functions. Conclusions/Significance Our work for the

  4. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Modulation during Metabolic Diseases and Cancers: Master and Minions

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Angela; La Rosa, Valentina Lucia; Rossetti, Paola; Rapisarda, Agnese Maria Chiara; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Corrado, Francesco; Buscema, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and metabolic diseases (such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, and cardiovascular diseases) has increased in the last decade, in both industrialized and developing countries. This also coincided with our observation of a similar increase in the prevalence of cancers. The aetiology of these diseases is very complex and involves genetic, nutritional, and environmental factors. Much evidence indicates the central role undertaken by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in the development of these disorders. Due to the fact that their ligands could become crucial in future target-therapies, PPARs have therefore become the focal point of much research. Based on this evidence, this narrative review was written with the purpose of outlining the effects of PPARs, their actions, and their prospective uses in metabolic diseases and cancers. PMID:28115924

  5. Gut microbiota from twins discordant for obesity modulate metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Ridaura, Vanessa K; Faith, Jeremiah J; Rey, Federico E; Cheng, Jiye; Duncan, Alexis E; Kau, Andrew L; Griffin, Nicholas W; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard; Bain, James R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Ilkayeva, Olga; Semenkovich, Clay F; Funai, Katsuhiko; Hayashi, David K; Lyle, Barbara J; Martini, Margaret C; Ursell, Luke K; Clemente, Jose C; Van Treuren, William; Walters, William A; Knight, Rob; Newgard, Christopher B; Heath, Andrew C; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2013-09-06

    The role of specific gut microbes in shaping body composition remains unclear. We transplanted fecal microbiota from adult female twin pairs discordant for obesity into germ-free mice fed low-fat mouse chow, as well as diets representing different levels of saturated fat and fruit and vegetable consumption typical of the U.S. diet. Increased total body and fat mass, as well as obesity-associated metabolic phenotypes, were transmissible with uncultured fecal communities and with their corresponding fecal bacterial culture collections. Cohousing mice harboring an obese twin's microbiota (Ob) with mice containing the lean co-twin's microbiota (Ln) prevented the development of increased body mass and obesity-associated metabolic phenotypes in Ob cage mates. Rescue correlated with invasion of specific members of Bacteroidetes from the Ln microbiota into Ob microbiota and was diet-dependent. These findings reveal transmissible, rapid, and modifiable effects of diet-by-microbiota interactions.

  6. Modulation of Abnormal Metabolic Brain Networks by Experimental Therapies in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson Disease: An Application to Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Implantation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Flores, Joseph; Cornfeldt, Michael; Mitrovic, Branka; Eidelberg, David; Doudet, Doris J

    2016-10-01

    Abnormal covariance pattern of regional metabolism associated with Parkinson disease (PD) is modulated by dopaminergic pharmacotherapy. Using high-resolution (18)F-FDG PET and network analysis, we previously derived and validated a parkinsonism-related metabolic pattern (PRP) in nonhuman primate models of PD. It is currently not known whether this network is modulated by experimental therapeutics. In this study, we examined changes in network activity by striatal implantation of human levodopa-producing retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells in parkinsonian macaques and evaluated the reproducibility of network activity in a small test-retest study.

  7. In vivo modulation of alternative pathways of P-450-catalyzed cyclophosphamide metabolism: impact on pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, L J; Drewes, P; Gustafsson, K; Brain, E G; Hecht, J E; Waxman, D J

    1999-03-01

    The widely used anticancer prodrug cyclophosphamide (CPA) is activated in liver by a 4-hydroxylation reaction primarily catalyzed by cytochrome P-4502B and P-4502C enzymes. An alternative metabolic pathway involves CPA N-dechloroethylation to yield chloroacetaldehyde (CA), a P-4503A-catalyzed deactivation/neurotoxication reaction. The in vivo modulation of these alternative, competing pathways of P-450 metabolism was investigated in pharmacokinetic studies carried out in the rat model. Peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) for 4-OH-CPA and CA were increased by 3- to 4-fold, and apparent plasma half-lives of both metabolites were correspondingly shortened in rats pretreated with phenobarbital (PB), an inducer of P-4502B and P-4503A enzymes. However, PB had no net impact on the extent of drug activation or its partitioning between these alternative metabolic pathways, as judged from AUC values (area-under-the-plasma concentration x time curve) for 4-OH-CPA and CA. The P-4503A inhibitor troleandomycin (TAO) decreased plasma Cmax and AUC of CA (80-85% decrease) without changing the Cmax or AUC of 4-OH-CPA in uninduced rats. In PB-induced rats, TAO decreased AUCCA by 73%, whereas it increased AUC4-OH-CPA by 93%. TAO thus selectively suppresses CPA N-dechloroethylation, thereby increasing the availability of drug for P-450 activation via 4-hydroxylation. By contrast, dexamethasone, a P-4503A inducer and antiemetic widely used in patients with cancer, stimulated large, undesirable increases in the Cmax and AUC of CA (8- and 4-fold, respectively) while reducing the AUC of the 4-hydroxylation pathway by approximately 60%. Tumor excision/in vitro colony formation and tumor growth delay assays using an in vivo 9L gliosarcoma solid tumor model revealed that TAO suppression of CPA N-dechloroethylation could be achieved without compromising the antitumor effect of CPA. The combination of PB with TAO did not, however, enhance the antitumor activity of CPA, despite the approximately 2

  8. Modulation of plant growth and metabolism in cadmium-enriched environments.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Shaista; Jamshieed, Sumiya; Rasool, Saiema; Ashraf, Muhammad; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Ahmad, Parvaiz

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a water soluble metal pollutant that is not essential to plant growth.It has attracted attention from soil scientists and plant nutritionists in recent years because of its toxicity and mobility in the soil-plant continuum. Even low levels of Cd (0.1-1 J.!M) cause adverse effects on plant growth and metabolism. Cadmium is known to trigger the synthesis of reactive oxygen species, hinder utilization, uptake and transport of essential nutrients and water, and modify photosynthetic machinery,thereby resulting in plant tissue death. Although the effects of Cd are dose- as well as plant species-dependent, some plants show Cd tolerance through a wide range of cellular responses. Such tolerance results from synthesis of osmolytes,generation of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants and metal-detoxifying peptides, changes in gene expression, and metal ion homeostasis and compartmentalization of ligand-metal complexes. Cd toxicity in plants produces effects on chlorophyllbio synthesis, reduces photosynthesis, and upsets plant water relations and hormonal and/or nutritional balances. All of these effects on plants and on plant metabolism ultimately reduce growth and productivity.In this review, we describe the extent to which Cd affects underlying metabolic processes in plants and how such altered processes affect plant growth. We review the sources of Cd contamination, its uptake, transportation and bioavailability and accumulation in plants, and its antagonistic and synergistic effects with other metals and compounds. We further address the effects of Cd on plant genetics and metabolism,and how plants respond to mitigate the adverse effects of Cd exposure, as well as strategies(e.g., plant breeding) that can reduce the impact of Cd contamination on plants.

  9. Inflorescences vs leaves: a distinct modulation of carbon metabolism process during Botrytis infection.

    PubMed

    Vatsa-Portugal, Parul; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Jacquens, Lucile; Clément, Christophe; Barka, Essaid Ait; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie

    2015-05-01

    Plant growth and survival depends critically on photo assimilates. Pathogen infection leads to changes in carbohydrate metabolism of plants. In this study, we monitored changes in the carbohydrate metabolism in the grapevine inflorescence and leaves using Botrytis cinerea and Botrytis pseudo cinerea. Fluctuations in gas exchange were correlated with variations in chlorophyll a fluorescence. During infection, the inflorescences showed an increase in net photosynthesis (Pn) with a stomatal limitation. In leaves, photosynthesis decreased, with a non-stomatal limitation. A decrease in the effective photosystem II (PSII) quantum yield (ΦPSII) was accompanied by an increase in photochemical quenching (qP) and non-photochemical quenching (qN). The enhancement of qP and ΦPSII could explain the observed increase in Pn. In leaves, the significant decline in ΦPSII and qP, and increase in qN suggest that energy was mostly oriented toward heat dissipation instead of CO2 fixation. The accumulation of glucose and sucrose in inflorescences and glucose and fructose in the leaves during infection indicate that the plant's carbon metabolism is differently regulated in these two organs. While a strong accumulation of starch was observed at 24 and 48 hours post-inoculation (hpi) with both species of Botrytis in the inflorescences, a significant decrease with B. cinerea at 24 hpi and a significant increase with B. pseudo cinerea at 48 hpi were observed in the leaves. On the basis of these results, it can be said that during pathogen attack, the metabolism of grapevine inflorescence and leaf is modified suggesting distinct mechanisms modifying gas exchange, PSII activity and sugar contents in these two organs.

  10. Genetic polymorphisms modulate the folate metabolism of Brazilian individuals with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Biselli, J M; Zampieri, B L; Goloni-Bertollo, E M; Haddad, R; Fonseca, M F R; Eberlin, M N; Vannucchi, H; Carvalho, V M; Pavarino, E C

    2012-10-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) carry three copies of the Cystathionine β-synthase (CβS) gene. The increase in the dosage of this gene results in an altered profile of metabolites involved in the folate pathway, including reduced homocysteine (Hcy), methionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Furthermore, previous studies in individuals with DS have shown that genetic variants in genes involved in the folate pathway influence the concentrations of this metabolism's products. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism affect the plasma concentrations of Hcy and methylmalonic acid (MMA) along with the concentration of serum folate in individuals with DS. Twelve genetic polymorphisms were investigated in 90 individuals with DS (median age 1.29 years, range 0.07-30.35 years; 49 male and 41 female). Genotyping for the polymorphisms was performed either by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based techniques or by direct sequencing. Plasma concentrations of Hcy and MMA were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as previously described, and serum folate was quantified using a competitive immunoassay. Our results indicate that the MTHFR C677T, MTR A2756G, TC2 C776G and BHMT G742A polymorphisms along with MMA concentration are predictors of Hcy concentration. They also show that age and Hcy concentration are predictors of MMA concentration. These findings could help to understand how genetic variation impacts folate metabolism and what metabolic consequences these variants have in individuals with trisomy 21.

  11. Selective androgen receptor modulators: in vitro and in vivo metabolism and analysis.

    PubMed

    de Rijke, Eva; Essers, Martien L; Rijk, Jeroen C W; Thevis, Mario; Bovee, Toine F H; van Ginkel, Leendert A; Sterk, Saskia S

    2013-01-01

    For future targeted screening in National Residue Control Programmes, the metabolism of seven SARMs, from the arylpropionamide and the quinolinone classes, was studied in vitro using S9 bovine liver enzymes. Metabolites were detected and identified with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToF-MS) and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS). Several metabolites were identified and results were compared with literature data on metabolism using a human cell line. Monohydroxylation, nitro-reduction, dephenylation and demethylation were the main S9 in vitro metabolic routes established. Next, an in vivo study was performed by oral administration of the arylpropionamide ostarine to a male calf and urine samples were analysed with UPLC-QToF-MS. Apart from two metabolites resulting from hydroxylation and dephenylation that were also observed in the in vitro study, the bovine in vivo metabolites of ostarine resulted in glucuronidation, sulfation and carboxylation, combined with either a hydroxylation or a dephenylation step. As the intact mother compounds of all SARMs tested are the main compounds present after in vitro incubations, and ostarine is still clearly present in the urine after the in vivo metabolism study in veal calves, the intact mother molecules were selected as the indicator to reveal treatment. The analytical UPLC-QqQ-MS/MS procedure was validated for three commercially available arylpropionamides according to European Union criteria (Commission Decision 2002/657/EC), and resulted in decision limits ranging from 0.025 to 0.05 µg l⁻¹ and a detection capability of 0.025 µg l⁻¹ in all cases. Adequate precision and intra-laboratory reproducibility (relative standard deviation below 20%) were obtained for all SARMs and the linearity was 0.999 for all compounds. This newly developed method is sensitive and robust, and therefore useful for confirmation and quantification of SARMs in bovine urine

  12. Branched short-chain fatty acids modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in primary adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Pålbrink, Ann-Ki; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Degerman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g. acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid, generated through colonic fermentation of dietary fibers, have been shown to reach the systemic circulation at micromolar concentrations. Moreover, SCFAs have been conferred anti-obesity properties in both animal models and human subjects. Branched SCFAs (BSCFAs), e.g., isobutyric and isovaleric acid, are generated by fermentation of branched amino acids, generated from undigested protein reaching colon. However, BSCFAs have been sparsely investigated when referring to effects on energy metabolism. Here we primarily investigate the effects of isobutyric acid and isovaleric acid on glucose and lipid metabolism in primary rat and human adipocytes. BSCFAs inhibited both cAMP-mediated lipolysis and insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis at 10 mM, whereas isobutyric acid potentiated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by all concentrations (1, 3 and 10 mM) in rat adipocytes. For human adipocytes, only SCFAs inhibited lipolysis at 10 mM. In both in vitro models, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase, a rate limiting enzyme in lipolysis. In addition, BSCFAs and SCFAs, in contrast to insulin, inhibited lipolysis in the presence of wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase inhibitor and OPC3911, a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor in rat adipocytes. Furthermore, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced insulin-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B. To conclude, BSCFAs have effects on adipocyte lipid and glucose metabolism that can contribute to improved insulin sensitivity in individuals with disturbed metabolism. PMID:27994949

  13. Modulation of a human lymphoblastoid B cell line by cyclic AMP. Ig secretion and phosphatidylcholine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, W.T.; Patke, C.L.; Gilliam, E.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Barron, K.S.; Orson, F.M.

    1988-09-01

    A transformed human B cell line, LA350, was found to be sensitive to cAMP-elevating agents by responding with rapid (0 to 2 h) severalfold elevations of intracellular cAMP to treatment with cholera toxin, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), forskolin, and dibutyryl cAMP (all p less than 0.001). These cAMP-elevating agents also produced significant inhibitions of subsequent (48 to 72 h) Ig secretion by the same B cells as measured by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay and an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay for IgM (both p less than 0.001). PMA- and IBMX-treated cells were particularly responsive to the effects of cholera toxin, showing a doubling of cAMP content and profound decrease in Ig production (p less than 0.001). Because our previous studies had correlated activation of the metabolic turnover of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) fraction of membrane phospholipids with enhanced Ig secretion, we examined the sensitivity of PC metabolism to cAMP in control and PMA-stimulated cells. Formation of PC was found to be inhibited by forskolin and IBMX (both p less than 0.002) but breakdown of PC was stimulated (p less than 0.001). These findings imply that as the enzymatic products of PC, choline phosphate and diacylglycerol, are depleted due to the combined effects of cAMP upon synthesis and turnover of PC, there is a decrease in Ig secretion. Since diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, it appears reasonable that Ig secretion is at least partially regulated by cAMP-responsive alterations in PC metabolism produced by protein kinase C-induced phosphorylation. We conclude that the early cAMP-sensitive changes in PC metabolism in this activated B cell line may signal for subsequent alterations in Ig secretion.

  14. Modulation of metabolic and clock gene mRNA rhythms by pineal and retinal circadian oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Karaganis, Stephen P.; Bartell, Paul A.; Shende, Vikram R.; Moore, Ashli F.; Cassone, Vincent M.

    2009-01-01

    Avian circadian organization involves interactions between three neural pacemakers: the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), pineal, and retina. Each of these structures is linked within a neuroendocrine loop to influence downstream processes and peripheral oscillations. However, the contribution of each structure to drive or synchronize peripheral oscillators or circadian outputs in avian species is largely unknown. To explore these interactions in the chick, we measured 2-deoxy[14C]-glucose (2DG) uptake and mRNA expression of the chick clock genes bmal1, cry1, and per3 in three brain areas and in two peripheral organs in chicks that underwent pinealectomy, enucleation, or sham surgery. We found that 2DG uptake rhythms damp under constant darkness in intact animals, while clock gene mRNA levels continue to cycle, demonstrating that metabolic rhythms are not directly driven by clock gene transcription. Moreover, 2DG rhythms are not phase-locked to rhythms of clock gene mRNA. However, pinealectomy and enucleation had similar disruptive effects on both metabolic and clock gene rhythms, suggesting that both of these oscillators act similarly to reinforce molecular and physiological rhythms in the chicken. Finally, we show that the relative phasing of at least one clock gene, cry1, varies between central and peripheral oscillators in a tissue specific manner. These data point to a complex, differential orchestration of central and peripheral oscillators in the chick, and, importantly, indicate a disconnect between canonical clock gene regulation and circadian control of metabolism. PMID:19136000

  15. Salinity modulates thermotolerance, energy metabolism and stress response in amphipods Gammarus lacustris

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchagina, Kseniya P.; Lubyaga, Yulia A.; Shatilina, Zhanna; Bedulina, Daria; Gurkov, Anton; Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V.; Baduev, Boris; Kondrateva, Elizaveta S.; Gubanov, Mikhail; Zadereev, Egor; Sokolova, Inna

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and salinity are important abiotic factors for aquatic invertebrates. We investigated the influence of different salinity regimes on thermotolerance, energy metabolism and cellular stress defense mechanisms in amphipods Gammarus lacustris Sars from two populations. We exposed amphipods to different thermal scenarios and determined their survival as well as activity of major antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase) and parameters of energy metabolism (content of glucose, glycogen, ATP, ADP, AMP and lactate). Amphipods from a freshwater population were more sensitive to the thermal challenge, showing higher mortality during acute and gradual temperature change compared to their counterparts from a saline lake. A more thermotolerant population from a saline lake had high activity of antioxidant enzymes. The energy limitations of the freshwater population (indicated by low baseline glucose levels, downward shift of the critical temperature of aerobic metabolism and inability to maintain steady-state ATP levels during warming) was observed, possibly reflecting a trade-off between the energy demands for osmoregulation under the hypo-osmotic condition of a freshwater environment and protection against temperature stress. PMID:27896024

  16. Bioenergetic cues shift FXR splicing towards FXRα2 to modulate hepatic lipolysis and fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Jorge C.; Massart, Julie; de Boer, Jan Freark; Porsmyr-Palmertz, Margareta; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Agudelo, Leandro Z.; Sinha, Indranil; Meierhofer, David; Ribeiro, Vera; Björnholm, Marie; Sauer, Sascha; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zierath, Juleen R.; Groen, Albert K.; Ruas, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a prominent role in hepatic lipid metabolism. The FXR gene encodes four proteins with structural differences suggestive of discrete biological functions about which little is known. Methods We expressed each FXR variant in primary hepatocytes and evaluated global gene expression, lipid profile, and metabolic fluxes. Gene delivery of FXR variants to Fxr−/− mouse liver was performed to evaluate their role in vivo. The effects of fasting and physical exercise on hepatic Fxr splicing were determined. Results We show that FXR splice isoforms regulate largely different gene sets and have specific effects on hepatic metabolism. FXRα2 (but not α1) activates a broad transcriptional program in hepatocytes conducive to lipolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Consequently, FXRα2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation and improves cellular insulin signaling to AKT. FXRα2 expression in Fxr−/− mouse liver activates a similar gene program and robustly decreases hepatic triglyceride levels. On the other hand, FXRα1 reduces hepatic triglyceride content to a lesser extent and does so through regulation of lipogenic gene expression. Bioenergetic cues, such as fasting and exercise, dynamically regulate Fxr splicing in mouse liver to increase Fxrα2 expression. Conclusions Our results show that the main FXR variants in human liver (α1 and α2) reduce hepatic lipid accumulation through distinct mechanisms and to different degrees. Taking this novel mechanism into account could greatly improve the pharmacological targeting and therapeutic efficacy of FXR agonists. PMID:26909306

  17. Therapeutic potential of the metabolic modulator phenformin in targeting the stem cell compartment in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Albini, Adriana; Longo, Caterina; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Grisendi, Giulia; Dominici, Massimo; Ciarrocchi, Alessia; Dallaglio, Katiuscia

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is the most dangerous and treatment-resistant skin cancer. Tumor resistance and recurrence are due to the persistence in the patient of aggressive cells with stem cell features, the cancer stem cells (CSC). Recent evidences have shown that CSC display a distinct metabolic profile as compared to tumor bulk population: a promising anti-tumor strategy is therefore to target specific metabolic pathways driving CSC behavior. Biguanides (metformin and phenformin) are anti-diabetic drugs able to perturb cellular metabolism and displaying anti-cancer activity. However, their ability to target the CSC compartment in melanoma is not known. Here we show that phenformin, but not metformin, strongly reduces melanoma cell viability, growth and invasion in both 2D and 3D (spheroids) models. While phenformin decreases melanoma CSC markers expression and the levels of the pro-survival factor MITF, MITF overexpression fails to prevent phenformin effects. Phenformin significantly reduces cell viability in melanoma by targeting both CSC (ALDHhigh) and non-CSC cells and by significantly reducing the number of viable cells in ALDHhigh and ALDHlow-derived spheroids. Consistently, phenformin reduces melanoma cell viability and growth independently from SOX2 levels. Our results show that phenformin is able to affect both CSC and non-CSC melanoma cell viability and growth and suggests its potential use as anti-cancer therapy in melanoma. PMID:28036292

  18. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; Vega, José M; Eliášová, Adriana; Repčák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress.

  19. MicroRNA modulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in cardiometabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Juan F.; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Rotllan, Noemi; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of cholesterol metabolism is one of the most studied biological processes since its first isolation from gallstones in 1784. High levels of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and reduced levels of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are widely recognized as major risk factors of cardiovascular disease. An imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can oxidize LDL particles increasing the levels of the highly pro-atherogenic oxidized LDLs (ox-LDLs). Furthermore, under pathological scenarios, numerous molecules can function as pro-oxidants, such as iron or high-glucose levels. In addition to the classical mechanisms regulating lipid homeostasis, recent studies have demonstrated the important role of microRNAs (miRNAs) as regulators of lipoprotein metabolism, its oxidative derivatives and redox balance. Here, we summarize the recent findings in the field, highlighting the contribution of some miRNAs in lipid and oxidative-associated pathologies. We also discuss how therapeutic intervention of miRNAs may be a promising strategy to decrease LDL, increase HDL and ameliorate lipid and oxidative related disorders, including atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23871755

  20. Women with metabolic syndrome present different autonomic modulation and blood pressure response to an acute resistance exercise session compared with women without metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tibana, Ramires A; Boullosa, Daniel A; Leicht, Anthony S; Prestes, Jonato

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of risk factors in individuals with high risk of diabetes and heart disease. Resistance training (RT) has been proposed to be a safe, effective and worthwhile method for the prevention and treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, no study has analysed the acute response of blood pressure (BP) and autonomic control of heart rate (HR) after a RT session in female patients with MetS. The aim of the present study was to analyse the response of laboratory assessed and ambulatory BP and cardiac autonomic modulation after a RT session in women with MetS. Nine women without MetS (35.0 ± 6.7 years) and 10 women with MetS (34.1 ± 9.4 years) completed one experimental exercise session and a control session. Laboratory BP, heart rate variability (HRV) and ambulatory BP of each subject were measured at rest, over 60 min, and for 24 h after the end of the sessions, respectively. There was a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP), night time diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean blood pressure (MBP) only for women with MetS, for all periods after the RT session when compared with the control session (P<0.05). Significantly lower laboratory values of SBP and DBP (10, 30 and 40 min postexercise) and MBP (10, 40 and 50 min postexercise) were observed in women with MetS (P<0.05). Patients with MetS exhibited significant lower basal HRV and a lower autonomic responsiveness during the 60 min of acute recovery. These results confirmed that an acute session of resistance exercise induced a lower BP during day time and sleeping hours in women with MetS that may offer a cardio-protective effect. Women with MetS exhibited an impaired autonomic modulation at rest and a lower acute autonomic responsiveness to a RT session. The dissociation between BP and HRV responses suggests that other factors than autonomic control could be involved in the hypotensive effect of a RT session in MetS patients.

  1. Enhancing Carbon Fixation by Metabolic Engineering: A Model System of Complex Network Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Stephanopoulos

    2008-04-10

    In the first two years of this research we focused on the development of a DNA microarray for transcriptional studies in the photosynthetic organism Synechocystis and the elucidation of the metabolic pathway for biopolymer synthesis in this organism. In addition we also advanced the molecular biological tools for metabolic engineering of biopolymer synthesis in Synechocystis and initiated a series of physiological studies for the elucidation of the carbon fixing pathways and basic central carbon metabolism of these organisms. During the last two-year period we focused our attention on the continuation and completion of the last task, namely, the development of tools for basic investigations of the physiology of these cells through, primarily, the determination of their metabolic fluxes. The reason for this decision lies in the importance of fluxes as key indicators of physiology and the high level of information content they carry in terms of identifying rate limiting steps in a metabolic pathway. While flux determination is a well-advanced subject for heterotrophic organisms, for the case of autotrophic bacteria, like Synechocystis, some special challenges had to be overcome. These challenges stem mostly from the fact that if one uses {sup 13}C labeled CO{sub 2} for flux determination, the {sup 13}C label will mark, at steady state, all carbon atoms of all cellular metabolites, thus eliminating the necessary differentiation required for flux determination. This peculiarity of autotrophic organisms makes it imperative to carry out flux determination under transient conditions, something that had not been accomplished before. We are pleased to report that we have solved this problem and we are now able to determine fluxes in photosynthetic organisms from stable isotope labeling experiments followed by measurements of label enrichment in cellular metabolites using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. We have conducted extensive simulations to test the method and

  2. Alcohol intake modulates the effect of a polymorphism of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene on plasma high density lipoprotein and the risk of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Fumeron, F; Betoulle, D; Luc, G; Behague, I; Ricard, S; Poirier, O; Jemaa, R; Evans, A; Arveiler, D; Marques-Vidal, P

    1995-01-01

    A polymorphism of the CETP gene (CETP/TaqIB) with two alleles B1 (60%) and B2 (40%) has been investigated in relation to lipid variables and the risk of myocardial infarction in a large case-control study (ECTIM) of men aged 25-64. No association was observed between the polymorphism and LDL or VLDL related lipid variables. Conversely, B2 carriers had reduced levels of plasma CETP (P < 0.0001) and increased levels of HDL cholesterol (P < 0.0001) and of other HDL related lipid variables. The effects of the polymorphism on plasma CETP and HDL cholesterol were independent, suggesting the presence of at least two functional variants linked to B2. A search for these variants on the coding sequence of the CETP gene failed to identify them. The effect of B2 on plasma HDL cholesterol was absent in subjects drinking < 25 grams/d of alcohol but increased commensurably, with higher values of alcohol consumption (interaction: P < 0.0001). A similar interaction was not observed for plasma CETP. The odds-ratio for myocardial infarction of B2 homozygotes decreased from 1.0 in nondrinkers to 0.34 in those drinking 75 grams/d or more. These results provide the first demonstration of a gene-environment interaction affecting HDL cholesterol levels and coronary heart disease risk. PMID:7657837

  3. Glycine prevents metabolic steatohepatitis in diabetic KK-Ay mice through modulation of hepatic innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shiori; Ikejima, Kenichi; Arai, Kumiko; Yokokawa, Junko; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Yamashina, Shunhei; Watanabe, Sumio

    2016-12-01

    Strategies for prevention and treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis remain to be established. We evaluated the effect of glycine on metabolic steatohepatitis in genetically obese, diabetic KK-A(y) mice. Male KK-A(y) mice were fed a diet containing 5% glycine for 4 wk, and liver pathology was evaluated. Hepatic mRNA levels for lipid-regulating molecules, cytokines/chemokines, and macrophage M1/M2 markers were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Hepatic expression of natural killer (NK) T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Body weight gain was significantly blunted and development of hepatic steatosis and inflammatory infiltration were remarkably prevented in mice fed the glycine-containing diet compared with controls. Indeed, hepatic induction levels of molecules related to lipogenesis were largely blunted in the glycine diet-fed mice. Elevations of hepatic mRNA levels for TNFα and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 were also remarkably blunted in the glycine diet-fed mice. Furthermore, suppression of hepatic NK T cells was reversed in glycine diet-fed KK-A(y) mice, and basal hepatic expression levels of NK T cell-derived cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13, were increased. Moreover, hepatic mRNA levels of arginase-1, a marker of macrophage M2 transformation, were significantly increased in glycine diet-fed mice. In addition, dietary glycine improved glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia in KK-A(y) mice. These observations clearly indicate that glycine prevents maturity-onset obesity and metabolic steatohepatitis in genetically diabetic KK-A(y) mice. The underlying mechanisms most likely include normalization of hepatic innate immune responses involving NK T cells and M2 transformation of Kupffer cells. It is proposed that glycine is a promising immunonutrient for prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome-related nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  4. PPARα inhibition modulates multiple reprogrammed metabolic pathways in kidney cancer and attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Donohoe, Dallas; Bultman, Scott; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Tim; Hellerstein, Marc; Weiss, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Kidney cancer [renal cell carcinoma (RCC)] is the sixth-most-common cancer in the United States, and its incidence is increasing. The current progression-free survival for patients with advanced RCC rarely extends beyond 1-2 yr due to the development of therapeutic resistance. We previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-α (PPARα) as a potential therapeutic target for this disease and showed that a specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in RCC cell lines associated with attenuation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. We now extend that work and show that PPARα inhibition attenuates components of RCC metabolic reprogramming, capitalizing on the Warburg effect. The specific PPARα inhibitor GW6471, as well as a siRNA specific to PPARα, attenuates the enhanced fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation associated with glycolysis inhibition, and PPARα antagonism also blocks the enhanced glycolysis that has been observed in RCC cells; this effect did not occur in normal human kidney epithelial cells. Such cell type-specific inhibition of glycolysis corresponds with changes in protein levels of the oncogene c-Myc and has promising clinical implications. Furthermore, we show that treatment with GW6471 results in RCC tumor growth attenuation in a xenograft mouse model, with minimal obvious toxicity, a finding associated with the expected on-target effects on c-Myc. These studies demonstrate that several pivotal cancer-relevant metabolic pathways are inhibited by PPARα antagonism. Our data support the concept that targeting PPARα, with or without concurrent inhibition of glycolysis, is a potential novel and effective therapeutic approach for RCC that targets metabolic reprogramming in this tumor.

  5. Seed priming improves chilling tolerance in chickpea by modulating germination metabolism, trehalose accumulation and carbon assimilation.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad; Hussain, Mubshar; Nawaz, Ahmad; Lee, Dong-Jin; Alghamdi, Salem S; Siddique, Kadambot H M

    2017-02-01

    Chilling stress is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting chickpea productivity worldwide. This study evaluated the potential role of seed priming in improving resistance to chilling stress in chickpea (cv. Punjab, 2008). The priming treatments involved soaking seeds of chickpea cultivar Punjab 2008 in either water for 8 h (on-farm priming), aerated water (hydropriming) for 18 h, or CaCl2 solution (ψs -1.25 MPa; osmopriming) for 18 h. Primed and untreated seeds were grown either at 18/15 °C (control) or 13/10 °C (chilling stress). Chilling stress suppressed the growth of chickpea while seed priming mitigated the adverse effects of chilling stress by improving stand establishment, growth, water relations, photosynthesis, α-amylase activity, sugar metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, membrane stability, and leaf accumulation of proline, nitrogen, potassium and soluble phenolics. Seed priming also improved the performance of chickpea under optimal (control) conditions. The overall order of improvement in resistance to chilling by using seed priming was osmopriming > hydropriming > on-farm priming. Osmopriming improved seedling dry weight, specific leaf area, leaf CO2 net assimilation rate, maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII, α-amylase activity, trehalose content and leaf relative water content by 10, 22, 17, 20, 73, 48 and 7%, respectively, relative to the non-primed control under chilling stress. Under optimal temperature conditions, the corresponding values were 30, 32, 16, 10, 83, 75 and 5%, respectively. Sugar metabolism, especially trehalose content, was strongly linked with stand establishment, photosynthesis, antioxidant potential (under chilling stress) and plant biomass. Overall, seed priming improved chickpea performance under both optimal temperature conditions and chilling stress through better germination metabolism and the accumulation of trehalose, which protected from oxidative damage and helped to maintain carbon

  6. Bisphenol A modulates the metabolic regulator oestrogen-related receptor-α in T-cells.

    PubMed

    Cipelli, Riccardo; Harries, Lorna; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Yoshihara, Shin'ichi; Melzer, David; Galloway, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used plastics constituent that has been associated with endocrine, immune and metabolic effects. Evidence for how BPA exerts significant biological effects at chronic low levels of exposure has remained elusive. In adult men, exposure to BPA has been associated with higher expression of two nuclear receptors, oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ) and oestrogen-related-receptor-α (ERRα), in peripheral white blood cells in vivo. In this study, we explore the expression of ESR2 (ERβ) and ESRRA (ERRα) in human leukaemic T-cell lymphoblasts (Jurkat cells) exposed to BPA in vitro. We show that exposure to BPA led to enhanced expression of ESRRA within 6 h of exposure (mean±s.e.m.: 1.43±0.08-fold increase compared with the control, P<0.05). After 72 h, expression of ESRRA remained significantly enhanced at concentrations of BPA ≥1 nM. Oxidative metabolism of BPA by rat liver S9 fractions yields the potent oestrogenic metabolite, 4-methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene (MBP). Exposure of cells to 1-100 nM MBP increased the expression of both ESRRA (significantly induced, P<0.05, at 1, 10, 100 nM) and ESR2 (1.32±0.07-fold increase at 100 nM exposure, P<0.01). ERRα is a major control point for oxidative metabolism in many cell types, including T-cells. Following exposure to both BPA and MBP, we found that cells showed a decrease in cell proliferation rate. Taken together, these results confirm the bioactivity of BPA against putative T-cell targets in vitro at concentrations relevant to general human exposure.

  7. One-year outcomes of out-of-hospital administration of intravenous glucose, insulin, and potassium (GIK) in patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (from the IMMEDIATE [Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency Care] Trial).

    PubMed

    Selker, Harry P; Udelson, James E; Massaro, Joseph M; Ruthazer, Robin; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Griffith, John L; Sheehan, Patricia R; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Rosenberg, Yves; Tian, Xin; Vickery, Ellen M; Atkins, James M; Aufderheide, Tom P; Sayah, Assaad J; Pirrallo, Ronald G; Levy, Michael K; Richards, Michael E; Braude, Darren A; Doyle, Delanor D; Frascone, Ralph J; Kosiak, Donald J; Leaming, James M; Van Gelder, Carin M; Walter, Gert-Paul; Wayne, Marvin A; Woolard, Robert H; Beshansky, Joni R

    2014-05-15

    The Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency care Trial of very early intravenous glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in out-of-hospital emergency medical service (EMS) settings showed 80% reduction in infarct size at 30 days, suggesting potential longer-term benefits. Here we report 1-year outcomes. Prespecified 1-year end points of this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, effectiveness trial included all-cause mortality and composites including cardiac arrest, mortality, or hospitalization for heart failure (HF). Of 871 participants randomized to GIK versus placebo, death occurred within 1 year in 11.6% versus 13.5%, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57 to 1.23, p = 0.36). The composite of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality was 12.8% versus 17.0% (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.02, p = 0.06). The composite of hospitalization for HF or mortality within 1 year was 17.2% versus 17.2% (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.37, p = 0.92). The composite of mortality, cardiac arrest, or HF hospitalization within 1 year was 18.1% versus 20.4% (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.16, p = 0.30). In patients presenting with suspected ST elevation myocardial infarction, HRs for 1-year mortality and the 3 composites were, respectively, 0.65 (95% CI 0.33 to 1.27, p = 0.21), 0.52 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.92, p = 0.03), 0.63 (95% CI 0.35 to 1.16, p = 0.14), and 0.51 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.87, p = 0.01). In patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes, serious end points generally were lower with GIK than placebo, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, in those with ST elevation myocardial infarction, the composites of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality, and of cardiac arrest, mortality, or HF hospitalization within 1 year, were significantly reduced.

  8. A proliferative probiotic Bifidobacterium strain in the gut ameliorates progression of metabolic disorders via microbiota modulation and acetate elevation

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Ryo; Kamikado, Kohei; Suda, Wataru; Takii, Hiroshi; Mikami, Yumiko; Suganuma, Natsuki; Hattori, Masahira; Koga, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota is an important contributor to the worldwide prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), which includes obesity and diabetes. The anti-MS effects exerted by Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis GCL2505 (BlaG), a highly proliferative Bifidobacterium strain in the gut, and B. longum ssp. longum JCM1217T (BloJ) were comparatively examined. BlaG treatment reduced visceral fat accumulation and improved glucose tolerance, whereas BloJ had no effect on these parameters. Gut microbial analysis revealed that BlaG exerted stronger effects on the overall bacterial structure of the gut microbiota than BloJ, including enrichment of the genus Bifidobacterium. The levels of acetate and glucagon-like peptide-1 were increased by BlaG treatment in both the gut and plasma, but not by BloJ treatment. Correlation analysis suggested that the elevation of gut acetate levels by BlaG treatment plays a pivotal role in the BlaG-induced anti-MS effects. These findings indicated that BlaG, a highly viable and proliferative probiotic, improves metabolic disorders by modulating gut microbiota, which results in the elevation of SCFAs, especially acetate. PMID:28252037

  9. A proliferative probiotic Bifidobacterium strain in the gut ameliorates progression of metabolic disorders via microbiota modulation and acetate elevation.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Ryo; Kamikado, Kohei; Suda, Wataru; Takii, Hiroshi; Mikami, Yumiko; Suganuma, Natsuki; Hattori, Masahira; Koga, Yasuhiro

    2017-03-02

    The gut microbiota is an important contributor to the worldwide prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), which includes obesity and diabetes. The anti-MS effects exerted by Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis GCL2505 (BlaG), a highly proliferative Bifidobacterium strain in the gut, and B. longum ssp. longum JCM1217(T) (BloJ) were comparatively examined. BlaG treatment reduced visceral fat accumulation and improved glucose tolerance, whereas BloJ had no effect on these parameters. Gut microbial analysis revealed that BlaG exerted stronger effects on the overall bacterial structure of the gut microbiota than BloJ, including enrichment of the genus Bifidobacterium. The levels of acetate and glucagon-like peptide-1 were increased by BlaG treatment in both the gut and plasma, but not by BloJ treatment. Correlation analysis suggested that the elevation of gut acetate levels by BlaG treatment plays a pivotal role in the BlaG-induced anti-MS effects. These findings indicated that BlaG, a highly viable and proliferative probiotic, improves metabolic disorders by modulating gut microbiota, which results in the elevation of SCFAs, especially acetate.

  10. The Modulation of the Symbiont/Host Interaction between Wolbachia pipientis and Aedes fluviatilis Embryos by Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha Fernandes, Mariana; Martins, Renato; Pessoa Costa, Evenilton; Casagrande Pacidônio, Etiene; Araujo de Abreu, Leonardo; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Moreira, Luciano A.; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Logullo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis, a maternally transmitted bacterium that colonizes arthropods, may affect the general aspects of insect physiology, particularly reproduction. Wolbachia is a natural endosymbiont of Aedes fluviatilis, whose effects in embryogenesis and reproduction have not been addressed so far. In this context, we investigated the correlation between glucose metabolism and morphological alterations during A. fluviatilis embryo development in Wolbachia-positive (W+) and Wolbachia-negative (W−) mosquito strains. While both strains do not display significant morphological and larval hatching differences, larger differences were observed in hexokinase activity and glycogen contents during early and mid-stages of embryogenesis, respectively. To investigate if glycogen would be required for parasite-host interaction, we reduced Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) levels in adult females and their eggs by RNAi. GSK-3 knock-down leads to embryonic lethality, lower levels of glycogen and total protein and Wolbachia reduction. Therefore, our results suggest that the relationship between A. fluviatilis and Wolbachia may be modulated by glycogen metabolism. PMID:24926801

  11. The modulation of the symbiont/host interaction between Wolbachia pipientis and Aedes fluviatilis embryos by glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Fernandes, Mariana; Martins, Renato; Pessoa Costa, Evenilton; Pacidônio, Etiene Casagrande; Araujo de Abreu, Leonardo; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Moreira, Luciano A; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Logullo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis, a maternally transmitted bacterium that colonizes arthropods, may affect the general aspects of insect physiology, particularly reproduction. Wolbachia is a natural endosymbiont of Aedes fluviatilis, whose effects in embryogenesis and reproduction have not been addressed so far. In this context, we investigated the correlation between glucose metabolism and morphological alterations during A. fluviatilis embryo development in Wolbachia-positive (W+) and Wolbachia-negative (W-) mosquito strains. While both strains do not display significant morphological and larval hatching differences, larger differences were observed in hexokinase activity and glycogen contents during early and mid-stages of embryogenesis, respectively. To investigate if glycogen would be required for parasite-host interaction, we reduced Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) levels in adult females and their eggs by RNAi. GSK-3 knock-down leads to embryonic lethality, lower levels of glycogen and total protein and Wolbachia reduction. Therefore, our results suggest that the relationship between A. fluviatilis and Wolbachia may be modulated by glycogen metabolism.

  12. Hepatic Farnesoid X-Receptor Isoforms α2 and α4 Differentially Modulate Bile Salt and Lipoprotein Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boesjes, Marije; Bloks, Vincent W.; Hageman, Jurre; Bos, Trijnie; van Dijk, Theo H.; Havinga, Rick; Wolters, Henk; Jonker, Johan W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor FXR acts as an intracellular bile salt sensor that regulates synthesis and transport of bile salts within their enterohepatic circulation. In addition, FXR is involved in control of a variety of crucial metabolic pathways. Four FXR splice variants are known, i.e. FXRα1-4. Although these isoforms show differences in spatial and temporal expression patterns as well as in transcriptional activity, the physiological relevance hereof has remained elusive. We have evaluated specific roles of hepatic FXRα2 and FXRα4 by stably expressing these isoforms using liver-specific self-complementary adeno-associated viral vectors in total body FXR knock-out mice. The hepatic gene expression profile of the FXR knock-out mice was largely normalized by both isoforms. Yet, differential effects were also apparent; FXRα2 was more effective in reducing elevated HDL levels and transrepressed hepatic expression of Cyp8b1, the regulator of cholate synthesis. The latter coincided with a switch in hydrophobicity of the bile salt pool. Furthermore, FXRα2-transduction caused an increased neutral sterol excretion compared to FXRα4 without affecting intestinal cholesterol absorption. Our data show, for the first time, that hepatic FXRα2 and FXRα4 differentially modulate bile salt and lipoprotein metabolism in mice. PMID:25506828

  13. APL-1, the Alzheimer’s Amyloid Precursor Protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, Modulates Multiple Metabolic Pathways Throughout Development

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Collin Y.; Raps, Daniel A.; Li, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene or in genes that process APP are correlated with familial Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The biological function of APP remains unclear. APP is a transmembrane protein that can be sequentially cleaved by different secretases to yield multiple fragments, which can potentially act as signaling molecules. Caenorhabditis elegans encodes one APP-related protein, APL-1, which is essential for viability. Here, we show that APL-1 signaling is dependent on the activity of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 and influences metabolic pathways such as developmental progression, body size, and egg-laying rate. Furthermore, apl-1(yn5) mutants, which produce high levels of the extracellular APL-1 fragment, show an incompletely penetrant temperature-sensitive embryonic lethality. In a genetic screen to isolate mutants in which the apl-1(yn5) lethality rate is modified, we identified a suppressor mutation in MOA-1/R155.2, a receptor-protein tyrosine phosphatase, and an enhancer mutation in MOA-2/B0495.6, a protein involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Knockdown of apl-1 in an apl-1(yn5) background caused lethality and molting defects at all larval stages, suggesting that apl-1 is required for each transitional molt. We suggest that signaling of the released APL-1 fragment modulates multiple metabolic states and that APL-1 is required throughout development. PMID:22466039

  14. Metabolic and Microbial Modulation of the Large Intestine Ecosystem by Non-Absorbed Diet Phenolic Compounds: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mosele, Juana I; Macià, Alba; Motilva, Maria-José

    2015-09-18

    Phenolic compounds represent a diverse group of phytochemicals whose intake is associated with a wide spectrum of health benefits. As consequence of their low bioavailability, most of them reach the large intestine where, mediated by the action of local microbiota, a series of related microbial metabolites are accumulated. In the present review, gut microbial transformations of non-absorbed phenolic compounds are summarized. Several studies have reached a general consensus that unbalanced diets are associated with undesirable changes in gut metabolism that could be detrimental to intestinal health. In terms of explaining the possible effects of non-absorbed phenolic compounds, we have also gathered information regarded their influence on the local metabolism. For this purpose, a number of issues are discussed. Firstly, we consider the possible implications of phenolic compounds in the metabolism of colonic products, such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), sterols (cholesterol and bile acids), and microbial products of non-absorbed proteins. Due to their being recognized as affective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents, the ability of phenolic compounds to counteract or suppress pro-oxidant and/or pro-inflammatory responses, triggered by bowel diseases, is also presented. The modulation of gut microbiota through dietetic maneuvers including phenolic compounds is also commented on. Although the available data seems to assume positive effects in terms of gut health protection, it is still insufficient for solid conclusions to be extracted, basically due to the lack of human trials to confirm the results obtained by the in vitro and animal studies. We consider that more emphasis should be focused on the study of phenolic compounds, particularly in their microbial metabolites, and their power to influence different aspects of gut health.

  15. Doses Lactobacillus reuteri depend on adhesive ability to modulate the intestinal immune response and metabolism in mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kan; Liu, Li; Dou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Chong; Liu, Jianxin; Zhang, Wenming; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the modulatory effects of Lactobacillus reuteri ZJ617 and ZJ615, which have high and low adhesive abilities, respectively, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on immune responses and metabolism in mice stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six C57BL/6 mice per group were orally inoculated with ZJ617, ZJ615 or LGG for one week (1 × 108 CFU/mouse) and i.p. injected with LPS (10 mg/kg) for 24 h. Compared with the LPS stimulation group, ZJ615, ZJ617 and LGG significantly decreased TNF-α levels in the sera of mice stimulated by LPS. ZJ615 and LGG significantly down-regulated mRNA levels of cytokines and Toll-like receptors, and suppressed activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling, while ZJ617 up-regulated anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA levels in the ilea of mice stimulated by LPS. Correlation analysis confirmed that adhesive ability is relative with the immunomodulation in the ilea of mice. There were 24, 7 and 10 metabolites and 10, 9 and 8 major metabolic pathways with significant differences (VIP > 1, P < 0.05) between the LPS and ZJ617 + LPS groups, the LPS and ZJ615 + LPS groups, and the ZJ617 + LPS and ZJ615 + LPS groups, respectively. The results indicated that both ZJ617 and ZJ615 could modulate the intestinal immune responses and metabolism in LPS-stimulated mice. PMID:27323686

  16. The modulation of leaf metabolism plays a role in salt tolerance of Cymodocea nodosa exposed to hypersaline stress in mesocosms

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Amalia; Marín-Guirao, Lázaro; Serra, Ilia A.; Spadafora, Antonia; Sandoval-Gil, José M.; Bernardeau-Esteller, Jaime; Fernandez, Juan M. R.; Mazzuca, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Applying proteomics, we tested the physiological responses of the euryhaline seagrass Cymodocea nodosa to deliberate manipulation of salinity in a mesocosm system. Plants were subjected to a chronic hypersaline condition (43 psu) to compare protein expression and plant photochemistry responses after 15 and 30 days of exposure with those of plants cultured under normal/ambient saline conditions (37 psu). Results showed a general decline in the expression level of leaf proteins in hypersaline stressed plants, with more intense reductions after long-lasting exposure. Specifically, the carbon-fixing enzyme RuBisCo displayed a lower accumulation level in stressed plants relative to controls. In contrast, the key enzymes involved in the regulation of glycolysis, cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, enolase 2 and triose-phosphate isomerase, showed significantly higher accumulation levels. These responses suggested a shift in carbon metabolism in stressed plants. Hypersaline stress also induced a significant alteration of the photosynthetic physiology of C. nodosa by means of a down-regulation in structural proteins and enzymes of both PSII and PSI. However we found an over-expression of the cytochrome b559 alpha subunit of the PSII initial complex, which is a receptor for the PSII core proteins involved in biogenesis or repair processes and therefore potentially involved in the absence of effects at the photochemical level of stressed plants. As expected hypersalinity also affects vacuolar metabolism by increasing the leaf cell turgor pressure and enhancing the up-take of Na+ by over-accumulating the tonoplast specific intrinsic protein pyrophosphate-energized inorganic pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) coupled to the Na+/H+-antiporter. The modulation of carbon metabolism and the enhancement of vacuole capacity in Na+ sequestration and osmolarity changes are discussed in relation to salt tolerance of C. nodosa. PMID:26167167

  17. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Activation by Resveratrol Modulates Amyloid-β Peptide Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giliberto, Luca; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Wu, Qingli; Simon, James E.; Janle, Elsa M.; Lobo, Jessica; Ferruzzi, Mario G.; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition into cerebral amyloid plaques. The natural polyphenol resveratrol promotes anti-aging pathways via the activation of several metabolic sensors, including the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Resveratrol also lowers Aβ levels in cell lines; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for this effect is largely unknown. Moreover, the bioavailability of resveratrol in the brain remains uncertain. Here we show that AMPK signaling controls Aβ metabolism and mediates the anti-amyloidogenic effect of resveratrol in non-neuronal and neuronal cells, including in mouse primary neurons. Resveratrol increased cytosolic calcium levels and promoted AMPK activation by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β. Direct pharmacological and genetic activation of AMPK lowered extracellular Aβ accumulation, whereas AMPK inhibition reduced the effect of resveratrol on Aβ levels. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited the AMPK target mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) to trigger autophagy and lysosomal degradation of Aβ. Finally, orally administered resveratrol in mice was detected in the brain where it activated AMPK and reduced cerebral Aβ levels and deposition in the cortex. These data suggest that resveratrol and pharmacological activation of AMPK have therapeutic potential against Alzheimer disease. PMID:20080969

  18. Lithium and valproate modulate energy metabolism in an animal model of mania induced by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Feier, Gustavo; Valvassori, Samira S; Varela, Roger B; Resende, Wilson R; Bavaresco, Daniela V; Morais, Meline O; Scaini, Giselli; Andersen, Monica L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown alterations in mitochondrial complexes of bipolar disorder (BD) patients. However, changes in the Krebs cycle enzymes have been little studied. The animal model of mania induced by amphetamine has been widely used for the study of bipolar mania. The aim of this study is to assess behavioral and energy metabolism changes in an animal model of mania induced by methamphetamine (m-AMPH). Wistar rats were first given m-AMPH or saline for 14 days, and then, between days 8 and 14, rats were treated with lithium (Li), valproate (VPA), or saline (Sal). Locomotor behavior was assessed using the open-field task and activities of Krebs cycle enzymes (citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase), mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II, III, and IV), and creatine kinase measured in the brain structures (prefrontal, amygdala, hippocampus, and striatum). Li and VPA reversed m-AMPH-induced hyperactivity. The administration of m-AMPH inhibited the activities of Krebs cycle enzymes and complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in all analyzed structures. Li and VPA reversed m-AMPH-induced energetic metabolism dysfunction; however, the effects of Li and VPA were dependent on the brain region analyzed. From the results obtained in this study, we suggested that the decreased Krebs cycle enzymes activity induced by m-AMPH may be inhibiting mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Therefore, changes in the Krebs cycle enzymes may also be involved in BD.

  19. Antisense Mediated Splicing Modulation For Inherited Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns—multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)—and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  20. Modulation of hepatic lipid metabolism by olive oil and its phenols in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Priore, Paola; Cavallo, Alessandro; Gnoni, Antonio; Damiano, Fabrizio; Gnoni, Gabriele V; Siculella, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common chronic liver disease in western countries, being considered the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Cumulative lines of evidence suggest that olive oil, used as primary source of fat by Mediterranean populations, may play a key role in the observed health benefits on NAFLD. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of the knowledge on the protective role of both major and minor components of olive oil on lipid metabolism during NAFLD. In particular, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for the increase or decrease in hepatic lipid content are critically analyzed, taking into account that several studies have often provided different and/or conflicting results in animal models fed on olive oil-enriched diet. In addition, new findings that highlight the hypolipidemic and the antisteatotic actions of olive oil phenols are presented. As mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD, the targeting of these organelles with olive oil phenols as a powerful therapeutic approach is also discussed.

  1. Chromium picolinate modulates serotonergic properties and carbohydrate metabolism in a rat model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Komorowski, James R; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Juturu, Vijaya; Orhan, Cemal; Ulas, Mustafa; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-10-01

    Chromium picolinate (CrPic) has shown both antidepressant and antidiabetic properties. In this study, the effects of CrPic on serotonergic properties and carbohydrate metabolism in diabetic rats were evaluated. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. (1) The control group received only standard diet (8 % fat). (2) The CrPic group was fed standard diet and CrPic (80 μg CrPic per kilogram body mass (b.m.)/day), for 10 weeks (microgram/kilogram b.m./day). (3) The HFD/STZ group fed a high-fat diet (HFD, 40 % fat) for 2 weeks and then received streptozotocin (STZ, 40 mg/kg, i.p.) (i.v.) HFD-STZ-CrPic group treated as the previous group and then were administered CrPic. CrPic administration to HFD/STZ-treated rats increased brain chromium levels and improved all measurements of carbohydrate metabolism and serotonergic properties (P<0.001). CrPic also significantly increased levels of insulin, tryptophan, and serotonin (P<0.001) in the serum and brain, and decreased cortisol levels in the serum (P<0.01). Except chromium levels, no significant effect of CrPic supplementation was detected on the overall measured parameters in the control group. CrPic administration was well tolerated without any adverse events. The results support the use of CrPic supplementation which improves serotonergic properties of brain in diabetes.

  2. Analysis of Candida albicans Mutants Defective in the Cdk8 Module of Mediator Reveal Links between Metabolism and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Allia K.; Morales, Diana K.; Liu, Zhongle; Grahl, Nora; Zhang, Anda; Willger, Sven D.; Myers, Lawrence C.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is a key virulence trait that involves hyphal growth and adhesin expression. Pyocyanin (PYO), a phenazine secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibits both C. albicans biofilm formation and development of wrinkled colonies. Using a genetic screen, we identified two mutants, ssn3Δ/Δ and ssn8Δ/Δ, which continued to wrinkle in the presence of PYO. Ssn8 is a cyclin-like protein and Ssn3 is similar to cyclin-dependent kinases; both proteins are part of the heterotetrameric Cdk8 module that forms a complex with the transcriptional co-regulator, Mediator. Ssn3 kinase activity was also required for PYO sensitivity as a kinase dead mutant maintained a wrinkled colony morphology in the presence of PYO. Furthermore, similar phenotypes were observed in mutants lacking the other two components of the Cdk8 module—Srb8 and Srb9. Through metabolomics analyses and biochemical assays, we showed that a compromised Cdk8 module led to increases in glucose consumption, glycolysis-related transcripts, oxidative metabolism and ATP levels even in the presence of PYO. In the mutant, inhibition of respiration to levels comparable to the PYO-treated wild type inhibited wrinkled colony development. Several lines of evidence suggest that PYO does not act through Cdk8. Lastly, the ssn3 mutant was a hyperbiofilm former, and maintained higher biofilm formation in the presence of PYO than the wild type. Together these data provide novel insights into the role of the Cdk8 module of Mediator in regulation of C. albicans physiology and the links between respiratory activity and both wrinkled colony and biofilm development. PMID:25275466

  3. Dunnione ameliorates cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage by modulating NAD(+) metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Arpana; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Lee, SeungHoon; Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2015-11-27

    Although cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug for the treatment of a variety of tumors, its use is critically limited because of adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, neuropathy, and gastrointestinal damage. Cisplatin treatment increases oxidative stress biomarkers in the small intestine, which may induce apoptosis of epithelial cells and thereby elicit damage to the small intestine. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a cofactor for various enzymes associated with cellular homeostasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that the hyper-activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is closely associated with the depletion of NAD(+) in the small intestine after cisplatin treatment, which results in downregulation of sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity. Furthermore, a decrease in SIRT1 activity was found to play an important role in cisplatin-mediated small intestinal damage through nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, facilitated by its acetylation increase. However, use of dunnione as a strong substrate for the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme led to an increase in intracellular NAD(+) levels and prevented the cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage correlating with the modulation of PARP-1, SIRT1, and NF-κB. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD(+) levels by pharmacological NQO1 substrates could be a promising therapeutic approach for protecting against cisplatin-induced small intestinal damage.

  4. Astrocyte arachidonate and palmitate uptake and metabolism is differentially modulated by dibutyryl-cAMP treatment.

    PubMed

    Seeger, D R; Murphy, C C; Murphy, E J

    2016-07-01

    Astrocytes play a vital role in brain lipid metabolism; however the impact of the phenotypic shift in astrocytes to a reactive state on arachidonic acid metabolism is unknown. Therefore, we determined the impact of dibutyryl-cAMP (dBcAMP) treatment on radiolabeled arachidonic acid ([1-(14)C]20:4n-6) and palmitic acid ([1-(14)C]16:0) uptake and metabolism in primary cultured murine cortical astrocytes. In dBcAMP treated astrocytes, total [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 uptake was increased 1.9-fold compared to control, while total [1-(14)C]16:0 uptake was unaffected. Gene expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (Acsl), acyl-CoA hydrolase (Acot7), fatty acid binding protein(s) (Fabp) and alpha-synuclein (Snca) were determined using qRT-PCR. dBcAMP treatment increased expression of Acsl3 (4.8-fold) and Acsl4 (1.3-fold), which preferentially use [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 and are highly expressed in astrocytes, consistent with the increase in [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 uptake. However, expression of Fabp5 and Fabp7 were significantly reduced by 25% and 45%, respectively. Acot7 (20%) was also reduced, suggesting dBcAMP treatment favors acyl-CoA formation. dBcAMP treatment enhanced [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 (2.2-fold) and [1-(14)C]16:0 (1.6-fold) esterification into total phospholipids, but the greater esterification of [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 is consistent with the observed uptake through increased Acsl, but not Fabp expression. Although total [1-(14)C]16:0 uptake was not affected, there was a dramatic decrease in [1-(14)C]16:0 in the free fatty acid pool as esterification into the phospholipid pool was increased, which is consistent with the increase in Acsl3 and Acsl4 expression. In summary, our data demonstrates that dBcAMP treatment increases [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 uptake in astrocytes and this increase appears to be due to increased expression of Acsl3 and Acsl4 coupled with a reduction in Acot7 expression.

  5. Myocardial oxidative stress, osteogenic phenotype, and energy metabolism are differentially involved in the initiation and early progression of δ-sarcoglycan-null cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Missihoun, Comlan; Zisa, David; Shabbir, Arsalan; Lin, Huey

    2009-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a common cause of heart failure, and identification of early pathogenic events occurring prior to the onset of cardiac dysfunction is of mechanistic, diagnostic, and therapeutic importance. The work characterized early biochemical pathogenesis in TO2 strain hamsters lacking δ-sarcoglycan. Although the TO2 hamster heart exhibits normal function at 1 month of age (presymptomatic stage), elevated levels of myeloperoxidase, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, malondialdehyde, osteopontin, and alkaline phosphatase were evident, indicating the presence of inflammation, oxidative stress, and osteogenic phenotype. These changes were localized primarily to the myocardium. Derangement in energy metabolism was identified at the symptomatic stage (4 month), and is marked by attenuated activity and expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in aerobic glucose metabolism. Thus, this study illustrates differential involvement of oxidative stress, osteogenic phenotype, and glucose metabolism in the initiation and early progression of δ-sarcoglycan-null DCM. PMID:18726675

  6. Metabolic and cytoskeletal modulation of transferrin receptor mobility in mitogen-activated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, G M; Galbraith, R M

    1980-01-01

    The transferrin receptors which appear on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found by the use of immunofluorescence techniques to display temperature-dependent patching and capping reactions upon binding of transferrin. Lateral mobility of ligand-occupied membrane sites was accompanied by both shedding and endocytosis of receptor-transferrin complexes. In the presence of sodium azide or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, cap formation and shedding were markedly inhibited. In contrast, endocytosis of patched receptor-ligand complexes was inhibited by azide and microtubule inhibitors, including colchicine, vinblastine and vincristine. Co-capping experiments performed to elucidate further the alterations in membrane configuration involved in these reactions failed to reveal any topographical relationship between transferrin receptors and lectin-binding sites in these cells. These studied indicate that temperature-dependent mobility of transferrin receptors upon mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes is dependent upon the integrity of the cytoskeletal system and metabolic function of the cell. PMID:6258830

  7. N-methyl-norsalsolinol modulates serotonin metabolism in the rat caudate nucleus: correlation with behavioural changes.

    PubMed

    Thümen, Ansgar; Behnecke, Anne; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Moser, Andreas

    2003-03-01

    In earlier studies the dihydroxylated tetrahydroisoquinoline derivative 2(N)-methyl-norsalsolinol (NMNorsal) was identified in patients with Parkinson's disease. In the present study, NMNorsal (20 or 40 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally to rats kept under normal light-dark cycles. Using brain microdialysis technique, serotonin (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (HIAA), dopamine (DA), and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were determined in the dialysate from caudate nucleus in vivo and from tissue in vitro at various times following NMNorsal administration. Even after high-dose NMNorsal administration (40 mg/kg) and measurements up to 48 h after administration, levels of DA and its metabolite DOPAC were not modified. In contrast to the DA metabolism, 5-HT levels in the dialysate increased to approx. 2-fold during the 48 h following administration of a single high-dose of NMNorsal while HIAA decreased to approx. 50%. These changes of 5-HT and HIAA were nearly identical in the homogenate preparation of the caudate nucleus when compared to the amounts present in the dialysate. During assessment controls and low-dose-treated animals were almost always sleeping. Only high-dose NMNorsal-treated rats were active, with maximum activity after 48 h, however, behavioural activity was clearly different to the classical 5-HT behavioural syndrome. Taken together, increased 5-HT levels in the striatum found in our studies seem to be linked to the behavioural activity induced by high-dose NMNorsal, and NMNorsal appeared to perturb normal diurnal rhythms of spontaneous locomotor activity. The precise mechanism by which NMNorsal acts on 5-HT metabolism and behaviour is, however, unclear and further investigation is required.

  8. Eimeria bovis infection modulates endothelial host cell cholesterol metabolism for successful replication.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Penny H; Hirzmann, Joerg; Kerner, Katharina; Gimpl, Gerald; Lochnit, Guenter; Hermosilla, Carlos R; Taubert, Anja

    2015-09-23

    During first merogony Eimeria bovis forms large macromeronts in endothelial host cells containing >120 000 merozoites I. During multiplication, large amounts of cholesterol are indispensable for the enormous offspring membrane production. Cholesterol auxotrophy was proven for other apicomplexan parasites. Consequently they scavenge cholesterol from their host cell apparently in a parasite-specific manner. We here analyzed the influence of E. bovis infection on endothelial host cell cholesterol metabolism and found considerable differences to other coccidian parasites. Overall, free cholesterol significantly accumulated in E. bovis infected host cells. Furthermore, a striking increase of lipid droplet formation was observed within immature macromeronts. Artificial host cell lipid droplet enrichment significantly improved E. bovis merozoite I production confirming the key role of lipid droplet contents for optimal parasite proliferation. The transcription of several genes being involved in both, cholesterol de novo biosynthesis and low density lipoprotein-(LDL) mediated uptake, was significantly up-regulated at a time in infected cells suggesting a simultaneous exploitation of these two cholesterol acquisition pathways. E. bovis scavenges LDL-derived cholesterol apparently through significantly increased levels of surface LDL receptor abundance and LDL binding to infected cells. Consequently, LDL supplementation significantly improved parasite replication. The up-regulation of the oxidized LDL receptor 1 furthermore identified this scavenger receptor as a key molecule in parasite-triggered LDL uptake. Moreover, cellular cholesterol processing was altered in infected cells as indicated by up-regulation of cholesterol-25-hydroxylase and sterol O-acyltransferase. Overall, these results show that E. bovis considerably exploits the host cell cholesterol metabolism to guarantee its massive intracellular growth and replication.

  9. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  10. Microbial modulators of soil carbon storage: integrating genomic and metabolic knowledge for global prediction.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Anderson, Ian C; Singh, Brajesh K

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic carbon performs a number of functions in ecosystems and it is clear that microbial communities play important roles in land-atmosphere carbon (C) exchange and soil C storage. In this review, we discuss microbial modulators of soil C storage, 'omics'-based approaches to characterize microbial system interactions impacting terrestrial C sequestration, and how data related to microbial composition and activities can be incorporated into mechanistic and predictive models. We argue that although making direct linkage of genomes to global phenomena is a significant challenge, many connections at intermediate scales are viable with integrated application of new systems biology approaches and powerful analytical and modelling techniques. This integration could enhance our capability to develop and evaluate microbial strategies for capturing and sequestering atmospheric CO2.

  11. Somatostatin Modulates Insulin-Degrading-Enzyme Metabolism: Implications for the Regulation of Microglia Activity in AD

    PubMed Central

    Tundo, Grazia; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sbardella, Diego; Boraso, Mariaserena; Viviani, Barbara; Coletta, Massimiliano; Marini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) into senile plaques and the impairment of somatostatin-mediated neurotransmission are key pathological events in the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin-degrading-enzyme (IDE) is one of the main extracellular protease targeting Aβ, and thus it represents an interesting pharmacological target for AD therapy. We show that the active form of somatostatin-14 regulates IDE activity by affecting its expression and secretion in microglia cells. A similar effect can also be observed when adding octreotide. Following a previous observation where somatostatin directly interacts with IDE, here we demonstrate that somatostatin regulates Aβ catabolism by modulating IDE proteolytic activity in IDE gene-silencing experiments. As a whole, these data indicate the relevant role played by somatostatin and, potentially, by analogue octreotide, in preventing Aβ accumulation by partially restoring IDE activity. PMID:22509294

  12. Computational Models of Reactive Oxygen Species as Metabolic Byproducts and Signal-Transduction Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Elizabeth J.; Smolko, Christian M.; Janes, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are widely involved in intracellular signaling and human pathologies, but their precise roles have been difficult to enumerate and integrate holistically. The context- and dose-dependent intracellular effects of ROS can lead to contradictory experimental results and confounded interpretations. For example, lower levels of ROS promote cell signaling and proliferation, whereas abundant ROS cause overwhelming damage to biomolecules and cellular apoptosis or senescence. These complexities raise the question of whether the many facets of ROS biology can be joined under a common mechanistic framework using computational modeling. Here, we take inventory of some current models for ROS production or ROS regulation of signaling pathways. Several models captured non-intuitive observations or made predictions that were later verified by experiment. There remains a need for systems-level analyses that jointly incorporate ROS production, handling, and modulation of multiple signal-transduction cascades. PMID:27965578

  13. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) modulate the metabolism of deoxynivalenol (DON) in the pig.

    PubMed

    Dänicke, Sven; Valenta, Hana; Ganter, Martin; Brosig, Bianca; Kersten, Susanne; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Kahlert, Stefan; Panther, Patricia; Kluess, Jeannette; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef

    2014-08-01

    Pigs might be exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and deoxynivalenol (DON) at the same time, and both toxins are thought to interactively affect the intestinal barrier, the innate immune system, and the xenobiotics metabolism. Hence, we aimed at examining the single and combined effects of both toxins on nutrient digestibility and DON metabolism. For this purpose, barrows (26 ± 4 kg) were fed restrictedly either a control diet (CON) or a diet contaminated with 3.1 mg DON/kg (DON) for 37 days. At day 37 of the experiment, pigs were infused intravenously for 60 min either with 100 μg DON/kg body weight (BW) (CON-DON), 7.5 μg LPS/kg BW (CON-LPS, DON-LPS) or a combination of both substances (CON-DON + LPS), or physiological saline (CON-CON, DON-CON). Blood samples were collected frequently until 3.25 h before the pigs were sacrificed for bile, liver, and kidney collection. The apparent digestibility of N-free extractives was significantly increased by 1 % when the DON-contaminated diet was fed. The total DON content in blood was significantly higher in endotoxemic pigs (34.8 ng/mL; CON-DON + LPS) when compared to the pigs infused with DON alone (18.8 ng/mL; CON-DON) while bile concentrations were not influenced by LPS. DON residue levels in liver and kidney closely reflected the treatment effects as described for blood. In contrast to DON infusion, the LPS challenge resulted in a significantly lower total DON concentration (13.2 vs. 7.5 ng/mL in groups DON-CON and DON-LPS, respectively) when the pigs were exposed to DON through the diet. The conjugation degree for DON in blood and bile was not influenced by treatments. In conclusion, endotoxemic pigs are characterized by higher DON residue levels in blood, liver, and kidney, probably by a compromised elimination.

  14. MicroRNA-194 Modulates Glucose Metabolism and Its Skeletal Muscle Expression Is Reduced in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Latouche, Celine; Natoli, Alaina; Reddy-Luthmoodoo, Medini; Heywood, Sarah E.; Armitage, James A.; Kingwell, Bronwyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) at different stages of the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and their role in glucose homeostasis was investigated. Methods Microarrays were used to assess miRNA expression in skeletal muscle biopsies taken from healthy individuals and patients with pre-diabetes or T2DM, and insulin resistant offspring of rat dams fed a high fat diet during pregnancy. Results Twenty-three miRNAs were differentially expressed in patients with T2DM, and 7 in the insulin resistant rat offspring compared to their controls. Among these, only one miRNA was similarly regulated: miR-194 expression was significantly reduced by 25 to 50% in both the rat model and in human with pre-diabetes and established diabetes. Knockdown of miR-194 in L6 skeletal muscle cells induced an increase in basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. This occurred in conjunction with an increased glycolysis, indicated by elevated lactate production. Moreover, oxidative capacity was also increased as we found an enhanced glucose oxidation in presence of the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP. When miR-194 was down-regulated in vitro, western blot analysis showed an increased phosphorylation of AKT and GSK3β in response to insulin, and an increase in expression of proteins controlling mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Conclusions Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with regulation of several miRNAs in skeletal muscle. Interestingly, miR-194 was a unique miRNA that appeared regulated across different stages of the disease progression, from the early stages of insulin resistance to the development of T2DM. We have shown miR-194 is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal muscle glucose metabolism from uptake, through to glycolysis, glycogenesis and glucose oxidation, potentially via mechanisms involving AKT, GSK3 and oxidative phosphorylation. MiR-194 could be down-regulated in patients with early features of diabetes as an

  15. Dopamine D4 receptors modulate brain metabolic activity in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum at rest and in response to methylphenidate

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, M.; Wang, G.; Michaelides, M.; Pascau, J.; Gispert, J.-D.; Delis, F.; Grandy, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Desco, M.; Rubinstein, M.; Volkow, N.D.; Thanos, P.K.

    2010-07-16

    Methylphenidate (MP) is widely used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Variable number of tandem repeats polymorphisms in the dopamine D4 receptor (D{sub 4}) gene have been implicated in vulnerability to ADHD and the response to MP. Here we examined the contribution of dopamine D4 receptors (D4Rs) to baseline brain glucose metabolism and to the regional metabolic responses to MP. We compared brain glucose metabolism (measured with micro-positron emission tomography and [{sup 18}F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose) at baseline and after MP (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administration in mice with genetic deletion of the D{sub 4}. Images were analyzed using a novel automated image registration procedure. Baseline D{sub 4}{sup -/-} mice had lower metabolism in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and greater metabolism in the cerebellar vermis (CBV) than D{sub 4}{sup +/+} and D{sub 4}{sup +/-} mice; when given MP, D{sub 4}{sup -/-} mice increased metabolism in the PFC and decreased it in the CBV, whereas in D{sub 4}{sup +/+} and D{sub 4}{sup +/-} mice, MP decreased metabolism in the PFC and increased it in the CBV. These findings provide evidence that D4Rs modulate not only the PFC, which may reflect the activation by dopamine of D4Rs located in this region, but also the CBV, which may reflect an indirect modulation as D4Rs are minimally expressed in this region. As individuals with ADHD show structural and/or functional abnormalities in these brain regions, the association of ADHD with D4Rs may reflect its modulation of these brain regions. The differential response to MP as a function of genotype could explain differences in brain functional responses to MP between patients with ADHD and healthy controls and between patients with ADHD with different D{sub 4} polymorphisms.

  16. Modulation of cAMP metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its effect on host infection.

    PubMed

    Barba, Jeannette; Alvarez, Angel H; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2010-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the single most relevant bacterial infectious agent as Tuberculosis is estimated to affect one-third of the world population. Like other microorganisms, M. tuberculosis needs to sense and adapt to changes in the several niches where it is found, ranging from the environment to a number of host-adapted programs, including infection of cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, epithelial cells and adipocytes. A strategy commonly used by cells to respond to such changes consists of producing small molecules known as second messengers. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the best-studied second messengers in many organisms, and in recent years its participation during the M. tuberculosis infection cycle has just begun to be thoroughly considered. In this work, we aimed to provide a perspective of how cAMP metabolism proceeds in M. tuberculosis, which genes are activated in response to cAMP signaling in this organism, and discuss the evidence for bacterially produced cAMP use during infection. Furthermore, key issues needing to be addressed for better understanding cAMP physiology in slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria are presented.

  17. Modulation of Lipid Metabolism and Spiramycin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces ambofaciens Unstable Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schauner, Catherine; Dary, Annie; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Leblond, Pierre; Decaris, Bernard; Germain, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens is prone to genetic instability involving genomic rearrangements at the extremities of the chromosomal DNA. An amplified DNA sequence (ADS205), including an open reading frame (orfPS), is responsible for the reversible loss of spiramycin production in the mutant strain NSA205 (ADS205+ Spi−). The product of orfPS is homologous to polyketide synthase systems (PKSs) involved in the biosynthesis of erythromycin and rapamycin and is overexpressed in strain NSA205 compared with the parental strain RP181110. As PKSs and fatty acid synthase systems have the same precursors, we tested the possibility that overexpression of orfPS also affects lipid metabolism in strain NSA205. This report focuses on comparative analysis of lipids in strain RP181110, the mutant strain NSA205, and a derivative, NSA228 (ADS205− Spi+). NSA205 showed a dramatically depressed lipid content consisting predominantly of phospholipids and triacylglycerols. This lipid content was globally restored in strain NSA228, which had lost ADS205. Furthermore, strains RP181110 and NSA205 presented similar phospholipid and triacylglycerol compositions. No abnormal fatty acids were detected in NSA205. PMID:10347068

  18. microRNA-17 family promotes polycystic kidney disease progression through modulation of mitochondrial metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hajarnis, Sachin; Lakhia, Ronak; Yheskel, Matanel; Williams, Darren; Sorourian, Mehran; Liu, Xueqing; Aboudehen, Karam; Zhang, Shanrong; Kersjes, Kara; Galasso, Ryan; Li, Jian; Kaimal, Vivek; Lockton, Steven; Davis, Scott; Flaten, Andrea; Johnson, Joshua A.; Holland, William L.; Kusminski, Christine M.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Harris, Peter C.; Trudel, Marie; Wallace, Darren P.; Igarashi, Peter; Lee, Edmund C.; Androsavich, John R.; Patel, Vishal

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic cause of renal failure. Here we identify miR-17 as a target for the treatment of ADPKD. We report that miR-17 is induced in kidney cysts of mouse and human ADPKD. Genetic deletion of the miR-17∼92 cluster inhibits cyst proliferation and PKD progression in four orthologous, including two long-lived, mouse models of ADPKD. Anti-miR-17 treatment attenuates cyst growth in short-term and long-term PKD mouse models. miR-17 inhibition also suppresses proliferation and cyst growth of primary ADPKD cysts cultures derived from multiple human donors. Mechanistically, c-Myc upregulates miR-17∼92 in cystic kidneys, which in turn aggravates cyst growth by inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation and stimulating proliferation through direct repression of Pparα. Thus, miR-17 family is a promising drug target for ADPKD, and miR-17-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism represents a potential new mechanism for ADPKD progression. PMID:28205547

  19. CO2 enrichment modulates ammonium nutrition in tomato adjusting carbon and nitrogen metabolism to stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Vega-Mas, Izargi; Marino, Daniel; Sánchez-Zabala, Joseba; González-Murua, Carmen; Estavillo, Jose María; González-Moro, María Begoña

    2015-12-01

    Ammonium (NH4(+)) toxicity typically occurs in plants exposed to high environmental NH4(+) concentration. NH4(+) assimilating capacity may act as a biochemical mechanism avoiding its toxic accumulation but requires a fine tuning between nitrogen assimilating enzymes and carbon anaplerotic routes. In this work, we hypothesized that extra C supply, exposing tomato plants cv. Agora Hybrid F1 to elevated atmospheric CO2, could improve photosynthetic process and thus ameliorate NH4(+) assimilation and tolerance. Plants were grown under nitrate (NO3(-)) or NH4(+) as N source (5-15mM), under two atmospheric CO2 levels, 400 and 800ppm. Growth and gas exchange parameters, (15)N isotopic signature, C and N metabolites and enzymatic activities were determined. Plants under 7.5mM N equally grew independently of the N source, while higher ammonium supply resulted toxic for growth. However, specific stomatal closure occurred in 7.5mM NH4(+)-fed plants under elevated CO2 improving water use efficiency (WUE) but compromising plant N status. Elevated CO2 annulled the induction of TCA anaplerotic enzymes observed at non-toxic NH4(+) nutrition under ambient CO2. Finally, CO2 enrichment benefited tomato growth under both nutritions, and although it did not alleviate tomato NH4(+) tolerance it did differentially regulate plant metabolism in N-source and -dose dependent manner.

  20. Modulation of phospholipid metabolism in murine keratinocytes by tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Galey, C.I.; Ziboh, V.A.; Marcelo, C.L.; Voorhees, J.J.

    1985-10-01

    The possibility that phospholipid deacylation may be a critical event in the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-associated effects on mouse skin prompted us to examine in vitro the effects of TPA on arachidonic acid metabolism in neonatal mouse keratinocytes. Three-day old neonatal keratinocytes were prelabeled with ( UC)arachidonic acid (( UC)AA) and ( UC) stearic acid (( UC)ST) and used to characterize the lipases that were activated when these cells were treated with TPA in culture. Data from these studies demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) are the major phospholipids that undergo early hydrolysis to release arachidonic acid when challenged by TPA. Of particular interest was the novel observation of the hydrolysis of UC-labeled PI in these keratinocytes, the accumulation of ( UC)1,2-diacylglyceride and the lack of the ( UC)diacylglyceride phosphorylation to form ( UC)phosphatidic acid. This lack of ( UC) phosphatidic accumulation implied that although TPA enhanced the hydrolysis of ( UC)PI resulting in increased ( UC)diacylglyceride it did not enhance the resynthesis of the ( UC)PI via the phosphorylation of the ( UC)diacylglyceride. Therefore, TPA probably is not involved in the turnover of PI in these cells but is involved in the activation of PC hydrolyzing phospholipase A2 and PI hydrolyzing phospholipase C in these keratinocytes releasing arachidonic acid which then undergoes oxygenation reactions to provide biologically active eicosanoids.

  1. Angiotensin II regulates collagen metabolism through modulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in diabetic skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Ren, Meng; Hao, Shaoyun; Yang, Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Chen, Lihong; Lin, Diaozhu; Li, Na; Yan, Li

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) balance in regulating collagen metabolism of diabetic skin. Skin tissues from diabetic model were collected, and the primary cultured fibroblasts were treated with Ang II receptor inhibitors before Ang II treatment. The collagen type I (Coll I) and collagen type III (Coll III) were measured by histochemistry. The expressions of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), MMP-1, TIMP-1 and propeptides of types I and III procollagens in skin tissues and fibroblasts were quantified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Collagen dysfunction was documented by changed collagen I/III ratio in streptozotocin (STZ)-injected mice compared with controls. This was accompanied by increased expression of TGF-β, TIMP-1 and propeptides of types I and III procollagens in diabetic skin tissues. In primary cultured fibroblasts, Ang II prompted collagen synthesis accompanied by increases in the expressions of TGF-β, TIMP-1 and types I and III procollagens, and these increases were inhibited by losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker, but not affected by PD123319, an Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist. These findings present evidence that Ang-II-mediated changes in the productions of MMP-1 and TIMP-1 occur via AT1 receptors and a TGF-β-dependent mechanism.

  2. Modulation of iron metabolism in aging and in Alzheimer's disease: relevance of the choroid plexus

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Sandro D.; Ferreira, Ana C.; Sousa, João C.; Santos, Nadine C.; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Sousa, Nuno; Palha, Joana A.; Marques, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential for mammalian cellular homeostasis. However, in excess, it promotes free radical formation and is associated with aging-related progressive deterioration and with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). There are no mechanisms to excrete iron, which makes iron homeostasis a very tightly regulated process at the level of the intestinal absorption. Iron is believed to reach the brain through receptor-mediated endocytosis of iron-bound transferrin by the brain barriers, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier, formed by the choroid plexus (CP) epithelial cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed by the endothelial cells of the brain capillaries. Importantly, the CP epithelial cells are responsible for producing most of the CSF, the fluid that fills the brain ventricles and the subarachnoid space. Recently, the finding that the CP epithelial cells display all the machinery to locally control iron delivery into the CSF may suggest that the general and progressive senescence of the CP may be at the basis of the impairment of regional iron metabolism, iron-mediated toxicity, and the increase in inflammation and oxidative stress that occurs with aging and, particularly, in AD. PMID:22661928

  3. Mitochondrial metabolic states and membrane potential modulate mtNOS activity.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Laura B; Zaobornyj, Tamara; Boveris, Alberto

    2006-03-01

    The mitochondrial metabolic state regulates the rate of NO release from coupled mitochondria: NO release by heart, liver and kidney mitochondria was about 40-45% lower in state 3 (1.2, 0.7 and 0.4 nmol/min mg protein) than in state 4 (2.2, 1.3 and 0.7 nmol/min mg protein). The activity of mtNOS, responsible for NO release, appears driven by the membrane potential component and not by intramitochondrial pH of the proton motive force. The intramitochondrial concentrations of the NOS substrates, L-arginine (about 310 microM) and NADPH (1.04-1.78 mM) are 60-1000 times higher than their KM values. Moreover, the changes in their concentrations in the state 4-state 3 transition are not enough to explain the changes in NO release. Nitric oxide release was exponentially dependent on membrane potential as reported for mitochondrial H2O2 production [S.S. Korshunov, V.P. Skulachev, A.A. Satarkov, High protonic potential actuates a mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. FEBS Lett. 416 (1997) 15-18.]. Agents that decrease or abolish membrane potential minimize NO release while the addition of oligomycin that produces mitochondrial hyperpolarization generates the maximal NO release. The regulation of mtNOS activity, an apparently voltage-dependent enzyme, by membrane potential is marked at the physiological range of membrane potentials.

  4. AMPK-dependent modulation of hepatic lipid metabolism by nesfatin-1.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yue; Li, Ziru; Gao, Ling; Li, Yin; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Weizhen

    2015-12-05

    The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanism by which peripheral nesfatin-1 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism. Continuous peripheral infusion of nesfatin-1 reduced adiposity and plasma levels of triglyceride and cholesterol. In mice fed high fat diet, peripheral nesfatin-1 significantly decreased hepatic steatosis measured by triglyceride content and oil red staining area and diameter. These alterations were associated with a significant reduction in lipogenesis-related transcriptional factors PPARγ and SREBP1, as well as rate-limited enzyme genes such as acaca, fasn, gpam, dgat1 and dgat2. In primary hepatocytes, nesfatin-1 inhibited both basal and oleic acid stimulated triglyceride accumulation, which was accompanied by a decrement in lipogenesis-related genes and an increase in β-oxidation-related genes. In cultured hepatocytes, nesfatin-1 increased levels of AMPK phosphorylation. Inhibition of AMPK by compound C blocked the reduction of triglyceride content elicited by nesfatin-1. Our studies demonstrate that nesfatin-1 attenuates lipid accumulation in hepatocytes by an AMPK-dependent mechanism.

  5. Exercise intervention as a protective modulator against metabolic disorders in cigarette smokers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eisa, Einas; Alghadir, Ahmad H.; Gabr, Sami A.; Iqbal, Zaheen A.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] assess the impact of exercise intensity on desire to smoke, serum cotinine, stress hormones, total antioxidant capacity, and oxidative free radicals as potential markers of cardiopulmonary metabolic disorders were measured.in cigarette smokers. [Subjects and Methods] The participants (150 randomly selected healthy men, aged 18–55 years) were classified into 4 smoking groups: control (non-smokers; N= 30); mild (N = 33); moderate (N = 42), and heavy (N = 45). The participants were assigned to either moderate (8 weeks) or short-term (20–45 min) exercise training. The desire to smoke, Mood and Physical Symptoms Scale, and Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale scores, cotinine, stress hormones (cortisol and testosterone), free radicals (malondialdehyde, nitric oxide), and total antioxidant capacity were evaluated. [Results] Significant increases in serum cotinine, cortisol, testosterone, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde levels and a reduction in total antioxidant capacity activity were observed in all smoker groups; heavy smokers showed a higher change in metabolites. In all smoker groups, both short and moderate- intensity exercises significantly reduce cotinine, cortisol, testosterone, and malondialdehyde and increased nitric oxide levels and total antioxidant capacity activity; further, the desire to smoke, Mood and Physical Symptoms Scale, and Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale scores were reduced. This supports the ability of exercise to increase nitric oxide bioavailability, enhance of blood vessels function and ultimately decrease the incidence of cardiopulmonary disorders. [Conclusion] Exercise interventions with varying intensities may be used as nicotine replacement therapy or protective aids against smoking-related cardiopulmonary disorders. PMID:27134398

  6. RBM4a-regulated splicing cascade modulates the differentiation and metabolic activities of brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Chun; Lu, Yi-Han; Liu, Yun-Ru; Lin, Ying-Ju

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding motif protein 4a (RBM4a) reportedly reprograms splicing profiles of the insulin receptor (IR) and myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) genes, facilitating the differentiation of brown adipocytes. Using an RNA-sequencing analysis, we first compared the gene expressing profiles between wild-type and RBM4a−/− brown adipocytes. The ablation of RBM4a led to increases in the PTBP1, PTBP2 (nPTB), and Nova1 proteins, whereas elevated RBM4a reduced the expression of PTBP1 and PTBP2 proteins in brown adipocytes through an alternative splicing-coupled nonsense-mediated decay mechanism. Subsequently, RBM4a indirectly shortened the half-life of the Nova1 transcript which was comparatively stable in the presence of PTBP2. RBM4a diminished the influence of PTBP2 in adipogenic development by reprogramming the splicing profiles of the FGFR2 and PKM genes. These results constitute a mechanistic understanding of the RBM4a-modulated splicing cascade during the brown adipogenesis. PMID:26857472

  7. Phospholipid metabolism in zymosan stimulated human monocytes: modulation by cyclic AMP (cAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey R.W.; Manzi, R.M.; Hoffstein, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Oxygenated products of arachidonic acid (AA) are critical components in the development of the inflammatory response. Monocytes exposed to inflammatory stimuli are capable of converting free AA into these bioactive molecules. However, the limiting step in the formation of these compounds is thought to be the mechanism responsible for the release of esterified AA from phospholipids. When (/sup 3/H) AA labeled monocytes were challenged with opsonized zymosan, 28 +/- 2% of the incorporated counts were released compared to 8 +/- 1% for the control. Upon pretreatment with isobutyl methyl xanthine (IBMX) or dibutyrl cyclic AMP (d-cAMP) zymosan stimulated AA release was markedly reduced. The IC/sub 50/'s were 4 x 10/sup -4/M and 7 x 10/sup -4/M respectively. Analysis of (/sup 3/H) AA incorporation into cellular phospholipids showed that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) were the primary pools labeled. Loss of label from both of these pools was evident after exposure to zymosan, however, pretreatment of cells with IBMX or d-cAMP inhibited release of (/sup 3/H)AA from the PC pool but not from the PI pool. The results show that human monocytes challenged with opsonized zymosan release arachidonic acid via cAMP-dependent and independent pathways. Furthermore, they suggest that a phospholipase activity (possibly A/sub 2/) against PC is modulated by cAMP.

  8. Prebiotic fiber modulation of the gut microbiota improves risk factors for obesity and the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Jill A.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2013-01-01

    Prebiotic fibers are non-digestible carbohydrates that promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut. Prebiotic consumption may benefit obesity and associated co-morbidities by improving or normalizing the dysbiosis of the gut microbiota. We evaluated the dose response to a prebiotic diet on the gut microbiota, body composition and obesity associated risk factors in lean and genetically obese rats. Prebiotic fibers increased Firmicutes and decreased Bacteroidetes, a profile often associated with a leaner phenotype. Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus numbers also increased. Changes in the gut microbiota correlated with energy intake, glucose, insulin, satiety hormones, and hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride accumulation. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis evaluating the results through the lens of the gut microbiota. Salient, new developments impacting the interpretation and significance of our data are discussed. We propose that prebiotic fibers have promise as a safe and cost-effective means of modulating the gut microbiota to promote improved host:bacterial interactions in obesity and insulin resistance. Human clinical trials should be undertaken to confirm these effects. PMID:22555633

  9. Vermicompost humic acids modulate the accumulation and metabolism of ROS in rice plants.

    PubMed

    García, Andrés Calderín; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; de Souza, Luiz Gilberto Ambrósio; Tavares, Orlando Carlos Huertas; Zonta, Everaldo; Gomes, Ernane Tarcisio Martins; García-Mina, José Maria; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    2016-03-15

    This work aims to determine the reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, gene expression, anti-oxidant enzyme activity, and derived effects on membrane lipid peroxidation and certain stress markers (proline and malondialdehyde-MDA) in the roots of unstressed and PEG-stressed rice plants associated with vermicompost humic acid (VCHA) application. The results show that the application of VCHA to the roots of unstressed rice plants caused a slight but significant increase in root ROS accumulation and the gene expression and activity of the major anti-oxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and peroxidase). This action did not have negative effects on root development, and an increase in both root growth and root proliferation occurred. However, the root proline and MDA concentrations and the root permeability results indicate the development of a type of mild stress associated with VCHA application. When VCHA was applied to PEG-stressed plants, a clear alleviation of the inhibition in root development linked to PEG-mediated osmotic stress was observed. This was associated with a reduction in root ROS production and anti-oxidant enzymatic activity caused by osmotic stress. This alleviation of stress caused by VCHA was also reflected as a reduction in the PEG-mediated concentration of MDA in the root as well as root permeability. In summary, the beneficial action of VCHA on the root development of unstressed or PEG-stressed rice plants clearly involves the modulation of ROS accumulation in roots.

  10. Dietary spices as beneficial modulators of lipid profile in conditions of metabolic disorders and diseases.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2013-04-25

    Spices are valued for their medicinal properties besides their use as food adjuncts to enhance the sensory quality of food. Dietary garlic, onion, fenugreek, red pepper, turmeric, and ginger have been proven to be effective hypocholesterolemics in experimentally induced hypercholesterolemia. The hypolipidemic potential of fenugreek in diabetic subjects and of garlic and onion in humans with induced lipemia has been demonstrated. Capsaicin and curcumin - the bioactive compounds of red pepper and turmeric - are documented to be efficacious at doses comparable to usual human intake. Capsaicin and curcumin have been shown to be hypotriglyceridemic, thus preventing accumulation of fat in the liver under adverse situations by enhancing triglyceride transport out of the liver. Capsaicin, curcumin, fenugreek, ginger, and onion enhance secretion of bile acids into bile. These hypocholesterolemic spices/spice principles reduce blood and liver cholesterol by enhancing cholesterol conversion to bile acids through activation of hepatic cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase. Many human trials have been carried out with garlic, onion, and fenugreek. The mechanism underlying the hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic influence of spices is fairly well understood. Health implications of the hypocholesterolemic effect of spices experimentally documented are cardio-protection, protection of the structural integrity of erythrocytes by restoration of membrane cholesterol/phospholipid profile and prevention of cholesterol gallstones by modulation of the cholesterol saturation index in bile.

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ca2+ Depletion Differentially Modulate the Sterol Regulatory Protein PCSK9 to Control Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Paul; Al-Hashimi, Ali; Sood, Sudesh; Lhoták, Šárka; Yu, Pei; Gyulay, Gabriel; Paré, Guillaume; Chen, S R Wayne; Trigatti, Bernardo; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G; Austin, Richard C

    2017-01-27

    Accumulating evidence implicates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as a mediator of impaired lipid metabolism, thereby contributing to fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis. Previous studies demonstrated that ER stress can activate the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP2), an ER-localized transcription factor that directly up-regulates sterol regulatory genes, including PCSK9 Given that PCSK9 contributes to atherosclerosis by targeting low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) degradation, this study investigates a novel mechanism by which ER stress plays a role in lipid metabolism by examining its ability to modulate PCSK9 expression. Herein, we demonstrate the existence of two independent effects of ER stress on PCSK9 expression and secretion. In cultured HuH7 and HepG2 cells, agents or conditions that cause ER Ca(2+) depletion, including thapsigargin, induced SREBP2-dependent up-regulation of PCSK9 expression. In contrast, a significant reduction in the secreted form of PCSK9 protein was observed in the media from both thapsigargin- and tunicamycin (TM)-treated HuH7 cells, mouse primary hepatocytes, and in the plasma of TM-treated C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, TM significantly increased hepatic LDLR expression and reduced plasma LDL concentrations in mice. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which ER Ca(2+) depletion promotes the activation of SREBP2 and subsequent transcription of PCSK9. However, conditions that cause ER stress regardless of their ability to dysregulate ER Ca(2+) inhibit PCSK9 secretion, thereby reducing PCSK9-mediated LDLR degradation and promoting LDLR-dependent hepatic cholesterol uptake. Taken together, our studies provide evidence that the retention of PCSK9 in the ER may serve as a potential strategy for lowering LDL cholesterol levels.

  12. Reducing FLI1 Levels in the MRL/lpr Lupus Mouse Model Impacts T Cell Function by Modulating Glycosphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Erin Morris; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Bunni, Marlene A.; Basher, Fahmin; Roddy, Patrick O.; Siskind, Leah J.; Nietert, Paul J.; Nowling, Tamara K.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease caused, in part, by abnormalities in cells of the immune system including B and T cells. Genetically reducing globally the expression of the ETS transcription factor FLI1 by 50% in two lupus mouse models significantly improves disease measures and survival through an unknown mechanism. In this study we analyze the effects of reducing FLI1 in the MRL/lpr lupus prone model on T cell function. We demonstrate that adoptive transfer of MRL/lpr Fli1+/+ or Fli1+/- T cells and B cells into Rag1-deficient mice results in significantly decreased serum immunoglobulin levels in animals receiving Fli1+/- lupus T cells compared to animals receiving Fli1+/+ lupus T cells regardless of the genotype of co-transferred lupus B cells. Ex vivo analyses of MRL/lpr T cells demonstrated that Fli1+/- T cells produce significantly less IL-4 during early and late disease and exhibited significantly decreased TCR-specific activation during early disease compared to Fli1+/+ T cells. Moreover, the Fli1+/- T cells expressed significantly less neuraminidase 1 (Neu1) message and decreased NEU activity during early disease and significantly decreased levels of glycosphingolipids during late disease compared to Fli1+/+ T cells. FLI1 dose-dependently activated the Neu1 promoter in mouse and human T cell lines. Together, our results suggest reducing FLI1 in lupus decreases the pathogenicity of T cells by decreasing TCR-specific activation and IL-4 production in part through the modulation of glycosphingolipid metabolism. Reducing the expression of FLI1 or targeting the glycosphingolipid metabolic pathway in lupus may serve as a therapeutic approach to treating lupus. PMID:24040398

  13. Leishmania panamensis infection and antimonial drugs modulate expression of macrophage drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes: impact on intracellular parasite survival

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Maria Adelaida; Navas, Adriana; Márquez, Ricardo; Rojas, Laura Jimena; Vargas, Deninson Alejandro; Blanco, Victor Manuel; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment failure is multifactorial. Despite the importance of host cell drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of drugs targeting intracellular pathogens, their impact on the efficacy of antileishmanials is unknown. We examined the contribution of pharmacologically relevant determinants in human macrophages in the antimony-mediated killing of intracellular Leishmania panamensis and its relationship with the outcome of treatment with meglumine antimoniate. Methods Patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis who failed (n = 8) or responded (n = 8) to treatment were recruited. Gene expression profiling of pharmacological determinants in primary macrophages was evaluated by quantitative RT–PCR and correlated to the drug-mediated intracellular parasite killing. Functional validation was conducted through short hairpin RNA gene knockdown. Results Survival of L. panamensis after exposure to antimonials was significantly higher in macrophages from patients who failed treatment. Sixteen macrophage drug-response genes were modulated by infection and exposure to meglumine antimoniate. Correlation analyses of gene expression and intracellular parasite survival revealed the involvement of host cell metallothionein-2A and ABCB6 in the survival of Leishmania during exposure to antimonials. ABCB6 was functionally validated as a transporter of antimonial compounds localized in both the cell and phagolysosomal membranes of macrophages, revealing a novel mechanism of host cell-mediated regulation of intracellular drug exposure and parasite survival within phagocytes. Conclusions These results provide insight into host cell mechanisms regulating the intracellular exposure of Leishmania to antimonials and variations among individuals that impact parasite survival. Understanding of host cell determinants of intracellular pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics opens new avenues to improved drug efficacy for intracellular

  14. Melatonin ameliorates metabolic risk factors, modulates apoptotic proteins, and protects the rat heart against diabetes-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali H; El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Othman, Azza I

    2015-01-15

    The present study investigated the ability of melatonin in reducing metabolic risk factors and cardiac apoptosis induced by diabetes. Streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into male rats, and after diabetic induction melatonin (10mg/kg i.g.) was administered orally for 21 days. Diabetic hearts showed increased number of apoptotic cells with downregulation of Bcl-2 and activation of p53 and CD95 as well as the caspases 9, 8 and 3. In addition, there was a significant decrease in insulin level, hyperglycemia, elevated HOMA-IR, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total lipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low and very low-density lipoprotein and decreased high-density lipoprotein. These changes were coupled with a significant increase in the activities of creatin kinase-MB (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the serum of the diabetic rats indicating myocardium injury. Oral administration of melatonin for 3 weeks after diabetes induction ameliorated the levels of hyperglycemia, insulin, HbA1c, lipids profile and HOMA-IR. The oral melatonin treatment of diabetic rats significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells in the heart compared to diabetic rats. It enhanced Bcl-2 expression and blocked the activation of CD95 as well as caspases 9, 8 and 3. These changes were accompanied with significant improvement of CK-MB and LDH in the serum indicating the ameliorative effect of melatonin on myocardium injury. Melatonin effectively ameliorated diabetic myocardium injury, apoptosis, reduced the metabolic risk factors and modulated important steps in both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Thus, melatonin may be a promising pharmacological agent for ameliorating potential cardiomyopathy associated with diabetes.

  15. Oligofructose and inulin modulate glucose and amino acid metabolism through propionate production in normal-weight and obese cats.

    PubMed

    Verbrugghe, Adronie; Hesta, Myriam; Gommeren, Kris; Daminet, Sylvie; Wuyts, Birgitte; Buyse, Johan; Janssens, Geert P J

    2009-09-01

    The effect of dietary oligofructose and inulin supplementation on glucose metabolism in obese and non-obese cats was assessed. Two diets were tested in a crossover design; a control diet high in protein (46 % on DM basis), moderate in fat (15 %), low in carbohydrates (27 %), but no soluble fibres added; and a prebiotic diet, with 2.5 % of a mixture of oligofructose and inulin added to the control diet. Eight non-obese and eight obese cats were allotted to each of two diets in random order at intervals of 4 weeks. At the end of each testing period, intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed. Area under the glucose curve (AUCgluc) was increased (P = 0.022) and the second insulin peak was delayed (P = 0.009) in obese compared to non-obese cats. Diets did not affect fasting plasma glucose concentrations, blood glucose response at each glucose time-point after glucose administration, AUCgluc, fasting serum insulin concentrations, area under the insulin curve, and height and appearance time of insulin response. Yet, analysis of acylcarnitines revealed higher propionylcarnitine concentrations (P = 0.03) when fed the prebiotic diet, suggesting colonic fermentation and propionate absorption. Prebiotic supplementation reduced methylmalonylcarnitine (P = 0.072) and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations (P = 0.025), both indicating reduced gluconeogenesis from amino acids. This trial evidenced impaired glucose tolerance and altered insulin response to glucose administration in obese compared to non-obese cats, regardless of dietary intervention; yet modulation of glucose metabolism by enhancing gluconeogenesis from propionate and inhibition of amino acid catabolism can be suggested.

  16. Integrated Yoga and Naturopathy module in management of Metabolic Syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Swathi; Mohanty, Sriloy; Saoji, Apar; Nagarathna, Raghuram

    A 50-year-old male participant with sedentary lifestyle, diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) [obesity, Type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension] and hypothyroidism since 2013, was administered integrated Yoga and Naturopathy (IYN) for 6 weeks as a tailor made individualized protocol at the residential integrative medical facility in Bangalore between October and November 2015. The results showed reduction in weight (97.9 kg to 74.6 kg), Body Mass Index (BMI) (35.1 kg/m(2) to 27.86 kg/m(2)), total cholesterol (192 mg% to 145 mg%), triglycerides (153 mg% to 90 mg%), Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) (124 mg% to 81 mg%), High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) (40 mg% to 46 mg%), fasting blood glucose (110 mg/dl to 75 mg/dl), postprandial glucose (267 mg/dl to 100 mg/dl), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (7.8%-7.1%), Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) (6.90 μIU/ml to 3.052 μIU/ml). Following the intervention, the anti-hypertensive, oral hypoglycemic, thyroid raising and analgesic medicines were not required to be continued. His knee pain minimized on discharge as observed on a Visual Analog Scale. He had an improved feeling of wellness and overall functional health. All his parameters were within normal range at the 12-weeks follow-up, as he had incorporated the lifestyle program into his daily routine. This case report suggests that lifestyle change by integration of specific non-drug Yoga and Naturopathic intervention is useful in the management of MetS.

  17. Extracts from Tribulus species may modulate platelet adhesion by interfering with arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The present work was designed to study the effects of crude extracts from Tribulus pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on selected biological functions of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were pre-incubated with extracts from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus, at the final concentrations of 0.5, 5 and 50 µg/ml. Then, for platelet activation thrombin, was used. The effects of crude extracts from T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on adhesion of blood platelets to collagen were determined by method according to Tuszynski and Murphy. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). In these studies we also compared the action of tested crude plant extracts with the effects of the polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, which has antiplatelet and antioxidative properties. The performed assays demonstrated that the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus and the phenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus might influence the platelet functions in vitro. The inhibitory, concentration-dependent effects of this tested extract and its phenolic fraction on adhesion of resting platelets and thrombin - stimulated platelets to collagen was found. We also observed that the crude extract from T. pterocarpus, like the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced TBARS production in blood platelets. In the comparative studies, the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus was not found to be more effective antiplatelet factor, than the polyphenolic fraction from this plant. The results obtained suggest that T. pterocarpus may be a promising source of natural compounds, valuable in the prevention of the enhanced activity of blood platelets in numerous cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Sodium restriction modulates innate immunity and prevents cardiac remodeling in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jover, Bernard; Reynes, Christelle; Rugale, Caroline; Reboul, Cyril; Jeanson, Laura; Tournier, Michel; Lajoix, Anne Dominique; Desmetz, Caroline

    2017-02-27

    In the view of the relationships between excessive sodium intake, immunity and target organ damage, we hypothesized that reduction in dietary sodium would be beneficial in the prevention of cardiac alterations through a restrained local immunity response in a rat model of metabolic syndrome. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a 60% fructose diet with either a normal sodium (0.64% NaCl) or a low sodium content (<0.01% NaCl) for 8weeks. After 4weeks, rats were infused or not with angiotensin II (200ng.kg(-1).min(-1), sc) for 4weeks. Tail-cuff blood pressure was determined in conscious rats. Heart and left ventricle weight, cardiomyocyte size, and cardiac fibrosis were evaluated. We performed a transcriptomic analysis in order to identify differentially regulated cardiac mRNAs between normal and low sodium diets. We validated those results using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Angiotensin II-induced blood pressure rise was blunted (~ 50%) in the low-sodium fed rats while cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were prevented. Transcriptomic analysis revealed 66 differentially regulated genes including 13 downregulated genes under the low sodium diet and implicated in the innate immune response. This was confirmed by reduced cardiac macrophages infiltration under the low sodium diet. Dietary sodium restriction prevents structural alterations of the heart of rats with fructose-induced insulin resistance and angiotensin II-hypertension. The reduction of cardiac inflammation and macrophage infiltration suggests that innate immunity has an important role in the beneficial effect of sodium restriction on cardiac remodeling.

  19. Modulation of Glycosaminoglycans Affects PrPSc Metabolism but Does Not Block PrPSc Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Hanna; Graßmann, Andrea; Bester, Romina; Hossinger, André; Möhl, Christoph; Paulsen, Lydia; Groschup, Martin H.; Schätzl, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are unconventional infectious agents composed primarily of the misfolded aggregated host prion protein PrP, termed PrPSc. Prions propagate by the recruitment and conformational conversion of cellular prion protein into abnormal prion aggregates on the cell surface or along the endocytic pathway. Cellular glycosaminoglycans have been implicated as the first attachment sites for prions and cofactors for cellular prion replication. Glycosaminoglycan mimetics and obstruction of glycosaminoglycan sulfation affect prion replication, but the inhibitory effects on different strains and different stages of the cell infection have not been thoroughly addressed. We examined the effects of a glycosaminoglycan mimetic and undersulfation on cellular prion protein metabolism, prion uptake, and the establishment of productive infections in L929 cells by two mouse-adapted prion strains. Surprisingly, both treatments reduced endogenous sulfated glycosaminoglycans but had divergent effects on cellular PrP levels. Chemical or genetic manipulation of glycosaminoglycans did not prevent PrPSc uptake, arguing against their roles as essential prion attachment sites. However, both treatments effectively antagonized de novo prion infection independently of the prion strain and reduced PrPSc formation in chronically infected cells. Our results demonstrate that sulfated glycosaminoglycans are dispensable for prion internalization but play a pivotal role in persistently maintained PrPSc formation independent of the prion strain. IMPORTANCE Recently, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) became the focus of neurodegenerative disease research as general attachment sites for cell invasion by pathogenic protein aggregates. GAGs influence amyloid formation in vitro. GAGs are also found in intra- and extracellular amyloid deposits. In light of the essential role GAGs play in proteinopathies, understanding the effects of GAGs on protein aggregation and aggregate dissemination is crucial

  20. Disulfiram modulates stemness and metabolism of brain tumor initiating cells in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Ah; Choi, Jung Won; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Park, Kyung Duk; Eum, Dayoung; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Il Han; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Background Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are among the most malignant pediatric brain tumors. Cells from brain tumors with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity have a number of characteristics that are similar to brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ALDH inhibition using disulfiram (DSF) against BTICs from AT/RT. Methods Primary cultured BTICs from AT/RT were stained with Aldefluor and isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. The therapeutic effect of DSF against BTICs from AT/RT was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Results AT/RT cells displayed a high expression of ALDH. DSF demonstrated a more potent cytotoxic effect on ALDH+ AT/RT cells compared with standard anticancer agents. Notably, treatment with DSF did not have a considerable effect on normal neural stem cells or fibroblasts. DSF significantly inhibited the ALDH enzyme activity of AT/RT cells. DSF decreased self-renewal ability, cell viability, and proliferation potential and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in ALDH+ AT/RT cells. Importantly, DSF reduced the metabolism of ALDH+ AT/RT cells by increasing the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ratio of NAD+/NADH and regulating Silent mating type Information Regulator 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), nuclear factor-kappaB, Lin28A/B, and miRNA let-7g. Animals in the DSF-treated group demonstrated a reduction of tumor volume (P < .05) and a significant survival benefit (P = .02). Conclusion Our study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of DSF against BTICs from AT/RT and suggested the possibility of ALDH inhibition for clinical application. PMID:25378634

  1. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1.

  2. α-Thujone (the active component of absinthe): γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptor modulation and metabolic detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Höld, Karin M.; Sirisoma, Nilantha S.; Ikeda, Tomoko; Narahashi, Toshio; Casida, John E.

    2000-01-01

    α-Thujone is the toxic agent in absinthe, a liqueur popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries that has adverse health effects. It is also the active ingredient of wormwood oil and some other herbal medicines and is reported to have antinociceptive, insecticidal, and anthelmintic activity. This study elucidates the mechanism of α-thujone neurotoxicity and identifies its major metabolites and their role in the poisoning process. Four observations establish that α-thujone is a modulator of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor. First, the poisoning signs (and their alleviation by diazepam and phenobarbital) in mice are similar to those of the classical antagonist picrotoxinin. Second, a strain of Drosophila specifically resistant to chloride channel blockers is also tolerant to α-thujone. Third, α-thujone is a competitive inhibitor of [3H]ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate binding to mouse brain membranes. Most definitively, GABA-induced peak currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons are suppressed by α-thujone with complete reversal after washout. α-Thujone is quickly metabolized in vitro by mouse liver microsomes with NADPH (cytochrome P450) forming 7-hydroxy-α-thujone as the major product plus five minor ones (4-hydroxy-α-thujone, 4-hydroxy-β-thujone, two other hydroxythujones, and 7,8-dehydro-α-thujone), several of which also are detected in the brain of mice treated i.p. with α-thujone. The major 7-hydroxy metabolite attains much higher brain levels than α-thujone but is less toxic to mice and Drosophila and less potent in the binding assay. The other metabolites assayed are also detoxification products. Thus, α-thujone in absinthe and herbal medicines is a rapid-acting and readily detoxified modulator of the GABA-gated chloride channel. PMID:10725394

  3. Host extract modulates metabolism and fumonisin biosynthesis by the plant-pathogenic fungus Fusarium proliferatum.

    PubMed

    Stępień, Łukasz; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Wilman, Karolina

    2015-01-16

    Fusarium proliferatum is a common pathogen able to infect a broad range of agriculturally important crops. Recently, some evidence for genetic variance among the species genotypes in relation to their plant origin has been reported. Mycotoxin contamination of plant tissues is the most important threat caused by F. proliferatum and fumonisins B (FBs) are the principal mycotoxins synthesized. The toxigenic potential of the pathogen genotypes is variable and also the reaction of different host plant species on the infection by pathogen is different. The objective of present study was to evaluate the impact of the extracts on the growth and fumonisin biosynthesis by 32 F. proliferatum strains originating from different host species (A-asparagus, M-maize, G-garlic, PS-pea and P-pineapple), and how it changes the secondary metabolism measured by fumonisin biosynthesis. The average strain dry weight was 65.2 mg for control conditions and it reached 180.7 mg, 100.5 mg, 76.6 mg, 126.2 mg and 51.1 mg when pineapple, asparagus, maize, garlic and pea extracts were added, respectively. In the second experiment the extracts were added after 5 days of culturing of the representative group of strains, displaying diverse reaction to the extract presence. Also, the influence of stationary vs. shaken culture was examined. Mean biomass amounts for shaken cultures of 15 chosen strains were as follows: 37.4 mg of dry weight for control culture (C), 219.6 mg (P), 113 mg (A), 93.6 mg (M), 62 mg (G) and 48 mg (PS), respectively. For stationary cultures, the means were as follows: C-57.4 mg, P-355.6 mg, A-291.6 mg, M-191.1 mg, G-171.1 mg and PS-58.9 mg. Few strains showed differential growth when stationary/shaken culture conditions were applied. Almost all strains synthesized moderate amounts of fumonisins in control conditions-less than 10 ng/μL, regardless of the origin and host species. Few strains were able to produce over 100 ng/μL of FBs when pineapple extract was added, twelve

  4. The P-glycoprotein Inhibitor GF120918 Modulates Ca2+-Dependent Processes and Lipid Metabolism in Toxoplasma Gondii

    PubMed Central

    Bottova, Iveta; Sauder, Ursula; Olivieri, Vesna; Hehl, Adrian B.; Sonda, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    Up-regulation of the membrane-bound efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is associated with the phenomenon of multidrug-resistance in pathogenic organisms, including protozoan parasites. In addition, P-gp plays a role in normal physiological processes, however our understanding of these P-gp functions remains limited. In this study we investigated the effects of the P-gp inhibitor GF120918 in Toxoplasma gondii, a model apicomplexan parasite and an important human pathogen. We found that GF120918 treatment severely inhibited parasite invasion and replication. Further analyses of the molecular mechanisms involved revealed that the P-gp inhibitor modulated parasite motility, microneme secretion and egress from the host cell, all cellular processes known to depend on Ca2+ signaling in the parasite. In support of a potential role of P-gp in Ca2+-mediated processes, immunoelectron and fluorescence microscopy showed that T. gondii P-gp was localized in acidocalcisomes, the major Ca2+ storage in the parasite, at the plasma membrane, and in the intravacuolar tubular network. In addition, metabolic labeling of extracellular parasites revealed that inhibition or down-regulation of T. gondii P-gp resulted in aberrant lipid synthesis. These results suggest a crucial role of T. gondii P-gp in essential processes of the parasite biology and further validate the potential of P-gp activity as a target for drug development. PMID:20386707

  5. Modulation of metabolic communication through gap junction channels by transjunctional voltage; synergistic and antagonistic effects of gating and ionophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Prado, Nicolás; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.

    2011-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels assembled from connexin (Cx) proteins provide a structural basis for direct electrical and metabolic cell-cell communication. Here, we focus on gating and permeability properties of Cx43/Cx45 heterotypic GJs exhibiting asymmetries of both voltage-gating and transjunctional flux (Jj) of fluorescent dyes depending on transjunctional voltage (Vj). Relatively small differences in the resting potential of communicating cells can substantially reduce or enhance this flux at relative negativity or positivity on Cx45 side, respectively. Similarly, series of Vj pulses resembling bursts of action potentials (APs) reduce Jj when APs initiate in the cell expressing Cx43 and increase Jj when APs initiate in the cell expressing Cx45. Jj of charged fluorescent dyes is affected by ionophoresis and Vj-gating and the asymmetry of Jj-Vj dependence in heterotypic GJs is enhanced or reduced when ionophoresis and Vj-gating work in a synergistic or antagonistic manner, respectively. Modulation of cell-to-cell transfer of metabolites and signaling molecules by Vj may occur in excitable as well as non-excitable tissues and may be more expressed in the border between normal and pathological regions where intercellular gradients of membrane potential and concentration of ions are substantially altered. PMID:21930112

  6. Hibiscus rosa sinensis Linn. Petals Modulates Glycogen Metabolism and Glucose Homeostasis Signalling Pathway in Streptozotocin-Induced Experimental Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sneha S; Mini, S

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is becoming more and more serious and reaches epidemic proportions worldwide. Scientific research is constantly looking for new agents that could be used as dietary functional ingredients in the fight against diabetes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Hibiscus rosa sinensis Linn. petals on experimental diabetes at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight and it was compared with standard anti-diabetic drug metformin. The elevated levels of serum glucose (398.56 ± 35.78) and glycated haemoglobin (12.89 ± 1.89) in diabetic rats were significantly decreased (156.89 ± 14.45 and 6.12 ± 0.49, respectively) by Hibiscus rosa sinensis petals (EHRS) administration. Hepatotoxicity marker enzyme levels in serum were normalized. The fraction supplementation restored the glycogen content by regulating the activities of glycogen metabolizing enzymes. It significantly modulated the expressions of marker genes involved in glucose homeostasis signalling pathway. Histopathological analysis of liver and pancreas supported our findings. The overall effect was comparable with metformin. Hence, our study reveals the role of hibiscus petals for alleviation of diabetes complications, thus it can be propagated as a nutraceutical agent.

  7. Vegetable oil blends with α-linolenic acid rich Garden cress oil modulate lipid metabolism in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Umesha, S S; Naidu, K Akhilender

    2012-12-15

    Vegetable oil blends with modified fatty acid profile are being developed to improve n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFAs) ratio in edible oils. The objective of this study is to develop vegetable oil blends with α-linolenic acid (ALA) rich Garden cress oil (GCO) and assess their modulatory effect on lipid metabolism. Sunflower oil (SFO), Rice bran oil (RBO), Sesame oil (SESO) were blended with GCO at different ratios to obtain n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio of 2.3-2.6. Native and GCO blended oils were fed to Wistar rats at 10% level in the diet for 60 days. Serum and liver lipids showed significant decrease in Total cholesterol (TC), Triglyceride (TG), LDL-C levels in GCO and GCO blended oil fed rats compared to native oil fed rats. ALA, EPA, DHA contents were significantly increased while linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA) levels decreased in different tissues of GCO and GCO blended oils fed rats. In conclusion, blending of vegetable oils with GCO increases ALA, decreases n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratio and beneficially modulates lipid profile.

  8. Lebetin 2, a Snake Venom-Derived Natriuretic Peptide, Attenuates Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury through the Modulation of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore at the Time of Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Tourki, Bochra; Matéo, Philippe; Morand, Jessica; Elayeb, Mohamed; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Marrakchi, Naziha; Belaidi, Elise; Messadi, Erij

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. It is now well established that natriuretic peptides can attenuate the development of irreversible ischemic injury during myocardial infarction. Lebetin 2 (L2) is a new discovered peptide isolated from Macrovipera lebetina venom with structural similarity to B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Our objectives were to define the acute cardioprotective actions of L2 in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts after regional or global ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We studied infarct size, left ventricular contractile recovery, survival protein kinases and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in injured myocardium. L2 dosage was determined by preliminary experiments at its ability to induce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) release without changing hemodynamic effects in normoxic hearts. L2 was found to be as effective as BNP in reducing infarct size after the induction of either regional or global IR. Both peptides equally improved contractile recovery after regional IR, but only L2 increased coronary flow and reduced severe contractile dysfunction after global ischemia. Cardioprotection afforded by L2 was abolished after isatin or 5-hydroxydecanote pretreatment suggesting the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptors and mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) channels in the L2-induced effects. L2 also increased survival protein expression in the reperfused myocardium as evidenced by phosphorylation of signaling pathways PKCε/ERK/GSK3β and PI3K/Akt/eNOS. IR induced mitochondrial pore opening, but this effect was markedly prevented by L2 treatment. These data show that L2 has strong cardioprotective effect in acute ischemia through stimulation of natriuretic peptide receptors. These beneficial effects are mediated, at least in part, by mitoKATP channel opening and downstream activated survival kinases, thus delaying mPTP opening and improving IR-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID

  9. Metabolic adaptation to a disruption in oxygen supply during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion is underpinned by temporal and quantitative changes in the cardiac proteome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Arslan, Fatih; Ren, Yan; Adav, Sunil S; Poh, Kian Keong; Sorokin, Vitaly; Lee, Chuen Neng; de Kleijn, Dominique; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2012-04-06

    Despite decades of intensive research, there is still no effective treatment for ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, an important corollary in the treatment of ischemic disease. I/R injury is initiated when the altered biochemistry of cells after ischemia is no longer compatible with oxygenated microenvironment (or reperfusion). To better understand the molecular basis of this alteration and subsequent incompatibility, we assessed the temporal and quantitative alterations in the cardiac proteome of a mouse cardiac I/R model by an iTRAQ approach at 30 min of ischemia, and at 60 or 120 min reperfusion after the ischemia using sham-operated mouse heart as the baseline control. Of the 509 quantified proteins identified, 121 proteins exhibited significant changes (p-value<0.05) over time and were mostly clustered in eight functional groups: Fatty acid oxidation, Glycolysis, TCA cycle, ETC (electron transport chain), Redox Homeostasis, Glutathione S-transferase, Apoptosis related, and Heat Shock proteins. The first four groups are intimately involved in ATP production and the last four groups are known to be important in cellular antioxidant activity. During ischemia and reperfusion, the short supply of oxygen precipitates a pivotal metabolic switch from aerobic metabolism involving fatty acid oxidation, TCA, and phosphorylation to anaerobic metabolism for ATP production and this, in turn, increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Therefore the implication of these 8 functional groups suggested that ischemia-reperfusion injury is underpinned in part by proteomic alterations. Reversion of these alterations to preischemia levels took at least 60 min, suggesting a refractory period in which the ischemic cells cannot adjust to the presence of oxygen. Therefore, therapeutics that could compensate for these proteomic alterations during this interim refractory period could alleviate ischemia-reperfusion injury to enhance cellular recovery from an ischemic to a normoxic

  10. Diastolic dysfunction in diabetes and the metabolic syndrome: promising potential for diagnosis and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    St John Sutton, M.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac disease in diabetes mellitus and in the metabolic syndrome consists of both vascular and myocardial abnormalities. The latter are characterised predominantly by diastolic dysfunction, which has been difficult to evaluate in spite of its prevalence. While traditional Doppler echocardiographic parameters enable only semiquantitative assessment of diastolic function and cannot reliably distinguish perturbations in loading conditions from altered diastolic functions, new technologies enable detailed quantification of global and regional diastolic function. The most readily available technique for the quantification of subclinical diastolic dysfunction is tissue Doppler imaging, which has been integrated into routine contemporary clinical practice, whereas cine magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) remains a promising complementary research tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of the disease. Diastolic function is reported to vary linearly with age in normal persons, decreasing by 0.16 cm/s each year. Diastolic function in diabetes and the metabolic syndrome is determined by cardiovascular risk factors that alter myocardial stiffness and myocardial energy availability/bioenergetics. The latter is corroborated by the improvement in diastolic function with improvement in metabolic control of diabetes by specific medical therapy or lifestyle modification. Accordingly, diastolic dysfunction reflects the structural and metabolic milieu in the myocardium, and may allow targeted therapeutic interventions to modulate cardiac metabolism to prevent heart failure in insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:20349347

  11. Saffron supplements modulate serum pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with metabolic syndrome: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kermani, Tayyebeh; Mousavi, Seyyed Hadi; Shemshian, Maryam; Norouzy, Abdolreza; Mazidi, Mohsen; Moezzi, Atefeh; Moghiman, Toktam; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; A. Ferns, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We have investigated the effect of a saffron supplement, given at a dose of 100 mg/kg, on prooxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB) in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial design was used in 75 subjects with metabolic syndrome who were randomly allocated to one of two study groups: (1) the case group received 100mg/kg saffron and (2) the placebo control group received placebo for 12 weeks. The serum PAB assay was applied to all subjects before (week 0) and after (weeks 6 and 12) the intervention. Results: There was a significant (p=0.035) reduction in serum PAB between week 0 to week 6 and also from week 0 to week 12. Conclusion: Saffron supplements can modulate serum PAB in subjects with metabolic syndrome, implying an improvement in some aspects of oxidative stress or antioxidant protection. PMID:26468462

  12. The Redox-Sensing Regulator Rex Modulates Central Carbon Metabolism, Stress Tolerance Response and Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Bitoun, Jacob P.; Liao, Sumei; Yao, Xin; Xie, Gary G.; Wen, Zezhang T.

    2012-01-01

    The Rex repressor has been implicated in regulation of central carbon and energy metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria. We have previously shown that Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of dental caries, alters its transcriptome upon Rex-deficiency and renders S. mutans to have increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, aberrations in glucan production, and poor biofilm formation. In this study, we showed that rex in S. mutans is co-transcribed as an operon with downstream guaA, encoding a putative glutamine amidotransferase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant Rex bound promoters of target genes avidly and specifically, including those down-regulated in response to Rex-deficiency, and that the ability of recombinant Rex to bind to selected promoters was modulated by NADH and NAD+. Results suggest that Rex in S. mutans can function as an activator in response to intracellular NADH/NAD+ level, although the exact binding site for activator Rex remains unclear. Consistent with a role in oxidative stress tolerance, hydrogen peroxide challenge assays showed that the Rex-deficient mutant, TW239, and the Rex/GuaA double mutant, JB314, were more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide killing than the wildtype, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB314 displayed major defects in biofilm formation, with a decrease of more than 50-fold in biomass after 48-hours. Collectively, these results further suggest that Rex in S. mutans regulates fermentation pathways, oxidative stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in response to intracellular NADH/NAD+ level. Current effort is being directed to further investigation of the role of GuaA in S. mutans cellular physiology. PMID:23028612

  13. The redox-sensing regulator Rex modulates central carbon metabolism, stress tolerance response and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Bitoun, Jacob P; Liao, Sumei; Yao, Xin; Xie, Gary G; Wen, Zezhang T

    2012-01-01

    The Rex repressor has been implicated in regulation of central carbon and energy metabolism in gram-positive bacteria. We have previously shown that Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of dental caries, alters its transcriptome upon Rex-deficiency and renders S. mutans to have increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, aberrations in glucan production, and poor biofilm formation. In this study, we showed that rex in S. mutans is co-transcribed as an operon with downstream guaA, encoding a putative glutamine amidotransferase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant Rex bound promoters of target genes avidly and specifically, including those down-regulated in response to Rex-deficiency, and that the ability of recombinant Rex to bind to selected promoters was modulated by NADH and NAD(+). Results suggest that Rex in S. mutans can function as an activator in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+) level, although the exact binding site for activator Rex remains unclear. Consistent with a role in oxidative stress tolerance, hydrogen peroxide challenge assays showed that the Rex-deficient mutant, TW239, and the Rex/GuaA double mutant, JB314, were more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide killing than the wildtype, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB314 displayed major defects in biofilm formation, with a decrease of more than 50-fold in biomass after 48-hours. Collectively, these results further suggest that Rex in S. mutans regulates fermentation pathways, oxidative stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+) level. Current effort is being directed to further investigation of the role of GuaA in S. mutans cellular physiology.

  14. Modulation of Vitamin D Status and Dietary Calcium Affects Bone Mineral Density and Mineral Metabolism in Göttingen Minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Scholz-Ahrens, Katharina E.; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Bronner, Felix; Delling, Günter; Açil, Yahya; Hahne, Hans-Jürgen; Hassenpflug, Joachim; Timm, Wolfram; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D deficiency impairs bone health and may cause rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Large animal models are useful to study experimental osteopathies and associated metabolic changes. We intended to modulate vitamin D status and induce nutritional osteomalacia in minipigs. The control group (n = 9) was fed a semisynthetic reference diet with 6 g calcium and 6,500 IU vitamin D3/kg and the experimental group (n = 10) the same diet but with only 2 g calcium/kg and without vitamin D. After 15 months, the deficient animals were in negative calcium balance, having lost bone mineral density significantly (means ± SEM) with −51.2 ± 14.7 mg/cm3 in contrast to controls (−2.3 ± 11.8 mg/cm3), whose calcium balance remained positive. Their osteoid surface was significantly higher, typical of osteomalacia. Their plasma 25(OH)D dropped significantly from 60.1 ± 11.4 nmol/L to 15.3 ± 3.4 nmol/L within 10 months, whereas that of the control group on the reference diet rose. Urinary phosphorus excretion and plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations were significantly higher and final plasma calcium significantly lower than in controls. We conclude that the minipig is a promising large animal model to induce nutritional osteomalacia and to study the time course of hypovitaminosis D and associated functional effects. PMID:24062955

  15. Purinergic receptor X7 is a key modulator of metabolic oxidative stress-mediated autophagy and inflammation in experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Das, Suvarthi; Seth, Ratanesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kadiiska, Maria B; Michelotti, Gregory; Diehl, Anna Mae; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that metabolic oxidative stress, autophagy, and inflammation are hallmarks of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) progression. However, the molecular mechanisms that link these important events in NASH remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of purinergic receptor X7 (P2X7) in modulating autophagy and resultant inflammation in NASH in response to metabolic oxidative stress. The study uses two rodent models of NASH. In one of them, a CYP2E1 substrate bromodichloromethane is used to induce metabolic oxidative stress and NASH. Methyl choline-deficient diet feeding is used for the other NASH model. CYP2E1 and P2X7 receptor gene-deleted mice are used to establish their roles in regulating metabolic oxidative stress and autophagy. Autophagy gene expression, protein levels, confocal microscopy based-immunolocalization of lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP)2A and histopathological analysis were performed. CYP2E1-dependent metabolic oxidative stress induced increases in P2X7 receptor expression and chaperone-mediated autophagy markers LAMP2A and heat shock cognate 70 but caused depletion of light chain 3 isoform B (LC3B) protein levels. P2X7 receptor gene deletion significantly decreased LAMP2A and inflammatory indicators while significantly increasing LC3B protein levels compared with wild-type mice treated with bromodichloromethane. P2X7 receptor-deleted mice were also protected from NASH pathology as evidenced by decreased inflammation and fibrosis. Our studies establish that P2X7 receptor is a key regulator of autophagy induced by metabolic oxidative stress in NASH, thereby modulating hepatic inflammation. Furthermore, our findings presented here form a basis for P2X7 receptor as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment for NASH.

  16. Expression profile of malignant and nonmalignant lesions of esophagus and stomach: differential activity of functional modules related to inflammation and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Luciana I; Esteves, Gustavo H; Carvalho, Alex F; Cristo, Elier B; Hirata, Roberto; Martins, Waleska K; Marques, Sarah M; Camargo, Luiz P; Brentani, Helena; Pelosof, Adriane; Zitron, Cláudia; Sallum, Rubens A; Montagnini, André; Soares, Fernando A; Neves, E Jordão; Reis, Luiz F L

    2005-08-15

    Adenocarcinomas of stomach and esophagus are frequently associated with preceding inflammatory alterations of the normal mucosa. Whereas intestinal metaplasia of the gastric mucosa is associated with higher risk of malignization, Barrett's disease is a risk factor for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Barrett's disease is characterized by the substitution of the squamous mucosa of the esophagus by a columnar tissue classified histopathologically as intestinal metaplasia. Using cDNA microarrays, we determined the expression profile of normal gastric and esophageal mucosa as well as intestinal metaplasia and adenocarcinomas from both organs. Data were explored to define functional alterations related to the transformation from squamous to columnar epithelium and the malignant transformation from intestinal metaplasia to adenocarcinomas. Based on their expression profile, adenocarcinomas of the esophagus showed stronger correlation with intestinal metaplasia of the stomach than with Barrett's mucosa. Second, we identified two functional modules, lipid metabolism and cytokine, as being altered with higher statistical significance. Whereas the lipid metabolism module is active in samples representing intestinal metaplasia and inactive in adenocarcinomas, the cytokine module is inactive in samples representing normal esophagus and esophagitis. Using the concept of relevance networks, we determined the changes in linear correlation of genes pertaining to these two functional modules. Exploitation of the data presented herein will help in the precise molecular characterization of adenocarcinoma from the distal esophagus, avoiding the topographical and descriptive classification that is currently adopted, and help with the proper management of patients with Barrett's disease.

  17. Optimization of myocardial function.

    PubMed

    Alpert, N R; Mulieri, L A; Hasenfuss, G; Holubarsch, C

    1993-01-01

    Under normal conditions the cardiac output is designed to meet the metabolic needs of the organism. Thus, the demands imposed on the heart muscle can range from low values at rest to an order of magnitude greater values during exercise. The heart uses a number of strategies to meet the short- and long-term changes in demand. These strategies are of general biological interest and employ similar mechanisms to those responsible for the differences in muscle performance seen between muscle from various species and diverse muscle types within a given animal. This review deals with the heart's utilization of these strategies to meet a broad range of requirements. Tortoise (TM) and rat soleus (RS) muscles are slow, have high economy and develop low power. In contrast (FM) and rat extensor digitorum longus (REDL) are fast, have low economy and have a high power output. These differences are explainable in terms of the characteristics of the myosin head cross-bridge cycle (Cross-bridge tension-time integral: FM/FT = 0.024; REDL/RS = 0.16. Myosin ATPase activity: FM/TM = 15; RDEL/RS = 2.3) and excitation contraction coupling system (time to peak tension: FM/TM = 0.2; REDL/RS = 0.4). Heart muscle employs similar strategies (cross-bridge cycle; excitation contraction coupling) to meet short (catecholamine) and long (hypertrophy secondary to pressure overload or thyrotoxicosis) term changes in demand. In the presence of catecholamine power is increased while economy is decreased. This difference between control (C) and isoproterenol treated hearts (I) is explainable in terms of the contractile and excitation contraction coupling systems (Cross-bridge tension-time integral: I/C = 0.4. Tension independent heat: I/C = 2.0. Tension independent heat rate: I/C = 2.5). A persistent increase in the demand on the heart results in myocardial hypertrophy that is associated with intracellular reorganization. Hyperthyroidism (T) and pressure overload (PO) were used to produce myocardial

  18. Cardiac NO signalling in the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pechánová, O; Varga, Z V; Cebová, M; Giricz, Z; Pacher, P; Ferdinandy, P

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that metabolic syndrome (i.e. a group of risk factors, such as abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides and low cholesterol level in high-density lipoprotein), which raises the risk for heart disease and diabetes, is associated with increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generation. ROS/RNS can modulate cardiac NO signalling and trigger various adaptive changes in NOS and antioxidant enzyme expressions/activities. While initially these changes may represent protective mechanisms in metabolic syndrome, later with more prolonged oxidative, nitrosative and nitrative stress, these are often exhausted, eventually favouring myocardial RNS generation and decreased NO bioavailability. The increased oxidative and nitrative stress also impairs the NO-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) signalling pathway, limiting the ability of NO to exert its fundamental signalling roles in the heart. Enhanced ROS/RNS generation in the presence of risk factors also facilitates activation of redox-dependent transcriptional factors such as NF-κB, promoting myocardial expression of various pro-inflammatory mediators, and eventually the development of cardiac dysfunction and remodelling. While the dysregulation of NO signalling may interfere with the therapeutic efficacy of conventional drugs used in the management of metabolic syndrome, the modulation of NO signalling may also be responsible for the therapeutic benefits of already proven or recently developed treatment approaches, such as ACE inhibitors, certain β-blockers, and sGC activators. Better understanding of the above-mentioned pathological processes may ultimately lead to more successful therapeutic approaches to overcome metabolic syndrome and its pathological consequences in cardiac NO signalling. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this

  19. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1: relevance of its modulation in the pathophysiology of obesity, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C D; Azevedo, I; Monteiro, R; Martins, M J

    2012-10-01

    establishment or the prevention of the metabolic syndrome, obesity and T2DM through 11β-HSD1 modulation. We intend to review and discuss 11β-HSD1 and obesity, the metabolic syndrome and T2DM and to highlight the potential of its inhibition for therapeutic or prophylactic approaches in those metabolic diseases.

  20. Modulation Role of abscisic acid (ABA) on growth, water relations and glycinebetaine metabolism in two maize (Zea mays L.) cultivars under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Gao, Mei; Hu, Jingjiang; Zhang, Xifeng; Wang, Kai; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    The role of plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in plants under drought stress (DS) is crucial in modulating physiological responses that eventually lead to adaptation to an unfavorable environment; however, the role of this hormone in modulation of glycinebetaine (GB) metabolism in maize particularly at the seedling stage is still poorly understood. Some hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the modulation role of ABA on plant growth, water relations and GB metabolism in the leaves of two maize cultivars, Zhengdan 958 (ZD958; drought tolerant), and Jundan 20 (JD20; drought sensitive), subjected to integrated root-zone drought stress (IR-DS) simulated by the addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG, 12% w/v, MW 6000). The IR-DS substantially resulted in increased betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity and choline content which act as the key enzyme and initial substrate, respectively, in GB biosynthesis. Drought stress also induced accumulation of GB, whereas it caused reduction in leaf relative water content (RWC) and dry matter (DM) in both cultivars. The contents of ABA and GB increased in drought-stressed maize seedlings, but ABA accumulated prior to GB accumulation under the drought treatment. These responses were more predominant in ZD958 than those in JD20. Addition of exogenous ABA and fluridone (Flu) (ABA synthesis inhibitor) applied separately increased and decreased BADH activity, respectively. Abscisic acid application enhanced GB accumulation, leaf RWC and shoot DM production in both cultivars. However, of both maize cultivars, the drought sensitive maize cultivar (JD20) performed relatively better than the other maize cultivar ZD958 under both ABA and Flu application in view of all parameters appraised. It is, therefore, concluded that increase in both BADH activity and choline content possibly resulted in enhancement of GB accumulation under DS. The endogenous ABA was probably involved in the regulation of GB metabolism by regulating

  1. Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans, With or Without Anterior Myocardial Territory and Left Ventricle as Organs at Risk, in Early-Stage Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Wenyong; Wang Xiaohong; Qiu Dasheng; Liu Dong; Jia Shaohui; Zeng Fanyu; Chen Zhengwang; Li Beihui; Xu Jiaozhen; Wei Lai; Hu Desheng

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We evaluated heart sparing using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan with the left ventricle (LV) and/or the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as additional organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer were selected for dosimetric planning. Both lungs, the right breast, heart, LV, and AMT were defined as OARs. We generated one tangential field plan and four IMRT plans for each patient. We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of the planning target volume and OARs. Results: Compared with the tangential field plan, the mean dose to the heart in the IMRT plans did not show significant differences; however, the dose to the AMT and LV decreased by 18.7-45.4% and 10.8-37.4%, respectively. The maximal dose to the heart decreased by 18.6-35.3%, to the AMT by 22.0-45.1%, and to the LV by 23.5-45.0%, And the relative volumes of the heart (V{sub {>=}12}), AMT (V{sub >11}) and LV (V{sub >10}) decreased significantly with different levels, respectively. The volume of the heart, AMT, LV, both lungs, and right breast receiving {>=}5 Gy showed a significant increase. Compared with the IMRT (H) plan, the mean dose to the heart, AMT, and LV decreased by 17.5-21.5%, 25.2-29.8%, and 22.8-29.8% and the maximal dose by 13.6-20.6%, 23.1-29.6%, and 17.3-29.1%, respectively. The IMRT plans for both lungs and the right breast showed no significant differences. Conclusions: The IMRT plans with the addition of the AMT and/or LV as OARs considerably increased heart sparing. We recommend including the LV as an additional OAR in such plans.

  2. NKT cell modulates NAFLD potentiation of metabolic oxidative stress-induced mesangial cell activation and proximal tubular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Alhasson, Firas; Dattaroy, Diptadip; Das, Suvarthi; Chandrashekaran, Varun; Seth, Ratanesh Kumar; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are associated with the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. We recently showed that NAFLD induces liver-specific cytochrome P-450 (CYP)2E1-mediated metabolic oxidative stress after administration of the CYP2E1 substrate bromodichloromethane (BDCM) (Seth RK, Das S, Kumar A, Chanda A, Kadiiska MB, Michelotti G, Manautou J, Diehl AM, Chatterjee S. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 274: 42–54, 2014; Seth RK, Kumar A, Das S, Kadiiska MB, Michelotti G, Diehl AM, Chatterjee S. Toxicol Sci 134:291–303, 2013). The present study examined the effects of CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress in NAFLD leading to kidney toxicity. Mice were fed a high-fat diet for 12 wk to induce NAFLD. NAFLD mice were exposed to BDCM, a CYP2E1 substrate, for 4 wk. NAFLD + BDCM increased CYP2E1-mediated lipid peroxidation in proximal tubular cells compared with mice with NAFLD alone or BDCM-treated lean mice, thus ruling out the exclusive role of BDCM. Lipid peroxidation increased IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. In parallel, mesangial cell activation was observed by increased α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor-β, which was blocked by the CYP2E1 inhibitor diallyl sulphide both in vivo and in vitro. Mice lacking natural killer T cells (CD1d knockout mice) showed elevated (>4-fold) proinflammatory mediator release, increased Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and PDGF2 mRNA, and mesangial cell activation in the kidney. Finally, NAFLD CD1D knockout mice treated with BDCM exhibited increased high mobility group box 1 and Fas ligand levels and TUNEL-positive nuclei, indicating that higher cell death was attenuated in TLR4 knockout mice. Tubular cells showed increased cell death and cytokine release when incubated with activated mesangial cells. In summary, an underlying condition of progressive NAFLD causes renal immunotoxicity and aberrant glomerular function possibly through high mobility group box 1-dependent TLR4 signaling

  3. Metabolic syndrome burden in apparently healthy adolescents are adversely associated with cardiac autonomic modulation- Penn State Children Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Colón, Sol M.; He, Fan; Bixler, Edward O.; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Calhoun, Susan; Zheng, Zhi-Jie; Liao, Duanping

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) has been associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adults. However, the association between MetS component cluster and CAM has not been examined in adolescents. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using data from the Penn State Child Cohort follow-up examination. CAM was assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of 39-hour RR intervals, including frequency (high frequency, HF; low frequency, LF; and LF/HF ratio) and time (SDNN, standard deviation of all RR intervals; RMSSD, square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR intervals; and HR, heart rate) domain variables. To assess the MetS burden, we used continuous MetS score (cMetS)–sum of the age and sex-adjusted standardized residual (Z-score) of five established MetS components. Linear mixed-effect models were used to analyze the association between cMetS and CAM in the entire population and stratified by gender. Results After adjusting for age, sex, and race, cMetS was significantly associated with reduced HRV and higher HR. With 1 standard deviation increase in cMetS, there was a significant decrease in HF(−0.10(SE=0.02)), LF(−0.07(SE=0.01)), SDNN(−1.97(SE=0.50)), and RMSSD(−1.70(SE=0.72)), and increase in LF/HF(0.08(SE=0.02)) and HR(1.40(SE=0.26)). All cMetS components, with the exception of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), were associated with significantly decreased HRV and increased HR. High blood pressure (MAP) and triglyceride (TG) levels were also associated with an increase in LF/HF and decrease in RMSSD. An increase in high-density lipoprotein was only associated with higher LF and SDNN. Moreover, cMetS and HRV associations were more pronounced in males than in females. The associations between HRV and. MAP, TG, and HDL were more pronounced in females. Conclusions cMetS score is associated with lower HRV, suggesting an adverse impact on CAM, even in apparently healthy adolescents

  4. Schisandra chinensis fruit modulates the gut microbiota composition in association with metabolic markers in obese women: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi-young; Wang, Jing-hua; Eom, Taewoong; Kim, Hojun

    2015-08-01

    Schisandra chinensis fruit (SCF) is known to have beneficial effects on metabolic diseases, including obesity, and to affect gut microbiota in in vivo studies. However, in human research, there have been a few studies in terms of its clinical roles in lipid metabolism and modulation of gut microbiota. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study with 28 obese women with SCF or placebo was conducted for 12 weeks. Anthropometry and blood and fecal sampling were performed before and after treatment. Analysis of the gut microbiota in feces was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Although the values did not differ significantly between the 2 groups, the SCF group tended to show a greater decrease in waist circumference, fat mass, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase than the placebo group. Clustering of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints for total bacteria before and after treatment indicated more separate clustering in SCF group than placebo. In correlation analysis, Bacteroides and Bacteroidetes (both increased by SCF) showed significant negative correlation with fat mass, aspartate aminotransferase, and/or alanine aminotransferase, respectively. Ruminococcus (decreased by SCF) showed negative correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and fasting blood glucose. In conclusion, administration of SCF for 12 weeks resulted in modulation of the gut microbiota composition in Korean obese women, and significant correlations with some bacterial genera and metabolic parameters were noted. However, in general, SCF was not sufficient to induce significant changes in obesity-related parameters compared with placebo.

  5. p-Coumaric acid modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via AMP-activated protein kinase in L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seon-A; Kang, Seong-Il; Shin, Hye-Sun; Kang, Seung-Woo; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2013-03-22

    p-Coumaric acid (3-[4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-propenoic acid) is a ubiquitous plant metabolite with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. In this study, we examined whether p-coumaric acid modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in L6 skeletal muscle cells. p-Coumaric acid increased the phosphorylation of AMPK in a dose-dependent manner in differentiated L6 skeletal muscle cells. It also increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the expression of CPT-1 mRNA and PPARα, suggesting that it promotes the β-oxidation of fatty acids. Also, it suppressed oleic acid-induced triglyceride accumulation, and enhanced 2-NBDG uptake in differentiated L6 muscle cells. Pretreatment with compound C inhibited AMPK activation, reduced ACC phosphorylation and 2-NBDG uptake, and increased triglyceride accumulation. However, p-coumaric acid counterbalanced the inhibitory effects of compound C. Taken together, these results suggest that p-coumaric acid modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via AMPK activation in L6 skeletal muscle cells and that it has potentially beneficial effects in improving or treating metabolic disorders.

  6. Feasibility of voxel-based statistical analysis method for myocardial PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Yu, A.; Kim, Jin Su; Paik, Chang H.; Kim, Kyeong Min; Moo Lim, Sang

    2014-09-01

    Although statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis is widely used in neuroimaging studies, to our best knowledge, there was no application to myocardial PET data analysis. In this study, we developed the voxel based statistical analysis method for myocardial PET which provides statistical comparison results between groups in image space. PET Emission data of normal and myocardial infarction rats were acquired For the SPM analysis, a rat heart template was created. In addition, individual PET data was spatially normalized and smoothed. Two sample t-tests were performed to identify the myocardial infarct region. This developed SPM method was compared with conventional ROI methods. Myocardial glucose metabolism was decreased in the lateral wall of the left ventricle. In the result of ROI analysis, the mean value of the lateral wall was 29% decreased. The newly developed SPM method for myocardial PET could provide quantitative information in myocardial PET study.

  7. Sarcolemmal KATP channel modulators and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Baczkó, I; Husti, Z; Lang, V; Leprán, I; Light, P E

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac atrial and ventricular arrhythmias are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Ischemic heart disease is the most common cause underlying 1) the development of ventricular fibrillation that results in sudden cardiac death and 2) atrial fibrillation that can lead to heart failure and stroke. Current pharmacological agents for the treatment of ventricular and atrial arrhythmias exhibit limited effectiveness and many of these agents can cause serious adverse effects - including the provocation of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channels (sarcK(ATP)) couple cellular metabolism to membrane excitability in a wide range of tissues. In the heart, sarcK(ATP) are activated during metabolic stress including myocardial ischemia, and both the opening of sarcK(ATP) and mitochondrial K(ATP) channels protect the ischemic myocardium via distinct mechanisms. Myocardial ischemia leads to a series of events that promote the generation of arrhythmia substrate eventually resulting in the development of life-threatening arrhythmias. In this review, the possible mechanisms of the anti- and proarrhythmic effects of sarcK(ATP) modulation as well as the influence of pharmacological K(ATP) modulators are discussed. It is concluded that in spite of the significant advances made in this field, the possible cardiovascular therapeutic utility of current sarcK(ATP) channel modulators is still hampered by the lack of chamber-specific selectivity. However, recent insights into the chamber-specific differences in the molecular composition of sarcKATP in addition to already existing cardioselective sarcK(ATP) channel modulators with sarcK(ATP) isoform selectivity holds the promise for the future development of pharmacological strategies specific for a variety of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  8. Mechanisms of cell survival in myocardial hibernation.

    PubMed

    Depre, Christophe; Vatner, Stephen F

    2005-04-01

    Myocardial hibernation represents a condition of regional ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic coronary artery disease, which reverses gradually after revascularization. The precise mechanism mediating the regional dysfunction is still debated. One hypothesis suggests that chronic hypoperfusion results in a self-protecting downregulation in myocardial function and metabolism to match the decreased oxygen supply. An alternative hypothesis suggests that the myocardium is subject to repetitive episodes of ischemic dysfunction resulting from an imbalance between myocardial metabolic demand and supply that eventually creates a sustained depression of contractility. It is generally agreed that hibernating myocardium is submitted repeatedly to ischemic stress, and therefore one question persists: how do myocytes survive in the setting of chronic ischemia? The hallmark of hibernating myocardium is a maintained viability of the dysfunctional myocardium which relies on an increased uptake of glucose. We propose that, in addition to this metabolic adjustment, there must be molecular switches that confer resistance to ischemia in hibernating myocardium. Such mechanisms include the activation of a genomic program of cell survival as well as autophagy. These protective mechanisms are induced by ischemia and remain activated chronically as long as either sustained or intermittent ischemia persists.

  9. The Citrus Flavanone Naringenin Protects Myocardial Cells against Age-Associated Damage

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Barbara; Cavallini, Chiara; Testai, Lara; Martelli, Alma; Calderone, Vincenzo; Martini, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the health-promoting effects of the citrus flavanone naringenin have been examined. The results have provided evidence for the modulation of some key mechanisms involved in cellular damage by this compound. In particular, naringenin has been revealed to have protective properties such as an antioxidant effect in cardiometabolic disorders. Very recently, beneficial effects of naringenin have been demonstrated in old rats. Because aging has been demonstrated to be directly related to the occurrence of cardiac disorders, in the present study, the ability of naringenin to prevent cardiac cell senescence was investigated. For this purpose, a cellular model of senescent myocardial cells was set up and evaluated using colorimetric, fluorimetric, and immunometric techniques. Relevant cellular senescence markers, such as X-gal staining, cell cycle regulator levels, and the percentage of cell cycle-arrested cells, were found to be reduced in the presence of naringenin. In addition, cardiac markers of aging-induced damage, including radical oxidative species levels, mitochondrial metabolic activity, mitochondrial calcium buffer capacity, and estrogenic signaling functions, were also modulated by the compound. These results suggested that naringenin has antiaging effects on myocardial cells. PMID:28386313

  10. Periodontitis and myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Hiroki; Kaneko, Makoto; Yoshida, Asuka; Aoyama, Norio; Akimoto, Shouta; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Izumi, Yuichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Komuro, Issei

    2017-04-01

    There is a deep relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis. It has been reported that myocardial hypertrophy may be affected by periodontitis in clinical settings. Although these clinical observations had some study limitations, they strongly suggest a direct association between severity of periodontitis and left ventricular hypertrophy. However, the detailed mechanisms between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis have not yet been elucidated. Recently, we demonstrated that periodontal bacteria infection is closely related to myocardial hypertrophy. In murine transverse aortic constriction models, a periodontal pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans markedly enhanced cardiac hypertrophy with matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, while another pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) did not accelerate these pathological changes. In the isoproterenol-induced myocardial hypertrophy model, P.g. induced myocardial hypertrophy through Toll-like receptor-2 signaling. From our results and other reports, regulation of chronic inflammation induced by periodontitis may have a key role in the treatment of myocardial hypertrophy. In this article, we review the pathophysiological mechanism between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis.

  11. Energy metabolism disorders in rare and common diseases. Toward bioenergetic modulation therapy and the training of a new generation of European scientists.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Rodrigue

    2015-06-01

    Energy metabolism alterations are found in a large number of rare and common diseases of genetic or environmental origin. The number of patients that could benefit from bioenergetic modulation therapy (BIOMET) is therefore very important and includes individuals with pathologies as diverse as mitochondrial diseases, acute coronary syndrome, chronic kidney disease, asthma or even cancer. Although, the alteration of energy metabolism is disease specific and sometimes patient specific, the strategies for BIOMET could be common and target a series of bioenergetic regulatory mechanisms discussed in this article. An excellent training of scientists in the field of energy metabolism, related human diseases and drug discovery is also crucial to form a young generation of MDs, PHDs and Pharma or CRO-group leaders who will discover novel personalized bioenergetic medicines, through pharmacology, genetics, nutrition or adapted exercise training. The Mitochondrial European Educational Training (MEET) consortium was created to pursue this goal, and we dedicated here a special issue of Organelle in Focus (OiF) to highlight their objectives. A total of 10 OiFs articles constitute this Directed Issue on Mitochondrial Medicine. As part of this editorial article, we asked timely questions to the PR. Jan W. Smeitink, professor of Mitochondrial Medicine and CEO of Khondrion, a mitochondrial medicine company. He shared with us his objectives and strategies for the study of mitochondrial diseases and the identification of future treatments. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  12. Modulation of CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 metabolic activities by Ferula asafetida resin

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jenoobi, Fahad I.; Al-Thukair, Areej A.; Alam, Mohd Aftab; Abbas, Fawkeya A.; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M.; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A.

    2014-01-01

    Present study investigated the potential effects of Ferula asafetida resin on metabolic activities of human drug metabolizing enzymes: CYP2D6 and CYP3A4. Dextromethorphan (DEX) was used as a marker to assess metabolic activities of these enzymes, based on its CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 mediated metabolism to dextrorphan (DOR) and 3-methoxymorphinan (3-MM), respectively. In vitro study was conducted by incubating DEX with human liver microsomes and NADPH in the presence or absence of Asafetida alcoholic extract. For clinical study, healthy human volunteers received a single dose of DEX alone (phase-I) and repeated the same dose after a washout period and four-day Asafetida treatment (phase-II). Asafetida showed a concentration dependent inhibition on DOR formation (in vitro) and a 33% increase in DEX/DOR urinary metabolic ratio in clinical study. For CYP3A4, formation of 3-MM in microsomes was increased at low Asafetida concentrations (10, 25 and 50 μg/ml) but slightly inhibited at the concentration of 100 μg/ml. On the other hand, in vivo observations revealed that Asafetida significantly increased DEX/3-MM urinary metabolic ratio. The findings of this study suggest that Asafetida may have a significant effect on CYP3A4 metabolic activity. Therefore, using Ferula asafetida with CYP3A4 drug substrates should be cautioned especially those with narrow therapeutic index such as cyclosporine, tacrolimus and carbamazepine. PMID:25561870

  13. Antitumor and chemosensitizing action of dichloroacetate implicates modulation of tumor microenvironment: A role of reorganized glucose metabolism, cell survival regulation and macrophage differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ajay; Kant, Shiva; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2013-11-15

    Targeting of tumor metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic strategy against cancer. Dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), has been shown to exert a potent tumoricidal action against a variety of tumor cells. The main mode of its antineoplastic action implicates a shift of glycolysis to oxidative metabolism of glucose, leading to generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates. However, the effect of DCA on tumor microenvironment, which in turn regulates tumor cell survival; remains speculative to a large extent. It is also unclear if DCA can exert any modulatory effect on the process of hematopoiesis, which is in a compromised state in tumor-bearing hosts undergoing chemotherapy. In view of these lacunas, the present study was undertaken to investigate the so far unexplored aspects with respect to the molecular mechanisms of DCA-dependent tumor growth retardation and chemosensitization. BALB/c mice were transplanted with Dalton's lymphoma (DL) cells, a T cell lymphoma of spontaneous origin, followed by administration of DCA with or without cisplatin. DCA-dependent tumor regression and chemosensitization to cisplatin was found to be associated with altered repertoire of key cell survival regulatory molecules, modulated glucose metabolism, accompanying reconstituted tumor microenvironment with respect to pH homeostasis, cytokine balance and alternatively activated TAM. Moreover, DCA administration also led to an alteration in the MDR phenotype of tumor cells and myelopoietic differentiation of macrophages. The findings of this study shed a new light with respect to some of the novel mechanisms underlying the antitumor action of DCA and thus may have immense clinical applications. - Highlights: • DCA modulates tumor progression and chemoresistance. • DCA alters molecules regulating cell survival, glucose metabolism and MDR. • DCA reconstitutes biophysical and cellular composition of tumor microenvironment.

  14. Effect of SO/sub 2/ on light modulation of plant metabolism. Progress report, June 1, 1982-May 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    Research progress is reported on investigations into the effect of light on the activity of enzymes involved in stomatal metabolism. The effects of sulfite, arsenite, and SO/sub 2/ on this light-mediated system have been studied. (ACR)

  15. CHEMICAL MODIFICATION MODULATES ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY, OXIDATIVE REACTIVITY, & METABOLIC STABILITY IN 4′F-DMA, A NEW BENZOTHIOPHENE SELECTIVE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATOR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Bolton, Judy L.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2008-01-01

    The benzothiophene SERMs raloxifene and arzoxifene, in the clinic or clinical trials for treatment of breast cancer and postmenopausal symptoms, are highly susceptible to oxidative metabolism and formation of electrophilic metabolites. 4′F-DMA, fluoro-substituted desmethyl arzoxifene (DMA), showed attenuated oxidation to quinoids in incubation with rat hepatocytes as well as in rat and human liver microsomes. Incubations of 4′F-DMA with hepatocytes yielded only one glucuronide conjugate and no GSH conjugates; whereas DMA underwent greater metabolism giving two glucuronide conjugates, one sulfate conjugate, and two GSH conjugates. Phase I and phase II metabolism was further evaluated in human small intestine microsomes and in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. In comparison to DMA, 4′F-DMA formed significantly less glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. The formation of quinoids was futher explored in hepatocytes in which DMA was observed to give concentration and time dependent depletion of GSH accompanied by damage to DNA which showed inverse dependence on GSH; in contrast, GSH depletion and DNA damage were almost completely abrogated in incubations with 4′F-DMA. 4′F-DMA shows ligand binding affinity to ERα and ERβ with similarity to both raloxifene and to DMA. ER-mediated biological activity was measured with the ERE-luciferase reporter system in transfected MCF-7 cells and Ishikawa cells, and in MCF-7 cells proliferation was measured. In all systems, 4′F-DMA exhibited anitestrogenic acitivty of comparable potency to raloxifene, but did not manifest estrogenic properties, mirroring previous results on inhibition of estradiol-mediated induction of alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa cells. These results suggest that 4′F-DMA might be an improved benzothiophene SERM with similar antiestrogenic activity to raloxifene, but improved metabolic stability and attenuated toxicity; showing that simple chemical modification can abrogate oxidative bioactivation

  16. Modulation of tissue fatty acids by L-carnitine attenuates metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Sunil K; Poudyal, Hemant; Ward, Leigh C; Waanders, Jennifer; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and dyslipidaemia are metabolic defects resulting from impaired lipid metabolism. These impairments are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Correcting the defects in lipid metabolism may attenuate obesity and dyslipidaemia, and reduce cardiovascular risk and liver damage. L-Carnitine supplementation was used in this study to enhance fatty acid oxidation so as to ameliorate diet-induced disturbances in lipid metabolism. Male Wistar rats (8-9 weeks old) were fed with either corn starch or high-carbohydrate, high-fat diets for 16 weeks. Separate groups were supplemented with L-carnitine (1.2% in food) on either diet for the last 8 weeks of the protocol. High-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats showed central obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinaemia, cardiovascular remodelling and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. L-Carnitine supplementation attenuated these high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced changes, together with modifications in lipid metabolism including the inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, reduced storage of short-chain monounsaturated fatty acids in the tissues with decreased linoleic acid content and trans fatty acids stored in retroperitoneal fat. Thus, L-carnitine supplementation attenuated the signs of metabolic syndrome through inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, preferential β-oxidation of some fatty acids and increased storage of saturated fatty acids and relatively inert oleic acid in the tissues.

  17. Additive effect of LRP8/APOER2 R952Q variant to APOE ε2/ε3/ε4 genotype in modulating apolipoprotein E concentration and the risk of myocardial infarction: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Nicola; Olivieri, Oliviero; Shen, Gong-Qing; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Pizzolo, Francesca; Busti, Fabiana; Friso, Simonetta; Bassi, Antonella; Li, Lin; Hu, Ying; Pignatti, Pier Franco; Corrocher, Roberto; Wang, Qing Kenneth; Girelli, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    Background The R952Q variant in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 8 (LRP8)/apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) gene has been recently associated with familial and premature myocardial infarction (MI) by means of genome-wide linkage scan/association studies. We were interested in the possible interaction of the R952Q variant with another established cardiovascular genetic risk factor belonging to the same pathway, namely apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε2/ε3/ε4 genotype, in modulating apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plasma levels and risk of MI. Methods In the Italian cohort used to confirm the association of the R952Q variant with MI, we assessed lipid profile, apolipoprotein concentrations, and APOE ε2/ε3/ε4 genotype. Complete data were available for a total of 681 subjects in a case-control setting (287 controls and 394 patients with MI). Results Plasma ApoE levels decreased progressively across R952Q genotypes (mean levels ± SD = RR: 0.045 ± 0.020, RQ: 0.044 ± 0.014, QQ: 0.040 ± 0.008 g/l; P for trend = 0.047). Combination with APOE genotypes revealed an additive effect on ApoE levels, with the highest level observed in RR/non-carriers of the E4 allele (0.046 ± 0.021 g/l), and the lowest level in QQ/E4 carriers (0.035 ± 0.009 g/l; P for trend = 0.010). QQ/E4 was also the combined genotype with the most significant association with MI (OR 3.88 with 95%CI 1.08–13.9 as compared with RR/non-carriers E4). Conclusion Our data suggest that LRP8 R952Q variant may have an additive effect to APOE ε2/ε3/ε4 genotype in determining ApoE concentrations and risk of MI in an Italian population. PMID:19439088

  18. Virus-Induced Alterations in Primary Metabolism Modulate Susceptibility to Tobacco rattle virus in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calvino, Lourdes; Osorio, Sonia; Hernández, M. Luisa; Hamada, Ignacio B.; del Toro, Francisco J.; Donaire, Livia; Yu, Agnés; Bustos, Regla; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Martínez-Rivas, José M.; Llave, César

    2014-01-01

    During compatible virus infections, plants respond by reprogramming gene expression and metabolite content. While gene expression studies are profuse, our knowledge of the metabolic changes that occur in the presence of the virus is limited. Here, we combine gene expression and metabolite profiling in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) infected with Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) in order to investigate the influence of primary metabolism on virus infection. Our results revealed that primary metabolism is reconfigured in many ways during TRV infection, as reflected by significant changes in the levels of sugars and amino acids. Multivariate data analysis revealed that these alterations were particularly conspicuous at the time points of maximal accumulation of TRV, although infection time was the dominant source of variance during the process. Furthermore, TRV caused changes in lipid and fatty acid composition in infected leaves. We found that several Arabidopsis mutants deficient in branched-chain amino acid catabolism or fatty acid metabolism possessed altered susceptibility to TRV. Finally, we showed that increments in the putrescine content in TRV-infected plants correlated with enhanced tolerance to freezing stress in TRV-infected plants and that impairment of putrescine biosynthesis promoted virus multiplication. Our results thus provide an interesting overview for a better understanding of the relationship between primary metabolism and virus infection. PMID:25358898

  19. The role of low-grade inflammation and metabolic flexibility in aging and nutritional modulation thereof: a systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Calçada, Dulce; Vianello, Dario; Giampieri, Enrico; Sala, Claudia; Castellani, Gastone; de Graaf, Albert; Kremer, Bas; van Ommen, Ben; Feskens, Edith; Santoro, Aurelia; Franceschi, Claudio; Bouwman, Jildau

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a biological process characterized by the progressive functional decline of many interrelated physiological systems. In particular, aging is associated with the development of a systemic state of low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammaging), and with progressive deterioration of metabolic function. Systems biology has helped in identifying the mediators and pathways involved in these phenomena, mainly through the application of high-throughput screening methods, valued for their molecular comprehensiveness. Nevertheless, inflammation and metabolic regulation are dynamical processes whose behavior must be understood at multiple levels of biological organization (molecular, cellular, organ, and system levels) and on multiple time scales. Mathematical modeling of such behavior, with incorporation of mechanistic knowledge on interactions between inflammatory and metabolic mediators, may help in devising nutritional interventions capable of preventing, or ameliorating, the age-associated functional decline of the corresponding systems.

  20. Apigenin Ameliorates Dyslipidemia, Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance by Modulating Metabolic and Transcriptional Profiles in the Liver of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Un Ju; Cho, Yun-Young; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-05-19

    Several in vitro and in vivo studies have reported the anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of the flavonoid apigenin. However, the long-term supplementary effects of low-dose apigenin on obesity are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of apigenin against obesity and related metabolic disturbances by exploring the metabolic and transcriptional responses in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed an HFD or apigenin (0.005%, w/w)-supplemented HFD for 16 weeks. In HFD-fed mice, apigenin lowered plasma levels of free fatty acid, total cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and hepatic dysfunction markers and ameliorated hepatic steatosis and hepatomegaly, without altering food intake and adiposity. These effects were partly attributed to upregulated expression of genes regulating fatty acid oxidation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain and cholesterol homeostasis, downregulated expression of lipolytic and lipogenic genes and decreased activities of enzymes responsible for triglyceride and cholesterol ester synthesis in the liver. Moreover, apigenin lowered plasma levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and fasting blood glucose. The anti-hyperglycemic effect of apigenin appeared to be related to decreased insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes activities. Thus, apigenin can ameliorate HFD-induced comorbidities via metabolic and transcriptional modulations in the liver.

  1. Urinary (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomic Fingerprinting Reveals Biomarkers of Pulse Consumption Related to Energy-Metabolism Modulation in a Subcohort from the PREDIMED study.

    PubMed

    Madrid-Gambin, Francisco; Llorach, Rafael; Vázquez-Fresno, Rosa; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Almanza-Aguilera, Enrique; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Estruch, Ramon; Corella, Dolores; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2017-04-07

    Little is known about the metabolome fingerprint of pulse consumption. The study of robust and accurate biomarkers for pulse dietary assessment has great value for nutritional epidemiology regarding health benefits and their mechanisms. To characterize the fingerprinting of dietary pulses (chickpeas, lentils, and beans), spot urine samples from a subcohort from the PREDIMED study were stratified using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Urine samples of nonpulse consumers (≤4 g/day of pulse intake) and habitual pulse consumers (≥25 g/day of pulse intake) were analyzed using a (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics approach combined with multi- and univariate data analysis. Pulse consumption showed differences through 16 metabolites coming from (i) choline metabolism, (ii) protein-related compounds, and (iii) energy metabolism (including lower urinary glucose). Stepwise logistic regression analysis was applied to design a combined model of pulse exposure, which resulted in glutamine, dimethylamine, and 3-methylhistidine. This model was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC > 90% in both training and validation sets). The application of NMR-based metabolomics to reported pulse exposure highlighted new candidates for biomarkers of pulse consumption and the impact on energy metabolism, generating new hypotheses on energy modulation. Further intervention studies will confirm these findings.

  2. Vitamin C modulates the metabolic and cytokine profiles, alleviates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress, and increases the life span of Gulo−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Warren, Alessandra; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Paquet, Eric R.; Le Couteur, David G.; Marette, André; Cogger, Victoria C.; Lebel, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal intake of dietary vitamin C (ascorbate) increases the risk of several chronic diseases but the exact metabolic pathways affected are still unknown. In this study, we examined the metabolic profile of mice lacking the enzyme gulonolactone oxidase (Gulo) required for the biosynthesis of ascorbate. Gulo−/− mice were supplemented with 0%, 0.01%, and 0.4% ascorbate (w/v) in drinking water and serum was collected for metabolite measurements by targeted mass spectrometry. We also quantified 42 serum cytokines and examined the levels of different stress markers in liver. The metabolic profiles of Gulo−/− mice treated with ascorbate were different from untreated Gulo−/− and normal wild type mice. The cytokine profiles of Gulo−/− mice, in return, overlapped the profile of wild type animals upon 0.01% or 0.4% vitamin C supplementation. The life span of Gulo−/− mice increased with the amount of ascorbate in drinking water. It also correlated significantly with the ratios of serum arginine/lysine, tyrosine/phenylalanine, and the ratio of specific species of saturated/unsaturated phosphatidylcholines. Finally, levels of hepatic phosphorylated endoplasmic reticulum associated stress markers IRE1α and eIF2α correlated inversely with serum ascorbate and life span suggesting that vitamin C modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress response and longevity in Gulo−/− mice. PMID:26922388

  3. A hepatic amino acid/mTOR/S6K-dependent signalling pathway modulates systemic lipid metabolism via neuronal signals

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Kenji; Yamada, Tetsuya; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Kaneko, Keizo; Ono, Hiraku; Asano, Tomoichiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is coordinated among tissues and organs via neuronal signals. Levels of circulating amino acids (AAs), which are elevated in obesity, activate the intracellular target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1)/S6kinase (S6K) pathway in the liver. Here we demonstrate that hepatic AA/mTORC1/S6K signalling modulates systemic lipid metabolism via a mechanism involving neuronal inter-tissue communication. Hepatic expression of an AA transporter, SNAT2, activates the mTORC1/S6K pathway, and markedly elevates serum triglycerides (TGs), while downregulating adipose lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hepatic Rheb or active-S6K expression have similar metabolic effects, whereas hepatic expression of dominant-negative-S6K inhibits TG elevation in SNAT2 mice. Denervation, pharmacological deafferentation and β-blocker administration suppress obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia with adipose LPL upregulation, suggesting that signals are transduced between liver and adipose tissue via a neuronal pathway consisting of afferent vagal and efferent sympathetic nerves. Thus, the neuronal mechanism uncovered here serves to coordinate amino acid and lipid levels and contributes to the development of obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:26268630

  4. Apigenin Ameliorates Dyslipidemia, Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance by Modulating Metabolic and Transcriptional Profiles in the Liver of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Un Ju; Cho, Yun-Young; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Several in vitro and in vivo studies have reported the anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of the flavonoid apigenin. However, the long-term supplementary effects of low-dose apigenin on obesity are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of apigenin against obesity and related metabolic disturbances by exploring the metabolic and transcriptional responses in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed an HFD or apigenin (0.005%, w/w)-supplemented HFD for 16 weeks. In HFD-fed mice, apigenin lowered plasma levels of free fatty acid, total cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and hepatic dysfunction markers and ameliorated hepatic steatosis and hepatomegaly, without altering food intake and adiposity. These effects were partly attributed to upregulated expression of genes regulating fatty acid oxidation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain and cholesterol homeostasis, downregulated expression of lipolytic and lipogenic genes and decreased activities of enzymes responsible for triglyceride and cholesterol ester synthesis in the liver. Moreover, apigenin lowered plasma levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and fasting blood glucose. The anti-hyperglycemic effect of apigenin appeared to be related to decreased insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes activities. Thus, apigenin can ameliorate HFD-induced comorbidities via metabolic and transcriptional modulations in the liver. PMID:27213439

  5. Cardiac metabolism and its interactions with contraction, growth, and survival of cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kolwicz, Stephen C; Purohit, Suneet; Tian, Rong

    2013-08-16

    The network for cardiac fuel metabolism contains intricate sets of interacting pathways that result in both ATP-producing and non-ATP-producing end points for each class of energy substrates. The most salient feature of the network is the metabolic flexibility demonstrated in response to various stimuli, including developmental changes and nutritional status. The heart is also capable of remodeling the metabolic pathways in chronic pathophysiological conditions, which results in modulations of myocardial energetics and contractile function. In a quest to understand the complexity of the cardiac metabolic network, pharmacological and genetic tools have been engaged to manipulate cardiac metabolism